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Sample records for metal ions-stimulated iron

  1. Iron, hepcidin and the metal connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eLoréal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, iron-related proteins appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach.

  2. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal*

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Zhi-wei; Xu, Xin-hua; Jin, Jian; He, Ping; Liu, Yong; Wang, Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitr...

  3. System and method for producing metallic iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  4. System and method for producing metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  5. Surface effects in metallic iron nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1994-01-01

    Nanoparticles of metallic iron on carbon supports have been studied in situ by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic anisotropy energy constant increases with decreasing particle size, presumably because of the influence of surface anisotropy. Chemisorption of oxygen results in formation...... of a surface layer with magnetic hyperfine fields similar to those of thicker passivation layers, and with a ferromagnetic coupling to the spins in the core of the particles. In contrast, thicker passivation layers have a noncollinear spin structure....

  6. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitnaker, James M.; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  7. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  8. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posada, Olga M., E-mail: O.M.PosadaEstefan@leeds.ac.uk [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, Wolfson Centre, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Gilmour, Denise [Pure and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Strathclyde, Thomas Graham Building, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom); Tate, Rothwelle J., E-mail: r.j.tate@strath.ac.uk [Strathclyde Institute for Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Grant, M. Helen [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, Wolfson Centre, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p < 0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p < 0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in apoptosis after a 48 h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions + debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. - Highlights: • Effects of CoCr nanoparticles and Co ions on U937 cells were investigated. • Ions released from wear debris play an important role in cellular response, • Toxicity of Co ions could be related to NO metabolic processes and apoptosis. • CoCr particles were a more effective inducer of apoptosis after cell

  9. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  10. Science Letters: Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; JIN Jian; HE Ping; LIU Yong; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitrate removal when both are removed simultaneously. Even a little amount of copper can enhance nitrate removal efficiently.Different mechanisms of these contaminants removal by iron metal were also discussed.

  11. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  12. Designing porous metallic glass compact enclosed with surface iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Young; Park, Hae Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung [Hybrid Materials Center (HMC), Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yongho [Graphene Research Institute (GRI) & HMC, Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Man, E-mail: jinman_park@hotmail.com [Global Technology Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, 129 Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Buem, E-mail: kbkim@sejong.ac.kr [Hybrid Materials Center (HMC), Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • Porous metallic glass compact was developed using electro-discharge sintering process. • Uniform PMGC can only be achieved when low electrical input energy was applied. • Functional iron-oxides were formed on the surface of PMGCs by hydrothermal technique. - Abstract: Porous metallic glass compact (PMGC) using electro-discharge sintering (EDS) process of gas atomized Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} metallic glass powder was developed. The formation of uniform PMGC can only be achieved when low electrical input energy was applied. Functional iron-oxides were formed on the surface of PMGCs by hydrothermal technique. This finding suggests that PMGC can be applied in the new area such as catalyst via hydrothermal technique and offer a promising guideline for using the metallic glasses as a potential functional application.

  13. The transition metals copper and iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Ríos, Camilo; Tristán-López, Luis; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montes, Sergio

    2010-07-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a worldwide health problem. Metals like iron and copper are essential for life, but they are also involved in several neurodegenerative mechanisms such as protein aggregation, free radical generation and oxidative stress. The role of Fe and Cu, their pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic relevance are discussed regarding four of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Metal-mediated oxidation by Fenton chemistry is a common feature for all those disorders and takes part of a self-amplifying damaging mechanism, leading to neurodegeneration. The interaction between metals and proteins in the nervous system seems to be a crucial factor for the development or absence of neurodegeneration. The present review also deals with the therapeutic strategies tested, mainly using metal chelating drugs. Metal accumulation within the nervous system observed in those diseases could be the result of compensatory mechanisms to improve metal availability for physiological processes.

  14. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes by iron metal and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Reduced forms of iron and sulfur, such as Fe(II), iron(II) sulfide and hydrogen sulfide, are abundant natural reductants in anaerobic soils and sediments. Redox reactions between these reductants and organic pollutants are often greatly accelerated in natural systems because of microbial mediation or because the electron transfer is mediated by the cycling of Fe(II)/Fe(III). For example, recent studies have shown that surface-bound, reduced iron species play the important role of electron transfer mediator in reductions promoted by iron-reducing bacteria. It has been postulated that the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons by iron metal may occur by a reaction of surface-bound Fe(II) at the iron metal-water interface. The surface-bound Fe(II) species at the passive oxide-water interface may serve as mediator for the transfer of electrons from Fe{sup 0} to adsorbed chlorinated hydrocarbon. Fast reduction rates for chlorinated hydrocarbons observed in this system may be attributed to the facile regeneration of reducing surface Fe(II) species due to the close proximity of the bulk reductant (Fe{sup 0}) to the electron carrier, surface-bound Fe(II). Evidence in support of this proposed mechanism is presented.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes by iron metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corp. Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Reduction of chlorinated ethenes in aqueous solution by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems under anaerobic and mildly aerobic conditions. The goal of this work was to gain a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long-term performance in groundwater treatment. Pseudo-first-order TCE, DCE and VC dechlorination rates and product mass balances (chloride ion and C2-C6 hydrocarbons) were measured for greater than twenty-five commercial iron metals. All experimental evidence was found to support a direct reduction mechanism in which electron transfer from Fe{sup o} to the adsorbed chloroethene occurs at the metal/water interface. XPS depth profile analysis was used to correlate Fe{sup o} surface concentration with observed dechlorination rates. A linear dependence of dechlorination rate on iron specific surface area was determined. Other factors that influence dechlorination rates will be discussed, including proton- and anion-promoted dissolution processes that remove surface iron oxides and yield new Fe{sup o} surfaces.

  16. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  17. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén, J. A.; González, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G.

    2003-06-01

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  18. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  19. Geochemistry of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals in metal-polluted Taihu Lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong-Bin; FAN Cheng-Xin; DING Shi-Ming; ZHANG Lu; ZHONG Ji-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    To understand the geochemical characteristics of iron and sulfur and the extent of iron-sulfide minerals influencing heavy metal behaviour in metal-polluted sediments of Talhu Lake,two sites,in Meiliang Bay (ML) and Wuli Lake (WL),were selected to study the fractionation of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals.There were relatively high concentrations of Fe2+ and low concentrations of total S2- in porewaters,indicating that conditions in these sediments favored iron reduction.The concentrations of acid volatile sulfides in sediments were 1.9-9.6μmol g-1 at ML and 1.0-11.7 μmol g-1 at WL,both in the range of values detected in unpolluted lakes.Pyrite-S was 10.2-49.4 μmol g-1 at ML and 10.333.0 μmol g-1 at WL,accounting for more than 69% of the reduced inorganic sulfur at both sites.The low degree of sulphidization (<14%) and pyritization (<10%) indicate that sulfate may be the limiting factor for pyrite formation.The extractability of Mn,Cu,Pb,Zn,Ni,and Cr in sediments all suggest that sulfides are not the major binding phase for these metals during early diagenesis.Sulfur may play a modest role in the geochemistry of iron and traced metals in the sediments.

  20. Development of a method for determination of metallic iron content within hot briquette iron (HBI for steelmaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcali M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing use of metallic iron in metallurgy and industrial chemical applications requires a fast, easy and cheap method for the determination of metallic iron, not merely in recyclable materials, such as iron pellets, reduced iron mill scale dust, electric arc furnace dust and pig iron, but from hot briquette iron (HBI as well. This study investigates a new method for determination of metallic iron within HBI used for steel-making materials. The effects of reaction time, temperature, and stirring rate were studied. The concentration of iron was determined via Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. After the optimization study, high-purity metallic iron powder (Sigma-Aldrich, PubChem Substance ID 24855469 was used to compare efficiencies and identify the optimum conditions; The present study was matched with international standard methods (BS ISO 5416:2006, IS 15774:2007. Results were consistent with certified values and metallic iron content could be determined within the 95% confidence level. The purposed method is easy, straightforward, and cheap.

  1. Noble Metal-Iron Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Emerging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Xuan, Shouhu

    2016-02-01

    This account provides an overview of current research activities that focus on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials from noble metal (e.g., Au, Ag, Pd) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) hybrids. An introduction to the synthetic strategies that have been developed for generating M-Fe3O4 nanomaterials with different novel structures is presented. Surface functionalization and bioconjugation of these hybrid nanoparticles and nanocomposites are also reviewed. The utilization of the advantageous properties of both noble metals and iron oxide for a variety of applications, such as theranostics, gene delivery, biosensing, cell sorting, bioseparation, and catalysis, is discussed and highlighted. Finally, future trends and perspectives of these sophisticated nanocomposites are outlined. The fundamental requirements underpinning the effective preparation of M-Fex Oy hybrid nanomaterials shed light on the future development of heterogeneous catalysts, nanotheranostics, nanomedicines, and other chemical technologies.

  2. Metallic iron nanoparticles: Flame synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunfeng Li; Yanjie Hu; Guangjian Huang; Chunzhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron (Fe) nanoparticles (NPs) with a typical core-shell structure have been prepared by a simple and continuous flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) method,which are stabilized by the corresponding Fe3O4 shell with a thickness of 4-6 nm.The size of metallic Fe cores is about 30-80 nm.The core-shell structured iron NPs show an air stability as long as one month as a result of the protection of oxide shell.Through the control of the residence time of materials in flame and flame atmosphere,metallic Fe and iron oxides are obtained,showing a better external magnetic field responsibility.It is concluded that the evolution of morphology and composition of flame-made magnetic NPs could be attributed to the competition mechanism between reduction and oxidation reactions of in situ flame combustion,which offers more choices and better effective design strategy for the synthesis of advanced functional materials via FSP techniques.

  3. Manufacturing and Application of Metalized Ore-Coal Pellets in Synthetic Pig Iron Smelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Khodosov, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents research data on manufacturing and application of metalized ore-coal pellets in synthetic pig iron smelting. A technology of pellets metallization by means of solid-phase reduction of iron from oxides using hematite-magnetite iron ore and low-caking coal as raw materials is described. Industrial testing of replacing 10, 15, and 20% of waste metal by the metalized ore-coal pellets in the coreless induction furnace IST-1 is described. Optimal temperature and time conditions of feeding the metalized pellets into the furnace in smelting pig iron of SCh-40-60 grade are determined.

  4. Kinetics of hexavalent chromium reduction by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijing QIAN; Yanjun WU; Yong LIU; Xinhua XU

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction to Cr(Ⅲ) by metallic iron (Fe0) was studied in batch reactors for a range of reactant concentrations, pH and temperatures. Nearly 86.8% removal efficiency for Cr(Ⅵ) was achieved when Fe0 concentration was 6 g/L (using commercial iron powder (200 mesh) I n 120 min). The reduction ofhexavalent chro-mium took place on the surface of the iron particles following pseudo-first order kinetics. The rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction increased with increasing Fe0 addition and temperature but inversely with initial pH. The pseudo-first-order rate coeffi-cients (kobs) were determined as 0.0024, 0.010, 0.0268 and 0.062 8 min-1 when iron powder dosages were 2, 6, 10 and 14 g/L at 25℃ and pH 5.5, respectively. According to the Arrehenius equation, the apparent activation energy of 26.5 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 3 330 min-1 were obtained at the temperature range of 288-308 K. Different Fe0 types were compared in this study. The reactivity was in the order starch-stabilized Fe0 nanoparticlesFe0 nano-particlesFe0 powderFe0 filings. Electrochemical analysis of the reaction process showed that Cr(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ) hydroxides should be the dominant final products.

  5. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohao Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase, and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  6. Soil and groundwater contamination with heavy metals at two scrap iron and metal recycling facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Holm, P. E.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2000-01-01

    Field studies were performed at two actual scrap iron and metal recycling facilities in order to evaluate the extent of heavy metal migration into subsoil and groundwater caused by more than 25 years of handling scrap directly on the ground without any measures to prevent leaching. Surface soil...... samples, called `scrap dirt', representing the different activities on the two recycling facilities, all showed very high concentrations of lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) , chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) and somewhat elevated concentrations of many other metals...

  7. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  8. RECYCLING BLENDS OF WASTE PLASTICS AND BIOMASS AS REDUCING AGENT FOR THE PRODUCTION OF METALLIC IRON FROM IRON OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMES RANSFORD DANKWAH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies on the production of metallic iron from iron oxide using blends of palm nut shells (Elaes Guineanses and waste plastics as reducing agent have been performed through experiments conducted in a horizontal tube furnace. Composite pellets were formed from mixtures of iron oxide and carbonaceous materials consisting of chars of palm nut shells (PNS, high density polyethylene (HDPE and two blends of PNS with HDPE. Two sources of iron oxide were utilised in this investigation; reagent grade iron oxide (96.89 % Fe2O3 and EAF slag (47.1 % FeO. The iron oxide-carbonaceous material composites were heated rapidly at 1500°C in a continuous stream of argon and the off gas was analysed continuously using an infrared (IR gas analyser and a gas chromatographic (GC analyser. Elemental analyses of samples of the reduced metal were performed chemically for its carbon and oxygen contents using a LECO carbon/sulphur and oxygen/nitrogen analysers, respectively. The extent of reduction (after ten and fifteen minutes for reagent grade iron oxide and EAF slag, respectively and the level of carburisation were determined for each carbonaceous reductant. The results indicate that carburised metallic iron can be produced effectively from iron oxide using PNS, HDPE and blends of these carbonaceous materials as reductants. The extent of reduction improved significantly when PNS was blended with HDPE.

  9. Divalent metal transporter, iron, and Parkinson's disease:A pathological relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-pil Lee; Xiongwei Zhu; Gang Liu; Shu G Chen; George Perry; Mark A Smith; Hyoung-gon Lee

    2010-01-01

    @@ Iron is an essential component of oxidative metabolism and a cofactor for a variety of enzymes. Because of its chemical properties as a transition metal, iron can serve both as an electron donor and acceptor and, as such, excess levels of free iron are toxic. Given this potential for toxicity, a number of pro-teins, including transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin, tightly control iron transport, uptake, and storage in the central nervous system.

  10. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Gates, C. Jun, I. Zatz, A. Zolfaghari

    2010-06-02

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron- induced conductivity.. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  11. The Effect of Nodular Cast Iron Metal Matrix on the Wear Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of studies on the effect of the nodular cast iron metal matrix composition on the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance. Nodular cast iron with different metal matrix obtained in the rough state and ADI were tested. To research of abrasive and adhesive wear the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides and without this component were chosen. The influence of the carbides amount for cast iron wear resistance was examined. It was found, that the highest abrasive and adhesive wear resistance under conditions of dry friction has a nodular cast iron with carbides with upper and lower bainite. Carbides in bainitic and pearlitic cast iron significantly increase the wear resistance in these conditions. In terms of fluid friction the largest wear resistance had cast iron group with the highest hardness.

  12. Leachability of heavy metals from scrap dirt sampled at two scrap iron and metal recycling facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Holm, Peter Engelund; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2000-01-01

    Column and batch leaching experiments were performed to quantify leaching of heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn) from scrap dirt representing different activities at two iron scrap and metal recycling facilities. The scrap dirt is often found directly upon the bare unprotected soil at recycling...... facilities. In most cases the leaching of heavy metals was modest, within ®ve times the leaching from reference soils, and the concentrations were usually within a factor of 2 of drinking water criteria. The high pH of the scrap dirt samples seemed to control the leaching. However, scrap dirt from car......, at that level, useful for evaluation of leaching potentials from scrap dirt. The experiments showed that scrap dirt at recycling facilities constitutes only a modest leaching problem, but a long-term soil pollution problem from a land-use perspective. Leaching experiments with compost solution indicated...

  13. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  14. Microscopic iron metal on glass and minerals - A tool for studying regolith maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. C.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Mckay, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    A novel method of producing mixtures of glass or minerals with iron metal is presented. A portion of the Fe(2+) in basaltic glass and minerals can be reduced to metal in a few hours at 1100 C and an oxygen fugacity well below the iron-wustite buffer. Part of the iron metals forms rounded submicrometer blebs on the surfaces and in some cases within the grains. A concentration of such blebs equivalent to 20-30 percent of a grain's surface area can totally dominate the reflectance spectra of basaltic glass, pyroxene, and olivine. The production of optically opaque iron metal blebs, combined with the decline in Fe(2+), affects the glass and mineral reflectance spectra in three ways: by lowering the overall reflectivity, reducing the spectral contrast of absorption features, and producing a continuum with a general rise in reflectivity toward longer wavelengths.

  15. The Ferroportin Metal Efflux Proteins Function in Iron and Cobalt Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relatively little is known about how metals such as iron are effluxed from cells, a necessary step for transport from the root to the shoot. Ferroportin is the sole iron efflux transporter in animals, and there are two closely related orthologs in Arabidopsis, FPN1 and FPN2. FPN1 localizes to the pl...

  16. Arenimonas metalli sp. nov., isolated from an iron mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Shi, Zunji; Wang, Gejiao

    2012-08-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium (CF5-1(T)) was isolated from Hongshan Iron Mine, Daye City, Hubei province, China. The major cellular fatty acids (>10%) were iso-C(16:0), iso-C(15:0), C(16:1)ω7c alcohol and iso-C(17:1)ω9c. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major respiratory quinone was Q-8. The genomic DNA G+C content was 70.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain CF5-1(T) was most closely related to Arenimonas malthae (95.3% gene sequence similarity), Arenimonas oryziterrae (94.7%), Arenimonas donghaensis (94.6%) and Arenimonas composti (94.5%). A taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach showed that strain CF5-1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Arenimonas, for which the name Arenimonas metalli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CF5-1(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10787(T) = KCTC 23460(T) = CCTCC AB 2010449(T)).

  17. Metallic iron for environmental remediation: A review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noubactep, Chicgoua

    2015-11-15

    This article critically evaluates recent review articles on using metallic iron (Fe(0)) for environmental remediation in order to provide insight for more efficient Fe(0)-based systems. The presentation is limited to peer-reviewed articles published during 2014 and 2015, excluding own contributions, dealing mostly with granular Fe(0). A literature search was conducted up to June 15th 2015 using Science Direct, SCOPUS, Springer and Web of Science databases. The search yielded eight articles that met the final inclusion criteria. The evaluation clearly shows that seven articles provide a narrative description of processes occurring in the Fe(0)/H20 system according to the concept that Fe(0) is a reducing agent. Only one article clearly follows a different path, presenting Fe(0) as a generator of adsorbing (hydroxides, oxides) and reducing (Fe(II), H/H2) agents. The apparent discrepancies between the two schools are identified and extensively discussed based on the chemistry of the Fe(0)/H20 system. The results of this evaluation indicate clearly that research on 'Fe(0) for environmental remediation' is in its infancy. Despite the current paucity of reliable data for the design of efficient Fe(0)-based systems, this review demonstrates that sensible progress could be achieved within a short period of time, specific recommendations to help guide future research are suggested.

  18. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  19. Heavy-metal nutrition and iron chlorosis of citrus seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.F.; Specht, A.W.

    1953-01-01

    Studies were made on the responses to differential supplies of copper, zinc, manganese, and iron shown by sweet orange and mandarin seedlings grown in vermiculite and solution cultures with the pH maintained near 4. The first three metallic ions were all found to interfere with Fe metabolism in such a way as to induce chlorosis under certain conditions. Relatively low concentrations of these elements also were toxic to roots. Copper appeared to be about 50 times as toxic as Mn and 12 to 15 times as toxic as Zn. Strongly chelated Fe prevented the development of chlorosis. It did not, however, prevent Cu toxicity in roots. It appeared to reduce slightly Zn toxicity in roots and to alleviate greatly toxicity due to Mn. Cu accumulates in roots, even to the point of toxicity, without being transported to the upper parts of the plants in increased amounts. Both Zn and Mn show marked accumulation in the roots as well as substantial distribution within the plant when these elements are increased in the nutrient solution. 12 references, 4 tables.

  20. Nanoscale Metallic Iron for Environmental Remediation: Prospects and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Noubactep, Chicgoua; Crane, Richard; 10.1007/s11270-011-0951-1

    2012-01-01

    The amendment of the subsurface with nanoscale metallic iron particles (nano-Fe0) has been discussed in the literature as an efficient in situ technology for groundwater remediation. However, the introduction of this technology was controversial and its efficiency has never been univocally established. This unsatisfying situation has motivated this communication whose objective was a comprehensive discussion of the intrinsic reactivity of nano-Fe0 based on the contemporary knowledge on the mechanism of contaminant removal by Fe0 and a mathematical model. It is showed that due to limitations of the mass transfer of nano-Fe0 to contaminants, available concepts cannot explain the success of nano-Fe0 injection for in situ groundwater remediation. It is recommended to test the possibility of introducing nano-Fe0 to initiate the formation of roll-fronts which propagation would induce the reductive transformation of both dissolved and adsorbed contaminants. Within a roll-front, FeII from nano-Fe0 is the reducing age...

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of an Iron Nitride Constructed by a Novel Template of Metal Organic Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An iron nitride with high surface area was synthesized from an iron-based metal organic framework (Fe-MOF in this work. During the synthesis process, the Fe-MOF of MIL-53 served as a hard template, a template to impart a certain degree of morphology for iron oxide products and to form porosities for iron nitride products. Moreover, it played the roles of iron sources for the synthesis of the final iron oxides and the iron nitrides. The physicochemical properties of the materials were characterized by a series of technologies including XRD, SEM, and N2-adsorption/desorption. The results showed that the iron nitride synthesized from MIL-53 was α-Fe2-3N. And, the α-Fe2-3N showed the morphology with loosely aggregated particles which favored the formation of rich interparticle porosities. As a result, the surface area of the α-Fe2-3N was larger than those of samples using α-Fe2O3 as precursors and its value was 41 m2/g. In addition, the results agreed that both raw material properties (such as crystallinity and surface areas and nitriding approaches had significant effects on the surface areas of iron nitrides. Also the results were proved by the iron oxide synthesized with different methods. This new synthetic strategy could be a general approach for the preparation of late transition metal nitrides with peculiar properties.

  2. Influence of Fe(2+)-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization on metal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has indicated that iron (oxyhydr-)oxides are capable of structurally incorporating and releasing metals and nutrients as a result of Fe2+-induced iron oxide recrystallization. In the present paper, we briefly review the current literature examining the mechanisms by which iron oxides recrystallize and summarize how recrystallization affects metal incorporation and release. We also provide new experimental evidence for the Fe2+-induced release of structural manganese from manganese-doped goethite. Currently, the exact mechanism(s) for Fe2+-induced recrystallization remain elusive, although they are likely to be both oxide-and metal-dependent. We conclude by discussing some future research directions for Fe2+-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization.

  3. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  4. Aging of iron (hydr)oxides by heat treatment and effects on heavy metal binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Starckpoole, M. M.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous iron (hydr)oxides are used to remove heavy metals from wastewater and in the treatment of air pollution control residues generated in waste incineration. In this study, iron oxides containing heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Hg, Cr, and Cd) were treated at 50, 600, and 900 °C to simulate...... oxides were transformed to hematite, which had a greater thermodynamic stability but less surface area than the initial products. Heat treatment also caused some volatilization of heavy metals (most notably, Hg). Leaching with water at pH 9 (L/S 10, 24 h) and weak acid extraction showed that heat...... of iron oxides may be advantageous to improve the thermodynamic stability of the product but that thermal treatment at both 600 and 900 °C significantly reduced the binding capacity for heavy metals....

  5. Tunable Optical Nanocavity of Iron-garnet with a Buried Metal Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Kuz'michev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication and characterization of a novel magnetophotonic structure designed as iron garnet based magneto-optical nanoresonator cavity constrained by two noble metal mirrors. Since the iron garnet layer requires annealing at high temperatures, the fabrication process can be rather challenging. Special approaches for the protection of metal layers against oxidation and morphological changes along with a special plasma-assisted polishing of the iron garnet layer surface were used to achieve a 10-fold enhancement of the Faraday rotation angle (up to 10.8\\(^{\\circ}/\\mu\\m within a special resonance peak of 12 nm (FWHM linewidth at a wavelength of 772 nm, in the case of a resonator with two silver mirrors. These structures are promising for tunable nanophotonics applications, in particular, they can be used as magneto-optical (MO metal-insulator-metal waveguides and modulators.

  6. In vitro studies on silver implanted pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    Pure iron has been verified as a promising biodegradable metal for absorbable cardiovascular stent usage. However, the degradation rate of pure iron is too slow. To accelerate the degradation of the surface of pure iron, silver ions were implanted into pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at an extracted voltage of 40keV. The implanted influence was up to 2×10(17)ions/cm(2). The composition and depth profiles, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of Ag ion implanted pure iron were investigated. The implantation depths of Ag was around 60nm. The element Ag existed as Ag2O in the outermost layer, then gradually transited to metal atoms in zero valent state with depth increase. The implantation of Ag ions accelerated the corrosion rate of pure iron matrix, and exhibited much more uniform corrosion behavior. For cytotoxicity assessment, the implantation of Ag ions slightly decreased the viability of all kinds of cell lines used in these tests. The hemolysis rate of Ag ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%, which was acceptable, whereas the platelet adhesion tests indicated the implantation of Ag ions might increase the risk of thrombosis.

  7. OXIDATION OF FINE CHEMICALS BY IRON BASED AND METAL-FREE CATALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hunaiti, Afnan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation by using transition metal complexes offers attractive opportunities for industrial applications following environmentally benign manufacturing processes. However, the number of such catalytic methods has substantially decreased. In this thesis, we developed and utilized three iron based catalysts (FeIII/thymine-1-acetic acid, FeIII/Phenanthroline, and FeII/Nmethylimidazole) and one organic catalysts (1,2-Di(1-naphthyl)-1,2-ethanediamine (NEDA)). The iron/THA catal...

  8. Decorporation of Iron Metal Using Dialdehyde Cellulose-Deferoxamine Microcarrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Kumar, Amit; Gupta, Dikshi; Singh, Harpal

    2017-01-01

    Deferoxamine iron chelator has a limited therapeutic index due to rapid clearance from blood and possesses dose-limiting toxicity. Therefore, an intravenous deferoxamine delivery system based on dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) polymer was developed and its efficacy and toxicity were tested in iron-overloaded animals. The amino groups of deferoxamine were conjugated to free aldehyde moieties of dialdehyde cellulose via Schiff base reaction to form dialdehyde cellulose-deferoxamine (DAC-DFO) conjugate and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray diffraction. The toxicity of prepared formulation was analyzed by XTT cell viability assay and LD50 study in mice. The change in serum iron levels, after intravenous administration of formulation, was observed in iron-overloaded rats. The DAC-DFO conjugate was tagged with Tc-99m to study the blood kinetics and observe change in blood circulation time. DAC-DFO conjugate was dispersible in water at concentration ∼75 mg/ml. In vitro cytotoxicity assay and LD50 study in mice indicated significantly enhanced safety of covalently bound deferoxamine (at >1000 mg/kg body weight compared to free drug at ∼270 mg/kg dose). A preliminary scintigraphy imaging and blood clearance study, with technetium-99m, indicated prolonged circulation of conjugated DFO in rabbit blood. A single dose of formulation injected into iron overloaded animals was found to maintain the normal serum iron levels until 10 days. The polymeric conjugate was effective in maintaining normal serum iron levels until 10 days at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight.

  9. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Iacob

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2IIIFeIIO(CH3COO6(H2O3]·2H2O (FeAc1, μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO6(H2O3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2, iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF, iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO6(CH3OH3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF, and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles.

  10. Desulphurization of hot metal and nickel pig iron using waste materials from the aluminum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.D.; McLean, A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Hasegawa, M.; Iwase, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Ferrous Metallurgy Research Group; Ren, M.L.; Zhang, D.F. [China Aluminum Co. Ltd., Shandong (China)

    2009-07-01

    The aluminium and steel industries are both energy-intensive and have significant impacts on the environment. The desulphurization of hot metal and nickel pig iron using waste materials from the aluminium industry was evaluated in this study. A simple processing technique using dross and white mud was developed to desulphurize hot metals. Waste materials with a high oxide content were combined with an aluminium instant reduction method and then used for hot metal desulphurization. The presence of nickel in the hot metals showed a negative effect on the desulphurization process as the nickel reduced carbon solubility in an iron-based metal solution. It was concluded that the use of waste slags and solids residuals from the aluminium industry within the steel industry will reduce the disposal of waste and provide significant economic benefits to both industries. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  11. Interference of Nickel with Copper and Iron Homeostasis Contributes to Metal Toxicity Symptoms in the Nickel Hyperaccumulator Plant Alyssum inflatum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasoul Ghasemi; S. Majid Ghaderian; Ute Krämer

    2009-01-01

    .... To better understand the role of interactions between transition metals in the development of metal toxicity symptoms in plants, the effects of exposure to excess nickel (Ni) on copper (Cu) and iron (Fe...

  12. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  13. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  14. Effects of sulfate on heavy metal release from iron corrosion scales in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    Trace heavy metals accumulated in iron corrosion scales within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) could potentially be released to bulk water and consequently deteriorate the tap water quality. The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate the release of trace heavy metals in DWDS under changing source water conditions. Experimental pipe loops with different iron corrosion scales were set up to simulate the actual DWDS. The effects of sulfate levels on heavy metal release were systemically investigated. Heavy metal releases of Mn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Cr and As could be rapidly triggered by sulfate addition but the releases slowly decreased over time. Heavy metal release was more severe in pipes transporting groundwater (GW) than in pipes transporting surface water (SW). There were strong positive correlations (R(2) > 0.8) between the releases of Fe and Mn, Fe and Ni, Fe and Cu, and Fe and Pb. When switching to higher sulfate water, iron corrosion scales in all pipe loops tended to be more stable (especially in pipes transporting GW), with a larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) and fewer unstable compounds (β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, FeCO3 and amorphous iron oxides). The main functional iron reducing bacteria (IRB) communities were favorable for the formation of Fe3O4. The transformation of corrosion scales and the growth of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) accounted for the gradually reduced heavy metal release with time. The higher metal release in pipes transporting GW could be due to increased Fe6(OH)12CO3 content under higher sulfate concentrations.

  15. Iron Drinking Water Pipe Corrosion Products: Concentrators of Toxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    data processing, and Dr. R. Gordon for providing some standard material for the V K-edge m-XANES analysis. Dr. Little was funded by the Linda Chrisey...Ferris: ’Sorption of strontium onto bacteriogenic iron oxides’. Environmental Science and Technology, 43, 4 (2009): p. 1008. 9. S. P. Nielsen : ’The

  16. DIVALENT METAL TRANSPORTER-1 REGULATION BY IRON AND VANADIUM MODULATES HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE IN LUNG CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) participates in the detoxification of metals that can damage lung epithelium. Elevated iron levels increase the expression of DMT1 in bronchial epithelial cells stimulating its uptake and storage in ferritin, thus making iron unavailable t...

  17. Assessment of metals contamination and ecological risk in ait Ammar abandoned iron mine soil, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to assess the pollution intensity and corresponding ecological risk of phosphorus and metals including Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb and Fe using various indices like geo-accumulation index, enrichment factor, pollution and ecological risk index. In all, 20 surface soil samples were collected from the Ait Ammar iron mine of Oued Zem city, province of Khouribga, in central Morocco. The concentrations of heavy metals in soil samples were used to assess their potential ecolo...

  18. Pyridinediimine Iron Complexes with Pendant Redox-Inactive Metals Located in the Secondary Coordination Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Mayra; Ziegler, Joshua M; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2016-01-19

    A series of pyridinediimine (PDI) iron complexes that contain a pendant 15-crown-5 located in the secondary coordination sphere were synthesized and characterized. The complex Fe((15c5)PDI)(CO)2 (2) was shown in both the solid state and solution to encapsulate redox-inactive metal ions. Modest shifts in the reduction potential of the metal-ligand scaffold were observed upon encapsulation of either Na(+) or Li(+).

  19. Mössbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Watanabe, Yuka, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp; Akiyama, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P. O. Box 180, Zagreb 10002 (Croatia); Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, P.O. Box 32, 1512 Budapest (Hungary); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-27

    A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron (Fe{sup 0}) and maghemite (γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were successfully prepared by mixing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅6H{sub 2}O (Mohr's salt) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}⋅3H{sub 2}O aqueous solution at 30 °C for 1 h, while those of Fe{sup 0} were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH{sub 4}. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs and Fe{sup 0} NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (δ) of 0.33{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1}, internal magnetic field (H{sub int}) of 25.8{sub ±0.5} T, and linewidth (Γ) of 0.62{sub ±0.04} mm s{sup −1}. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of Fe{sup 0} NP is mainly composed of a sextet having δ, Δ, and H{sub int} of 0.00{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1} 0.45{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1}, and 22.8{sub ±0.1} T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe{sup 0} and γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (k{sub MB}) of 6.7 × 10{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe{sup 0}+γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3:7) mixture (k{sub MB} = 6.5×10{sup −3}h{sup −1}). These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe{sub 0} and γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  20. Reduction of Nitroaromatic Compounds on the Surface of Metallic Iron: Quantum Chemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The initial reduction steps of nitroaromatic compounds on the surface of metallic iron have been studied theoretically using nitrobenzene (NB as a representative of nitroaromatic compounds. The quantum chemical cluster approximation within the semiempirical Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap for Metal Compounds method was applied to model the Fe(110 crystallographic surface, taken as a representative reactive surface for granular iron. This surface was modeled as a 39-atom two-layer metal cluster with rigid geometry. The associative and dissociative adsorption of nitrobenzene was considered. Based on our quantum chemical analysis, we suggest that the direct electron donation from the metal surface into the π* orbital of NB is a decisive factor responsible for subsequent transformation of the nitro group. Molecularly adsorbed NB interacts with metal iron exclusively through nitro moiety oxygens which occupy tri-coordinated positions on surface The charge transfer from metal to NB of approximately 2 atomic units destablizes the nitro group. As a result, the first dissociation of the N-O bond goes through a relatively low activation barrier. The adsorbed nitrosobenzene is predicted to be a stable surface species, though still quiet labile.

  1. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  2. Interaction between tungsten monocarbide and an iron-based metallic melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanov, I. V.; Anikeev, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    A technique and results of investigation of compacted tungsten carbide substrates by scanning microscopy are reported. Samples are prepared in the course of studies of the wettability of tungsten carbide substrates with the iron melt, which are performed in accordance with the sessile drop method using two different heating strategies, namely, contact and noncontact heating of metal.

  3. Experiment Research on the Enrichment of Precious Metals from Nickel-copper-iron Matte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xingxiang; LIU Yang; DONG Haigang; FU Guangqiang; WU Yuedong; ZHAO Jiachun; WU Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    According to the chemical and phase composition of the nickel-copper-iron matte containing precious metals and the progress in enrichment of precious metals from the nickel-copper-iron matte containing precious metals at home and abroad,this paper put forward the process route of enrichment of precious metals and selectively leaching of base metals from the nickel-copper-iron matte by sulfuric acid and sodium hypochlorite.The effects of particle size,leaching temperature,leaching time,amount of sulfuric acid and sodium hypochlorite on the leaching rate of nickel,cobalt,copper and iron are mainly discussed.The results show that raw material particle size has significantly effects on the leaching rate of base metals,high leaching rate of base metals and enrichment of precious metals are obtained with the suitable particle size.Through the experiments,the reasonable experiment parameters and conditions were determined as fellows:particle size of-200 to +250 mesh,leaching temperature 95℃,leaching time 5 h,sulfuric acid concentration 30%,adding amount of sodium hypochlorite 3 times of matte weight.Under these experiment parameters and conditions,the leaching rate of nickel,cobalt,copper and iron were 97.39%,96.24%,98.30% and 99.01%,respectively.The content of nickel,cobalt,copper,iron in the leaching residues was 8.15%,0.23%,1.40% and 0.24%,respectively.The content of Pt,Pd,Au,Ag and Rh in the leaching residues was 247 g/t,521 g/t,112 g/t,494 g/t and 24 g/t,respectively.The content of Pt,Pd,Au,Ag and Rh in the leaching solution was <0.0005 g/L,0.0023 g/L,0.0007 g/L,<0.0005 g/L and 0.00017 g/L,respectively.This process has advantages as follows:a small investment,simple technology,high enrichment efficiency.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  5. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  6. Bacterial assimilation reduction of iron in the treatment of non-metallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Malachovský

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural non-metallics, including granitoide and quartz sands, often contain iron which decreases the whiteness of these raw materials. Insoluble Fe3+ in these samples could be reduced to soluble Fe2+ by bacteria of Bacillus spp. and Saccharomyces spp. The leaching effect, observed by the measurement of Fe2+concentration in a solution, showed higher activities of a bacterial kind isolated from the Bajkal lake and also by using of yeast Saccharomyces sp. during bioleaching of quartz sands. However, allkinds of Bacillus spp. isolated from the Slovak deposit and from Bajkal lake were very active in the iron reduction during bioleaching of the feldspar raw material. This metal was efficiently removed from quartz sands as documented by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,317 % to 0,126 % and from feldpars raw materials by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,288 % to 0,115 % after bioleaching. The whiteness of these non-metallics was increased during a visual comparison of samples before and after bioleaching but samples contain selected magnetic particles. A removal of iron as well as a release of iron minerals from silicate matrix should increase the effect of the magnetic separation and should give a product which is suitable for industrial applications.

  7. Magnetic effects of H in Metals, the case of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Patricio; León, Andrea; Florez, Juan Manuel

    A growing consensus on the possible role of hydrogen in future energy technology has incited worldwide efforts for the development of new hydrogen-storage materials and their application to rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. Meanwhile, research in the basic properties of metal-hydrogen systems has also been advanced. High-pressure experiments have unraveled new features of elemental hydrogen (phases of solid H2 and metallization of liquid H2 and superconductivity) as well as of many metal-hydrogen systems (superabundant vacancy formation, phase diagrams over wide p-x-T ranges) . In this work we address the magnetic changes induced by interstitial hydrogen in Fe. From the point of view of the Slater Pauli Curve, Fe alloys (Fe(1-x)Mx) show an increase of the magnetization (but always less than pure Fe) due substitutional non magnetic impurities like M = V, Cr, Ti. For the magnetic impurity Cobalt, the Slater Pauli Curve reaches its maximum of about 2.5 Bohr magnetons per atom when x =0.4. For an interstitial impurity H, which adds one electron to the system, we observe an increasing of the magnetization too but less than the effect induced by the volume expansion. Therefore like the case of NiHx , one of the effects of interstitial hydrogen on a ferromagnetic material is to fill the minority spin states . Authors acknowledge financial support from FONDECYT under contract 1130950 and DGIP contract 11.15.73.

  8. MetalPredator: a web server to predict iron-sulfur cluster binding proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Banci, Lucia; Andreini, Claudia

    2016-09-15

    The prediction of the iron-sulfur proteome is highly desirable for biomedical and biological research but a freely available tool to predict iron-sulfur proteins has not been developed yet. We developed a web server to predict iron-sulfur proteins from protein sequence(s). This tool, called MetalPredator, is able to process complete proteomes rapidly with high recall and precision. The web server is freely available at: http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metalpredator/ andreini@cerm.unifi.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effects of microscopic iron metal on the reflectance spectra of glass and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. C.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Mckay, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Maturity, which is a measure of the time lunar soils have been in the upper approximately 1 mm of the surface, is correlated with changes in the soils' optical properties. Mature soil is darker and somewhat redder than immature soil of the same composition, and features in the reflectance spectrum become more subdued with increasing maturity. The maturation process also involves accumulation of agglutinitic glass and submicroscopic metallic iron particles. We have produced submicrometer iron metal blebs on the surface and within glass and mineral grains by the method of high-temperature reduction. This technique has permitted the determination of optical changes in samples much simpler than lunar soil, and offers a useful tool with which to investigate the maturation process.

  10. Interaction between cadmium and iron. Accumulation and distribution of metals and changes in growth parameters of Phaseolus vulgaris L. seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Siedlecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between cadmium, one of the most toxic heavy metals, and iron, an essential plant nutritional element, was investigated in Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Słowianka seedlings. The interaction was externally induced by changing the content of both metals in the nutrient medium. Under iron deficiency conditions (0 and 0.5 of normal dose of this element, the toxic effects of cadmium on plant growth parameters, like fresh and dry weight accumulation, primary leaves area, etc., were generally much more pronounced than under normal iron supply. At normal and excess iron supply (1, 2 and 4 doses cadmium diminished iron accumulation in roots and primary leaves, but on the other hand excess iron decreased cadmium level, preventing plants from extreme toxicity of very high cadmium concentrations in the growth environment. It is to be noted that iron is classified also as a heavy metal, and its excess may become toxic, e.g. decreasing root dry weight or diminishing leaf area, especially at the highest dose. The detoxication role of iron against cadmium, and possibly other toxic metals is, however, limited to concentrations of this element in the nutrient solution which themselves are not toxic for the organism.

  11. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazir, Rabia [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Applied Chemistry Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Ahmed, Sohail [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mazhar, Muhammad, E-mail: mazhar42pk@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Nawazish Ali [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Shah, Muhammad Raza [HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Nadeem, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2} and [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2}, and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals.

  12. Evaluating the Metal Source(s) of Iron Oxide-Copper-Gold (IOCG) Deposits (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A. C.; Bilenker, L.; Lundstrom, C.; Reich, M.; Barra, F.; Hanchar, J. M.; Westhues, A.

    2013-12-01

    Iron oxide - copper - gold deposits (IOCG) are characterized by high modal abundances of magnetite and/or hematite, ubiquitous and variable grades of Cu and Au, and, often, economic grades of other metals including REE, U, Ag, Mo and Zn. The largest deposits contain >1 billion tonnes of iron. There seems to be a general consensus that metals in IOCG deposits were transported by, and precipitated from, aqueous fluids. However, there is a lack of agreement for the source of the metal-bearing aqueous fluid(s) as well as the source of iron and other metals (i.e., magmatic or hydrothermal, or some combination of the two). Published fluid inclusion data indicate that metal-bearing aqueous fluids were trapped over a wide range of temperatures, with homogenization temperatures between 500 and 600 °C for inclusions associated with the precipitation of iron-oxide minerals, and between 300 and 500 °C for inclusions associated with main-stage sulfides (e.g., chalcopyrite, pyrite). The high trapping temperatures for fluid inclusions and the observation that some IOCG deposits appear to be related temporally and spatially to igneous intrusions, characteristics similar to those observed for porphyry-type ore deposits, have led some authors to propose that magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluids are responsible for IOCG formation. Others, however, favor a genetic model that invokes large-scale circulation of basinal brines, which are heated by magmatic intrusions and subsequently leach Fe and other metals from the crust. Evidence cited for this model includes the pervasive alkali metasomatism associated with some IOCG deposits, and the depletion of Fe, Cu and Au in some deposit wall rocks. Stable isotope evidence thus far is inconclusive. Published d34S values for IOCG deposits range from -30 to +30, but generally cluster around zero per mil. d18O ranges from ~0 to +10 per mil. Chlorine isotope values for fluids in inclusions liberated from quartz, calcite and apatite are

  13. The process of nanostructuring of metal (iron) matrix in composite materials for directional control of the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemtsova, Elena; Yurchuk, Denis; Smirnov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1-50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type "frame in the frame" that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  14. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  15. Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    The etiology of many neurodegenerative diseases has been only partly attributed to acquired traits, suggesting environmental factors may also contribute. Metal dyshomeostasis causes or has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Metal flux across the blood-brain barrier (the primary route of brain metal uptake) and the choroid plexuses as well as sensory nerve metal uptake from the nasal cavity are reviewed. Transporters that have been described at the blood-brain barrier are listed to illustrate the extensive possibilities for moving substances into and out of the brain. The controversial role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease, evidence suggesting brain aluminum uptake by transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis and of aluminum citrate by system Xc;{-} and an organic anion transporter, and results suggesting transporter-mediated aluminum brain efflux are reviewed. The ability of manganese to produce a parkinsonism-like syndrome, evidence suggesting manganese uptake by transferrin- and non-transferrin-dependent mechanisms which may include store-operated calcium channels, and the lack of transporter-mediated manganese brain efflux, are discussed. The evidence for transferrin-dependent and independent mechanisms of brain iron uptake is presented. The copper transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B, and their roles in Menkes and Wilson's diseases, are summarized. Brain zinc uptake is facilitated by L- and D-histidine, but a transporter, if involved, has not been identified. Brain lead uptake may involve a non-energy-dependent process, store-operated calcium channels, and/or an ATP-dependent calcium pump. Methyl mercury can form a complex with L-cysteine that mimics methionine, enabling its transport by the L system. The putative roles of zinc transporters, ZnT and Zip, in regulating brain zinc are discussed. Although brain uptake mechanisms for some metals have been identified, metal efflux from the brain has received little attention, preventing integration of

  16. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub

  17. Explosive welding: Mixing of metals without mutual solubility (iron-silver)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Volkova, A. Yu.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.

    2012-11-01

    The results obtained for joints of dissimilar metals, iron-silver (earlier, copper-tantalum), which form immiscible liquid suspensions, explain why they are mixed in explosive welding. Inhomogeneities of the wavy interface, such as protrusions and zones of localized melting, were observed. The effect of granulating fragmentation, which is responsible for crushing initial materials into particles, was understood as one of the most efficient ways to dissipate the supplied energy. It is shown that, in the case of joints of metals without mutual solubility, zones of localized melting represent colloidal solutions, which form either emulsions or suspensions. At solidification, the emulsion represents a hazard for joint stability due to possible separation; on the contrary, suspension can enable the dispersion strengthening of the joint. The results can be used in the development of new metal joints without mutual solubility.

  18. The involvement of transition metal ions on iron-dependent lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Marisa G; Ferrarotti, Nidia F; Boveris, Alberto

    2010-04-01

    The metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) are considered trace elements, and the metals cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) are known as ultra-trace elements, considering their presence in low to very low quantity in humans. The biologic activity of these transition metals is associated with the presence of unpaired electrons that favor their participation in redox reactions. They are part of important enzymes involved in vital biologic processes. However, these transition metals become toxic to cells when they reach elevated tissue concentrations and produce cellular oxidative damage. Phospholipid liposomes (0.5 mg/ml, phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS), 60/40) were incubated for 60 min at 37 degrees C with 25 microM of Fe2+ in the absence and in the presence of Cu2+, Co2+, and Ni2+ (0-100 microM) with and without the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 5-50 microM). Iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in PC/PS liposomes was assessed by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) production. Metal transition ions promoted lipid peroxidation by H2O2 decomposition and direct homolysis of endogenous hydroperoxides. The Fe2+-H2O2-mediated lipid peroxidation takes place by a pseudo-second order process, and the Cu2+-mediated process by a pseudo-first order reaction. Co2+ and Ni2+ alone do not induce lipid peroxidation. Nevertheless, when they are combined with Fe2+, Fe2+-H2O2-mediated lipid peroxidation was stimulated in the presence of Ni2+ and was inhibited in the presence of Co2+. The understanding of the effects of transition metal ions on phospholipids is relevant to the prevention of oxidative damage in biologic systems.

