WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal implanted germanium

  1. Heavy ion time-of-flight ERDA of high dose metal implanted germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, N.; Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Wielunski, L.S. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Bunder, J. [New South Wales Univ., Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Wollongong Univ. Coll

    1996-12-31

    With the thick Ge substrates used in ion implantation, RBS can have difficulty in resolving the mass-depth ambiguities when analysing materials composed of mixtures of elements with nearly equal masses. Additional, and complimentary techniques are thus required. This paper reports the use of heavy ion time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF- ERDA), and conventional RBS in the analysis of Ge(100) implanted with high dose Ti and Cu ions from a MEWA ion source . Heavy ion ToF ERDA has been used to resolve, and profile the implanted transition metal species, and also to study any oxygen incorporation into the sample resulting from the implantation, or subsequential reactions with air or moisture. This work is part of a study on high dose metal ion implantation of medium atomic weight semiconductor materials. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  3. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  4. Metal induced crystallization of silicon germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjukic, M.

    2007-05-15

    In the framework of this thesis the applicability of the aluminium-induced layer exchange on binary silicon germanium alloys was studied. It is here for the first time shown that polycrstalline silicon-germanium layers can be fabricated over the whole composition range by the aluminium-induced layer exchange. The experimental results prove thet the resulting material exhibits a polycrystalline character with typocal grain sizes of 10-100 {mu}m. Raman measurements confirm that the structural properties of the resulting layers are because of the large crystallites more comparable with monocrystalline than with nano- or microcrystalline silicon-germanium. The alloy ratio of the polycrystalline layer correspondes to the chemical composition of the amorphous starting layer. The polycrystalline silicon-germanium layers possess in the range of the interband transitions a reflection spectrum, as it is otherwise only known from monocrystalline reference layers. The improvement of the absorption in the photovoltaically relevant spectral range aimed by the application of silicon-germanium could be also proved by absorption measurments. Strongly correlated with the structural properties of the polycrystalline layers and the electronic band structure resulting from this are beside the optical properties also the electrical properties of the material, especially the charge-carrier mobility and the doping concentration. For binary silicon-germanium layers the hole concentration of about 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for pure silicon increrases to about 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sub -3} for pure germanium. Temperature-resolved measurements were applied in order to detect doping levels respectively semiconductor-metal transitions. In the last part of the thesis the hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline thin silicon-germanium layers, which were fabricated by means of aluminium-induced layer exchange, is treated.

  5. Lattice site and thermal stability of transition metals in germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Augustyns, Valérie; Pereira, Lino

    Although the first transistor was based on germanium, current chip technology mainly uses silicon due to its larger abundance, a lower price and higher quality silicon-oxide. However, a very important goal in microelectronics is to obtain faster integrated circuits. The advantages of germanium compared to silicon (e.g. a higher mobility of the charge carriers) motivates further research on germanium based materials. Semiconductor doping (e.g. introducing impurities into silicon and germanium in order to alter - and control - their properties) can be done by ion implantation or by in situ doping, whereby the host material is doped during growth. This thesis focuses on introducing dopants by ion implantation. The implantation as well as the subsequent measurements were performed in ISOLDE (CERN) using the emission channeling technique. Although ion implantation generates undesired defects in the host material (e.g. vacancies), such damage can be reduced by performing the implantation at an elevated temperature....

  6. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M; Yeoh, LaReine A; Carter, Damien J; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A; Jaeger, David L; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hamilton, Alexander R

    2015-08-10

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (10(19) to 10(20) cm(-3)) low-resistivity (10(-4)Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory.

  8. Reduction of phosphorus diffusion in germanium by fluorine implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mubarek, H. A. W.

    2013-12-01

    The control of phosphorus (P) diffusion in germanium (Ge) is essential for the realisation of ultrashallow n-type junctions in Ge. This work reports a detailed study of the effect of fluorine (F) co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge. P and F profiles were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The ion implantation damage was investigated using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that F co-implantation reduces the implanted P profile width and reduces both intrinsic and extrinsic P diffusion in Ge. A defect mediated mechanism for the strong influence of F co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge is proposed and invokes the formation of FnVm clusters in the F-amorphized Ge layer. A fraction of these FnVm clusters decorate the interstitial type end-of-range defects in the re-grown Ge layer and the rest react during re-growth with interstitial germanium atoms diffusing back from the amorphous crystalline interface. The Ge vacancies are then annihilated and mobile interstitial F is released and out diffuses from the surface. This results in a re-grown Ge layer which has a low vacancy concentration and in which the P diffusion rate is reduced. These results open the way to the realization of enhanced Ge n-type devices.

  9. Reduction of phosphorus diffusion in germanium by fluorine implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mubarek, H. A. W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-14

    The control of phosphorus (P) diffusion in germanium (Ge) is essential for the realisation of ultrashallow n-type junctions in Ge. This work reports a detailed study of the effect of fluorine (F) co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge. P and F profiles were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The ion implantation damage was investigated using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that F co-implantation reduces the implanted P profile width and reduces both intrinsic and extrinsic P diffusion in Ge. A defect mediated mechanism for the strong influence of F co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge is proposed and invokes the formation of F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters in the F-amorphized Ge layer. A fraction of these F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters decorate the interstitial type end-of-range defects in the re-grown Ge layer and the rest react during re-growth with interstitial germanium atoms diffusing back from the amorphous crystalline interface. The Ge vacancies are then annihilated and mobile interstitial F is released and out diffuses from the surface. This results in a re-grown Ge layer which has a low vacancy concentration and in which the P diffusion rate is reduced. These results open the way to the realization of enhanced Ge n-type devices.

  10. Implantation of sodium ions into germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korol' , V. M., E-mail: vkorol@ctsnet.ru [Southern Federal University, Research Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Kudriavtsev, Yu. [CINVESTAV, Dep. Ingenieria Electrica (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    The donor properties of Na atoms introduced by ion implantation into p-Ge with the resistivity 20-40 {Omega} cm are established for the first time. Na profiles implanted into Ge (the energies 70 and 77 keV and the doses (0.8, 3, 30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}) are studied. The doses and annealing temperatures at which the thermoprobe detects n-type conductivity on the sample surface are established. After implantation, the profiles exhibit an extended tail. The depth of the concentration maximum is in good agreement with the calculated mean projected range of Na ions R{sub p}. Annealing for 30 min at temperatures of 250-700 Degree-Sign C brings about a redistribution of Na atoms with the formation of segregation peaks at a depth, which is dependent on the ion dose, and is accompanied by the diffusion of Na atoms to the surface with subsequent evaporation. After annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C less than 7% of the implanted ions remain in the matrix. The shape of the profile tail portions measured after annealing at temperatures 300-400 Degree-Sign C is indicative of the diffusion of a small fraction of Na atoms into the depth of the sample.

  11. Germanium ion implantation to Improve Crystallinity during Solid Phase Epitaxy and the effect of AMU Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. S.; Yoo, D. H.; Son, G. H.; Lee, C. H.; Noh, J. H.; Han, J. J.; Yu, Y. S.; Hyung, Y. W.; Yang, J. K.; Song, D. G.; Lim, T. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, H. D.; Moon, J. T.

    2006-11-01

    Germanium ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) using high current implantation equipment. Electron back-scatter diffraction(EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19 percent of signal, which might be due to pre-amorphization effect on silicon layer deposited by LPCVD process with germanium ion implantation. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of NMOS transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers, which implied non-uniform distribution of donor-type impurities into channel area. It was confirmed that arsenic atoms were incorporated into silicon layer during germanium ion implantation. Since the equipment for germanium pre-amorphization implantation(PAI) was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit(AMU) contamination during PAI of germanium with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of arsenic with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use germanium isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination, however it led serious reduction of productivity because of decrease in beam current by 30 percent as known to be difference in isotope abundance. It was effective to use enriched germanium source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity. Spatial distribution of arsenic impurities in wafers was closely related to hardware configuration of ion implantation equipment.

  12. Phosphorus diffusion in germanium following implantation and excimer laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Li, Cheng; Huang, Shihao; Lu, Weifang; Yan, Guangming; Zhang, Maotian; Wu, Huanda; Lin, Guangyang; Wei, Jiangbin; Huang, Wei; Lai, Hongkai; Chen, Songyan

    2014-05-01

    We focus our study on phosphorus diffusion in ion-implanted germanium after excimer laser annealing (ELA). An analytical model of laser annealing process is developed to predict the temperature profile and the melted depth in Ge. Based on the heat calculation of ELA, a phosphorus diffusion model has been proposed to predict the dopant profiles in Ge after ELA and fit SIMS profiles perfectly. A comparison between the current-voltage characteristics of Ge n+/p junctions formed by ELA at 250 mJ/cm2 and rapid thermal annealing at 650 °C for 15 s has been made, suggesting that ELA is promising for high performance Ge n+/p junctions.

  13. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Ian U

    2012-01-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z=32), arsenic (As, Z=33), and selenium (Se, Z=34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4. We perform a standard abundance analysis of germanium, arsenic, selenium, and several other elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. When combined with previous derivations of germanium abundances in metal-poor stars, our sample reveals an increase in the [Ge/Fe] ratios at higher metallicities. This could mark the onset of the weak s-process contribution to germanium. In contrast, the [As/Fe] and [Se/Fe] ratios rema...

  14. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2012-09-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z = 32), arsenic (As, Z = 33), and selenium (Se, Z = 34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 Prochaska).This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  15. Fibroblastic activities post implantation of cobalt chromium alloy and pure germanium in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J M; Natiella, J R; Baier, R E; Natiella, R R

    1984-02-01

    Different preimplantation surface finishes were applied to surgical vitallium discs and germanium prisms implanted for 20 days within the back muscles of adult rabbits. Histopathologic analysis of the numbers of nuclei of active fibroblasts immediately adjacent to the implants was carried out. The mean apparent volume fractions (MAVF) for the subdermal implant sites were found to depend on the surface cleanliness of the implant, the cleanest or highest-surface-energy surfaces giving the highest MAVF values for active fibroblasts.

  16. Positron annihilation studies of fluorine-vacancy complexes in phosphorus- and fluorine-implanted germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, C. J.; Coleman, P. G.; El Mubarek, H. A. W.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of FnV2 complexes, with n = 5 ± 1, near the end-of-range damage region in germanium implanted with 30 keV phosphorus and 40 keV fluorine ions, after annealing to 400 °C, has been observed using variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy in conjunction with secondary ion mass spectrometry. Phosphorus ions were implanted at 6 × 1013 and 1015, F at 1015 cm-2. Complexes—at lower concentrations—have also been observed at shallower depths in samples implanted with P at 1015 cm-2. The complexes break up and their components diffuse away at 450 and 500 °C for the higher and lower P dose samples, respectively.

  17. Probing the carrier concentration profiles in phosphorus-implanted germanium using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry with photon energy in the 0.045-0.65 eV range was used to investigate germanium samples implanted with 30 keV phosphorus ions and annealed at 700 °C. The infrared response of implanted layers is dominated by free carrier absorption which is modeled using a Drude oscillator. The carrier concentration profiles were modeled using an error function, and compared with those obtained by electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the flat region of the carrier concentration profile, average carrier concentration and mobility of 1.40 × 1019 cm-3 and 336 cm2V-1s-1, respectively, were obtained. A phosphorus diffusivity of ˜1.2 × 10-13 cm2/s was obtained. The mobility versus carrier concentration relationships obtained for the implanted samples are close to the empirical relationship for bulk Ge.

  18. Doping of germanium by ion-implantation and laser annealing in the melting regime

    OpenAIRE

    Milazzo, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    Germanium is the main candidate for replacing silicon in active regions in future complementary metal-oxide transistors due to: (i) its higher mobility of charge carriers that makes it able to attain higher drive current; (ii) the availability of high-k materials, excellent substitutes for its unstable native oxide and (iii) its lower melting point that allows lower processing temperatures. However, a downscaling beyond 15-nm necessarily requires higher doping levels (higher than 1x10^20cm^-3...

  19. Multiple implantation and multiple annealing of phosphorus doped germanium to achieve n-type activation near the theoretical limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Bedell, Stephen W.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2012-09-01

    Full activation of n-type dopant in germanium (Ge) reaching to its solid solubility has never been achieved by using ion implantation doping technique. This is because implantation of dopants always leaves defects such as vacancy and interstitials in the Ge crystal. While implantation-induced defects are electrically neutral for the most of semiconductor materials, they are electrically positive for Ge resulting in compensation of n-type dopants. In this Letter, we verified that 5 × 1019 P/cm3 is the maximum active concentration, which can be fully activated in germanium "without leaving implantation damage" per implantation/annealing cycle. The repetition of implantation and annealing of phosphorous (P) with the concentration of 5 × 1019 cm-3 leads to the activation of 1 × 1020 P/cm3 close to its solid solubility limit of 2 × 1020 P/cm3.

  20. Engineered porous metals for implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  1. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  2. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage. PMID:28401949

  3. Suppression of ion-implantation induced porosity in germanium by a silicon dioxide capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Alkhaldi, Huda S.; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Pastor, David; Huston, Larissa Q.; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Ion implantation with high ion fluences is indispensable for successful use of germanium (Ge) in the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. However, Ge readily becomes porous after a moderate fluence implant ( ˜1 ×1015 ion cm-2 ) at room temperature, and for heavy ion species such as tin (Sn), holding the target at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature suppresses porosity formation only up to a fluence of 2 ×1016 ion cm-2 . We show, using stylus profilometry and electron microscopy, that a nanometer scale capping layer of silicon dioxide significantly suppresses the development of the porous structure in Ge during a S n - implant at a fluence of 4.5 ×1016 ion cm-2 at LN2 temperature. The significant loss of the implanted species through sputtering is also suppressed. The effectiveness of the capping layer in preventing porosity, as well as suppressing sputter removal of Ge, permits the attainment of an implanted Sn concentration in Ge of ˜15 at.% , which is about 2.5 times the maximum value previously attained. The crystallinity of the Ge-Sn layer following pulsed-laser-melting induced solidification is also greatly improved compared with that of uncapped material, thus opening up potential applications of the Ge-Sn alloy as a direct bandgap material fabricated by an ion beam synthesis technique.

  4. Investigation of germanium implanted with aluminum by multi-laser micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanson, A., E-mail: andrea.sanson@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Napolitani, E. [MATIS IMM-CNR at Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Giarola, M. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Privitera, V.; Priolo, F. [MATIS IMM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy); Carnera, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-31

    Germanium samples, implanted with aluminum and annealed, have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy using different excitation lines with the aim of gaining insights about the Al distribution at different depths beneath the sample surface and to correlate the Raman spectra with the electrical and chemical profiles, obtained by Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements, respectively. The intensity of the Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1}, due to the local vibrational mode of the substitutional Al atoms in the Ge matrix, has been directly related to the SRP behavior, while no correlation has been observed with SIMS profiles. These findings show that the electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. Finally, a clear down shift is observed for the Ge–Ge Raman peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}, which also seems to be directly related to the active content of Al dopant atoms. This work shows that micro-Raman spectroscopy can be a suitable tool for the study of doping profiles in Ge. - Highlights: ► Al-implanted Ge and annealed were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ► Using different laser lines we have investigated the implants at different depths. ► The Al–Ge Raman peak at about 370 cm{sup −1} is directly related to the SRP behavior. ► The electrically active content is entirely due to the substitutional Al atoms. ► Carrier effects are observed on the Ge–Ge peak at ∼ 300 cm{sup −1}.

  5. Research progress of high mobility germanium based metal oxide semiconductor devices%高迁移率 Ge沟道器件研究进展∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安霞; 黄如; 李志强; 云全新; 林猛; 郭岳; 刘朋强; 黎明; 张兴

    2015-01-01

    Germanium based metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) device has been a research hotspot and considered as a po-tential candidate for future complementary MOS (CMOS) technology due to its high and symmetric carrier mobility. However, the poor quality of gate dielectric/channel interface significantly restricts the performance of germanium based MOS devices. Besides, the solid-solubility and activation concentration of dopants in Ge are both quite low, and the dopants diffuse fast in Ge, which makes it difficult to achieve ultra-shallow junction with high dopant concentration, especially for Ge NMOS devices. To solve these problems, different techniques are proposed and overviewed. The proposed nitrogen-plasma-passivation method can effectively suppress the regrowth of germanium sub-oxide and reduce the interface state density. Thus the performance of the fabricated Ge NMOS device is significantly improved. To enhance the n-type dopant ac-tivation in Ge, the multiple implantation technique and the multiple annealing technique are proposed. High electrical activation over 1 × 1020 cm−3 is achieved, and the corresponding contact resistivity is reduced to 3.8 × 10−7 Ω·cm2. Besides, the implantation after germanide (IAG) technique is first proposed to modulate the Schottky barrier height (SBH). The record-low electron SBH of 0.10 eV is obtained by IAG technique, and the optimized process window is given. In addition, the poor thermal stability of NiGe restricts the further improvement of performance of Ge MOS device. P and Sb co-implantation technique and novel ammonium fluoride pretreatment method are proposed to improve the thermal stability of NiGe. The electrical characteristic of NiGe/Ge diode is also improved simultaneously. The results provide the guidelines for further enhancing the performances of germanium-based MOS devices.

  6. He reemission implanted in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, T., E-mail: tanabe@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Observation of He reemission of various metals under He{sup +} implantation at wide temperature range. • Materials examined are aluminum (Al), Nickel (Ni) and molybdenum (Mo). • He reemission is quite temperature dependent and different with materials. • Three metals show similar dependence on temperature normalized with respective melting point. • He reemission is successfully correlated with He behavior in metals. - Abstract: Helium (He) reemission of Al, Ni and Mo under energetic He implantation (10–30 keV) in wide temperature range is studied to understand behavior of implanted He in correlation with structure changes. The reemission behavior is categorized into 4 different temperature ranges with the normalized temperature (T{sub m}) to the melting point of each metal. At elevated temperatures (well above ∼0.6 T{sub m}), interstitial He atoms and/or He-vacancy (ies) clusters can migrate remaining no structure change and showing smooth reemission without any burst. Between ∼0.25 and 0.6 T{sub m}, He reemission always accompanies significant structure modification. For ∼04–0.6 T{sub m}, implanted He coalesce to make bubbles and the bubbles can move to the surface. Bubble migration accompanies materials flow to the surface resulting in fuzz surface or columnar structure, depending on implantation flux. Slower bubble motion at ∼0.25–0.4 prohibits the material migration. Instead the bubbles coalesce to grow large and multi-layered blistering appears as periodic reemission behavior. Below ∼0.25 T{sub m}, He migration is too slow for bubbles to grow large, but bubble density increases up to a certain fluence, where neighboring bubbles start to coalesce. Accordingly, He release is mostly caused by mechanical failure or blister rapture. With increasing fluence, all defects (bubbles and dislocation loops) tangle or inter connected with neighboring defects and accordingly He migration to the surface along the tangled or connected

  7. Laplace DLTS investigation of transition metal-hydrogen complexes in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution Laplace DLTS technique has been used to examine fine structures in the carrier emission processes hidden in the broad conventional DLTS peaks recorded in germanium samples, doped by several transition metals - Ni, Cr and Fe. These structures are found to be correlated with the acceptors, related to mentioned impurities, and also with possible presence of hydrogen-related defects. A link explaining interaction of transition metals with hydrogen due to the applied chemical treatment during sample preparation process is revealed and compared to what is known in silicon.

  8. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  9. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of fabricating a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate...

  10. Reduction in number of crystal defects in a p+Si diffusion layer by germanium and boron cryogenic implantation combined with sub-melt laser spike annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Atsushi; Harada, Tsubasa; Miyano, Kiyotaka; Harakawa, Hideaki; Aoyama, Tomonori; Yamashita, Hirofumi; Kohyama, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    To reduce the number of crystal defects in a p+Si diffusion layer by a low-thermal-budget annealing process, we have examined crystal recovery in the amorphous layer formed by the cryogenic implantation of germanium and boron combined with sub-melt laser spike annealing (LSA). The cryogenic implantation at -150 °C is very effective in suppressing vacancy clustering, which is advantageous for rapid crystal recovery during annealing. The crystallinity after LSA is shown to be very high and comparable to that after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) owing to the cryogenic implantation, although LSA is a low-thermal-budget annealing process that can suppress boron diffusion effectively. It is also shown that in the p+Si diffusion layer, there is high contact resistance due to the incomplete formation of a metal silicide contact, which originates from insufficient outdiffusion of surface contaminants such as fluorine. To widely utilize the marked reduction in the number of crystal defects, sufficient removal of surface contaminants will be required in the low-thermal-budget process.

  11. Additive manufacturing technologies of porous metal implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Quanzhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical metal materials with good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are widely used in orthopedic surgery and dental implant materials, but they can easily cause stress shielding due to the significant difference in elastic modulus between the implant and human bones. The elastic modulus of porous metals is lower than that of dense metals. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the pore parameters to make the elastic modulus of porous metals match or be comparable with that of the bone tissue. At the same time, the open porous metals with pores connected to each other could provide the structural condition for bone ingrowth, which is helpful in strengthening the biological combination of bone tissue with the implants. Therefore, the preparation technologies of porous metal implants and related research have been drawing more and more attention due to the excellent features of porous metals. Selective laser melting (SLM and electron beam melting technology (EBM are important research fields of additive manufacturing. They have the advantages of directly forming arbitrarily complex shaped metal parts which are suitable for the preparation of porous metal implants with complex shape and fine structure. As new manufacturing technologies, the applications of SLM and EBM for porous metal implants have just begun. This paper aims to understand the technology status of SLM and EBM, the research progress of porous metal implants preparation by using SLM and EBM, and the biological compatibility of the materials, individual design and manufacturing requirements. The existing problems and future research directions for porous metal implants prepared by SLM and EBM methods are discussed in the last paragraph.

  12. Additive manufacturing technologies of porous metal implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Linxi; Yang Quanzhan; Zhang Guirong; Zhao Fangxin; Shen Gang; Yu Bo

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical metal materials with good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are widely used in orthopedic surgery and dental implant materials, but they can easily cause stress shielding due to the signiifcant difference in elastic modulus between the implant and human bones. The elastic modulus of porous metals is lower than that of dense metals. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the pore parameters to make the elastic modulus of porous metals match or be comparable with that of the bone tissue. At the same time, the open porous metals with pores connected to each other could provide the structural condition for bone ingrowth, which is helpful in strengthening the biological combination of bone tissue with the implants. Therefore, the preparation technologies of porous metal implants and related research have been drawing more and more attention due to the excellent features of porous metals. Selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting technology (EBM) are important research fields of additive manufacturing. They have the advantages of directly forming arbitrarily complex shaped metal parts which are suitable for the preparation of porous metal implants with complex shape and ifne structure. As new manufacturing technologies, the applications of SLM and EBM for porous metal implants have just begun. This paper aims to understand the technology status of SLM and EBM, the research progress of porous metal implants preparation by using SLM and EBM, and the biological compatibility of the materials, individual design and manufacturing requirements. The existing problems and future research directions for porous metal implants prepared by SLM and EBM methods are discussed in the last paragraph.

  13. Particle migration and gap healing around trabecular metal implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, O; Kold, S; Zippor, B;

    2005-01-01

    Bone on-growth and peri-implant migration of polyethylene particles were studied in an experimental setting using trabecular metal and solid metal implants. Cylindrical implants of trabecular tantalum metal and solid titanium alloy implants with a glass bead blasted surface were inserted either...... in an exact surgical fit or with a peri-implant gap into a canine knee joint. We used a randomised paired design. Polyethylene particles were injected into the knee joint. In both types of surgical fit we found that the trabecular metal implants had superior bone ongrowth in comparison with solid metal...... implants (exact fit: 23% vs. 7% [p=0.02], peri-implant gap: 13% vs. 0% [p=0.02]. The number of peri-implant polyethylene particles was significantly reduced around the trabecular metal implants with a peri-implant gap compared with solid implants....

  14. Metal-optic cavity for a high efficiency sub-fF germanium photodiode on a silicon waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Ryan; Kim, Myung-Ki; Wu, Ming C

    2013-09-23

    We propose two designs of nanoscale sub-fF germanium photodiodes which are efficiently integrated with silicon waveguides. The metal-optic cavities are simulated with the finite difference time domain method and optimized using critical coupling concepts. One design is for a metal semiconductor metal photodiode with <200 aF capacitance, 39% external quantum efficiency, and 0.588 (λ/n)³ cavity volume at 1.5 µm wavelength. The second design is for a vertical p-i-n photodiode with <100 aF capacitance, 51% external quantum efficiency, and 0.804 (λ/n)³ cavity volume. Both designs make use of CMOS compatible materials germanium and aluminum metal for potential future monolithic integration with silicon photonics.

  15. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, S H

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growt...

  16. Effects of interdigitated platinum finger geometry on spectral response characteristics of germanium metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun-Duk; Janardhanam, V; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2014-10-01

    We fabricated interdigitated germanium (Ge) metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors (MSM PDs) with interdigitated platinum (Pt) finger electrodes and investigated the effects of Pt finger width and spacing on their spectral response. An increase in the incident optical power enhances the creation of electron-hole pairs, resulting in a significant increase in photo current. Lowering of the Schottky barrier could be a main cause of the increase in both photo and dark current with increasing applied bias. The manufactured Ge MSM PDs exhibited a considerable spectral response for wavelengths in the range of 1.53-1.56 μm, corresponding to the entire C-band spectrum range. A reduction in the area fraction of the Pt finger electrode in the active region by decreasing and increasing finger width and spacing, respectively, led to an increase in illuminated active area and suppression of dark current, which was responsible for the improvement in responsivity and quantum efficiency of Ge MSM PDs.

  17. Synthetic, structural, and theoretical investigations of alkali metal germanium hydrides--contact molecules and separated ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Weijie; Allis, Damian G; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of a series of crown ether ligated alkali metal (M=K, Rb, Cs) germyl derivatives M(crown ether)nGeH3 through the hydrolysis of the respective tris(trimethylsilyl)germanides is reported. Depending on the alkali metal and the crown ether diameter, the hydrides display either contact molecules or separated ions in the solid state, providing a unique structural insight into the geometry of the obscure GeH3- ion. Germyl derivatives displaying M--Ge bonds in the solid state are of the general formula [M([18]crown-6)(thf)GeH3] with M=K (1) and M=Rb (4). The compounds display an unexpected geometry with two of the GeH3 hydrogen atoms closely approaching the metal center, resulting in a partially inverted structure. Interestingly, the lone pair at germanium is not pointed towards the alkali metal, rather two of the three hydrides are approaching the alkali metal center to display M--H interactions. Separated ions display alkali metal cations bound to two crown ethers in a sandwich-type arrangement and non-coordinated GeH3- ions to afford complexes of the type [M(crown ether)2][GeH3] with M=K, crown ether=[15]crown-5 (2); M=K, crown ether=[12]crown-4 (3); and M=Cs, crown ether=[18]crown-6 (5). The highly reactive germyl derivatives were characterized by using X-ray crystallography, 1H and 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to analyze the geometry of the GeH3- ion in the contact molecules 1 and 4.

  18. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  19. Osteoblastic cell behavior on nanostructured metal implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehennec, L Le; Martin, F.; Lopez-Heredia, M.A.; Louarn, G.; Amouriq, Y.; Cousty, J.; Layrolle, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Surface modifications at the nanometric scale may promote protein adsorption, cell adhesion and thus favor the osseointegration of metal implants. The behavior of osteoblastic cells was studied on mirror-polished (Smooth-SS) and nanostructured (Nano-SS) stainless steel surfaces. MATERIALS & ME

  20. Biomimetic Composite-Metal Hip Resurfacing Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Bougherara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing technique is a conservative arthroplasty used in the young patient in which the femoral head is reshaped to accept metal cap with small guide stem. In the present investigation, a hybrid composite-metal resurfacing implant is proposed. The cup is made of carbon fiber/polyamide 12 (CF/PA12 covered with a thin layer of cobalt chrome (Co-Cr. Finite element (FE method was applied to analyze and compare the biomechanical performances of the hybrid hip resurfacing (HHR and the conventional Birmingham (BHR. Results of the finite element analysis showed that the composite implant leads to an increase in stresses in the cancellous bone by more than 15% than BHR, indicating a lower potential for stress shielding and bone fracture and higher potential for bone apposition with the HHR.

  1. Self-aligned metal double-gate junctionless p-channel low-temperature polycrystalline-germanium thin-film transistor with thin germanium film on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akito; Nishimura, Yuya; Ohsawa, Hiroki

    2017-03-01

    Low-temperature (LT) polycrystalline-germanium (poly-Ge) thin-film transistors (TFTs) are viable contenders for use in the backplanes of flat-panel displays and in systems-on-glass because of their superior electrical properties compared with silicon and oxide semiconductors. However, LT poly-Ge shows strong p-type characteristics. Therefore, it is not easy to reduce the leakage current using a single-gate structure such as a top-gate or bottom-gate structure. In this study, self-aligned planar metal double-gate p-channel junctionless LT poly-Ge TFTs are fabricated on a glass substrate using a 15-nm-thick solid-phase crystallized poly-Ge film and aluminum-induced lateral metallization source-drain regions (Al-LM-SD). A nominal field-effect mobility of 19 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of 2 × 103 were obtained by optimizing the Al-LM-SD on a glass substrate through a simple, inexpensive LT process.

  2. Mineral commodity profiles: Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterman, W.C.; Jorgenson, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Overview -- Germanium is a hard, brittle semimetal that first came into use a half-century ago as a semiconductor material in radar units and as the material from which the first transistor was made. Today it is used principally as a component of the glass in telecommunications fiber optics; as a polymerization catalyst for polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a commercially important plastic; in infrared (IR) night vision devices; and as a semiconductor and substrate in electronics circuitry. Most germanium is recovered as a byproduct of zinc smelting, although it also has been recovered at some copper smelters and from the fly ash of coal-burning industrial powerplants. It is a highly dispersed element, associated primarily with base-metal sulfide ores. In the United States, germanium is recovered from zinc smelter residues and manufacturing scrap and is refined by two companies at four germanium refineries. One of the four refineries is dedicated to processing scrap. In 2000, producers sold zone-refined (high-purity) germanium at about $1,250 per kilogram and electronic-grade germanium dioxide (GeO2) at $800 per kilogram. Domestic refined production was valued at $22 million. Germanium is a critical component in highly technical devices and processes. It is likely to remain in demand in the future at levels at least as high as those of 2000. U.S. resources of germanium are probably adequate to meet domestic needs for several decades.

  3. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    ) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions...

  4. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  5. 77 FR 5813 - Cardiovascular Metallic Implants: Corrosion, Surface Characterization, and Nickel Leaching...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cardiovascular Metallic Implants: Corrosion, Surface... public workshop entitled ``Cardiovascular Metallic Implants: Corrosion, Surface Characterization, and... implants are made of metals and may be susceptible to corrosion, it is unclear whether the...

  6. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0138 TITLE: "Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome." PRINCIPAL...Orthopaedic Implant Outcome." 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Nadim James Hallab, PhD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...battlefield injuries resulting in increased exposure to metal may sensitize individuals and lead to excessive immune responses to orthopedic implants

  7. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed.

  8. Transfer-less flexible and transparent high-κ/metal gate germanium devices on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible wearable electronics have been of great interest lately for the development of innovative future technology for various interactive applications in the field of consumer electronics and advanced healthcare, offering the promise of low-cost, lightweight, and multifunctionality. In the pursuit of this trend, high mobility channel materials need to be investigated on a flexible platform, for the development of flexible high performance devices. Germanium (Ge) is one of the most attractive alternatives for silicon (Si) for high-speed computational applications, due its higher hole and electron mobility. Thus, in this work we show a cost effective CMOS compatible process for transforming conventional rigid Ge metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPS) into a mechanically flexible and semi-transparent platform. Devices exhibit outstanding bendability with a bending radius of 0.24 cm, and semi-transparency up to 30 %, varying with respect to the diameter size of the release holes array.

  9. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions to metal implants, orthopedic or otherwise, are well documented in the literature. The first case of a dermatitis reaction over a stainless steel fracture plate was described in 1966. Most skin reactions are eczematous and allergic in nature, although urticarial, bullous......, and vasculitic eruptions may occur. Also, more complex immune reactions may develop around the implants, resulting in pain, inflammation, and loosening. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are the three most common metals that elicit both cutaneous and extracutaneous allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure......) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions...

  10. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    ) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions......Cutaneous reactions to metal implants, orthopedic or otherwise, are well documented in the literature. The first case of a dermatitis reaction over a stainless steel fracture plate was described in 1966. Most skin reactions are eczematous and allergic in nature, although urticarial, bullous......, and vasculitic eruptions may occur. Also, more complex immune reactions may develop around the implants, resulting in pain, inflammation, and loosening. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are the three most common metals that elicit both cutaneous and extracutaneous allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure...

  11. Analysis of metal ion release from biomedical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dimić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials are commonly used for fixation or replacement of damaged bones in the human body due to their good combination of mechanical properties. The disadvantage of metals as implant materials is their susceptibility to corrosion and metal ion release, which can cause serious health problems. In certain concentrations metals and metal ions are toxic and their presence can cause diverse inflammatory reactions, genetic mutations or even cancer. In this paper, different approaches to metal ion release examination, from biometallic materials sample preparation to research results interpretation, will be presented. An overview of the analytical techniques, used for determination of the type and concentration of released ions from implants in simulated biofluids, is also given in the paper.

  12. Tunable electronic structures of germanium monochalcogenide nanosheets via light non-metallic atom functionalization: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2016-08-17

    Germanium monochalcogenides, i.e. GeS and GeSe sheets, are isoelectronic analogues of phosphorene, which have been synthesized in recent experiments (P. Ramasamy et al., J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 479). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we have investigated their tunable electronic and magnetic properties via light non-metallic atom (B, C, N, O, Si, P, S) functionalization. We find that on these GeS and GeSe sheets O and S adatoms prefer to locate at the top site above the Ge atom, while the other ones like to occupy the anion site, which push the original S/Se atom to the hollow site instead. O and S adatoms slightly affect the semiconducting behaviour of the doped systems, while B, C, N, Si, P ones will drastically modify their band structures and induce versatile spintronic properties. Through the supercell calculations, B and C adatoms are found to induce a bipolar semiconducting behaviour in the decorated systems, while the N/P adatom will cause a spin-gapless-semiconducting/nearly-half-metallic feature in them. The B/C/N/Si/P-substituted GeS/GeSe sheet can be formed by removing the hollow-site S/Se atom from the adatom-decorated structures, which exhibit an opposite semiconducting/metallic behaviour to their phosphorene counterparts. A general odd-even rule is proposed for this phenomenon, which shows that an odd (even) number of valence electron difference between the substitution and host atoms would cause a metallic (semiconducting) feature in the substituted systems. Our study demonstrates that atom functionalization is an efficient way to tailor the properties of GeS and GeSe nanosheets, which have adaptable electronic properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  13. Ion beam analysis of metal ion implanted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Chu, J.W.; Johnson, E.P.; Noorman, J.T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation is an established method for altering the surface properties of many materials. While a variety of analytical techniques are available for the characterisation of implanted surfaces, those based on particle accelerators such as Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) provide some of the most useful and powerful for this purpose. Application of the latter techniques to metal ion implantation research at ANSTO will be described with particular reference to specific examples from recent studies. Where possible, the information obtained from ion beam analysis will be compared with that derived from other techniques such as Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Auger spectroscopies. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Titanium: the mystery metal of implant dentistry. Dental materials aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, G R; Gardner, L K; Toth, R W

    1985-09-01

    A number of important points concerning titanium and its alloys have been discussed. They are summarized as follows. Ti and its alloys, particularly the alpha-beta alloys, possess mechanical properties that make them ideal implant materials. Ti and its alloys oxidize readily in air. This surface oxide is extremely stable in the physiologic environment of the body. The stability and inertness of this surface oxide layer acts to protect Ti from corrosive breakdown when used in the body. The elimination of surface irregularities and contaminants is important when preparing a metal for implantation. Titanium can be coupled with equally passive metals in the body without causing galvanic corrosion.

  15. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on Germanium Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on germanium substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Effects of growth temperature and InAs coverage on the size, density, and height of quantum dots were investigated. Growth temperature was varied from 400 to 450 °C and InAs coverage was varied between 1.40 and 2.35 monolayers (MLs. The surface morphology and structural characteristics of the quantum dots analyzed by atomic force microscope revealed that the density of the InAs quantum dots first increased and then decreased with the amount of InAs coverage; whereas density decreased with increase in growth temperature. It was observed that the size and height of InAs quantum dots increased with increase in both temperature and InAs coverage. The density of QDs was effectively controlled by growth temperature and InAs coverage on GaAs buffer layer.

  16. Impact of mechanical stress on gate tunneling currents of germanium and silicon p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal gate work function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youn Sung; Numata, Toshinori; Nishida, Toshikazu; Harris, Rusty; Thompson, Scott E.

    2008-03-01

    Uniaxial four-point wafer bending stress-altered gate tunneling currents are measured for germanium (Ge)/silicon (Si) channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with HfO2/SiO2 gate dielectrics and TiN/P+ poly Si electrodes. Carrier separation is used to measure electron and hole currents. The strain-altered hole tunneling current from the p-type inversion layer of Ge is measured to be ˜4 times larger than that for the Si channel MOSFET, since the larger strain-induced valence band-edge splitting in Ge results in more hole repopulation into a subband with a smaller out-of-plane effective mass and a lower tunneling barrier height. The strain-altered electron tunneling current from the metal gate is measured and shown to change due to strain altering the metal work function as quantified by flatband voltage shift measurements of Si MOS capacitors with TaN electrodes.

  17. [Biodeterioration and corrosion of metallic implants and prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, G D

    1993-01-01

    The use of surgical implants and prosthetic devices to replace the original function of different components of the human biological system is a well established tradition in the history of medicine. Currently, one of the most prevalent points of view in dealing with this subject, is that of biocompatibility of materials of construction and methods of fabrication of these devices, in order to avoid negative impacts on the patient due to failure of implants through degradation mechanisms such as corrosion. This article presents a current general review of the relationship between biocompatibility and deterioration of metallic implants and prosthetic devices, emphasizing the specific forms that corrosion adopts in biological media. The historical perspective shows the consolidation of a tendency towards a more systematic study of these phenomena in recent years, as opposed to trial and error practices that used to be common before the third decade of this century. The understanding of interactions between implants and biological tissue, thus led to some of the most promising current techniques, such as the use of powder metallurgy components to optimize skeletal fixation of implants by means of interstitial bone growth into porous metallic surfaces. The review of metals and alloys currently used for the fabrication of implants shows the amplitude of available technological alternatives, as well as the multiple criteria required to make a good selection for each specific case. Applications and pros and cons of stainless steel, Cr, Ni, Co and Ti alloys, and tantalum are briefly discussed. The introduction to basic concepts of corrosion, serves as a basis for the description of the typical forms that these phenomena adopt in biological media, including pitting, crevice corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, stress corrosion, fretting corrosion, galvanic corrosion, and intergranular corrosion. This review shows that the study of interactions between biological media and metallic

  18. The effect of metal detector gates on implanted permanent pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperman, Y; Zarfati, D; Laniado, S

    1988-10-01

    The effect of metal detector security gates, such as are used in airports, was tested in 103 nonselected pacemaker patients. Various types of single and dual chamber units were examined, using telemetry during the test. Pulse rate and duration were measured immediately before and after the procedure. No ill effect was seen on any of the units tested, pacemaker inhibition was not observed, and programmability was not affected. Metal detector security gates have no effect on implanted permanent pacemakers.

  19. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  20. Germanium nanoparticles formed in silicon dioxide layer by multi-energy implantation and oxidation state of Ge atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, H.; Arai, N.; Gotoh, N.; Minotani, T.; Kojima, K.; Adachi, K.; Kotaki, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2007-04-01

    Ge nanoparticles (NPs) embedded silicon oxide is expected to be promising light emission source, especially, UV - blue light region. We have tried to form Ge NPs in a 100- nm-thick SiO2 layer on Si substrate by multi-energy implantation of Ge negative ions with energies of 50, 20 and 10 keV and doses of 1.4 × 1016, 3.2 × 1015 and 2.2 × 1015 ions/cm2, respectively. Samples were annealed for 1 h at a temperature less than 900oC. By this implantation, Formations of Ge nanoparticles in a surface 50-nm depth region were expected. The depth distribution of implanted Ge atoms in the oxide was measured by XPS (Ge 2p, O 1s, Si 2p) with monochromatic Al K.. and Ar etching at 4 keV. The depth profiles were well agreed with the cross-sectional TEM image. But some extent of Ge atoms diffused to the SiO2/Si interface at 900 oC. The chemical sifted spectra of Ge 2p3/2 showed about 60 % of the oxidation of Ge atom around the end of the range (EOR) even in the as-implanted sample. This oxidation was considered to be due to the excess oxygen atoms near EOR by forward of sputtered oxygen atoms from SiO2 layer. Raman spectra supported this oxidation. In a preliminary investigation of cathode luminescence, the Ge-implanted sample with annealing at 600oC showed CL peak at 3.12 eV (397 nm in wavelength) in UV-blue region at room temperature. This means the Ge-implanted sample has a possibility for light emission in the UV-blue region.

  1. Germanium nanoparticles formed in silicon dioxide layer by multi-energy implantation and oxidation state of Ge atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, H [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Arai, N [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Gotoh, N [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Minotani, T [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kojima, K [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Adachi, K [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, Ichikonomoto, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan); Kotaki, H [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Sharp Corporation, Ichikonomoto, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan); Ishibashi, T [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Gotoh, Y [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ishikawa, J [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Ge nanoparticles (NPs) embedded silicon oxide is expected to be promising light emission source, especially, UV - blue light region. We have tried to form Ge NPs in a 100- nm-thick SiO2 layer on Si substrate by multi-energy implantation of Ge negative ions with energies of 50, 20 and 10 keV and doses of 1.4 x 1016, 3.2 x 1015 and 2.2 x 1015 ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Samples were annealed for 1 h at a temperature less than 900oC. By this implantation, Formations of Ge nanoparticles in a surface 50-nm depth region were expected. The depth distribution of implanted Ge atoms in the oxide was measured by XPS (Ge 2p, O 1s, Si 2p) with monochromatic Al K.. and Ar etching at 4 keV. The depth profiles were well agreed with the cross-sectional TEM image. But some extent of Ge atoms diffused to the SiO2/Si interface at 900 oC. The chemical sifted spectra of Ge 2p3/2 showed about 60 % of the oxidation of Ge atom around the end of the range (EOR) even in the as-implanted sample. This oxidation was considered to be due to the excess oxygen atoms near EOR by forward of sputtered oxygen atoms from SiO2 layer. Raman spectra supported this oxidation. In a preliminary investigation of cathode luminescence, the Ge-implanted sample with annealing at 600oC showed CL peak at 3.12 eV (397 nm in wavelength) in UV-blue region at room temperature. This means the Ge-implanted sample has a possibility for light emission in the UV-blue region.

  2. Determining the Metal/Silicate Partition Coefficient of Germanium: Implications for Core and Mantle Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are several hypotheses for the thermal state of the early Earth. Some hypothesize a shallow magma ocean, or deep magma ocean, or heterogeneous accretion which requires no magma ocean at all. Previous models are unable to account for Ge depletion in Earth's mantle relative to CI chondrites. In this study, the element Ge is used to observe the way siderophile elements partition into the metallic core. The purpose of this research is to provide new data for Ge and to further test these models for Earth's early stages. The partition coefficients (D(sub Ge) = c(sub metal)/c(sub silicate), where D = partition coefficient of Ge and c = concentration of Ge in the metal and silicate, respectively) of siderophile elements were studied by performing series of high pressure, high temperature experiments. They are also dependent on oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition. Ge is a moderately siderophile element found in both the mantle and core, and has yet to be studied systematically at high temperatures. Moreover, previous work has been limited by the low solubility of Ge in silicate melts (less than 100 ppm and close to detection limits for electron microprobe analysis). Reported here are results from 14 experiments studying the partitioning of Ge between silicate and metallic liquids. The Ge concentrations were then analyzed using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) which is sensitive enough to detect ppm levels of Ge in the silicate melt.

  3. Gate stack and channel engineering: Study of metal gates and germanium channel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todi, Ravi M.

    The continued scaling of device dimensions in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology within the sub-100 nm region requires an alternative high dielectric constant (high-kappa) oxide layer to counter high tunneling leakage currents, a metallic gate electrode to address polysilicon depletion, boron penetration and high polysilicon sheet resistance, and high mobility channel materials to boost the CMOS performance. Metal gates can also offer improved thermal and chemical stability, but their use requires that we improve our understanding of how the metal alloy phase, crystallographic orientation, and composition affect the electronic properties of the metal alloy-oxide interface. To replace n++ and p++ polysilicon gate electrodes and maintain scaled device performance requires metal gate electrodes with work functions within 0.2 eV of the silicon conduction and valence band edges, i.e., 5.0-5.2 and 4.1-4.3 eV, for PMOS and NMOS devices, respectively. In addition to work function and thermal/chemical stability, metal gates must be integrated into the CMOS process flow. It is the aim of this work to significantly expand our knowledge base in alloys for dual metal gates by carrying out detailed electrical and materials studies of the binary alloy systems of Ru with p-type metal Pt. Three n-type metals systems, Ru-Ta, Ru-Hf and Ru-Nb have also been partially investigated. This work also focuses on high mobility Ge p-MOSFETs for improved CMOS performance. DC magnetron sputtering has been used to deposit binary alloy films on thermally grown SiO2. The composition of the alloy films have been determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and the identification of phases present have been made using x-ray and electron diffraction of samples. The microstructure of the phases of interest has been examined in the transmission electron microscope and film texture was characterized via x-ray diffraction. The electrical characterization includes basic

  4. Oxygen and germanium migration at low temperature influenced by the thermodynamic nature of the materials used in germanium metal-insulator-semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kimihiko; Taoka, Noriyuki; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu, E-mail: nakatuka@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-09-07

    The influence of the reductive character of the metals used for the gate electrode on O migration in gate stacks and following reductive or oxidative reactions at an interface between a high permittivity (high-k) insulating layer and Ge or Si was investigated. The magnitude of the increase or decrease of Ge or Si oxides in the gate stacks caused by the metal layer deposition can be systematically correlated with the oxygen chemical potential (μ{sub O}) of gate metals for both Ge and Si systems. However, the influence of the gate metals on oxidative/reductive reactions of a semiconductor element is more significant for the Ge gate stacks than the Si system. Detailed investigations of Ge oxide as a function of depth were used to determine that the strong μ{sub O} dependence of the increase or decrease in the Ge oxide is because of the high diffusivity of Ge into the high-k oxide. In particular, migration of Ge into the high-k oxide occurs concurrently with O migration towards the reductive metal layer, and the strong reductive character of the metal significantly influences the decrease in the amount of Ge oxide. These results indicate the importance of the selection of gate metals based on μ{sub O} for controlling high-k/Ge interfacial structures.

  5. Neuropsychiatric symptoms following metal-on-metal implant failure with cobalt and chromium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ben; Griffiths, Emily; Almond, Solomon

    2017-01-24

    There were at least 31,171 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants in the UK between 2003 and 2011. Some of these were subject to failure and widescale recalls and revisions followed. This is a presentation of ten cases (mean age 60 years) where we evaluated neuropsychiatric morbidity following metal-on-metal hip implant failure and revision. Implants were ASR total hip replacement (acetabular implant, taper sleeve adaptor and unipolar femoral implants) performed between 2005 and 2009. This case series describes, for the first time, neuropsychiatric complications after revision where there has been cobalt and chromium toxicity. Pre-revision surgery, nine patients had toxic levels of chromium and cobalt (mean level chromium 338 nmol/l, mean cobalt 669.4 nmol/l). Depression assessment showed 9 of 9 respondents fulfilled the BDI criteria for depression and 3 of these were being treated. 7 of 9 patients showing short term memory deficit with mean mini mental state examination score of 24.2. The normal population mean MMSE for this group would be expected to be 28 with cobalt and chromium metallosis following MoM implant failure. Larger studies of neurocognitive effects are indicated in this group. There may be implications for public health.