  19. PERSPECTIVE SOURCES OF METALS RESOURCES (CU, NI FOR CAST IRON ALLOYING, ARISING ON THE TERRITORY OF THE REPUBLIC OF BELARUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Tribushevski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the practical foundation of combined resources-economy technologies of the alloyed cast iron melting using wastes of galvanic productions, containing sulfates and hydroxides of these metals, instead of metallic nickel and copper.

  20. Effects of thermal treatment on mineralogy and heavy metal behavior in iron oxide stabilized air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Bender-Koch, C.; Starckpoole, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Stabilization of air pollution control residues by coprecipitation with ferrous iron and subsequent thermal treatment (at 600 and 900 °C) has been examined as a means to reduce heavy metal leaching and to improve product stability. Changes in mineralogy and metal binding were analyzed using various...

  1. AtNRAMP3, a multispecific vacuolar metal transporter involved in plant responses to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomine, Sébastien; Lelièvre, Françoise; Debarbieux, Elise; Schroeder, Julian I; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    2003-06-01

    Metal homeostasis is critical for the survival of living organisms, and metal transporters play central roles in maintaining metal homeostasis in the living cells. We have investigated the function of a metal transporter of the NRAMP family, AtNRAMP3, in Arabidopsis thaliana. A previous study showed that AtNRAMP3 expression is upregulated by iron (Fe) starvation and that AtNRAMP3 protein can transport Fe. In the present study, we used AtNRAMP3 promoter beta-glucoronidase (GUS) fusions to show that AtNRAMP3 is expressed in the vascular bundles of roots, stems, and leaves under Fe-sufficient conditions. This suggests a function in long-distance metal transport within the plant. Under Fe-starvation conditions, the GUS activity driven by the AtNRAMP3 promoter is upregulated without any change in the expression pattern. We analyze the impact of AtNRAMP3 disruption and overexpression on metal accumulation in plants. Under Fe-sufficient conditions, AtNRAMP3 overexpression or disruption does not lead to any change in the plant metal content. Upon Fe starvation, AtNRAMP3 disruption leads to increased accumulation of manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) in the roots, whereas AtNRAMP3 overexpression downregulates Mn accumulation. In addition, overexpression of AtNRAMP3 downregulates the expression of the primary Fe uptake transporter IRT1 and of the root ferric chelate reductase FRO2. Expression of AtNRAMP3::GFP fusion protein in onion cells or Arabidopsis protoplasts shows that AtNRAMP3 protein localizes to the vacuolar membrane. To account for the results presented, we propose that AtNRAMP3 influences metal accumulation and IRT1 and FRO2 gene expression by mobilizing vacuolar metal pools to the cytosol.

  2. Metal speciation in health and medicine represented by iron and vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crans, Debbie C; Woll, Kellie A; Prusinskas, Kestutis; Johnson, Michael D; Norkus, Eugenijus

    2013-11-04

    The influence of metals in biology has become more and more apparent within the past century. Metal ions perform essential roles as critical scaffolds for structure and as catalysts in reactions. Speciation is a key concept that assists researchers in investigating processes that involve metal ions. However, translation of the essential area across scientific fields has been plagued by language discrepancies. To rectify this, the IUPAC Commission provided a framework in which speciation is defined as the distribution of species. Despite these attempts, contributions from inorganic chemists to the area of speciation have not fully materialized in part because the past decade's contributions focused on technological advances, which are not yet to the stage of measuring speciation distribution in biological solutions. In the following, we describe how speciation influences the area of metals in medicine and how speciation distribution has been characterized so far. We provide two case studies as an illustration, namely, vanadium and iron. Vanadium both has therapeutic importance and is known as a cofactor for metalloenzymes. In addition to being a cation, vanadium(V) has analogy with phosphorus and as such is a potent inhibitor for phosphorylases. Because speciation can change the metal's existence in cationic or anionic forms, speciation has profound effects on biological systems. We also highlight how speciation impacts iron metabolism, focusing on the rather low abundance of biologically relevant iron cation that actually exists in biological fluids. fluids. Furthermore, we point to recent investigations into the mechanism of Fenton chemistry, and that the emerging results show pH dependence. The studies suggest formation of Fe(IV)-intermediates and that the generally accepted mechanism may only apply at low pH. With broader recognition toward biological speciation, we are confident that future investigations on metal-based systems will progress faster and with

  3. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The removal of heavy metals by iron mine drainage sludge and Phragmites australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Ha, Nguyen Thi; Anh, Bui Thi Kim

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the removal of heavy metals from solutions by the combination of modified iron mine drainage sludge (sorbent column) and surface and subsurface flow constructed wetlands using the common reed (Phragmites australis) during 30 days of experiment. The results of this study demonstrated that the average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column were 59.0, 55.1, 38.7, and 42.4%, respectively. The decreasing trend of removal rates of metals by sorbent column was obtained during the experiment. The average removal rates of Zn, Pb, Mn, and As by sorbent column-surface constructed wetland were 78.9, 73.5, 91.2, and 80.5%, respectively; those by sorbent column-subsurface flow constructed wetland were 81.7, 81.1, 94.1, and 83.1% which reflected that subsurface flow constructed wetland showed higher removal rate than the surface system. Concentrations of heavy metals in the outlet water were lower than the Vietnamese standard limits regulated for industrial wastewater. The results indicate the feasibility of integration of iron mine drainage sludge and constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment.

  5. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  6. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion.

  7. Influences On The Oceanic Biogeochemical Cycling Of The Hybrid-Type Metals: Cobalt, Iron, And Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    chemical speciation of these three metals is also important to their nutritive utilization in the ocean and biogeochemical cycling. As all three...bioactive trace elements for marine phytoplankton nutrition has become evident. In particular, iron is now believed to limit primary productivity in major...0.4 µm FeTd 1.6 10 m 8 bottom *Td : total dissolved   93  Sta. Surf . Chl a average PP dist. to land O2 Co Fe Mn (mg m-3) (mg C m

  8. Removal of Metal Iron from Groundwater Using Aceh Natural Zeolite and Membrane Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyati, S.; Arahman, N.; Syawaliah; Mukramah

    2017-03-01

    The adsorption and the ultrafiltration processes were combined for removal of Fe2+ in water sample solution. Aceh natural zeolite used as an adsorbent, and three kind of ultrafiltration membranes (M10K, M30K, and MPVP) were used in this study. The concentration of Fe2+ in the product of adsorption and ultrafiltration is about 0.254 mg/L. This value is below the permissible limit of ferrous metal (0.3 mg/L) in drinking water. The combination of adsorption and ultrafiltration can be used as an alternative treatment of excess iron content in groundwater

  9. Assessment of metals contamination and ecological risk in ait Ammar abandoned iron mine soil, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to assess the pollution intensity and corresponding ecological risk of phosphorus and metals including Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb and Fe using various indices like geo-accumulation index, enrichment factor, pollution and ecological risk index. In all, 20 surface soil samples were collected from the Ait Ammar iron mine of Oued Zem city, province of Khouribga, in central Morocco. The concentrations of heavy metals in soil samples were used to assess their potential ecological risks. According to the results of potential ecological risk index (RI, pollution index (PI, geo-accumulation index (Igeo, enrichment factor (EF, potential contamination index (Cp, contaminant factor (Cf and degree of contamination (Cd, based on the averages, considerable pollution of metals in soils of study area was observed. The consequence of the correlation matrix and principal component analysis (PCA indicated that Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr and P mainly originated from natural sources and Cd and Pb are mostly derived from anthropogenic sources. The results showed that these metals in soil were ranked by severity of ecological risk as Pb > Cd > Cu > Cr > Zn, based on their single-element indexes. In view of the potential ecological risk (RI, soils from all soil samples showed a potential ecological risk. These results will provide basic information for the improvement of soil environment management and heavy metal pollution prevention in Ait Ammar.

  10. Thermographic measurements of the spin Peltier effect in metal/yttrium-iron-garnet junction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-07-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE), heat-current generation due to spin-current injection, in various metal (Pt, W, and Au single layers and Pt/Cu bilayer)/ferrimagnetic insulator [yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG)] junction systems has been investigated by means of a lock-in thermography (LIT) method. The SPE is excited by a spin current across the metal/YIG interface, which is generated by applying a charge current to the metallic layer via the spin Hall effect. The LIT method enables the thermal imaging of the SPE free from the Joule-heating contribution. Importantly, we observed spin-current-induced temperature modulation not only in the Pt/YIG and W/YIG systems, but also in the Au/YIG and Pt/Cu/YIG systems, excluding the possible contamination by anomalous Ettingshausen effects due to proximity-induced ferromagnetism near the metal/YIG interface. As demonstrated in our previous study, the SPE signals are confined only in the vicinity of the metal/YIG interface; we buttress this conclusion by reducing a spatial blur due to thermal diffusion in an infrared-emission layer on the sample surface used for the LIT measurements. We also found that the YIG-thickness dependence of the SPE is similar to that of the spin Seebeck effect measured in the same Pt/YIG sample, implying the reciprocal relation between them.

  11. Abiological catalysis by artificial haem proteins containing noble metals in place of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Hanna M; Dydio, Paweł; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-23

    Enzymes that contain metal ions--that is, metalloenzymes--possess the reactivity of a transition metal centre and the potential of molecular evolution to modulate the reactivity and substrate-selectivity of the system. By exploiting substrate promiscuity and protein engineering, the scope of reactions catalysed by native metalloenzymes has been expanded recently to include abiological transformations. However, this strategy is limited by the inherent reactivity of metal centres in native metalloenzymes. To overcome this limitation, artificial metalloproteins have been created by incorporating complete, noble-metal complexes within proteins lacking native metal sites. The interactions of the substrate with the protein in these systems are, however, distinct from those with the native protein because the metal complex occupies the substrate binding site. At the intersection of these approaches lies a third strategy, in which the native metal of a metalloenzyme is replaced with an abiological metal with reactivity different from that of the metal in a native protein. This strategy could create artificial enzymes for abiological catalysis within the natural substrate binding site of an enzyme that can be subjected to directed evolution. Here we report the formal replacement of iron in Fe-porphyrin IX (Fe-PIX) proteins with abiological, noble metals to create enzymes that catalyse reactions not catalysed by native Fe-enzymes or other metalloenzymes. In particular, we prepared modified myoglobins containing an Ir(Me) site that catalyse the functionalization of C-H bonds to form C-C bonds by carbene insertion and add carbenes to both β-substituted vinylarenes and unactivated aliphatic α-olefins. We conducted directed evolution of the Ir(Me)-myoglobin and generated mutants that form either enantiomer of the products of C-H insertion and catalyse the enantio- and diastereoselective cyclopropanation of unactivated olefins. The presented method of preparing artificial haem

  12. Dual-Functional Electrocatalyst Derived from Iron-Porphyrin-Encapsulated Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungwon; Lee, Hyunjoon; Bae, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Chul; Ji, Hoon; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Lee, Min Hyung; Kwon, Oh Joong; Lee, Chang Yeon

    2017-08-30

    Active, stable electrocatalysts based on non-precious metals for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are critical for the development of cost-effective, efficient renewable energy technologies. Here, Fe/Fe3C-embedded nitrogen-doped carbon was fabricated via pyrolysis of iron-porphyrin-encapsulated mesoporous metal-organic frameworks [PCN-333 (Fe), where "PCN" stands for "porous coordination network"] at 700 °C. The various characterization techniques confirmed that Fe- and Fe3C-containing Fe-N-C material (FeP-P333-700) was successfully prepared by pyrolysis of porphyrin-encapsulated PCN-333 (Fe). FeP-P333-700 exhibited superior electrocatalytic performance for the ORR and HER owing to the synergistic effect of Fe/Fe3C and Fe-N-C active sites.

  13. Controlled synthesis of metallic iron nanoparticles and their magnetic hyperthermia performance in polyaniline composite nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ta-I.; Chang, Su-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Electrospun magnetic iron/polyaniline nanofibers with applicable heating performance in an AC magnetic field were developed. A new and low-cost method was introduced to synthesize metallic iron (Fe0) nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous environment at room temperature with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone and sodium citrate to tailor their particle sizes ranging from 10 to 20 nm. The experimental results showed that regulating the free iron ions present in the solution is critical for obtaining Fe0 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were subsequently incorporated with conductive polyaniline (PANI) to fabricate Fe0/PANI/polycaprolactone nanofibers using an electrospinning technique. The resultant composite nanofibers have controlled fiber diameters and also show electrochemical redox properties originating from the PANI polymer. The heating performance test concluded that both eddy current loss from PANI and Neel relaxation loss of magnetic Fe0 nanoparticles can contribute to the power dissipation of the prepared composite nanofibers. The optimal heating performance can be obtained by adjusting the composition of Fe0 nanoparticles and PANI in nanofibers.

  14. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  15. Chemical Forms of Heavy Metals in Carbonate—Derived Laterite and Enrichment of Its Iron Oxide Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 漆亮

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the seven-step continuous extracting method was employed in the study of chemical forms of the six heavy metals Co,Zn,Pb,Cu,Cr and Mn,The result shows that the etals in the laterite are present in the chemical form of crystalline iron oxides and residues,and they are transformed towared organic and exchangeable forms in the surface soil.Linear regression analysis indicates that the above heavy metals have a positive correlation with the crystalline iron oxide minerals.The crystalline iron oxide minerals have a very important role to play in the enrichment of heavy metals,especially the solid components in the laterite.

  16. Divalent metal transporter 1 regulates iron-mediated ROS and pancreatic ß cell fate in response to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tonnesen, Morten Fog; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard

    2012-01-01

    divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression correlating with increased ß cell iron content and ROS production. Iron chelation and siRNA and genetic knockdown of DMT1 expression reduce cytokine-induced ROS formation and cell death. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the absence of cytokines in Dmt1...... knockout islets is defective, highlighting a physiological role of iron and ROS in the regulation of insulin secretion. Dmt1 knockout mice are protected against multiple low-dose streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Thus, ß cells...

  17. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  18. Solubility of Iron in Metallic Hydrogen and Stability of Dense Cores in Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H2O, MgO and SiO2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interior...

  19. HE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumeng Zhao; Shuhui Yang; Liang Sheng; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensively used in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed under alkaline condition, especially when transition metal ions exit. Experiments show that the valence of transition metal ion is also responsible for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ and Fe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, it can affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can also combine with phenol, forming complexes which not only are stable structures and are difficult to be removed from pulp, but also significantly affect the brightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when used together, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The optimum dosage of sodium silicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2+ and 0.25% (on solution) for Fe3+. Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously can obviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, the chelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite and cellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ effectively, and pulp brightness is improved greatly. Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  20. Metal Pollution Around an Iron Smelter Complex in Northern Norway at Different Modes of Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Steinnes, E; Eidhammer-Sjobakk, T; Varskog, P

    2003-01-01

    The moss biomonitoring technique was employed to study the atmospheric deposition in and around the town of Mo i Rana, northern Norway, before and after closing an iron smelter and establishing alternative ferrous metal industries. Samples of Hylocomium splendens were collected from the same sites in 1989 and 1993. A combination of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry was used to obtain data for 38 elements in these moss samples, and the analytical data were subjected to factor analysis. In general, the deposition was higher when the iron smelter was still in operation, in particular for Fe and for many elements normally associated with crustal matter. For Cr there was a substantially increased deposition due to the operation of a new ferrochrome smelter. Also for Ni and Au an increased deposition was observed, whereas for metals such as Mn, Co, Ag, Sb, and W there was no appreciable change. INAA proved to be a powerful tool for this kind of study. The regional di...

  1. Influence of rare earth metals on the nucleation and solidification behavior of iron and 1045 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; McLean, A.; Rutter, J. W.; Sommerville, I. D.

    1988-06-01

    Two series of experiments have been conducted to determine the influence of rare earth additions on the nucleation and crystallization behavior of pure iron and 1045 steel. In the first series, additions of rare earth suicide or cerium dioxide powder to two-Kg 1045 steel ingots indicated that rare earth suicide can refine the as-cast structure of such ingots. However, if the holding time after rare earth silicide addition is over two minutes, the grain refinement decreases. With cerium dioxide additions, a relatively large columnar zone was obtained. In the second series, the effects of cerium metal or cerium dioxide powder additions on the degree of undercooling obtainable in pure iron and 1045 steel were examined by the lévitation melting method. Surface tension measurements of the levitated droplets were carried out at the same time to investigate the possible effects of surface tension variations on the nucleation and crystallization behavior of the metals. The experimental data show that rare earth inclusions can greatly reduce the degree of undercooling of iron and steel, and that a small amount of dissolved cerium can further reduce the degree of undercooling of levitated droplets. The structure and reaction products obtained with Fe-Ce levitated droplets were examined with both optical and scanning electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction analysis. The experimental results clearly indicated that cerium solute redistribution during solidification is the dominant factor in refining the as-cast structure. A nucleation and solidification model for the Fe-Ce levitated droplets has been developed, which can successfully explain the experimental results.

  2. Bioaccessibility of micron-sized powder particles of molybdenum metal, iron metal, molybdenum oxides and ferromolybdenum--Importance of surface oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörsdorf, Alexander; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Yolanda

    2015-08-01

    The European chemical framework REACH requires that hazards and risks posed by chemicals, including alloys and metals, that are manufactured, imported or used in different products (substances or articles) are identified and proven safe for humans and the environment. Metals and alloys need hence to be investigated on their extent of released metals (bioaccessibility) in biologically relevant environments. Read-across from available studies may be used for similar materials. This study investigates the release of molybdenum and iron from powder particles of molybdenum metal (Mo), a ferromolybdenum alloy (FeMo), an iron metal powder (Fe), MoO2, and MoO3 in different synthetic body fluids of pH ranging from 1.5 to 7.4 and of different composition. Spectroscopic tools and cyclic voltammetry have been employed to characterize surface oxides, microscopy, light scattering and nitrogen absorption for particle characterization, and atomic absorption spectroscopy to quantify released amounts of metals. The release of molybdenum from the Mo powder generally increased with pH and was influenced by the fluid composition. The mixed iron and molybdenum surface oxide of the FeMo powder acted as a barrier both at acidic and weakly alkaline conditions. These findings underline the importance of the surface oxide characteristics for the bioaccessibility of metal alloys.

  3. Regulation of copper and iron homeostasis by metal chelators: a possible chemotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Anne; Liu, Yan; Nguyen, Michel; Meunier, Bernard

    2015-05-19

    With the increase of life expectancy of humans in more than two-thirds of the countries in the World, aging diseases are becoming the frontline health problems. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now one of the major challenges in drug discovery, since, with the exception of memantine in 2003, all clinical trials with drug candidates failed over the past decade. If we consider that the loss of neurons is due to a high level of oxidative stress produced by nonregulated redox active metal ions like copper linked to amyloids of different sizes, regulation of metal homeostasis is a key target. The difficulty for large copper-carrier proteins to directly extract copper ions from metalated amyloids might be considered as being at the origin of the rupture of the copper homeostasis regulation in AD brains. So, there is an urgent need for new specific metal chelators that should be able to regulate the homeostasis of metal ions, specially copper and iron, in AD brains. As a consequence of that concept, chelators promoting metal excretion from brain are not desired. One should favor ligands able to extract copper ions from sinks (amyloids being the major one) and to transfer these redox-active metal ions to copper-carrier proteins or copper-containing enzymes. Obviously, the affinity of these chelators for the metal ion should not be a sufficient criterion, but the metal specificity and the ability of the chelators to release the metal under specific biological conditions should be considered. Such an approach is still largely unexplored. The requirements for the chelators are very high (ability to cross the brain-blood barrier, lack of toxicity, etc.), few chemical series were proposed, and, among them, biochemical or biological data are scarce. As a matter of fact, the bioinorganic pharmacology of AD represents less than 1% of all articles dedicated to AD drug research. The major part of these articles deals with an old and rather toxic drug, clioquinol and related analogs, that

  4. Low-Level Toxic Metal Exposure in Healthy Weaning-Age Infants: Association with Growth, Dietary Intake, and Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungil Choi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Even low levels of toxic metal exposure (As, Cd, Hg, and Pb in infancy might be harmful to children’s development. This study investigated toxic metal exposure on healthy weaning-age infants and its relationship with growth, diet, and iron/anemia status. The weight, height, head circumference, whole blood levels of four toxic metals, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin of healthy infants was measured. Among 210 infants with a median age of 11.4 months (interquartile range: 10.5–12.0, the median levels of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb were 1.2 μg/L, 0.05 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 0.83 μg/dL, respectively. In adjusted linear regression models, post-birth weight gain (Pb and current head circumference (As, Pb were negatively associated with toxic metal levels. In multiple linear regression or logistic regression analysis, the duration of breastfeeding (all four metals, perceived adequacy of rice-based food intake (As, regular fish intake (As, Hg, and iron deficiency with/without anemia (Cd, Pb were associated with increased toxic metal levels. Although levels of toxic metals may not usually be high in this population, individual exposure risk may need to be assessed after considering the type of feeding or intake of complementary foods and the iron/anemia status while evaluating growth status during late infancy.

  5. Low-Level Toxic Metal Exposure in Healthy Weaning-Age Infants: Association with Growth, Dietary Intake, and Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungil; Chang, Ju Young; Hong, Jeana; Shin, Sue; Park, Jeong Su; Oh, Sohee

    2017-04-06

    Even low levels of toxic metal exposure (As, Cd, Hg, and Pb) in infancy might be harmful to children's development. This study investigated toxic metal exposure on healthy weaning-age infants and its relationship with growth, diet, and iron/anemia status. The weight, height, head circumference, whole blood levels of four toxic metals, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin of healthy infants was measured. Among 210 infants with a median age of 11.4 months (interquartile range: 10.5-12.0), the median levels of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb were 1.2 μg/L, 0.05 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 0.83 μg/dL, respectively. In adjusted linear regression models, post-birth weight gain (Pb) and current head circumference (As, Pb) were negatively associated with toxic metal levels. In multiple linear regression or logistic regression analysis, the duration of breastfeeding (all four metals), perceived adequacy of rice-based food intake (As), regular fish intake (As, Hg), and iron deficiency with/without anemia (Cd, Pb) were associated with increased toxic metal levels. Although levels of toxic metals may not usually be high in this population, individual exposure risk may need to be assessed after considering the type of feeding or intake of complementary foods and the iron/anemia status while evaluating growth status during late infancy.

  6. Evaluation of the effect of divalent metal transporter 1 gene polymorphism on blood iron, lead and cadmium levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha, E-mail: kayaalti@ankara.edu.tr; Akyüzlü, Dilek Kaya; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-02-15

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a member of the proton-coupled metal ion transporter family, mediates transport of ferrous iron from the lumen of the intestine into the enterocyte and export of iron from endocytic vesicles. It has an affinity not only for iron but also for other divalent cations including manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc. DMT1 is encoded by the SLC11a2 gene that is located on chromosome 12q13 in humans and express four major mammalian isoforms (1A/+IRE, 1A/-IRE, 2/+IRE and 2/-IRE). Mutations or polymorphisms of DMT1 gene may have an impact on human health by disturbing metal trafficking. To study the possible association of DMT1 gene with the blood levels of some divalent cations such as iron, lead and cadmium, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (IVS4+44C/A) in DMT1 gene was investigated in 486 unrelated and healthy individuals in a Turkish population by method of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). The genotype frequencies were found as 49.8% homozygote typical (CC), 38.3% heterozygote (CA) and 11.9% homozygote atypical (AA). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system and the average levels of iron, lead and cadmium in the blood samples were 446.01±81.87 ppm, 35.59±17.72 ppb and 1.25±0.87 ppb, respectively. Individuals with the CC genotype had higher blood iron, lead and cadmium levels than those with AA and CA genotypes. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism in the DMT1 gene and iron and lead levels (p=0.001 and p=0.036, respectively), but no association was found with cadmium level (p=0.344). This study suggested that DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, lead and cadmium levels. - Highlights: • DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, cadmium and lead levels.

  7. Amelioration of iron mine soils with biosolids: Effects on plant tissue metal content and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The achievement of environmentally sound and economically feasible disposal strategies for biosolids is a major issue in the wastewater treatment industry around the world, including Swaziland. Currently, an iron ore mine site, which is located within a wildlife sanctuary, is being considered as a suitable place where controlled disposal of biosolids may be practiced. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of urban biosolids on iron mine soils with regard to plant metal content and ecotoxicological effects on earthworms. This was done through chemical analysis of plants grown in biosolid-amended mine soil. Earthworm behaviour, reproduction and bioaccumulation tests were also conducted on biosolid-amended mine soil. According to the results obtained, the use of biosolids led to creation of soil conditions that were generally favourable to earthworms. However, plants were found to have accumulated Zn up to 346 mg kg(-1) (in shoots) and 462 mg kg(-1) (in roots). This was more than double the normal Zn content of plants. It was concluded that while biosolids can be beneficial to mine soils and earthworms, they can also lead to elevated metal content in plant tissues, which might be a concern to plant-dependant wildlife species. Nonetheless, it was not possible to satisfactorily estimate risks to forage quality since animal feeding tests with hyperaccumulator plants have not been reported. Quite possibly, there may be no cause for alarm since the uptake of metals from soil is greater in plants grown in pots in the greenhouse than from the same soil in the field since pot studies fail to mimic field conditions where the soil is heterogeneous and where the root system possesses a complex topology. It was thought that further field trials might assist in arriving at more satisfactory conclusions.

  8. Enhanced Grain Iron Levels in Rice Expressing an IRON-REGULATED METAL TRANSPORTER, NICOTIANAMINE SYNTHASE, and FERRITIN Gene Cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyaves, Kulaporn; Wu, Ting-Ying; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2017-01-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition is widespread, especially in poor populations across the globe, and iron deficiency anemia is one of the most prevalent forms of micronutrient deficiencies. Iron deficiency anemia has severe consequences for human health, working ability, and quality of life. Several interventions including iron supplementation and food fortification have been attempted and met with varied degrees of success. Rice, which is a staple food for over half of the world’s population, is an important target crop for iron biofortification. The genetic variability of iron content in the rice germplasm is very narrow, and thus, conventional breeding has not been successful in developing high iron rice varieties. Therefore, genetic engineering approaches have targeted at increasing iron uptake, translocation, and storage in the rice endosperm. We previously reported that AtIRT1, when expressed together with AtNAS1 and PvFERRITIN (PvFER) in high-iron (NFP) rice, has a synergistic effect of further increasing the iron concentration of polished rice grains. We have now engineered rice expressing AtIRT1, AtNAS1, and PvFER as a single locus gene cassette and compared the resulting lines with transgenic lines expressing AtIRT1 and PvFER gene cassettes. We also evaluated the efficacies of the MsENOD12B and native AtIRT1 promoters for the expression of AtIRT1 in rice in both types of gene cassettes, and found the native AtIRT1 promoter to be a better choice for driving the AtIRT1 expression in our biofortification strategy. All the single insertion transgenic lines have significant increases of iron concentration, both in polished and unpolished grains, but the concerted expression of AtIRT1, AtNAS1, and PvFER resulted to be a more effective strategy in achieving the highest iron increases of up to 10.46 μg/g dry weight. Furthermore, the transformed high iron lines grew better under iron deficiency growth conditions and also have significantly increased grain zinc

  9. Functionalized polymer-iron oxide hybrid nanofibers: Electrospun filtration devices for metal oxyanion removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Katherine T; Johns, Adam J; Myung, Nosang V; Cwiertny, David M

    2017-06-15

    Via a single-pot electrospinning synthesis, we developed a functionalized polymer-metal oxide nanofiber filter for point of use (POU) water treatment of metal oxyanions (e.g., arsenate and chromate). Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) functionalization was accomplished by inclusion of surface-active, quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) [cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB)] that provide strong base ion exchange sites. Embedded iron oxide [ferrihydrite (Fh)] nanoparticles were used for their established role as metal sorbents. We examined the influence of QAS and Fh loading on composite properties, including nanofiber morphology, surface area, surface chemical composition, and the accessibility of embedded nanoparticles to solution. Composite performance was then evaluated using kinetic, isotherm, and pH-edge sorption experiments with arsenate and chromate, and benchmarked to unmodified PAN nanofibers and freely dispersed Fh nanoparticles. We also assessed the long-term stability of QAS in the composite matrix. For composites containing QAS or Fh nanoparticles, increasing QAS/Fh nanoparticle loading generally yielded increasing metal oxyanion uptake. The optimized composite (PAN 7 wt%, Fh 3 wt%, TBAB 1 wt%) exhibited two distinct sites for simultaneous, non-competitive metal binding (i.e., iron oxide sites for arsenate removal via sorption and well-retained QAS sites for chromate removal via ion exchange). Moreover, surface-segregating QAS enriched Fh abundance at the nanofiber surface, allowing immobilized nanoparticles to exhibit reactivity comparable to that of unsupported (i.e., suspended or freely dispersed) nanoparticles. To simulate POU application, the optimized composite was tested in a dead-end, flow-through filtration system for arsenate and chromate removal at environmentally relevant concentrations (e.g., μg/L) in both idealized and simulated tap water matrices. Performance trends indicate that dual mechanisms for uptake are

  10. Role of the metal in the bonding and properties of bimetallic complexes involving manganese, iron, and cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereniak, Stephen J; Carlson, Rebecca K; Clouston, Laura J; Young, Victor G; Bill, Eckhard; Maurice, Rémi; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Kim, Hyun Jung; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C

    2014-02-05

    A multidentate ligand platform is introduced that enables the isolation of both homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of divalent first-row transition metal ions such as Mn(II), Fe(II), and Co(II). By means of a two-step metalation strategy, five bimetallic coordination complexes were synthesized with the general formula M1M2Cl(py3tren), where py3tren is the triply deprotonated form of N,N,N-tris(2-(2-pyridylamino)ethyl)amine. The metal-metal pairings include dicobalt (1), cobalt-iron (2), cobalt-manganese (3), diiron (4), and iron-manganese (5). The bimetallic complexes have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray anomalous scattering studies, cyclic voltammetry, magnetometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, combustion analyses, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and ab initio quantum chemical methods. Only the diiron chloride complex in this series contains a metal-metal single bond (2.29 Å). The others show weak metal-metal interactions (2.49 to 2.53 Å). The diiron complex is also distinct with a septet ground state, while the other bimetallic species have much lower spin states from S = 0 to S = 1. We propose that the diiron system has delocalized metal-metal bonding electrons, which seems to correlate with a short metal-metal bond and a higher spin state. Multiconfigurational wave function calculations revealed that, indeed, the metal-metal bonding orbitals in the diiron complex are much more delocalized than those of the dicobalt analogue.

  11. [Effect of the change in sulphate and dissolved oxygen mass concentration on metal release in old cast iron distribution pipes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-li; Shi, Bao-you; Sun, Hui-fang; Zhang, Zhi-huan; Gu, Jun-nong; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-09-01

    To understand the processes of corrosion by-product release and the consequent "red water" problems caused by the variation of water chemical composition in drinking water distribution system, the effect of sulphate and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on total iron release in corroded old iron pipe sections historically transporting groundwater was investigated in laboratory using small-scale pipe section reactors. The release behaviors of some low-level metals, such as Mn, As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni, in the process of iron release were also monitored. The results showed that the total iron and Mn release increased significantly with the increase of sulphate concentration, and apparent red water occurred when sulphate concentration was above 400 mg x L(-1). With the increase of sulfate concentration, the effluent concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni also increased obviously, however, the effluent concentrations of these metals were lower than the influent concentrations under most circumstances, which indicated that adsorption of these metals by pipe corrosion scales occurred. Increasing DO within a certain range could significantly inhibit the iron release.

  12. Interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms and iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria from sulphidic mine environment during bioleaching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Sanja; Beškoski, Vladimir P; Djokic, Lidija; Vasiljevic, Branka; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Avdalović, Jelena; Gojgić Cvijović, Gordana; Beškoski, Latinka Slavković; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Iron and sulfur oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus species, hold the dominant role in mine environments characterized by low pH values and high concentrations of reduced sulfur and iron compounds, such as ores, rocks and acid drainage waters from mines. On the other hand, heterotrophic microorganisms, especially their biofilms, from these specific niches are receiving increased attention, but their potential eco-physiological roles have not been fully understood. Biofilms are considered a threat to human health, but biofilms also have beneficial properties as they are deployed in waste recycling and bioremediation systems. We have analyzed interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms with iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria both from the sulphidic mine environment (copper mine Bor, Serbia). High tolerance to Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) and the presence of genetic determinants for the respective metal tolerance and biofilm-forming ability was shown for indigenous heterotrophic bacteria that included strains of Staphylococcus and Rhodococcus. Two well characterized bacteria- Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (known biofilm former) and Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (known metal resistant representative) were also included in the study. The interaction and survivability of autotrophic iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus bacteria and biofilms of heterotrophic bacteria during co-cultivation was revealed. Finally, the effect of heterotrophic biofilms on bioleaching process with indigenous iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was shown not to be inhibitory under in vitro conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-05

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature.

  14. Sources and fates of heavy metals in a mining-impacted stream: temporal variability and the role of iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaider, Laurel A; Senn, David B; Estes, Emily R; Brabander, Daniel J; Shine, James P

    2014-08-15

    Heavy metal contamination of surface waters at mining sites often involves complex interactions of multiple sources and varying biogeochemical conditions. We compared surface and subsurface metal loading from mine waste pile runoff and mine drainage discharge and characterized the influence of iron oxides on metal fate along a 0.9-km stretch of Tar Creek (Oklahoma, USA), which drains an abandoned Zn/Pb mining area. The importance of each source varied by metal; mine waste pile runoff contributed 70% of Cd, while mine drainage contributed 90% of Pb, and both sources contributed similarly to Zn loading. Subsurface inputs accounted for 40% of flow and 40-70% of metal loading along this stretch. Streambed iron oxide aggregate material contained highly elevated Zn (up to 27,000 μg g(-1)), Pb (up to 550 μg g(-1)) and Cd (up to 200 μg g(-1)) and was characterized as a heterogeneous mixture of iron oxides, fine-grain mine waste, and organic material. Sequential extractions confirmed preferential sequestration of Pb by iron oxides, as well as substantial concentrations of Zn and Cd in iron oxide fractions, with additional accumulation of Zn, Pb, and Cd during downstream transport. Comparisons with historical data show that while metal concentrations in mine drainage have decreased by more than an order of magnitude in recent decades, the chemical composition of mine waste pile runoff has remained relatively constant, indicating less attenuation and increased relative importance of pile runoff. These results highlight the importance of monitoring temporal changes at contaminated sites associated with evolving speciation and simultaneously addressing surface and subsurface contamination from both mine waste piles and mine drainage. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sources and fates of heavy metals in a mining-impacted stream: Temporal variability and the role of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaider, Laurel A.; Senn, David B.; Estes, Emily R.; Brabander, Daniel J.; Shine, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of surface waters at mining sites often involves complex interactions of multiple sources and varying biogeochemical conditions. We compared surface and subsurface metal loading from mine waste pile runoff and mine drainage discharge and characterized the influence of iron oxides on metal fate along a 0.9-km stretch of Tar Creek (Oklahoma, USA), which drains an abandoned Zn/Pb mining area. The importance of each source varied by metal: mine waste pile runoff contributed 70% of Cd, while mine drainage contributed 90% of Pb, and both sources contributed similarly to Zn loading. Subsurface inputs accounted for 40% of flow and 40-70% of metal loading along this stretch. Streambed iron oxide aggregate material contained highly elevated Zn (up to 27,000 μg g−1), Pb (up to 550 μg g−1) and Cd (up to 200 μg g−1) and was characterized as a heterogeneous mixture of iron oxides, fine-grain mine waste, and organic material. Sequential extractions confirmed preferential sequestration of Pb by iron oxides, as well as substantial concentrations of Zn and Cd in iron oxide fractions, with additional accumulation of Zn, Pb, and Cd during downstream transport. Comparisons with historical data show that while metal concentrations in mine drainage have decreased by more than an order of magnitude in recent decades, the chemical composition of mine waste pile runoff has remained relatively constant, indicating less attenuation and increased relative importance of pile runoff. These results highlight the importance of monitoring temporal changes at contaminated sites associated with evolving speciation and simultaneously addressing surface and subsurface contamination from both mine waste piles and mine drainage. PMID:24867708

  16. Potential for iron oxides to control metal releases in CO2 sequestration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P.M.; Roy, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the release of metals into groundwater following the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subsurface during carbon sequestration projects remains an open research question. Changing the chemical composition of even the relatively deep formation brines during CO2 injection and storage may be of concern because of the recognized risks associated with the limited potential for leakage of CO2-impacted brine to the surface. Geochemical modeling allows for proactive evaluation of site geochemistry before CO2 injection takes place to predict whether the release of metals from iron oxides may occur in the reservoir. Geochemical modeling can also help evaluate potential changes in shallow aquifers were CO2 leakage to occur near the surface. In this study, we created three batch-reaction models that simulate chemical changes in groundwater resulting from the introduction of CO2 at two carbon sequestration sites operated by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). In each of these models, we input the chemical composition of groundwater samples into React??, and equilibrated them with selected mineral phases and CO 2 at reservoir pressure and temperature. The model then simulated the kinetic reactions with other mineral phases over a period of up to 100 years. For two of the simulations, the water was also at equilibrium with iron oxide surface complexes. The first model simulated a recently completed enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project in south-central Illinois in which the MGSC injected into, and then produced CO2, from a sandstone oil reservoir. The MGSC afterwards periodically measured the brine chemistry from several wells in the reservoir for approximately two years. The sandstone contains a relatively small amount of iron oxide, and the batch simulation for the injection process showed detectable changes in several aqueous species that were attributable to changes in surface complexation sites. After using the batch reaction

  17. Identifying the optimal HVOF spray parameters to attain minimum porosity and maximum hardness in iron based amorphous metallic coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vignesh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow based Erosion – corrosion problems are very common in fluid handling equipments such as propellers, impellers, pumps in warships, submarine. Though there are many coating materials available to combat erosion–corrosion damage in the above components, iron based amorphous coatings are considered to be more effective to combat erosion–corrosion problems. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF spray process is considered to be a better process to coat the iron based amorphous powders. In this investigation, iron based amorphous metallic coating was developed on 316 stainless steel substrate using HVOF spray technique. Empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and micro hardness of iron based amorphous coating incorporating HVOF spray parameters such as oxygen flow rate, fuel flow rate, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spray distance. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to identify the optimal HVOF spray parameters to attain coating with minimum porosity and maximum hardness.

  18. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YumengZhao; ShuhuiYang; LiangSheng; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensivelyused in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed underalkaline condition, especially when transition metalions exit. Experiments show that the valence oftransition metal ion is also responsible for thedecomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ andFe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogenperoxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, itcan affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can alsocombine with phenol, forming complexes which notonly are stable structures and are difficult to beremoved from pulp, but also significantly affect thebrightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when usedtogether, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxidedecomposition. The optimum dosage of sodiumsilicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2~ and0.25% (on solution) for Fe3~. Adding chelants such asDTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously canobviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, thechelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite andcellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fez+ effectively, and pulpbrightness is improved greatly. Adding sodiumthiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxidesolution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxidebleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  19. Hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process for landfill leachate treatment with novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Son Dong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2017-04-01

    A novel nanosize metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent was synthesized and tested as coagulant/catalyst in a hybrid zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process to treat leachate. Two different types of leachates, one from municipal solid waste (MSW) tipping hall (MSWIL) and second from an MSW landfill site (MSWLL), were collected and characterized. The morphology, elemental composition, and mineral phases of the nano-Ca/CaO and nano-Fe/Ca/CaO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coagulation process with 2.5 g L(-1) nano-Ca/CaO attained 64.0, 56.0, and 20.7% removal of color, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total suspended solids (TSS) in MSWLL. With only 1.0 g L(-1) of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO, relatively high color, COD and TSS removal was achieved in MSWLL at 67.5, 60.2, and 37.7%, respectively. The heavy metal removal efficiency reached 91-99% after treatment with nano-Fe/Ca/CaO in both leachate samples. The coupling process, using 1.0 g L(-1) of nano-Fe/Ca/CaO and 20 mM H2O2 doses, achieved enhancement removal of color, COD, and TSS, up to 95%, 96%, and 66%, respectively, without initial pH control. After this treatment, the color, COD, TSS, and heavy metals were significantly decreased, fitting the Korean discharge regulation limit. A hybrid coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process with novel nanosized metallic calcium/iron dispersed reagent proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Conventional treatments (biological or physicochemical) are not sufficient anymore to reach the level of purification needed to fully reduce the negative impact of landfill leachates on the environment. This implies that new treatment alternatives species must be proposed. A coupled zero valent iron (ZVI)/H2O2 oxidation process proved to be a suitable treatment for dealing with leachate samples. Coagulation with nFe/Ca/CaO allows 91-99% of

  20. Insight into Bio-metal Interface Formation in vacuo: Interplay of S-layer Protein with Copper and Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Anna A.; Grachova, Elena V.; Neudachina, Vera S.; Yashina, Lada V.; Blüher, Anja; Molodtsov, Serguei L.; Mertig, Michael; Ehrlich, Hermann; Adamchuk, Vera K.; Laubschat, Clemens; Vyalikh, Denis V.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms of interaction between inorganic matter and biomolecules, as well as properties of resulting hybrids, are receiving growing interest due to the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. The majority of potential applications for metal-biohybrid structures require stability of these systems under vacuum conditions, where their chemistry is elusive, and may differ dramatically from the interaction between biomolecules and metal ions in vivo. Here we report for the first time a photoemission and X-ray absorption study of the formation of a hybrid metal-protein system, tracing step-by-step the chemical interactions between the protein and metals (Cu and Fe) in vacuo. Our experiments reveal stabilization of the enol form of peptide bonds as the result of protein-metal interactions for both metals. The resulting complex with copper appears to be rather stable. In contrast, the system with iron decomposes to form inorganic species like oxide, carbide, nitride, and cyanide.

  1. Heavy metal removal using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): Theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaolin, E-mail: lishaolin@tongji.edu.cn; Wang, Wei; Liang, Feipeng; Zhang, Wei-xian, E-mail: zhangwx@tongji.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • nZVI is able to perform fast and simultaneous removal of different heavy metal ions. • Fast separation and seeding effect of nZVI facilities its application in wastewater. • A novel process of E{sub h}-controlled reactor, nZVI separator and reuse is proposed. • E{sub h}-controlled system and nZVI recirculation increase material efficiency of nZVI. • The process produces stable effluent and is effective in wastewater treatment. - Abstract: Treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals requires considerations on simultaneous removal of different ions, system reliability and quick separation of reaction products. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an ideal reagent for removing heavy metals from wastewater. Batch experiments show that nZVI is able to perform simultaneous removal of different heavy metals and arsenic; reactive nZVI in uniform dispersion brings rapid changes in solution E{sub h}, enabling a facile way for reaction regulation. Microscope characterizations and settling experiments suggest that nZVI serves as solid seeds that facilitate products separation. A treatment process consisting of E{sub h}-controlled nZVI reaction, gravitational separation and nZVI recirculation is then demonstrated. Long-term (>12 months) operation shows that the process achieves >99.5% removal of As, Cu and a number of other toxic elements. The E{sub h}-controlled reaction system sustains a highly-reducing condition in reactor and reduces nZVI dosage. The process produces effluent of stable quality that meets local discharge guidelines. The gravitational separator shows high efficacy of nZVI recovery and the recirculation improves nZVI material efficiency, resulting in extraordinarily high removal capacities ((245 mg As + 226 mg-Cu)/g-nZVI). The work provides proof that nanomaterials can offer truly green and cost-effective solutions for wastewater treatment.

  2. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto (VTT (Finland)); Svensson, Daniel (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu (JAEA (Japan)); Wersin, Paul; Rosch, Dominic (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland))

    2010-05-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia

  3. Ductile iron castings fabricated using metallic moulds; Fabricacion de piezas de fundicion con grafito esferoidal en molde metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrestarazu, A.; Sertucha, J.; Suarez, R.; Alvarez-Ilzarbe, I.

    2013-07-01

    The features and suitability of high requirements ductile iron castings production using metallic moulds have been studied in the present work. The structural and mechanical properties of the produced castings have been analysed and compared to the corresponding ones but fabricated using green sand moulds according to a conventional production process. The higher cooling rate in the metallic moulds is the main cause for the appearance of the detected structural changes in castings. The mechanical and microstructural properties obtained directly on castings are remarkable due to the higher nodule count among other factors. Finally, the benefits and inconveniences found in this kind of production methodology using metallic moulds are also discussed. (Author)

  4. Effect of accelerated carbonation and zero valent iron on metal leaching from bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Andreas, L; Lagerkvist, A

    2016-05-01

    About 85% of the ashes produced in Sweden originated from the incineration of municipal solid waste and biofuel. The rest comes from the thermal treatment of recycled wood, peat, charcoal and others. About 68% of all ashes annually produced in Sweden are used for constructions on landfills, mainly slopes, roads and embankments, and only 3% for construction of roads and working surfaces outside the landfills (SCB, 2013). Since waste bottom ash (BA) often has similar properties to crushed bedrock or gravel, it could be used for road constructions to a larger extent. However, the leaching of e.g. Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn can cause a threat to the surrounding environment if the material is used as it is. Carbonation is a commonly used pre-treatment method, yet it is not always sufficient. As leaching from aged ash is often controlled by adsorption to iron oxides, increasing the number of Fe oxide sorption sites can be a way to control the leaching of several critical elements. The importance of iron oxides as sorption sites for metals is known from both mineralogical studies of bottom ash and from the remediation of contaminated soil, where iron is used as an amendment. In this study, zero valent iron (Fe(0)) was added prior to accelerated carbonation in order to increase the number of adsorption sites for metals and thereby reduce leaching. Batch, column and pHstat leaching tests were performed and the leaching behaviour was evaluated with multivariate data analysis. It showed that leaching changed distinctly after the tested treatments, in particular after the combined treatment. Especially, the leaching of Cr and Cu clearly decreased as a result of accelerated carbonation. The combination of accelerated carbonation with Fe(0) addition reduced the leaching of Cr and Cu even further and reduced also the leaching of Mo, Zn, Pb and Cd compared to untreated BA. Compared with only accelerated carbonation, the Fe(0) addition significantly reduced the leaching of Cr, Cu and Mo

  5. Nanoparticle iron chelators: a new therapeutic approach in Alzheimer disease and other neurologic disorders associated with trace metal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Harris, Peggy L R; Rolston, Raj K; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-10-09

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be a major etiologic factor in initiating and promoting neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease. Contributing to this, there is a dyshomeostasis of metal ions in Alzheimer disease with abnormally high levels of redox-active metals, particularly iron, in affected areas of the brain. Although it is unclear whether metal excesses are the sole cause of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration or a by-product of neuronal loss, the finding that metal chelators can partially solubilize amyloid-beta deposits in Alzheimer disease suggests a promising therapeutic role for chelating agents. However, the blood-brain barrier and toxicity of known chelators limit their utility. In this study, we suggest that covalent conjugation of iron chelators with nanoparticles may help overcome the limitations in blood-brain barrier permeability of existing chelation therapy. Using in vitro studies, we have shown that a chelator-nanoparticle system and the chelator-nanoparticle system complexed with iron, when incubated with human plasma, preferentially adsorb apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-I, that would facilitate transport into and out of the brain via mechanisms used for transporting low-density lipoprotein. Our studies suggest a unique approach, utilizing nanoparticles, to transport chelators and chelator-metal complexes in both directions across the blood-brain barrier, thus providing safer and more effective chelation treatment in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  7. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala A. Sainna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu2(μ2-H (μ2-NHCH3(μ3-CPtCH3(P(CH332](COn+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH35, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes.