  6. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; von Schulthess, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET{sub Ge68}) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET{sub CT}) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT}. Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET{sub CT} in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET{sub Ge68} images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT} images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the

  7. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Alister J [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Sandison, Ann [Department of Histopathology, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W [Science Division, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sampson, Barry [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Atkinson, Kirk D [8 Nuclear Department Defence Academy College of Management and Technology HMS Sultan Military Road Gosport PO12 3BY (United Kingdom); Skinner, John A [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Goode, Angela [Dept of Materials, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Powell, Jonathan J, E-mail: Paul.Quinn@diamond.ac.u [Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research Centre, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  8. High-performance germanium n+/p junction by nickel-induced dopant activation of implanted phosphorus at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huang; Chao, Lu; Jue, Yu; Jiang-Bin, Wei; Chao-Wen, Chen; Jian-Yuan, Wang; Jian-Fang, Xu; Chen, Wang; Cheng, Li; Song-Yan, Chen; Chun-Li, Liu; Hong-Kai, Lai

    2016-05-01

    High-performance Ge n+/p junctions were fabricated at a low formation temperature from 325 °C to 400 °C with a metal(nickel)-induced dopant activation technique. The obtained NiGe electroded Ge n+/p junction has a rectification ratio of 5.6× 104 and a forward current of 387 A/cm2 at -1 V bias. The Ni-based metal-induced dopant activation technique is expected to meet the requirement of the shallow junction of Ge MOSFET. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176092 and 61474094), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB933503 and 2013CB632103), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China-National Research Foundation of Korea Joint Research Project (Grant No. 11311140251).

  9. The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha; Tellez, Alejandra; Molina, Luciana; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra; Barsoum, Wael; Taylor, James S

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of patch testing on surgical decision making and outcomes in patients evaluated for suspected metal hypersensitivity related to implants in bones or joints. Medical chart review. Tertiary care academic medical center. All patients who had patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis related to orthopedic implants. Patch testing. The surgeon's preoperative choice of metal implant alloy compared with patch testing results and the presence of hypersensitivity complications related to the metal implant on postsurgical follow-up. Patients with potential metal hypersensitivity from implanted devices (N = 72) were divided into 2 groups depending on timing of their patch testing: preimplantation (n = 31) and postimplantation (n = 41). History of hypersensitivity to metals was a predictor of positive patch test results to metals in both groups. Positive patch test results indicating metal hypersensitivity influenced the decision-making process of the referring surgeon in all preimplantation cases (n = 21). Patients with metal hypersensitivity who received an allergen-free implant had surgical outcomes free of hypersensitivity complications (n = 21). In patients who had positive patch test results to a metal in their implant after implantation, removal of the device led to resolution of associated symptoms (6 of 10 patients). The findings of this study support a role for patch testing in patients with a clinical history of metal hypersensitivity before prosthetic device implantation. The decision on whether to remove an implanted device after positive patch test results should be made on a case-by-case basis, as decided by the surgeon and patient.

  10. Calibration of radiographs by a reference metal ball affects preoperative selection of implant size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, Lars; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Gotfredsen, Erik; Wenzel, Ann

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of a reference ball for calibration of periapical and panoramic radiographs on preoperative selection of implant size for three implant systems. Presurgical digital radiographs (70 panoramic, 43 periapical) from 70 patients scheduled for single-tooth implant treatment, recorded with a metal ball placed in the edentulous area, were evaluated by three observers with the intent to select the appropriate implant size. Four reference marks corresponding to the margins of the metal ball were manually placed on the digital image by means of computer software. Additionally, an implant with proper dimensions for the respective site was outlined by manually placing four reference marks. The diameter of the metal ball and the unadjusted length and width of the implant were calculated. Implant size was adjusted according to a "standard" calibration method (SCM; magnification factor 1.25 in panoramic images and 1.05 in periapical images) and according to a reference ball calibration method (RCM; true magnification). Based on the unadjusted as well as the adjusted implant dimensions, the implant size was selected among those available in a given implant system. For periapical radiographs, when comparing SCM and RCM with unadjusted implant dimensions, implant size changed in 42% and 58%, respectively. When comparing SCM and RCM, implant size changed in 24%. For panoramic radiographs, comparing SCM and RCM changed implant size in 48%. The use of a reference metal ball for calibration of periapical and panoramic radiographs when selecting implant size during treatment planning might be advantageous.

  11. Photosensibilite de la silice dopee au germanium: Effet de l'implantation ionique a haute energie et de l'illumination ultraviolette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essid, Mourad

    La photosensibilité est un phénomène largement exploité de nos jours dans les applications nécessitant un changement d'indice de réfraction permanent. Ce changement est observé dans des fibres optiques ou des guides plans quand ils sont exposés à la lumière ultraviolette. Plusieurs mécanismes seraient responsables de ce changement. Le modèle qui revient le plus dans la majorité des études entreprises à ce sujet est celui des centres de couleurs. Partant de ce modèle, nous avons concentré nos recherches dans cette thèse à l'études des propriétés optiques des défauts dans les verres à base de silice dopée au germanium. Dans la première partie de la thèse, nous utilisons la technique de l'implantation ionique pour induire d'énormes quantités de défauts dans des guides plans. L'abondance de ces défauts nous a permis d'étudier leurs interactions avec la lumière ultraviolette et de détecter une dépendance en longueur d'onde de leur évolution en fonction de la dose de rayonnement délivrée par le laser. Leur disparition ou leur transformation en d'autres défauts se traduit directement par un changement de l'indice de réfraction selon les analyses de Kramers-Kronig. Nous avons étudié en profondeur les transformations des défauts qui absorbent autour de 5 eV et qui sont en grande majorité responsables du changement de l'indice de réfraction dans ce genre de matériau. Deux défauts sont connus et sont à l'origine de cette bande d'absorption. Le défaut NOMV (Neutral Oxygen mono-Vacancy) qui absorbe à 5.06 eV et le défaut GLPC (Germanium Lone Pair center) qui absorbe à 5.14 eV. Des mesures d'absorption optiques et de résonance paramagnétique électronique montrent des liens étroits entre la disparition de l'un ou de l'autre de ces deux défauts et de l'émergence de nouveaux défauts paramagnétiques absorbant à plus hautes énergies. Le recuit thermique de plusieurs échantillons nous a permis de conclure que les deux d

  12. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in the insulating matrix. These nanocomposites have been characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as a function of the implantation dose. The experimental results are compared with a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. We conclude in that the conductivity process is due only to percolation (when the conducting elements are in geometric contact) and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible.

  13. Failure of total hip implants: metals and metal release in 52 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lidén, Carola; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2014-01-01

    Background . The pathogenesis of total joint replacement failure is multifactorial. One hypothesis suggests that corrosion and wear of alloys result in metal ion release, which may then cause sensitization and even implant failure, owing to the acquired immune reactivity. Objectives . To assess c...

  14. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  15. Materials analyses and electrochemical impedance of implantable metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Matiar M R; Ul Alam, Arif; Sharma, Rahul P; Deen, M Jamal

    2015-04-21

    Implantable electrodes with high flexibility, high mechanical fixation and low electrochemical impedance are desirable for neuromuscular activation because they provide safe, effective and stable stimulation. In this paper, we report on detailed materials and electrical analyses of three metal implantable electrodes - gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and titanium (Ti) - using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning acoustic microscopy, drop shape analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We investigated the cause of changes in electrochemical impedance of long-term immersed Au, Pt and Ti electrodes on liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). We analyzed the surface wettability, surface and interface defects and the elemental depth profile of the electrode-adhesion layers on the LCP. The impedance of the electrodes decreased at lower frequencies, but increased at higher frequencies compared with that of the short-term immersion. The increase of impedances was influenced by the oxidation of the electrode/adhesion-layers that affected the double layer capacitance behavior of the electrode/PBS. The oxidation of the adhesion layer for all the electrodes was confirmed by XPS. Alkali ions (sodium) were adsorbed on the Au and Pt surfaces, but diffused into the Ti electrode and LCPs. The Pt electrode showed a higher sensitivity to surface and interface defects than that of Ti and Au electrodes. These findings may be useful when designing electrodes for long-term implantable devices.

  16. The investigation of ZnO:Al2O3/metal composite back reflectors in amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Guang-Hong; Zhao Lei; Yan Bao-Jun; Chen Jing-Wei; Wang Ge; Diao Hong-Wei; Wang Wen-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Different aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO)/metal composite thin films,including AZO/Ag/Al,AZO/Ag/nickelchromium alloy (NiCr),and AZO/Ag/NiCr/Al,are utilized as the back reflectors of p-i-n amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells.NiCr is used as diffusion barrier layer between Ag and Al to prevent mutual diffusion,which increases the short circuit current density of solar cell.NiCr and NiCr/Al layers are used as protective layers of Ag layer against oxidation and sulfurization,the higher efficiency of solar cell is achieved.The experimental results show that the performance of a-SiGe solar cell with AZO/Ag/NiCr/Al back reflector is best.The initial conversion efficiency is achieved to be 8.05%.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the electrothermal phenomenon in silicon-on-insulator and silicon-germanium-on-insulator metal-oxide field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Toufik; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-03-01

    Self-heating effects are investigated in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), silicon-germanium-on-insulator (SGOI), and strained-silicon-directly-on-insulator (SSDOI) metal-oxide field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), using a Monte Carlo simulator self-consistently coupled with the solution of the heat diffusion equation. Although the influence of thermal effects is in general higher in these structures, as compared to bulk Si MOSFETs, its impact is much more important in SGOI and SSDOI FET structures incorporating ultrathin Si channels, with SGOI FETs giving the worst thermal performance. A study of the dependence of the extent of self-heating on the buried-oxide thickness is also performed, showing that this parameter is important in designing SOI structures with better thermal management.

  18. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Metal-Poor Stars: New Detections of Phosphorus, Germanium, Arsenic, Selenium, Cadmium, Tellurium, Lutetium, Osmium, Iridium, Platinum, Gold, and More!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy with HST/STIS provides a 30% increase in the number of elements that can be detected in metal-poor stars. Although nearly every element from hydrogen through bismuth is probably present in most metal-poor stars, not all elements can be detected. The resonance lines of the dominant species of some elements are only found in the UV in late-type stars. The chemical compositions of these stars reflect the history of stellar nucleosynthesis from the first stars to today. Here, I present a summary of recent work that has expanded the chemical inventory in metal-poor stars using UV spectroscopy conducted using HST/STIS. The highlights include new detections of phosphorus, germanium, arsenic, selenium, cadmium, tellurium, lutetium, osmium, iridium, platinum, and gold in metal-poor stars. These detections reveal new insights into stellar nucleosynthesis in the earliest generations of massive stars, provide new constraints on the r-process, and open new channels for chemically-tagging stars that have assembled to form the Milky Way stellar halo.

  19. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  20. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M [Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.c.wang@bath.ac.uk

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  1. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward.

  2. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants-diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological......Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte...... transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch...

  3. Nanometer structure and conductor mechanism of polymer modified by metal ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴瑜光; 张通和; 张燕文; 张荟星; 张孝吉; 周固

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified by Ag, Ti, Cu and Si ion implanta-tion with a dose ranging from 1 × l016 to 2 x 1017 ions/cm2 using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA)source. The electrical properties of PET have been improved by metal ion implantation. The resistivityof implanted PET decreased obviously with an increase in ion dose. The results show that the conduc-tive behavior of a metal ion implanted sample is different from Si-implantation samples. In order to un-derstant the mechanism of electrical conduction, the structures of implanted layer were observed in de-tail by XRD and TEM. The nano carbon particles were dispersed in implanted PET. The nano metallicparticles were built up in metallic ion implanted layers with dose range from 1 × 1016 to 1 x 1017 ions/cm2. The nanometer metal net structure was formed in implanted layer when a dose of 2 x 1017ions/cm2 is reached. Anomalous fractal growths were observed. These surface structure changes revealedconducting mechanism evolution, lt is believed that the change would result in an improvement of theconductive properties. The conducting mechanism will be changed with increasing metal ion dose.

  4. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuslem, A. S.; Hanna, A. N.; Yapici, T.; Wehbe, N.; Diallo, E. M.; Kutbee, A. T.; Bahabry, R. R.; Hussain, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO2) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  5. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Almuslem, A. S.

    2017-02-14

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  6. Metal-reinforced single implant mandibular overdenture retained by an attachment: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grageda, Edgar; Rieck, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. The single implant-retained overdenture has the additional advantage of being less expensive and invasive than a 2-implant supported overdenture but has a high incidence of fracture of the acrylic resin base at the point of the implant. The treatment, design, and fabrication of a metal-reinforced single-implant mandibular overdenture with the Locator attachment as a retention device is described.

  7. Germanium geochemistry and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Germanium is enriched in the following geologic environments: 1. (1) iron meteorites and terrestrial iron-nickel; 2. (2) sulfide ore deposits, particularly those hosted by sedimentary rocks; 3. (3) iron oxide deposits; 4. (4) oxidized zones of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits; 5. (5) pegmatites, greisens, and skarns; and 6. (6) coal and lignitized wood. In silicate melts, Ge is highly siderophile in the presence of native iron-nickel; otherwise, it is highly lithophile. Among silicate minerals, Ge is concentrated in those having less polymerized silicate tetrahedra such as olivine and topaz. In deposits formed from hydrothermal solutions, Ge tends to be enriched mostly in either sulfides or in fluorine-bearing phases; it is thus concentrated both in some hydrothermal sulfide deposits and in pegmatites, greisens, and skarns. In sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having low to moderate sulfur activity, Ge is concentrated in sphalerite in amounts up to 3000 ppm. Sulfide deposits that formed from solutions having higher sulfur activity allowed Ge to either form its own sulfides, particularly with Cu, or to substitute for As, Sn, or other metals in sulfosalts. The Ge in hydrothermal fluids probably derives from enrichment during the fractional crystallization of igneous fluids, or is due to the incorporation of Ge from the country rocks, particularly from those containing organic material. Germanium bonds to lignin-derivative organic compounds that are found in peat and lignite, accounting for its common concentration in coals and related organic material. Germanium is precipitated from water together with iron hydroxide, accounting for its concentration in some sedimentary and supergene iron oxide deposits. It also is able to substitute for Fe in magnetite in a variety of geologic environments. In the oxidized zone of Ge-bearing sulfide deposits, Ge is concentrated in oxides, hydroxides, and hydroxy-sulfates, sometimes forming its own minerals. It is particularly

  8. Influence of metallic dental implants and metal artefacts on dose calculation accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany)

    2014-10-31

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artefacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which inhibit the correct representation of shape and density of the metal and the surrounding tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of dental implants on the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy planning and the benefit of metal artefact reduction (MAR). A second aim was to determine the treatment technique which is less sensitive to the presence of metallic implants in terms of dose calculation accuracy. Phantoms consisting of homogeneous water equivalent material surrounding dental implants were designed. Artefact-containing CT data were corrected using the correct density information. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to 2-dimensional dose measurements using GafChromic trademark EBT2 films. For all plans the accuracy of dose calculations is significantly higher if performed on corrected CT data (p = 0.015). The agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions is significantly higher for VMAT than for IMRT plans for calculations on uncorrected CT data (p = 0.011) as well as on corrected CT data (p = 0.029). For IMRT and VMAT the application of metal artefact reduction significantly increases the agreement of dose calculations with film measurements. VMAT was found to provide the highest accuracy on corrected as well as on uncorrected CT data. VMAT is therefore preferable over IMRT for patients with metallic implants, if plan quality is comparable for the two techniques. (orig.) [German] Zahnimplantate aus Metall verursachen in Computertomographiedaten (CT) streifenfoermige Artefakte. Diese verhindern eine korrekte Zuordnung von Form und Dichteeigenschaften des Metalls und des umgebenden Gewebes. Ziel dieser Studie war es, den Einfluss von Zahnimplantaten auf die Genauigkeit der Dosisberechnung in der

  9. Combined use of transcranial magnetic stimulation and metal electrode implants: a theoretical assessment of safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Rouhani, Hossein; Elahi, Behzad; Shahim, Kamal; Chen, Robert; Mosig, Juan R.; Pollo, Claudio; Graham, Simon J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the safety considerations encountered in the simultaneous use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and neurological interventions involving implanted metallic electrodes, such as electrocorticography. Metal implants are subject to magnetic forces due to fast alternating magnetic fields produced by the TMS coil. The question of whether the mechanical movement of the implants leads to irreversible damage of brain tissue is addressed by an electromagnetic simulation which quantifies the magnitude of imposed magnetic forces. The assessment is followed by a careful mechanical analysis determining the maximum tolerable force which does not cause irreversible tissue damage. Results of this investigation provide useful information on the range of TMS stimulator output powers which can be safely used in patients having metallic implants. It is shown that conventional TMS applications can be considered safe when applied on patients with typical electrode implants as the induced stress in the brain tissue remains well below the limit of tissue damage.

  10. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mirza Rustum Baig; Rajan Gunaseelan

    2012-01-01

    The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported...

  11. Yunnan Chihong Zinc & Germanium Co.,Ltd.Invested RMB 300 Million for Germanium Project with Output 30 Tons/Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>Recently,Yunnan Chihong Zinc & Germanium Co.,Ltd.,an A-share listed company held by Yunnan Metallurgical Group Co.,Ltd.,kicked off its construction of a project for comprehen- sive utilization of lead-zinc associated metal germanium resources to be output at 30 tons/year.It is introduced that the investment

  12. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  13. The electrochemical behavior of metallic implant materials as an indicator of their biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitter, H; Plenk, H

    1987-07-01

    This study introduces a simple in vitro arrangement to measure current densities of implant metals. The in vivo condition of a metallic implant lying in tissues exhibiting different redox potentials is simulated in so-called straddle tests by applying a constant potential difference of 250 mV in saline containing the stable, fast-reacting redox system K4Fe(CN)6/K3Fe(CN)6. From a variety of corrosion-resistant implant metals and alloys, gold showed the highest current densities, followed by the stainless steel, the cobalt-based alloy, and the TiAIV-alloy. The pure metals titanium, niobium, and tantalum showed the lowest values. This can be explained by the stable oxide layer on these base metals, preventing an exchange of electrons and thus any redox reaction. This rating of metallic implant materials based on in vitro measurements of current densities is in good accordance with their biocompatibility rating reported from in vivo experiences. It seems that simple and cheap electrochemical tests allow an even more precise differentiation of the suitability of metallic materials for implant purposes than most of the conventional implantation tests, considering that biocompatibility is not only determined by corrosion products, but also by exchange currents and reaction products of redox processes involving tissue compounds.

  14. Assessment of metal artifact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Parsa; N. Ibrahim; B. Hassan; K. Syriopoulos; P. van der Stelt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were

  15. Assessment of metal artifact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsa, A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hassan, B.; Syriopoulos, K.; van der Stelt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were

  16. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants-diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2011-01-01

    algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological...

  17. Improving Passivation Process of Si Nanocrystals Embedded in SiO2 Using Metal Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhovani Bornacelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the photoluminescence (PL of Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs embedded in SiO2 obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy. The Si-NCs are formed at high depth (1-2 μm inside the SiO2 achieving a robust and better protected system. After metal ion implantation (Ag or Au, and a subsequent thermal annealing at 600°C under hydrogen-containing atmosphere, the PL signal exhibits a noticeable increase. The ion metal implantation was done at energies such that its distribution inside the silica does not overlap with the previously implanted Si ion . Under proper annealing Ag or Au nanoparticles (NPs could be nucleated, and the PL signal from Si-NCs could increase due to plasmonic interactions. However, the ion-metal-implantation-induced damage can enhance the amount of hydrogen, or nitrogen, that diffuses into the SiO2 matrix. As a result, the surface defects on Si-NCs can be better passivated, and consequently, the PL of the system is intensified. We have selected different atmospheres (air, H2/N2 and Ar to study the relevance of these annealing gases on the final PL from Si-NCs after metal ion implantation. Studies of PL and time-resolved PL indicate that passivation process of surface defects on Si-NCs is more effective when it is assisted by ion metal implantation.

  18. Growth and characterization of germanium epitaxial film on silicon (001 with germane precursor in metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Hong Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of germanium (Ge epitaxial film grown directly on a silicon (Si (001 substrate with 6° off-cut using conventional germane precursor in a metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD system is studied. The growth sequence consists of several steps at low temperature (LT at 400 °C, intermediate temperature ramp (LT-HT of ∼10 °C/min and high temperature (HT at 600 °C. This is followed by post-growth annealing in hydrogen at temperature ranging from 650 to 825 °C. The Ge epitaxial film of thickness ∼ 1 μm experiences thermally induced tensile strain of 0.11 % with a treading dislocation density (TDD of ∼107/cm2 and the root-mean-square (RMS roughness of ∼ 0.75 nm. The benefit of growing Ge epitaxial film using MOCVD is that the subsequent III-V materials can be grown in-situ without the need of breaking the vacuum hence it is manufacturing worthy.

  19. Monte Carlo studies of positron implantation in elemental metallic and multilayer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, V.J.; Welch, D.O.; Lynn, K.G.

    1992-01-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo computer code developed at Brookhaven [sup 1,2] to study the implantation profiles of 1-10 keV positrons incident on a wide range of semi-infinite metals and multilayer systems. Our Monte Carlo program accounts for elastic scattering as well as inelastic scattering from core and valence electrons, and includes the excitation of plasmons. The implantation profiles of positrons in many metals as well as Pd/Al, and Al/Co/Si multilayers are presented. Scaling relations and closed-form expressions representing he implantation profiles are also discussed.

  20. Monte Carlo studies of positron implantation in elemental metallic and multilayer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, V.J.; Welch, D.O.; Lynn, K.G.

    1992-12-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo computer code developed at Brookhaven {sup 1,2} to study the implantation profiles of 1-10 keV positrons incident on a wide range of semi-infinite metals and multilayer systems. Our Monte Carlo program accounts for elastic scattering as well as inelastic scattering from core and valence electrons, and includes the excitation of plasmons. The implantation profiles of positrons in many metals as well as Pd/Al, and Al/Co/Si multilayers are presented. Scaling relations and closed-form expressions representing he implantation profiles are also discussed.

  1. Analysis of Accumulating Ability of Heavy Metals in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Improved by Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Naiyan; Zhang, Fengshou

    2012-05-01

    Heavy metals have seriously contaminated soil and water, and done harm to public health. Academician WANG Naiyan proposed that ion-implantation technique should be exploited for environmental bioremediation by mutating and breeding plants or microbes. By implanting N+ into Taikonglian No.1, we have selected and bred two lotus cultivars, Jingguang No.1 and Jingguang No.2. The present study aims at analyzing the feasibility that irradiation can be used for remediation of soil and water from heavy metals. Compared with parent Taikonglian No.1, the uptaking and accumulating ability of heavy metals in two mutated cultivars was obviously improved. So ion implantation technique can indeed be used in bioremediation of heavy metals in soil and water, but it is hard to select and breed a cultivar which can remedy the soil and water from all the heavy metals.

  2. In vitro studies on silver implanted pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    Pure iron has been verified as a promising biodegradable metal for absorbable cardiovascular stent usage. However, the degradation rate of pure iron is too slow. To accelerate the degradation of the surface of pure iron, silver ions were implanted into pure iron by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at an extracted voltage of 40keV. The implanted influence was up to 2×10(17)ions/cm(2). The composition and depth profiles, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of Ag ion implanted pure iron were investigated. The implantation depths of Ag was around 60nm. The element Ag existed as Ag2O in the outermost layer, then gradually transited to metal atoms in zero valent state with depth increase. The implantation of Ag ions accelerated the corrosion rate of pure iron matrix, and exhibited much more uniform corrosion behavior. For cytotoxicity assessment, the implantation of Ag ions slightly decreased the viability of all kinds of cell lines used in these tests. The hemolysis rate of Ag ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%, which was acceptable, whereas the platelet adhesion tests indicated the implantation of Ag ions might increase the risk of thrombosis.

  3. First-principles calculations on implanted TiO2 by 3d transition metal ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    3d transition metal (V, Cr and Fe) ions are implanted into TiO2 by the method of metal ion implantation. The electronic band structures of TiO2 films doped 3d transition metal ions have been analyzed by ab initio band calculations based on a self-consistent full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method within the first-principle formalism. Influence of implantation on TiO2 films is examined by the method of UV-visible spectrometry. The results of experiment and calculation show that the optical band gap of TiO2 films is narrowed by ion implantation. The calculation shows that the 3d state of V, Cr and Fe ions plays a significant role in red shift of UV-Vis absorbance spectrum.

  4. Depth concentrations of deuterium ions implanted into some pure metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Kitowski, K.; Kulikauskas, V.; Wilczynska, T.; Hofman, A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2012-01-01

    Pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh) were implanted by 25-keV deuterium ions at fluences in the range (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2. The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium ions were measured 10 days and three months after the implantation by using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS). Comparison of the obtained results allowed us to make conclusions about relative stability of deuterium and hydrogen gases in pure metals and diluted Pd alloys. Very high diffusion rates of implanted deuterium ions in V and Pd pure metals and Pd alloys were observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed formation of nanosized defects in implanted corundum and titanium.

  5. FRACTAL PATTERN GROWTH OF METAL ATOM CLUSTERS IN ION IMPLANTED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TONG-HE; WU YU-GUANG; SANG HAI-BO; ZHOU GU

    2001-01-01

    The fractal and multi-fractal patterns of metal atoms are observed in the surface layer and cross section of a metal ion implanted polymer using TEM and SEM for the first time. The surface structure in the metal ion implanted polyethylene terephthalane (PET) is the random fractal. Certain average quantities of the random geometric patterns contain self-similarity. Some growth origins appeared in the fractal pattern which has a dimension of 1.67. The network structure of the fractal patterns is formed in cross section, having a fractal dimension of 1.87. So it can be seen that the fractal pattern is three-dimensional space fractal. We also find the collision cascade fractal in the cross section of implanted nylon, which is similar to the collision cascade pattern in transverse view calculated by the TRIM computer program. Finally, the mechanism for the formation and growth of the fractal patterns during ion implantation is discussed.

  6. Intraoral framework pick-up technique to improve fit of a metal-resin implant prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Rustum Baig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of passive fit is an important prerequisite for the prevention of complications in full-arch screw-retained implant prosthesis. With cemented prosthesis, the cementation compensates for the discrepancies in the cast framework, but the lack of retrievability seems undesirable. The aim of this paper is to propose a modified screw-retained prosthesis design for complete arch implant fixed rehabilitation. A technique for the fabrication of a full-arch metal-resin implant-supported screw-retained prosthesis is described. Cementation of the framework to the abutments intraorally improves the passivity of fit of the prosthesis on the implants. Maintenance of screw-access channels in the final prosthesis ensures retrievability. The metal-resin design allows for easy repair and maintenance. The prosthesis is cost-effective compared to conventional options and can be employed as a viable treatment alternative when considering metal-acrylic resin complete arch fixed prosthesis.

  7. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases.

  8. Characterization of low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters having gold absorbers with implanted $^{163}$Ho ions

    CERN Document Server

    Gastaldo, L; von Seggern, F; Porst, J P; Schäfer, S; Pies, C; Kempf, S; Wolf, T; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C; Herlert, A; Johnston, K

    2013-01-01

    For the first time we have investigated the behavior of fully micro-fabricated low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) after undergoing an ion-implantation process. This experiment had the aim to show the possibility to perform a high precision calorimetric measurement of the energy spectrum following the electron capture of $^{163}$Ho using MMCs having the radioactive $^{163}$Ho ions implanted in the absorber. The implantation of $^{163}$Ho ions was performed at ISOLDE-CERN. The performance of a detector that underwent an ion-implantation process is compared to the one of a detector without implanted ions. The results show that the implantation dose of ions used in this experiment does not compromise the properties of the detector. In addition an optimized detector design for future $^{163}$Ho experiments is presented.

  9. Ultrahigh-current-density metal-ion implantation and diamondlike-hydrocarbon films for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1993-09-01

    The metal-ion-implantation system used to implant metals into substrates are described. The metal vapor required for operation is supplied by drawing sufficient electron current from the plasma discharge to an anode-potential crucible so a solid, pure metal placed in the crucible will be heated to the point of vaporization. The ion-producing, plasma discharge is initiated within a graphite-ion-source body, which operates at high temperature, by using an argon flow that is turned off once the metal vapor is present. Extraction of ion beams several cm in diameter at current densities ranging to several hundred micro-A/sq cm on a target 50 cm downstream of the ion source were demonstrated using Mg, Ag, Cr, Cu, Si, Ti, V, B, and Zr. These metals were implanted into over 100 substrates (discs, pins, flats, wires). A model describing thermal stresses induced in materials (e.g. ceramic plates) during high-current-density implantation is presented. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of iron and 304-stainless-steel samples implanted with Ti or B are examined. Diamondlike-hydrocarbon coatings were applied to steel surfaces and found to exhibit good tribological performance.

  10. 3D Metal Printing - Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Frameworks of Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla León, M; Klemm, I M; García-Arranz, J; Özcan, M

    2017-09-01

    An edentulous patient was rehabilitated with maxillary metal-ceramic and mandibular metal-resin implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Metal frameworks of the FDPs were fabricated using 3D additive manufacturing technologies utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) processes. Both SLM and EBM technologies were employed in combination with computer numerical control (CNC) post-machining at the implant interface. This report highlights the technical and clinical protocol for fabrication of FDPs using SLM and EBM additive technologies. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  11. Germanium content in Polish hard coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowska Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the policy of the European Union, it is necessary to search for new sources of scarce raw materials. One of these materials is germanium, listed as a critical element. This semi-metal is widely used in the electronics industry, for example in the production of semiconductors, fibre optics and solar cells. Coal and fly ash from its combustion and gasification for a long time have been considered as a potential source of many critical elements, particularly germanium. The paper presents the results of germanium content determination in the Polish hard coal. 23 coal samples of various coal ranks were analysed. The samples were collected from 15 mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin and from one mine of the Lublin Coal Basin. The determination of germanium content was performed with the use of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Electrothermal Atomization (GFAAS. The investigation showed that germanium content in the analysed samples was at least twice lower than the average content of this element in the hard coals analysed so far and was in the range of 0.08 ÷ 1.28 mg/kg. Moreover, the content of Ge in the ashes from the studied coals does not exceed 15 mg/kg, which is lower than the average value of Ge content in the coal ashes. The highest content of this element characterizes coals of the Lublin Coal Basin and young coals type 31 from the Vistula region. The results indicate a low utility of the analysed coal ashes as a source of the recovery of germanium. On the basis of the analyses, the lack of the relationship between the content of the element and the ash content in the tested coals was noted. For coals of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, the relationship between the content of germanium in the ashes and the depth of the seam was observed.

  12. Indium (In)- and tin (Sn)-based metal induced crystallization (MIC) on amorphous germanium (α-Ge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Park, Jin-Hong, E-mail: jhpark9@skku.edu

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • In- and Sn-based MIC phenomenon on amorphous (α)-Ge is newly reported. • The In- and Sn-MIC phenomenon respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. • The Sn-MIC process presents higher sheet resistance and bigger crystal grains. - Abstract: In this paper, metal-induced crystallization (MIC) phenomenon on α-Ge by indium (In) and tin (Sn) are thoroughly investigated. In- and Sn-MIC process respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. Compared to the previously reported MIC samples including In-MIC, Sn-MIC process presented higher sheet resistance (similar to that of SPC) and bigger crystal grains above 50 nm (slightly smaller than that of SPC). According to SIMS analysis, Sn atoms diffused more slowly into Ge than In at 400 °C, providing lower density of heterogeneous nuclei induced by metals and consequently larger crystal grains.

  13. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Emily Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Due to their strength, elasticity, and durability, a variety of metal alloys are commonly used in medical implants. Traditionally, corrosion-resistant metals have been preferred. These permanent materials can cause negative systemic and local tissue effects in the long-term. Permanent stenting can lead to late-stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Metallic pins and screws for fracture fixation can corrode and fail, cause loss of bone mass, and contribute to inflammation and pain at the im...

  14. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  15. Influence of implantation of three metallic ions on the mechanical properties of two polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.V. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics; Perry, A.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Treglio, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation of poly ethylene terephthalate (PET) and polystyrene (PS) with various high energy metallic ions at 70 kV to dose of 3 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm 2 have been made. Measurements of the mechanical properties of the polymers before and after implantation have been made with an ultra microindentation system using both pointed and a small (2 nm) radiused spherical tipped indenter. Significant differences have been observed between the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces and those of the Au and W implanted surfaces. For both the PET and PS the resistance to indenter penetration at very low loads was much greater for the Ti-B dual implanted surfaces. The estimated hardness and modulus versus depth of penetration for both indenters shows that the spherical indenter produces more consistent and less controversial values that are somewhat lower than the optimistic estimates from pointed indenters. 8 refs., 2 fig.

  16. Development of physical fundamentals and computer design of technology of ion implantation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolobov, Yu.P.; Sharkeev, Yu.P.; Abdrashitov, V.G.; Kashin, O.A

    2001-07-01

    The unique possibilities of controlled modification of the chemical composition, structure and properties of thin surface films of metals and alloys are offered by the method of high-dose ion implantation (Hll). Modification of the surface of materials by ion implantation has been used on an increasing scale as an industrial technology of ensuring a large increase of the service life of components and tools. It is urgent to investigate the physical fundamentals of this promising technology.

  17. Evaluation of machining methods for trabecular metal implants in a rabbit intramedullary osseointegration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglurkar, Mukund; Davy, Dwight T; Stewart, Matthew; Goldberg, Victor M; Welter, Jean F

    2007-02-01

    Implant success is dependent in part on the interaction of the implant with the surrounding tissues. Porous tantalum implants (Trabecular Metal, TM) have been shown to have excellent osseointegration. Machining this material to complex shapes with close tolerances is difficult because of its open structure and the ductile nature of metallic tantalum. Conventional machining results in occlusion of most of the surface porosity by the smearing of soft metal. This study compared TM samples finished by three processing techniques: conventional machining, electrical discharge machining, and nonmachined, "as-prepared." The TM samples were studied in a rabbit distal femoral intramedullary osseointegration model and in cell culture. We assessed the effects of these machining methods at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implant placement. The finishing technique had a profound effect on the physical presentation of the implant interface: conventional machining reduced surface porosity to 30% compared to bulk porosities in the 70% range. Bone ongrowth was similar in all groups, while bone ingrowth was significantly greater in the nonmachined samples. The resulting mechanical properties of the bone implant-interface were similar in all three groups, with only interface stiffness and interface shear modulus being significantly higher in the machined samples.

  18. Systemic levels of metallic ions released from orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Liliane Siqueira; Serra, Glaucio Guimarães; Albuquerque Palermo, Elisabete Fernandes; Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Müller, Carlos Alberto; Meyers, Marc André; Elias, Carlos Nelson

    2009-04-01

    Orthodontic mini-implants are a potential source of metallic ions to the human body because of the corrosion of titanium (Ti) alloy in body fluids. The purpose of this study was to gauge the concentration of Ti, aluminum (Al), and vanadium (V), as a function of time, in the kidneys, livers, and lungs of rabbits that had Ti-6Al-4V alloy orthodontic mini-implants placed in their tibia. Twenty-three New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. Four orthodontic mini-implants were placed in the left proximal tibia of 18 rabbits. Five control rabbits had no orthodontic mini-implants. After 1, 4, and 12 weeks, the rabbits were killed, and the selected tissues were extracted and prepared for analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Low amounts of Ti, Al, and V were detectable in the 1-week, 4-weeks, and 12-weeks groups, confirming that release of these metals from the mini-implants occurs, with diffusion and accumulation in remote organs. Despite the tendency of ion release when using the Ti alloy as orthodontic mini-implants, the amounts of metals detected were significantly below the average intake of these elements through food and drink and did not reach toxic concentrations.

  19. Hardening of Metallic Materials Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yufan; Clark, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Milhone, Jason; Nonn, Paul; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    A new approach of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been developed with the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). The new approach efficiently reduces the duty cycle under the same average power for PIII. The experiment uses a Nitrogen plasma at a relatively high density of 1010 1011 cm-3 with ion temperatures of working cycle. The samples (Alloy Steel 9310) are analyzed by a Vicker Hardness Tester to study the hardness and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study implantation density and depth. Different magnetic fields are also applied on samples to reduce the energy loss and secondary emission. Higher efficiency of implantation is expected from this experiment and the results will be presented. Hilldale Undergraduate/Faculty Research Fellowship of University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor Cary Forest's Kellett Mid-Career Faculty Award.

  20. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns.......To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns....

  1. Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    subject compared to the normal populations. Figure 2. S ystemic levels of metal ions in subject groups in part per billion ( PPB ). 0.00...totaling 60mL) from soldiers exposed to metals in battle and compared with immune cell reactivity of 3 other groups of people (injured soldiers without...on an individual’s metal immune reactivity profile and systemic lead level. This study will involve 75 subjects divided into three groups of 25

  2. Advanced metal artifact reduction MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty implants: compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Jan; Thawait, Gaurav K. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fritz, Benjamin [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Raithel, Esther; Nittka, Mathias [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Gilson, Wesley D. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States); Mont, Michael A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Compressed sensing (CS) acceleration has been theorized for slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), but has not been shown to be feasible. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CS-SEMAC is feasible for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants. Following prospective institutional review board approval, 22 subjects with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants underwent 1.5 T MRI. We compared CS-SEMAC prototype, high-bandwidth TSE, and SEMAC sequences with acquisition times of 4-5, 4-5 and 10-12 min, respectively. Outcome measures included bone-implant interfaces, image quality, periprosthetic structures, artifact size, and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR). Using Friedman, repeated measures analysis of variances, and Cohen's weighted kappa tests, Bonferroni-corrected p-values of 0.005 and less were considered statistically significant. There was no statistical difference of outcomes measures of SEMAC and CS-SEMAC images. Visibility of implant-bone interfaces and pseudocapsule as well as fat suppression and metal reduction were ''adequate'' to ''good'' on CS-SEMAC and ''non-diagnostic'' to ''adequate'' on high-BW TSE (p < 0.001, respectively). SEMAC and CS-SEMAC showed mild blur and ripple artifacts. The metal artifact size was 63 % larger for high-BW TSE as compared to SEMAC and CS-SEMAC (p < 0.0001, respectively). CNRs were sufficiently high and statistically similar, with the exception of CNR of fluid and muscle and CNR of fluid and tendon, which were higher on intermediate-weighted high-BW TSE (p < 0.005, respectively). Compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants when compared to high-BW TSE and image quality similar to conventional SEMAC. (orig.)

  3. Cobalt-alloy implant debris induce HIF-1α hypoxia associated responses: a mechanism for metal-specific orthopedic implant failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauryn Samelko

    Full Text Available The historical success of orthopedic implants has been recently tempered by unexpected pathologies and early failures of some types of Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloy containing artificial hip implants. Hypoxia-associated responses to Cobalt-alloy metal debris were suspected as mediating this untoward reactivity at least in part. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α is a major transcription factor involved in hypoxia, and is a potent coping mechanism for cells to rapidly respond to changing metabolic demands. We measured signature hypoxia associated responses (i.e. HIF-1α, VEGF and TNF-α to Cobalt-alloy implant debris both in vitro (using a human THP-1 macrophage cell line and primary human monocytes/macrophages and in vivo. HIF-1α in peri-implant tissues of failed metal-on-metal implants were compared to similar tissues from people with metal-on-polymer hip arthroplasties, immunohistochemically. Increasing concentrations of cobalt ions significantly up-regulated HIF-1α with a maximal response at 0.3 mM. Cobalt-alloy particles (1 um-diameter, 10 particles/cell induced significantly elevated HIF-1α, VEGF, TNF-α and ROS expression in human primary macrophages whereas Titanium-alloy particles did not. Elevated expression of HIF-1α was found in peri-implant tissues and synovial fluid of people with failing Metal-on-Metal hips (n = 5 compared to failed Metal-on-Polymer articulating hip arthroplasties (n = 10. This evidence suggests that Cobalt-alloy, more than other metal implant debris (e.g. Titanium alloy, can elicit hypoxia-like responses that if unchecked can lead to unusual peri-implant pathologies, such as lymphocyte infiltration, necrosis and excessive fibrous tissue growths.

  4. Safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices is sometimes a risky procedure. Thus MRI in these patients should be performed when it is the only examination able to help with the diagnosis. Moreover the diagnostic benefit must outweigh the risks. Coronary artery stents, prosthetic cardiac valves, metal sternal sutures, mediastinal vascular clips, and epicardial pacing wires are not contraindications for MRI, in contrast to pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Appropriate patient selection and precautions ensure MRI safety. However it is commonly accepted that although hundreds of patients with pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have undergone safe MRI scanning, it is not a safe procedure. Currently, heating of the pacemaker lead is the major problem undermining MRI safety. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are currently neither "MRI-safe" nor "MRI-compatible" pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. In this article we review the international literature in regard to safety during MRI of patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

  5. Wear behaviour of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys used in metal-on-metal hip implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, Rocco

    The influence of carbon (C) content, microstructure, crystallography and mechanical properties on the wear behaviour of metal-on-metal (MM) hip implants made from commercially available cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys designated as American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) grade F1537, F75 and as-cast were studied in this work. The as-received bars of wrought CoCrMo alloys (ASTM F1537 of either about 0.05% or 0.26% C) were each subjected to various heat treatments to develop different microstructures. Pin and plate specimens were fabricated from each bar and were tested against each other using a linear reciprocating pin-on-plate apparatus in 25% by volume bovine serum solution. The applied normal load was 9.81 N and the reciprocating plate had a sinusoidal velocity with an average speed of 26 mm/s. The wear was measured gravimetrically and it was found to be most strongly affected by alloy C content, irrespective of grain size or carbide morphology. More precisely, the wear behaviour was directly correlated to the dissolved C content of the alloys. Increased C in solid-solution coincided with lower volumetric wear since C helps to stabilize the face-centred cubic (FCC) crystal structure thus limiting the amount of strain induced transformation (SIT) to the hexagonal close-packed crystal structure (HCP). Based on the observed surface twinning in and around the contact zone and the potentially detrimental effect of the HCP phase, it was postulated that the MM wear behaviour of CoCrMo alloys in the present study was controlled by a deformation mechanism, rather than corrosion or tribochemical reactions.

  6. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    3a- 3d for lymphocyte and monocyte responses at a single time point (6month-5 years post-operative). Subgroups Subjects in Group Subject Recruited...49) Hercus B, Revell PA. Phenotypic characteristics of T lymphocytes in the interfacial tissue of aseptically loosened prosthetic joints. J Mater...mechanism for implant debris reactivity. J Orthop Res 2008;(epub ahead of print ). BODY: Current Status: The Study is finalizing the recruitment

  7. Maxillary overdentures supported by four splinted direct metal laser sintering implants: a 3-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco; Luongo, Fabrizia; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Anil, Sukumaran; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Nowadays, the advancements in direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technology allow the fabrication of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate implant survival, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss of DMLS implants used to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures. Materials and Methods. Over a 2-year period, 120 implants were placed in the maxilla of 30 patients (18 males, 12 females) to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures (ODs). Each OD was supported by 4 implants splinted by a rigid cobalt-chrome bar. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The outcome measures were implant failure, biological and prosthetic complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss (distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact, DIB). Results. The 3-year implant survival rate was 97.4% (implant-based) and 92.9% (patient-based). Three implants failed. The incidence of biological complication was 3.5% (implant-based) and 7.1% (patient-based). The incidence of prosthetic complication was 17.8% (patient-based). No detrimental effects on marginal bone level were evidenced. Conclusions. The use of 4 DMLS titanium implants to support bar-retained maxillary ODs seems to represent a safe and successful procedure. Long-term clinical studies on a larger sample of patients are needed to confirm these results.

  8. Maxillary Overdentures Supported by Four Splinted Direct Metal Laser Sintering Implants: A 3-Year Prospective Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Nowadays, the advancements in direct metal laser sintering (DMLS technology allow the fabrication of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate implant survival, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss of DMLS implants used to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures. Materials and Methods. Over a 2-year period, 120 implants were placed in the maxilla of 30 patients (18 males, 12 females to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures (ODs. Each OD was supported by 4 implants splinted by a rigid cobalt-chrome bar. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The outcome measures were implant failure, biological and prosthetic complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss (distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact, DIB. Results. The 3-year implant survival rate was 97.4% (implant-based and 92.9% (patient-based. Three implants failed. The incidence of biological complication was 3.5% (implant-based and 7.1% (patient-based. The incidence of prosthetic complication was 17.8% (patient-based. No detrimental effects on marginal bone level were evidenced. Conclusions. The use of 4 DMLS titanium implants to support bar-retained maxillary ODs seems to represent a safe and successful procedure. Long-term clinical studies on a larger sample of patients are needed to confirm these results.

  9. Crown color match of implant-supported zirconia and Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal restorations:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the crown color match of implant supported zirconia restorations and Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal (PFM) restorations in anterior maxillary region by spectrophotometric evaluation. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients with 29 implant......-supported single crowns in anterior maxillary area were recruited, 11 of the implant crowns were zirconia restorations and 18 were PFM restorations. Color match of the implant crown with contra-lateral/neighboring tooth at the position of body 1/3 of the crown were assessed using spectrophotometer (Spectro......ShadeTM, Micro Dental) in CIEL¿a¿b¿ coordinates. Subjective crown color match scores were evaluated. Independent sample t test of SPSS17.0 was used to compare the difference between zirconia restoration and PFM restoration. Spearman correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the spectrophotometric...

  10. Crown color match of implant-supported zirconia and Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal restorations:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Min; Fei, Wei; Hosseini, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the crown color match of implant supported zirconia restorations and Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal (PFM) restorations in anterior maxillary region by spectrophotometric evaluation. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients with 29 implant......-supported single crowns in anterior maxillary area were recruited, 11 of the implant crowns were zirconia restorations and 18 were PFM restorations. Color match of the implant crown with contra-lateral/neighboring tooth at the position of body 1/3 of the crown were assessed using spectrophotometer (Spectro......ShadeTM, Micro Dental) in CIEL¿a¿b¿ coordinates. Subjective crown color match scores were evaluated. Independent sample t test of SPSS17.0 was used to compare the difference between zirconia restoration and PFM restoration. Spearman correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the spectrophotometric...

  11. Indium-carbon pairs in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G; Vianden, R [Helmholtz Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2003-08-06

    The interactions of carbon with the probe nucleus {sup 111}In have been studied in germanium using the perturbed angular correlation method, which has the ability to detect the microscopic environments of the probe atom by means of the interaction of the nuclear moments of the probe with the surrounding electromagnetic fields. At high dose carbon implantation in germanium two complexes have been identified by their unique quadrupole interaction frequencies. An interaction frequency of {nu}{sub Q1} = 207(1) MHz ({eta} = 0.16(3)) appeared at annealing temperatures below 650 deg. C. Above 650 deg. C, it was replaced by a second interaction frequency of {nu}{sub Q2} 500(1) MHz ({eta} = 0). The frequencies are attributed to two different carbon-indium pairs. The orientation of the corresponding electric field gradients and the thermal stability of the defect complexes are studied.

  12. Investigation on the Tribology of Co Implanted Stainless Steel Using Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junxia GUO; Xun CAI; Qiulong CHEN

    2004-01-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was ion implanted with Co, and the tribological property on the surface of the stainless steel was investigated. The Co ion implantation was carried out using a metal vapor vacuum arc (Mevva) broad-beam ion source with an extraction voltage of 40 kV, implantation doses of 3×1017/cm2 and 5×1017/cm2, and ion current densities of 13, 22 and 32 μA/cm2. The results showed that the near-surface hardness of Co-implanted stainless steel sample was increased by 50% or more, and it increased with increasing ion current density at first and then declined. The friction coefficient decreased from 0.74 to 0.20 after Co implantation. The wear rate after Co implantation reduced by 25% or more as compared to the unimplanted sample. The wear rate initially decreased with increasing ion current density and then an increase was observed. Within the range of experimental parameters, there exists a critical ion current density for the Co-implanted stainless steel, at which the wear rate decreased with increasing retained dose, going through a minimum and then increased. The critical ion current density in this paper is about 22 μA/cm2.