  8. Investigations of Heavy Metal Ion Sorption Using Nanocomposites of Iron-Modified Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodyńska, D.; Bąk, J.; Kozioł, M.; Pylypchuk, L. V.

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic biochar nanocomposites were obtained by modification of biochar by zero-valent iron. The article provides information on the impact of contact time, initial Cd(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) ion concentrations, dose of the sorbents, solution pH and temperature on the adsorption capacity. On the basis of experiments, it was found that the optimum parameters for the sorption process are phase contact time 360 min (after this time, the equilibrium of all concentrations is reached), the dose of sorbent equal to 5 g/dm3, pH 5 and the temperature 295 K. The values of parameters calculated from the kinetic models and isotherms present the best match to the pseudo second order and Langmuir isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ∆H 0, ∆S 0 and ∆G 0 indicate that the sorption of heavy metal ions is an exothermic and spontaneous process as well as favoured at lower temperatures, suggesting the physical character of sorption. The solution of nitric acid(V) at the concentration 0.1 mol/dm3 was the best acidic desorbing agent used for regeneration of metal-loaded magnetic sorbents. The physicochemical properties of synthesized composites were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD, XPS and TG analyses. The point characteristics of the double layer for biochar pHPZC and pHIEP were designated.

  9. Detailed Iron-Group Abundances in a Very Metal-Poor Main Sequence Turnoff Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneden, Chris; Roederer, Ian U.; Boesgaard, Ann M.; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Cowan, John J.; Sobeck, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    We have obtained Keck HIRES and HST STIS high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -2.9) main-sequence turnoff star BD+03 740. A detailed chemical composition analysis based on synthetic spectrum computations has been conducted. Our initial focus has been on the iron-group elements in the Z = 21-28 range. This study takes advantage of recent improvements in neutral and ionzied species transition data for all of these elements except Sc (Z = 21) by the Wisconsin atomic physics group (see a companion presentation on Cr II at this meeting). Several metal-poor abundance surveys have concluded that there are large overabundances of Co and underabundances of Cr with respect to Fe for stars with [Fe/H] synthesis in the Galaxy.This work has been supported by HST STScI Program GO-14232; and NSF grants AST-1211585 and AST-1616040 to CS; AST-1516182 to JEL and EDH; NASA grant NNX16AE96G to JEL

  10. Potential ecological and human health risks of heavy metals in surface soils associated with iron ore mining in Pahang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diami, Siti Merryan; Kusin, Faradiella Mohd; Madzin, Zafira

    2016-10-01

    The composition of heavy metals (and metalloid) in surface soils of iron ore mine-impacted areas has been evaluated of their potential ecological and human health risks. The mining areas included seven selected locations in the vicinity of active and abandoned iron ore-mining sites in Pahang, Malaysia. Heavy metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Co, Pb, Cr, Ni, and Cd and metalloid As were present in the mining soils of the studied area, while Cu was found exceeding the soil guideline value at all sampling locations. However, the assessment of the potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated low ecological risk (RI between 44 and 128) with respect to Cd, Pb, Cu, As, Zn, Co, and Ni in the surface soils. Contributions of potential ecological risk [Formula: see text]by metal elements to the total potential ecological RI were evident for Cd, As, Pb, and Cu. Contribution of Cu appears to be consistently greater in the abandoned mining area compared to active iron ore-mining site. For non-carcinogenic risk, no significant potential health risk was found to both children and adults as the hazard indices (HIs) were all below than 1. The lifetime cancer risk (LCR) indicated that As has greater potential carcinogenic risk compared to other metals that may induce carcinogenic effects such as Pb, Cr, and Cd, while the LCR of As for children fell within tolerable range for regulatory purposes. Irrespective of carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic risk, greater potential health risk was found among children (by an order of magnitude higher for most metals) compared to adults. The hazard quotient (HQ) and cancer risk indicated that the pathways for the risk to occur were found to be in the order of ingestion > dermal > inhalation. Overall, findings showed that some metals and metalloid were still present at comparable concentrations even long after cessation of the iron ore-mining activities.

  11. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Svensson, D. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Wersin, P.; Rosch, D. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited

  12. Iron Catalysis in Organic Synthesis: A Critical Assessment of What It Takes To Make This Base Metal a Multitasking Champion

    OpenAIRE

    Fürstner, Alois

    2016-01-01

    The current status of homogeneous iron catalysis in organic chemistry is contemplated, as are the reasons why this particular research area only recently starts challenging the enduring dominance of the late and mostly noble metals over the field. Centered in the middle of the d-block and able to support formal oxidation states ranging from −II to +VI, iron catalysts hold the promise of being able to encompass organic synthesis at large. They are expected to serve reductive as well as oxidati...

  13. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  14. Divalent metal transporter 1 regulates iron-mediated ROS and pancreatic β cell fate in response to cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tonnesen, Morten Fog; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Hagedorn, Peter H; Friberg, Josefine; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Heller, R Scott; Nielsen, Anja Østergren; Størling, Joachim; Baeyens, Luc; Anker-Kitai, Leeat; Qvortrup, Klaus; Bouwens, Luc; Efrat, Shimon; Aalund, Mogens; Andrews, Nancy C; Billestrup, Nils; Karlsen, Allan E; Holst, Birgitte; Pociot, Flemming; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-10-03

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to target-cell damage in inflammatory and iron-overload diseases. Little is known about iron transport regulation during inflammatory attack. Through a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β induces divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression correlating with increased β cell iron content and ROS production. Iron chelation and siRNA and genetic knockdown of DMT1 expression reduce cytokine-induced ROS formation and cell death. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the absence of cytokines in Dmt1 knockout islets is defective, highlighting a physiological role of iron and ROS in the regulation of insulin secretion. Dmt1 knockout mice are protected against multiple low-dose streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Thus, β cells become prone to ROS-mediated inflammatory damage via aberrant cellular iron metabolism, a finding with potential general cellular implications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Significance of bioleaching method in dissolution of iron and in the quality improvement of non-metallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Štyriaková

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple laboratory bioleaching experiments for the iron removal with heterotrophic bacteria on natural raw materials were conducted to explore a simple cyclic operation for a potential use at the industrial scale. Heterotrophic bacteria of Bacillus spp. growing in the presence of feldspar raw materials are able to dissolve iron. Anaerobic conditions Quickly formed by bacteria enable a simple manipulation with the sample solution. Insoluble Fe(III in the feldspars sample could be enzymatically dissolved as Fe3+ and also reduced to soluble Fe2+ by silicate bacteria of Bacillus spp. This metal was efficiently removed from the feldspars sample as documented by a Fe2O3 decrease (from 0.29 % to 0.12 % after bioleaching in the conical flask and by a Fe2O3 decrease (from 0.29 % to 0.19 % after bioleaching in the percolate column. Bioleaching of Fe was more effective in the conical flask. Iron-bearing minerals can be easily removed by magnetic separation, but ultra fine iron particles are difficult to treat by conventional mineral processing methods. Thus bioleaching is an attractive alternative for effective removal of iron minerals. The removal of iron with the whiteness increase should give a product, which is fit for industrial ceramic applications.

  16. Distribution, speciation, and risk assessment of selected metals in the gold and iron mine soils of the catchment area of Miyun Reservoir, Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingxing; Zhu, Yi; Ji, Hongbing

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the metal distribution, speciation, correlation and origin, risk assessment, 86 surface soil samples from the catchment area around the Miyun Reservoir, Beijing, including samples from gold and iron mine areas, were monitored for fractions of heavy metal and total contents. Most of the metal concentrations in the gold and iron mine soil samples exceeded the metal background levels in Beijing. The contents of most elements in the gold mine tailings were noticeably higher than those in the iron mine tailings. Geochemical speciation data of the metals showed that the residual fraction dominated most of the heavy metals in both mines. In both mine areas, Mn had the greatest the acid-soluble fraction (F1) per portion. The high secondary-phase fraction portion of Cd in gold mine samples indicated that there was a direct potential hazard to organisms in the tested areas. Multivariate analysis coupled with the contents of selected metals, showed that Hg, Pb, Cr, and Ni in gold mine areas represented anthropogenic sources; Cd, Pb, and Cr in iron mine areas represented industrial sources. There was moderate to high contamination of a few metals in the gold and iron soil samples, the contamination levels were relatively higher in gold mine than in iron mine soils.

  17. THE SYNTHESIS, THERMODYNAMIC BEHAVIOR, AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL-ION-SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR IRON AND THE ACTINIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Harris, Wesley R.; Carrano, Carl J.; Weitl, Frederick L.

    1979-12-01

    Enterobactin, a microbial iron-transport compound which is a hexadentate ligand via its three catechol groups, has been studied by potentiometric, spectrophotometric and electrochemical techniques. The proton-dependent stability constant for the ferric enterobactin complex has been determined spectrophotometrically by competition vs EDTA. At physiological pH, enterobactin is by far the most powerful iron chelating agent yet characterized. In a biomimetic approach to the design and synthesis of ferric-ion-specific sequestering agents that could prove to be new therapeutic agents for iron mobilization in man, several structural analogs of enterobactin have been chosen as target compounds. Because of the large number of chemical and biological similarities of plutonium(IV) with iron(III) a biomimetic approach has also been taken in the synthesis of a new class of actinide-specific sequestering agents which incorporate four catechol groups. In general both the iron and actinide sequestering agents are derivatives of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid or the 5-sulfo 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. Both MECAM [1,3,5-N,N{prime},N{double_prime}-tris(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)triamino-methylbenzene] and 3,4-LICAMS [1,5,10-N,N{prime},N{double_prime}-tris(5-sulfo-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)triazadecane] have been found to remove iron from the human iron transport protein transferrin. In fact, all of the synthetic tricatecholate ligands rapidly remove iron from human transferrin - in marked contrast to the trihydroxamate ligands such as desferrioxamine B (the most commonly used drug for iron removal in man). The details of the kinetics of transferrin iron removal by 3,4-LICAMS have been investigated. In addition, the mode of coordination to ferric ion of enterobactin and analogous compounds has been investigated and the change in this coordination as a function of protonation of the metal-ligand complex characterized. Protonation of these compounds occurs through one-proton steps to give a

  18. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  19. Iron Catalysis in Organic Synthesis: A Critical Assessment of What It Takes To Make This Base Metal a Multitasking Champion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstner, Alois

    2016-11-23

    The current status of homogeneous iron catalysis in organic chemistry is contemplated, as are the reasons why this particular research area only recently starts challenging the enduring dominance of the late and mostly noble metals over the field. Centered in the middle of the d-block and able to support formal oxidation states ranging from -II to +VI, iron catalysts hold the promise of being able to encompass organic synthesis at large. They are expected to serve reductive as well as oxidative regimes, can emulate "noble tasks", but are also able to adopt "early" transition metal character. Since a comprehensive coverage of this multidimensional agenda is beyond the scope of an Outlook anyway, emphasis is laid in this article on the analysis of the factors that perhaps allow one to control the multifarious chemical nature of this earth-abundant metal. The challenges are significant, not least at the analytical frontier; their mastery mandates a mindset that differs from the routines that most organic chemists interested in (noble metal) catalysis tend to cultivate. This aspect notwithstanding, it is safe to predict that homogeneous iron catalysis bears the chance to enable a responsible paradigm for chemical synthesis and a sustained catalyst economy, while potentially providing substantial economic advantages. This promise will spur the systematic and in-depth investigations that it takes to upgrade this research area to strategy-level status in organic chemistry and beyond.

  20. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  1. Assessment of heavy metal accumulation in macrophyte, agricultural soil, and crop plants adjacent to discharge zone of sponge iron factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Nayek, S.; Saha, R. N.; Satpati, S.

    2008-08-01

    The present study deals with the characterization of effluent released from sponge iron industries and distribution of heavy metals in soil and macrophytes near to effluent discharge channel. Apart from this, accumulation of heavy metals in nearby soil and vegetation system irrigated with effluent-contaminated water is also the subject of this study. Physico-chemical analysis of effluent reveals that the concentration of total suspended solids (TSS), total hardness (TH), iron (Fe2+), and oil and grease are greater than the IS (1981) norms for discharge of water into inland water body. The soil along the sides of the effluent channel also shows higher concentration of heavy metals than the background soil. The enrichment of the heavy metals are in the order of Chromium (Cr) > Iron (Fe) > Manganese (Mn) > Zinc (Zn) > Copper (Cu) > Cadmium (Cd). Macrophytes growing along the sides of the effluent channel also show significant accumulation of heavy metals almost in the same order as accumulated in soil. Higher uptake of heavy metals by these varieties reveals that these species can be used for future phytoremediation. The effluent as well as contaminated water is extensively used for irrigation for growing vegetables like tomato ( Lycopersicon esculatum) in the surrounding areas. Heavy metal accumulation in this agricultural soil are in the sequence of Cr > Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cd. More or less similar type of accumulation pattern are also found in tomato plants except Fe and Zn exceeding Cr and Mn. Transfer Factor of heavy metals from soil to tomato plants (TFS) shows average value of <1, suggesting less uptake of heavy metals from soil. Among the plant parts studied, fruit shows least accumulation. Although tomato plants show some phenotypic changes, the survival of tomato plants as well as least accumulation of metals in fruit reveals their tolerance to heavy metals. Therefore it may be suggested that this plant can be grown successfully in the heavy metal

  2. EFFECT OF BRAZING TIME ON TiC CERMET/IRON JOINT BRAZED WITH Ag-Cu-Zn FILLER METAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.X. Zhang; J.C. Feng; Z.R. Li; H.J. Liu

    2004-01-01

    The brazing of TiC cermet to iron was carried out at 1223K for 5-20min using Ag-Cu-Zn filler metal. The formation phase and interface structure of the joints were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the joint strength was tested by shearing method. The results showed: there occurred three new formation phases, Cu(s.s), FeNi and Ag(s.s) in TiC cermet/iron joint. The interface structure was expressed as TiC cermet/Cu(s.s)+FeNi/Ag(s.s)+a little Cu(s.s)+a little FeNi/Cu(s.s)+ FeNi/iron. With brazing time increasing, there appeared highest shear strength of the joints, the value of which was up to 252.2MPa when brazing time was 10min.

  3. An Investigation of the Levels and Distribution of Selected Heavy Metals in Sediments and Plant Species within the Vicinity of Ex-Iron Mine in Bukit Besi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A. Kutty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the abandoned mine impacts on the concentrations and distribution of heavy metals in surface sediments and plant species within the vicinity of an ex-iron mine in Malaysia was conducted. The sequential extraction method was used to extract anthropogenic metals in sediments. The results showed that metals in EFLE, AR, and OO fractions were higher than ambient concentrations which indicate that heavy metals have been loaded from ex-iron mining area into the surrounding aquatic environments. The metal accumulation in the four dominant plant species grown naturally within the vicinity of Bukit Besi ex-iron mining was investigated. Exceptional elevated concentrations of metal were found in plants and surface sediments. Several established criteria were applied to determine the hyperaccumulator plants. The results revealed that Melastoma malabathricum and Pityrogramma calomelanos are classified as Fe and Al hyperaccumulators, while Scirpus triqueter, Melastoma malabathricum, and Pityrogramma calomelanos were undoubtedly hyperaccumulator for Cd.

  4. Novel iron metal matrix composite reinforced by quartz sand for the effective dechlorination of aqueous 2-chlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Yang, Bo; Han, Yanni; Jiang, Chaojin; Wu, Deli; Fan, Jinhong; Ma, Luming

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we tested a novel iron metal matrix composite (MMC) synthesized by mechanically introducing quartz sand (SiO2) into an iron matrix (denoted as SiO2-Fe MMC). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant of the SiO2-Fe MMC (initial pH 5.0) for 20 mg/L of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) was 0.051 × 10(-3) L/m(2)/min, which was even higher than that of some reported Pd/Fe bimetals. This extraordinary high activity was promoted by the quick iron dissolution rate, which was caused by the formation of Fe-C internal electrolysis from carbonization of process control agent (PCA) and the active reinforcement/metal interfaces during the milling process. In addition, pH has slight effect on the dechlorination rate. The SiO2-Fe MMC retained relatively stable activity, still achieving 71% removal efficiency for 2-CP after six consecutive cycles. The decrease in dechlorination efficiency can be attributed to the rapid consumption of Fe(0). A dechlorination mechanism using the SiO2-Fe MMC was proposed by a direct electron transfer from Fe(0) to 2-CP at the quartz sand/iron interface.

  5. Analysis and simulation of non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal graphite iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustal, B.; Schelnberger, B.; Bührig-Polaczek, A.

    2016-03-01

    Non-metallic inclusions in spheroidal cast iron (SGI) reduce fatigue strength and yield strength. This type of inclusion usually accumulates at grain boundaries. Papers addressing this topic show the overall impact of both the fraction of so-called white (carbides) and black (non-metallic) inclusions on mechanical properties. In the present work we focus on the origin and the formation conditions of black Mg-bearing inclusions, further distinguishing between Si-bearing and non-Si-bearing Mg inclusions. The formation was simulated applying thermodynamic approaches. Moreover, appropriate experiments have been carried out and a large number of particles have been studied applying innovative feature analysis with regard to shape, size, and composition. Magnesium silicates are predicted at elevated oxygen concentrations, whereas at low levels of oxygen sulphides and carbides appear at a late stage of solidification. Experiments with three consecutive flow obstacles show that the amount of magnesium silicates decrease after each of the three obstacles, whereas the fraction of non-Si-bearing inclusions remains approximately constant. The size of inclusions divides in halves over the flow path and the number of particles increases accordingly. We point out that based on feature analysis Mg-O-C bearing inclusion show disadvantageous form factors for which reason this kind of inclusions may be extremely harmful in terms of crack initiation. All results obtained indicate that magnesium silicates are entrapped on mould filling, whereas Mg-(O, C, S, P, N) bearing particles are precipitates at late stages of solidification. Consequently, the only avoidance strategy is setting up optimum retained magnesium content.

  6. Ammine-Stabilized Transition-Metal Borohydrides of Iron, Cobalt, and Chromium: Synthesis and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedern, Elsa; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-11-02

    Iron and cobalt borohydrides stabilized by ammonia (NH3), [Fe(NH3)6](BH4)2 and [Co(NH3)6](BH4)2, were synthesized along with a solid solution, [Co(NH3)6](BH4)(2-x)Cl(x) (x ∼ 1), and a bimetallic compound, [Fe(NH3)6](Li2(BH4)4). The compounds were prepared by new low-temperature, solvent-based synthesis methods, using dimethyl sulfide or liquid NH3, which allow for the removal of inert metal halides. The crystal structures were determined from synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. [M(NH3)6](BH4)2 (M = Fe, Co) and [Co(NH3)6](BH4)(2-x)Cl(x) crystallize in the cubic crystal system, where the transition metals are octahedrally coordinated by NH3. Polymeric chains of lithium coordinated by four bridging BH4(-) anions are found in [Fe(NH3)6](Li2(BH4)4). The new compounds have high hydrogen densities of ∼14 wt % H2 and ∼140 g H2/L and release a mixture of hydrogen and NH3 gas at low temperatures, T < 80 °C. The decomposition mechanisms of the prepared compounds along with the composites [Fe(NH3)6](BH4)2·nNH3BH3 (n = 2, 4, 6) were studied by thermal analysis and in situ SR-PXD.

  7. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  8. Removal of dissolved heavy metals from pre-settled stormwater runoff by iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J.; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    Sorption to iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) is a promosing technology for removal of the dissolved heavy metal fraction in stormwater runoff. The development of a new technology is necessary since studies of stormwater runoff from traffic areas indicate that an oil separator and detention pond may...... not guarantee that emission limit values set by the Danish EPA are satisfied. Runoff water was sampled from an urban highway, allowed to settle for 24 hours to simulate the effect of a detention pond, and finally spiked with metals to ensure concentration levels similar to high levels reported in the leterature...

  9. Testing Metallic Iron Filtration Systems for Decentralized Water Treatment at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Tepong-Tsindé

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors to consider for the design of appropriate water treatment systems including: cost, the concentration and type of biological and/or chemical contamination, concentration limits at which contaminant(s are required to be removed, required flow rate, level of local expertise for on-going maintenance, and social acceptance. An ideal technology should be effective at producing clean, potable water; however it must also be low-cost, low-energy (ideally energy-free and require low-maintenance. The use of packed beds containing metallic iron (Fe0 filters has the potential to become a cheap widespread technology for both safe drinking water provision and wastewater treatment. Fe0 filters have been intensively investigated over the past two decades, however, sound design criteria are still lacking. This article presents an overview of the design of Fe0 filters for decentralized water treatment particularly in the developing world. A design for safe drinking water to a community of 100 people is also discussed as starting module. It is suggested that Fe0 filters have the potential for significant worldwide applicability, but particularly in the developing world. The appropriate design of Fe0 filters, however, is site-specific and dependent upon the availability of local expertise/materials.

  10. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  11. Impact of two iron(III) chelators on the iron, cadmium, lead and nickel accumulation in poplar grown under heavy metal stress in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G; Csog, Árpád; Fodor, Ferenc; Tatár, Enikő; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminiţa; Záray, Gyula

    2012-04-15

    Poplar (Populus jacquemontiana var. glauca cv. Kopeczkii) was grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) or Pb(II), and Fe as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations. The present study was designed to compare the accumulation and distribution of Fe, Cd, Ni and Pb within the different plant compartments. Generally, Fe and heavy-metal accumulation were higher by factor 2-7 and 1.6-3.3, respectively, when Fe(III) citrate was used. Iron transport towards the shoot depended on the Fe(III) chelate and, generally, on the heavy metal used. Lead was accumulated only in the root. The amounts of Fe and heavy metals accumulated by poplar were very similar to those of cucumber grown in an identical way, indicating strong Fe uptake regulation of these two Strategy I plants: a cultivar and a woody plant. The Strategy I Fe uptake mechanism (i.e. reducing Fe(III) followed by Fe(II) uptake), together with the Fe(III) chelate form in the nutrient solution had significant effects on Fe and heavy metal uptake. Poplar appears to show phytoremediation potential for Cd and Ni, as their transport towards the shoot was characterized by 51-54% and 26-48% depending on the Fe(III) supply in the nutrient solution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficiency of Aluminum and Iron Electrodes for the Removal of Heavy Metals [(Ni (II), Pb (II), Cd (II)] by Electrocoagulation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar; Hussain, Amira; Muneer, Majid; Zia, Khalid Mahmood [Government College Univ., Faisalabad (Pakistan); Hafeez, Samia [Bahaud-din-Zakariya Univ., Multan (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15

    Electrocoagulation (EC) technique is applied for the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metals ions such as nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) by using sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant flocs usually aluminium or iron cations into the solution. During electrolytic reactions hydrogen gas evolve at the cathode. All the experiments were carried out in Batch mode. The tank was filled with synthetic wastewater containing heavy metals and efficiency of electrocoagulation in combination with aluminum and iron electrodes were investigated for removal of such metals. Several parameters, such as contact time, pH, electro-coagulant concentration, and current density were optimized to achieve maximum removal efficiency (%). The concentrations of heavy metals were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). It is found that the electro-coagulation process has potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of heavy metals from wastewater specially using iron electrodes in terms of high removal efficiencies and operating cost.

  13. Nanophase modification of the superficial layer of cast iron during the interaction of the melt with a carbide-forming metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Xu, Yunhua; Zhong, Lisheng; Zhao, Nana

    2016-11-01

    In the present publication, we report on the results of a study of the structural-phase state of the superficial layer of cast iron formed as a result of an interaction of cast-iron melt with a plate of carbide-forming Ta metal. It is found that, as a result of the interaction, in the superficial layer of cast iron there forms a cermet-type heterophase structure with nanocrystalline carbide phase. The influence of the formed heterophase structure on the physical properties of the superficial layer of cast iron is demonstrated.

  14. Different behaviours in phytoremediation capacity of two heavy metal tolerant poplar clones in relation to iron and other trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldantoni, Daniela; Cicatelli, Angela; Bellino, Alessandro; Castiglione, Stefano

    2014-12-15

    Plant biodiversity and intra-population genetic variability have not yet been properly exploited in the framework of phytoremediation and soil reclamation. For this reason, iron and other metal accumulation capacity of two Cu and Zn tolerant poplar clones, namely AL22 (Populus alba L.) and N12 (Populus nigra L.), was investigated in a pot experiment. Cuttings of the two clones were planted in iron rich soil collected from an urban-industrial area. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were analysed in leaves (at different times), as well as in stems and in roots (at the end of the experiment), both in control plants and in plants grown on a soil whose Fe availability was artificially enhanced. Results showed that Cd and Zn were preferentially accumulated in leaves, whereas Cu, Fe and Pb were mainly accumulated in roots. The main differences in metal accumulation between clones were related to Cd (about tenfold higher concentrations in N12) and Cu (higher concentrations in AL22). Once soil Fe availability was enhanced, the uptake and accumulation of all metals declined, with the exception of Fe at the first sampling time in AL22 leaves. The different behaviour of the two poplar clones suggests that a thoughtful choice should be made for their use in relation to soil heavy metal remediation.

  15. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  16. Nanoscale zero-valent iron for metal/metalloid removal from model hydraulic fracturing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), and As(V) in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0.35 to 4.10 M (Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters) increased Cu(II) removal (25.4-80.0%), inhibited Zn(II) removal (58.7-42.9%), slightly increased and then reduced Cr(VI) removal (65.7-44.1%), and almost unaffected As(V) removal (66.7-75.1%) by 8-h reaction with nZVI at 1-2 g L(-1). The removal kinetics conformed to pseudo-second-order model, and increasing I decreased the surface area-normalized rate coefficient (ksa) of Cu(II) and Cr(VI), probably because agglomeration of nZVI in saline wastewaters restricted diffusion of metal(loid)s to active surface sites. Increasing I induced severe Fe dissolution from 0.37 to 0.77% in DIW to 4.87-13.0% in Day-90 wastewater; and Fe dissolution showed a significant positive correlation with Cu(II) removal. With surface stabilization by alginate and polyvinyl alcohol, the performance of entrapped nZVI in Day-90 wastewater was improved for Zn(II) and Cr(VI), and Fe dissolution was restrained (3.20-7.36%). The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in removal trends from Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters was attributed to: (i) distinctive removal mechanisms of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) (adsorption, (co-)precipitation, and reduction), compared to Zn(II) (adsorption) and As(V) (bidentate inner-sphere complexation); and (ii) changes in solution speciation (e.g., from Zn(2+) to ZnCl3(-) and ZnCl4(2-); from CrO4(2-) to CaCrO4 complex). Bare nZVI was susceptible to variations in wastewater chemistry while entrapped nZVI was more stable and environmentally benign, which could be used to remove metals/metalloids before subsequent treatment for reuse/disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  18. The associations of heavy metals with crystalline iron oxides in the polluted soils around the mining areas in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui; Tan, Nianhao; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Juju; Liang, Xiaoliang; Qu, Mingkai; Feng, Xionghan; Qiu, Guohong; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan

    2016-10-01

    In current selective sequential extraction (SSE) methods, heavy metals associated well-crystallized iron oxyhydroxides are not well defined and considered, and usually fall into residual forms, which actually make their mobility and environmental risk underestimated. This study compared various fractions of heavy metals in samples of mining tailings and nearby soils under different land uses in Guangdong Province of China. Iron oxides in these soils were mainly Al-substituted goethites and/or hematites. Independent of the land uses, the percentages of various Cd fractions in the soils decrease in the order of well-crystallized iron oxyhydroxides-associated (27.2-91.2%) > residual (2.1-37.0%) > reducible FeMn oxides (3.2-45.7%) > exchangeable (1.0-28.2%) > organic-associated form (0-5.1%). Pb mainly existes in the residual fraction (25.9-74.5%), followed by crystalline iron oxyhydroxides-associated (0.4-69.0%) and reducible fractions (2.4-40.4%). Zn mainly exists in the residual fraction (25.4-85.9%), followed by the well-crystallized iron oxyhydroxides-associated fraction (6.4-55.0%). However, Cu mainly existes in the residual form and the fractionation of Cu varies obviously between samples. The association of these metals with crystalline iron oxyhydroxides in the soils decreases in the sequence of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu. These results suggest that in heavy-metal-polluted weathered soils in tropical and subtropical areas enriched with iron oxides, it is essential to assess potential bioavailability and toxicity of heavy metals bound to well-crystallized iron oxyhydroxides with appropriate procedures in the fractionation measurement. The modified Tessier method present here can be used to quantify the fractions of heavy metals in such areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of iron and aluminum coagulant metal residuals and lead release from drinking water pipe materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Alisha D; Nguyen, Caroline K; Edwards, Marc A; Stoddart, Amina; McIlwain, Brad; Gagnon, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    Bench-scale experiments investigated the role of iron and aluminum residuals in lead release in a low alkalinity and high (> 0.5) chloride-to-sulfate mass ratio (CSMR) in water. Lead leaching was examined for two lead-bearing plumbing materials, including harvested lead pipe and new lead: tin solder, after exposure to water with simulated aluminum sulfate, polyaluminum chloride and ferric sulfate coagulation treatments with 1-25-μM levels of iron or aluminum residuals in the water. The release of lead from systems with harvested lead pipe was highly correlated with levels of residual aluminum or iron present in samples (R(2) = 0.66-0.88), consistent with sorption of lead onto the aluminum and iron hydroxides during stagnation. The results indicate that aluminum and iron coagulant residuals, at levels complying with recommended guidelines, can sometimes play a significant role in lead mobilization from premise plumbing.

  20. Toxic metal(loid) speciation during weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robert A.; Hayes, Sarah M.; Hammond, Corin M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Toxic metalliferous mine-tailings pose a significant health risk to ecosystems and neighboring communities from wind and water dispersion of particulates containing high concentrations of toxic metal(loid)s (e.g., Pb, As, Zn). Tailings are particularly vulnerable to erosion before vegetative cover can be reestablished, i.e., decades or longer in semi-arid environments without intervention. Metal(loid) speciation, linked directly to bioaccessibility and lability, is controlled by mineral weathering and is a key consideration when assessing human and environmental health risks associated with mine sites. At the semi-arid Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter Superfund site in central Arizona, the mineral assemblage of the top 2 m of tailings has been previously characterized. A distinct redox gradient was observed in the top 0.5 m of the tailings and the mineral assemblage indicates progressive transformation of ferrous iron sulfides to ferrihydrite and gypsum, which, in turn weather to form schwertmannite and then jarosite accompanied by a progressive decrease in pH (7.3 to 2.3). Within the geochemical context of this reaction front, we examined enriched toxic metal(loid)s As, Pb, and Zn with surficial concentrations 41.1, 10.7, 39.3 mM kg-1 (3080, 2200, and 2570 mg kg-1), respectively. The highest bulk concentrations of As and Zn occur at the redox boundary representing a 1.7 and 4.2 fold enrichment relative to surficial concentrations, respectively, indicating the translocation of toxic elements from the gossan zone to either the underlying redox boundary or the surface crust. Metal speciation was also examined as a function of depth using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The deepest sample (180 cm) contains sulfides (e.g., pyrite, arsenopyrite, galena, and sphalerite). Samples from the redox transition zone (25-54 cm) contain a mixture of sulfides, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, cerrusite, and smithsonite) and metal(loid)s sorbed to neoformed secondary Fe

  1. Roles for root iron plaque in sequestration and uptake of heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Rudra D; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Aradhana; Chauhan, Puneet S; Norton, Gareth J; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2014-10-01

    Toxic metal(loid) contamination of soil and sediment poses long term risk to soil and human health through plant-human or plant-animal-human food chain pathways. Iron plaque (IP) formation is frequent in aquatic and wetland plant species and is responsible for the sequestration of various metal(loids). The presence of IP may act as a buffer or barrier and may thus enhance or reduce the uptake of potentially phytotoxic metals and metalloids by plants. If IP acts as a barrier, then low IP producing macrophytes/aquatic plants may be better accumulators of toxic metals and may find use in constructed wetlands for remediation of pollutants, while high IP forming edible plant species could be safer for human consumption. Conversely, if IP acts as a buffer for mineral nutrients and toxic elements then those cultivars may be rich in nutrients, but may also cause toxicity. However, an ecotoxicological risk is also inevitable if IP rich macrophyte roots containing heavy metals are consumed by herbivores. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of IP in metal and metalloid sequestration, uptake, and transport. Furthermore, we will address the role of root IP in Oryza sativa for arsenic (As) sequestration leading to lower grain As translocation, reducing the risk of human exposure.

  2. Rapid magnetic removal of aqueous heavy metals and their relevant mechanisms using nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pengpeng; Ye, Zhengfang; Xie, Wuming; Chen, Qi; Li, Jing; Xu, Zhencheng; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-08-01

    Much work is devoted to heavy metal sorption, reduction and relevant mechanisms by nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particle, but fewer studies utilize its magnetic properties in aqueous metal removals. Here, we have investigated the use of nZVI particles both electrosprayed (E-nZVI) and non-electrosprayed (NE-nZVI) with different concentration levels (0.186-1.86 mg/mL) in removing aqueous Cd(II), Cr(IV), and Pb(II) through the magnetic separation means. The effects of the reaction time (5-20 min) and magnetic treatment time (1-30 min) on relevant magnetic removal efficiencies were studied. Metal ion concentration was analyzed using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and the magnetically obtained metal-nZVI mixtures were further analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that the magnetic removal efficiencies of heavy metals varied with the metal species, nZVI loading, reaction and magnetic separation time. In most cases, use of 1.5 mg/mL E-nZVI or NE-nZVI resulted in removal efficiencies of more than 80% for Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cr(IV). Increasing the magnetic treatment time from 1 to 20 min was shown to lead to ≈ 20% increase in Pb(II) removal efficiency, but no improvements for Cd(II) and Cr(IV). In contrast, increasing the reaction time decreased the Pb(II) removal efficiency, yet no effects observed for Cd(II) and Cr(IV). In general, 1 min reaction and 5 min magnetic treatment were found sufficient to achieve considerable heavy metal removals. For comparable efficiencies, use of magnetic method could significantly reduce nZVI loading. XPS analysis results indicated that atomic percentages of O 1s, Fe 2p, Cd 3d, Pb 4f and Cr 2p varied with metal exposures. Different from Cd(II) and Cr(IV), aqueous iron ions might be possibly present when treating Pb(II). This study demonstrated a rapid heavy metal removal method using the magnetic property of nZVI particles, while contributing to understanding of the relevant removal mechanisms.

  3. Effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) on the fate of metals during anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Mama, Daouda; Li, Jiangwei; Dimon, Biaou; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most widely used processes to stabilize waste sewage sludge and produce biogas renewable energy. In this study, two different iron nanoparticles [nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and magnetite (Fe3O4)] were used in the mesophilic AD processes (37 ± 1 °C) to improve biogas production. In addition, changes of heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) speciation during AD of sludge with and without iron nanoparticles have been investigated. Concentrations of metals in the initial sludge were as follows: 63.1, 73.4, 1102.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis) for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively. Sequential fractionation showed that metals were predominantly bonded to organic matter and carbonates in the initial sludge. Compared with AD without iron nanoparticles, the application of iron nanoparticles (at dose of 0.5% in this study) showed positive impact not only on biogas production, but also on improvement of metals stabilization in the digestate. Metals were found concentrated in Fe-Mn bound and residual fractions and little was accumulated in the liquid digestate and most mobile fractions of solid digestate (water soluble, exchangeable and carbonates bound). Therefore, iron nanoparticles when properly used, could improve not only biogas yield, but also regulate and control the mobilization of metals during AD process. However, our study also observed that iron nanoparticles could promote the immobilization of phosphorus within the sludge during AD, and more research is needed to fully address the mechanism behind this phenomenon and the impact on future phosphorus reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Water Quality Index and Heavy Metal Contamination in Active and Abandoned Iron Ore Mining Sites in Pahang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madzin Zafira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of heavy metals in water and surface soils of iron ore mining sites were investigated to evaluate on the potential occurrence of heavy metal contamination. Physico-chemical characteristics of the waters were also investigated to determine the current status of water quality index (WQI of the sites. Samples of water and surface soils of active mine (Kuala Lipis and abandoned mine (Bukit Ibam in Pahang were collected at four locations, respectively. The physico-chemical parameters measured for WQI were pH, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, suspended solids (SS, and ammoniacal nitrogen (AN. The water quality parameters were classified according to the Department of Environment (DOE water quality classification. The study revealed that most of the sites in Bukit Ibam and Kuala Lipis were categorized as clean to slightly polluted. On the other hand, heavy metal analysis in water showed that aluminium and manganese level in both sites have exceeded the allowable limits for raw and treated water standards by the Ministry of Health. For heavy metal compositions in soils showed most of the heavy metal concentrations were below the recommended guideline values except for lead, arsenic, zinc and copper.

  5. Iron based metal organic framework as an effective lead ions remover from aqueous solution: Thermodynamic and kinetics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shooto Ntaote David

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic frameworks (MOFs based on iron as a central metal ion and 1,2,4,5-tetrabenzenecarboxylic acid as ligand was successful synthesized, characterized and studied as adsorbent for the removal of lead ions in aqueous solution. Characterization of Fe-MOF was attained by SEM, EDX, TGA and FT-IR techniques. EDX spectrum showed the presence of C, O and Fe, which may facilitate in creating charges and functionalities on the surface of the Fe-MOF for adsorption. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were also investigated. The results showed that Fe-MOF has a high Pb2+ adsorption affinity. The removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solutions varied with concentration, contact time and temperature. All adsorption studies were carried out in batch experiments.

  6. Human and animal health risk assessment of metal contamination in soil and plants from Ait Ammar abandoned iron mine, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Mohamed; Haddioui, Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate metal pollution in food chain and assess the resulting health risks to native citizens in Ait Ammar village. The results showed that cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and copper (Cu) concentrations in animal organs were above the metal concentration safety limit. Nevertheless, soils and plants from mining area were contaminated with iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), and Cr, Cu, Zn respectively. Cd concentrations in almost animal organs were higher than the acceptable daily upper limit, suggesting human consumption of this livestock meat and offal may pose a health risk. The estimated intake of Pb and Cd for Ait Ammar population could be a cause of concern because it exceeded the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) proposed by Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) in this area. Thus, conducting regular periodic studies to assess the dietary intake of mentioned elements are recommended.

  7. Ultra-metal-poor Stars: Spectroscopic Determination of Stellar Atmospheric Parameters Using Iron Non-LTE Line Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzeddine, Rana; Frebel, Anna; Plez, Bertrand

    2017-10-01

    We present new ultra-metal-poor stars parameters with [Fe/H] up-to-date iron model atom with a new recipe for non-elastic hydrogen collision rates. We study the departures from LTE in their atmospheric parameters and show that they can grow up to ∼1.00 dex in [Fe/H], ∼150 K in {T}{eff} and ∼0.5 dex in log g toward the lowest metallicities. Accurate NLTE atmospheric stellar parameters, in particular [Fe/H] being significantly higher, are the first step to eventually providing full NLTE abundance patterns that can be compared with Population III supernova nucleosynthesis yields to derive properties of the first stars. Overall, this maximizes the potential of these likely second-generation stars to investigate the early universe and how the chemical elements were formed.

  8. Postsynthesis-Treated Iron-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Selective Catalysts for the Sustainable Synthesis of Nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapeyko, Anastasia; Climent, Maria J; Corma, Avelino; Concepción, Patricia; Iborra, Sara

    2015-10-12

    The dehydration of aldoximes to the corresponding nitriles can be performed with excellent activity and selectivity by using iron trimesate as a homogeneous catalyst. Iron trimesate has been heterogenized by synthesizing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) from iron trimesate, that is, Fe(BTC), and MIL-100 (Fe). These materials were active and selective aldoxime dehydration catalysts, and postsynthesis-treated MIL-100 (Fe) produced the desired nitriles with 100 % conversion and selectivities >90 % under mild reaction conditions and in short reaction times. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of different Fe species in the catalyst, and in situ IR spectroscopy combined with catalytic results indicates that the catalytic activity is associated with Fe framework species. The postsynthesis-treated MIL-100 (Fe)-NH4 F can be recycled several times and has an excellent reaction scope, which gives better catalytic results than other solid acid or base catalysts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Recovery of Iron from Pyrite Cinder Containing Non-ferrous Metals Using High-Temperature Chloridizing-Reduction-Magnetic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Guo, Hongwei; Xu, Jifang; Lv, Yanan; Xu, Zemin; Huo, Haijiang

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new technique that uses high-temperature chloridizing -reduction-magnetic separation to recover iron from pyrite cinder containing non-ferrous metals. The effects of the reduction temperature, reduction time, and chlorinating agent dosage were investigated. The optimized process parameters were proposed as the following: CaCl2 dosage of 2 pct, chloridizing at 1398 K (1125 °C) for 10 minutes, reducing at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 80 minutes, grinding to a particle size of 78.8 pct less than 45 μm, and magnetic field intensity of 73 mT. Under the optimized conditions, the Cu, Pb, and Zn removal rates were 45.2, 99.2, and 89.1 pct, respectively. The iron content of the magnetic concentrate was 90.6 pct, and the iron recovery rate was 94.8 pct. Furthermore, the reduction behavior and separation mechanism were determined based on microstructure and phase change analyses using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and optical microscopy.

  10. Evidence-based safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic herbo-metallic preparations containing gold, iron, and mercury with special reference to pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul K Shingadiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Safety and efficacy of herbo- metallic or mineral formulations in Ayurvedic therapeutics is subject of great concern in present era. Especially in paediatrics in which, a number of herbo-metallic formulations are found in practice for prevention as well as for the treatment of paediatric disorders. Among various herbo-metallic preparations mentioned in Ayurveda, gold, iron and mercurial formulations are more popular in paediatric practices. Present study has been conducted to highlight an evidence based safety and efficacy of metallic preparations in paediatrics. Material and Method: Subject related published research articles from reputed journals were searched through four online search engines Pubmed, Google scholar and Ayush research portal and DHARA online. The data of the articles were analysed to confirm their safety and efficacy in paediatrics. Results: Total 10 clinical studies showing safety and efficacy of Ayurvedic herbo-metallic preparations in paediatric disorders were compiled, which included 3 formulations of gold, 4 of iron and 3 mercurial formulations. Children suffering from Chronic tonsillitis, Iron deficiency anaemia, Sickle cell anaemia and Bronchial asthma were treated with significant effect and positive changes in haematological parameters. No any adverse or toxic effect of any of these formulations was noticed. Conclusion: Metallic preparations of gold, iron and mercury are found quite safe to the use in pediatric disorders with proper dose and adjuvant. They are also found effective in the diseases which are chronic and diffi cult to treat such as sickle cell anemia, seizure, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. The distribution of iron between the metal-binding sites of transferrin human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Moreton, K

    1980-02-01

    The Makey & Seal [(1976) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 453, 250--256] method of polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in buffer containing 6 M-urea was used to determine the distribution of iron between the N-terminal and C-terminal iron-binding sites of transferrin in human serum. In fresh serum the two sites are unequally occupied; there is preferential occupation of the N-terminal site. On incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C the preference of iron for the N-terminal site becomes more marked. On storage of serum at -15 degrees C the iron distribution changes so that there is a marked preference for the C-terminal site. Dialysis of serum against buffer at pH 7.4 also causes iron to be bound much more strongly by the C-terminal than by the N-terminal site. The original preference for the N-terminal site can be resroted to the dialysed serum by addition of the diffusible fraction.

  12. Metallic corrosion processes reactivation sustained by iron-reducing bacteria: Implication on long-term stability of protective layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnault, L.; Jullien, M.; Mustin, C.; Bildstein, O.; Libert, M.

    In deep geological environments foreseen for the disposal of radioactive waste, metallic containers will undergo anaerobic corrosion. In this context, the formation of corrosion products such as magnetite may reduce the rate of corrosion processes through the formation of a protective layer. This study aims at determining the direct impact of iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) activity on the stability of corrosion protective layers. Batch experiments investigating iron corrosion processes including the formation of secondary magnetite and its subsequent alteration in the presence of IRB show the bacteria ability to use structural Fe(III) for respiration which leads to the sustainment of a high corrosion rate. With the bio-reduction of corrosion products such as magnetite, and H 2 as electron donor, IRB promote the reactivation of corrosion processes in corrosive environments by altering the protective layer. This phenomenon could have a major impact on the long-term stability of metallic compounds involved in multi-barrier system for high-level radioactive waste containment.

  13. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of peat and polymeric wastes in the presence of iron sub-group metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulman, E.M.; Kosivtsov, Y.Y.; Lugovoy, Y.V. [Tver Technical University, Tver (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation is the study of activity of iron sub-group metal chlorides in co-processing of peat and polymeric wastes by low-temperature catalytic pyrolysis method. Iron sub-group metal chlorides in concentration varied from 1 to 10% (wt) were used as the catalysts of pyrolysis. The process was conducted in fixed bed reactor in inert gaseous atmosphere at the temperature interval of 350-550{sup o}C. All the investigated catalysts were found to promote the increase of liquid fraction mass and the decrease of solid carbon-containing residue mass up to 10-30%. Cobalt catalyst revealed the highest selectivity with respect to liquid products formation. The use of the catalysts in low-temperature peat and polymeric wastes pyrolysis process was found to favour the increase gaseous products volume up to 20-50% as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons volume in 1.2 folds in comparison to uncatalysed process. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Study of carbon and silicon loss through oxidation in cast iron base metal using rotary furnace for melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvester Olanrewaju OMOLE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The projection of loss of carbon and silicon through oxidation is uncertain phenomenon depending on the furnace used for melting, which affect the carbon equivalent value (CEV of cast iron produced. CEV enhances the fluidity of molten metal as well as having great effects on the mechanical properties of cast products. Study on the way elemental loss takes place during melting with rotary furnace will give idea of approach to minimize the loss. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the magnitude of the elemental loss with rotary furnace and means to minimize the loss. 60kg of grey cast iron scrap was charged into rotary furnace of 100kg capacity after preheating the furnace for 40 minutes. Graphite and ferrosilicon was added to the charge in order to obtain a theoretical composition of not less than 4.0% carbon and 2.0% silicon. Charges in the furnace were heated to obtain molten metal which was tapped at 1400°C. Tapping was done for casting at three different times. The castings solidified in sand mould and allowed to cool to room temperature in the mould. Castings were denoted as sample 1, 2 and 3. Final compositions of each casting were analyzed with optical light emission spectrometer. Sample 1 has 2.95% carbon and 1.82% silicon. Sample 2 has 2.88% carbon and 1.70% silicon and sample 3 has 2.75% carbon and 1.63% silicon.

  15. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, T. J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-05-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37°C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18°C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37°C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  16. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37 C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18 C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  17. Iron isotope and trace metal records of iron cycling in the proto-North Atlantic during the Cenomanian-Turonian oceanic anoxic event (OAE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Li, Xiaona; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Gordon, Gwenyth; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Anbar, Ariel; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Severmann, Silke

    2012-09-01

    The global carbon cycle during the mid-Cretaceous (˜125-88 million years ago, Ma) experienced numerous major perturbations linked to increased organic carbon burial under widespread, possibly basin-scale oxygen deficiency and episodes of euxinia (anoxic and H2S-containing). The largest of these episodes, the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event (ca. 93.5 Ma), or oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 2, was marked by pervasive deposition of organic-rich, laminated black shales in deep waters and in some cases across continental shelves. This deposition is recorded in a pronounced positive carbon isotope excursion seen ubiquitously in carbonates and organic matter. Enrichments of redox-sensitive, often bioessential trace metals, including Fe and Mo, indicate major shifts in their biogeochemical cycles under reducing conditions that may be linked to changes in primary production. Iron enrichments and bulk Fe isotope compositions track the sources and sinks of Fe in the proto-North Atlantic at seven localities marked by diverse depositional conditions. Included are an ancestral mid-ocean ridge and euxinic, intermittently euxinic, and oxic settings across varying paleodepths throughout the basin. These data yield evidence for a reactive Fe shuttle that likely delivered Fe from the shallow shelf to the deep ocean basin, as well as (1) hydrothermal sources enhanced by accelerated seafloor spreading or emplacement of large igneous province(s) and (2) local-scale Fe remobilization within the sediment column. This study, the first to explore Fe cycling and enrichment patterns on an ocean scale using iron isotope data, demonstrates the complex processes operating on this scale that can mask simple source-sink relationships. The data imply that the proto-North Atlantic received elevated Fe inputs from several sources (e.g., hydrothermal, shuttle and detrital inputs) and that the redox state of the basin was not exclusively euxinic, suggesting previously unknown heterogeneity in

  18. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: a potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung-Gun; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung; An, Byungryul; Kim, Song-Bae; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2014-02-28

    The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1mgg(-1)) and arsenic (71.9mgg(-1)) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0mgg(-1)), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0mgg(-1)) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9mgg(-1)) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for heavy metal treatment than the powdered form. This research provides promising results for the application of MIOIBs as an adsorbent for various heavy metals from wastewater and sewage.

  19. Preparation of Metallic Iron Powder from Pyrite Cinder by Carbothermic Reduction and Magnetic Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Long

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction and magnetic separation procedure of pyrite cinder in the presence of a borax additive was performed for the preparation of reduced powder. The effects of borax dosage, reduction temperature, reduction time and grinding fineness were investigated. The results show that when pyrite cinder briquettes with 5% borax were pre-oxidized at 1050 °C for 10 min, and reduced at 1050 °C for 80 min, with the grinding fineness (<0.44 mm passing 81%, the iron recovery was 91.71% and the iron grade of the magnetic concentrate was 92.98%. In addition, the microstructures of the products were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mineralography, and the products were also studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique (XRD to investigate the mechanism; the results show that the borax additive was approved as a good additive to improve the separation of iron and gangue.

  20. Distribution of Precious Metals (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt, and Rh) Between Copper Matte and Iron Silicate Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avarmaa, Katri; Johto, Hannu; Taskinen, Pekka

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of precious metals (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt, and Rh) between copper matte and silica-saturated iron silicate slag were determined at 1523 K to 1623 K (1250 °C to 1350 °C), in controlled CO-CO2-SO2-Ar gas mixtures. The experiments were done in silica crucibles and a fixed partial pressure of sulfur dioxide for matte grades of 55, 65, and 75 wt pct Cu. High-temperature equilibration/quenching/electron probe X-ray microanalysis technique was used to obtain compositions of the equilibrated matte and slag. The technique was applied for the first time to the distributions of precious metals in simulated flash smelting conditions. The resolution of electron probe microanalysis became critical as the detection limits were insufficient to measure reliably the precious metals concentrations (except silver) in the slag. The distribution coefficient of silver, L m/s[Ag] = [wt pctAg in matte]/(wt pctAg in slag), was found to be between 200 and 300, which agrees well with the latest studies in the literature. For other precious metals, the minimum values of distribution coefficients were determined according to the detection limits in the slag. The values obtained were for gold and platinum >250, for palladium >1000, and for rhodium >900. The distribution coefficients of palladium, although locating above distribution coefficient of the detection limit, formed a clear dependency with a good repeatability as a function of the matte grade. It increased along with matte grade and was approximately 1000 at 50 pct Cu and 2000 to 3000 at 70 pct Cu. The precious metals replace metal in the matte structure and they are present as sulfides in the copper matte.

  1. A novel approach for rapidly and cost-effectively assessing toxicity of toxic metals in acidic water using an acidophilic iron-oxidizing biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Cheng, Kuo-Chih; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Contamination by heavy metals and metalloids is a serious environmental and health concern. Acidic wastewaters are often associated with toxic metals which may enter and spread into agricultural soils. Several biological assays have been developed to detect toxic metals; however, most of them can only detect toxic metals in a neutral pH, not in an acidic environment. In this study, an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium (IOB) Strain Y10 was isolated, characterized, and used to detect toxic metals toxicity in acidic water at pH 2.5. The colorimetric acidophilic IOB biosensor was based on the inhibition of the iron oxidizing ability of Strain Y10, an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium, by metals toxicity. Our results showed that Strain Y10 is acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium. Thiobacillus caldus medium (TCM) (pH 2.5) supplied with both S4O6(2-) and glucose was the optimum growth medium for Strain Y10. The optimum temperature and pH for the growth of Strain Y10 was 45 °C and pH 2.5, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the color-based acidophilic IOB biosensor can be semi-quantitatively observed by eye or quantitatively measured by spectrometer to detect toxicity from multiple toxic metals at pH 2.5 within 45 min. Our study shows that monitoring toxic metals in acidic water is possible by using the acidophilic IOB biosensor. Our study thus provides a novel approach for rapid and cost-effective detection of toxic metals in acidic conditions that can otherwise compromise current methods of chemical analysis. This method also allows for increased efficiency when screening large numbers of environmental samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High efficiency iron electrode and additives for use in rechargeable iron-based batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Aniszfeld, Robert; Manohar, Aswin; Malkhandi, Souradip; Yang, Bo

    2017-02-21

    An iron electrode and a method of manufacturing an iron electrode for use in an iron-based rechargeable battery are disclosed. In one embodiment, the iron electrode includes carbonyl iron powder and one of a metal sulfide additive or metal oxide additive selected from the group of metals consisting of bismuth, lead, mercury, indium, gallium, and tin for suppressing hydrogen evolution at the iron electrode during charging of the iron-based rechargeable battery. An iron-air rechargeable battery including an iron electrode comprising carbonyl iron is also disclosed, as is an iron-air battery wherein at least one of the iron electrode and the electrolyte includes an organosulfur additive.

  3. REMOVAL OF TNT AND RDX FROM WATER AND SOIL USING IRON METAL. (R825549C043)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated water and soil at active or abandoned munitions plants is a serious problem since these compounds pose risks to human health and can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial life. Our objective was to determine if zero-valent iron (Fe0) could be used to p...

  4. Metal capital sustaining a North American city. Iron and copper in New Haven, CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drakonakis, Konstantine; Rostkowski, Katherine; Rauch, Jason; Graedel, T.E. [Center for Industrial Ecology, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 205 Prospect St., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gordon, R.B. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2007-02-15

    A detailed inventory shows that an average resident of the City of New Haven depends on a per capita capital stock of 9200 kg/c of iron and 144 kg/c of copper in the city infrastructure, buildings, transportation systems, and equipment. Of the iron stock 28% is in items such as rail cars and ships in ocean trade not permanently within the city, and 22% is devoted to receiving and delivering oil fuel to the city and its surrounding communities. Copper is principally used in the distribution of electric power and in water piping within buildings. The city's 9200 kg/c of iron stock-in-use is less than the 13,000 kg/c national average due to New Haven's lack of heavy industry and relatively small number of large buildings. The 144 kg/c of copper stock-in-use is only 58% of the overall value for the United States, but is comparable to that in cities such as Stockholm, Sweden. Attainment of a level of iron and copper services with contemporary technology in less developed countries to the level enjoyed in New Haven would require consumption of the presently identified world copper resources. (author)

  5. Cooling History of Almahata Sitta Ureilite as Inferred from Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Aoyagi, Y.; Goodrich, C. A.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goldstein, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of various ureilite lithologies with lesser chondritic lithologies [1]. In the ureilite lithologies, Fe metal is a common accessory phase present either as large grain boundary grains or small particles formed by reduction of olivine and pyroxene. In our earlier studies on grain boundary metals in one of AS fragments (#44) we found unique features never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In order to further characterize these metal grains, we performed a detailed TEM study on a FIB section prepared from one of AS #44 grain boundary metals and here discuss its thermal history.

  6. Investigation of iron(III) reduction and trace metal interferences in the determination of dissolved iron in seawater using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ussher, Simon J. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Milne, Angela [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Landing, William M. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Attiq-ur-Rehman, Kakar [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Seguret, Marie J.M.; Holland, Toby [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Achterberg, Eric P. [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Nabi, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Worsfold, Paul J., E-mail: pworsfold@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-12

    A detailed investigation into the performance of two flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) manifolds (with and without a preconcentration column) for the determination of sub-nanomolar dissolved iron (Fe(II) + Fe(III)), following the reduction of Fe(III) by sulphite, in seawater is described. Kinetic experiments were conducted to examine the efficiency of reduction of inorganic Fe(III) with sulphite under different conditions and a rigorous study of the potential interference caused by other transition metals present in seawater was conducted. Using 100 {mu}M concentrations of sulphite a reduction time of 4 h was sufficient to quantitatively reduce Fe(III) in seawater. Under optimal conditions, cobalt(II) and vanadium(IV)/(III) were the major positive interferences and strategies for their removal are reported. Specifically, cobalt(II) was masked by the addition of dimethylglyoxime to the luminol solution and vanadium(IV) was removed by passing the sample through an 8-hydroxyquinoline column in a low pH carrier stream. Manganese(II) also interfered by suppression of the CL response but this was not significant at typical open ocean concentrations.

  7. Expansion of metal-redox nanosynthesis: the case study of iron gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeminde, Alec; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-05-21

    Metal nanoalloys have rapidly grown in importance due to their higher surface area and unique nanosized properties. The metal-redox methodology is used and expanded upon utilizing FeGa as a model system. It is shown to control the stoichiometry and size of magnetic FeGa nanoalloy composites for the first time.

  8. Effects of metal compounds with distinct physicochemical properties on iron homeostasis and antibacterial activity in the lungs: chromium and vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Sisco, Maureen; Prophete, Colette; Yoshida, Kotaro; Chen, Lung-chi; Zelikoff, Judith T; Smee, Jason; Holder, Alvin A; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline; Crans, Debbie C; Ghio, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    In situ reactions of metal ions or their compounds are important mechanisms by which particles alter lung immune responses. The authors hypothesized that major determinants of the immunomodulatory effect of any metal include its redox behavior/properties, oxidation state, and/or solubility, and that the toxicities arising from differences in physicochemical parameters are manifest, in part, via differential shifts in lung iron (Fe) homeostasis. To test the hypotheses, immunomodulatory potentials for both pentavalent vanadium (VV; as soluble metavanadate or insoluble vanadium pentoxide) and hexavalent chromium (CrVI; as soluble sodium chromate or insoluble calcium chromate) were quantified in rats after inhalation (5h/day for 5 days) of each at 100 microg metal/m3. Differences in effects on local bacterial resistance between the two VV, and between each CrVI, agents suggested that solubility might be a determinant of in situ immunotoxicity. For the soluble forms, VV had a greater impact on resistance than CrVI, indicating that redox behavior/properties was likely also a determinant. The soluble VV agent was the strongest immunomodulant. Regarding Fe homeostasis, both VV agents had dramatic effects on airway Fe levels. Both also impacted local immune/airway epithelial cell Fe levels in that there were significant increases in production of select cytokines/chemokines whose genes are subject to regulation by HIF-1 (whose intracellular longevity is related to cell Fe status). Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the role that metal compound properties play in respiratory disease pathogenesis and provide a rationale for differing pulmonary immunotoxicities of commonly encountered ambient metal pollutants.

  9. Modified composites based on mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and synthetic minerals: A potential material for the treatment of various toxic heavy metals and its toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung-Gun [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Chun; Song, Mi-Kyung [Center for Integrated Risk Research, Cellular and Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); An, Byungryul [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song-Bae [Environmental Functional Materials and Biocolloids Laboratory, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hyup [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Convergence Green Technology and Policy, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae-Woo, E-mail: plead36@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Meso-iron-oxyhydroxide was found to be efficient for anion heavy metal adsorption. • The composite bead can simultaneously remove the cations and anions of heavy metals. • Powdered form had stronger cytotoxicity than did the granular form. • Adsorbent recovery is facilitated by granulation process of powder-type. - Abstract: The composites of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide and/or commercial synthetic zeolite were investigated for use in the removal of toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium, copper, lead and arsenic, from aqueous solution. Four types of adsorbents, dried alginate beads (DABs), synthetic-zeolite impregnated beads (SZIBs), meso-iron-oxyhydroxide impregnated beads (MIOIBs) and synthetic-zeolite/meso-iron-oxyhydroxide composite beads (SZMIOIBs), were prepared for heavy metal adsorption tests. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of cations and anions of heavy metals and the possibility of regenerating the adsorbents. Among these adsorbents, the MIOIBs can simultaneously remove cations and anions of heavy metals; they have high adsorption capacities for lead (60.1 mg g{sup −1}) and arsenic (71.9 mg g{sup −1}) compared with other adsorbents, such as DABs (158.1 and 0.0 mg g{sup −1}), SZIB (42.9 and 0.0 mg g{sup −1}) and SZMIOIB (54.0 and 5.9 mg g{sup −1}) for lead and arsenic, respectively. Additionally, the removal efficiency was consistent at approximately 90%, notwithstanding repetitive regeneration. The characteristics of meso-iron-oxyhydroxide powder were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller and transmission electron microscopy. We also performed a comparative toxicity study that indicated that much lower concentrations of the powdered form of mesostructured iron oxyhydroxide had stronger cytotoxicity than the granular form. These results suggest that the granular form of meso iron oxyhydroxide is a more useful and safer adsorbent for

  10. Investigation of the wear of hard-metal drilling tools when drilling cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    Escursell Mor, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Spheroidal cast iron still has a lot of applications; especially in the automotive industry. In this Master Thesis the wear of the drilling tools and its effect on the quality of the drilled holes is being studied. An experimental investigation of different types of tool coatings and geometry will be done to understand the diverse factors that affect the creation of wear. Also the forces involved in the process of drilling will be experimentally calculated. Studying the results, recommenda...

  11. Analysis of thermal expansivity of iron (Fe) metal at ultra high temperature and pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepika Kandpal; B R K Gupta

    2007-01-01

    In the present investigation we have explained the thermal and compression properties of HCP iron (Fe) at high pressure with variable temperature (isobars) and at high temperature with variable pressure (isotherm). The usual Tait equation of state is modified by incorporating the effect of thermal pressure. The calculated values of pressure for different isotherms and isochors and thermal expansivity () as a function of both temperature and pressure have been compared with those values obtained by Isaak et al and Wasserman et al.

  12. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER.

  13. Determination of aluminium in molybdenum and tungsten metals, iron, steel and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys with pyrocatechol violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, E M

    1971-09-01

    A method for determining 0.001-0.10% of aluminium in molybdenum and tungsten metals is described. After sample dissolution, aluminium is separated from the matrix materials by chloroform extraction of its acetylacetone complex, at pH 6.5, from an ammonium acetate-hydrogen peroxide medium, then back-extracted into 12M hydrochloric add. Following separation of most co-extracted elements, except for beryllium and small amounts of chroinium(III) and copper(II), by a combined ammonium pyrrolidincdithiocarbamate-cupfen-on-chlorofonn extraction, aluminium is determined spectrophotometrically with Pyrocatechol Violet at 578 nm. Chromium interferes during colour development but beryllium, in amounts equivalent to the aluminium concentration, does not cause significant error in the results. Interference from copper(II) is eliminated by reduction with ascorbic acid. The proposed method is also applicable to iron, steel, ferrovanadium, and copper-base alloys after preliminary removal of the matrix elements by a mercury cathode separation.

  14. Chemical stabilization of metals in mine wastes by transformed red mud and other iron compounds: laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardau, C; Lattanzi, P; Peretti, R; Zucca, A

    2014-01-01

    A series of static and kinetic laboratory-scale tests were designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of transformed red mud (TRM) from bauxite refining residues, commercial zero-valent iron, and synthetic iron (III) hydroxides as sorbents/reagents to minimize the generation of acid drainage and the release of toxic elements from multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes. In particular, in some column experiments the percolation of meteoric water through a waste pile, alternated with periods of dryness, was simulated. Wastes were placed in columns together with sorbents/reagents in three different set-ups: as blended amendment (mixing method), as a bed at the bottom of the column (filtration method), or as a combination of the two previous methods. The filtration methods, which simulate the creation of a permeable reactive barrier downstream of a waste pile, are the most effective, while the use of sorbents/reagents as amendments leads to unsatisfactory results, because of the selective removal of only some contaminants. The efficacy of the filtration method is not significantly affected by the periods of dryness, except for a temporary rise of metal contents in the leachates due to dissolution of soluble salts formed upon evaporation in the dry periods. These results offer original information on advantages/limits in the use of TRM for the treatment of multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes, and represent the starting point for experimentation at larger scale.

  15. Characterising the reactivity of metallic iron in Fe0/As-rock/H O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-03

    Jun 3, 2011 ... arsenic, azo dyes, bacteria, halogenated organic compounds, heavy metals, nitrates ..... ers during clean-up of copper containing solutions. Miner. Eng. 20 .... ment and interpretation of hydrogen evolution rates. Environ. Sci.

  16. Trace Element Composition of Metal and Sulphides in Iron Meteorites Determined Using ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giscard, M. D.; Hammond, S. J.; Bland, P. A.; Benedix, G. K.; Rogers, N. W.; Russell, S. S.; Genge, M. J.; Rehkamper, M.

    2012-09-01

    We measured trace element concentrations in Nantan, Toluca, Cape York, Carthage, Gibeon and Dronino. Poikiloblastic daubreelite in Gibeon indicates shock metamorphism. There is a volatile depletion in metal and sulphides.

  17. Ion microprobe analyses of carbon in Fe-Ni metal in iron meteorites and mesosiderites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Huss, Gary R.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon concentrations in kamacite, taenite, and plessite (kamacite-taenite intergrowths) were measured in 18 iron meteorites and 2 mesosiderites using the Cameca ims 1280 ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i with a 5-7 μm beam and a detection limit of groups. Carbon concentrations range from ∼100 to ∼1000 ppm in taenite and plessite in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIIAB, which contain graphite and/or carbides, but only 2-6 ppm in groups IVA, IVB and the ungrouped iron, Tishomingo, which lack graphite and carbides. Carbon contents in kamacite range from ∼2 to ∼10 ppm in most studied meteorites, including IIAB, but higher abundances were found in kamacite from IAB Pitts subgroup meteorites Pitts and Woodbine (12-15 ppm). Our carbon abundances for kamacite are lower than most published ion probe data, indicating that earlier carbon measurements had contamination problems. Grains of taenite and fine-grained plessite in carbon-rich meteorites, which all have normal M-shaped nickel profiles due to slow cooling, have diverse carbon contents and zoning profiles. This is because taenite decomposed by diverse mechanisms over a range of temperatures, when nickel could only diffuse over sub-μm distances. Carbon diffusion through taenite to growing carbides was rapid at the upper end of this temperature range, but was very limited at the lower end of the temperature range. In mesosiderites, carbon increases from 12 ppm in tetrataenite to 40-115 ppm in cloudy taenite as nickel decreases from 50% to 35%. Low carbon levels in tetrataenite may reflect ordering of iron and nickel; higher carbon in cloudy taenite is attributed to metastable bcc phase, possibly martensite, with ∼300 ppm carbon intergrown with tetrataenite. Pearlitic plessite, which only forms in carbon-rich irons, contains much less carbon than martensitic plessite: 10-20 ppm and 300-500, respectively, in IAB irons. Pearlitic plessite consists of μm-scale intergrowths of low-nickel kamacite and

  18. Preparation of Nano-Sized γ-Al2O3 Supported Iron Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis by Solvated Metal Atom Impregnation Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two types of small iron clusters supported on γ-Al2O3-RT(dehydroxylated at room temperature) and γ-Al2O3-800 (dehydroxylated at 800 ℃) were prepared by solvated metal atom impregnation (SMAI) techniques. The iron atom precursor complex, bis(toluene)iron(0) formed in the metal atom reactor, was impregnated into γ-Al2O3 having different concentrations of surface hydroxyl groups to study the effect of surface hydroxylation on the crucial stage of iron cluster formation. Catalysts prepared in this way were characterized by TEM, M(o)ssbauer, and chemisorption measurements, and the results show that higher concentration of surface hydroxyl groups of γ-Al2O3-RT favors the formation of more positively charged supported iron cluster Fen/γ-Al2O3-RT, and the lower concentration of surface hydroxyl groups of γ-Al2O3-800 favors the formation of basically neutral supported iron cluster Fen/γ-Al2O3-800. The measured results also indicate that the higher concentration of surface hydroxyl groups causes the rapid decomposition of precursor complex, bis(toluene)iron(0), and favors the formation of relatively large iron cluster. Consequently, these two types of catalysts show different catalytic properties in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The catalytic pattern of Fen/γ-Al2O3-RT in F-T reaction is similar to that of the unreduced α-Fe2O3 and that of Fen/γ-Al2O3-800 is similar to that of the reduced α-Fe2O3.

  19. Humic acid and metal ions accelerating the dechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl by nanoscale zero-valent iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Dongmei Zhou; Yujun Wang; Xiangdong Zhu; Shengyang Jin

    2011-01-01

    Transformation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by zero-valent iron represents one of the latest innovative technologies for environmental remediation.The dechlorination of 4-chlorobiphenyl (4-C1BP) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) in the presence of humic acid or metal ions was investigated.The results showed that the de chlorination of 4-CIBP by NZVI increased with decreased solution pH.When the initial pH value was 4.0,5.5,6.8,and 9.0,the de chlorination efliciencies of 4-C1BP after 48 hr were 53.8%,47.8%,35.7%,and 35.6%,respectively.The presence of humic acid inhibited the reduction of 4-ClBP in the first 4 hr,and then significantly accelerated the dechlorination by reaching 86.3% in 48 hr.Divalent metal ions,Co2+,Cu2+,and Ni2+,were reduced and formed bimetals with NZVI,thereby enhanced the dechlorination of 4-CIBP.The dechlorination percentages of 4-CIBP in the presence of 0.1 mmol/L Co2+,Cu2+ and Ni2+ were 66.1%,66.0% and 64.6% in 48 hr,and then increased to 67.9%,71.3% and 73.5%,after 96 hr respectively.The dechlorination kinetics of 4-CIBP by the NZVI in all cases followed pseudo-first order model.The results provide a basis for better understanding of the dechlorination mechanisms of PCBs in real environment.

  20. Stabilising metal(loid)s in soil with iron and aluminium-based products: microbial, biochemical and plant growth impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garau, Giovanni; Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola; Mele, Elena; Deiana, Pietrino; Deiana, Salvatore

    2014-06-15

    Four iron and aluminium-based products, including red mud (RM), hematite (Fe2O3), an iron-rich water treatment residual (Fe-WTR) and amorphous Al hydroxide (Al-OH), were evaluated for their effectiveness at stabilising As and heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) in a circumneutral contaminated soil [As (2105 mg kg(-1)), Cd (18 mg kg(-1)), Cu (264 mg kg(-1)), Pb (710 mg kg(-1)), Zn (522 mg kg(-1))]. Treatment impacts on soil microbial and biochemical features (i.e. microbial biomass-C, microbial counts, 16S rRNA PCR-TTGE of culturable bacteria, dehydrogenase, urease and β-glucosidase activity, Biolog derived parameters-AWCD and richness) as well as bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth were also assessed. After 6 months equilibration, all the amendments (application rate 3% w/w) but RM reduced labile As while only Al-OH reduced the concentration of water-soluble heavy metals. Despite the highest bioavailability of contaminants, most of the soil microbial and biochemical features monitored (i.e. microbial biomass-C, total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity and AWCD) were significantly higher in the RM-soil. Bean germination was completely inhibited in RM-soil while wheat growth was similar to that of the control. The Al-OH treatment was best overall, promoting microbial abundance, diversity and activity while increasing bean and wheat growth and reducing As accumulated in plant shoots. Results suggest that Al-OH is a suitable candidate for field evaluations while the use of RM in the remediation of circumneutral or subalkaline contaminated soils should be reconsidered.

  1. Toxic metal immobilization in contaminated sediment using bentonite- and kaolinite-supported nano zero-valent iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašević, D. D.; Kozma, G.; Kerkez, Dj. V.; Dalmacija, B. D.; Dalmacija, M. B.; Bečelić-Tomin, M. R.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.; Rončević, S.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using supported nanoscale zero-valent iron with bentonite and kaolinite for immobilization of As, Pb and Zn in contaminated sediment from the Nadela river basin (Serbia). Assessment of the sediment quality based on the pseudo-total metal content (As, Pb and Zn) according to the corresponding Serbian standards shows its severe contamination, such that it requires disposal in special reservoirs and, if possible, remediation. A microwave-assisted sequential extraction procedure was employed to assess potential metal mobility and risk to the aquatic environment. According to these results, As showed lower risk to the environment than Pb and Zn, which both represent higher risk to the environment. The contaminated sediment, irrespective of the different speciation of the treated metals, was subjected to the same treatment. Semi-dynamic leaching test, based on leachability index and effective diffusion coefficients, was conducted for As-, Pb- and Zn-contaminated sediments in order to assess the long-term leaching behaviour. In order to simulate "worst case" leaching conditions, the test was modified using acetic and humic acid solution as leachants instead of deionized water. A diffusion-based model was used to elucidate the controlling leaching mechanisms; in the majority of samples, the controlling leaching mechanism appeared to be diffusion. Three different single-step leaching tests were applied to evaluate the extraction potential of examined metals. Generally, the test results indicated that the treated sediment is safe for disposal and could even be considered for "controlled utilization".

  2. Study of the structural and magnetic properties of metallic iron-hematite particles for use in magnetorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio Ospina, Diana Marcela; Castro Navas, Irvin Jadway [Universidad del Valle, Escuela de Ingenieria de Materiales (Colombia); Perez Alcazar, German Antonio; Tabares, Jesus Anselmo, E-mail: jesus_tabares_8@hotmail.com [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are new iron-based materials, whose applications include brakes, dampers, clutches, shock absorbers systems and polishing of optical surfaces (lens and mirrors). They are dependent on the size and shape of particles as the magnetic properties. Interested in the possibility of using iron-rich powders, commonly used in nondestructive testing, ranging in size from a few {mu}m to about 200 {mu}m and lower cost than those commercially used for MR fluids, a study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron-rich metallic particles by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) at room temperature has been done. Powders, as received, were separated into particle sizes smaller than 20 {mu}m (sample A) and in the range of 20-38 {mu}m (sample B) because these are the sizes generally required for applications in MR fluids. The particles whose sizes exceed the above values were ground in a high energy planetary mill for 3 h, using different values of rotational speed/time: 200 rpm for one hour, a pause of 10 s, 140 rpm for one hour, pause 10 s and then 175 rpm during the last hour. These powders were sieved to obtain particles smaller than 20 {mu}m (sample C). According XRD results, in all samples, only {alpha}-Fe (lattice parameter a = 2,867(2) Angstrom-Sign ) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (lattice parameter a 5,037(1) Angstrom-Sign and c = 13,755(8) Angstrom-Sign ) were present. The Moessbauer spectra were fitted with two sextets. The hyperfine parameters values allowed us to assign the highest relative area spectrum (sextet) corresponding to {alpha}-Fe and the second one to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in accord to the XRD results. Thus, the preparation method using mechanical milling for diminishing the size of the metallic particles allowed us to get particles with size and magnetic properties that could lead to potentially MR fluids applications.

  3. Iron Oxide Doped Alumina-Zirconia Nanoparticle Synthesis by Liquid Flame Spray from Metal Organic Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Juha-Pekka Nikkanen; Helmi Keskinen; Mikko Aromaa; Mikael Järn; Tomi Kanerva; Erkki Levänen; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Tapio Mäntylä

    2008-01-01

    The liquid flame spray (LFS) method was used to make iron oxide doped alumina-zirconia nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were generated using a turbulent, high-temperature (Tmax⁡∼3000 K) H2-O2 flame. The precursors were aluminium-isopropoxide, zirconium-n-propoxide, and ferrocene in xylene solution. The solution was atomized into micron-sized droplets by high velocity H2 flow and introduced into the flame where nanoparticles were formed. The particle morphology, size, phase, and chemical compositi...

  4. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  5. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III) phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Renald

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine)(μ4-phosphato)iron(III)], [Fe(PO4)(N2H4)] n , was prepared under hydro-thermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one Fe(III) atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The Fe(III) atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetra-hedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octa-hedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetra-hedron bridges four Fe(III) atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two Fe(III) atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4)(N2H4)] and [Mn(SO4)(N2H4)].

  6. On Corrosion of Ferrous Metals in Typical Indian Soils Part I : Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrodibility of cast iron in ten typical Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure and the physico-chemical properties of the soils responsible for their corrosivity have been determined. The results have been statistically analysed, interpreted and correlated with various factors. Corrosion of cast iron in non acidic soils (p/supH4-10 proceeds through electro-chemical mechanism. Usually the rate of corrosion is maximum at the beginning and with development of the film of corrosion products, the rate gradually decrease with time until it becomes more or less constant, 'Even' general corrosion is observed on most of the cases. The maximum penetration is directly proportional corrodibility. The corrosivity of soils in situ is directly poroportional to the moisture equivalent or, in turn, to the clay content. The corrosivity of soils increases with the concentration at soluble electrolytes. Ferric oxide present in a laterite soil functions as a cathodic depolariser and hence increases its corrosivity. In an acidic soil, the corrosion mainly proceeds through the mechanism of direct chemical reaction.

  7. Penile strangulation by iron metal ring: A novel and effective method of management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonam, Somorendro; Kshetrimayum, Nillachandra; Rana, Indrajit

    2017-01-01

    Penile strangulation by metal ring is a rare urological emergency situation which requires urgent decompression of the penis to avoid adverse effect. It is usually associated with an attempt to improve sexual act and/or to prolong erection. But sometimes, cutting of the ring to decompress the penis safely is a very difficult task particularly when the strangulating object is a hard metal object as in our case. Here, we present a case which was managed by cutting in a novel way with the help of dental micromotor with wheel shape bur. PMID:28216935

  8. Magnetic coupling in 3d transition-metal monolayers and bilayers on bcc (100) iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirbt, S.; Eriksson, O.; Johansson, B.;

    1995-01-01

    We have calculated the magnetization profile in the (100) surface of bcc Fe covered by a monolayer or a bilayer of 3d transition metals. The calculated trends are explained in terms of the hybridization between the 3d states of the overlayer and the Fe substrate.......We have calculated the magnetization profile in the (100) surface of bcc Fe covered by a monolayer or a bilayer of 3d transition metals. The calculated trends are explained in terms of the hybridization between the 3d states of the overlayer and the Fe substrate....

  9. Optimizing Open Iron Sites in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Ethane Oxidation: A First-Principles Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peilin; Getman, Rachel B; Snurr, Randall Q

    2017-04-10

    Activation of the C-H bonds in ethane to form ethanol is a highly desirable, yet challenging, reaction. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with open Fe sites are promising candidates for catalyzing this reaction. One advantage of MOFs is their modular construction from inorganic nodes and organic linkers, allowing for flexible design and detailed control of properties. In this work, we studied a series of single-metal atom Fe model systems with ligands that are commonly used as MOF linkers and tried to understand how one can design an optimal Fe catalyst. We found linear relationships between the binding enthalpy of oxygen to the Fe sites and common descriptors for catalytic reactions, such as the Fe 3d energy levels in different reaction intermediates. We further analyzed the three highest-barrier steps in the ethane oxidation cycle (including desorption of the product) with the Fe 3d energy levels. Volcano relationships are revealed with peaks toward higher Fe 3d energy and stronger electron-donating group functionalization of linkers. Furthermore, we found that the Fe 3d energy levels positively correlate with the electron-donating strength of functional groups on the linkers. Finally, we validated our hypotheses on larger models of MOF-74 iron sites. Compared with MOF-74, functionalizing the MOF-74 linkers with NH2 groups lowers the enthalpic barrier for the most endothermic step in the reaction cycle. Our findings provide insight for catalyst optimization and point out directions for future experimental efforts.

  10. Mechanisms of iron photoreduction in a metal-rich, acidic stream (St. Kevin Gulch, Colorado, U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wetherbee, G.A.; Harnish, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Iron photoreduction in metal-rich, acidic streams affected by mine drainage accounts for some of the variability in metal chemistry of such streams, producing diel variations in Fe(II). Differentiation of the mechanisms of the Fe photoreduction reaction by a series of in-stream experiments at St. Kevin Gulch, Colorado, indicates that a homogeneous, solution-phase reaction can occur in the absence of suspended particulate Fe and bacteria, and the rate of reaction is increased by the presence of Fe colloids in the stream water. In-stream Fe photoreduction is limited during the diel cycle by the available Fe(III) in the water column and streambed. The quantum yield of Fe(II) was reproducible in diel measurements: the quantum yield, in mol E-1 (from 300 to 400 nm) was 1.4 ?? 10-3 in 1986, 0.8 ?? 10-3 in 1988 and 1.2 ?? 10-3 in 1989, at the same location and under similar streamflow and stream-chemistry conditions. In a photolysis control experiment, there was no detectable production of Fe(II) above background concentrations in stream-water samples that were experimentally excluded from sunlight. ?? 1992.

  11. Pressure-Induced Metallization in Iron-Based Ladder Compounds Ba1-xCsxFe2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawai, Takafumi; Kawashima, Chizuru; Ohgushi, Kenya; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Nambu, Yusuke; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Sato, Taku J.; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2017-02-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on the iron-based ladder compounds Ba1-xCsxFe2Se3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.65, and 1) under high pressure. A cubic anvil press was used up to 8.0 GPa, whereas further higher pressure was applied using a diamond anvil cell up to 30.0 GPa. Metallic behavior of the electrical conductivity was confirmed in the x = 0.25 and 0.65 samples for pressures greater than 11.3 and 14.4 GPa, respectively, with the low-temperature log T upturn being consistent with weak localization of 2D electrons due to random potential. At pressures higher than 23.8 GPa, three-dimensional Fermi-liquid-like behavior was observed in the latter sample. No metallic conductivity was observed in the parent compounds BaFe2Se3 (x = 0) up to 30.0 GPa and CsFe2Se3 (x = 1) up to 17.0 GPa. The present results indicate that the origins of the insulating ground states in the parent and intermediate compounds are intrinsically different; the former is a Mott insulator, whereas the latter is an Anderson insulator owing to the random substitution of Cs for Ba.

  12. Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300 °C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M = Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200 °C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18 nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

  13. Bioleaching of metal from municipal waste incineration fly ash using a mixed culture of sulfur-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tomonori; Nakanishi, Akane; Tateda, Masafumi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the behavior and characteristics of metal leaching from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash among pure cultures of a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) and an iron-oxidizing bacterium (IOB) and a mixed culture. The IOB has a high metal-leaching ability, though its tolerability against the ash addition is low. The SOB might better tolerate an increase in ash addition than the IOB, though metal leaching ability of the SOB is limited. Mixed culture could compensate for these deficiencies, and high metal leachability was exhibited in the 1% ash culture, i.e., 67% and 78% of leachabilities for Cu and Zn, respectively, and 100% for Cr and Cd. Furthermore, comparably high leachabilities such as 42% and 78% for Cu and Zn were observed even in the 3% ash cultures. Characterization of metal leaching by the mixed culture revealed that the acidic and oxidizing condition had remained stable thorough the experimental period. Ferric iron remained in the mixed culture, and the metal leaching was enhanced by redox mechanisms coupling with the leaching by sulfate. An increase of ferrous iron enhanced the Cr, Cu, and As leaching. The optimum concentration of sulfur existed for As and Cr (5 gl(-1)) and Cu (2 gl(-1)). The presence of the degradable and non-degradable organic compound that must be existed in the natural environment or waste landfills made no significant change in the leachability of metals other than Zn. These results suggested that bioleaching using a mixed culture of SOB and IOB is a promising technology for recovering the valuable metals from MSWI fly ash.

  14. Numerical simulation of iron/TiC ceramic tappet brazed with TiZrNiCu filler metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽霞; 冯吉才; 李卓然

    2003-01-01

    Maximum value of thermal stress and stress concentration zones of iron/TiC ceramic tappet during cooling were studied.The results show that when the temperature is 300 K,the maximum values of shear stress and tensile stress on iron/TiC ceramic interface both appear on the tip of TiZrNiCu/iron interface,so cracks always originate from TiZrNiCu/iron interface.Positive tensile stress on iron undersurface relaxes to the inner of iron and negative tensile stress on iron undersurface concentrates on the side of iron as the temperature declines,which leads to the origination of cracks on iron undersurface because of the alternation between positive and negative tensile stress.

  15. Iron-Clad Fibers: A Metal-Based Biological Strategy for Hard Flexible Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Matthew J.; Masic, Admir; Holten-Andersen, Niels; Waite, J. Herbert; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The extensible byssal threads of marine mussels are shielded from abrasion in wave-swept habitats by an outer cuticle that is largely proteinaceous and approximately fivefold harder than the thread core. Threads from several species exhibit granular cuticles containing a protein that is rich in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) as well as inorganic ions, notably Fe3+. Granular cuticles exhibit a remarkable combination of high hardness and high extensibility. We explored byssus cuticle chemistry by means of in situ resonance Raman spectroscopy and demonstrated that the cuticle is a polymeric scaffold stabilized by catecholato-iron chelate complexes having an unusual clustered distribution. Consistent with byssal cuticle chemistry and mechanics, we present a model in which dense cross-linking in the granules provides hardness, whereas the less cross-linked matrix provides extensibility.

  16. Diel cycle of iron, aluminum and other heavy metals in a volcano watershed in northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that heavy metals in surface water show diel (24-hr) changes in concentrations due to diel biogeochemical cycle. Accordingly, it is important to have a better sampling policy for monitoring the environmental impact of heavy metals of surface water, especially volcanic and mining areas. This study investigated Tatun Volcano watershed in northern Taiwan with a 24-h sampling operation to explore the diel cycle of arsenic concentrations and discuss on the corresponding biogeochemical processes. According to the previous studies, solar energy is the main factor of diel cycles, which could have strong effects on temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and many other water qualities. These changes produce a series of chain reactions and finally result in the change of heavy metal concentrations. In general, diel cycle of dissolved oxygen is dominated by metabolism of aquatic plants and sunlight photoreduction in acidic stream water; therefore, the Fe and Al contents would be accordingly changed. In addition, the concentrations of heavy metals will be simultaneously modified due to the high adsorption capacity of Fe and Al hydroxides. In this study, the results of hydro chemical analysis show that creek water is characterized by higher temperature, low pH value (3.0-4.5) and high SO4content(60-400 ppm) due to the mixing of hot spring. That the pH dramatically drops in the noon demonstrates that pH is highly dependent on photoreduction. This can be confirmed by the opposite trend of Fe concentration. The high Fe content in the noon also demonstrates that the precipitation of Fe hydroxides is not dominant in the day time and Fe is mainly in dissolved and/or colloid forms. Under the situation, heavy metals are supposed to have a similar trend with Fe. However, arsenic, aluminum and rare earth elements show a quite different diel cycle from Fe and other heavy metals. It concludes that arsenic and rare earth elements may be adsorbed by Al hydroxides instead of Fe

  17. Inert anode containing oxides of nickel, iron and zinc useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA)

    2002-01-01

    An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO: 0.2 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.8 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.3 ZnO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

  18. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated.

  19. The role of iron compounds and hydrogen peroxideon the oxidation of metallic mercury

    OpenAIRE

    "愛甲, 博美"

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury with ferric and ferrous ions was studied. The results were; (1) Mercury uptake of free ferric ion increased with hydrogen peroxide, the maximum uptake was 1.0 mM. However, ferric ion was not taken up without hydrogen peroxide. (2) In the presence of ferric and ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide, mercury uptake was maximum when the mole ratio (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) was 0.1.

  20. Metal complex with terpyrindine derivative ligand as highly selective colorimetric sensor for iron(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Taka-aki Okamura; Hong-Ping Zhou; Wei-Yin Sun; Yu-Peng Tian

    2013-01-01

    A new metal complex [MnL2](NO3)2.CH3CN (1) was synthesized by reaction of 4'-4-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-phenyl-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine (L) with manganese nitrate.The structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography.The results of UV-vis studies showed that the complex exhibits colorimetric sensing ability for Fe3+,which can be observed by naked eye.

  1. Beryllium, Oxygen and Iron Abundances in Extremely Metal-Deficient Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of beryllium in the oldest, most metal-poor stars acts as a probe of early star formation and Galactic chemical evolution. We have analyzed high-resolution, high signal-to-noise Keck/HIRES spectra of 24 stars with [Fe/H] from -2.3 to -3.5 in order to determine the history of Be abundances and explore the possibility of a Be plateau. We have determined stellar parameters spectroscopically. Oxygen abundances have been derived from three OH features which occur in the same spectral region. We have supplemented this sample with reanalyzed spectra of 25 stars from previous observations; our total sample ranges in [Fe/H] from -0.5 to -3.5. We find that the relationship between Be and [Fe/H] continues to lower metallicities with a slope of 0.92 +-0.04. Although there is no indication of a plateau with constant Be abundance, the four lowest metallicity stars do show a Be enhancement relative to Fe. A single relationship between Be and [O/H] has a slope of 1.21 +-0.08, but there is also a good fit with t...

  2. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  3. The Effect of Iron Content on Glass Forming Ability and Thermal Stability of Co–Fe–Ni–Ta–Nb–B–Si Bulk Metallic Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Hitit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, change in glass forming ability (GFA and thermal stability of Co–Fe-based bulk metallic glasses were investigated as a function of iron content. Cylindrical samples of alloys with diameters of up to 4 mm were synthesized by a suction casting method in an arc furnace. Structures and thermal properties of the as-cast samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, respectively. It was found that the critical casting thickness of the alloys reduced as iron content was increased and cobalt content was decreased. It was determined that GFA parameters, reduced glass transition temperature (Tg/Tl and δ (= Tx/(Tl − Tg, show a very good correlation with critical casting thickness values. It was also observed that changing iron content did not effect thermal properties of the alloys.

  4. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  5. Survey of heavy metal pollution (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron and manganese in drinking water resources of Nurabad city, Lorestan, Iran 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHodratolah Shams Khorramabadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy water passes through the pipelines from supply resources to consuming places in which passing from these stages may cause some cases of contamination like heavy metal contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination of heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese in water resources of Nurabad city of Lorestan in 2013. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, samples were collected from 7 wells of drinking water and 2 water storage tanks during 6 months in Nurabad. So that, heavy metal parameters such as copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, and manganese were measured using an atomic absorption device and also electrical conductivity, sulfate, chloride and total dissolved solids were also measured in accordance with standard methods. Results: Results indicated that the concentration of studied metals in water sources was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard, and in the water supply system the concentration of some metals was more than standard level. Moreover, the results showed that the concentration of studied heavy metals were more in winter than in autumn. Conclusion: Generally, in the water resources of Nurabad city the concentration of studied heavy metals was lower than the national standards and World Health Organization standard and there are not problems for water consumers. However, due to public health and the presence of a high concentration of these metals in the distribution supply, the heavy metal concentration in drinking water of this region should be monitored regularly by responsible organizations.

  6. Iron Oxide Doped Alumina-Zirconia Nanoparticle Synthesis by Liquid Flame Spray from Metal Organic Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha-Pekka Nikkanen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid flame spray (LFS method was used to make iron oxide doped alumina-zirconia nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were generated using a turbulent, high-temperature (Tmax⁡∼3000 K H2-O2 flame. The precursors were aluminium-isopropoxide, zirconium-n-propoxide, and ferrocene in xylene solution. The solution was atomized into micron-sized droplets by high velocity H2 flow and introduced into the flame where nanoparticles were formed. The particle morphology, size, phase, and chemical composition were determined by TEM, XRD, XPS, and N2-adsorption measurements. The collected particulate material consists of micron-sized aggregates with nanosized primary particles. In both doped and undoped samples, tetragonal phase of zirconia was detected in room temperature while alumina was found to be noncrystalline. In the doped powder, Fe was oxidized to Fe2O3. The primary particle size of collected sample was approximately from 6 nm to 40 nm. Doping was observed to increase the specific surface area of the powder from 39 m2/g to 47 m2/g.