  13. Direct metal laser sintering titanium dental implants: a review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, F; Chambrone, L; van Noort, R; Miller, C; Hatton, P; Mangano, C

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  14. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs; to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  15. Topological design and additive manufacturing of porous metals for bone scaffolds and orthopaedic implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojian; Xu, Shanqing; Zhou, Shiwei; Xu, Wei; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Qian, M; Brandt, Milan; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-03-01

    One of the critical issues in orthopaedic regenerative medicine is the design of bone scaffolds and implants that replicate the biomechanical properties of the host bones. Porous metals have found themselves to be suitable candidates for repairing or replacing the damaged bones since their stiffness and porosity can be adjusted on demands. Another advantage of porous metals lies in their open space for the in-growth of bone tissue, hence accelerating the osseointegration process. The fabrication of porous metals has been extensively explored over decades, however only limited controls over the internal architecture can be achieved by the conventional processes. Recent advances in additive manufacturing have provided unprecedented opportunities for producing complex structures to meet the increasing demands for implants with customized mechanical performance. At the same time, topology optimization techniques have been developed to enable the internal architecture of porous metals to be designed to achieve specified mechanical properties at will. Thus implants designed via the topology optimization approach and produced by additive manufacturing are of great interest. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of topological design and manufacturing processes of various types of porous metals, in particular for titanium alloys, biodegradable metals and shape memory alloys. This review also identifies the limitations of current techniques and addresses the directions for future investigations.

  16. Improved lumen visualization in metallic vascular implants by reducing RF artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, LW; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a method is proposed for MRI of the lumen of metallic vascular implants, like stents or vena cava filters. The method is based on the reduction of artifacts caused by flow, susceptibility, and RIF eddy currents. Whereas both flow artifacts and susceptibility artifacts are well underst

  17. Novel metallic implantation technique for osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome. A cadaver study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.A. van Bergen; M. Zengerink; L. Blankevoort; M.N. van Sterkenburg; J. van Oldenrijk; C.N. van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A metallic inlay implant (HemiCAP) with 15 offset sizes has been developed for the treatment of localized osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome. The aim of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) a matching offset size is available for each talus, (2) th

  18. In-vitro examinations and patient examinations by MR: Significance of metal implants. In-vitro- und Patientenuntersuchungen mittels MRT: Bedeutung metallischer Implantate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebmeier, J.; Roedl, W. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Zentrum Innere Medizin); Weikl, A. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik 2 mit Poliklinik); Glueckert, K. (Waldkrankenhaus St. Marien, Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Orthopaedische Klinik mit Poliklinik); Hofmann-Preiss, K. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Chirurgische Klinik mit Poliklinik); Huk, W.J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Kopfklinikum); Wolf, F. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-05-01

    This study presents the results of in-vitro and clinical experiences with metallic implants during MRT investigations. In-vitro temperature measurements of various implants showed little temperature rise depending on the shape and the orientation in the static magnetic field (max. 0.3deg C). Ferromagnetic forces could not be detected with these implants. In contrast, severe temperature increase (9.3deg C) was observed with an intratracheal spiral tube. Tubes of this type should not be used in MR imaging to avoid the risk of burning. 105 MR examinations were performed in patients with metallic implants (CNS shunts, aortocoronary bypass grafts, aortic-, mitral-prothesis, orthopedic implants, skin staples, shrapnels). Patients with vascular clips were accepted for MR imaging when the clips were non-ferromagnetic only. No adverse effects were observed in these patients. (orig.).

  19. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  20. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids after implantation of hip replacements with metal-on-metal bearing--systematic review of clinical and epidemiological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Hartmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of metal-on-metal (MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. OBJECTIVE: To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. METHODS: Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor, patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors. RESULTS: Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L. Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. DISCUSSION: Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed "time out" for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted

  1. Patch Testing for Evaluation of Hypersensitivity to Implanted Metal Devices: A Perspective From the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Peter C; Crawford, Glen; Nedorost, Susan; Scheinman, Pamela L; Atwater, Amber Reck; Mowad, Christen; Brod, Bruce; Ehrlich, Alison; Watsky, Kalman L; Sasseville, Denis; Silvestri, Dianne; Worobec, Sophie M; Elliott, John F; Honari, Golara; Powell, Douglas L; Taylor, James; DeKoven, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society recognizes the interest in the evaluation and management of metal hypersensitivity reactions. Given the paucity of robust evidence with which to guide our practices, we provide reasonable evidence and expert opinion-based guidelines for clinicians with regard to metal hypersensitivity reaction testing and patient management. Routine preoperative evaluation in individuals with no history of adverse cutaneous reactions to metals or history of previous implant-related adverse events is not necessary. Patients with a clear self-reported history of metal reactions should be evaluated by patch testing before device implant. Patch testing is only 1 element in the assessment of causation in those with postimplantation morbidity. Metal exposure from the implanted device can cause sensitization, but a positive metal test does not prove symptom causality. The decision to replace an implanted device must include an assessment of all clinical factors and a thorough risk-benefit analysis by the treating physician(s) and patient.

  2. Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    be tested to determine serum lead concentration. Previous studies revealed that blood lead concentration in patients with extra-articular gunshot...stainless steel . Acta Orthopedica Scandinavia 1977;48:245-9. (14) Fisher AA. Allergic dermatit is presumably due to metallic foreign bodies...T, Zitting A, Jolanki R, Tarvainen K. Nickel release from metals, and a case of allergic contact dermatitis from stainless steel . Contact Dermatit is

  3. Formation of the intermediate semiconductor layer for the Ohmic contact to silicon carbide using Germanium implanttation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hui; Wang Yue-Hu; Zhang Yu-Ming; Qiao Da-Yong; Zhang Yi-Men

    2009-01-01

    By formation of an intermediate semiconductor layer(ISL)with a narrow band gap at the metallic contact/SiC interface, this paper realises a new method to fabricate the low-resistance Ohmic contacts for SiC. An array of transfer length method(TLM)test patterns is formed on N-wells created by P+ion implantation into Si-faced p-type 4H-SiC epilayer. The ISL of nickel-metal Ohmic contacts to n-tyDe 4H-SiC could be formed by using Germanium ion implantation into SiC. The specific contact resistance ρ_c as loW as 4.23×10~(-5) Ω·cm~2 is achieved after annealing in N_2 at 800℃ for 3 min, which iS much lower than that(>900℃)in the typical SiC metallisation process. The sheet resistance Rsh of the implanted layers is 1.5 kΩ/□. The technique for converting photoresist into nanocrystalline graphite is used to protect the SiC surface in the annealing after Ge~+ ion implantations.

  4. Transition metal implanted ZnO. A correlation between structure and magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays ferromagnetism is often found in potential diluted magnetic semiconductor systems. However, many authors question the origin of this ferromagnetism, i.e. if the observed ferromagnetism stems from ferromagnetic precipitates rather than from carriermediated magnetic coupling of ionic impurities, as required for a diluted magnetic semiconductor. In this thesis, this question will be answered for transition-metal implanted ZnO single crystals. Magnetic secondary phases, namely metallic Fe, Co and Ni nanocrystals, are formed inside ZnO. They are - although difficult to detect by common approaches of structural analysis - responsible for the observed ferromagnetism. Particularly Co and Ni nanocrystals are crystallographically oriented with respect to the ZnO matrix. Their structure phase transformation and corresponding evolution of magnetic properties upon annealing have been established. Finally, an approach, pre-annealing ZnO crystals at high temperature before implantation, has been demonstrated to sufficiently suppress the formation of metallic secondary phases. (orig.)

  5. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni; Estuningsih, Sri; Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul; Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-09-01

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  6. Crohn’s disease and Trabecular Metal implants: a report of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peron

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim The aim of the present study was to report two cases with Crohn’s disease in whom dental implants successfully osseointegrated and remained functionally stable up to 13 and 12 months of follow-up, respectively. Cases presentation In cases 1 (age 35 years and 2 (age 36 years, tooth 24 and 14, respectively, were atraumatically extracted and a particulated bone grafting material (buccal and palatal aspect of the defect and a Trabecular Metal implant (11.5 mm length, 4.7 mm diameter were inserted in each extraction socket. After implant placement and abutment connection with the final torque (25 Ncm, the provisional restoration was adapted in the oral cavity creating the emergence profile. The provisional crown was screw-retained and had slight occlusal contacts in the centric occlusion (intercuspation position. A periapical radiograph was taken as a control radiograph at the baseline. Postoperatively, antibiotics were prescribed as well as analgesics and an oral rinse was recommended. In both cases, the provisional restoration was removed after 2 weeks and replaced with a full ceramic restoration. Case-1 and case-2 were followed up after 13 months and 12 months respectively. In both cases postoperative healing was uneventful and radiographs taken at follow-up showed no evidence of crestal bone loss. Implants in both cases demonstrated an excellent clinical condition at follow-up. Conclusion Trabecular Metal implants can osseointegrate and remain functionally stable in patients with Crohn’s disease.

  7. Peculiarities and application perspectives of metal-ion implants in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoldi, P.; Gonella, F. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Arnold, G.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaglin, G. [Venice Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica; Bertoncello, R. [Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Inorganica, Metallorganica e Analitica

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation in insulators causes modifications in the refractive-index as a result of radiation damage, phase separation, or compound formation. As a consequence, light waveguides may be formed with interesting applications in the field of optoelectronics. Recently implantation of metals ions (e.g. silver, copper, gold, lead,...) showed the possibility of small radii colloidal particles formation, in a thin surface layer of the glass substrate. These particles exhibit an electron plasmon resonance which depends on the optical constants of the implanted metal and on the refractive-index of the glass host. The non-linear optical properties of such colloids, in particular the enhancement of optical Kerr susceptibility, suggest that the, ion implantation technique may play an important role for the production of all-optical switching devices. In this paper an analysis of the state-of-the-art of the research in this field will be presented in the framework of ion implantation in glass physics and chemistry.

  8. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni, E-mail: deni@ipb.ac.id; Estuningsih, Sri [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi [Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, Muhammadiyah University of Riau (UMRI), Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Hermawan, Hendra [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & CHU de Québec Research Center, Laval University (ULaval) (Canada)

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  9. Synthesis of tantalum nitride diffusion barriers for Cu metal by plasma immersion ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M; Kumar, D; George, P J; Paul, A K

    2002-01-01

    A Tantalum nitride diffusion barrier layer for copper metal was synthesized by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation technique (PIII). Effect of nitrogen dose in Ta layer was investigated in improving its diffusion barrier properties. Silicon wafers coated with Ta were implanted with nitrogen at two different doses viz. 10$^{15}$ions/cm$^2$ and 10$^{17}$ions/cm$^2$ corresponding to low and high dose regime. High dose of implanted nitrogen ions in the film render it to become Ta(N), Thereafter a copper (Cu) layer was deposited on the samples to produce Cu/Ta(N)/Si structure. To evaluate the barrier properties of Ta(N) these samples were annealed up to 700$^\\circ$C for 30 minutes. Sheet resistance, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) measurements were carried out to investigate the effect of annealing. Low dose implanted Ta layer does not show any change in its diffusion barrier properties, while high dose implanted layer stops the diffusion of Cu metal through it at annealing temperature...

  10. Effect of Nitrogen Implantation on Metal Transfer during Sliding Wear under Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Autry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen implantation in Interstitial-Free steel was evaluated for its impact on metal transfer and 1100 Al rider wear. It was determined that nitrogen implantation reduced metal transfer in a trend that increased with dose; the Archard wear coefficient reductions of two orders of magnitude were achieved using a dose of 2e17 ions/cm2, 100 kV. Cold-rolling the steel and making volumetric wear measurements of the Al-rider determined that the hardness of the harder material had little impact on volumetric wear or friction. Nitrogen implantation had chemically affected the tribological process studied in two ways: directly reducing the rider wear and reducing the fraction of rider wear that ended up sticking to the ISF steel surface. The structure of the nitrogen in the ISF steel did not affect the tribological behavior because no differences in friction/wear measurements were detected after postimplantation heat treating to decompose the as-implanted ε-Fe3N to γ-Fe4N. The fraction of rider-wear sticking to the steel depended primarily on the near-surface nitrogen content. Covariance analysis of the debris oxygen and nitrogen contents indicated that nitrogen implantation enhanced the tribo-oxidation process with reference to the unimplanted material. As a result, the reduction in metal transfer was likely related to the observed tribo-oxidation in addition to the introduction of nitride wear elements into the debris. The primary Al rider wear mechanism was stick-slip, and implantation reduced the friction and friction noise associated with that wear mechanism. Calculations based on the Tabor junction growth formula indicate that the mitigation of the stick-slip mechanism resulted from a reduced adhesive strength at the interface during the sticking phase.

  11. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  12. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da, E-mail: roselisboa@cardiol.br [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Silva, Carlos Augusto Bueno [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Greco, Otaviano José [Belo Horizonte, Hospital São João de Deus, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil); Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira [Faculdade de Medicina da UFMG, Divinópolis, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  13. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. Objective: To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. Methods: This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform, measuring the low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Results: Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively, with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00. The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Conclusions: Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents.

  14. MSM-Metal Semiconductor Metal Photo-detector Using Black Silicon Germanium (SiGe) for Extended Wavelength Near Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    they produced that microstructure using only halogenated etching gas (sulfur hexafluoride [ SF6 ]), the spectral absorbance of light was extended well...infrared imaging. In 2003, Mazur and colleagues reported that using femtosecond laser processing coupled with halogenated etching gas could produce...metal-masked, wet-chemical etching approach versus a femtosecond gas -phase etching process, and (2) we used in-situ boron doping p≈5x10 19 /cm 3

  15. On the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces inducing dropwise condensation of steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Michael H; Leipertz, Alfred; Fröba, Andreas P

    2010-04-20

    The present work provides new information on the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces responsible for the adjustment of stable dropwise condensation (DWC) of steam. The results are based on condensation experiments and surface analyses via contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For studying possible influences of the base material and the implanted ion species, commercially pure titanium grade 1, aluminum alloy Al 6951, and stainless steel AISI 321 were treated with N(+), C(+), O(+), or Ar(+) using ion beam implantation technology. The studies suggest that chemically inhomogeneous surfaces are instrumental in inducing DWC. As this inhomogeneity is apparently caused by particulate precipitates bonded to the metal surface, the resulting nanoscale surface roughness may also influence the condensation form. On such surfaces nucleation mechanisms seem to be capable of maintaining DWC even when CA and SFE measurements indicate increased wettability. The precipitates are probably formed due to the supersaturation of ion implanted metal surfaces with doping elements. For high-alloyed materials like AISI 321 or Hastelloy C-276, oxidation stimulated by the condensation process obviously tends to produce similar surfaces suitable for DWC.

  16. ERD studies of D-ion depth distributions after implantation into some pure metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Wilczynska, T.; Kitowski, K.; Hofman, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a report on experimental results of depth distributions of deuterium ions implanted with 25 keV energy at a fluence interval of (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2 into samples of pure metals (Cu, Ti, Zr, V, Pd) and diluted Pd alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh). The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium and hydrogen atoms were measured within a few hours after implantation with the use of elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis. After three months the measurements were repeated. The comparison of the obtained results in both series of studies allowed us to make an important observation of the desorption rates of implanted deuterium atoms from pure metals and diluted Pd alloys. The maximum measured concentrations of deuterium atoms in pure Zr and Ti foils with relatively small desorption rate of deuterium atoms within three months after implantation were observed. Also a very high spreading of deuterium atom distributions was observed in all the measured pure metals and alloys. It can be explained by the large diffusion coefficients of deuterium and extremely fast kinetics.

  17. Soluble and particulate Co-Cr-Mo alloy implant metals activate the inflammasome danger signaling pathway in human macrophages: a novel mechanism for implant debris reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Marco S; Desai, Ronak; McAllister, Kyron; Reddy, Anand; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim J

    2009-07-01

    Immune reactivity to soluble and particulate implant debris remains the primary cause of aseptic inflammation and implant loosening. However, the intracellular mechanisms that trigger immune cells to sense and respond to exogenous nonbiological agents such as metal particles or metal ions released from orthopedic implants remain unknown. Recent studies in immunology have outlined the importance of the intracellular inflammasome complex of proteins in sensing danger/stress signals triggered by nonbiological agents in the cytosol of macrophages. We hypothesized that metal implant debris can activate the inflammasome pathway in macrophages that causes caspase-1-induced cleavage of intracellular pro-IL-1beta into its mature form, resulting in IL-1beta secretion and induction of a broader proinflammatory response. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether soluble cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, and nickel ions and Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles induce inflammasome- mediated macrophage reactivity. Our results demonstrate that these agents stimulate IL-1beta secretion in human macrophages that is inflammasome mediated (i.e., NADPH-, caspase-1-, Nalp3-, and ASC-dependent). Thus, metal ion- and particle-induced activation of the inflammasome in human macrophages provides evidence of a novel pathway of implant debris-induced inflammation, where contact with implant debris is sensed and transduced by macrophages into a proinflammatory response.

  18. Development of silicon-germanium visible-near infrared arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, John W.; Rouse, Caitlin; Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Lewis, Jay S.; Dhar, Nibir K.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Puri, Yash R.; Sood, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    Photodetectors based on germanium which do not require cooling and can provide good near-infrared (NIR) detection performance offer a low-cost alternative to conventional infrared sensors based on material systems such as InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe. As a result of the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficients between germanium and silicon, tensile strain incorporated into Ge epitaxial layers deposited on Si utilizing specialized growth processes can extend the operational range of detection to 1600 nm and longer wavelengths. We have fabricated Ge based PIN photodetectors on 300 mm diameter Si wafers to take advantage of high throughput, large-area complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This device fabrication process involves low temperature epitaxial deposition of Ge to form a thin p+ (boron) Ge seed/buffer layer, and subsequent higher temperature deposition of a thicker Ge intrinsic layer. This is followed by selective ion implantation of phosphorus of various concentrations to form n+ Ge regions, deposition of a passivating oxide cap, and then top copper contacts to complete the PIN detector devices. Various techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have been employed to characterize the material and structural properties of the epitaxially grown layers and fabricated detector devices, and these results are presented. The I-V response of the photodetector devices with and without illumination was also measured, for which the Ge based photodetectors consistently exhibited low dark currents of around ~1 nA at -1 V bias.

  19. Potential release of in vivo trace metals from metallic medical implants in the human body: from ions to nanoparticles--a systematic analytical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk

    2014-06-01

    Metal ion release from metallic materials, e.g. metallic alloys and pure metals, implanted into the human body in dental and orthopedic surgery is becoming a major cause for concern. This review briefly provides an overview of both metallic alloys and pure metals used in implant materials in dental and orthopedic surgery. Additionally, a short section is dedicated to important biomaterials and their corrosive behavior in both real solutions and various types of media that model human biological fluids and tissues. The present review gives an overview of analytical methods, techniques and different approaches applied to the measurement of in vivo trace metals released into body fluids and tissues from patients carrying metal-on-metal prostheses and metal dental implants. Reference levels of ion concentrations in body fluids and tissues that have been determined by a host of studies are compiled, reviewed and presented in this paper. Finally, a collection of published clinical data on in vivo released trace metals from metallic medical implants is included. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal hypersensitivity reactions to implants: opinions and practices of patch testing dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Peter C; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous metal hypersensitivity reactions (MHR) are common but rare with implanted devices. This study aimed to characterize the opinions of dermatologists who are actively evaluating/advising patients with MHR. A questionnaire was distributed to all individuals who attended the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) 2012 and the American Contact Dermatitis Society 2013 meetings. A total of 119 individuals responded with a participation rates of 10% (ESCD) and 32% (American Contact Dermatitis Society). Ninety-six percent of the respondents evaluate MHR and 91% were attending physicians. Orthopedic and dental devices were common problems compared with cardiovascular devices. Patch testing is the top choice for evaluating MHR. Lymphocyte transformation and intradermal tests are rarely used. Eighty-two percent of the respondents evaluate plastic/glue components in symptomatic patients postimplant. Most dermatologists use a tray specifically for joint allergy or a history-based custom array of allergens. Those patients with a strong clinical history of metal allergy should be evaluated before metal implantation (54%), whereas others forgo evaluation and recommend a titanium implant based on history alone (38%). Diagnostic criteria for postimplant reactions were evaluated. Eight percent of the respondents felt that no evaluation was necessary, with ESCD respondents being significantly more likely to not recommend evaluation (P = 0.001). Metal hypersensitivity reactions consultation requests are common for preimplant and postimplant issues. Patch testing is currently the best test for MHR.

  1. Interaction of power pulses of laser radiation with glasses containing implanted metal nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Hole, D E; Bukharaev, A A

    2001-01-01

    The sodium-calcium silicate glasses, implanted by the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 7 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 by the ion current flux density of 10 mu A/cm sup 2 , are studied. The ion implantation makes it possible to synthesize in the near-the-surface glass area the composite layer, including the silver nanoparticles. The effect of the powerful pulse excimer laser on the obtained composite layer is investigated. It is established that the laser radiation leads to decrease in the silver nanoparticles size in the implanted layer. However nonuniform distribution of particles by size remains though not so wide as before the irradiation. The experimental results are explained by the effect of glass and metallic particles melting in the nanosecond period of time

  2. Time-dependent release of cobalt and chromium ions into the serum following implantation of the metal-on-metal Maverick type artificial lumbar disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeh, Alexander; Becker, Claudia; Planert, Michael; Lattke, Peter; Wohlrab, David

    2009-06-01

    In total hip endoprosthetics and consequently for TDA, metal-on-metal combinations are used with the aim of reducing wear debris. In metal-on-metal TDA the release of metal ions has until now been secondary to the main discussion. In order to investigate the ion release following the implantation of the metal-on-metal Maverick type artificial lumbar disc we measured the serum cobalt and chromium concentration following implantation of 15 Maverick TDAs (monosegmental L5/S1, n = 5; bisegmental L4/5 and L5/S1, n = 5; average age 36.5 years). Five healthy subjects (no metal implants) acted as a control group. The two measurements of the metals were carried out using the absorption spectrometry after an average of 14.8 and 36.7 months. In summary, the concentrations of cobalt and chromium ions in the serum at both follow-ups amounted on average to 3.3 microg/l (SD 2.6) for cobalt and 2.2 microg/l (SD 1.5) for chromium. These figures are similar to the figures shown in the literature following the implantation of metal-on-metal THA. After a comparison to the control group, both the chromium and cobalt levels in the serum showed visible increases regarding the first and the second follow-up. As there is still a significant release of cobalt and chromium into the serum after an average follow-up of 36.7 months a persistent release of these ions must be taken into consideration. Despite the evaluation of the systemic and local effects of the release of Cr/Co from orthopaedic implants has not yet been concluded, one should take into consideration an explanation given to patients scheduled for the implantation of a metal-on-metal TDA about these results and the benefits/risks of alternative combinations of gliding contact surfaces.

  3. Comparative study of some metallic biomaterials used as implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mobarak, N.A. [Chemistry Department, Girls' College of Education, Riyadh University for Girls, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-15

    The electrochemical behavior of two Ti alloys (TA and TAV) and two grades of stainless steels (SS{sub 1} and SS{sub 2}), commonly used as biomedical implant materials, particularly for orthopedic and osteosynthesis applications, was investigated in Hank's solution at 37 C and different pH. The aim was to distinguish between the behavior of these materials in artificial physiological solution through analysis of their corrosion potential variation with time and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Characterization of the modified surface layers was made by means of microscopic examinations, hardness measurements and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results indicated that in neutral Hank's solution (pH = 7.2) SS{sub 2} and SS{sub 1} samples were of higher corrosion resistance than titanium alloys. The behavior was reversed in the acidic media (pH=5.0 or 3.0), where TA had the least corrosion rate and the corrosion susceptibility increased in the order TA

  4. Preventing bacterial growth on implanted device with an interfacial metallic film and penetrating X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jincui; Sun, An; Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Peipei; Su, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Device-related infections have been a big problem for a long time. This paper describes a new method to inhibit bacterial growth on implanted device with tissue-penetrating X-ray radiation, where a thin metallic film deposited on the device is used as a radio-sensitizing film for bacterial inhibition. At a given dose of X-ray, the bacterial viability decreases as the thickness of metal film (bismuth) increases. The bacterial viability decreases with X-ray dose increases. At X-ray dose of 2.5 Gy, 98% of bacteria on 10 nm thick bismuth film are killed; while it is only 25% of bacteria are killed on the bare petri dish. The same dose of X-ray kills 8% fibroblast cells that are within a short distance from bismuth film (4 mm). These results suggest that penetrating X-rays can kill bacteria on bismuth thin film deposited on surface of implant device efficiently.