  7. Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation by Metal-Doped Bismuth Vanadate Photoanode with Iron Oxyhydroxide Electrocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jin Joo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive attention has been currently focused on the discovery of semiconductor and proficient cocatalysts for eventual applications to the photoelectrochemical water splitting system. A W-Mo-doped BiVO4 semiconductor was prepared by the surfactant-assisted thermal decomposition method on a fluorine-doped tin oxide conductive film. The W-Mo-doped BiVO4 films showed a porous morphology with the grain sizes of about 270 nm. Because the hole diffusion length of BiVO4 is about 100 nm, the W-Mo-doped BiVO4 film in this study is an ideal candidate for the photoelectrochemical water oxidation. Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH electrocatalyst was chemically deposited on the W-Mo-doped BiVO4 to investigate the effect of the electrocatalyst on the semiconductor. The W-Mo-doped BiVO4/FeOOH composite electrode showed enhanced activity compared to the pristine W-Mo-doped BiVO4 electrode for water oxidation reaction. The chemical deposition is a promising method for the deposition of FeOOH on semiconductor.

  8. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renald David

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine(μ4-phosphatoiron(III], [Fe(PO4(N2H4]n, was prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one FeIII atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The FeIII atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetrahedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octahedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetrahedron bridges four FeIII atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two FeIII atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N—H...O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4(N2H4] and [Mn(SO4(N2H4].

  9. Photoemission study of metallic iron nanoparticles surface aging in biological fluids. Influence on biomolecules adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canivet, L.; Denayer, F.O. [Université de Lille 2, Droit et Santé, 42 rue P. Duez, 59000 Lille (France); Champion, Y.; Cenedese, P. [CNRS-ICMPE, 2 rue H. Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Dubot, P., E-mail: pdubot@icmpe.cnrs.fr [CNRS-ICMPE, 2 rue H. Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France)

    2014-07-01

    Iron nanoparticles (nFe) prepared by vaporization and cryogenic condensation process (10–100 nm) has been exposed to Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and the B-Ali cell growth fluids. These media can be used for cellular growth to study nFe penetration through cell membrane and its induced cytotoxicity. Surface chemistry of nFe exposed to such complex fluids has been characterized as the nanoparticles surface can be strongly changed by adsorption or corrosion processes before reaching intracellular medium. Particle size and surface chemistry have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS). Exposition of nFe particles to growth and differentiation media leads to the formation of an oxy-hydroxide layer containing chlorinated species. We found that the passivated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer of the bare nFe particles is rapidly transformed into a thicker oxy-hydroxide layer that has a greater ability to adsorb molecular ions or ionic biomolecules like proteins or DNA.

  10. Engineering Diffusivity, Band gap and Operating Voltage in Lithium Iron Phosphate through transition metal doping

    OpenAIRE

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Density functional calculations are carried out to understand and tailor the electrochemical profile diffusivity, band gap and open circuit voltage of transition metal doped olivine phosphate LiFe_{1-x}M_{x}PO_{4} (M = V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni). Diffusion and hence the ionic conductivity is studied by calculating the activation barrier, V_{act}, experienced by the diffusing Li^{+} ion. We show that the effect of dopants on diffusion is both site dependent and short ranged and thereby it paves way...

  11. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked.

  12. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-03

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2.

  13. Effect of Ekabor 2 powder on the mechanical properties of pure iron powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altintaş, Ayberk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ekabor 2 powder of different weights, used by V type powder mixture was mixed with pure iron powder. Specimens were created by dry pressing into die followed by cold isostatic press at a pressure of 100 bar for purpose of resizing. The conventional sintering process at 900 °C and 950 °C was carried out for 4 h using conventional furnaces. Specimens were gradually cooled by air. The sintered pellets were examined in terms of density, wear abrasion, surface roughness and hardness at 900 °C and 950 °C. Microstructure of pellets was observed with optic microscope. The results show that the hardness gradually increased with additions of 0 wt. % to 10 wt. % of Ekabor 2 however, after 10 wt. %, this hardness tended to decrease.Se mezclaron diferentes cantidades de polvo denominado “Ekabor 2”, el cual se utiliza en mezclas de polvo tipo V, con hierro puro en polvo. La muestras se obtuvieron por prensado en seco seguido de prensa isostática en frío a una presión de 100 bar, con el objeto de redimensionar la muestra. Se llevó a cabo el proceso de sinterización convencional a 900 °C y 950 °C durante 4 h utilizando hornos convencionales. Las muestras se enfriaron gradualmente en aire. Las pastillas sinterizadas (pellets se examinaron en términos de densidad, resistencia a la abrasión, rugosidad y dureza a 900 °C y 950 °C. Se observó la microestructura de las pastillas por microscopía óptica. Los resultados mostraron un aumento gradual de la dureza con la adición de 0 % en peso a 10% en peso de polvo Ekabor 2. Sin embargo, para mayores cantidades del 10% en peso se observó una tendencia a disminuir en la dureza.

  14. First-Principles Momentum Dependent Local Ansatz Approach to the Ground-State Properties of Iron-Group Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-08-01

    The ground-state properties of iron-group transition metals from Sc to Cu have been investigated on the basis of the first-principles momentum dependent local ansatz (MLA) theory. Correlation energy gain is found to show large values for Mn and Fe: 0.090 Ry (Mn) and 0.094 Ry (Fe). The Hund-rule coupling energies are found to be 3000 K (Fe), 1400 K (Co), and 300 K (Ni). It is suggested that these values can resolve the inconsistency in magnetic energy between the density functional theory and the first-principles dynamical coherent potential approximation theory at finite temperatures. Charge fluctuations are shown to be suppressed by the intra-orbital correlations and inter-orbital charge-charge correlations, so that they show nearly constant values from V to Fe: 1.57 (V and Cr), 1.52 (Mn), and 1.44 (Fe), which are roughly twice as large as those obtained by the d band model. The amplitudes of local moments are enhanced by the intra-orbital and inter-orbital spin-spin correlations and show large values for Mn and Fe: 2.87 (Mn) and 2.58 (Fe). These values are in good agreement with the experimental values estimated from the effective Bohr magneton number and the inner core photoemission data.

  15. Adsorption of Azo-Dye Orange II from Aqueous Solutions Using a Metal-Organic Framework Material: Iron- Benzenetricarboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rojas García

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Metal-Organic Framework (MOF, iron-benzenetricarboxylate (Fe(BTC, has been studied for the adsorptive removal of azo-dye Orange II from aqueous solutions, where the effect of various parameters was tested and isotherm and kinetic models were suggested. The adsorption capacities of Fe(BTC were much higher than those of an activated carbon. The experimental data can be best described by the Langmuir isotherm model (R2 > 0.997 and revealed the ability of Fe(BTC to adsorb 435 mg of Orange II per gram of adsorbent at the optimal conditions. The kinetics of Orange II adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating the coexistence of physisorption and chemisorption, with intra-particle diffusion being the rate controlling step. The thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption of Orange II was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process (−25.53 kJ·mol−1. The high recovery of the dye showed that Fe(BTC can be employed as an effective and reusable adsorbent for the removal of Orange II from aqueous solutions and showed the economic interest of this adsorbent material for environmental purposes.

  16. Adsorption of Azo-Dye Orange II from Aqueous Solutions Using a Metal-Organic Framework Material: Iron- Benzenetricarboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas García, Elizabeth; López Medina, Ricardo; May Lozano, Marcos; Hernández Pérez, Isaías; Valero, Maria J.; Maubert Franco, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    A Metal-Organic Framework (MOF), iron-benzenetricarboxylate (Fe(BTC)), has been studied for the adsorptive removal of azo-dye Orange II from aqueous solutions, where the effect of various parameters was tested and isotherm and kinetic models were suggested. The adsorption capacities of Fe(BTC) were much higher than those of an activated carbon. The experimental data can be best described by the Langmuir isotherm model (R2 > 0.997) and revealed the ability of Fe(BTC) to adsorb 435 mg of Orange II per gram of adsorbent at the optimal conditions. The kinetics of Orange II adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating the coexistence of physisorption and chemisorption, with intra-particle diffusion being the rate controlling step. The thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption of Orange II was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process (−25.53 kJ·mol−1). The high recovery of the dye showed that Fe(BTC) can be employed as an effective and reusable adsorbent for the removal of Orange II from aqueous solutions and showed the economic interest of this adsorbent material for environmental purposes. PMID:28788289

  17. First-Principles Momentum Dependent Local Ansatz Approach to the Momentum Distribution Function in Iron-Group Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2017-03-01

    The momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of iron-group transition metals from Sc to Cu have been investigated on the basis of the first-principles momentum dependent local ansatz wavefunction method. It is found that the MDF for d electrons show a strong momentum dependence and a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac distribution function along high-symmetry lines of the first Brillouin zone, while the sp electrons behave as independent electrons. In particular, the deviation in bcc Fe (fcc Ni) is shown to be enhanced by the narrow eg (t2g) bands with flat dispersion in the vicinity of the Fermi level. Mass enhancement factors (MEF) calculated from the jump on the Fermi surface are also shown to be momentum dependent. Large mass enhancements of Mn and Fe are found to be caused by spin fluctuations due to d electrons, while that for Ni is mainly caused by charge fluctuations. Calculated MEF are consistent with electronic specific heat data as well as recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy data.

  18. Half-sandwich iron(ii) complexes with protic acyclic diaminocarbene ligands: synthesis, deprotonation and metalation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Javier; García, Lucía; Vivanco, Marilín; Sol, Daniel; García-Granda, Santiago

    2017-08-08

    A variety of half-sandwich iron(ii) complexes with diprotic acyclic diaminocarbene ligands (pADCs) have been obtained by reaction of the cationic complexes [Fe(Cp)(CO)2(CNR)](+) and [Fe(Cp)(CO)(CNR)2](+) with methylamine, and their acid-base behaviour was studied, revealing an easy reversible deprotonation reaction of both N-H moieties of the carbene ligands. The deprotonation process is frequently followed by a nucleophilic attack of the nitrogen atom on a vicinal carbonyl or isocyanide ligand, affording the corresponding metallacycles. Metalation of one or two N-H groups of the pADC ligands can be accomplished by reaction of the carbene complexes with either [AuCl(PPh3)] or [Ru(p-cym)Cl2]2 in the presence of KOH or LiHMDS as deprotonating agents. A number of Fe(ii)/Au(i) and Fe(ii)/Ru(ii) heterometallic complexes have been prepared in this way, some of them formally containing unique metalla-N-heterocyclic carbene ligands.

  19. What happens when iron becomes wet? Observation of reactions at interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, M

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation has been applied to investigation of interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces, with a special attention to corrosion. Three topics are shown: (1) nano structures of rusts formed on steel after atmospheric corrosion. Evolution of 'Fe(O, OH) sub 6 network' is the key to understand how the durable rusts prevent from formation of more rusts. (2) In situ observation of reactions at the interface has been carried out for localized corrosion of stainless steel. It is shown that change in states of Cr sup 3 sup + and Br sup - ions near the interface is deeply related with a breakout of the passivation film. (3) A structural phase transformation on a Cu sub 3 Au(001) surface was investigated. Ordering remains even at a temperature higher than the bulk-critical temperature, showing surface-induced ordering. These approaches gives us crucial information for a new steel-product. (author)

  20. Boron rings containing planar octa- and enneacoordinate cobalt, iron and nickel metal elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For a series of boron rings with planar hyper-coordinate 8th group transition metal atoms, singlet 1FeB8-2, multiplet kFeB9n (n = -1, k = 1; n = 0, k = 2), singlet 1CoB8n(n = -1, +1, +3), multiplet kCoB9n (n = +1, k = 2; n = 0, k = 1) and singlet 1NiB9+, the geometry structures have been optimized to be local minima on corresponding potential hyper-surfaces. The electron structures are discussed by orbital analysis and the aromaticity is predicted by nucleus-independent chemical shifts calculation at both the B3LYP/6-311+G* and BP86/6-311+G* levels of theory, respectively. The results suggest that all these structures with high symmetry planar geometries are stable and have aromatic properties with six π valence electrons.

  1. Microstructure design of metal composite for active material in sodium nickel-iron chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Mangi; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Hong, Inchul; Kim, Woosung; Moon, Goyoung; Lee, Heesoo; Jung, Keeyoung; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Choi, Joon-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    In this manuscript, it is reported how the microstructure of metal composites can be designed to obtain excellent cycle performance in Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 battery. The microstructure consists of an active material and a conducting material. The conducting material is an active material as well as a conducting chain (an electron path). In Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cells, it is preferable that Ni is selected as the conducting material, since the nickel chloride is not formed on the surface of Ni particles during the electrochemical reaction of Fe particles. In addition, the particle size of Ni should be smaller than that of Fe, in order to ensure that the conducting chain is well-connected. Through this design, the cycle performance of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was significantly improved, compared to that of a Na-NiCl2 cell. At the 100th cycle, the charge/discharge capacity of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was much higher than that of a Na-NiCl2 cell, approximately 42%.

  2. Iron-Group Abundances in the Metal-Poor Main Sequence Turnoff Star HD~84937

    CERN Document Server

    Sneden, Christopher; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Pignatari, Marco; Lawler, James E; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den; Wood, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    We have derived new very accurate abundances of the Fe-group elements Sc through Zn (Z = 21-30) in the bright main-sequence turnoff star HD 84937, based on high-resolution spectra covering the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. New or recent laboratory transition data for 14 species of seven elements have been used. Abundances from more than 600 lines of non-Fe species have been combined with about 550 Fe lines in HD 84937 to yield abundance ratios of high precision. The abundances have been determined from both neutral and ionized transitions, which generally are in agreement with each other. We find no substantial departures from standard LTE Saha ionization balance in this [Fe/H] = -2.32 star. Noteworthy among the abundances are: [Co/Fe] = 0.14 and [Cu/Fe] = -0.83, in agreement with past studies abundance trends in this and other low metallicity stars; and = 0.31, which has not been noted previously. A detailed examination of scandium, titanium, and vanadium abundances in large-sample spectroscopic...

  3. Engineering Diffusivity and Operating Voltage in Lithium Iron Phosphate through Transition-Metal Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    Density-functional calculations are carried out to understand and tailor the electrochemical profile—diffusivity, band gap, and open-circuit voltage—of transition-metal-doped olivine phosphate: LiFe1 -xMxPO4 (M =V , Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni). Diffusion and, hence, the ionic conductivity is studied by calculating the activation barrier Vact experienced by the diffusing Li+ ion. We show that the effect of dopants on diffusion is both site dependent and short ranged, and thereby it paves ways for microscopic control of ionic conductivity via selective dopants in olivine phosphates. Dopants with lower-valence electrons (LVEs) compared to Fe repel the Li+ ion to facilitate its outward diffusion, whereas higher-valence-electron (HVE) dopants attract the Li+ ion to facilitate the inward diffusion. From the electronic structure calculation, we establish that irrespective of the dopant M , except Mn, the band gap is reduced since the M d states always lie within the pure band gap. Atomically localized d states of HVE dopants lie above the Fermi energy and that of LVE lie below it. Half-filled Mn d states undergo a large spin-exchange split to bury the dopant states in the valence and conduction bands of the pristine system, and, in turn, the band gap remains unchanged in LiFe1 -xMnxPO4 . Baring Mn, the open-circuit voltage increases with HVE dopants and decreases with LVE dopants.

  4. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should...

  5. A single low-energy, iron-poor supernova as the source of metals in the star SMSS J031300.36-670839.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, S C; Bessell, M S; Frebel, A; Casey, A R; Asplund, M; Jacobson, H R; Lind, K; Norris, J E; Yong, D; Heger, A; Magic, Z; Da Costa, G S; Schmidt, B P; Tisserand, P

    2014-02-27

    The element abundance ratios of four low-mass stars with extremely low metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium) indicate that the gas out of which the stars formed was enriched in each case by at most a few--and potentially only one--low-energy supernova. Such supernovae yield large quantities of light elements such as carbon but very little iron. The dominance of low-energy supernovae seems surprising, because it had been expected that the first stars were extremely massive, and that they disintegrated in pair-instability explosions that would rapidly enrich galaxies in iron. What has remained unclear is the yield of iron from the first supernovae, because hitherto no star has been unambiguously interpreted as encapsulating the yield of a single supernova. Here we report the optical spectrum of SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, which shows no evidence of iron (with an upper limit of 10(-7.1) times solar abundance). Based on a comparison of its abundance pattern with those of models, we conclude that the star was seeded with material from a single supernova with an original mass about 60 times that of the Sun (and that the supernova left behind a black hole). Taken together with the four previously mentioned low-metallicity stars, we conclude that low-energy supernovae were common in the early Universe, and that such supernovae yielded light-element enrichment with insignificant iron. Reduced stellar feedback both chemically and mechanically from low-energy supernovae would have enabled first-generation stars to form over an extended period. We speculate that such stars may perhaps have had an important role in the epoch of cosmic reionization and the chemical evolution of early galaxies.

  6. Optical properties of beta-iron silicide, ruthenium silicide and osmium silicide: Semiconducting transition metal silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Anthony Glen

    2001-09-01

    Various optical techniques were used to study the semiconducting transition metal silicides of β- FeSi2, Ru2Si3, and OsSi2. The Raman spectra of ion beam synthesized (IBS) β-FeSi 2 were shown to provide evidence of a net tensile stress in these IBS materials. Possible origins of the observed stress were suggested and a simple model was proposed in order to calculate a value of the observed stress. A correlation between the tensile stress, the nature of the band gap, and the resulting light emitting properties of IBS β-FeSi2 was suggested. The photoreflectance (PR) spectra of IBS β- FeSi2 reveals a direct gap at 0.815 eV and were shown to agree with the band gap value obtained by photoluminescence (PL) once the adjustments for the temperature difference and trap related recombination effects were made. This provides very convincing evidence for intrinsic light emission from IBS β- FeSi2. Furthermore, a model was developed that helps to clarify the variety of inconsistent results obtained by optical absorption measurements. When the results of PL and PR were inserted into this model, a good agreement was obtained with our measured optical absorption results. We also obtained PR spectra of β-FeSi 2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These spectra reveal the multiple direct transitions near the fundamental absorption edge of β-FeSi 2 that were predicted by theory. We suggest an order of these critical point transitions following the trends reported in the theoretical investigations. Doping these β-FeSi2 thin films with small amounts of chromium was shown to have a measurable effect on the interband optical spectra. We also report on the effects of alloying β- FeSi2 with cobalt. A decrease in the critical point transitions nearest the fundamental absorption edge was observed as the cobalt concentration increased. Finally, Raman spectroscopy was used to study the vibrational properties of β-FeSi2. The measured Raman spectra agreed very well with the

  7. The Arabidopsis AtOPT3 protein functions in metal homeostasis and movement of iron to developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Minviluz G; Patel, Ami; McClain, William E; Mathieu, Melanie; Remley, Melissa; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Gassmann, Walter; Blevins, Dale G; Stacey, Gary

    2008-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AtOPT3 belongs to the oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family, a relatively poorly characterized family of peptide/modified peptide transporters found in archebacteria, bacteria, fungi, and plants. A null mutation in AtOPT3 resulted in embryo lethality, indicating an essential role for AtOPT3 in embryo development. In this article, we report on the isolation and phenotypic characterization of a second AtOPT3 mutant line, opt3-2, harboring a T-DNA insertion in the 5' untranslated region of AtOPT3. The T-DNA insertion in the AtOPT3 promoter resulted in reduced but sufficient AtOPT3 expression to allow embryo formation in opt3-2 homozygous seeds. Phenotypic analyses of opt3-2 plants revealed three interesting loss-of-function phenotypes associated with iron metabolism. First, reduced AtOPT3 expression in opt3-2 plants resulted in the constitutive expression of root iron deficiency responses regardless of exogenous iron supply. Second, deregulation of root iron uptake processes in opt3-2 roots resulted in the accumulation of very high levels of iron in opt3-2 tissues. Hyperaccumulation of iron in opt3-2 resulted in the formation of brown necrotic areas in opt3-2 leaves and was more pronounced during the seed-filling stage. Third, reduced AtOPT3 expression resulted in decreased accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds. The reduced accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds is especially noteworthy considering the excessively high levels of accumulated iron in other opt3-2 tissues. AtOPT3, therefore, plays a critical role in two important aspects of iron metabolism, namely, maintenance of whole-plant iron homeostasis and iron nutrition of developing seeds.

  8. Pristine but metal-rich Río Sucio (Dirty River) is dominated by Gallionella and other iron-sulfur oxidizing microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Avendaño, Roberto; Libby, Eduardo; Rojas, Leonardo; Cambronero, Juan Carlos; Pieper, Dietmar H; Timmis, Kenneth N; Chavarría, Max

    2017-03-01

    Whether the extreme conditions of acidity and heavy metal pollution of streams and rivers originating in pyritic formations are caused primarily by mining activities or by natural activities of metal-oxidizing microbes living within the geological formations is a subject of considerable controversy. Most microbiological studies of such waters have so far focused on acid mine drainage sites, which are heavily human-impacted environments, so it has been problematic to eliminate the human factor in the question of the origin of the key metal compounds. We have studied the physico-chemistry and microbiology of the Río Sucio in the Braulio Carrillo National Park of Costa Rica, 22 km from its volcanic rock origin. Neither the remote origin, nor the length of the river to the sampling site, have experienced human activity and are thus pristine. The river water had a characteristic brownish-yellow color due to high iron-dominated minerals, was slightly acidic, and rich in chemolithoautotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, dominated by Gallionella spp. Río Sucio is thus a natural acid-rock drainage system whose metal-containing components are derived primarily from microbial activities.

  9. Total and labile metals in surface sediments of the tropical river-estuary system of Marabasco (Pacific coast of Mexico): Influence of an iron mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmolejo-Rodriguez, Ana Judith [Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, (IPN) La Paz, B.C.S. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain)], E-mail: amarmole@ipn.mx; Prego, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain); Meyer-Willerer, Alejandro [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Universidad de Colima, Col. (Mexico); Shumilin, Evgueni [Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, (IPN) La Paz, B.C.S. (Mexico); Cobelo-Garcia, Antonio [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Marabasco is a tropical river-estuary system comprising the Marabasco river and the Barra de Navidad Lagoon. The river is impacted by the Pena Colorada iron mine, which produces 3.5 million tons of pellets per year. Thirteen surface sediment samples were collected in May 2005 (dry season) in order to establish background levels of Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the system and to ascertain the potential mobility of metals in the sediments. Analyses were carried out in the fraction finer than 63 {mu}m, and labile metals extracted according the BCR procedure. Certified reference materials were used for validation of methods. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were in the range of 0.05-0.34, 6-95, 0.7-31, 9-26, 2-18, and 53-179 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively; Al and Fe ranges of 24-127, and 26-69 mg g{sup -1} correspondingly. Cadmium was found to be significantly labile in the sediments (20-100%), followed by Co (0-35%), Ni (3-16%) and Zn (0-25%), whereas the labile fraction for Cu, Fe and Pb was almost negligible (<4%). According with the total metal concentrations, background levels and normalised enrichment factors (NEF) of the metals studied, the impact of the Pena Colorada iron mine on the Marabasco system is lower than expected when compared with other similar World systems influenced by mining activities.

  10. Cotransport of microorganisms and metallic colloids in quartz sand or iron oxide-coated sand under real site hydrogeological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong; Wen, Yujuan; Yang, Xinyao; Yang, Yuesuo

    2017-04-01

    The need for studying the fate and transport of engineered and naturally-occurring nanoparticles is of great concern in the past decade. Wudalianchi scenic spot as a famous International Geological Park has the biggest cold spring in China, which is also one of the three biggest cold spring in the world, with a history of over 200 years using in drinking and medical purpose. Thousands of tourists all over the world travelling here each year to enjoy the high quality mineral water and take a bath in the cold spring and "mud-bath" with special medication purposes. Recreation activities gave rise to the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) releasing into the water environment and increase the risk of contamination. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of ENMs-exposure in natural environment and how it influences the transport of microorganisms of Wudalianchi in/without the presence of natural colloids (humic acid) under a series of ion strength. A thorough critical literature review of both work in the study site and the bio/nano-particle transport in porous media was a kick-off of the study. With support of the site investigations and sampling of groundwater, surface water and surface mud/soils, further numerical modelling of the hydrogeochemical speciation of the groundwater was carried out, indicating comprehensive water-rock interactions of this particular region. Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs), including metals, metal oxides and other metal-containing nanoparticles, are produced and ubiquitously applied to medical, cosmetic, photonics and catalysis industries, etc. TiO2, a widely used raw material for cosmetic industries (e.g., sunscreens), was used in this study to represent MNPs. The microorganisms used in this study were extracted from the soil in Wudalianchi. Humic acid (HA), a key component of dissolved organic matter (DOM) chosen as the natural colloids in this study, are ubiquitous and significant constituents in soils and water environment that

  11. Landslide-induced iron mobilisation shapes benthic accumulation of nutrients, trace metals and REE fractionation in an oligotrophic alpine stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Rose, Andrew L.; Burton, Edward D.; Webster-Brown, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Large alpine landslides that entrain substantial organic material below the water table and create suspended floodplains may have long-term consequences for the mobilisation of redox sensitive elements, such as Fe, into streamwaters. In turn, the cycling of iron in aquatic systems can influence the fate of nutrients, alter primary productivity, enhance accumulation of trace metals and induce fractionation of rare earth elements (REE). In this study we examine a reach of a pristine oligotrophic alpine stream bracketing a 30 year-old landslide and explore the consequences of landslide-induced Fe mobilisation for aqueous geochemistry and the composition of benthic stream cobble biofilm. Elevated Fe2+ and Mn in landslide zone stream waters reflect inputs of circumneutral groundwater from the landslide debris-zone floodplain. Geochemical characteristics are consistent with reductive dissolution being a primary mechanism of Fe2+ and Mn mobilisation. Stream cobble biofilm in the landslide zone is significantly (P extractable; Fe(III)Ab). While the landslide zone accounts for less than ∼9% of the total stream length, we estimate it is responsible for approximately 60-80% of the stream's benthic biofilm load of poorly crystalline Fe(III) and Mn. Biofilm Fe(III) precipitates are comprised mainly of ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite and an organic-Fe species, while precipitate samples collected proximal to hyporheic seeps contain abundant sheath structures characteristic of the neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidising bacteria Leptothrix spp. Stream-cobble Fe(III)-rich biofilm is accumulating PO43- (∼3-30 times background) and behaving as a preferential substrate for photosynthetic periphyton, with benthic PO43-, chlorophyll a, organic carbonHCl and total N all significantly positively correlated with Fe(III)Ab and significantly elevated within the landslide zone (P transformed basis. Stream cobble biofilm also exhibits distinct REE fractionation along the flow path, with light REE (La

  12. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  13. Two-State Reactivity in Low-Valent Iron-Mediated C-H Activation and the Implications for Other First-Row Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihua; Tang, Hao; Chen, Kejuan; Hu, Lianrui; Yao, Jiannian; Shaik, Sason; Chen, Hui

    2016-03-23

    C-H bond activation/functionalization promoted by low-valent iron complexes has recently emerged as a promising approach for the utilization of earth-abundant first-row transition metals to carry out this difficult transformation. Herein we use extensive density functional theory and high-level ab initio coupled cluster calculations to shed light on the mechanism of these intriguing reactions. Our key mechanistic discovery for C-H arylation reactions reveals a two-state reactivity (TSR) scenario in which the low-spin Fe(II) singlet state, which is initially an excited state, crosses over the high-spin ground state and promotes C-H bond cleavage. Subsequently, aryl transmetalation occurs, followed by oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in a single-electron transfer (SET) step in which dichloroalkane serves as an oxidant, thus promoting the final C-C coupling and finalizing the C-H functionalization. Regeneration of the Fe(II) catalyst for the next round of C-H activation involves SET oxidation of the Fe(I) species generated after the C-C bond coupling. The ligand sphere of iron is found to play a crucial role in the TSR mechanism by stabilization of the reactive low-spin state that mediates the C-H activation. This is the first time that the successful TSR concept conceived for high-valent iron chemistry is shown to successfully rationalize the reactivity for a reaction promoted by low-valent iron complexes. A comparative study involving other divalent middle and late first-row transition metals implicates iron as the optimum metal in this TSR mechanism for C-H activation. It is predicted that stabilization of low-spin Mn(II) using an appropriate ligand sphere should produce another promising candidate for efficient C-H bond activation. This new TSR scenario therefore emerges as a new strategy for using low-valent first-row transition metals for C-H activation reactions.

  14. 铁矿尾矿中各种金属的分离与提取%The Separation and Extraction of Metal Content in Iron Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔娜; 闫怀义; 李野; 李淑英

    2014-01-01

    Using the hydrogen sulfide system analysis method , all kinds of metal containing in iron tailings of FanShi XinBaoDa Co., Ltd.were separated and analyzed.The experimental results showed that the iron tailings mainly contained Pb, Hg and microcrystalline Cu , Bi, and the iron tailings after extraction of Pb , Hg, Cu, Bi basic without the metals of pollute the environment.%采用硫化氢系统分析法,分离、分析了繁峙鑫宝达矿业有限责任公司铁矿尾矿中各种金属。实验结果表明:该尾矿中主要含有铅、汞和微量的铜、铋,用NH3 CO3可以将其从尾矿中分离提取出来,分离提取铅、汞、铜、铋后的尾矿基本不含污染环境的金属,可以避免对环境的污染。

  15. Theoretical analysis for the heterogeneous decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen on an iron-metallic plate in a laminar stagnation-point flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.C. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Campeche, 24030 Campeche (Mexico); Mendez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: fmendez@servidor.unam.mx; Trevino, C. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2006-12-15

    In this work, we have theoretically analyzed the conversion process of hydrogen sulfide, H{sub 2}S, to atomic hydrogen, H{sup 0}, in a planar stagnation-point flow over an iron-metallic surface. We assume that a binary mixture of hydrogen sulfide and methane composes the laminar stagnation flow. In order to characterize this complex phenomenon with very specific chemical activities on the surface of the metallic plate, we propose a heterogeneous reaction scheme based on four reactions: two electrochemical, one adsorption and an additional exothermic reaction needed to complete the direct conversion of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen on the surface of the iron. The nondimensional governing equations, which include the mass species and momentum conservation of the mixture and the molecular diffusion of hydrogen into the iron plate, are numerically solved by conventional finite-difference methods. The numerical results show the critical conditions of the H{sub 2}S decomposition as functions of the involved nondimensional parameters of the present model. In particular, we show parametrically the influence that has the initial concentration of H{sub 2}S on the surface coverage of the chemical products HS{sup -} H{sup +} and H{sup 0} derived from the chemical and electrochemical reactions.

  16. Electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates, VSB-1 and VSB-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Oh, Eun-Jin; Jhung, Sung Hwa; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates VSB-1 and VSB-5 have been investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at Fe K- and Ni K-edges. The Fe K-edge XANES study clearly demonstrated that substituted iron ions were stabilized in octahedral nickel sites of nanoporous nickel phosphate lattice. A comparison with several Fe-references revealed that the substituted irons have mixed Fe2+/Fe3+ oxidation state with the average valence of +2.8-3.0. According to the Ni K-edge XANES analysis, the aliovalent substitution of Ni2+ with Fe2+/Fe3+ induced a slight reduction of divalent nickel ions in VSB-5 to meet a charge balance. On the contrary, Fe substitution for the VSB-1 phase did not cause notable decrease in the oxidation state of nickel ions, which would be related either to the accompanying decrease of pentavalent phosphorus cations or to the increase of oxygen anions. In conclusion, the present findings clearly demonstrated that the nanoporous lattice of nickel phosphate can accommodate effectively iron ions in its octahedral nickel sites.

  17. A single low-energy, iron-poor supernova as the source of metals in the star SMSS J 031300.36-670839.3

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, S C; Frebel, A; Casey, A R; Asplund, M; Jacobson, H R; Lind, K; Norris, J E; Yong, D; Heger, A; Magic, Z; Da Costa, G S; Schmidt, B P; Tisserand, P

    2014-01-01

    The element abundance ratios of four low-mass stars with extremely low metallicities indicate that the gas out of which the stars formed was enriched in each case by at most a few, and potentially only one low-energy, supernova. Such supernovae yield large quantities of light elements such as carbon but very little iron. The dominance of low-energy supernovae is surprising, because it has been expected that the first stars were extremely massive, and that they disintegrated in pair-instability explosions that would rapidly enrich galaxies in iron. What has remained unclear is the yield of iron from the first supernovae, because hitherto no star is unambiguously interpreted as encapsulating the yield of a single supernova. Here we report the optical spectrum of SMSS J031300.36- 670839.3, which shows no evidence of iron (with an upper limit of 10^-7.1 times solar abundance). Based on a comparison of its abundance pattern with those of models, we conclude that the star was seeded with material from a single supe...

  18. Surprising abundance of Gallionella-related iron oxidizers in creek sediments at pH 4.4 or at high heavy metal concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabisch, Maria; Beulig, Felix; Akob, Denise M; Küsel, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    We identified and quantified abundant iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) at three iron-rich, metal-contaminated creek sites with increasing sediment pH from extremely acidic (R1, pH 2.7), to moderately acidic (R2, pH 4.4), to slightly acidic (R3, pH 6.3) in a former uranium-mining district. The geochemical parameters showed little variations over the 1.5 year study period. The highest metal concentrations found in creek sediments always coincided with the lowest metal concentrations in creek water at the slightly acidic site R3. Sequential extractions of R3 sediment revealed large portions of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, U) bound to the iron oxide fraction. Light microscopy of glass slides exposed in creeks detected twisted stalks characteristic of microaerobic FeOB of the family Gallionellaceae at R3 but also at the acidic site R2. Sequences related to FeOB such as Gallionella ferruginea, Sideroxydans sp. CL21, Ferritrophicum radicicola, and Acidovorax sp. BrG1 were identified in the sediments. The highest fraction of clone sequences similar to the acidophilic "Ferrovum myxofaciens" was detected in R1. Quantitative PCR using primer sets specific for Gallionella spp., Sideroxydans spp., and "Ferrovum myxofaciens" revealed that ~72% (R2 sediment) and 37% (R3 sediment) of total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies could be assigned to groups of FeOB with dominance of microaerobic Gallionella spp. at both sites. Gallionella spp. had similar and very high absolute and relative gene copy numbers in both sediment communities. Thus, Gallionella-like organisms appear to exhibit a greater acid and metal tolerance than shown before. Microaerobic FeOB from R3 creek sediment enriched in newly developed metal gradient tubes tolerated metal concentrations of 35 mM Co, 24 mM Ni, and 1.3 mM Cd, higher than those in sediments. Our results will extend the limited knowledge of FeOB at contaminated, moderately to slightly acidic environments.

  19. Surprising abundance of Gallionella-related iron oxidizers in creek sediments at pH 4.4 or at high heavy metal concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFabisch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We identified and quantified abundant iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB at three iron-rich, metal-contaminated creek sites with increasing sediment pH from extremely acidic (R1, pH 2.7, to moderately acidic (R2, pH 4.4, to slightly acidic (R3, pH 6.3 in a former uranium-mining district. The geochemical parameters showed little variations over the 1.5 year study period. The highest metal concentrations found in creek sediments always coincided with the lowest metal concentrations in creek water at the slightly acidic site R3. Sequential extractions of R3 sediment revealed large portions of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, U bound to the iron oxide fraction. Light microscopy of glass slides exposed in creeks detected twisted stalks characteristic of microaerobic FeOB of the family Gallionellaceae at R3 but also at the acidic site R2. Sequences related to FeOB such as Gallionella ferruginea, Sideroxydans sp. CL21, Ferritrophicum radicicola, and Acidovorax sp. BrG1 were identified in the sediments. The highest fraction of clone sequences similar to the acidophilic ‘Ferrovum myxofaciens’ was detected in R1. Quantitative PCR using primer sets specific for Gallionella spp., Sideroxydans spp., and ‘Ferrovum myxofaciens’ revealed that approximately 72% (R2 sediment and 37% (R3 sediment of total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies could be assigned to groups of FeOB with dominance of microaerobic Gallionella spp. at both sites. Gallionella spp. had similar and very high absolute and relative gene copy numbers in both sediment communities. Thus, Gallionella-like organisms appear to exhibit a greater acid and metal tolerance than shown before. Microaerobic FeOB from R3 creek sediment enriched in newly developed metal gradient tubes tolerated metal concentrations of 35 mM Co, 24 mM Ni, and 1.3 mM Cd, higher than those in sediments. Our results will extend the limited knowledge of FeOB at contaminated, moderately to slightly acidic environments.

  20. Surprising abundance of Gallionella-related iron oxidizers in creek sediments at pH 4.4 or at high heavy metal concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabisch, Maria; Beulig, Felix; Akob, Denise M.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    We identified and quantified abundant iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) at three iron-rich, metal-contaminated creek sites with increasing sediment pH from extremely acidic (R1, pH 2.7), to moderately acidic (R2, pH 4.4), to slightly acidic (R3, pH 6.3) in a former uranium-mining district. The geochemical parameters showed little variations over the 1.5 year study period. The highest metal concentrations found in creek sediments always coincided with the lowest metal concentrations in creek water at the slightly acidic site R3. Sequential extractions of R3 sediment revealed large portions of heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, U) bound to the iron oxide fraction. Light microscopy of glass slides exposed in creeks detected twisted stalks characteristic of microaerobic FeOB of the family Gallionellaceae at R3 but also at the acidic site R2. Sequences related to FeOB such as Gallionella ferruginea, Sideroxydans sp. CL21, Ferritrophicum radicicola, and Acidovorax sp. BrG1 were identified in the sediments. The highest fraction of clone sequences similar to the acidophilic “Ferrovum myxofaciens” was detected in R1. Quantitative PCR using primer sets specific for Gallionella spp., Sideroxydans spp., and “Ferrovum myxofaciens” revealed that ~72% (R2 sediment) and 37% (R3 sediment) of total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies could be assigned to groups of FeOB with dominance of microaerobic Gallionella spp. at both sites. Gallionella spp. had similar and very high absolute and relative gene copy numbers in both sediment communities. Thus, Gallionella-like organisms appear to exhibit a greater acid and metal tolerance than shown before. Microaerobic FeOB from R3 creek sediment enriched in newly developed metal gradient tubes tolerated metal concentrations of 35 mM Co, 24 mM Ni, and 1.3 mM Cd, higher than those in sediments. Our results will extend the limited knowledge of FeOB at contaminated, moderately to slightly acidic environments.

  1. Multiple metal sources in the glaciomarine facies of the Neoproterozoic Jacadigo iron formation in the “Santa Cruz deposit”, Corumbá, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Angerer, Thomas; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Walde, Detlef; Galen P. Halverson; Boyce, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Rapitan-type banded iron formation (BIF) in the Banda Alta Formation (Fm) of the Neoproterozoic Jacadigo Group in Brazil was deposited in a redox-stratified, marine sub-basin, which was strongly influenced by glacial advance/retraction cycles with temporary influx of continental freshwater and upwelling metal-enriched seawater from deeper anoxic parts. These new finding are based on new stratigraphic, whole-rock geochemical, and stable Fe and C isotope data from the “Santa Cruz” hematite ...

  2. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L. during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakatsu Yoneyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn and iron (Fe are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synthesized information on the routes of metal transport and accumulation in rice plants by examining metal speciation, metal transporters, and the xylem-to-phloem transport system. At grain-filling, Zn and Cd ascending in xylem sap are transferred to the phloem by the xylem-to-phloem transport system operating at stem nodes. Grain Fe is largely derived from the leaves by remobilization. Zn and Fe concentrations in phloem-sap and grains are regulated within a small range, while Cd concentrations vary depending on xylem supply. Transgenic techniques to increase concentrations of the metal chelators (nicotianamine, 2′-deoxymugineic acid are useful in increasing grain Zn and Fe concentrations. The elimination of OsNRAMP5 Cd-uptake transporter and the enhancement of root cell vacuolar Cd sequestration reduce uptake and root-to-shoot transport, respectively, resulting in a reduction of grain Cd accumulation.

  3. Route and Regulation of Zinc, Cadmium, and Iron Transport in Rice Plants (Oryza sativa L.) during Vegetative Growth and Grain Filling: Metal Transporters, Metal Speciation, Grain Cd Reduction and Zn and Fe Biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Ishikawa, Satoru; Fujimaki, Shu

    2015-08-13

    Zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) are essential but are sometimes deficient in humans, while cadmium (Cd) is toxic if it accumulates in the liver and kidneys at high levels. All three are contained in the grains of rice, a staple cereal. Zn and Fe concentrations in rice grains harvested under different levels of soil/hydroponic metals are known to change only within a small range, while Cd concentrations show greater changes. To clarify the mechanisms underlying such different metal contents, we synthesized information on the routes of metal transport and accumulation in rice plants by examining metal speciation, metal transporters, and the xylem-to-phloem transport system. At grain-filling, Zn and Cd ascending in xylem sap are transferred to the phloem by the xylem-to-phloem transport system operating at stem nodes. Grain Fe is largely derived from the leaves by remobilization. Zn and Fe concentrations in phloem-sap and grains are regulated within a small range, while Cd concentrations vary depending on xylem supply. Transgenic techniques to increase concentrations of the metal chelators (nicotianamine, 2'-deoxymugineic acid) are useful in increasing grain Zn and Fe concentrations. The elimination of OsNRAMP5 Cd-uptake transporter and the enhancement of root cell vacuolar Cd sequestration reduce uptake and root-to-shoot transport, respectively, resulting in a reduction of grain Cd accumulation.

  4. Comparison of bioleaching of heavy metals from municipal sludge using indigenous sulfur and iron-oxidizing microorganisms: continuous stirred tank reactor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Kothari, Richa; Dastidar, M G; Sreekrishnan, T R; Kim, Dong J

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken using indigenous sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms and iron-oxidizing microorganisms in separate 12 litre continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for solubilization of heavy metals from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. The CSTRs were operated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 4 to 10 days using sewage sludge feed having near neutral pH. The pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and solubilization efficiency of metals were found to be highly dependent on HRT and an increase in HRT led to higher solubilization of metals in both the CSTRs. In both the CSTRs, the CSTR operated with sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms at an HRT of 8 days was found to be optimum in solubilizing 58% Cu, 52% Ni, 72% Zn and 43% Cu from the sludge. The nutrient value, nitrogen and phosphorus of bioleached sludge was also conserved (<20% loss) at 8 days HRT. The metals fractionation study conducted using BCR sequential extraction procedure suggested that most of the metals remaining in the bioleached sludge were in the more stable fractions (F3 and F4) and, therefore, can be safely apply as a fertilizer on land.

  5. Ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  6. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  7. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  8. Iron-nucleated folding of a metalloprotein in high urea: resolution of metal binding and protein folding events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morleo, Anna; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Huang, Victor W; Kurtz, Donald M

    2010-08-10

    Addition of iron salts to chaotrope-denatured aporubredoxin (apoRd) leads to nearly quantitative recovery of its single Fe(SCys)(4) site and native protein structure without significant dilution of the chaotrope. This "high-chaotrope" approach was used to examine iron binding and protein folding events using stopped-flow UV-vis absorption and CD spectroscopies. With a 100-fold molar excess of ferrous iron over denatured apoRd maintained in 5 M urea, the folded holoFe(III)Rd structure was recovered in >90% yield with a t(1/2) of Ser iron ligand variants support formation of an unfolded-Fe(SCys)(3) complex between steps 1 and 2, which we propose is the key nucleation event that pulls together distal regions of the protein chain. These results show that folding of chaotrope-denatured apoRd is iron-nucleated and driven by extraordinarily rapid formation of the Fe(SCys)(4) site from an essentially random coil apoprotein. This high-chaotrope, multispectroscopy approach could clarify folding pathways of other [M(SCys)(3)]- or [M(SCys)(4)]-containing proteins.

  9. Magnetic solid phase extraction of typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples with metal organic framework MIL-101 (Cr) modified zero valent iron nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Lei, Man; Wu, Yalin; Yuan, Yongyong

    2017-03-03

    Metal-organic framework material has been paid more attention because of its good physical and chemical properties. Nanoscale zero valent iron is also in the center of concern recently. Combination of their merits will give impressive results. Present study firstly synthesized a new magnetic nanomaterial nano-scale zero valent iron-functionalized metal-organic framworks MIL-101 (Fe@MIL-101) by co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared Fe@MIL-101 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, etc. The experimental results showed that Fe@MIL-101 earned good adsorption ability to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The limits of detection of developed magnetic solid phase extraction were all below 0.064μgL(-1) and precision can be expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD, %) and which was better than 4.4% (n=6). The real water analysis indicated that the spiked recoveries were satisfied, and Fe@MIL-101 earned excellent reusability. All these demonstrated that Fe@MIL-101 exhibited excellent adsorption capability to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and would be a good adsorbent for development of new monitoring methods for environmental pollutants.

  10. Heavy metal accumulation in Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf from the Karabük iron-steel factory in Karabük, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansaran-Duman, Demet; Atakol, Orhan; Atasoy, Ilknur; Kahya, Didem; Aras, Sümer; Beyaztaş, Taylan

    2009-01-01

    Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf lichen specimens were collected every 5 km starting from around an iron-steel factory located in the central area of Karabük province, up to Yenice Forest. Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr contents were analyzed in the samples collected from polluted and unpolluted areas. A Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf sample from Yenice Forest was used as a control. The reason for this choise was the abundance of species diversity, and therefore sample collection might cause a very low impact on natural population density. The forest is among the 100 forested areas that must be urgently taken under protection according to WWF (World Wildlife Fund) researches. Results of the current study manifested significant variations among the contents of these elements between stations. As expected, the pollution sources, such as iron-steel factory, roads and railroads, industry, heavy traffic, and waste treatment plants, have major impact on the heavy metal accumulation in P. furfuracea (L.) Zopf, and, in accordance to their location, samples 8 and 10 displayed high element accumulation. Surprisingly, although Yenice Forest is under protection, results of our study showed that the region is becoming polluted by the influence of many pollution sources in the area. The present study also confirms the efficient metal accumulation capacity of lichens.

  11. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  12. Investigation of heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr) stabilization in river sediment by nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-fang; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaomao; Wang, Weiya; Li, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano-zero-valent iron/activated carbon (nZVI/AC) composite was evaluated for its effectiveness in the stabilization of Cu, Pb, Cd, and Cr in dredged river sediment. Synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) were adopted to compare the effects of nZVI/AC dosage, particle size, time duration, and temperature on heavy metal leachability. The results show that leachability dropped considerably with the addition of nZVI/AC and powdered particles in the size of 0.075-0.18 mm was more effective in stabilization than granular ones. Stabilization effect was stable in long-term and robust against changes in temperature. Tessier sequential extraction revealed that heavy metals were associated with solid particle, inorganic or organic matters in sediment. The addition of nZVI/AC was able to convert relatively weakly bound heavy metals into more strongly bound species and thus reduce the bioavailability and toxicity. Also, the standard potential of heavy metals may decide the mechanism of stabilization process.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Brazing TiC Cermet to Iron with TiZrNiCu Filler Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia ZHANG; Jicai FENG

    2004-01-01

    The maximum thermal stress and stress concentration zones of iron/TiC cermet joint during cooling were studied in this paper. The results showed that the shear stress on iron/TiC cermet joint concentrates on the interface tip and the maximum shear stress appears on the left tip of iron/TiZrNiCu interlace. Positive tensile stress on TiC cermet undersurface concentrates on both sides of TiC cermet and its value decreases during cooling. Negative tensile stress on TiC cermet undersurface concentrates on the center of TiC cermet and its value increases during cooling. Brazing temperature has little effect on the development and maximum thermal stress.