  5. The structural and optical properties of metal ion-implanted GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Veselý, M.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    The practical development of novel optoelectronic materials with appropriate optical properties is strongly connected to the structural properties of the prepared doped structures. We present GaN layers oriented along the (0 0 0 1) crystallographic direction that have been grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates implanted with 200 keV Co+, Fe+ and Ni+ ions. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers have been characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy to obtain a comprehensive insight into the structural modification of implanted GaN layers and to study the subsequent influence of annealing on crystalline-matrix recovery. Photoluminescence was measured to control the desired optical properties. The post-implantation annealing induced the structural recovery of the modified GaN layer depending on the introduced disorder level, e.g. depending on the ion implantation fluence, which was followed by structural characterisation and by the study of the surface morphology by AFM.

  6. Wear Resistance of Mo-Implanted H13 Steel by a Metal Vapour Vacuum Arc Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Tong-He

    2003-10-01

    Pulsed molybdenum ion beams extracted from a metal vapour vacuum arc ion source at voltage of 25 kV or 48 kV were implanted into H13 steel with a high implantation dose of 5×1017 ions·cm-2 and a time-averaged ion beam current density of about 300 µA·cm-2. We have investigated the steel implanted for wear resistance by an optical interference microscope and a pin-on-disc apparatus. The Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy demonstrated that rather low-energy ions could penetrate quite deep into the substrates. It was observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission-electron microscopy that carbide of molybdenum appeared in the doped region. The results showed that dramatically improved wear resistance of H13 steel after molybdenum ion implantation at 48 kV was attributed to the development of Mo2C precipitates in the doped zone and to the formation of the implantation affected zone below the doped zone.

  7. Wear Resistance of Mo-Implanted H13 Steel by a Metal Vapour Vacuum Arc Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建华; 张通和

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed molybdenum ion beams extracted from a metal vapour vacuum arc ion source at voltage of 25kV or 48kV were implanted into H13 steel with a high implantation dose of 5×1017 inons·cm-2 and a time-averaged ion beam current density of about 300μA·cm-2. We have investigated the steel implanted for wear resistance by an optical interference microscope and a pin-on-disc apparatus. The Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy demonstrated that rather low-energy ions could penetrate quite deep into the substrates. It was observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission-electron microscopy that carbide of molybdenum appeared in the doped region. The results showed that dramatically improved wear resistance of H13 steel after molybdenum ion implantation at 48 kV was attributed to the development of Mo2 C precipitates in the doped zone and to the formation of the implantation affected zone below the doped zone.

  8. Implanted cardiac devices are reliably detected by commercially available metal detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Katja Fiedler; Hjortshøj, Søren; Pehrson, Steen;

    2013-01-01

    Explosions of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) (pacemakers, defibrillators, and loop recorders) are a well-recognized problem during cremation, due to lithium-iodine batteries. In addition, burial of the deceased with a CIED can present a potential risk for environmental cont...... contamination. Therefore, detection of CIEDs in the deceased would be of value. This study evaluated a commercially available metal detector for detecting CIEDs....

  9. Multimodality Imaging of the Long-term Vascular Responses Following Implantation of Metallic and Bioresorbable Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Gkogkas, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The pattern of vascular responses following stent/scaffold implantation in conventional interventional practice has been assessed by coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography and manifests as in-stent vascular response (focal or diffuse) or as edge vascular response (EVR) at the transition zones (focal). The utilization of bioresorbable scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers or biocorrodible metals for coronary revacularizati...

  10. Metal-nanocluster composites made by ion implantation: A novel third-order nonlinear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Yang, L.; Magruder, R.H. III; Becker, K.; Wittig, J.E. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); White, C.W.; Zhur, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yang, L.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R.R. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01

    We describe our recent studies of metal-insulator nanocluster composites made by ion implantation in such substrates as glass and sapphire. The metal clusters have diameters ranging from 3 to 30 nm. The composites exhibit an electronic nonlinear optical response which is fast on the picosecond time scale. In addition to possibilities for technological application, these materials also offer a way of studying unusual properties of composite materials, such as the quantum confinement of conduction-band electrons and the transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} as a function of cluster size.

  11. Metal-nanocluster composites made by ion implantation: A novel third-order nonlinear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Yang, L.; Magruder, R.H. III; Becker, K.; Wittig, J.E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); White, C.W.; Zhur, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yang, L.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R.R. (City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We describe our recent studies of metal-insulator nanocluster composites made by ion implantation in such substrates as glass and sapphire. The metal clusters have diameters ranging from 3 to 30 nm. The composites exhibit an electronic nonlinear optical response which is fast on the picosecond time scale. In addition to possibilities for technological application, these materials also offer a way of studying unusual properties of composite materials, such as the quantum confinement of conduction-band electrons and the transverse relaxation time T[sub 2] as a function of cluster size.

  12. Repair of olecranon fractures using fiberWire without metallic implants: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okawa Atsushi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Olecranon fractures are a common injury in fractures. The tension band technique for olecranon fractures yields good clinical outcomes; however, it is associated with significant complications. In many patients, implants irritate overlying soft tissues and cause pain. This is mostly due to protrusion of the proximal ends of the K-wires or by the twisted knots of the metal wire tension band. Below we described 2 cases of olecranon fractures treated with a unique technique using FiberWire without any metallic implants. Technically, the fragment was reduced, and two K-wires were inserted from the dorsal cortex of the distal segment to the tip of the olecranon. K-wire was exchanged for a suture retriever, and 2 strands of FiberWire were retrieved twice. Each of the two FiberWires was manually tensioned and knotted on the posterior surface of the olecranon. Bony unions could be achieved, and patients had no complaint of pain and skin irritation. There was only a small loss of flexion and extension in comparison with that of the contralateral side, and the patient did not feel inconvenienced in his daily life. Using the method described, difficulty due to K-wire or other metallic implants was avoided.

  13. Repair of olecranon fractures using fiberWire without metallic implants: report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Olecranon fractures are a common injury in fractures. The tension band technique for olecranon fractures yields good clinical outcomes; however, it is associated with significant complications. In many patients, implants irritate overlying soft tissues and cause pain. This is mostly due to protrusion of the proximal ends of the K-wires or by the twisted knots of the metal wire tension band. Below we described 2 cases of olecranon fractures treated with a unique technique using FiberWire without any metallic implants. Technically, the fragment was reduced, and two K-wires were inserted from the dorsal cortex of the distal segment to the tip of the olecranon. K-wire was exchanged for a suture retriever, and 2 strands of FiberWire were retrieved twice. Each of the two FiberWires was manually tensioned and knotted on the posterior surface of the olecranon. Bony unions could be achieved, and patients had no complaint of pain and skin irritation. There was only a small loss of flexion and extension in comparison with that of the contralateral side, and the patient did not feel inconvenienced in his daily life. Using the method described, difficulty due to K-wire or other metallic implants was avoided. PMID:20937160

  14. Antibacterial properties of metal and metalloid ions in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal diseases like periodontitis and peri-implantitis have been linked with Gram-negative anaerobes. The incorporation of various chemotherapeutic agents, including metal ions, into several materials and devices has been extensively studied against periodontal bacteria, and materials doped with metal ions have been proposed for the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions already used in the treatment of periodontal diseases, as well as the potential use of alternative materials that are currently available for other applications but have been proved to be cytotoxic to the specific periodontal pathogens. The sources of this review included English articles using Google Scholar™, ScienceDirect, Scopus and PubMed. Search terms included the combinations of the descriptors "disease", "ionic species" and "bacterium". Articles that discuss the biocidal properties of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions against the specific periodontal bacteria were included. The articles were independently extracted by two authors using predefined data fields. The evaluation of resources was based on the quality of the content and the relevance to the topic, which was evaluated by the ionic species and the bacteria used in the study, while the final application was not considered as relevant. The present review summarizes the extensive previous and current research efforts concerning the use of metal ions in periodontal diseases therapy, while it points out the challenges and opportunities lying ahead.

  15. Spin transport in p-type germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rortais, F; Oyarzún, S; Bottegoni, F; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Laczkowski, P; Ferrari, A; Vergnaud, C; Ducruet, C; Beigné, C; Reyren, N; Marty, A; Attané, J-P; Vila, L; Gambarelli, S; Widiez, J; Ciccacci, F; Jaffrès, H; George, J-M; Jamet, M

    2016-04-27

    We report on the spin transport properties in p-doped germanium (Ge-p) using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, electrical spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal and the spin pumping-inverse spin Hall effect method. Electrical spin injection is carried out using three-terminal measurements and the Hanle effect. In the 2-20 K temperature range, weak antilocalization and the Hanle effect provide the same spin lifetime in the germanium valence band (≈1 ps) in agreement with predicted values and previous optical measurements. These results, combined with dynamical spin injection by spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect, demonstrate successful spin accumulation in Ge. We also estimate the spin Hall angle θ(SHE) in Ge-p (6-7 x 10(-4) at room temperature, pointing out the essential role of ionized impurities in spin dependent scattering.

  16. Promoting cell proliferation using water dispersible germanium nanowires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bezuidenhout

    Full Text Available Group IV Nanowires have strong potential for several biomedical applications. However, to date their use remains limited because many are synthesised using heavy metal seeds and functionalised using organic ligands to make the materials water dispersible. This can result in unpredicted toxic side effects for mammalian cells cultured on the wires. Here, we describe an approach to make seedless and ligand free Germanium nanowires water dispersible using glutamic acid, a natural occurring amino acid that alleviates the environmental and health hazards associated with traditional functionalisation materials. We analysed the treated material extensively using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, High resolution-TEM, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Using a series of state of the art biochemical and morphological assays, together with a series of complimentary and synergistic cellular and molecular approaches, we show that the water dispersible germanium nanowires are non-toxic and are biocompatible. We monitored the behaviour of the cells growing on the treated germanium nanowires using a real time impedance based platform (xCELLigence which revealed that the treated germanium nanowires promote cell adhesion and cell proliferation which we believe is as a result of the presence of an etched surface giving rise to a collagen like structure and an oxide layer. Furthermore this study is the first to evaluate the associated effect of Germanium nanowires on mammalian cells. Our studies highlight the potential use of water dispersible Germanium Nanowires in biological platforms that encourage anchorage-dependent cell growth.

  17. Histological Evidence of the Osseointegration of Fractured Direct Metal Laser Sintering Implants Retrieved after 5 Years of Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mangano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is an additive manufacturing technique that allows the fabrication of dental implants layer by layer through the laser fusion of titanium microparticles. The surface of DMLS implants is characterized by a high open porosity with interconnected pores of different sizes; therefore, it has the potential to enhance and accelerate bone healing. To date, however, there are no histologic/histomorphometric studies in the literature evaluating the interface between bone and DMLS implants in the long-term. Purpose. To evaluate the interface between bone and DMLS implants retrieved after 5 years of functional loading. Methods. Two fractured DMLS implants were retrieved from the human jaws, using a 5 mm trephine bur. Both the implants were clinically stable and functioned regularly before fracture. The specimens were processed for histologic/histomorphometric evaluation; the bone-to-implant contact (BIC% was calculated. Results. Compact, mature lamellar bone was found over most of the DMLS implants in close contact with the implant surface; the histomorphometric evaluation showed a mean BIC% of 66.1% (±4.5%. Conclusions. The present histologic/histomorphometric study showed that DMLS implants were well integrated in bone, after 5 years of loading, with the peri-implant bone undergoing continuous remodeling at the interface.

  18. Histological Evidence of the Osseointegration of Fractured Direct Metal Laser Sintering Implants Retrieved after 5 Years of Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco; Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing technique that allows the fabrication of dental implants layer by layer through the laser fusion of titanium microparticles. The surface of DMLS implants is characterized by a high open porosity with interconnected pores of different sizes; therefore, it has the potential to enhance and accelerate bone healing. To date, however, there are no histologic/histomorphometric studies in the literature evaluating the interface between bone and DMLS implants in the long-term. To evaluate the interface between bone and DMLS implants retrieved after 5 years of functional loading. Two fractured DMLS implants were retrieved from the human jaws, using a 5 mm trephine bur. Both the implants were clinically stable and functioned regularly before fracture. The specimens were processed for histologic/histomorphometric evaluation; the bone-to-implant contact (BIC%) was calculated. Compact, mature lamellar bone was found over most of the DMLS implants in close contact with the implant surface; the histomorphometric evaluation showed a mean BIC% of 66.1% (±4.5%). The present histologic/histomorphometric study showed that DMLS implants were well integrated in bone, after 5 years of loading, with the peri-implant bone undergoing continuous remodeling at the interface.

  19. High Precision Metal Thin Film Liftoff Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A metal film liftoff process includes applying a polymer layer onto a silicon substrate, applying a germanium layer over the polymer layer to create a bilayer lift off mask, applying a patterned photoresist layer over the germanium layer, removing an exposed portion of the germanium layer, removing the photoresist layer and a portion of the polymer layer to expose a portion of the substrate and create an overhanging structure of the germanium layer, depositing a metal film over the exposed portion of the substrate and the germanium layer, and removing the polymer and germanium layers along with the overlaying metal film.

  20. Analysis of Accumulating Ability of Heavy Metals in Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Improved by Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建华; 王乃彦; 张丰收

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals have seriously contaminated soil and water, and done harm to public health. Academician WANG Naiyan proposed that ion-implantation technique should be exploited for environmental bioremediation by mutating and breeding plants or microbes. By implanting N^+ into Taikonglian No.l, we have selected and bred two lotus cultivars, Jingguang No.1 and Jingguang No.2. The present study aims at analyzing the feasibility that irradiation can be used for remediation of soil and water from heavy metals. Compared with parent Taikonglian No.l, the uptaking and accumulating ability of heavy metals in two mutated cultivars was obviously improved. So ion implantation technique can indeed be used in bioremediation of heavy metals in soil and water, but it is hard to select and breed a cultivar which can remedy the soil and water from all the heavy metals.

  1. Using the "final-on-four" concept to deliver an immediate metal-resin implant-fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Ozcelik, Tuncer Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    In traditional dental implant therapy, the time between implant placement and delivery of the definitive prosthesis can be long and uncomfortable for a patient wearing a conventional removable denture on an atrophied ridge. New clinical protocols, often with tilted implants, are being used to immediately restore mandibular implants with interim restorations, thus shortening the patient's return to function. However, these conversion type interim restorations do not decrease the time to definitive prosthetic rehabilitation. The Ohio State University (OSU) developed an immediate load surgical and prosthetic protocol to compensate for the disadvantages of previous techniques. With this protocol, a custom, definitive, screw-retained metal-resin fixed prosthesis can be delivered 2 to 4 days postoperatively and has been described using 5 implants. This clinical report presents the OSU immediate loading protocol, combined with a tilted implant technique, for the fabrication of a mandibular metal-resin implant fixed complete dental prosthesis (MRIFCDP) in 3 days postoperatively and with only 4 implants. Replacing the mandibular dentition with an immediate load-fixed metal-resin prosthesis by means of the "final-on-four" technique resulted in a custom, definitive, and functional restorative solution immediately after surgery.

  2. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knöös, Tommy

    2003-10-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox® (a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants.

  3. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  4. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell R.; O' Brien, Kendall E. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hansen, Michael S. [National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P < 0.05). Quality ratings favored the optimized GRE cine. Similarly, the average metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P < 0.05), and quality ratings favored the optimized TSE imaging. Imaging sequences tailored to minimize metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static

  5. An environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process to recover germanium from coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming, E-mail: zmxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • An environmental friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process is proposed. • Rare and valuable metal germanium from coal fly ash is recycled. • Residues are not a hazardous material and can be further recycled. • A germanium recovery ratio of 94.64% is obtained in pilot scale experiments. - Abstract: The demand for germanium in the field of semiconductor, electronics, and optical devices is growing rapidly; however, the resources of germanium are scarce worldwide. As a secondary material, coal fly ash could be further recycled to retrieve germanium. Up to now, the conventional processes to recover germanium have two problems as follows: on the one hand, it is difficult to be satisfactory for its economic and environmental effect; on the other hand, the recovery ratio of germanium is not all that could be desired. In this paper, an environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process (VRMP) was proposed to recover germanium from coal fly ash. The results of the laboratory scale experiments indicated that the appropriate parameters were 1173 K and 10 Pa with 10 wt% coke addition for 40 min, and recovery ratio germanium was 93.96%. On the basis of above condition, the pilot scale experiments were utilized to assess the actual effect of VRMP for recovery of germanium with parameter of 1473 K, 1–10 Pa and heating time 40 min, the recovery ratio of germanium reached 94.64%. This process considerably enhances germanium recovery, meanwhile, eliminates much of the water usage and residue secondary pollution compared with other conventional processes.

  6. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants.

  7. Neoplastic transformation of cells by soluble but not particulate forms of metals used in orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, A; Law, F C; Allen, M J; Rushton, N

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in cell culture techniques have made it possible to study the cellular mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and to apply these methods as screening tools in vitro. This study investigated and compared the ability of the metals most commonly used in orthopedic implants to induce toxicity and neoplastic transformation in the C3H10T1/2 mouse fibroblast cell line. Eight metals (cobalt, chromium, nickel, iron, molybdenum, aluminium, vanadium and titanium) and their alloys (stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloy and titanium alloy) were tested, both as soluble salts and as solid particles. There were marked differences between the various metals in terms of both toxicity and transforming ability. Significant increases in the incidence of cell transformation were seen with soluble forms of cobalt, chromium, nickel and molybdenum but not with iron, aluminium, vanadium or titanium. For most of the metals. transforming ability was directly related to toxicity, although this correlation did not hold for either molybdenum or vanadium. The physical form of the metal was critically important in determining its effects, and transformation occurred only with soluble metal salts.

  8. [Influence of implants on human body during MRI examinations: fundamental experiment using metal balls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Osamu; Usui, Shuji; Ueda, Yoshitake; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2005-07-20

    It is increasingly the case that patients who have implants feel pain during high-field MRI examinations. A probable reason for the pain is the generation by irradiation of RF pulses and changing of the magnetic field gradient. As a fundamental study on the effect of implants on the human body under MRI procedures, temperature measurements were obtained from metal balls incorporated into gel-filled phantoms by using two kinds of measuring instruments, a copper-constantan thermocouple and a fluorescence fiber thermometer. At first we pursued a correlation between a copper-constantan thermocouple (absolute measurement) and fluoroptic thermometer and confirmed the precision and stability of the fluoroptic thermometer under MRI procedures. When a stainless steel ball with or without a loop antenna was used, only in the former case did the temperature rise during RF pulse irradiation. There was no significant difference between the magnetic field gradient ON and OFF. Furthermore, differences in metal (steel, aluminum, brass, stainless steel, copper) and size (5, 10, 20 mmPhi) were affected according to the increase of temperature. In conclusion, both RF pulse irradiation and a loop antenna are necessary for heat generation on the surface of metals.

  9. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao; Muntele, Claudiu I; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10(15)ions/cm(2) to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. An Improved Metal-Packaged Strain Sensor Based on A Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating in Hydrogen-Loaded Boron–Germanium Co-Doped Photosensitive Fiber for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Local strain measurements are considered as an effective method for structural health monitoring of high-temperature components, which require accurate, reliable and durable sensors. To develop strain sensors that can be used in higher temperature environments, an improved metal-packaged strain sensor based on a regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG fabricated in hydrogen (H2-loaded boron–germanium (B–Ge co-doped photosensitive fiber is developed using the process of combining magnetron sputtering and electroplating, addressing the limitation of mechanical strength degradation of silica optical fibers after annealing at a high temperature for regeneration. The regeneration characteristics of the RFBGs and the strain characteristics of the sensor are evaluated. Numerical simulation of the sensor is conducted using a three-dimensional finite element model. Anomalous decay behavior of two regeneration regimes is observed for the FBGs written in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber. The strain sensor exhibits good linearity, stability and repeatability when exposed to constant high temperatures of up to 540 °C. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results in strain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that the improved metal-packaged strain sensors based on RFBGs in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber provide great potential for high-temperature applications by addressing the issues of mechanical integrity and packaging.

  11. An Improved Metal-Packaged Strain Sensor Based on A Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating in Hydrogen-Loaded Boron–Germanium Co-Doped Photosensitive Fiber for High-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yun; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Shao-Ping; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-01-01

    Local strain measurements are considered as an effective method for structural health monitoring of high-temperature components, which require accurate, reliable and durable sensors. To develop strain sensors that can be used in higher temperature environments, an improved metal-packaged strain sensor based on a regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) fabricated in hydrogen (H2)-loaded boron–germanium (B–Ge) co-doped photosensitive fiber is developed using the process of combining magnetron sputtering and electroplating, addressing the limitation of mechanical strength degradation of silica optical fibers after annealing at a high temperature for regeneration. The regeneration characteristics of the RFBGs and the strain characteristics of the sensor are evaluated. Numerical simulation of the sensor is conducted using a three-dimensional finite element model. Anomalous decay behavior of two regeneration regimes is observed for the FBGs written in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber. The strain sensor exhibits good linearity, stability and repeatability when exposed to constant high temperatures of up to 540 °C. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results in strain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that the improved metal-packaged strain sensors based on RFBGs in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber provide great potential for high-temperature applications by addressing the issues of mechanical integrity and packaging. PMID:28241465

  12. Bare metal or drug-eluting stent implantation in last remaining vessel PCI? A serious dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jianhua; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of an old male diabetic patient with last remaining vessel coronary artery disease and poor left ventricular function. In presence of an old occlusion of the left main coronary artery, a subtotal stenosis of a dominant right coronary artery required angioplasty. After ample consideration it was decided to implant a bare metal stent (BMS) instead of a drug-eluting stent (DES). The major reason was the fear for early discontinuation of clopidogrel in case a drug-eluting stent was placed. The procedure and follow-up are described followed by an overview of current literature concerning similar pathology.

  13. Osseointegration of metallic devices: current trends based on implant hardware design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Paulo G; Jimbo, Ryo

    2014-11-01

    Osseointegration of metallic devices has been one of the most successful treatments in rehabilitative dentistry and medicine over the past five decades. While highly successful, the quest for designing surgical instrumentation and associated implantable devices that hastens osseointegration has been perpetual and has often been approached as single variable preclinical investigations. The present manuscript presents how the interplay between surgical instrumentation and device macrogeometry not only plays a key role on both early and delayed stages of osseointegration, but may also be key in how efficient smaller length scale designing (at the micrometer and nanometer scale levels) may be in hastening early stages of osseointegration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stern, Steven E. [Bond University, Bond Business School, Gold Coast, QLD (Australia); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-07-15

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  15. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Coinage Metal Complexes of the Germanium-Rich Metalloid Clusters [Ge9R3]− and [Ge9RI2]2− with R = Si(iPr3 and RI = Si(TMS3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix S. Geitner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis of novel coinage metal NHC (N-heterocyclic carbene compounds of the germanium-rich metalloid clusters [Ge9R3]− and [Ge9RI2]2− with R = Si(iPr3 and RI = Si(TMS3. NHCDippCu{η3Ge9R3} with R = Si(iPr3 (1 represents a less bulky silyl group-substituted derivative of the known analogous compounds with R = Si(iBu3 or Si(TMS3. The coordination of the [NHCDippCu]+ moiety to the cluster unit occurs via one triangular face of the tri-capped trigonal prismatic [Ge9] cluster. Furthermore, a series of novel Zintl cluster coinage metal NHC compounds of the type (NHCM2{η3Ge9RI2} (RI = Si(TMS3 M = Cu, Ag and Au; NHC = NHCDipp or NHCMes is presented. These novel compounds represent a new class of neutral dinuclear Zintl cluster coinage metal NHC compounds, which are obtained either by the stepwise reaction of a suspension of K12Ge17 with Si(TMS3Cl and the coinage metal carbene complexes NHCMCl (M = Cu, Ag, Au, or via a homogenous reaction using the preformed bis-silylated cluster K2[Ge9(Si(TMS32] and the corresponding NHCMCl (M = Cu, Ag, Au complex. The molecular structures of NHCDippCu{η3Ge9(Si(iPr33} (1 and (NHCDippCu2{η3-Ge9(Si(TMS32} (2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. In 2, the coordination of the [NHCDippCu]+ moieties to the cluster unit takes place via both open triangular faces of the [Ge9] entity. Furthermore, all compounds were characterized by means of NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, 29Si and ESI-MS.

  16. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Emily K.