  14. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  15. Extraction of Micronutrient Metals from Peat-based Media Using Various Chelate-ligand and Iron-source Extractants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives of the study were to determine effects of chelate-ligand (experiment 1) and iron-source (experiment 2) unbuffrered extractant solutions on substrate pH and Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn extraction from peat-based media. Chelate-ligand extractants consisted of 5 mM solutions of ethylenediaminedisucc...

  16. Thermal Treatment of Iron Oxide Stabilized APC Residues from Waste Incineration and the Effect on Heavy Metal Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Stackpoole, M.; Bender-Koch, C.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide stabilized APC residues from MSWI were heat treated at 600°C and 900°C. The thermal treatments resulted in a change in product stability by forcing a transformation in the mineralogical structures of the products. The treatments, moreover, simulated somewhat the natural aging processes...

  17. A layered magnetic iron/iron oxide nanoscavenger for the analytical enrichment of ng-L(-1) concentration levels of heavy metals from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatapanis, Andreas E; Petrakis, Dimitrios E; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2012-05-13

    Magnetically driven separation techniques have received considerable attention in recent decade because of their great potential application. In this study, we investigate the application of an unmodified layered magnetic Fe/Fe(2)O(3) nanoscavenger for the analytical enrichment and determination of sub-parts per billion concentrations of Cd(II), Pb(II), Ni(II), Cr(VI) and As(V) from water samples. The synthesized nanoscavenger was characterized by BET, TGA, XRD and IR and the parameters influencing the extraction and recovery of the preconcentration process were assessed by atomic absorption spectrometry. The possible mechanism of the enrichment of heavy metals on Fe/Fe(2)O(3) was proposed, which involved the dominant adsorption and reduction. The nanoscale size offers large surface area and high reactivity of sorption and reduction reactions. The obtained limits of detection for the metals studied were in the range of 20-125 ng L(-1) and the applicability of the nanomaterial was verified using a real sample matrix. The method is environmentally friendly as only 15 mg of nanoscavenger are used, no organic solvent is required for the extraction and the experiment is performed without the need for filtration or preparation of packed preconcentration columns.

  18. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  19. Characteristics and adaptability of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms used for the recovery of metals from minerals and their concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawlings Douglas E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microorganisms are used in large-scale heap or tank aeration processes for the commercial extraction of a variety of metals from their ores or concentrates. These include copper, cobalt, gold and, in the past, uranium. The metal solubilization processes are considered to be largely chemical with the microorganisms providing the chemicals and the space (exopolysaccharide layer where the mineral dissolution reactions occur. Temperatures at which these processes are carried out can vary from ambient to 80°C and the types of organisms present depends to a large extent on the process temperature used. Irrespective of the operation temperature, biomining microbes have several characteristics in common. One shared characteristic is their ability to produce the ferric iron and sulfuric acid required to degrade the mineral and facilitate metal recovery. Other characteristics are their ability to grow autotrophically, their acid-tolerance and their inherent metal resistance or ability to acquire metal resistance. Although the microorganisms that drive the process have the above properties in common, biomining microbes usually occur in consortia in which cross-feeding may occur such that a combination of microbes including some with heterotrophic tendencies may contribute to the efficiency of the process. The remarkable adaptability of these organisms is assisted by several of the processes being continuous-flow systems that enable the continual selection of microorganisms that are more efficient at mineral degradation. Adaptability is also assisted by the processes being open and non-sterile thereby permitting new organisms to enter. This openness allows for the possibility of new genes that improve cell fitness to be selected from the horizontal gene pool. Characteristics that biomining microorganisms have in common and examples of their remarkable adaptability are described.

  20. Multivariate statistical and lead isotopic analyses approach to identify heavy metal sources in topsoil from the industrial zone of Beijing Capital Iron and Steel Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangxu; Guo, Qingjun; Xiao, Huayun; Chen, Tongbin; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Heavy metals are considered toxic to humans and ecosystems. In the present study, heavy metal concentration in soil was investigated using the single pollution index (PIi), the integrated Nemerow pollution index (PIN), and the geoaccumulation index (Igeo) to determine metal accumulation and its pollution status at the abandoned site of the Capital Iron and Steel Factory in Beijing and its surrounding area. Multivariate statistical (principal component analysis and correlation analysis), geostatistical analysis (ArcGIS tool), combined with stable Pb isotopic ratios, were applied to explore the characteristics of heavy metal pollution and the possible sources of pollutants. The results indicated that heavy metal elements show different degrees of accumulation in the study area, the observed trend of the enrichment factors, and the geoaccumulation index was Hg > Cd > Zn > Cr > Pb > Cu ≈ As > Ni. Hg, Cd, Zn, and Cr were the dominant elements that influenced soil quality in the study area. The Nemerow index method indicated that all of the heavy metals caused serious pollution except Ni. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb show obvious correlation and have higher loads on the same principal component, suggesting that they had the same sources, which are related to industrial activities and vehicle emissions. The spatial distribution maps based on ordinary kriging showed that high concentrations of heavy metals were located in the local factory area and in the southeast-northwest part of the study region, corresponding with the predominant wind directions. Analyses of lead isotopes confirmed that Pb in the study soils is predominantly derived from three Pb sources: dust generated during steel production, coal combustion, and the natural background. Moreover, the ternary mixture model based on lead isotope analysis indicates that lead in the study soils originates mainly from anthropogenic sources, which contribute much more

  1. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, F.T. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the `dry method`. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  2. Study on preferential adsorption of cationic-style heavy metals using amine-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs-NH2) as efficient adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Liu, Lili; Yang, Yong; Lin, Kuangfei

    2017-06-01

    Amine-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs-NH2) were successfully synthesized via a simple method, which exhibited excellent adsorbents properties for cationic-type heavy metals. The adsorption and desorption performances of Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and Ni2+ were fully investigated in detail and the possible adsorption mechanism was proposed on the basis of various characterizations as well as the adsorption priority. As a result, the MIONPs-NH2 could remove metal cations rapidly depending on the complexation of amino groups on surface and the adsorption was both sensitive to pH and ionic strength. Moreover, the corresponding competitive adsorption processes and desorption experiments indicated that the as-synthesized sample has the strongest affinity and adsorption priority for Pb2+, followed by Cu2+ and Zn2+, and finally by Cd2+and Ni2+. The present study may provide a helpful direction for the application of the MIONPs-NH2 in wastewater treatments involving multiple heavy metal cations.

  3. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)-peroxo complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong-Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-10-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)-peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)Fe(III)-(μ,η(2):η(2)-O2)-M(n+) (M(n+) = Sr(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Lu(3+), Y(3+) and Sc(3+); TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. Complexes that contain Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. We discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca(2+) ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.

  4. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  5. Structures, bonding and reactivity of iron and manganese high-valent metal-oxo complexes: A computational investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawana Pandey; Azaj Ansari; Nidhi Vyas; Gopalan Rajaraman

    2015-02-01

    Iron and manganese ions with terminal oxo and hydroxo ligands are discovered as key intermediates in several synthetic and biochemical catalytic cycles. Since many of these species possess vigorous catalytic abilities, they are extremely transient in nature and experiments which probe the structure and bonding on such elusive species are still rare. We present here comprehensive computational studies on eight iron and manganese oxo and hydroxo (FeIII/IV/V-O, FeIII-OH and MnIII/IV/V-O, MnIII-OH) species using dispersion corrected (B3LYP-D2) density functional method. By computing all the possible spin states for these eight species, we set out to determine the ground state S value of these species; and later on employing MO analysis, we have analysed the bonding aspects which contribute to the high reactivity of these species. Direct structural comparison to iron and manganese-oxo species are made and the observed similarity and differences among them are attributed to the intricate metal–oxygen bonding. By thoroughly probing the bonding in all these species, their reactivity towards common chemical reactions such as C–H activation and oxygen atom transfer are discussed.

  6. Adsorptive removal of methyl orange and methylene blue from aqueous solution with a metal-organic framework material, iron terephthalate (MOF-235).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Enamul; Jun, Jong Won; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2011-01-15

    An iron terephthalate (MOF-235), one of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), has been used for the removal of harmful dyes (anionic dye methyl orange (MO) and cationic dye methylene blue (MB)) from contaminated water via adsorption. The adsorption capacities of MOF-235 are much higher than those of an activated carbon. The performance of MOF-235 having high adsorption capacity is remarkable because the MOF-235 does not adsorb nitrogen at liquid nitrogen temperature. Based on this study, MOFs, even if they do not adsorb gases, can be suggested as potential adsorbents to remove harmful materials in the liquid phase. Adsorption of MO and MB at various temperatures shows that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process and that the entropy increases (the driving force of the adsorption) with adsorption of MO and MB. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Iron Nickel Oxide Nanopowder as Corrosion Inhibitor: Effect of Metallic Cations on Carbon Steel in Aqueous NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, A. U.; Mishra, Brajendra [Colorado School of Mines, Denver (United States); Mittal, Vikas [The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of iron-nickel oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.NiO) nanopowder (FeNi) as an anti-corrosion pigment for a different application. The corrosion protection ability and the mechanism involved was determined using aqueous solution of FeNi prepared in a corrosive solution containing 3.5 wt.% NaCl. Anti-corrosion abilities of aqueous solution were determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on line pipe steel (API 5L X-80). The protection mechanism involved the adsorption of metallic cations on the steel surface forming a protective film. Analysis of EIS spectra revealed that corrosion inhibition occurred at low concentration, whereas higher concentration of aqueous solution produced induction behavior.

  8. Sorption behavior of Pb(II) and Cd(II) on iron ore slime and characterization of metal ion loaded sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M; Rout, K; Mohapatra, B K; Anand, S

    2009-07-30

    The present investigation evaluates the sorption effectiveness of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions on iron ore slime (IOS) obtained from Jindal Steel Ltd., Vijayanagaram, India. The sorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics for both the cations. Pb(II) and Cd(II) sorption increased with the increase in pH from 2 to 4.5. The sorption data fitted well to Freundlich model as compared to Langmuir model. Synergistic effect of Pb(II) and Cd(II) on their sorption on IOS sample showed that Pb(II) sorption increases in presence of Cd(II) whereas Cd(II) sorption decreases. Presence of chloride or sulphate resulted in increased Pb(II) sorption but adversely affected Cd(II) sorption. The XRD patterns of Pb(II) adsorbed on IOS sample showed disappearance of some silica peaks and shifting of hematite peaks corresponding to 104 and 110 plane. For Cd(II) sorbed IOS sample, only peak shift for hematite of 104 and 110 plane was observed. Shifting of IR bands indicated that the Pb(II) sorption occurred through an inner sphere mechanism where as Cd(II) sorption occurred through outer sphere mechanism. EPMA studies showed that Pb(II) form a uniform thin layer and Cd(II) concentrate only on iron oxide phase. Regeneration and stability data on metal ion loaded IOS sample has been included.

  9. Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides by using a plasma technique and their application for removal of heavy-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Changlun; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides (NZVI/rGOs) from spent graphene oxide (GO)-bound iron ions were developed by using a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method to improve the reactivity and stability of NZVI. The NZVI/rGOs exhibited excellent water treatment performance with excellent removal capacities of 187.16 and 396.37 mg g(-1) for chromium and lead, respectively. Moreover, the NZVI/rGOs could be regenerated by plasma treatment and maintained high removal ability after four cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results implied that the removal mechanisms could be attributed to adsorption/precipitation, reduction, or both. Such multiple removal mechanisms by the NZVI/rGOs were attributed to the reduction ability of the NZVI particles and the role of dispersing and stabilizing abilities of the rGOs. The results indicated that the NZVI/rGOs prepared by a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method might be an effective composite for heavy-metal-ion removal.

  10. Effects of external atmosphere on the metallization phenomenology of composite pellets containing fines of iron ore and coal; Estudo do efeito da atmosfera gasosa na fenomenologia da metalizacao de pelotas auto-redutoras de minerio de ferro e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Abreu, Jose C.; Oliveira, Luiz M.R. de [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    1996-12-31

    This work presents the effects of temperature, time and CO/CO{sub 2} ratio on metallization and morphology of metallic iron produced by reduction of composite pellets containing fines of iron and anthracite coal. The experiments were conducted in a temperature range of 950 - 1250 deg C, and maximum time of 60 minutes. On the other hand, mixtures of CO/CO{sub 2}, from 100% CO{sub 2} up to 100% CO, were used in the experiments, conducted in an appropriate electrically heated furnace apparatus. In order to fulfill the objectives, the reduced pellets were chemically analyzed before observed in optical and scanning electronic microscopes and the results presented in graphics of percentage metallization versus . The following main results may be drawn from this work: (a) the type of external atmosphere exert a major influence on the reduction rates and metallization of the composite pellets: (i) when CO is raised in the mixture, there is an increase in metallization and reaction rate and the metallization continue unchanged; (ii) and uniform internal reduction mechanism occurs. (b) when CO is decreased in CO-CO{sub 2} mixture, the reduction led to a superficial metallic layer, the metallization, initially high, drops and a topochemical mechanism of re-oxidation occurs. (c) the scanning electronic microscopy allowed to observe that calcium is always present in the root of whiskers. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  12. Heavy metal accumulation in the above-ground vegetation and soil around an iron smelting factory in Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel F. Isola; Olusanya A. Olatunji; Akinjide M. Afolabi; Ademayowa A. Omodara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the accumulation of heavy metals in the above-ground vegetation and soil around an iron smelting factory located at the Fashina Area, Ile-Ife, Osun State, southwestern Nigeria. This was with a view to establish baseline data which can be used for assessing the impact of the steel processing industry in the area. Samples of the two most common herbaceous species (Chromolaena odorataand Aspilia africana) around the factory were randomly collected at 10 m away from the wall of the factory, and soil samples were randomly collected at 0–15 cm depths in the same area. The plant species were oven-dried, put through a mixed acid digestion procedure, and, along with soil samples, were analyzed for N, P, K, C, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Cr using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The data obtained were subjected to appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. The results revealed that the soils were slightly acidic, with pH values of 6.23±0.24 in the dry season and 6.10±0.16 in the rainy season. There was a significant difference (P P > N in both Aspilia africana andChromolaena odorata. In the dry season, C percentage concentration was higher inAspilia africana, while the other elements followed the trend observed in the rainy season. The concentration of Zn was higher inAspilia af-ricana in both the polluted site and the control site in the rainy season, while the concentrations of the other heavy metals were higher inChromolaena odoratain the dry season. This study revealed that the heavy metal concentration varied with the plant species and also with the prevailing seasonal conditions. Also, the accumulation and concentration of heavy metals in both plant species and in the soil indicated a potential hazard of the factory to the local environment.

  13. Homoleptic 2,2'-bipyridine metalates(-I) of iron and cobalt, one cocrystallized with an anthracene radical anion and the other with neutral anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennessel, William W; Ellis, John E

    2014-08-01

    Homoleptic 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) metalates of iron and cobalt have been synthesized directly from the corresponding homoleptic anthracene metalates. In the iron structure, bis[([2.2.2]cryptand)potassium(I)] tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ferrate(-I) anthracene(-I), [K(C18H36N2O6)]2[Fe(C10H8N2)3](C14H10), the asymmetric unit contains one potassium complex cation in a general position, the Fe center and one and a half bipy ligands of the ferrate complex on a crystallographic twofold axis that includes the Fe atom, and one half of an anthracene radical anion whose other half is generated by a crystallographic inversion center. The cations and anions are well separated and the geometry about the Fe center is essentially octahedral. In the cobalt structure, ([2.2.2]cryptand)potassium(I) bis(2,2'-bipyridine)cobaltate(-I) anthracene hemisolvate tetrahydrofuran (THF) disolvate, [K(C18H36N2O6)][Co(C10H8N2)2]·0.5C14H10·2C4H8O, the asymmetric unit contains the cation, anion, and both cocrystallized THF solvent molecules in general positions, and one half of a cocrystallized anthracene molecule whose other half is generated by a crystallographic inversion center. The cation and anion are well separated and the ligand planes in the cobaltate anion are periplanar. Each anthracene molecule is midway between and is oriented perpendicular to a pair of symmetry-related bipy ligands such that aromatic donor-acceptor interactions may play a role in the packing arrangement. The lengths of the bonds that connect the bipy rings support the assertion that the ligands are bipy radical anions in the iron structure. However, in the case of cobalt, these lengths are between the known ranges for a bipy radical anion and a bipy dianion, and therefore no conclusion can be made from the crystallography alone. One cocrystallized THF solvent molecule in the cobalt structure was modeled as disordered over three positions with appropriate geometric and thermal restraints, which resulted in a refined

  14. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Iron Sulfide-Carbon Core-Shell Nanorods as a Conversion-Type Battery Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shuo; Cao, Xianyi

    2017-01-01

    to prepare carbon-encapsulated ploy iron sulfide through solid-state chemical sulfurizing. The resulting core-shell nanorods consisting of approximately 13% carbon and 87% Fe7S8 have a hierarchically porous structure and a very high specific surface area of 277 m2g-1. When tested for use in fabrication...... of systematic structural analysis and microscopic mapping, we discuss the charge-discharge mechanisms and the crucial factors associated with the stability and structural changes upon charge-discharge cycling....

  15. Iron Cycling in Low pH Environments - Potential Application for the Recovery of Precious Metals from Industrial Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E. M.; Helle, T.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    The use of many different precious metals (gold, platinum…) and Rare Earth Elements (lanthanum, neodymium…) in the production of electronic products is drastically increasing. To meet this demand, not only mining activities but recently also the recovery of these elements from industrial waste is in the focus of research. It has been shown that the application of extracting solutions with pH values lower than 4 lead to an economically feasible recovery of industrially precious metals. This abiotic extraction efficiency can potentially be increased by using microorganisms capable of dissolving more stable minerals at low pH. In collaboration with industry, a waste incineration plant, and governmental authorities, we investigate the extraction and recovery of strategically important metals and Rare Earth Elements from industrial waste. We optimize the (bio)-geochemical conditions for the extraction of these elements. To this end, a variety of microorganisms are evaluated for efficient metal extraction. We focus on known laboratory cultures capable of oxidizing and reducing Fe minerals and S compounds. Additionally, unknown microbial communities able to increase the efficiency of precious metal extraction from the industrial waste are enriched from environments with comparable geochemical conditions found in the extraction solutions.

  16. New class of scorpionate: tris(tetrazolyl)-iron complex and its different coordination modes for alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ka Hyun; Lee, Kang Mun; Go, Min Jeong; Choi, Sung Ho; Park, Hyoung-Ryun; Kim, Youngjo; Lee, Junseong

    2014-08-18

    We report formation of a new metallascorpionate ligand, [FeL3](3-) (IPtz), containing a Fe core and three 5-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-tetrazole (LH2) ligands. It features two different binding sites, oxygen and nitrogen triangles, which consist of three oxygen or nitrogen donors from tetrazole. The binding affinities of the complex for three alkali metal ions were studied using UV spectrophotometry titrations. All three alkali metal ions show high affinities and binding constants (>3 × 10(6) M(-1)), based on the 1:1 binding isotherms to IPtz. The coordination modes of the alkali metals and IPtz in the solid were studied using X-ray crystallography; two different electron-donor sites show different coordination numbers for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) ions. The oxygen triangles have the κ(2) coordination mode with Li(+) and κ(3) coordination mode with Na(+) and K(+) ions, whereas the nitrogen triangles show κ(3) coordination with K(+) only. The different binding affinities of IPtz in the solid were manipulated using multiple metal precursors. A Fe-K-Zn trimetallic complex was constructed by assembly of an IPtz ligand, K, and Zn precursors and characterized using X-ray crystallography. Oxygen donors are coordinated with the K ion via the κ(3) coordination mode, and nitrogen donors are coordinated with Zn metal by κ(3) coordination. The solid-state structure was confirmed to be a honeycomb coordination polymer with a one-dimensional infinite metallic array, i.e., -(K-K-Fe-Zn-Fe-K)n-.

  17. Long Lived Photo-induced Charge Separation in a Trinuclear Iron-{mu}3-oxo-based Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Lauren; Kucheryavy, Pavel; Liu, Cunming; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Lockard, Jenny V.

    2017-06-29

    The presence of long-lived charge-separated excited states in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can enhance their photocatalytic activity by decreasing the probability that photogenerated electrons and holes recombine before accessing adsorbed reactants. Detecting these charge separated states via optical transient absorption, however, can be challenging when they lack definitive optical signatures. Here, we investigate the long-lived excited state of a MOF with such vague optical properties, MIL-100(Fe), comprised of Fe3-μ3-oxo clusters and trimesic acid linkers using Fe K-edge X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy, to unambiguously determine its ligand-to-metal charge transfer character. Spectra measured at time delays up to 3.6 μs confirm the long lived nature of the charge separated excited state. Several trinuclear iron μ3- oxo carboxylate complexes, which model the trinuclear cores of the MOF structure, are measured for comparison using both steady state XAS and XTA to further support this assignment and corresponding decay time. The MOF is prepared as a colloidal nanoparticle suspension for these measurements so both its fabrication and particle size analysis are presented, as well.

  18. 3D origami electrochemical device for sensitive Pb(2+) testing based on DNA functionalized iron-porphyrinic metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu; Yang, Chunlei; Zhu, Shaojun; Yan, Mei; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2017-01-15

    A highly sensitive electrochemical (EC) biosensor combined with a 3D origami device for detection of Pb(2+)was developed based on novel Au nanoparticles modified paper working electrode (Au-PWE) as sensor platform and DNA functionalized iron-porphyrinic metal-organic framework ((Fe-P)n-MOF-Au-GR) hybrids as signal probes. In the presence of Pb(2+), GR could be specifically cleaved at the ribonucleotide (rA) site, which produced the short (Fe-P)n-MOF-linked oligonucleotide fragment to hybridize with hairpin DNA immobilized on the surface of Au-PWE. Because of the mimic peroxidase property of (Fe-P)n-MOF, enzymatically amplified electrochemical signal was obtained to offer the sensitive detection of Pb(2+). In addition, benefiting from the Pb(2+) dependent GR, the proposed assay could selectively detect Pb(2+) in the presence of other metal ions. This method showed a good linear relationship between the current response and the Pb(2+) concentration ranging from 0.03 to 1000nmolL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.02nmolL(-1). The Au-PWE based electrochemical sensor along with the (Fe-P)n-MOF-Au-GR probe exhibited the advantages of low-cost, simple fabrication, high sensitivity and selectivity, providing potential application of real-time Pb(2+) detection both in environmental and biological samples.

  19. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  20. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  1. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  2. Reducing available amounts of heavy metals in contaminated soils by adding iron oxides. Final report; Verringerung der Bioverfuegbarkeit von Schwermetallen in kontaminierten Boeden durch Zugabe von Eisenoxiden. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluquet, E.; Mueller, I.

    1998-02-01

    This project was part of a German-French research co-operation and investigated the practicability to immobilize heavy metals by adding iron oxides to contaminated soils (harbour sediment, bracky marsh contaminated by emission of a zinc/lead smelter, alluvial Gley soil contaminated by mining activity). Pot and field trials were carried out using three different soils. Five iron bearing materials were added to the soil (1% pure Fe in soil dry matter): Red mud from Al-industry, Fe-precipitation sludge from drinking water treatment, bog iron ore, unused steel shot and steel shot waste from surface treatment of rolled steel plates. When mixed with the soil NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and DTPA extractable amounts of heavy metals and uptake by plants was markedly reduced. It was demonstrated that precipitated Fe-bearing sludge from drinking water treatment was a very effective material reducing the NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} soluble amounts by 40-50% (DTPA 30-40%) in the pot tests while the uptake by plants was reduced by 40% and more. Heavy metals were strongly bound in a fixed order Cd>Pb>Zn>Cu and stayed immobilized until the end of project. Heavy metals were immobilized to a certain extent in field trials, but less effect was observed on concentration in plants and soil extracts compared with the pot tests. In practice the treatment should exceed the 1% pure Fe tested and the application should more homogeneously affect the soil layer where the plant roots mainly grow. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen eines deutsch-franzoesischen Projektverbundes wurde die Moeglichkeit der Immobilisierung von Schwermetallen in kontaminierten Boeden durch gezielte Zufuhr von Eisenoxiden untersucht. Die praxisorientierten Untersuchungen wurden in Gefaess- und Feldversuchen mit drei unterschiedlichen Boeden (Spuelfeldboden aus Hafenschlick, immissionsbelastete Brackmarsch, durch Bergbau belasteter Auenboden) ausgefuehrt. Dazu wurden fuenf eisen(oxid)haltige Materialien (Rotschlamm aus der Al

  3. Determination Of Iron, Cobalt, Chromium And Copper Metals In Commercially Available Khat (Catha Edulis Forsk In Arba Minch, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammed Yimer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Khat (Catha sedulous foresk is a plant that grows in a certain area of east Africa and Arab peninsula. A large number of peoples in Ethiopia chew chat leaves because of its pleasurable and stimulating effects. In the present study the levels of selected trace metals (Cu, Co, Cr and Fe in two different kinds of Khat sampled from different khat shops in Arba Minch were analyzed. The discern weights of oven dried khat samples were digested by wet digestion using 3ml of HNO3, 1ml of HClO4 and 1ml of H2O2 by setting the temperature first to 60o c for 30 min and then increased to 210o c for the next 2h and 30 min. The content of minerals in the digests was analyzed using flame atomic spectrometry. The concentration of the trace metals in dry weight (µg/g were obtained in the khat samples Co 5µg/g, Cu 4µg/g, Fe 2.9µg/g and Cr 3µg/g. Among the metal content analyzed Co was the most abundant one followed by Cu and Cr whereas Fe was less abundant metal in khat sample that grown in Arba Minch area.

  4. 77 FR 14499 - Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... Comment 2: Financial Ratios Comment 3: Errors in Calculation of Indonesian Surrogate Values Comment 4... Administrative Review, 76 FR 55357 (September 7, 2011) (Preliminary Results). \\2\\ See Floor-Standing, Metal-Top... Final Results of Administrative Review, 77 FR 1455 (January 10, 2012). Based on our analysis of...

  5. Evaluation of the Accumulation of Trace Metals (as, U, CR, CU, PB, Zn) on Iron-Manganese Coatings on in Situ Stream Pebbles and Emplaced Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, M. M.; Blake, J.; Crossey, L. J.; Ali, A.; Hansson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to trace metals (As, U, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn) has potential negative health effects on human populations and wildlife. Geothermal waters often have elevated concentrations of trace elements and understanding the geochemical cycling of these elements can be challenging. Previous studies have utilized in situ stream pebbles and glass or ceramic substrates with iron-manganese oxide coatings to understand contamination and or chemical cycling. This project's main focus is to develop an ideal tracing method using adsorption onto substrate surfaces and to define key parameters that are necessary for the phenomenon of adsorption between trace metals and these surface coatings to occur. Sampling locations include the Jemez River and Rio San Antonio in the Jemez mountains, northern New Mexico. Both streams have significant geothermal inputs. Pebbles and cobbles were gathered from the active stream channel and 6mm glass beads and 2 X1 in. ceramic plates were placed in streams for three weeks to allow for coating accumulation. Factors such as leachate type, water pH, substrate type, coating accumulation period and leach time were all considered in this experiment. It was found that of the three leachates (aqua regia, 10% aqua regia and hydroxylamine), hydroxylamine was the most effective at leaching coatings without dissolving substrates. Samples leached with aqua regia and 10% aqua regia were found to lose weight and mass over the following 5, 7, and 10 day measurements. Glass beads were determined to be more effective than in stream pebbles as an accumulation substrate: coatings were more easily controlled and monitored. Samples leached with hydroxylamine for 5 hours and 72 hours showed little difference in their leachate concentrations, suggesting that leach time has little impact on the concentration of leachate samples. This research aims to find the best method for trace metal accumulation in streams to aid in understanding geochemical cycling.

  6. Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrezaei, Parastoo; Alpatova, Alla; Khosravi, Kambiz; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Chen, Yuan; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-06-15

    The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of NAs in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the NAs removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the NAs removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox(®) bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  8. Impact of carboxymethyl cellulose coating on iron sulphide nanoparticles stability, transport, and mobilization potential of trace metals present in soils and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Van Havere, Lynn; Du Laing, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The stability and transport behaviour of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized iron sulphide (FeS) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as well as their concurrent scavenging and mobilization of trace metal contaminants from field-contaminated soils and sediment was studied through a series of batch and column experiments. The synthesized CMC-FeS ENPs were shown to have a hydrodynamic diameter of 154.5 ± 5.8 nm and remained stable in suspension for a prolonged period of time (several weeks) when kept under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of CMC, much larger FeS particles were formed, which quickly aggregated and precipitated within minutes. Batch experiments indicated that the CMC-FeS ENPs have a high affinity for metal contaminants (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn), as high amounts of these trace metals could be retrieved in the aqueous phase after treatment of the soils with the nanoparticles (i.e., up to 29 times more compared to the water-leachable metal contents). Furthermore, batch retention of the nanoparticles by the solid soil phase was low (trace metals, although no clear trend could be observed and metal leaching appeared to depend on the specific element under consideration, the type of extraction liquid, as well as on soil properties. Column breakthrough tests demonstrated that the CMC-FeS ENPs were highly mobile in the tested soil, even without the use of an external pressure (i.e., just via gravitational percolation). Maximal breakthrough of the nanoparticles was observed after approximately 10 or 16 pore volumes (PVs) for 83.3 or 500 mg L(-1) CMC-FeS ENPs, respectively, and only about 7% of the nanoparticles were retained by the soil after 22.7 PVs. Simultaneous elution of trace elements showed that up to 19, 8.7, or 11% of the respective Cd, Pb, or Zn content originally present in the soil was extracted after 22.7 PVs, with initial peaking occurring during the first 5 PVs. Moreover, filtration of the percolates over 0.10 μm (which

  9. Effect of humic acid and transition metal ions on the debromination of decabromodiphenyl by nano zero-valent iron: kinetics and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lei; Liang, Bin; Fang, Zhanqiang, E-mail: sunmoon124@163.com; Xie, Yingying [South China Normal University, School of Chemistry and Environment (China); Tsang, Eric Pokeung [Guangdong Technology Research Centre for Ecological Management and Remediation of Water System (China)

    2014-12-15

    E-waste sites are one of the main sources of the pollutant decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209); contaminated farmland and water bodies urgently need to be remediated. As a potential in situ remediation technology, nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) technology effectively removes PBDEs. However, the humic acid (HA) and heavy metals in the contaminated sites affect the remediation effects. In this study, we explored the influence of HA and transition metals on the removal of PBDEs by nZVI. The specific surface area and average size of the nZVI particles we prepared were 35 m{sup 2}/g and 50–80 nm, respectively. The results showed that HA inhibited the removal of PBDEs; as the concentration of HA increased, its inhibitory effect intensified and the k{sub obs} decreased. However, the three metal ions (Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+}) enhanced the removal of PBDEs. The enhancement effect was followed the order Ni{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. As the concentration of metal ions increased, the promotion effect improved. The synergistic effect of HA and the metal ions was manifested in the combination of the inhibitory effect and the enhancement effect. The values of the first-order kinetic constants (k{sub obs}) under the combined effect were between the values of the rate constants under the individual components. The inhibitory mechanism was the chemisorption of HA, i.e., the benzene carboxylic and phenolic hydroxyl groups in HA occupied the surfactant reactive sites of nZVI, thus inhibiting the removal of BDE209. The promotion mechanism of Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} can be explained by their reduction to zero valence on the nZVI surface; furthermore, Ni{sup 2+} strongly affects the debromination and dehydrogenation of BDE209, leading to a stronger promotability than Cu{sup 2+}or Co{sup 2+}.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Applications in the Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuolian Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the applicability of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles for the selective removal of toxic heavy metals from electroplating wastewater. The maghemite nanoparticles of 60 nm were synthesized using a coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Batch experiments were carried out for the removal of Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions by maghemite nanoparticles. The effects of contact time, initial concentration of Pb2+ ions, solution pH, and salinity on the amount of Pb2+ removed were investigated. The adsorption process was found to be highly pH dependent, which made the nanoparticles selectively adsorb this metal from wastewater. The adsorption of Pb2+ reached equilibrium rapidly within 15 min and the adsorption data were well fitted with the Langmuir isotherm.

  11. Strengthening of metallic iron rust in reduced ilmenite%还原钛铁矿中金属铁锈蚀反应速率过程的强化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇峰; 刘霞; 邱冠周; 姜涛

    2012-01-01

    Using Panzhihua reduced ilmenite as material, the effects of hydrochloric acid and oxygen gas on rust course of metallic iron and Ti-Fe separation in reduced ilmenite in NH4CI aqueous solution were studied. The results show that when hydrochloric acid is added in the solution, metallic iron in reduced ilmenite is leached instead of being rusted. When oxygen gas is introduced into the reaction system, the rust reaction mechanism of metallic iron is not changed, and rust rate is increased remarkably, and the Ti-Fe separation effect is greatly enhanced. Rust of metallic iron in reduced ihnenite is controlled by internal diffusions. After oxygen gas is introduced, the apparent activation energy of rust reaction is decreased to 8.12 kJ/mol from 13.28 kJ/mol in air atmosphere. Oxygen gas improves the internal diffusions and cathodic reaction of rust of metallic iron. Consequently, rust rate of metallic iron is increased.%以攀枝花还原钛铁矿为原料,研究在NH4Cl溶液体系下盐酸和氧气对还原钛铁矿中金属铁锈蚀反应过程及钛铁分离效果的影响.研究结果表明:添加盐酸后,还原钛铁矿中金属铁的锈蚀反应有转变为浸出反应的倾向;通入氧气后,还原钛铁矿中金属铁的锈蚀反应历程没有发生变化,锈蚀反应速度显著加快,钛铁分离效果明显改善;还原钛铁矿中金属铁的锈蚀反应过程受内扩散控制,通入氧气后锈蚀反应的表观活化能由通入空气时的13.28kJ/mol降低至8.12 kJ/mol,氧气加快内扩散过程,促进还原钛铁矿中金属铁锈蚀过程的阴极反应,从而加快金属铁的锈蚀反应速率.

  12. Kinetic Analysis of a Globin-Coupled Histidine Kinase, AfGcHK: Effects of the Heme Iron Complex, Response Regulator, and Metal Cations on Autophosphorylation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Veronika; Stranava, Martin; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula; Hranicek, Jakub; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2015-08-18

    The globin-coupled histidine kinase, AfGcHK, is a part of the two-component signal transduction system from the soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5. Activation of its sensor domain significantly increases its autophosphorylation activity, which targets the His183 residue of its functional domain. The phosphate group of phosphorylated AfGcHK is then transferred to the cognate response regulator. We investigated the effects of selected variables on the autophosphorylation reaction's kinetics. The kcat values of the heme Fe(III)-OH(-), Fe(III)-cyanide, Fe(III)-imidazole, and Fe(II)-O2 bound active AfGcHK forms were 1.1-1.2 min(-1), and their Km(ATP) values were 18.9-35.4 μM. However, the active form bearing a CO-bound Fe(II) heme had a kcat of 1.0 min(-1) but a very high Km(ATP) value of 357 μM, suggesting that its active site structure differs strongly from the other active forms. The Fe(II) heme-bound inactive form had kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.4 min(-1) and 78 μM, respectively, suggesting that its low activity reflects a low affinity for ATP relative to that of the Fe(III) form. The heme-free form exhibited low activity, with kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.3 min(-1) and 33.6 μM, respectively, suggesting that the heme iron complex is essential for high catalytic activity. Overall, our results indicate that the coordination and oxidation state of the sensor domain heme iron profoundly affect the enzyme's catalytic activity because they modulate its ATP binding affinity and thus change its kcat/Km(ATP) value. The effects of the response regulator and different divalent metal cations on the autophosphorylation reaction are also discussed.

  13. Porphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks for solar fuel synthesis photocatalysis: band gap tuning via iron substitutions

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Alex; Ruiz-Salvador, A. Rabdel; Hernandez, Norge C.; Calero, Sofia; Hamad, S; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are very promising due to a combination of high tuneability and convenient porous structure. Introducing porphyrin units within MOFs is a potential route to engineer these natural photosynthesis molecular catalysts into artificial photosynthesis heterogeneous catalysts. Using computer simulations based on density functional theory, we explore how to modify the electronic structure of porphyrin-based MOFs to make them suitable for the pho...

  14. Mineralogical change and geochemical behavior of heavy metals in iron oxide minerals formed by weathering of black shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Y.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.; Jung, E.

    2010-12-01

    The black shales(slates) in Goesan and Dukpyong areas in Korea have been known to contain high levels of heavy metals. The local fault zones mainly consisting of Fe oxides are found in this area, where acid rock drainage (ARD) occurrence is also observed. Samples including bedrocks, encrustations, and weathering products were collected from two sites in the study area and the formation of secondary Fe oxides and their roles in the behavior of heavy metals during black shale weathering were studied by mineralogical and geochemical analyses. Illite, feldspar, and quartz are dominant primary minerals and goethite, jarosite, and kaolinite are secondary minerals identified from XRD analysis. The main chemical components of weathering products are Fe2O3, and SiO2 by XRF analysis. From SEM and EDS analysis, K-jarosite and transformation of jarosite to goethite are identified. Illite probaly plays an important role to supply K for the formation of K-jarosite. Subtle increase in pH values(>4) can transform jarosite into goethite, and considering SEM and EDS analysis and pH values of samples, the goethite is probably formed by transformation of jarosite or oxidation of pyrite. Zn, As, Pb, Ni, and Cu are the most abundant heavy metals in the weathering products regardless of Fe oxide facies, and Cr in the bed rocks from ICP-MS, ICP-AES analyses, and enrichment factor calculation. Zn is the most enriched element in the samples containing goethite, indicating its affinity to goethite by substitution, adsorption, or coprecipitation. Arsenic is the most abundant heavy metal in the samples containg jarosite probably by the substitution of AsO42- for SO42-. Cr is the only element released during weathering by mass balance calculation.

  15. Simple combination of oxidants with zero-valent-iron (ZVI) achieved very rapid and highly efficient removal of heavy metals from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuejun; Yang, Zhe; Dong, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaohong; Ren, Qidong; Lv, Xiaofang; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This study, for the first time, demonstrated a continuously accelerated Fe(0) corrosion driven by common oxidants (i.e., NaClO, KMnO4 or H2O2) and thereby the rapid and efficient removal of heavy metals (HMs) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) under the experimental conditions of jar tests and column running. ZVI simply coupled with NaClO, KMnO4 or H2O2 (0.5 mM) resulted in almost complete As(V) removal within only 10 min with 1000 μg/L of initial As(V) at initial pH of 7.5(±0.1) and liquid solid ratio of 200:1. Simultaneous removal of 200 μg/L of initial Cd(II) and Hg(II) to 2.4-4.4 μg/L for Cd(II) and to 4.0-5.0 μg/L for Hg(II) were achieved within 30 min. No deterioration of HM removal was observed during the ten recycles of jar tests. The ZVI columns activated by 0.1 mM of oxidants had stably treated 40,200 (NaClO), 20,295 (KMnO4) and 40,200 (H2O2) bed volumes (BV) of HM-contaminated drinking water, but with no any indication of As breakthrough (removal from both the jar tests and column running implied a continuous and stable activation (overcoming of iron passivation) of Fe(0) surface by the oxidants. Via the proper increase in oxidant dosing, the ZVI/oxidant combination was applicable to treat highly As(V)-contaminated wastewater. During Fe(0) surface corrosion accelerated by oxidants, a large amount of fresh and reactive iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were continuously generated, which were responsible for the rapid and efficient removal of HMs through multiple mechanisms including adsorption and co-precipitation. A steady state of Fe(0) surface activation and HM removal enabled this simply coupled system to remove HMs with high speed, efficiency and perdurability.

  16. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  17. Iron, copper, zinc and manganese transport and regulation in pathogenic Enterobacteria: correlations between strains, site of infection and the relative importance of the different metal transport systems for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle ePorcheron

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For all microorganisms, acquisition of metal ions is essential for survival in the environment or in their infected host. Metal ions are required in many biological processes as components of metalloproteins and serve as cofactors or structural elements for enzymes. However, it is critical for bacteria to ensure that metal uptake and availability is in accordance with physiological needs, as an imbalance in bacterial metal homeostasis is deleterious. Indeed, host defense strategies against infection either consist of metal starvation by sequestration or toxicity by the highly concentrated release of metals. To overcome these host strategies, bacteria employ a variety of metal uptake and export systems and finely regulate metal homeostasis by numerous transcriptional regulators, allowing them to adapt to changing environmental conditions. As a consequence, iron, zinc, manganese and copper uptake systems significantly contribute to the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. However, during the course of our experiments on the role of iron and manganese transporters in extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC virulence, we observed that depending on the strain tested, the importance of tested systems in virulence may be different. This could be due to the different set of systems present in these strains, but literature also suggests that as each pathogen must adapt to the particular microenvironment of its site of infection, the role of each acquisition system in virulence can differ from a particular strain to another. In this review, we present the systems involved in metal transport by Enterobacteria and the main regulators responsible for their controlled expression. We also discuss the relative role of these systems depending on the pathogen and the tissues they infect.

  18. A high performance layered transition metal oxide cathode material obtained by simultaneous aluminum and iron cationic substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mofid, Wassima; Ivanov, Svetlozar; Konkin, Alexander; Bund, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The method of self-combustion synthesis was applied to prepare double Al- and Fe-substituted LiNi0.6Mn0.2Co0.15Al0.025Fe0.025O2 (NMCAF) and non-substituted LiNi0.6Mn0.2Co0.2O2 (NMC-3:1:1) cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. The novel NMCAF structure obtained by simultaneous cationic substitution showed an improved capacity and high stability during electrochemical cycling. X-ray diffraction patterns proved that both materials have a layered α-NaFeO2 type structure with a good hexagonal ordering. It was found that NMCAF has increased a and c lattice parameters due to a structural expansion caused by Al and Fe ion substitution. Rietveld refinement analysis revealed a significant decrease of the cationic mixing after the metal substitution, suggesting a structural stabilization. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy showed that Al and Fe substitution markedly influenced the EPR spectrum of NMC-(3:1:1). The EPR spectral lines of both materials are attributed to Mn4+ and Ni2+ present in the structure. The change in the Ni2+ line after the metal substitution suggests a redistribution of the Ni ions in the structure, which can be related to the diminished cation mixing in the NMCAF. The improved electrochemical behavior of NMCAF is closely connected to the stabilization of the layered structure and the reduction of the cation mixing after metal substitution.

  19. Metal exposure in cows grazing pasture contaminated by iron industry: Insights from magnetic particles used as tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrault, Sophie; Catinon, Mickaël; Boudouma, Omar; Bordier, Louise; Agnello, Gregory; Reynaud, Stéphane; Tissut, Michel

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MP) emitted by an iron smelter were used to investigate the exposure of cows grazing on a grassland polluted by these MP and by large amounts of potentially toxic elements (PTE). The morphology as well as the chemical composition of the MP separated from cow dung were studied. Large amounts of typical MP were found (1.1 g kg(-1) dry weight) in the cow dung sampled from the exposed site, whereas these particles were absent from the reference unpolluted site. The ingested MP were mainly technogenic magnetic particles (TMP) emitted by the smelter. Considering the MP concentration in the grazed grass on the exposed site, it was concluded that cows absorb the MP not only from the grass but also from the soil surface. The results of a mild acidic leaching of the MP suggested that the particles were possibly submitted to a superficial dissolution in the abomasum, pointing at a potential route of transfer of the PTE originating from the TMP and leading into food chains. TMP were only a small part of the anthropogenic contamination having affected the soil and the dung. However, due to their unequivocal signature, TMP are a powerful tracer of the distribution of PTE in the different compartments constituting the food chains and the ecosystems. Furthermore, the measurement of the particle sizes gave evidence that a noticeable proportion of the MP could enter the respiratory tract.

  20. Influence of Forced Convection on the Solidification of Metal in Cast-Iron and Ceramic Ingot Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, O. A.; Dremov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    A nonstationary problem of solidification of an ingot in molds with walls of varying thermal conductivity has been solved by the variational method with account taken of forced convection in the liquid phase of the metal. A formula for the temperature distribution in the liquid phase and the dependence of the time of advance of the solidification front on its coordinates have been obtained. Numerical calculations of the time of solidification of the ingot in castiron and ceramic molds have been done at different convection rates.

  1. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  2. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  3. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation

  4. Chemical versus Enzymatic Digestion of Contaminated Estuarine Sediment: Relative Importance of Iron and Manganese Oxides in Controlling Trace Metal Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A.; Olsen, Y. S.

    2000-12-01

    Chemical and enzymatic reagents have been employed to determine available concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in contaminated estuarine sediment. Gastric and intestinal enzymes (pepsin, pH 2, and trypsin, pH 7·6, respectively) removed significantly more metal than was water-soluble or exchangeable (by seawater or ammonium acetate), while gastro-intestinal fluid of the demersal teleost, Pleuronectes platessa L. (plaice), employed to operationally define a bioavailable fraction of contaminants, generally solubilized more metal than the model enzymes. Manganese was considerably more available than Fe under these conditions and it is suggested that the principal mechanism of contaminant release is via surface complexation and reductive solubilization of Mn oxides, a process which is enhanced under conditions of low pH. Of the chemical reagents tested, acetic acid best represents the fraction of Mn (as well as Cu and Zn) which is available under gastro-intestinal conditions, suggesting that the reducing tendency of acetate is similar to that of the ligands encountered in the natural digestive environment. Although the precise enzymatic and non-enzymatic composition of plaice gastro-intestinal fluid may be different to that encountered in more representative, filter-feeding or burrowing organisms, a general implication of this study is that contaminants associated with Mn oxides are significantly more bioavailable than those associated with Fe oxides, and that contaminant bioavailability may be largely dictated by the oxidic composition of contaminated sediment.

  5. Application of iron and zinc isotopes to track the sources and mechanisms of metal loading in a mountain watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ian, Ridley W.; Lamothe, P.J.; Kimball, B.A.; Verplanck, P.L.; Runkel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Here the hydrogeochemical constraints of a tracer dilution study are combined with Fe and Zn isotopic measurements to pinpoint metal loading sources and attenuation mechanisms in an alpine watershed impacted by acid mine drainage. In the tested mountain catchment, ??56Fe and ??66Zn isotopic signatures of filtered stream water samples varied by ???3.5??? and 0.4???, respectively. The inherent differences in the aqueous geochemistry of Fe and Zn provided complimentary isotopic information. For example, variations in ??56Fe were linked to redox and precipitation reactions occurring in the stream, while changes in ??66Zn were indicative of conservative mixing of different Zn sources. Fen environments contributed distinctively light dissolved Fe (+0.4???). Acidic drainage from mine wastes contributed heavier dissolved Fe (???+0.5???) and lighter Zn (???+0.2???) isotopes relative to the fen. Upwelling of Fe-rich groundwater near the mouth of the catchment was the major source of Fe (??56Fe ??? 0???) leaving the watershed in surface flow, while runoff from mining wastes was the major source of Zn. The results suggest that given a strong framework for interpretation, Fe and Zn isotopes are useful tools for identifying and tracking metal sources and attenuation mechanisms in mountain watersheds. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A simple solvothermal process for fabrication of a metal-organic framework with an iron oxide enclosure for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Jiao, Zhe; Yao, Weixuan

    2014-12-05

    An active magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid material was prepared using a novel in situ solvothermal method in the presence of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, that holds much promise for large-scale synthesis. MIL-101(Fe), an iron terephthalate with pore structure and high resistance to water and common solvents, was functionalized as a model with superparamagnetic qualities, using Fe3O4. The electrostatic interaction between Fe3O4 and metal ions was thereby used to chemically stabilize magnetic nanoparticles, and thus MOF crystals were uniformly enclosed by Fe3O4 to form a homogeneous magnetic product identified as a Fe3O4/MIL-101 composite. This hybrid material with magnetic susceptibility but with the lowest possible loading amount of Fe3O4 was examined, and its potential application for magnetic solid-phase extraction of six organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from human hair and urine samples, followed by gas chromatography analysis, was assessed. The main effect parameters including solution ionic strength, desorption solvent, extraction time and desorption time were investigated in sequence. Under optimized conditions, this method showed low detection limits (0.21-2.28 ng/mL), wide linearity, and good precision (1.8-8.7% for intra-day, 2.9-9.4% for inter-day). The matrix interference produced by hair or urine could be effectively eliminated using this method, and satisfactory recoveries of the spiked samples were 76.8-94.5% and 74.9-92.1%, respectively, indicating that the Fe3O4/MIL-101 sorbents are feasible for the analysis of trace analytes from biological samples.

  7. Economic Geology (Metals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jacob E.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews metalliferous ore-deposit research reported in 1971. Research was dominated by isotopic studies, and worldwide metals exploration was marked by announcements of important new discoveries of base metals, iron ore, nickel, titanium, and uranium. (Author/PR)

  8. Economic Geology (Metals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jacob E.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews metalliferous ore-deposit research reported in 1971. Research was dominated by isotopic studies, and worldwide metals exploration was marked by announcements of important new discoveries of base metals, iron ore, nickel, titanium, and uranium. (Author/PR)

  9. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by the pyrolysis of a compression activated iron(II) phthalocyanine/phthalocyanine metal-free derivative/ferric acetate mixture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tawanda Mugadza; Edith Antunes; Tebello Nyokong

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from an activated mixture of iron (II) phthalocyanine, its metal-free derivative and ferric acetate. The powdered mixture was activated by compression into a tablet by applying a force of 300 kN, followed by re-grinding into powder and heating it to high temperatures (1000°C). The activation by compression resulted in more than 50% debundling of SWCNTs as judged by transition electron microscopy. Acid functionalization of the SWCNTs was confirmed by the increase in the D:G ratio from 0.56 to 0.87 in the Raman spectra and the observation of an average of one carboxylic acid group per 13 carbon atoms from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA also showed that the initial decomposition temperatures for the activated and non-activated mixtures to be 205°C and 245°C, respectively. Hence, activation leads to the lowering of the pyrolysis temperature of the phthalocyanines. X-ray diffraction, electronic absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectra were also employed to characterize the SWCNT.

  10. Formation Reason and Countermeasures of Non-Metal Inclusions of Cast Irons%铸铁非金属夹杂物的形成原因与应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文和; 王峰; 赵鲁生

    2011-01-01

    The composition and source of slag of cast irons melted in cupola and medium frequency furnace was introduced. The measures to reduce non-metal inclusions in cast irons were proposed as follows: ( 1 )improving metallurgical quality of the cast irons; (2 )improving the morphology and distribution of the nonmetal inclusions. The formation reason of the secondary slag was described. It's considered that, by adopting proper measures and iron melt treating technique, the secondary oxidation of the iron melt and its harmful effect can be reduced.%介绍了冲天炉和中频炉熔炼铸铁的炉渣成分及来源,提出减少铸铁内部非金属夹杂物的措施:(1)提高铸铁的冶金质量;(2)改善铸铁中非金属夹杂物的形态及分布.描述了铁液二次渣的形成原因,认为采取适宜的措施及铁液处理技术,可以减轻铁液二次氧化及其不利影响.

  11. Hepcidin Suppresses Brain Iron Accumulation by Downregulating Iron Transport Proteins in Iron-Overloaded Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Luo, Qianqian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Iron accumulates progressively in the brain with age, and iron-induced oxidative stress has been considered as one of the initial causes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Based on the role of hepcidin in peripheral organs and its expression in the brain, we hypothesized that this peptide has a role to reduce iron in the brain and hence has the potential to prevent or delay brain iron accumulation in iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of hepcidin expression adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) and hepcidin peptide on brain iron contents, iron transport across the brain-blood barrier, iron uptake and release, and also the expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons. We demonstrated that hepcidin significantly reduced brain iron in iron-overloaded rats and suppressed transport of transferrin-bound iron (Tf-Fe) from the periphery into the brain. Also, the peptide significantly inhibited expression of TfR1, DMT1, and Fpn1 as well as reduced Tf-Fe and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake and iron release in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons, while downregulation of hepcidin with hepcidin siRNA retrovirus generated opposite results. We concluded that, under iron-overload, hepcidin functions to reduce iron in the brain by downregulating iron transport proteins. Upregulation of brain hepcidin by ad-hepcidin emerges as a new pharmacological treatment and prevention for iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Influence of departures from LTE on calcium, titanium, and iron abundance determinations in cool giants of different metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashonkina, L. I.; Sitnova, T. N.; Pakhomov, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    We have performed statistical equilibrium calculations for Ca I-Ca II, Ti I-Ti II, and Fe I-Fe II by taking into account the nonequilibrium line formation conditions (the non-LTE approach) in model atmospheres of giant stars with effective temperatures 4000 K ≤ T eff ≤ 5000 K and metal abundances -4 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0. The dependence of departures from LTE on atmospheric parameters has been analyzed. We present the non-LTE abundance corrections for 28 Ca I lines, 42 Ti I lines, 54 Ti II lines, and 262 Fe I lines and a three-dimensional interpolation code to obtain the non-LTE correction online for an individual line and specified atmospheric parameters.

  13. Influence of departures from LTE on calcium, titanium, and iron abundance determinations in cool giants of different metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Pakhomov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation for Ca I-Ca II, Ti I-Ti II, and Fe I-Fe II is considered in model atmospheres of giant stars with an effective temperature of 4000 K $\\le$ Teff $\\le$ 5000 K and a metal abundance of -4 $\\le$ [Fe/H] $\\le$ 0. The departures from LTE are analyzed depending on atmospheric parameters. We present the non-LTE abundance corrections for 28 lines of Ca I, 42 lines of Ti I, 54 lines of Ti II, and 262 lines of Fe I and a three-dimensional interpolation code to obtain the non-LTE correction online (http://spectrum.inasan.ru/nLTE/) for an individual spectral line and given atmospheric parameters.

  14. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous macroscopic algae were observed in slightly acidic to circumneutral (pH 5.9-6.5), metal-rich stream water that leaked out from a former uranium mining district (Ronneburg, Germany). These algae differed in color and morphology and were encrusted with Fe-deposits. To elucidate their potential interaction with Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), we collected algal samples at three time points during summer 2013 and studied the algae-bacteria-mineral compositions via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and a 16S and 18S rRNA gene-based bacterial and algae community analysis. Surprisingly, sequencing analysis of 18S rRNA gene regions of green and brown algae revealed high homologies with the freshwater algae Tribonema (99.9-100 %). CLSM imaging indicated a loss of active chloroplasts in the algae cells, which may be responsible for the change in color in gene-targeted studies revealed that Gallionella-related FeOB dominated the bacterial RNA and DNA communities (70-97 and 63-96 %, respectively), suggesting their capacity to compete with the abiotic Fe-oxidation under the putative oxygen-saturated conditions that occur in association with photosynthetic algae. Quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed even higher Gallionella-related 16S rRNA gene copy numbers on the surface of green algae compared to the brown algae. The latter harbored a higher microbial diversity, including some putative predators of algae. A loss of chloroplasts in the brown algae could have led to lower photosynthetic activities and reduced EPS production, which is known to affect predator colonization. Collectively, our results suggest the coexistence of oxygen-generating algae Tribonema sp. and strictly microaerophilic neutrophilic FeOB in a heavy metal-rich environment.

  15. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    deficiency altered the cellular content of these proteins so that transferrin receptors were higher and ferritin lower. The transport of iron from brain to blood was addressed in the last part of the thesis. It was found that in the case of iron and transferrin, there is no evidence showing other significant routes of transport from the brain extracellular fluid into the blood than drainage to the ventricular system followed by export to the blood via the arachnoid villi. The turnover of transferrin in the CSF was found to be very high. For reasons mentioned above, transferrin of the CSF is of little significance for transport and cellular delivery of iron to transferrin receptor-expressing neurons. Instead, transferrin of the CSF probably plays a significant role for neutralization and export to the blood of metals, including iron. Once appearing in blood, transferrin of the CSF was degraded at the same rate as intravenously injected transferrin, which indicates that the transferrin of CSF is not altered to an extent that changes its catabolism during the passage from CSF to blood plasma. The metabolism of iron in the developing brain was found to differ markedly when compared to that of the adult brain. A developing regulated transfer of iron to the brain was reflected morphologically by a higher content of transferrin receptors and non-heme iron in endothelial cells of the developing rat brain than in the adult. Neurons had a very low level of transferrin receptors. After about 20 days of age, iron transport into the brain decreased rapidly, and transferrin receptors appeared on neurons. Iron and transferrin injected into the ventricular system of the developing brain were much more widely distributed in the brain parenchyma than in the adult brain. This high accumulation of substances injected into the ventricles in young animals is probably due to the lower rate of production and turnover of CSF, which will increase the time available for diffusion of proteins into the

  16. The iron isotope composition of enstatite meteorites: Implications for their origin and the metal/sulfide Fe isotopic fractionation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2014-10-01

    Despite their unusual chemical composition, it is often proposed that the enstatite chondrites represent a significant component of Earth’s building materials, based on their terrestrial similarity for numerous isotope systems. In order to investigate a possible genetic relationship between the Fe isotope composition of enstatite chondrites and the Earth, we have analyzed 22 samples from different subgroups of the enstatite meteorites, including EH and EL chondrites, aubrites (main group and Shallowater) and the Happy Canyon impact melt. We have also analyzed the Fe isotopic compositions of separated (magnetic and non-magnetic) phases from both enstatite chondrites and achondrites. On average, EH3-5 chondrites (δ56Fe = 0.003 ± 0.042‰; 2 standard deviation; n = 9; including previous literature data) as well as EL3 chondrites (δ56Fe = 0.030 ± 0.038‰; 2 SD; n = 2) have identical and homogeneous Fe isotopic compositions, indistinguishable from those of the carbonaceous chondrites and average terrestrial peridotite. In contrast, EL6 chondrites display a larger range of isotopic compositions (-0.180‰ < δ56Fe < 0.181‰; n = 11), a result of mixing between isotopically distinct mineral phases (metal, sulfide and silicate). The large Fe isotopic heterogeneity of EL6 is best explained by chemical/mineralogical fragmentation and brecciation during the complex impact history of the EL parent body. Enstatite achondrites (aubrites) also exhibit a relatively large range of Fe isotope compositions: all main group aubrites are enriched in the light Fe isotopes (δ56Fe = -0.170 ± 0.189‰; 2 SD; n = 6), while Shallowater is, isotopically, relatively heavy (δ56Fe = 0.045 ± 0.101‰; 2 SD; n = 4; number of chips). We take this variation to suggest that the main group aubrite parent body formed a discreet heavy Fe isotope-enriched core, whilst the Shallowater meteorite is most likely from a different parent body where core and silicate material remixed. This could be

  17. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  18. Metal-dusting resistance of uncoated and coated iron and nickel base materials against metal-dusting in heat treatment furnaces with carbonaceous atmospheres; Bestaendigkeit von unbeschichteten und beschichteten Eisen- und Nickelbasiswerkstoffen gegenueber Metal-Dusting in Aufkohlanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleingries, Mirko; Ackermann, Helen; Lucka, Klaus [OWI Oel-Waerme-Institut GmbH, Aachen (Germany); Hoja, Timo; Mehner, Andeas; Zoch, Hans-Werner [IWT, Stiftung Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, Bremen (Germany); Altena, Herwig [AICHELIN Ges.m.b.H, Moedling (Austria)

    2010-03-15

    Metal-Dusting is a well-known corrosion problem that occurs in carburizing atmospheres in industrial thermal processing plants. In literature almost no quantitative data on the metal dusting resistance of typical alloys employed in industrial furnaces are available. Therefore, a series of experiments with uncoated and sol gel ZrO{sub 2} coated high temperature materials was conducted in order to quantify their metal dusting behaviour under conditions close to those in case hardening furnaces. The experimental results show a strong influence of the surface conditions on the alloys resistance and a noticeable enhancement of the resistance by sol gel coatings. (orig.)

  19. Photo- and Electronically Switchable Spin-Crossover Iron(II) Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on a Tetrathiafulvalene Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Ying; Ge, Jing-Yuan; Hua, Carol; Jiao, Cheng-Qi; Wu, Yue; Leong, Chanel F; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2017-05-08

    A major challenge is the development of multifunctional metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), wherein magnetic and electronic functionality can be controlled simultaneously. Herein, we rationally construct two 3D MOFs by introducing the redox active ligand tetra(4-pyridyl)tetrathiafulvalene (TTF(py)4 ) and spin-crossover Fe(II) centers. The materials exhibit redox activity, in addition to thermally and photo-induced spin crossover (SCO). A crystal-to-crystal transformation induced by I2 doping has also been observed and the resulting intercalated structure determined. The conductivity could be significantly enhanced (up to 3 orders of magnitude) by modulating the electronic state of the framework via oxidative doping; SCO behavior was also modified and the photo-magnetic behavior was switched off. This work provides a new strategy to tune the spin state and conductivity of framework materials through guest-induced redox-state switching. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Nitrogen-deficient and iron-rich associated absorbers with oversolar metallicities towards the quasar HE0141-3932

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Reimers, D; Fechner, C; Janknecht, E; López, S

    2005-01-01

    HE0141-3932 (zem=1.80) is a bright blue radio-quite quasar which reveals an emission line spectrum with an unusually weak Ly-alpha line. In addition, large redshift differences (Delta z=0.05) are observed between high ionization and low ionization emission lines. Absorption systems identified at z=1.78, 1.71, and 1.68 show mild oversolar metallicities (Z ~= 1-2Zsolar) and can be attributed to the associated gas clouds ejected from the circumnuclear region. The joint analysis of the emission and absorption lines leads to the conclusion that this quasar is seen almost pole-on. Its apparent luminosity may be Doppler boosted by ~10 times. The absorbing gas shows high abundance of Fe, Mg, and Al ([Fe, Mg, Al/C] ~= 0.15+/-0.10) along with underabundance of N ([N/C]0 and [Fe/C]<0 at Z ~ Zsolar. Full details of this work are given in Reimers et al. (2005).

  1. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  2. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Daniele; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Gandin, Valentina; Evangelisti, Claudio; Vitulli, Giovanni; Schiavi, Eleonora; Marzano, Cristina; Ferretti, Anna M; Salvadori, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP) by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS). Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP), as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm) with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use.

  3. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Barbaro

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS. Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP, as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use.

  4. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  5. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Joseph P Bressler

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. ...

  6. The Arabidopsis AtOPT3 Protein Functions in Metal Homeostasis and Movement of Iron to Developing Seeds1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Minviluz G.; Patel, Ami; McClain, William E.; Mathieu, Melanie; Remley, Melissa; Rogers, Elizabeth E.; Gassmann, Walter; Blevins, Dale G.; Stacey, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AtOPT3 belongs to the oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family, a relatively poorly characterized family of peptide/modified peptide transporters found in archebacteria, bacteria, fungi, and plants. A null mutation in AtOPT3 resulted in embryo lethality, indicating an essential role for AtOPT3 in embryo development. In this article, we report on the isolation and phenotypic characterization of a second AtOPT3 mutant line, opt3-2, harboring a T-DNA insertion in the 5′ untranslated region of AtOPT3. The T-DNA insertion in the AtOPT3 promoter resulted in reduced but sufficient AtOPT3 expression to allow embryo formation in opt3-2 homozygous seeds. Phenotypic analyses of opt3-2 plants revealed three interesting loss-of-function phenotypes associated with iron metabolism. First, reduced AtOPT3 expression in opt3-2 plants resulted in the constitutive expression of root iron deficiency responses regardless of exogenous iron supply. Second, deregulation of root iron uptake processes in opt3-2 roots resulted in the accumulation of very high levels of iron in opt3-2 tissues. Hyperaccumulation of iron in opt3-2 resulted in the formation of brown necrotic areas in opt3-2 leaves and was more pronounced during the seed-filling stage. Third, reduced AtOPT3 expression resulted in decreased accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds. The reduced accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds is especially noteworthy considering the excessively high levels of accumulated iron in other opt3-2 tissues. AtOPT3, therefore, plays a critical role in two important aspects of iron metabolism, namely, maintenance of whole-plant iron homeostasis and iron nutrition of developing seeds. PMID:18083798

  7. Iron and Mechanisms of Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of transition metals (e.g., copper, zinc, and iron and the dysregulation of their metabolism are a hallmark in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. This paper will be focused on the mechanism of neurotoxicity mediated by iron. This metal progressively accumulates in the brain both during normal aging and neurodegenerative processes. High iron concentrations in the brain have been consistently observed in Alzheimer's (AD and Parkinson's (PD diseases. In this connection, metalloneurobiology has become extremely important in establishing the role of iron in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed several protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, among them, the activation of cellular signaling pathways. The final response will depend on the identity, intensity, and persistence of the oxidative insult. The characterization of the mechanisms mediating the effects of iron-induced increase in neuronal dysfunction and death is central to understanding the pathology of a number of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  9. 复合无机盐法分离铜包钢复合金属%Separation of copper coated iron composite metal using Inorganic compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学林; 陈亚鹏; 蔡庄红; 田克情

    2011-01-01

    铜包钢复合材料的出现在节约了大量有色金属,也带来了资源再利用的难题,为了减少复杂的物理回收方法带来的能源浪费和环境压力,实现资源的合理利用,借助合成氨工业上的铜氨液工艺,在催化剂的作用下,把铜包钢废弃物中的铜提取出来。经过滤、蒸发、浓缩、灼烧后转化为黑色氧化铜粉末,最佳配料比是Cu:NH3:(NH4)2CO3:催化剂为1:5:1:0.3。%The practice of using copper-clad steel saves a lot of non-ferrous metals, and brings problem of reuse of resources. In order to reduce energy waste and environmental pressures generated by physical recovery methods, and achieve rational use of resources, we extract the copper from the wasted copper coated iron with the catalyst, and the copper ammonia solution process in ammonia industry. After filtration, evaporation, condensation, burning, the copper converts to black Copper oxide powder, and the optimal charge ratio isCu:NH3 : (NH4)2 CO3 : and catalyst 1 : 5: 1 :0.3.

  10. Heavy Metal Resistances and Chromium Removal of a Novel Cr(VI)-Reducing Pseudomonad Strain Isolated from Circulating Cooling Water of Iron and Steel Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Kun; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Ye, Yun

    2016-12-01

    Three bacterial isolates, GT2, GT3, and GT7, were isolated from the sludge and water of a circulating cooling system of iron and steel plant by screening on Cr(VI)-containing plates. Three isolates were characterized as the members of the genus Pseudomonas on the basis of phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. All isolates were capable of resisting multiple antibiotics and heavy metals. GT7 was most resistant to Cr(VI), with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 6.5 mmol L(-1). GT7 displayed varied rates of Cr(VI) reduction in M2 broth, which was dependent on pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and inoculating dose. Total chromium analysis revealed that GT7 could remove a part of chromium from the media, and the maximum rate of chromium removal was up to 40.8 %. The Cr(VI) reductase activity of GT7 was mainly associated with the soluble fraction of cell-free extracts and reached optimum at pH 6.0∼8.0. The reductase activity was apparently enhanced by external electron donors and Cu(II), whereas it was seriously inhibited by Hg(II), Cd(II), and Zn(II). The reductase showed a K m of 74 μmol L(-1) of Cr(VI) and a V max of 0.86 μmol of Cr(VI) min(-1) mg(-1) of protein. The results suggested that GT7 could be a promising candidate for in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI).

  11. Impact of iron and steel industry and waste incinerators on human exposure to dioxins, PCBs, and heavy metals: results of a cross-sectional study in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierens, Sébastien; Mairesse, Hélène; Heilier, Jean-François; Focant, Jean-François; Eppe, Gauthier; De Pauw, Edwin; Bernard, Alfred

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated the impact of two iron and steel plants and two municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWI) in Wallonia (Belgium) on the exposure of residents to dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and heavy metals. In total, 142 volunteers living around these facilities were recruited and compared with 63 referents from a rural area with no industrial source of pollution. Information about smoking habits, dietary habits, anthropometric characteristics, residential history, and health status was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. The volunteers provided blood under fasting conditions in order to evaluate the body burden of dioxins (17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans [PCDD/Fs] congeners) and PCBs. Samples of blood and urine were also taken for the determination of cadmium, mercury, and lead. After adjustment for covariates, concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and lead in urine or blood were not increased in subjects living in the vicinity of MSWIs or sinter plants by comparison with referents. Residents around the sinter plants and the MSWI located in the industrial area had concentrations of dioxins and PCBs in serum similar to that of referents. By contrast, subjects living in the vicinity of the MSWI in the rural area showed significantly higher serum levels of dioxins (geometric mean, 38 vs. 24 pg TEQ/g fat) and coplanar PCBs (geometric mean, 10.8 vs. 7.0 pg TEQ/g fat). Although age-adjusted dioxin levels in referents did not vary with local animal fat consumption, concentrations of dioxins in subjects living around the incinerators correlated positively with their intake of local animal fat, with almost a doubling in subjects with the highest fat intake. These results indicate that dioxins and coplanar PCBs emitted by MSWIs can indeed accumulate in the body of residents who regularly consume animal products of local origin.

  12. Anomalous peaks in NMR spectra of iron-containing silicate minerals: pseudo-contact shifts and the potential for mapping the distributions of transition metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, J. F.; Kelsey, K. E.

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has now been applied to problems of mineral structure for more than 25 years. Early attempts to collect MAS spectra on natural minerals rich in iron (or other cations with unpaired electron spins, e.g. more than a few % FeO) showed serious peak broadening, loss of signal, and thus loss of structural information. Spectroscopists have thus largely avoided such materials and have worked either with low-Fe natural minerals (e.g. zeolites) or with Fe-free synthetic compositions. While this problem remains, it has recently become apparent that in silicates with minor contents of such elements (100's to 1000's of ppm), or, in special cases, with much higher contents (at least 4% FeO), NMR spectra of nuclides such as Si-29 and Al-27 may indeed provide interesting and useful structural information that may eventually reveal new details of cation distribution, ordering, clustering, etc. Here we report on the early stages of this new application. In a recent report (Stebbins, Panero, Smyth and Frost, Am. Min. in press) we noted the presence of a variety of tiny "extra" peaks in Si-29 spectra of forsterite and wadsleyite, both containing 10's to 1000's of ppm of transition metal impurities. Some of these have chemical shifts well outside the known range for diamagnetic silicates, and were hypothesized to result from "pseudo-contact" interactions with unpaired electrons, which depend strongly on local structure. Peak shifts of this type have long been known in Sn-119 and Y-89 spectra for oxides such as rare-earth stannates (Grey et al.), but have apparently not been previously reported for silicates. New data on Si-29 and Al-27 NMR of synthetic pyrope (0.6 % CoO) and natural pyropes from the Dora Maira massif (1.5 to 3.5 wt % FeO) also show "anomalous" resonances, some of which again fall well outside the range of normal chemical shifts (e.g. +140 ppm in a Si-29 spectrum, 70 and 35 ppm in the Al-27 spectrum of a

  13. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  14. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  15. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  16. Scattering Effect of Iron Metallic Particles on the Extinction Coefficient of CaO-SiO2-B2O3-Na2O-Fe2O3-CaF2 Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dae-Woo; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-10-01

    The extinction coefficient of the CaO-SiO2-B2O3-Na2O-Fe2O3-CaF2 glasses has been studied using a FT-IR and a UV-visible spectrometer in the range of 0.5-5 μm to investigate thermal radiation through glassy flux film during continuous casting of steels. In present investigations, iron oxide has been reduced to metallic iron droplets by reaction with graphite crucible during melting, which brings considerable increase of the extinction coefficient due to the scattering. To analyze the scattering effect of these droplets on the extinction coefficient, the number density and size parameter of metallic particles have been measured using an automated scanning electron microscope. The number of metallic particles is intensively proportional to boron contents due to the transition of molar structure, BO4 to BO3, with increasing boron oxide. It is found that calculated scattering coefficients based on Mie scattering theory are in good agreement with measured ones. As the increased scattering coefficient of glassy film would not cause any serious side effects on casting operations, utilization of scattering effects is believed to be significantly essential for the future design of commercial mold fluxes.

  17. Copper Stress Affects Iron Homeostasis by Destabilizing Iron-Sulfur Cluster Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chillappagari, Shashi; Seubert, Andreas; Trip, Hein; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Miethke, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Copper and iron are essential elements for cellular growth. Although bacteria have to overcome limitations of these metals by affine and selective uptake, excessive amounts of both metals are toxic for the cells. Here we investigated the influences of copper stress on iron homeostasis in Bacillus

  18. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  19. Iron acquisition in the dental pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: what does it use as a source and how does it get this essential metal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Eric R; Menke, Sharon; Shoemaker, Christopher; Tomaras, Andrew P; McGillivary, Glen; Actis, Luis A

    2007-06-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans requires iron to grow under limiting conditions imposed by synthetic and natural chelators. Although none of the strains tested used hemoglobin, lactoferrin or transferrin, all of them used FeCl3 and hemin as iron sources under chelated conditions. Dot-blot binding assays showed that all strains bind lactoferrin, hemoglobin, and hemin but not transferrin. When compared with smooth strains, the rough isolates showed higher hemin binding activity, which was sensitive to proteinase K treatment. A. actinomycetemcomitans harbors the Fur-regulated afeABCD locus coding for iron acquisition in isogenic and non-isogenic cell backgrounds. The genome of this oral pathogen also harbors several other predicted iron uptake genes including the hitABC locus, which restored iron acquisition in the E. coli 1017 ent mutant. However, the disruption of this locus in the parental strain did not affect iron acquisition as drastically as the inactivation of AfeABCD, suggesting that the latter system could be more involved in iron transport than the HitABC system. The genome of this oral pathogen also harbors an active copy of the exbBexbDtonB operon, which could provide the energy needed for hemin acquisition. However, inactivation of each coding region of this operon did not affect the hemin and iron acquisition phenotypes of isogenic derivatives. This observation suggests that the function of these proteins could be replaced by those coded for by tolQ, tolR and tolA as it was described for other bacterial transport systems. Interruption of a hasR homolog, an actively transcribed gene that is predicted to code for an outer membrane hemophore receptor protein, did not affect the ability of an isogenic derivative to bind and use hemin under chelated conditions. This result also indicates that A. actinomycetemcomitans could produce more than one outer membrane hemin receptor as it was described in other human pathogens. All strains tested formed biofilms

  20. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  1. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If $\\gtrsim 10\\%$ of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  2. Influence of an iron-rich amendment on chemical lability and plant (Raphanus sativus L.) availability of two metallic elements (As and Pb) on mine-impacted agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Kim, Yong-Seong; Hyun, Seunghun; Moon, Deok Hyun; Chang, Jun Young

    2016-10-01

    Variation of the chemical extractability and phytoavailability of two metallic elements (e.g., As and Pb) on amendment-treated soils was investigated. Four mine-impacted agricultural soils contaminated with both As (174-491 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (116-357 mg kg(-1)) were amended with an iron-rich sludge at the rate of 5 % (w/w). After a 4-, 8-, and 16-week incubation, the extractability of metallic elements was assessed by sequential extraction procedure (SEP; F1-F5). The control without amendment was also run. In amended soils, the labile element mass (i.e., F1 + F2) promptly decreased (15-48 % of As and 5-10 % of Pb) in 4 weeks, but the decrement was continued over 16 weeks up to 70 and 28 % for As and Pb, respectively. The labile mass decrement was quantitatively corresponded with the increment of F3 (bound to amorphous metal oxides). In plant test assessed by radish (Raphanus sativus) grown on the 16-week soils, up to 57 % of As and 28 % of Pb accumulation was suppressed and 10-43 % of growth (i.e., shoot/root elongation and fresh weight) was improved. For both the control and amended soils, element uptake by plant was well correlated with their labile soil concentrations (r (2) = 0.799 and 0.499 for As and Pb, respectively). The results confirmed that the iron-rich material can effectively suppress element uptake during R. sativus seedling growth, most likely due to the chemical stabilization of metallic elements in growth medium.

  3. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  4. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  5. The advance on removal of heavy metals in water by nanoscale zero-valent iron%纳米零价铁颗粒去除水中重金属的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李钰婷; 张亚雷; 代朝猛; 张伟贤

    2012-01-01

    重金属是毒性大、难降解、易累积的环境污染物,纳米零价铁作为一种新型功能修复材料在去除水体和土壤中重金属方面有着广阔的应用前景.本文综述了纳米零价铁颗粒去除水中重金属的研究进展,包括纳米零价铁的常用制备方法及特性、去除效能、对不同重金属的去除机理以及发展前景和今后的研究方向,以期为该领域的深入研究提供借鉴并拓展新的思路.%Heavy metals are environmental pollutants which are highly toxic,difficult to be biodegraded and easy to enrich.Nanoscale zero-valent iron(nZVI),as a new functional material in environment remediation,has been extensively investigated for removal of heavy metals in waters and soils.In this paper,advance in the removal of heavy metals by nZVI are reviewed.It includes synthesis and characteristics of the nanoparticles,and studies on the removal of heavy metals by nanoparticles such as capabilities,mechanism and perspectives of the technology.

  6. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  7. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  8. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g{sup −1} and 131 emu g{sup −1}, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  9. Oxidation of ethane to ethanol by N2O in a metal-organic framework with coordinatively unsaturated iron(II) sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Dianne J.; Bloch, Eric D.; Mason, Jarad A.; Queen, Wendy L.; Hudson, Matthew R.; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Dzubak, Allison L.; Verma, Pragya; Lee, Kyuho; Bonino, Francesca; Crocellà, Valentina; Yano, Junko; Bordiga, Silvia; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R. [UCB; (NIST); (LBNL); (UMM); (Turin)

    2014-08-19

    Enzymatic haem and non-haem high-valent iron–oxo species are known to activate strong C–H bonds, yet duplicating this reactivity in a synthetic system remains a formidable challenge. Although instability of the terminal iron–oxo moiety is perhaps the foremost obstacle, steric and electronic factors also limit the activity of previously reported mononuclear iron(IV)–oxo compounds. In particular, although nature's non-haem iron(IV)–oxo compounds possess high-spin S = 2 ground states, this electronic configuration has proved difficult to achieve in a molecular species. These challenges may be mitigated within metal–organic frameworks that feature site-isolated iron centres in a constrained, weak-field ligand environment. Here, we show that the metal–organic framework Fe2(dobdc) (dobdc4- = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) and its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), are able to activate the C–H bonds of ethane and convert it into ethanol and acetaldehyde using nitrous oxide as the terminal oxidant. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the active oxidant is likely to be a high-spin S = 2 iron(IV)–oxo species.

  10. Selective Binding of O(2) over N(2) in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloch, Eric D; Murray, Leslie J; Queen, Wendy L; Chavan, Sachin; Maximoff, Sergey N; Bigi, Julian P; Krishna, Rajamani; Peterson, Vanessa K; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J; Smit, Berend; Bordiga, Silvia; Brown, Craig M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2011-09-21

    The air-free reaction between FeCl₂ and H₄dobdc (dobdc{sup 4–} = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) in a mixture of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and methanol affords Fe₂(dobdc)·4DMF, a metal–organic framework adopting the MOF-74 (or CPO-27) structure type. The desolvated form of this material displays a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of 1360 m²/g and features a hexagonal array of one-dimensional channels lined with coordinatively unsaturated Fe{sup II} centers. Gas adsorption isotherms at 298 K indicate that Fe₂(dobdc) binds O₂ preferentially over N₂, with an irreversible capacity of 9.3 wt %, corresponding to the adsorption of one O₂ molecule per two iron centers. Remarkably, at 211 K, O₂ uptake is fully reversible and the capacity increases to 18.2 wt %, corresponding to the adsorption of one O₂ molecule per iron center. Mössbauer and infrared spectra are consistent with partial charge transfer from iron(II) to O₂ at low temperature and complete charge transfer to form iron(III) and O₂{sup 2–} at room temperature. The results of Rietveld analyses of powder neutron diffraction data (4 K) confirm this interpretation, revealing O₂ bound to iron in a symmetric side-on mode with d{sub O–O} = 1.25(1) Å at low temperature and in a slipped side-on mode with dO–O = 1.6(1) Å when oxidized at room temperature. Application of ideal adsorbed solution theory in simulating breakthrough curves shows Fe₂(dobdc) to be a promising material for the separation of O₂ from air at temperatures well above those currently employed in industrial settings.

  11. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  12. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  13. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  14. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  15. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2001-08-15

    The overall purpose of the project was to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addressed how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  16. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatusmycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L−1 and glucose at 28.45 g L−1. The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L−1 or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg−1 produced with iron addition of 300 mg L−1. The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L−1 of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron.

  17. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sandra M; Umeo, Suzana H; Marcante, Rafael C; Yokota, Meire E; Valle, Juliana S; Dragunski, Douglas C; Colauto, Nelson B; Linde, Giani A

    2015-03-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L (-1) and glucose at 28.45 g L (-1) . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L (-1) or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg (-1) produced with iron addition of 300 mg L (-1) . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L (-1) of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron.

  18. Zoning and contamination rate of magnesium and heavy metals of iron, zinc and copper in the north and northwest aquifer of Khoy (Zourabad based on GIS and determining the contaminated source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khodadadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Heavy metals are the most toxic pollutants in aquatic ecosystems. This contamination can result from the release of heavy metal elements during alteration and weathering of ultramafic and mafic rocks (ophiolite zones. Among the important metals and pollutants in the ophiolite; chromium, cobalt, nickel, iron, magnesium, manganese, zinc and copper could be noted. Basically, a mass of serpentine consists of serpentine, amphibole, talc, chlorite, magnetite, and the remainder of olivine, pyroxene and spinel (Kil et al., 2010. In such areas, the prevailing cold climate, during the serpentinization, chloritization and epidotiization, the activity of the solvent, such as chloride, fluoride, carbonates, sulfide, sulfosalt would be able to import the elements such as magnesium and iron, copper and zinc into the soil and groundwater. The study area is located in northwestern Iran. This area is located in the northwest of the city of Khoy. Because of the proximity to the north and northwest Khoy plains with ophiolite rocks, the soil of this region could possibly show the potential of contamination with heavy metals. Due to the toxicity and disease of unauthorized grades of these elements in groundwater in the study area, this study is focused on the more contaminated groundwater of the areas. Materials and methods In this study, over a period of 5 days, sampling from 42 water sources, including fountains, aqueducts, wells, piezometers and wells in operation, was performed. The container was washed with acid and then rinsed 3 times with the water sample. The pH and temperature of the water in the samples was measured in the field. Then to each of the samples was taken from 2 to 5 ml of concentrated nitric acid (This causes that the metal elements would not adsorbed or precipitated by these particles and pH of the samples was measured with litmus paper to reach level 2. This was done to ensure the consolidation of the water samples. Analysis of

  19. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Photodriven CO2 Reduction Catalyzed by Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Iron Nanoparticles Encapsulated by Ultrathin Carbon Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Huimin; Dao, Thang Duy; Li, Mu; Liu, Guigao; Meng, Xianguang; Chang, Kun; Shi, Li; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient utilization of solar light with an excellent reduction capacity is achieved for plasmonic Fe@C nanostructures. By carbon layer coating, the optimized catalyst exhibits enhanced selectivity and stability applied to the solar-driven reduction of CO2 into CO. The surface-plasmon effect of iron particles is proposed to excite CO2 molecules, and thereby facilitates the final reaction activity.

  20. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Truhan, Jr., John J [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  1. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  2. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  3. Effect of Sulfur on Liquidus Temperatures in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2-S System in Equilibrium with Metallic Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baojun; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2011-10-01

    The phase equilibria in the ZnO-"FeO"-Al2O3-CaO-SiO2-S system have been determined experimentally in equilibrium with metallic iron. A pseudoternary section of the form ZnO-"FeO"-(Al2O3+CaO+SiO2) for CaO/SiO2 = 0.71 (weight), (CaO+SiO2)/Al2O3 = 5.0 (weight), and fixed 2.0 wt pct S concentration has been constructed. It was found that the addition of 2.0 wt pct S to the liquid extends the spinel primary phase field significantly and decreases the size of the wustite primary phase field. The liquidus temperature in the wustite primary phase field is decreased by approximately 80 K and the liquidus temperature in the spinel primary phase field is decreased by approximately 10 K with addition of 2.0 wt pct S in the composition range investigated. It was also found that iron-zinc sulfides are present in some samples in the spinel primary phase field, which are matte appearing at low zinc concentrations and sphalerite (Zn,Fe)S at higher zinc concentrations. The presence of sulfur in the slag has a minor effect on the partitioning of ZnO between the wustite and liquid phases but no effect on the partitioning of ZnO between the spinel and liquid phases.

  4. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  5. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  6. Production of iron from metallurgical waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

    2013-09-17

    A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

  7. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, functional groups at the surface of retained particle complex iron available in the cell. In response to a reduction in concentrations of requisite iron, a functional deficiency can result intracellularly. Superoxide production by the cell exposed to a particle increases ferrireduction which facilitates import of iron with the objective being the reversal of the metal deficiency. Failure to resolve the functional iron deficiency following cell exposure to particles activates kinases and transcription factors resulting in a release of inflammatory mediators and inflammation. Tissue injury is the end product of this disruption in iron homeostasis initiated by the particle exposure. Elevation of available iron to the cell precludes deficiency of the metal and either diminishes or eliminates biological effects.General Significance: Recognition of the pathway for biological effects after particle exposure to involve a functional deficiency of iron suggests novel therapies such as metal supplementation (e.g. inhaled and oral). In addition, the demonstration of a shared mechanism of biological effects allows understanding the common clinical, physiological, and pathological presentation fol

  8. Distribution of ferric iron in larval lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S J; Youson, J H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of ferric iron in larval lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) were investigated using light microscopy and the Prussian blue stain. Animals from various watersheds contained different concentrations of iron, although the sites of deposition were the same for all animals. A major portion of iron is within adipose tissue, while the liver, and cartilage contain predominantly low to trace amounts of iron, respectively. Iron is associated with fibrous connective tissue in several places in the body, and this association may have particular significance in the inner ear. Iron is also located in cells of the meninges. The presence of iron in the epithelial cells of the posterior intestine may reflect elimination of the metal through the extrusion of iron-loaded cells into the intestinal lumen. Iron within mucous cells of the epidermis, suggest elimination of iron during mucous secretion. Iron-loaded cells of bipolar shape are also present in the epidermis, but are particularly prominent around the branchiopore. Low concentrations of iron are observed within in melanin-containing macrophages (melano-macrophages) in regions of iron absorption, erythrophagocytosis, and haemopoiesis. High levels of iron in the epithelia and lumina of pronephric tubules are concomitant with degeneration of this organ. These data are evidence of the wide spread distribution of iron in lamprey tissues and additional evidence for the potential value of lampreys for the study of iron metabolism in vertebrates.

  9. THE CONTENT OF IRON AND MANGANESE AND SOME HEAVY METALS IN WELLS ON THE EXAMPLE OF WATER FROM THE WELLS OF GORZYCE COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pawęska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study was to estimate the quality of shallow groundwater from wells which are the source of drinking water. The study included 8 wells located in the municipality of Gorzyce. The results are presented as medium concentrations of the analyzed components during one year of observation. The results confirm that poorly protected wells are characterized by poorer quality water. In most of the analyzed cases, the average concentration of pollution indexes (this applies particularly to iron and manganese concentration exceed the limits established for drinking water.

  10. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    significantly heavier than bulk crust and hydrothermal iron imply partial oxidation of a ferrous seawater iron reservoir. In contrast, mean δ 56Fe values closer to that of hydrothermal iron in post-Sturtian shales reflects oxidation of a larger proportion of the ferrous seawater iron reservoir, and by inference, higher environmental oxygen levels. Nevertheless, significant iron isotopic variation in post-Sturtian shales suggest redox heterogeneity and possibly a dominantly anoxic deep ocean, consistent with results from recent studies using iron speciation and redox sensitive trace metals. However, the interpretation of generally increasing environmental oxygen levels after the Sturtian glaciation highlights the need to better understand the sensitivity of different redox proxies to incremental changes in oxygen levels to enable us to reconcile results from different paleoredox proxies.

  11. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conejero, Geneviève; Curie, Catherine; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosom...

  12. Disorders of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woimant, France; Trocello, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and trace elements play an important role in relation to the physiology and pathology of the nervous system. Neurologic diseases related to disorders of metabolism of copper and iron are reviewed. Copper disorders are divided into two classes: ATP7A- or ATP7B-related inherited copper transport disorders (Menkes disease, occipital horn syndrome, ATP7A-related distal motor neuropathy, and Wilson disease) and acquired diseases associated with copper deficiency or copper excess. Iron brain disorders are divided into genetic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, neuroferritinopathy, and aceruloplasminemia), genetic systemic iron accumulation with neurologic features (hemochromatosis), and acquired diseases associated with iron excess (superficial siderosis) or iron deficiency (restless leg syndrome). The main features of cadmium, lead, aluminum, mercury, and manganese toxicity are summarized.

  13. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used ... fewer red blood cells. The red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron- ...

  15. Reconciling viability and cost-effective shape memory alloy options – A review of copper and iron based shape memory metallic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are group of alloys that display anthropomorphic characteristics. These alloys recover their pre-deformed morphology when heated above their transition temperatures after being deformed in their lower temperature phase (martensitic phase. This unique material behavior is explored in industrial and technological applications where capacity for strain recovery is a key design parameter. Copper and iron based SMAs are largely viewed as potential cost effective substitute to Ni–Ti SMAs judging from their promising shape memory properties, damping capacity and other functional properties. Despite their outstanding potentials, the susceptibility of copper based SMAS to phase stabilization, transition hysteresis, aging and brittleness creates doubt on the possibility of transiting from the realm of potential to functional long term use in engineering applications. On the other hand the low percentage shape recovery in the Fe based SMAs also creates a gap between the theory and potential use of these alloys. This paper takes a critical look at the science of shape memory phenomena as applicable to copper and iron based SMA systems. It also covers the limitations of these systems, the effect of processing parameters on these alloys, proposed solutions to limitations associated with this group of shape memory alloys and thoughts for future consideration.

  16. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSheldon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response.

  17. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  18. Novel Applications for Oxalate-Phosphate-Amine Metal-Organic-Frameworks (OPA-MOFs): Can an Iron-Based OPA-MOF Be Used as Slow-Release Fertilizer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstoetz, Manuela; Rose, Terry J; Clark, Malcolm W; Yee, Lachlan H; Raymond, Carolyn A; Vancov, Tony

    2015-01-01

    A porous iron-based oxalate-phosphate-amine metal-organic framework material (OPA-MOF) was investigated as a microbially-induced slow-release nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Seedling growth, grain yields, nutrient uptake of wheat plants, and soil dynamics in incubated soil, were investigated using OPA-MOF vs standard P (triple-superphosphate) and N (urea) fertilizers in an acidic Ferralsol at two application rates (equivalent 120 and 40 kg N ha(-1)). While urea hydrolysis in the OPA-MOF treatment was rapid, conversion of ammonium to nitrate was significantly inhibited compared to urea treatment. Reduced wheat growth in OPA-MOF treatments was not caused by N-deficiency, but by limited P-bioavailability. Two likely reasons were slow P-mobilisation from the OPA-MOF or rapid P-binding in the acid soil. P-uptake and yield in OPA-MOF treatments were significantly higher than in nil-P controls, but significantly lower than in conventionally-fertilised plants. OPA-MOF showed potential as enhanced efficiency N fertilizer. However, as P-bioavailability was insufficient to meet plant demands, further work should determine if P-availability may be enhanced in alkaline soils, or whether central ions other than Fe, forming the inorganic metal-P framework in the MOF, may act as a more effective P-source in acid soils.

  19. Novel Applications for Oxalate-Phosphate-Amine Metal-Organic-Frameworks (OPA-MOFs: Can an Iron-Based OPA-MOF Be Used as Slow-Release Fertilizer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Anstoetz

    Full Text Available A porous iron-based oxalate-phosphate-amine metal-organic framework material (OPA-MOF was investigated as a microbially-induced slow-release nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P fertilizer. Seedling growth, grain yields, nutrient uptake of wheat plants, and soil dynamics in incubated soil, were investigated using OPA-MOF vs standard P (triple-superphosphate and N (urea fertilizers in an acidic Ferralsol at two application rates (equivalent 120 and 40 kg N ha(-1. While urea hydrolysis in the OPA-MOF treatment was rapid, conversion of ammonium to nitrate was significantly inhibited compared to urea treatment. Reduced wheat growth in OPA-MOF treatments was not caused by N-deficiency, but by limited P-bioavailability. Two likely reasons were slow P-mobilisation from the OPA-MOF or rapid P-binding in the acid soil. P-uptake and yield in OPA-MOF treatments were significantly higher than in nil-P controls, but significantly lower than in conventionally-fertilised plants. OPA-MOF showed potential as enhanced efficiency N fertilizer. However, as P-bioavailability was insufficient to meet plant demands, further work should determine if P-availability may be enhanced in alkaline soils, or whether central ions other than Fe, forming the inorganic metal-P framework in the MOF, may act as a more effective P-source in acid soils.