    Due to their strength, elasticity, and durability, a variety of metal alloys are commonly used in medical implants. Traditionally, corrosion-resistant metals have been preferred. These permanent materials can cause negative systemic and local tissue effects in the long-term. Permanent stenting can lead to late-stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Metallic pins and screws for fracture fixation can corrode and fail, cause loss of bone mass, and contribute to inflammation and pain at the implant site, requiring reintervention. Corrodible metallic implants have the potential to prevent many of these complications by providing transient support to the affected tissue, dissolving at a rate congruent with the healing of the tissue. Alloys of iron and manganese (FeMn) exhibit similar fatigue strength, toughness, and elasticity compared with 316L stainless steel, making them very attractive candidates for bioresorbable stents and temporary fracture fixation devices. Much attention in recent years has been given to creating alloys with ideal mechanical properties for various applications. Little work has been done on determining the blood compatibility of these materials or on examining how their surfaces can be improved to improve cell adhesion, however. We examined thethrombogenic response of blood exposed to various resorbable ferrous stent materials through contact with porcine blood. The resorbable materials induced comparable or lower levels of several coagulation factors compared with 316L stainless steel. Little platelet adhesion was observed on any of the tested materials. Endothelialization is an important process after the implantation of a vascular stent, as it prevents damage to the vessel wall that can accelerate neointimal hyperplasia. Micromotion can lead to the formation of fibrous tissue surrounding an orthopedic implant, loosening, and ultimately failure of the implant. Nanoscale features were created on the surfaces of noble metal coatings, silicon

  17. Alternative procedure for making a metal suprastructure in a milled bar implant-supported overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, C; Graser, G N; Tallents, R H; Hagan, M E

    1998-08-01

    The predictability of implant-supported prostheses has been established. Although the original Brånemark design has been successfully used in the mandible, esthetic, speech, and hygiene-related problems have been reported in maxillary fixed prostheses. Implant-overdentures can overcome some of the problems encountered in maxillary fixed prostheses. Milled-bar implant-supported overdentures fabricated by electric discharge machining are characterized by stability similar to a fixed prostheses and are removable for hygiene procedures. However, the procedure is costly and requires highly trained technicians. An alternative procedure to produce an accurately fitting metal suprastructure is presented. This procedure does not require additional technical skills and uses instruments and materials that are readily available and relatively inexpensive. The use of simple and easy to replace attachments allows repairs to be performed in the dental office, thus reducing maintenance cost. The overall result is a prosthesis that incorporates the features of a spark erosion overdenture at a fraction of the cost and that is available to a broader patient population.

  18. Fabrication of highly transparent Al-ion-implanted ZnO thin films by metal vapor vacuum arc method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han; Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Kao, Chi-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we utilized the metal vapor vacuum arc technique to implant vaporized aluminum (Al) ions in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. By adjusting the ion implantation dose and operational parameters, the conductivity and optical properties of the ZnO thin film can be controlled. The electrical sheet resistance of Al-ion-implanted ZnO decreased from 3.02 × 107 to 3.03 × 104 Ω/sq, while the transparency of the film was mostly preserved (91.5% at a wavelength of 550 nm). The ZnO thin-film Young’s modulus significantly increased with increasing Al ion dose.

  19. Mandibular remodeling measured on cephalograms. 1. Osseous changes relative to superimposition on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Ben-Bassat, Y; Korn, E L; Bravo, L A; Curry, S

    1992-08-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying remodeling of mandibular surfaces in a sample of growing children who represent those usually treated by orthodontists in the mixed and early adult dentition. The sample, 31 patients with metallic implants of the Björk-type, was monitored at annual intervals between 8 1/2 and 15 1/2 years of age. (Maxillary remodeling changes for the sample have been reported earlier.) The present article reports findings concerning changes at condyle, gonion, menton, pogonion, and point B as identified on lateral cephalograms. Data are reported in the Frankfort plane frame of reference with the cephalograms from different time points superimposed on the metallic implants. Mean displacement at condyle was larger than that at any other landmark and was similar in magnitude and direction to the observations of Björk when the difference in orientation of the vertical axis in the two studies is taken into account. The mean displacement of gonion was in an upward and backward direction at an angle of approximately 45 degrees to the Frankfort plane. Mean displacements at menton and pogonion were in a downward and backward direction but were very small. Mean displacement at point B was somewhat greater than that of menton and gonion, oriented in an upward and backward direction. Individual variation for most of the parameters measured was sufficiently large to warrant the inference that caution should be used when mean values are applied to the analysis of individual cases.

  20. Hearing loss and potential hazards of metallic middle-ear implants in NMR-magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huettenbrink, K.B.

    1987-08-01

    Concurrent with the expanding clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, patients with metallic middle-ear implants will certainly be exposed to this strong magnetic field in the future. To determine potential hazards, associated with movements of steel- or Platinium stapes-prostheses, several tests were performed in a 0.5 tesla NMR unit and the induced forces were calculated. Although the commonly used paramagnetic steel-wire or platinium-alloys will not dislodge in vivo, ferromagnetic prostheses may present a hazardous risk. Prior to exposure to the magnetic field, information about the implanted material should therefore be obtained. A side-effect of the induced current flow is the attenuation of the sound-vibrations of the stapes prosthesis. This, 5-10 dB impairment of transmission develops only at a certain position of the patient's head, when the prosthesis vibrates perpendicularly to the magnetic field's Z-axis. Patients with a metallic prosthesis should be informed about this purely physical, harmless phenomenon prior to entering the NMR-cylinder.

  1. Ultrafast optical phase modulation with metallic nanoparticles in ion-implanted bilayer silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Torres, C [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Z, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, DF, 07738 (Mexico); Tamayo-Rivera, L; Silva-Pereyra, H G; Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Crespo-Sosa, A; Cheang-Wong, J C; Oliver, A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rangel-Rojo, R [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada Apartado Postal 360, Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Torres-Martinez, R, E-mail: crstorres@yahoo.com.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada Unidad Queretaro, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro, 76090 (Mexico)

    2011-09-02

    The nonlinear optical response of metallic-nanoparticle-containing composites was studied with picosecond and femtosecond pulses. Two different types of nanocomposites were prepared by an ion-implantation process, one containing Au nanoparticles (NPs) and the other Ag NPs. In order to measure the optical nonlinearities, we used a picosecond self-diffraction experiment and the femtosecond time-resolved optical Kerr gate technique. In both cases, electronic polarization and saturated absorption were identified as the physical mechanisms responsible for the picosecond third-order nonlinear response for a near-resonant 532 nm excitation. In contrast, a purely electronic nonlinearity was detected at 830 nm with non-resonant 80 fs pulses. Regarding the nonlinear optical refractive behavior, the Au nanocomposite presented a self-defocusing effect, while the Ag one presented the opposite, that is, a self-focusing response. But, when evaluating the simultaneous contributions when the samples are tested as a multilayer sample (silica-Au NPs-silica-Ag NPs-silica), we were able to obtain optical phase modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, as a result of a significant optical Kerr effect present in these nanocomposites. This allowed us to implement an ultrafast all-optical phase modulator device by using a combination of two different metallic ion-implanted silica samples. This control of the optical phase is a consequence of the separate excitation of the nonlinear refracting phenomena exhibited by the separate Au and Ag nanocomposites.

  2. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Robert E., E-mail: robert.neal@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre (Australia); Kavnoudias, Helen, E-mail: H.Kavnoudias@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia); Rosenfeldt, Franklin, E-mail: F.Rosenfeldt@alfred.org.au; Ou, Ruchong, E-mail: Ruchong.Ou@bakeridi.edu.au [Monash University, Department of Surgery (Australia); Mclean, Catriona A., E-mail: C.Mclean@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Department of Anatomical Pathology (Australia); Davalos, Rafael V., E-mail: davalos@vt.edu [Virginia Tech, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences (United States); Thomson, Kenneth R., E-mail: K.Thomson@alfred.org.au [The Alfred Hospital, Radiology Research Unit, Department of Radiology (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  3. Comparison and Combination of Dual-Energy- and Iterative-Based Metal Artefact Reduction on Hip Prosthesis and Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Malte N; Schabel, Christoph; Thomas, Christoph; Raupach, Rainer; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    To compare and combine dual-energy based and iterative metal artefact reduction on hip prosthesis and dental implants in CT. A total of 46 patients (women:50%,mean age:63±15years) with dental implants or hip prostheses (n = 30/20) were included and examined with a second-generation Dual Source Scanner. 120kV equivalent mixed-images were derived from reconstructions of the 100/Sn140kV source images using no metal artefact reduction (NOMAR) and iterative metal artefact reduction (IMAR). We then generated monoenergetic extrapolations at 130keV from source images without IMAR (DEMAR) or from source images with IMAR, (IMAR+DEMAR). The degree of metal artefact was quantified for NOMAR, IMAR, DEMAR and IMAR+DEMAR using a Fourier-based method and subjectively rated on a five point Likert scale by two independent readers. In subjects with hip prosthesis, DEMAR and IMAR resulted in significantly reduced artefacts compared to standard reconstructions (33% vs. 56%; for DEMAR and IMAR; respectively, pdental implants only IMAR showed a significant reduction of artefacts whereas DEMAR did not (71%, vs. 8% pprosthesis: 47%, dental implants 18%; both pdental implants, compared to a dual energy based method. The combination of DE-source images with IMAR and subsequent monoenergetic extrapolation provides an incremental benefit compared to both single methods.

  4. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  5. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  6. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [German] Metallische Implantate verursachen streifenfoermige Artefakte in CT-Bildern, welche die Dosisberechnung beeinflussen. In dieser Studie soll der Nutzen des iterativen Metall-Artefakt-Reduktions-Algorithmus iMAR hinsichtlich der Wiedergabetreue von Hounsfield-Werten (HU) und der Genauigkeit von Dosisberechnungen untersucht werden. Es wurden heterogene Phantome aus verschiedenen Arten gewebeaequivalenten Materials mit

  7. Metal ion trend may be more predictive for malfunctioning metal-on-metal implants than a single measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, J.M.; Hol, A.; Susante, J.L.C. van

    2013-01-01

    Forty-eight unilateral hip resurfacing arthroplasty patients were evaluated for cobalt and chromium levels. The metal ion trend of 42 well-functioning patients was compared with six sub-optimal functioning patients. Median metal ion levels were significantly higher for the sub-optimal group. For the

  8. N-Acetyl-Cysteine as Effective and Safe Chelating Agent in Metal-on-Metal Hip-Implanted Patients: Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giampreti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic toxicity associated with cobalt (Co and chromium (Cr containing metal hip alloy may result in neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, and hypothyroidism. However clinical management concerning chelating therapy is still debated in literature. Here are described two metal-on-metal hip-implanted patients in which N-acetyl-cysteine decreased elevated blood metal levels. A 67-year-old male who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in September 2009 referred to our Poison Control Centre for persisting elevated Co/Cr blood levels (from March 2012 to November 2014. After receiving oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine, Co/Cr blood concentrations dropped by 86% and 87% of the prechelation levels, respectively, and persisted at these latter concentrations during the following 6 months of follow-up. An 81-year-old female who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in January 2007 referred to our Centre for detection of high Co and Cr blood levels in June 2012. No hip revision was indicated. After a therapy with oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine Co/Cr blood concentrations decreased of 45% and 24% of the prechelation levels. Chelating agents reported in hip-implanted patients (EDTA, DMPS, and BAL are described in few cases. N-acetyl-cysteine may provide chelating sites for metals and in our cases reduced Co and Cr blood levels and resulted well tolerable.

  9. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Oncology Department, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Co circumflex te du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. The Ability of Dental Specialists to Distinguish Lateral Incisor Metal-Free From Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Implant Supported Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Eduardo V; Kauling, Ana Elisa C; Freitas, Sérgio Fernando T; Cardoso, Antônio C; Ferreira, Cimara Fortes

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of dental specialists to distinguish lateral incisor metal-free from porcelain-fused-to-metal implant supported crowns in the anterior region. Five single-tooth implants in the maxillary lateral incisor region were restored with two types of implant-supported crowns (porcelain-fused-to-metal and metal-free). Photographs were presented to 20 evaluators. The evaluators had to answer whether the crown was: metal-free, porcelain-fused-to-metal or they could not tell the difference. The results showed that groups 1 (all participants), 3 (Restorative & Prosthodontic specialists), 4 (graduated 10 years) and 5 (graduated > 10 years) failed to respond correctly (P > 0.05) to which type of crown was presented to them. Group 2 (Periodontology & Implantology specialists) showed an accuracy rate of 35.6% (P = 0.009), in relation to metal-free crowns, 5.6 which is below the random index. The authors concluded that the evaluators from the 5 groups studied were unable to significantly distinguish which type of crown was used in the 10 presented situations.

  11. Characterization of the bone-metal implant interface by Digital Volume Correlation of in-situ loading using neutron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Tudisco, Erika; Perdikouri, Christina; Belfrage, Ola; Kaestner, Anders; Hall, Stephen; Tägil, Magnus; Isaksson, Hanna

    2017-07-01

    Metallic implants are commonly used as surgical treatments for many orthopedic conditions. The long-term stability of implants relies on an adequate integration with the surrounding bone. Unsuccessful integration could lead to implant loosening. By combining mechanical loading with high-resolution 3D imaging methods, followed by image analysis such as Digital Volume Correlation (DVC), we aim at evaluating ex vivo the mechanical resistance of newly formed bone at the interface. X-rays tomography is commonly used to image bone but induces artefacts close to metallic components. Utilizing a different interaction with matter, neutron tomography is a promising alternative but has not yet been used in studies of bone mechanics. This work demonstrates that neutron tomography during in situ loading is a feasible tool to characterize the mechanical response of bone-implant interfaces, especially when combined with DVC. Experiments were performed where metal screws were implanted in rat tibiae during 4 weeks. The screws were pulled-out while the samples were sequentially imaged in situ with neutron tomography. The images were analyzed to quantify bone ingrowth around the implants. DVC was used to track the internal displacements and calculate the strain fields in the bone during loading. The neutron images were free of metal-related artefacts, which enabled accurate quantification of bone ingrowth on the screw (ranging from 60% to 71%). DVC allowed successful identification of the deformation and cracks that occurred during mechanical loading and led to final failure of the bone-implant interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of the clearance on in-vitro tribology of large diameter metal-on-metal articulations pertaining to resurfacing hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Claude B; Schön, Rolf; Konrad, Reto; Liebentritt, Gernot; Gnepf, Patric; Shen, Ming; Roberts, Paul; Grigoris, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Large-diameter metal-on-metal articulations may provide an opportunity for wear reduction in total hip implants because earlier studies have shown that the formation of a fluid film that completely separates the bearing surfaces is theoretically possible. In such a lubrication mode and under ideal conditions, there is theoretically no amount of wear. Studies have suggested that the two primary parameters controlling the lubrication mode are the diameter and the clearance of the articulation. The goal of the present study was to experimentally investigate the influence of these two parameters on the wear behavior of large-diameter metal-on-metal articulations pertaining to resurfacing hip implants. The results of this in vitro investigation showed that longer running-in periods and higher amounts of running-in wear were associated with larger clearances.

  13. The effect of microstructure on the wear of cobalt-based alloys used in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, R; Bobyn, J D; Medley, J B; Yue, S

    2006-02-01

    The influence of microstructure on the wear of cobalt-based alloys used in metal-on-metal hip implants was investigated in a boundary lubrication regime designed to represent the conditions that occurred some of the time in vivo. These cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys were either wrought, with a total carbon content of 0.05 or 0.23 wt %, cast with a solution-annealing procedure or simply as-cast but not solution annealed. Bars of these different alloy grades were subjected to various heat treatments to develop different microstructures. The wear was evaluated in a linear-tracking reciprocating pin-on-plate apparatus with a 25 per cent bovine serum lubricant. The wear was found to be strongly affected by the dissolved carbon content of the alloys and mostly independent of grain size or the carbide characteristics. The increased carbon in solid solution caused reductions in volumetric wear because carbon helped to stabilize a face-centred cubic crystal structure, thus limiting the amount of strain-induced transformation to a hexagonal close-packed crystal structure. Based on the observed surface twining in and around the contact zone and the potentially detrimental effect of the hexagonal close-packed phase, it was postulated that the wear of cobalt-based alloys in the present study was controlled by a deformation mechanism.

  14. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  15. The influence of direct laser metal sintering implants on the early stages of osseointegration in diabetic mini-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Naiwen; Liu, Xiangwei; Cai, Yanhui; Zhang, Sijia; Jian, Bo; Zhou, Yuchao; Xu, Xiaoru; Ren, Shuai; Wei, Hongbo; Song, Yingliang

    2017-01-01

    High failure rates of oral implants have been reported in diabetic patients due to the disruption of osseointegration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether direct laser metal sintering (DLMS) could improve osseointegration in diabetic animal models. Surface characterizations were carried out on two types of implants. Cell morphology and the osteogenic-related gene expression of MG63 cells were observed under conditions of DLMS and microarc oxidation (MAO). A diabetes model in mini-pigs was established by intravenous injection of streptozotocin (150 mg/kg), and a total of 36 implants were inserted into the mandibular region. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histologic evaluations were performed 3 and 6 months after implantation. The Ra (the average of the absolute height of all points) of MAO surface was 2.3±0.3 µm while the DLMS surface showed the Ra of 27.4±1.1 µm. The cells on DLMS implants spread out more podia than those on MAO implants through cell morphology analysis. Osteogenic-related gene expression was also dramatically increased in the DLMS group. Obvious improvement was observed in the micro-CT and Van Gieson staining analyses of DLMS implants compared with MAO at 3 months, although this difference disappeared by 6 months. DLMS implants showed a higher bone-implant contact percentage (33.2%±11.2%) at 3 months compared with MAO group (18.9%±7.3%) while similar results were showed at 6 months between DLMS group (42.8%±10.1%) and MAO group (38.3%±10.8%). The three-dimensional environment of implant surfaces with highly porous and fully interconnected channel and pore architectures can improve cell spreading and accelerate the progress of osseointegration in diabetic mini-pigs.

  16. Histological and biomechanical analysis of porous additive manufactured implants made by direct metal laser sintering: a pilot study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübinger, Stefan; Mosch, Isabel; Robotti, Pierfrancesco; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2013-10-01

    It was the aim of this study to analyze osseointegrative properties of porous additive manufactured titanium implants made by direct metal laser sintering in a sheep model after an implantation period of 2 and 8 weeks. Three different types of implants were placed in the pelvis of six sheep. In each sheep were placed three standard machined (M), three sandblasted and etched (SE), and three porous additive manufactured (AM) implants. Of these three implants (one per type) were examined histologically and six implants were tested biomechanically. Additionally a semiquantitative histomorphometrical and qualitative fluorescent microscopic analysis were performed. After 2 and 8 weeks bone-to-implant-contact (BIC) values of the AM surface (2w: 20.49% ± 5.18%; 8w: 43.91% ± 9.69%) revealed no statistical significant differences in comparison to the M (2w: 20.33% ± 11.50%; 8w: 25.33% ± 4.61%) and SE (2w: 43.67 ± 12.22%; 8w: 53.33 ± 8.96%) surfaces. AM surface showed the highest increase of the BIC between the two observation time points. Considering the same implantation period histomorphometry and fluorescent labelling disclosed no significant differences in the bone surrounding the three implants groups. In contrast Removal-torque-test showed a significant improve in fixation strength (P ≤ 0.001) for the AM (1891.82 ± 308, 44 Nmm) surface after eight weeks in comparison to the M (198.93±88,04 Nmm) and SE (730.08 ± 151,89 Nmm) surfaces. All three surfaces (M, SE, and AM) showed sound osseointegration. AM implants may offer a possible treatment option in clinics for patients with compromised bone situations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  17. Supersaturating silicon with transition metals by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Smith, Matthew J.; Gradečak, Silvija [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Williams, James S. [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Sullivan, Joseph T.; Winkler, Mark T.; Buonassisi, Tonio [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Mathews, Jay; Warrender, Jeffrey M. [Benet Laboratories, U.S. Army ARDEC, Watervliet, New York 12189 (United States)

    2013-09-28

    We investigate the possibility of creating an intermediate band semiconductor by supersaturating Si with a range of transition metals (Au, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pd, Pt, W, and Zn) using ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). Structural characterization shows evidence of either surface segregation or cellular breakdown in all transition metals investigated, preventing the formation of high supersaturations. However, concentration-depth profiling reveals that regions of Si supersaturated with Au and Zn are formed below the regions of cellular breakdown. Fits to the concentration-depth profile are used to estimate the diffusive speeds, v{sub D,} of Au and Zn, and put lower bounds on v{sub D} of the other metals ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} m/s. Knowledge of v{sub D} is used to tailor the irradiation conditions and synthesize single-crystal Si supersaturated with 10{sup 19} Au/cm{sup 3} without cellular breakdown. Values of v{sub D} are compared to those for other elements in Si. Two independent thermophysical properties, the solute diffusivity at the melting temperature, D{sub s}(T{sub m}), and the equilibrium partition coefficient, k{sub e}, are shown to simultaneously affect v{sub D}. We demonstrate a correlation between v{sub D} and the ratio D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67}, which is exhibited for Group III, IV, and V solutes but not for the transition metals investigated. Nevertheless, comparison with experimental results suggests that D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67} might serve as a metric for evaluating the potential to supersaturate Si with transition metals by PLM.

  18. No Evidence of Genotoxic Damage in a Group of Patients with Titanium Dental Implants and Different Metal Restorations in the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Sánchez-Siles, Mariano; Gilbel-del Águila, Osmundo

    2015-08-01

    Titanium is the most widely used metal in implant dentistry. In spite of its biocompatibility, when it is released into the oral environment, it can have local negative biological effects. The aims of this study were to detect the concentration of metal ions in patients with dental implants, to evaluate whether or not their release might be influenced by the presence of other metals, and to assay whether these ions might provoke genotoxic damage in oral mucosa cells. One hundred five patients with a total of 180 dental implants were included. The sample was divided into seven groups (n = 15 per group). Group 1 consisted of patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants; Group 2, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 3, patients with dental amalgams; Group 4, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth; Group 5, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants and dental amalgams; and Group 6, patients with metal-porcelain fixed crowns on dental implants, metal-porcelain fixed crowns on teeth, and dental amalgams. Group 7 was the control group, without any dental treatment. The concentration of metal ions was detected using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; genotoxicity was measured using the buccal micronucleus cytome assay protocol. Group 5 displayed the highest concentration of metal ions in parts per billion (Ti, Co, Ni, Zn, Pd, Sn, and Pb). Group 6 was characterized by the highest presence of Hg. No signs of genotoxic damage were found in any of the study groups. Patients with titanium dental implants combined with other metal restorations presented higher concentrations of metal ions, but no genotoxic damage was observed in oral mucosal epithelial cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. MOM Failure Modes: An In-Depth Look at Metal Ions and Implant Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Donaldson, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary MOM bearings (large-diameter heads offered the perceived benefits of much greater range of motion and greater stability with reduced risk of impingement and dislocation. A variety of design and Both positive [1-3] and negative reports [4-8] have now emerged with regard to total hip arthroplasty (THA and resurfacing arthroplasty. As a result, there has been an avalanche of studies focused on critical issues such as: surgical positioning, shallow cups (face angles 144-170° [9-11] and “edge loading”. [5,7,12-17] However, there are several, possibly synergistic, risk scenarios that could trigger adverse MOM wear and very little progress has been made in understanding such interacting parameters. In an effort to understand the role of metal ion analysis and how it relates to revision surgery and implant wear, selected MOM revised cases were reviewed [28]. Retrieval data was included in conjunction with metal ion analyses and intraoperative observations to determine various failure modes.  We suggest MOM devices that are well fixed but fail after 2 years can be classified into one of six modes: (i normal, (ii allergic reaction, (iii 3rd body wear, (iv repetitive subluxation with metal impingement, (v multi-directional subluxation with soft tissue impingement, and (vi repetitive subluxation with soft tissue impingement.