  20. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoma eIhemere

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe(III chelate reductase activity and gene expression levels consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in FEA1 transgenic plants. We also show that genes involved in iron homeostasis in cassava have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in transgenic plants. Steady state transcript levels of the metal-chelate transporter MeYSL1, and the iron storage proteins, MeFER2 and MeFER6, were elevated in various tissues of FEA1 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. These results suggest that these gene products play a role in iron translocation and homeostasis in FEA1 transgenic cassava plants. These results are discussed in terms of enhanced strategies for the iron biofortification of plants.

  1. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  2. Intestinal HIF2α promotes tissue-iron accumulation in disorders of iron overload with anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik R; Taylor, Matthew; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Martin, Angelical; Xie, Liwei; Bredell, Bryce X; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2013-12-10

    Several distinct congenital disorders can lead to tissue-iron overload with anemia. Repeated blood transfusions are one of the major causes of iron overload in several of these disorders, including β-thalassemia major, which is characterized by a defective β-globin gene. In this state, hyperabsorption of iron is also observed and can significantly contribute to iron overload. In β-thalassemia intermedia, which does not require blood transfusion for survival, hyperabsorption of iron is the leading cause of iron overload. The mechanism of increased iron absorption in β-thalassemia is unclear. We definitively demonstrate, using genetic mouse models, that intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) are activated early in the pathogenesis of β-thalassemia and are essential for excess iron accumulation in mouse models of β-thalassemia. Moreover, thalassemic mice with established iron overload had significant improvement in tissue-iron levels and anemia following disruption of intestinal HIF2α. In addition to repeated blood transfusions and increased iron absorption, chronic hemolysis is the major cause of tissue-iron accumulation in anemic iron-overload disorders caused by hemolytic anemia. Mechanistic studies in a hemolytic anemia mouse model demonstrated that loss of intestinal HIF2α/DMT1 signaling led to decreased tissue-iron accumulation in the liver without worsening the anemia. These data demonstrate that dysregulation of intestinal hypoxia and HIF2α signaling is critical for progressive iron overload in β-thalassemia and may be a novel therapeutic target in several anemic iron-overload disorders.

  3. Degradação redutiva de azo-corantes utilizando-se ferro metálico Reductive degradation of azo-dyes by metallic iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Lima de Souza

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Corantes azo são extensivamente utilizados em processos de tingimento de fibras têxteis, sendo caracterizados por elevada resistência frente a processos aeróbios de biodegradação e, por conseqüência, persistência nos processos convencionais de tratamento de resíduos. Neste trabalho reporta-se a degradação redutiva de corantes azo, utilizando-se ferro metálico. Em condições experimentais otimizadas (pH 7 e 10 g de lã de aço comercial a completa descoloração do corante modelo (preto reativo 5 foi conseguida em um sistema contínuo, operando com tempos de retenção de 6 min. Nestas condições, o ferro solubilizado alcança concentrações compatíveis com os limites impostos pela atual legislação brasileira (12 mg L-1. Trata-se de um resultado bastante promissor, principalmente levando-se em consideração o caráter recalcitrante dos azo corantes e a simplicidade do sistema proposto.Azo dyes are extensively used in textile dying processes and are characterized by extreme resistance to biodegradation and consequently persistence during conventional wastewater treatment processes. In this work the reductive degradation of azo dyes was studied using zero-valent iron. At optimized experimental conditions (pH 7 and 10 g of commercial iron wool complete decolorization of the model dye (reactive black 5 was afforded in a continuous system operating with hydraulic retention time of 6 min. At these conditions the released total soluble iron reaches a concentration compatible with the limits imposed by the current Brazilian legislation (12 mg L-1. That is a very promising result, mainly taking into account the high recalcitrant character of azo dyes and the simplicity of the proposed system.

  4. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of iron(II), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) ortho-dihalophenolate complexes: insights into metal-halogen secondary bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Boshart, Monica D; Schofield, Jeremy A; Rodriguez, Meghan M; Grubel, Katarzyna; Rokhsana, Dalia; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-09-15

    Metal complexes incorporating the tris(3,5-diphenylpyrazolyl)borate ligand (Tp(Ph2)) and ortho-dihalophenolates were synthesized and characterized in order to explore metal-halogen secondary bonding in biorelevant model complexes. The complexes Tp(Ph2)ML were synthesized and structurally characterized, where M was Fe(II), Co(II), or Ni(II) and L was either 2,6-dichloro- or 2,6-dibromophenolate. All six complexes exhibited metal-halogen secondary bonds in the solid state, with distances ranging from 2.56 Å for the Tp(Ph2)Ni(2,6-dichlorophenolate) complex to 2.88 Å for the Tp(Ph2)Fe(2,6-dibromophenolate) complex. Variable temperature NMR spectra of the Tp(Ph2)Co(2,6-dichlorophenolate) and Tp(Ph2)Ni(2,6-dichlorophenolate) complexes showed that rotation of the phenolate, which requires loss of the secondary bond, has an activation barrier of ~30 and ~37 kJ/mol, respectively. Density functional theory calculations support the presence of a barrier for disruption of the metal-halogen interaction during rotation of the phenolate. On the other hand, calculations using the spectroscopically calibrated angular overlap method suggest essentially no contribution of the halogen to the ligand-field splitting. Overall, these results provide the first quantitative measure of the strength of a metal-halogen secondary bond and demonstrate that it is a weak noncovalent interaction comparable in strength to a hydrogen bond. These results provide insight into the origin of the specificity of the enzyme 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase (PcpA), which is specific for ortho-dihalohydroquinone substrates and phenol inhibitors.

  5. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1, ceruloplasmin (Cp, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status.

  6. A study on the production processes of granulated iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Khodosov, I. E.

    2016-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the production process of high-quality granulated iron using hematite-magnetite iron ore and coal of different brands as a raw material are presented. According to the research the optimal coal consumption, temperature and time parameters of the metallization process, necessary for obtaining metallized materials with the specified composition and metallization degree, are defined. The conditions for the formation of metal granules with high content (over 98%) of primary iron are found. The process includes two stages: initially the solid-phase reduction of iron from oxides with production of metallized sponge material is carried out, further as the temperature increases the separation of slag and metal phases takes place.

  7. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  8. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. XI - Multi-element studies of 38 new irons and the high abundance of ungrouped irons from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.; Ouyang, Xinwei; Wang, Jianmin; Jerde, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of 14 elements in the metal of 38 iron meteorites and a pallasite are reported. Three samples are paired with previously classified irons, raising the number of well-classified, independent iron meteorites to 598. Several of the new irons are from Antarctica. Of 24 independent irons from Antarctica, eight are ungrouped, a much higher fraction than that among all classified irons. The difference is probably related to the fact that the median mass of Antarctic irons is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of non-Antarctic irons. Smaller meteoroids may tend to sample a larger number of asteroidal source regions, perhaps because small meteoroids tend to have higher ejection velocities or because they have random-walked a greater increment of orbital semimajor axis away from that of the parent body.

  9. Iron and Zinc Exploitation during Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Terwilliger, Austen; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient bacteria originated from metal-rich environments. Billions of years of evolution directed these tiny single cell creatures to exploit the versatile properties of metals in catalyzing chemical reactions and biological responses. The result is an entire metallome of proteins that use metal co-factors to facilitate key cellular process that range from the production of energy to the replication of DNA. Two key metals in this regard are iron and zinc, both abundant on Earth but not readily accessible in a human host. Instead, pathogenic bacteria must employ clever ways to acquire these metals. In this review we describe the many elegant ways these bacteria mine, regulate, and craft the use of two key metals (iron and zinc) to build a virulence arsenal that challenges even the most sophisticated immune response. PMID:26497057

  10. Vacuolar iron transporter BnMEB2 is involved in enhancing iron tolerance of Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron toxicity is a major nutrient disorder that severely affects crop development and yield. Vacuolar detoxification of metal stress is an important strategy for plants to survive and adapt to this adverse environment. Vacuolar iron transporter (VIT members are involved in this process and play essential roles in iron storage and transport. In this study, a rapeseed VIT gene BnMEB2 (BnaC07g30170D was identified. BnMEB2 is a homolog to Arabidopsis MEB2 (At5g24290 and acts as a detoxifier in vacuolar sequestration of divalent metal. Transient expression analysis revealed that BnMEB2 was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Q-PCR detection showed a high expression of BnMEB2 in mature (60-day-old leaves and could be obviously induced by exogenous iron stress in both roots and leaves. Over-expressed BnMEB2 in both Arabidopsis wild type and meb2 mutant seedlings resulted in greatly improved iron tolerability with no significant changes in the expression level of other vacuolar iron transporter genes. The mutant meb2 grew slowly and its root hair elongation was inhibited under high iron concentration condition while BnMEB2 over-expressed transgenic plants of the mutant restored the phenotypes with apparently higher iron storage in roots and dramatically increased iron content in the whole plant. Taken together, these results suggested that BnMEB2 was a VIT gene in rapeseed which was necessary for safe storage and vacuole detoxification function of excess iron to enhance the tolerance of iron toxicity. This research sheds light on a potentially new strategy for attenuating hazardous metal stress from environment and improving iron biofortification in Brassicaceae crops.

  11. Ion-stimulated gas desorption yields of coated (Au, Ag, Pd) stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Malabaila, M; Taborelli, M

    2005-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, and palladium-coated 316LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analysed for chemical composition by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The large effective desorption yield of 2 x 10**4 molecules/ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with heavy ions and the consequence of a subsequent venting on the desorption yields of a beam-scrubbed vacuum chamber are described. Practical consequences for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) are discussed.

  12. Metals and metal derivatives in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colotti, Gianni; Ilari, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto; Morea, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    Several chemical elements are required by living organisms in addition to the four elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen usually present in common organic molecules. Many metals (e.g. sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and selenium) are known to be required for normal biological functions in humans. Disorders of metal homeostasis and of metal bioavailability, or toxicity caused by metal excess, are responsible for a large number of human diseases. Metals are also extensively used in medicine as therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. In the past 5000 years, metals such as arsenic, gold and iron have been used to treat a variety of human diseases. Nowadays, an ever-increasing number of metal-based drugs is available. These contain a broad spectrum of metals, many of which are not among those essential for humans, able to target proteins and/or DNA. This mini-review describes metal-containing compounds targeting DNA or proteins currently in use, or designed to be used, as therapeutics against cancer, arthritis, parasitic and other diseases, with a special focus on the available information, often provided by X-ray studies, about their mechanism of action at a molecular level. In addition, an overview of metal complexes used for diagnosing diseases is presented.

  13. Seasonal variations of coastal sedimentary trace metals cycling: insight on the effect of manganese and iron (oxy)hydroxides, sulphide and organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Duc Huy; Lenoble, Véronique; Durrieu, Gaël; Omanović, Dario; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Mounier, Stéphane; Garnier, Cédric

    2015-03-15

    The combination of analysis, multivariate treatment (PCA) and chemical speciation calculation confirmed the control of Fe, Mn, sulphide and organic matter on metals dynamics in coastal sediments (0-5 cm surface sediments and sediments cores) of Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean). The temporal monitoring of the physic-chemical parameters as well as the dissolved/particulate minor (Fe/Mn) and trace elements (i.e. Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, …) concentrations in porewaters and sediments were assessed. Multivariate treatment revealed different behaviours for marine elements, terrestrial ones and contaminants. Seasonal variations of metals mobilization in porewater were observed, related to diagenesis activity. Element mobility was studied by selective extractions (ascorbate, acid and alkaline) on sediments. Thermodynamic simulation (PHREEQC) was performed to calculate the elemental dissolved speciation, the mineral saturation index and then to simulate the solid/liquid interaction through precipitation processes, studying the contrasted influence of dissolved organic matter and sulphide.

  14. The effect of temperature and pressure on the distribution of iron group elements between metal and olivine phases in the process of differentiation of protoplanetary material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Ilyin, N. P.; Kolomeytsava, L. N.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution patterns of Ni, Co, Mn, and Cr were studied in olivines of various origins: from meteorites (chondrites, achondrites, pallasites), which are likely analogs of the protoplanetary material, to peridotite inclusions in kimberlite pipes, which are analogs of mantle material. According to X-ray microanalysis data, nickel is concentrated in peridotite olivines, while manganese is concentrated in meteoritic olivines. The maximum chromium content was found in ureilites, which were formed under reducing conditions. Experiments at pressures of 20 to 70 kbar and temperatures of 1100 to 2000 C have shown that in a mixture of olivine and Ni metal or NiO, nickel enters the silicate phase, displacing Fe into the metallic phase. Equilibrium temperatures were estimated from the Fe, Ni distribution coefficients between the metal and olivine: 1500 K for pallasites, 1600 K for olivine-bronzite H6 chondrites, 1200 K for olivine-hypersthene L6, 900 K for LL6, and 1900 K for ureilites (at P = 1 atm). The equilibrium conditions of peridotites are close to T = 1800 K and P over 100 kbar. It is concluded that there is a sharp difference between the conditions of differentiation of the protoplanetary material at the time meteorites were formed and the conditions of differentiation of the planets into concentric layers.

  15. Optimum design of cast iron finned radiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵立华; 张泓森; 董重成

    2003-01-01

    The height, thickness and spacing of fins have an impact on the thermal characteristics of a radiator.The calculation of heat output and metal thermal intensity for cast iron finned radiator are given by using heat transfer formula of vertical plate and parallel fins. Each factor having effect on the metal thermal intensity of a radiator is analyzed and the optimum structure parameters of a radiator are given in order to maximize metal thermal intensity.

  16. Ferritin iron minerals are chelator targets, antioxidants, and coated, dietary iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2010-08-01

    Cellular ferritin is central for iron balance during transfusions therapies; serum ferritin is a small fraction of body ferritin, albeit a convenient reporter. Iron overload induces extra ferritin protein synthesis but the protein is overfilled with the extra iron that damages ferritin, with conversion to toxic hemosiderin. Three new approaches that manipulate ferritin to address excess iron, hemosiderin, and associated oxidative damage in Cooley's Anemia and other iron overload conditions are faster removal of ferritin iron with chelators guided to ferritin gated pores by peptides; more ferritin protein synthesis using ferritin mRNA activators, by metal complexes that target mRNA 3D structures; and determining if endocytotic absorption of iron from legumes, which is mostly ferritin, is regulated during iron overload to prevent excess iron entry while providing protein. More of a focus on ferritin features, including protein cage structure, iron mineral, regulatable mRNA, and specific gut absorption properties, will achieve the three novel experimental goals for managing iron homeostasis with transfusion therapies.

  17. Ferritin iron minerals are chelator targets, antioxidants, and coated, dietary iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular ferritin is central for iron balance during transfusions therapies; serum ferritin is a small fraction of body ferritin, albeit a convenient reporter. Iron overload induces extra ferritin protein synthesis but the protein is overfilled with the extra iron that damages ferritin, with conversion to toxic hemosiderin. Three new approaches that manipulate ferritin to address excess iron, hemosiderin, and associated oxidative damage in Cooley’s Anemia and other iron overload conditions, are faster removal of ferritin iron with chelators guided to ferritin gated pores by peptides; more ferritin protein synthesis using ferritin mRNA activators, by metal complexes that target mRNA 3D structures; and determining if endocytotic absorption of iron from legumes, which is mostly ferritin, is regulated during iron overload to prevent excess iron entry while providing protein. More of a focus on ferritin features, including protein cage structure, iron mineral, regulatable mRNA, and specific gut absorption properties, will achieve the three novel experimental goals for managing iron homeostasis with transfusion therapies. PMID:20712793

  18. Extending hydraulic lifetime of iron walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, P.D. [General Electric Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1997-12-31

    Iron walls for control of groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated solvents and reducible metals are becoming much more widely used and field studies of this technology have proven successful to date. However, there is still much uncertainty in predicting long-term performance. This work focuses on two factors affecting the lifetime of the iron media: plugging at the treatment zone entrance and precipitation in the bulk iron media. Plugging at the system entrance is due principally to dissolved oxygen in the incoming water and is an issue in aerobic aquifers or in ex-situ canister tests. In an in-situ treatment system, plugging would result in a dramatic reduction in flow through the iron zone. Designs to minimize plugging in field applications include use of larger iron particles and admixing sand of comparable size with the iron particles. Mineral precipitation in the bulk iron media can lead to porosity losses in the media, again reducing flow through the treatment zone. Decreases in reactivity of the iron media may also occur. The nature of the mineral precipitation and the factors that affect extent of mineral precipitation are examined by a variety of tools, including tracer tests, aqueous inorganic profiles, and surface analysis techniques. At short treatment times, measured porosity losses are due mainly to entrapment of a film of H{sub 2} gas on the iron surfaces and also to Fe(OH){sub 2} precipitation. Over longer treatment times precipitation of Fe(OH){sub 2} and FeCO{sub 3} in low carbonate waters and of Fe(OH){sub 2}, FeCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in higher carbonate waters will begin to dominate porosity losses. Preliminary results of an on-going study to control pH in an iron zone by admixing iron sulfide with iron show no difference in extent of carbonate precipitation versus a 100% iron system, suggesting that these systems are supersaturated with respect to carbonate precipitation.

  19. Genome and low-iron response of an oceanic diatom adapted to chronic iron limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Biogeochemical elemental cycling is driven by primary production of biomass via phototrophic phytoplankton growth, with 40% of marine productivity being assigned to diatoms. Phytoplankton growth is widely limited by the availability of iron, an essential component of the photosynthetic apparatus. The oceanic diatom Thalassiosira oceanica shows a remarkable tolerance to low-iron conditions and was chosen as a model for deciphering the cellular response upon shortage of this essential micronutrient. Results The combined efforts in genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics reveal an unexpected metabolic flexibility in response to iron availability for T. oceanica CCMP1005. The complex response comprises cellular retrenchment as well as remodeling of bioenergetic pathways, where the abundance of iron-rich photosynthetic proteins is lowered, whereas iron-rich mitochondrial proteins are preserved. As a consequence of iron deprivation, the photosynthetic machinery undergoes a remodeling to adjust the light energy utilization with the overall decrease in photosynthetic electron transfer complexes. Conclusions Beneficial adaptations to low-iron environments include strategies to lower the cellular iron requirements and to enhance iron uptake. A novel contribution enhancing iron economy of phototrophic growth is observed with the iron-regulated substitution of three metal-containing fructose-bisphosphate aldolases involved in metabolic conversion of carbohydrates for enzymes that do not contain metals. Further, our data identify candidate components of a high-affinity iron-uptake system, with several of the involved genes and domains originating from duplication events. A high genomic plasticity, as seen from the fraction of genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer, provides the platform for these complex adaptations to a low-iron world. PMID:22835381

  20. Cellular distribution of ferric iron, ferritin, transferrin and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in substantia nigra and basal ganglia of normal and β2-microglobulin deficient mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Trinder, D.; Morgan, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus......beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus...

  1. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  2. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron. PMID:22247543

  3. Mutual interaction between iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Skalny, Anatoly V

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is identified as an important medical problem. One of the pathologic conditions observed in obesity is systemic iron deficiency and hypoferremia. Along with a large number of studies indicating disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity, recent data indicate a cause-effect relationship between iron status and obesity-related pathologies. The primary objective of the article is to consider two aspects of the iron-obesity interplay: (1) the mechanisms leading to impaired iron balance, and (2) the pathways of iron participation in obesity-related pathogenesis. While considering disturbance of iron homeostasis in obesity, a number of potential mechanisms of hypoferremia are proposed. At the same time, the inflammation of obesity and obesity-related hepcidin and lipocalin 2 hyperproduction seem to be the most probable reasons of obesity-related hypoferremia. Oversecretion of these proteins leads to iron sequestration in reticuloendothelial system cells. The latter also leads to increased adipose tissue iron content, thus producing preconditions for adverse effects of local iron overload. Being a redox-active metal, iron is capable of inducing oxidative stress as well as endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction. Iron-mediated mechanisms of toxicity may influence aspects of obesity pathogenesis possibly even leading to obesity aggravation. Thus, a mutual interaction between disturbance in iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis is proposed. All sides of this interaction should be considered to design new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron complex-catalyzed ammonia-borane dehydrogenation. A potential route toward B-N-containing polymer motifs using earth-abundant metal catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R Tom; Gordon, John C; Hamilton, Charles W; Henson, Neil J; Lin, Po-Heng; Maguire, Steven; Murugesu, Muralee; Scott, Brian L; Smythe, Nathan C

    2012-03-28

    Ammonia-borane (NH(3)BH(3), AB) has garnered interest as a hydrogen storage material due to its high weight percent hydrogen content and ease of H(2) release relative to metal hydrides. As a consequence of dehydrogenation, B-N-containing oligomeric/polymeric materials are formed. The ability to control this process and dictate the identity of the generated polymer opens up the possibility of the targeted synthesis of new materials. While precious metals have been used in this regard, the ability to construct such materials using earth-abundant metals such as Fe presents a more economical approach. Four Fe complexes containing amido and phosphine supporting ligands were synthesized, and their reactivity with AB was examined. Three-coordinate Fe(PCy(3))[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (1) and four-coordinate Fe(DEPE)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (2) yield a mixture of (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and (NHBH)(n) products with up to 1.7 equiv of H(2) released per AB but cannot be recycled (DEPE = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphino)ethane). In contrast, Fe supported by a bidentate P-N ligand (4) can be used in a second cycle to afford a similar product mixture. Intriguingly, the symmetric analogue of 4 (Fe(N-N)(P-P), 3), only generates (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and does so in minutes at room temperature. This marked difference in reactivity may be the result of the chemistry of Fe(II) vs Fe(0).

  5. Diel behavior of iron and other heavy metals in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH: Fisher Creek, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammons, C.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; Cleasby, T.E.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Three simultaneous 24-h samplings at three sites over a downstream pH gradient were conducted to examine diel fluctuations in heavy metal concentrations in Fisher Creek, a small mountain stream draining abandoned mine lands in Montana. Average pH values at the upstream (F1), middle (F2), and downstream (F3) monitoring stations were 3.31, 5.46, and 6.80, respectively. The downstream increase in pH resulted in precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) on the streambed. At F1 and F2, Fe showed strong diel cycles in dissolved concentration and Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio; these cycles were attributed to daytime photoreduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), reoxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), and temperature-dependent hydrolysis and precipitation of HFO. At the near-neutral downstream station, no evidence of Fe(III) photoreduction was observed, and suspended particles of HFO dominated the total Fe load. HFO precipitation rates between F2 and F3 were highest in the afternoon, due in part to reoxidation of a midday pulse of Fe2+ formed by photoreduction in the upper, acidic portions of the stream. Dissolved concentrations of Fe(II) and Cu decreased tenfold and 2.4-fold, respectively, during the day at F3. These changes were attributed to sorption onto fresh HFO surfaces. Results of surface complexation modeling showed good agreement between observed and predicted Cu concentrations at F3, but only when adsorption enthalpies were added to the thermodynamic database to take into account diel temperature variations. The field and modeling results illustrate that the degree to which trace metals adsorb onto actively forming HFO is strongly temperature dependent. This study is an example of how diel Fe cycles caused by redox and hydrolysis reactions can induce a diel cycle in a trace metal of toxicological importance in downstream waters. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  7. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  8. Thermomagnetic evidence of native iron in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results of thermomagnetic analysis concerning the distribution of metallic iron in the sediments ranging in age from Miocene to Early Cretaceous sampled from the following sections: Gams (Austria); Verkhorech'e and Sel'bukhra (the Crimea); Kvirinaki and Tetritskaro (Georgia); Aimaki, Dzhengutai, Madzhalis, and Gergebil (Ciscaucasia, Russia); Klyuchi and Teplovka (Volga region, Russia); Koshak (Kazakhstan); and Khalats and Kara-Kala (Turkmenia). Small amounts of native iron (from 10-5% to 0.05%) are identified in 521 samples of 921 studied; i.e., iron particles are almost pervasive. This fact traces the origin of these particles to cosmic dust. Some established features point to the heterogeneous character of the cosmic dust: (a) the samples clearly fall into two groups. One group comprises the rocks that contain iron particles; the rocks of the other group are iron-free. In the first group, four intervals are distinguished where the sediments are globally enriched with iron with constant nickel content (5-6%); (b) in terms of composition, the iron particles are divided into three groups. The first group contains pure iron; the particles pertaining to the second group contain iron with a minor amount of nickel typical for kamacite; and the third group comprises the particles of Fe-Ni alloy with more than 20% nickel. The first and the second groups are ubiquitous; the particles of the third group are spread locally. They bear no relation to cosmic dust and are probably associated with the meteoritic impacts.

  9. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V; Trachenko, K

    2014-11-26

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the "rigid liquid" state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line.

  10. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  11. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Dissolution of heavy metals from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) dust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIBOO

    precipitator (ESP) dust of a coal based sponge iron plant by fungal leaching ... Microbial leaching is based on the natural ... sponge iron plant ESP dust using three different fungal ..... Fungal bioleaching of metals in preservative treated wood.

  14. Particulate trace metals in Cochin backwaters: Distribution of seasonal indices

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Joseph, T.

    A seasonal analysis of particulate trace metals, viz. iron, manganese, zinc, copper, cobalt and nickel collected from 4 stations in Cochin backwaters are presented. The spatial trend for cobalt, iron and nickel was stationary at surface whereas...

  15. Role of hydrous iron oxide formation in attenuation and diel cycling of dissolved trace metals in a stream affected by acid rock drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, S.R.; Gammons, C.H.; Jones, C.A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mining-impacted streams have been shown to undergo diel (24-h) fluctuations in concentrations of major and trace elements. Fisher Creek in south-central Montana, USA receives acid rock drainage (ARD) from natural and mining-related sources. A previous diel field study found substantial changes in dissolved metal concentrations at three sites with differing pH regimes during a 24-h period in August 2002. The current work discusses follow-up field sampling of Fisher Creek as well as field and laboratory experiments that examine in greater detail the underlying processes involved in the observed diel concentration changes. The field experiments employed in-stream chambers that were either transparent or opaque to light, filled with stream water and sediment (cobbles coated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides), and placed in the stream to maintain the same temperature. Three sets of laboratory experiments were performed: (1) equilibration of a Cu(II) and Zn(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment at pH 6.9 and different temperatures; (2) titration of Fisher Creek water from pH 3.1 to 7 under four different isothermal conditions; and (3) analysis of the effects of temperature on the interaction of an Fe(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment under non-oxidizing conditions. Results of these studies are consistent with a model in which Cu, Fe(II), and to a lesser extent Zn, are adsorbed or co-precipitated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides as the pH of Fisher Creek increases from 5.3 to 7.0. The extent of metal attenuation is strongly temperature-dependent, being more pronounced in warm vs. cold water. Furthermore, the sorption/co-precipitation process is shown to be irreversible; once the Cu, Zn, and Fe(II) are removed from solution in warm water, a decrease in temperature does not release the metals back to the water column. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Recovery of Iron from Copper Tailings by Direct Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Xia, De-Hong; Gu, Jing; Liu, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shou-Zeng; Qi, Zhao-Dong; Ao, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Direct reduction of copper tailings were performed to recover iron efficiently by carbon-containing pellets, and the metallization rate was gained by chemical analysis method. The results showed that the metallization rate of copper tailings was up to 85.32% and the best reduction parameters are also found. Content of precious metals, such as, gold, silver in copper tailings can be enriched by 1.8~1.9 times through removing iron. The apparent activation energy of direct reduction of iron oxide in copper tailings is calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and the restrictive factor of reduction process is solid diffusion.

  17. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  18. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  2. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  4. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  5. Acquisition, transport, and storage of iron by pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, D H

    1999-07-01

    Iron is required by most living systems. A great variety of means of acquisition, avenues of uptake, and methods of storage are used by pathogenic fungi to ensure a supply of the essential metal. Solubilization of insoluble iron polymers is the first step in iron assimilation. The two methods most commonly used by microorganisms for solubilization of iron are reduction and chelation. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron by enzymatic or nonenzymatic means is a common mechanism among pathogenic yeasts. Under conditions of iron starvation, many fungi synthesize iron chelators known as siderophores. Two classes of compounds that function in iron gathering are commonly observed: hydroxamates and polycarboxylates. Two major responses to iron stress in fungi are a high-affinity ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Regulation of these two mechanisms at the molecular level has received attention. Uptake of siderophores is a diverse process, which varies among the different classes of compounds. Since free iron is toxic, it must be stored for further metabolic use. Polyphosphates, ferritins, and siderophores themselves have been described as storage molecules. The iron-gathering mechanisms used by a pathogen in an infected host are largely unknown and can only be posited on the basis of in vitro studies at present.

  6. Deciphering the iron response in Acinetobacter baumannii: A proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Zimbler, Daniel L; Actis, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that plays a role in bacterial differential gene expression and protein production. Accordingly, the comparative analysis of total lysate and outer membrane fractions isolated from A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T) cells cultured under iron-rich and -chelated conditions using 2-D gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of 58 protein spots differentially produced. While 19 and 35 of them represent iron-repressed and iron-induced protein spots, respectively, four other spots represent a metal chelation response unrelated to iron. Most of the iron-repressed protein spots represent outer membrane siderophore receptors, some of which could be involved in the utilization of siderophores produced by other bacteria. The iron-induced protein spots represent a wide range of proteins including those involved in iron storage, such as Bfr, metabolic and energy processes, such as AcnA, AcnB, GlyA, SdhA, and SodB, as well as lipid biosynthesis. The detection of an iron-regulated Hfq ortholog indicates that iron regulation in this bacterium could be mediated by Fur and small RNAs as described in other bacteria. The iron-induced production of OmpA suggests this protein plays a role in iron metabolism as shown by the diminished ability of an isogenic OmpA deficient derivative to grow under iron-chelated conditions.

  7. Core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles as excellent MRI contrast enhancement agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, Hafsa, E-mail: hkhurshi@udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 sharp lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Hadjipanayis, Costas G. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Chen, Hongwei [Department of Radiology, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Li, Wanfeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 sharp lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Machaidze, Revaz [Department of Neurological Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Tzitzios, Vasilis [Institute of Materials Science, “Demokritos” 15310 Athens (Greece); Hadjipanayis, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 sharp lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We report the use of metallic iron-based nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. Core/shell structured iron-based nanoparticles prepared by thermally decomposing organo-metallic compounds of iron at high temperature in the presence of hydrophobic surfactants were coated and stabilized in the aqueous solvent using the newly developed polysiloxane PEO–b–PγMPS (poly(ethylene oxide)–block–poly (γ methacryloxypropyl trimethyl oxysilane)) diblock copolymers. Particles are well suspended in water and retain their core–shell morphology after coating with the copolymer. In comparison to the conventionally used iron-oxide nanoparticles, core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles offer a much stronger T{sub 2} shortening effect than that of iron-oxide with the same core size due to their better magnetic properties. -- Highlights: ► Core/shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by organo-metallic synthesis. ► Water dispersibility was obtained by coating particles with a polysiloxane diblock copolymer. ► In comparison to Fe-oxide, Fe/Fe-oxide nanoparticles offer a much stronger T{sub 2} shortening effect.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  9. Metal-Filme

    OpenAIRE

    Fendler, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Heavy Metal hat seinen Ursprung im Hard- und Bluesrock der 1960er und 1970er Jahre. Seine musikalischen Vorgänger sind Bands wie Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple und Iron Butterfly. Der Begriff taucht in der Musik erstmals 1968 auf, als Iron Butterfly ihrem Debütalbum den Titel 'Heavy' gaben und Steppenwolf in ihrem Song 'Born to be wild' über "heavy metal thunder" sangen. Die Entstehung des Ausdrucks ist jedoch unklar, sie wird unter anderem Jimi Hendrix zugeordnet, aber auch als Ausdruck für eine ...

  10. Mineral resource of the month: Iron and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on Earth, but it does not occur in nature in a useful metallic form. Although ancient people may have recovered some iron from meteorites, it wasn’t until smelting was invented that iron metal could be derived from iron oxides. After the beginning of the Iron Age in about 1200 B.C., knowledge of iron- and steelmaking spread from the ancient Middle East through Greece to the Roman Empire, then to Europe and, in the early 17th century, to North America. The first successful furnace in North America began operating in 1646 in what is now Saugus, Mass. Introduction of the Bessemer converter in the mid-19th century made the modern steel age possible.

  11. Bioactive dietary polyphenols decrease heme iron absorption by decreasing basolateral iron release in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianyi; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Okhee

    2010-06-01

    Because dietary polyphenolic compounds have a wide range of effects in vivo and vitro, including chelation of metals such as iron, it is prudent to test whether the regular consumption of dietary bioactive polyphenols impair the utilization of dietary iron. Because our previous study showed the inhibitory effect of (-) -epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and grape seed extract (GSE) on nonheme iron absorption, we investigated whether EGCG and GSE also affect iron absorption from heme. The fully differentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on microporous membrane inserts were incubated with heme (55)Fe in uptake buffer containing EGCG or GSE in the apical compartment for 7 h. Both EGCG and GSE decreased (P heme-derived iron. However, apical heme iron uptake was increased (P heme (55)Fe, the transfer of iron across the intestinal basolateral membrane was extremely low, indicating that basolateral export was impaired by GSE. In contrast, EGCG moderately decreased the cellular assimilation of heme (55)Fe, but the basolateral iron transfer was extremely low, suggesting that the basolateral efflux of heme iron was also inhibited by EGCG. Expression of heme oxygenase, ferroportin, and hephaestin protein was not changed by EGCG and GSE. The apical uptake of heme iron was temperature dependent and saturable in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells. Our data show that bioactive dietary polyphenols inhibit heme iron absorption mainly by reducing basolateral iron exit rather than decreasing apical heme iron uptake in intestinal cells.

  12. Interaction of carbon with vacancy and self-interstitial atom clusters in {alpha}-iron studied using metallic-covalent interatomic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Jansson, Ville [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Khater, Hassan [Department Matematica Aplicada III, E.T.S. Enginyeria de Camins, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-01-31

    The presence of even small amount of carbon interstitial impurity affects properties of Fe and Fe-based ferritic alloys. From earlier experiments it follows that carbon exhibits considerably strong interaction with lattice defects and therefore influences their mobility, hence affecting the evolution of the microstructure under irradiation. This work is dedicated to understanding the interaction of carbon-vacancy complexes with glissile dislocation loops, which form in Fe, Fe-based alloys and ferritic steels under irradiation. We apply large scale atomistic simulations coupled with the so-called 'metallic-covalent bonding' interatomic model for the Fe-C system, known to be the most consistent interatomic model available today. With these techniques we have studied (i) the stability of vacancy-carbon clusters; (ii) the interaction of octahedral carbon with 1/2<1 1 1> loops; (iii) possibility of the dynamic drag of carbon by 1/2<1 1 1> loops and (iv) the interaction of 1/2<1 1 1> loops with the most stable vacancy-carbon clusters expected to occur under irradiation. Finally, we have shown that carbon-vacancy complexes act as strong traps for 1/2<1 1 1> loops.

  13. Geobacter metallireducens gen. nov. sp. nov., a microorganism capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of iron and other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Giovannoni, S.J.; White, D.C.; Champine, J.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Goodwin, S.

    1993-01-01

    The gram-negative metal-reducing microorganism, previously known as strain GS-15, was further characterized. This strict anaerobe oxidizes several short-chain fatty acids, alcohols, and monoaromatic compounds with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, acetate is also oxidized with the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), and nitrate. In whole cell suspensions, the c-type cytochrome(s) of this organism was oxidized by physiological electron acceptors and also by gold, silver, mercury, and chromate. Menaquinone was recovered in concentrations comparable to those previously found in gram-negative sulfate reducers. Profiles of the phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids indicated that both the anaerobic desaturase and the branched pathways for fatty acid biosynthesis were operative. The organism contained three lipopolysaccharide hydroxy fatty acids which have not been previously reported in microorganisms, but have been observed in anaerobic freshwater sediments. The 16S rRNA sequence indicated that this organism belongs in the delta proteobacteria. Its closest known relative is Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. The name Geobacter metallireducens is proposed.

  14. Iron(III) and copper(II) complexes of trans-bis(ferrocenyl)porphyrin: Effect of metal ions on long-range electronic communication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Sahoo; Sankar Prasad Rath

    2015-02-01

    A series of complex with a general formula of M(Fc2Ph2P) [Fc2Ph2P = 5, 10-bisferrocenyl-15,20-bisphenylporphyrin (2−); M = Fe(III)Cl Fe(III)(ClO4) and Cu(II)] have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal X-ray structure of CuII(Fc2Ph2P) has been reported in which two ferrocene moieties are in anti form with respect to each other. The ferrocenyl groups of CuII(Fc2Ph2P) are more easily oxidized via a single two-electron quasi-reversible process compared to the free base ligand in which two 1e-oxidative response separated by 0.23 V are observed. Electrochemical study of FeIII(Fc2Ph2P)Cl revealed ferrocenebased two-electron quasi-reversible oxidation at 0.72 V indicating no observable coupling of the ferrocene moieties. The higher oxidation state of Fe(III) reduces the electron releasing tendency of the porphyrin ring and thus make the ferrocene oxidation difficult. The porphyrin, however, lack substituents at the -pyrrolic positions, and the ferrocenyl moieties are therefore free to rotate. The observed electrochemical analyses thus demonstrate that the oxidation of the ferrocene subunit is strongly affected by porphyrin ring as well as the central metal through extended -conjugation.

  15. Two heterometallic-organic frameworks composed of iron(III)-salen-based ligands and d(10) metals: gas sorption and visible-light photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2015-03-01

    Two examples of heterometallic-organic frameworks (HMOFs) composed of dicarboxyl-functionalized Fe(III)-salen complexes and d(10) metals (Zn, Cd), [Zn2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅4 DMF⋅4 H2O (1) and [Cd2(Fe-L)2(μ2-O)(H2O)2]⋅2 DMF⋅H2O (2) (H4L = 1,2-cyclohexanediamino-N,N'-bis(3-methyl-5-carboxysalicylidene), have been synthesized and structurally characterized. In 1 and 2, each square-pyramidal Fe(III) atom is embedded in the [N2O2] pocket of an L(4-) anion, and these units are further bridged by a μ2-O anion to give an (Fe-L)2(μ2-O) dimer. The two carboxylate groups of each L(4-) anion bridge Zn(II) or Cd(II) atoms to afford a 3D porous HMOF. The gas sorption and magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. Remarkably, 1 and 2 show activity for the photocatalytic degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) under visible-light irradiation, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first time that this has been observed for Fe(III)-salen-based HMOFs.

  16. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  17. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world's population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes) has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains) and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA) metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings (NTS). Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of yellow stripe like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II) complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  18. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  19. Ferritins and iron storage in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briat, Jean-François; Duc, Céline; Ravet, Karl; Gaymard, Frédéric

    2010-08-01

    Iron is essential for both plant productivity and nutritional quality. Improving plant iron content was attempted through genetic engineering of plants overexpressing ferritins. However, both the roles of these proteins in the plant physiology, and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their expression are largely unknown. Although the structure of ferritins is highly conserved between plants and animals, their cellular localization differ. Furthermore, regulation of ferritin gene expression in response to iron excess occurs at the transcriptional level in plants, in contrast to animals which regulate ferritin expression at the translational level. In this review, our knowledge of the specific features of plant ferritins is presented, at the level of their (i) structure/function relationships, (ii) cellular localization, and (iii) synthesis regulation during development and in response to various environmental cues. A special emphasis is given to their function in plant physiology, in particular concerning their respective roles in iron storage and in protection against oxidative stress. Indeed, the use of reverse genetics in Arabidopsis recently enabled to produce various knock-out ferritin mutants, revealing strong links between these proteins and protection against oxidative stress. In contrast, their putative iron storage function to furnish iron during various development processes is unlikely to be essential. Ferritins, by buffering iron, exert a fine tuning of the quantity of metal required for metabolic purposes, and help plants to cope with adverse situations, the deleterious effects of which would be amplified if no system had evolved to take care of free reactive iron.

  20. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  1. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  2. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  3. Iron and genome stability: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pra, Daniel, E-mail: daniel_pra@yahoo.com [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); PPG em Saude e Comportamento, Universidade Catolica de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Henriques, Joao Antonio Pegas [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40-45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  4. Synthesis and functionalisation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles including calcium oxide, gold, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) were synthesised using a range of techniques including reduction, co-precipitation and spinning disc technology. SPIOs were primarily synthesised via a co-precipitation method using iron (II) chloride, iron (III) chloride and ammonia; a spinning disc reactor and gaseous ammonia were trialled successfully for scale up, producing spherical particles of 10-40 nm in diameter a...

  5. Maternal Cadmium, Iron and Zinc Levels, DNA Methylation and Birth Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND:Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous and environmentally persistent toxic metal that has been implicated in neurotoxicity, carcinogenesis and obesity and essential metals including zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) may alter these outcomes. However mechanisms underlying these relationsh...

  6. Iron-binding properties of sugar cane yeast peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz, Lucia; Ponezi, Alexandre N; Milani, Raquel F; Nunes da Silva, Vera S; Sonia de Souza, A; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The extract of sugar-cane yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was enzymatically hydrolysed by Alcalase, Protex or Viscozyme. Hydrolysates were fractionated using a membrane ultrafiltration system and peptides smaller than 5kDa were evaluated for iron chelating ability through measurements of iron solubility, binding capacity and dialyzability. Iron-chelating peptides were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). They showed higher content of His, Lys, and Arg than the original hydrolysates. In spite of poor iron solubility, hydrolysates of Viscozyme provided higher iron dialyzability than those of other enzymes. This means that more chelates of iron or complexes were formed and these kept the iron stable during simulated gastro-intestinal digestion in vitro, improving its dialyzability.

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  9. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  10. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  11. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  12. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  13. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  14. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  15. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  16. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  17. Siderophores: More than Stealing Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Behnsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Siderophores are small molecular iron chelators that are produced by microbes and whose most notable function is to sequester iron from the host and provide this essential metal nutrient to microbes. Recent studies have proposed additional, noncanonical roles for siderophores, including the acquisition of noniron metals and modulation of host functions. Recently, Holden et al. (V. I. Holden, P. Breen, S. Houle, C. M. Dozois, and M. A. Bachman, mBio 7:e01397-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01397-16 showed that siderophores secreted by Klebsiella pneumoniae during lung infection induce stabilization of the transcription factor HIF-1α, increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the lung, and promote dissemination of K. pneumoniae to the spleen. Thus, their study demonstrated novel roles for siderophores in vivo, beyond iron sequestration. The interaction of siderophores with host cells further promotes the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae and is likely relevant for other pathogens that also secrete siderophores in the host.

  18. Duodenal Absorption and Tissue Utilization of Dietary Heme and Nonheme Iron Differ in Rats123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang; Thomas, Carrie E.; Insogna, Karl L.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary heme contributes to iron intake, yet regulation of heme absorption and tissue utilization of absorbed heme remains undefined. Objectives: In a rat model of iron overload, we used stable iron isotopes to examine heme- and nonheme-iron absorption in relation to liver hepcidin and to compare relative utilization of absorbed heme and nonheme iron by erythroid (RBC) and iron storage tissues (liver and spleen). Methods: Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups for injections of either saline or iron dextran (16 or 48 mg Fe over 2 wk). After iron loading, rats were administered oral stable iron in the forms of 57Fe-ferrous sulfate and 58Fe-labeled hemoglobin. Expression of liver hepcidin and duodenal iron transporters and tissue stable iron enrichment was determined 10 d postdosing. Results: High iron loading increased hepatic hepcidin by 3-fold and reduced duodenal expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) by 76%. Nonheme-iron absorption was 2.5 times higher than heme-iron absorption (P = 0.0008). Absorption of both forms of iron was inversely correlated with hepatic hepcidin expression (heme-iron absorption: r = −0.77, P = 0.003; nonheme-iron absorption: r = −0.80, P = 0.002), but hepcidin had a stronger impact on nonheme-iron absorption (P = 0.04). Significantly more 57Fe was recovered in RBCs (P = 0.02), and more 58Fe was recovered in the spleen (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin significantly decreased heme- and nonheme-iron absorption but had a greater impact on nonheme-iron absorption. Differential tissue utilization of heme vs. nonheme iron was evident between erythroid and iron storage tissues, suggesting that some heme may be exported into the circulation in a form different from that of nonheme iron. PMID:25332470

  19. Vacuolar Iron Transporter BnMEB2 Is Involved in Enhancing Iron Tolerance of Brassica napus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Wei; Zuo, Rong; Zhou, Rongfang; Huang, Junyan; Tang, Minqiang; Cheng, Xiaohui; Liu, Yueying; Tong, Chaobo; XIANG, YANG; Dong, Caihua; Liu, Shengyi

    2016-01-01

    Iron toxicity is a nutrient disorder that severely affects crop development and yield in some soil conditions. Vacuolar detoxification of metal stress is an important strategy for plants to survive and adapt to this adverse environment. Vacuolar iron transporter (VIT) members are involved in this process and play essential roles in iron storage and transport. In this study, we identified a rapeseed VIT gene BnMEB2 (BnaC07g30170D) homologs to Arabidopsis MEB2 (At5g24290). Transient expression ...

  20. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media.

  1. Tribological Aspects of Cast Iron Investigated Via Fracture Toughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fragassa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness of metallic materials is a method which covers the determination of the strain fracture toughness (KIC of metallic materials by increasing-force test of fatigue precracked specimens. This method has been applied for investigating the fracture behaviour of cast iron. Two groups of cast alloys, Compacted Graphite Iron (CGI and Spheroidal Graphite Iron (SGI have been investigated. While SGI benefits of a wide scientific literature, CGI is a relatively unknown material despite of its large potentialities in industrial applications.

  2. Control of microstructure of cast irons Indefinite Chill Double Pour-ICDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Válek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ICDP cast irons designated for working layer of centrifugal cylinders of rolling mill must have precisely defined properties. The most closely observed parameters of the ICDP (Indefinite Child Double Pour cast irons are the following: the amount of graphite in a microstructure and hardness of base metal material. Secretion of graphite in cast iron with ledeburitic basic metal compound is a complex process that can be controlled and managed with the use of thermal analysis. On the basis of the evaluation of cooling curve parameters of cast iron there is performed metallurgical adjustment of meltage by adding elements supporting graphite end carbide formation into cast iron. The identified structural and mechanical properties of ICDP cast irons were correlated with recorded KO. Subsequently, a methodology for control of the metallurgical adjustment of cast iron before casting was proposed so as to ensure the desired microstructure and properties the ICDP cast iron.

  3. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on changes in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and...

  4. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on changes in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and...