  20. Investigation of dispersion and clustering in bubbles of ion implanted potassium in refractory metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium is a well known dopant for refractory metals. Being insoluble and of large atomic size it forms stable trapping sites for mobile defects at high temperature in the form of fine bubbles. Because of its insolubility it is difficult to introduce potassium into refractory metals, such as in lamp filaments. Ion implantation offers an excellent research tool as it permits the injection of insoluble element into the surface layer. This method was used to produce a uniform dispersion of potassium at a very fine level into tungsten and rhenium. Clustering and bubble formation were studied as a function of annealing time (up to 20 hours) and temperature (up to 2300 C). The methods of investigation were transmission electron microscopy and microchemical analysis. Orientation relationships between host metal and potassium precipitates inside bubbles were analyzed from superimposed electron diffraction patterns. In tungsten, the orientation relationship and the morphology of the bubbles are identical to those published for powder-metallurgically doped material. The bubbles are trapping sites for grain boundaries and dislocations as explained by the Zener drag-force model.

  1. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  2. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tissue reaction to implants of different metals: A study using guide wires in cannulated screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Devine

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cannulated screws, along with guide wires, are typically used for surgical fracture treatment in cancellous bone. Breakage or bending deformation of the guide wire is a clinical concern. Mechanically superior guide wires made of Co-Cr alloys such as MP35N and L605 may reduce the occurrence of mechanical failures when used in combination with conventional (316L stainless steel cannulated screws. However the possibility of galvanic or crevice corrosion and adverse tissue reaction, exists when using dissimilar materials, particularly in the event that a guide wire breaks, and remains in situ. Therefore, we designed an experiment to determine the tissue reaction to such an in vivo environment. Implant devices were designed to replicate a clinical situation where dissimilar metals can form a galvanic couple. Histological and SEM analyses were used to evaluate tissue response and corrosion of the implants. In this experiment, no adverse in vivo effects were detected from the use of dissimilar materials in a model of a broken guide wire in a cannulated screw.

  4. Lattice location of implanted transition metals in 3C-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A. R. G.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Bosne, E.; Amorim, L. M.; Augustyns, V.; Silva, D. J.; da Silva, M. R.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the lattice location of implanted transition metal (TM) 56Mn, 59Fe and 65Ni ions in undoped single-crystalline cubic 3C-SiC by means of the emission channeling technique using radioactive isotopes produced at the CERN-ISOLDE facility. We find that in the room temperature as-implanted state, most Mn, Fe and Ni atoms occupy carbon-coordinated tetrahedral interstitial sites (T C). Smaller TM fractions were also found on Si substitutional (S Si) sites. The TM atoms partially disappear from ideal-T C positions during annealing at temperatures between 500 °C and 700 °C, which is accompanied by an increase in the TM fraction occupying both S Si sites and random sites. An explanation is given according to what is known about the annealing mechanisms of silicon vacancies in silicon carbide. The origin of the observed lattice sites and their changes with thermal annealing are discussed and compared to the case of Si, highlighting the feature that the interstitial migration of TMs in SiC is much slower than in Si.

  5. An exploration of plastic deformation dependence of cell viability and adhesion in metallic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, B; Toker, S M; Cingoz, A; Bagci-Onder, T; Gerstein, G; Maier, H J; Canadinc, D

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between cell viability and adhesion behavior, and micro-deformation mechanisms was investigated on austenitic 316L stainless steel samples, which were subjected to different amounts of plastic strains (5%, 15%, 25%, 35% and 60%) to promote a variety in the slip and twin activities in the microstructure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed that cells most favored the samples with the largest plastic deformation, such that they spread more and formed significant filopodial extensions. Specifically, brain tumor cells seeded on the 35% deformed samples exhibited the best adhesion performance, where a significant slip activity was prevalent, accompanied by considerable slip-twin interactions. Furthermore, maximum viability was exhibited by the cells seeded on the 60% deformed samples, which were particularly designed in a specific geometry that could endure greater strain values. Overall, the current findings open a new venue for the production of metallic implants with enhanced biocompatibility, such that the adhesion and viability of the cells surrounding an implant can be optimized by tailoring the surface relief of the material, which is dictated by the micro-deformation mechanism activities facilitated by plastic deformation imposed by machining.

  6. Lattice location of implanted transition metals in 3C–SiC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085259; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; David Bosne, Eric; Amorim, Lígia; Silva, Daniel; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Bharuth-Ram, Krishanlal; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the lattice location of implanted transition metal (TM) 56Mn, 59Fe and 65Ni ions in undoped single-crystalline cubic 3C–SiC by means of the emission channeling technique using radioactive isotopes produced at the CERN-ISOLDE facility. We find that in the room temperature as-implanted state, most Mn, Fe and Ni atoms occupy carbon-coordinated tetrahedral interstitial sites (TC). Smaller TM fractions were also found on Si substitutional (SSi) sites. The TM atoms partially disappear from ideal-TC positions during annealing at temperatures between 500 °C and 700 °C, which is accompanied by an increase in the TM fraction occupying both SSi sites and random sites. An explanation is given according to what is known about the annealing mechanisms of silicon vacancies in silicon carbide. The origin of the observed lattice sites and their changes with thermal annealing are discussed and compared to the case of Si, highlighting the feature that the interstitial migration of TMs in SiC is much slo...

  7. Simultaneous Removal of Surfactant Template from MCM-41 and Implantation of Transition Metal Complexes into Mesopores with Supercritical Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The simultaneous removal of up to 92% of the surfactant template and chemical implantation of transition metal complexes into mesopores has been successfully achieved by treating as-synthesized pure siliceous MCM-41 with supercritical CO2 modified with CH2Cl2/MeOH mixture, resulting in the formation of functionalized material with uniform pore structure.

  8. Dialysis Patients with Implanted Drug-Eluting Stents Have Lower Major Cardiac Events and Mortality than Those with Implanted Bare-Metal Stents: A Taiwanese Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Fu Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the efficacy and long-term clinical benefits of DES for dialysis patients.It is unclear whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with drug-eluting stent (DES implantation is associated with lower rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE or mortality compared to bare-metal stents (BMS.From a nationwide cohort selected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we enrolled 2,835 dialysis patients who were hospitalized for PCI treatment with stent implantation from Dec 1, 2006. Follow-up was from the date of index hospitalization for PCI until the first MACE, date of death, or December 31, 2011, whichever came first.A total of 738 patients (26.0% had DES implanted, and 2,097 (74% had BMS implanted. The medium time to the first MACE was 0.53 years (interquartile range: 0.89 years; range: 0-4.62 years. At 1-year follow-up, patients treated with BMS had significantly, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI, all-cause mortality, and composite MACE compared to those treated with DES. The overall repeat revascularization with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, non-fatal MI, all-cause mortality, and composite MACE were significantly lower in patients treated with DES than those treated with BMS. Multivariate cox regression analysis showed that older age, history of diabetes, history of heart failure, history of stroke, and DES vs. BMS were independent significant predictors of MACE.DES implantation conferred survival benefits in dialysis patients compared with BMS implantation.

  9. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Avignone, F.T.; Collar, J.I.; Courant, H.; Garcia, E.; Guerard, C.K.; Hensley, W.K.; Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Miley, H.S.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Osetrov, S.B.; Pogosov, V.S.; Pomansky, A.A.; Puimedon, J.; Reeves, J.H.; Ruddick, K.; Saenz, C.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Starostin, A.S.; Tamanyan, A.G.; Vasiliev, S.I.; Villar, J.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States) Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States) Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States) Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain) Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation) Inst. for Nuclear Research, Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Russian Federation) Yerevan Physical Inst., Yerevan (Armenia))

    1993-04-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is in progress. Sources of background observed during Phase I are discussed. Cosmogenic [sup 7]Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination, presumably in electroformed copper, is reported. (orig.)

  10. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzinski, R. L.; Avignone, F. T.; Collar, J. I.; Courant, H.; García, E.; Guerard, C. K.; Hensley, W. K.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Miley, H. S.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Núñez-Lagos, R.; Osetrov, S. B.; Pogosov, V. S.; Pomansky, A. A.; Puimedón, J.; Reeves, J. H.; Ruddick, K.; Sáenz, C.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M. L.; Smolnikov, A. A.; Starostin, A. S.; Tamanyan, A. G.; Vasiliev, S. I.; Villar, J. A.

    1993-04-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is in progress. Sources of background observed during Phase I are discussed. Cosmogenic 7Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination, presumably in electroformed copper, is reported.

  11. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  13. Dislocation and spontaneous reduction of the femoral implant against the femoral neck in an infected metal on metal hip resurfacing with complex collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, Bernhard, E-mail: Bernhard.Tins@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY 107 AG (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Metal on metal resurfacing hip implants are known to have complications unique to this type of implant. The case presented adds a further previously not described complication, the dislocation and spontaneous reduction of the pin of the femoral component against the femoral neck. The radiographic and CT findings are demonstrated. The dislocation was aided by bone loss due to an infection with a large periarticular collection. Periarticular collections in hip resurfacings are often due to a hypersensitivity type reaction to metal debris. However in the case presented it was due to infection. MRI was not able to discern the infection from a sterile collection. CT demonstrated bone loss and periosteal reaction suggestive of infection. In addition calcification of the pseudocapsule was seen, this is not a recognized feature of sterile collections.

  14. SIMS as a new methodology to depth profile helium in as-implanted and annealed pure bcc metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorondy-Novak, S.; Jomard, F.; Prima, F.; Lefaix-Jeuland, H.

    2017-05-01

    Reliable He profiles are highly desirable for better understanding helium behavior in materials for future nuclear applications. Recently, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) allowed the characterization of helium distribution in as-implanted metallic systems. The Cs+ primary ion beam coupled with CsHe+ molecular detector appeared to be a promising technique which overcomes the very high He ionization potential. In this study, 4He depth profiles in pure body centered cubic (bcc) metals (V, Fe, Ta, Nb and Mo) as-implanted and annealed, were obtained by SIMS. All as-implanted samples exhibited a projected range of around 200 nm, in agreement with SRIM theoretical calculations. After annealing treatment, SIMS measurements evidenced the evolution of helium depth profile with temperature. The latter SIMS results were compared to the helium bubble distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This study confirmed the great potential of this experimental procedure as a He-depth profiling technique in bcc metals. Indeed, the methodology described in this work could be extended to other materials including metallic and non-metallic compounds. Nevertheless, the quantification of helium concentration after annealing treatment by SIMS remains uncertain probably due to the non-uniform ionization efficiency in samples containing large bubbles.

  15. SIMS as a new methodology to depth profile helium in as-implanted and annealed pure bcc metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorondy-Novak, S. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jomard, F. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, UVSQ, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles cedex (France); Prima, F. [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech – CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, 75005 Paris (France); Lefaix-Jeuland, H., E-mail: helene.lefaix@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-05-01

    Reliable He profiles are highly desirable for better understanding helium behavior in materials for future nuclear applications. Recently, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) allowed the characterization of helium distribution in as-implanted metallic systems. The Cs{sup +} primary ion beam coupled with CsHe{sup +} molecular detector appeared to be a promising technique which overcomes the very high He ionization potential. In this study, {sup 4}He depth profiles in pure body centered cubic (bcc) metals (V, Fe, Ta, Nb and Mo) as-implanted and annealed, were obtained by SIMS. All as-implanted samples exhibited a projected range of around 200 nm, in agreement with SRIM theoretical calculations. After annealing treatment, SIMS measurements evidenced the evolution of helium depth profile with temperature. The latter SIMS results were compared to the helium bubble distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This study confirmed the great potential of this experimental procedure as a He-depth profiling technique in bcc metals. Indeed, the methodology described in this work could be extended to other materials including metallic and non-metallic compounds. Nevertheless, the quantification of helium concentration after annealing treatment by SIMS remains uncertain probably due to the non-uniform ionization efficiency in samples containing large bubbles.

  16. Surface modification of orthodontic implants by nanocomposite coatings based on chitosan and metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the properties of nanostructured coatings in orthodontic implants. Material and methods. Low and average molecular mass chitosan, 3-amynopropil-3-methoxysylan and suspensions of 5 nm and 10 nm gold nano-spheres stabilized with natrium citrate were used for nanocomposed surfaces. 2mg/ml polyethylenamin water solution was used for making the underlayer before putting polyion coverage using «POLYION-1M». The polyion covering dynamics was studied by polyquartz weighing method. Morphology of created layers was studied with atomic microscopy, elements were studied by secondary ion mass-spectrometry. Results. The best transmission among structures of chito-san/metals was showed by low molecular mass of chitosan and 8-1 Onm nanoparticles of metals. Analysis of roughness of surface shows that nanoparticles of gold make the most solid surface on 3-amynopropil-3-methoxysylan underlayer. Conclusion. The development of biocomparative materials in maxillofacial surgery is considered to be effective method of decreasing the risk of post-operative inflammatory complications by local antibacterial effect.

  17. Evaluation of MR issues for the latest standard brands of orthopedic metal implants: Plates and screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yue-fen, E-mail: zou_yf@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Chu, Bin, E-mail: 18262636700@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Wang, Chuan-bing, E-mail: wangchuanb_csr@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China); Hu, Zhi-yi, E-mail: huzhiyi@medmail.com.cn [Department of Spine Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, No. 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Although previous studies have indicated that most of the orthopedic implants are compatible in MR imaging system especially for titanium alloy, there are still concerns about the safety of patients with stainless steel implants, who were refused to a MR scan in most cases in our country. •In this study, it was verified that both titanium alloy and stainless steel materials (plates and screws) cause a weak force and low MRI-related heating at a 1.5-T or less, which do not pose an additional hazard or risk to patients. In addition, we also had explored the influence of different sequences and parameters on size of metallic artifacts to obtain optimized pulse sequences with appropriate parameters for reducing artifacts, which would be convenient and useful in clinical work. -- Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) issues for the latest standard brands of plates and screws used in orthopedic surgery at a 1.5-T MR system, including the safety and metallic artifacts. Methods: The plates and screws (made of titanium alloy and stainless steel materials, according to the latest standard brands) were assessed for displacement in degrees, MRI-related heating and artifacts at a 1.5-T MR system. The displacement in degrees of the plates and screws was evaluated on an angel-measurement instrument at the entrance of the MR scanner. The MRI-related heating was assessed on a swine leg fixed with a plate by using a “worst-case” pulse sequence. A rectangular water phantom was designed to evaluate metallic artifacts of a screw on different sequences (T1/T2-weighted FSE, STIR, T2-FSE fat saturation, GRE, DWI) and then artifacts were evaluated on T2-weighted FSE sequence by modifying the scanning parameters including field of view (FOV), echo train length (ETL) and bandwidth to identify the influence of parameters on metallic artifacts. 15 volunteers with internal vertebral fixation (titanium alloy materials) were scanned

  18. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toftegaard, Jakob, E-mail: jaktofte@rm.dk; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben S.; Poulsen, Per R. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Seghers, Dieter; Huber, Michael; Brehm, Marcus [Varian Medical Systems, Imaging Laboratory GmbH, Baden-Daettwil 5405 (Switzerland); Elstrøm, Ulrik V. [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of a marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and 3 scans

  19. Transition Metal Ion Implantation into Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings: Development of a Base Material for Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre thick diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings produced by direct ion deposition were implanted with 30 keV Ar+ and transition metal ions in the lower percentage (<10 at.% range. Theoretical calculations showed that the ions are implanted just beneath the surface, which was confirmed with RBS measurements. Atomic force microscope scans revealed that the surface roughness increases when implanted with Ar+ and Cu+ ions, whereas a smoothing of the surface from 5.2 to 2.7 nm and a grain size reduction from 175 to 93 nm are measured for Ag+ implanted coatings with a fluence of 1.24×1016 at. cm−2. Calculated hydrogen and carbon depth profiles showed surprisingly significant changes in concentrations in the near-surface region of the DLC coatings, particularly when implanted with Ag+ ions. Hydrogen accumulates up to 32 at.% and the minimum of the carbon distribution is shifted towards the surface which may be the cause of the surface smoothing effect. The ion implantations caused an increase in electrical conductivity of the DLC coatings, which is important for the development of solid-state gas sensors based on DLC coatings.

  20. Mesostructured Metal Germanium Sulfide and Selenide Materials Based on the Tetrahedral [Ge 4S 10] 4- and [Ge 4Se 10] 4- Units: Surfactant Templated Three-Dimensional Disordered Frameworks Perforated with Worm Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachhold, Michael; Kasthuri Rangan, K.; Lei, Ming; Thorpe, M. F.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Petkov, Valeri; Heising, Joy; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2000-06-01

    The polymerization of [Ge4S10]4- and [Ge4Se10]4- unit clusters with the divalent metal ions Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, and Co2+ in the presence of various surfactant cations leads to novel mesostructured phases. The surfactants are the quaternary ammonium salts C12H25NMe3Br, C14H29NMe3Br, C16H33NMe3Br, and C18H37NMe3Br, which play the role of templates, helping to assemble a three-dimensional mesostructured metal-germanium chalcogenide framework. These materials are stoichiometric in nature and have the formula of (R-NMe3)2[MGe4Q10] (Q=S, Se). The local atomic structure was probed by X-ray diffuse scattering and pair distribution function analysis methods and indicates that the adamantane clusters stay intact while the linking metal atoms possess a tetrahedral coordination environment. A model can be derived, from the comparison of measured and simulated X-ray powder diffraction patterns, describing the structure as an amorphous three-dimensional framework consisting of adamantane [Ge4Q10]4- units that are bridged by tetrahedral coordinated M2+ cations. The network structures used in the simulations were derived from corresponding disordered structures developed for amorphous silicon. The frameworks in (R-NMe3)2[MGe4Q10] are perforated with worm hole-like tunnels, occupied by the surfactant cations, which show no long-range order. This motif is supported by transmission electron microscopy images of these materials. The pore sizes of these channels were estimated to lie in the range of 20-30 Å, depending on the appointed surfactant cation length. The framework wall thickness of ca. 10 Å is thereby independent from the surfactant molecules used. Up to 80% of the surfactant molecules can be removed by thermal degradation under vacuum without loss of mesostructural integrity. Physical, chemical, and spectroscopic properties of these materials are discussed.

  1. Heteroepitaxial growth of relaxed germanium on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Ammar

    Germanium has a many advantages to silicon as a semiconductor material. Most importantly, Ge has a larger lattice mobility (hole and electron) compared to Si. The larger mobility provides a higher source injection velocity, which translates into higher drive current and smaller gate delay. In addition, the near-infrared photodetection and compatibility with Si technology of Ge-based materials, allow simultaneous fabrication of photodetectors and Si CMOS receiver circuits in a monolithically integrated fashion. The main disadvantage is that germanium based oxides are not stable and but rather soluble in water. But the inevitable shift to high-kappa/metal gate has made Ge a serious option nevertheless. In order for the semiconductor industry to take advantage of the properties of Ge, heterogeneous integration of Ge and Si must be possible since using bulk Ge is not viable. However, Ge growth on Si is hampered by the large lattice mismatch (4%) between Ge and Si which results in growth that is dominated by "islanding" and misfit dislocations. The following thesis, investigates both the islanding and dislocation density issues associated with this problem. A 90% reduction of surface roughness by hydrogen annealing is demonstrated accompanied with a theoretical model to explain these results. Using multi-steps of growth and hydrogen annealing, Ge layers on Si were achieved with dislocation density as low as 1x107cm-2 and Rrms surface roughness of 2.5nm. The method was patented and named, Multiple Hydrogen Annealing for Heteroexpitaxy (MHAH). A complete experimentally based theoretical model is provided that explains these results. In addition, MOSCAPS, a pMOS transistor, and a MSM photodetector are fabricated on the MHAH-Ge substrates. Also high-kappa/metal gate compatibility is demonstrated on MHAH-Ge. The electrical results indicate that MHAH-Ge approaches the electrical quality of bulk Ge. These results point to a promising step in achieving heterogeneous integration

  2. Retention behaviors of tritium loaded near the surface region of metals by gas absorption and plasma implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, T., E-mail: t-otsuka@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Ogawa, Y.; Higaki, M.; Ishitani, Y.

    2015-08-15

    Retention behaviors of hydrogen loaded by gas absorption and plasma implantation to pure copper, pure tungsten and the F82H steels at various temperatures have been examined by the tritium imaging plate technique. Three components are distinguished in hydrogen retained near the surface region; one is an endothermic trapping component in the bulk or near the surface region, second is an exothermic trapping component induced by plasma implantation and third is a trapping component in oxide layers. The relative amount of each component in depth near the surface region of the metals can alter retention behaviors of hydrogen with respect to the loading temperatures.

  3. Cytocompatibility of pure metals and experimental binary titanium alloys for implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeong-Joon; Song, Yo-Han; An, Ji-Hae; Song, Ho-Jun; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2013-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the biocompatibility of nine types of pure metal ingots (Ag, Al, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Nb, V, Zr) and 36 experimental titanium (Ti) alloys containing 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt% of each alloying element. The cell viabilities for each test group were compared with that of CP-Ti using the WST-1 test and agar overlay test. The ranking of pure metal cytotoxicity from most potent to least potent was as follows: Cu>Al>Ag>V>Mn>Cr>Zr>Nb>Mo>CP-Ti. The mean cell viabilities for pure Cu, Al, Ag, V, and Mn were 21.6%, 25.3%, 31.7%, 31.7%, and 32.7%, respectively, which were significantly lower than that for the control group (p<0.05). The mean cell viabilities for pure Zr and Cr were 74.1% and 60.6%, respectively (p<0.05). Pure Mo and Nb demonstrated good biocompatibility with mean cell viabilities of 93.3% and 93.0%, respectively. The mean cell viabilities for all the Ti-based alloy groups were higher than 80% except for Ti-20 Nb (79.6%) and Ti-10 V (66.9%). The Ti-10 Nb alloy exhibited the highest cell viability (124.8%), which was higher than that of CP-Ti. Based on agar overlay test, pure Ag, Cr, Cu, Mn, and V were ranked as 'moderately cytotoxic', whereas the rest of the tested pure metals and all Ti alloys, except Ti-10 V (mild cytotoxicity), were ranked as 'noncytotoxic'. The results obtained in this study can serve as a guide for the development of new Ti-based alloy implant systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of magnetic field interactions and radiofrequency-radiation-induced heating of metallic spinal implants in 7 T field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukimura, Itsuko; Murakami, Hideki; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Hirooki; Yamabe, Daisuke; Oikawa, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru

    2016-10-21

    The safety of metallic spinal implants in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using ultrahigh fields has not been established. Hence, we examined whether the displacement forces caused by a static magnetic field and the heating induced by radiofrequency radiation are substantial for spinal implants in a 7 T field. We investigated spinal rods of various lengths and materials, a screw, and a cross-linking bridge in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The displacement forces of the metallic implants in static 7 T and 3 T static magnetic fields were measured and compared. The temperature changes of the implants during 15-min-long fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo image acquisition sequences were measured in the 7 T field. The deflection angles of the metallic spinal materials in the 7 T field were 5.0-21.0° [median: 6.7°], significantly larger than those in the 3 T field (1.0-6.3° [2.2°]). Among the metallic rods, the cobalt-chrome rods had significantly larger deflection angles (17.8-21.0° [19.8°]) than the pure titanium and titanium alloy rods (5.0-7.7° [6.2°]). The temperature changes of the implants, including the cross-linked rods, were 0.7-1.0°C [0.8°C] and 0.6-1.0°C [0.7°C] during the fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo sequences, respectively; these changes were slightly larger than those of the controls (0.4-1.1°C [0.5°C] and 0.3-0.9°C [0.6°C], respectively). All of the metallic spinal implants exhibited small displacement forces and minimal heating, indicating that MRI examinations using 7 T fields may be performed safely on patients with these implants. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  5. Value of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) for artefact reduction from metallic orthopedic implants in post-mortem studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Guggenberger, Roman; Winklhofer, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to assess the performance of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) reconstructions to reduce metal artefacts in bodies with orthopedic devices in comparison with standard single-energy CT (SECT) examinations in forensic imaging. Forensic and clinical impacts of this study are also discussed. Thirty metallic implants in 20 consecutive cadavers with metallic implants underwent both SECT and DECT with a clinically suitable scanning protocol. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the corresponding SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visual rating and measurements of attenuation changes induced by streak artefact. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed statistically significant differences between monoenergetic DECT extrapolated images and SECT, with improvements in diagnostic assessment in monoenergetic DECT at higher monoenergies. The mean value of OPTkeV was 137.6 ± 4.9 with a range of 130 to 148 keV. This study demonstrates that monoenergetic DECT images extrapolated at high energy levels significantly reduce metallic artefacts from orthopedic implants and improve image quality compared to SECT examination in forensic imaging. (orig.)

  6. Sirolimus-eluting versus bare-metal stent implantation in patients with ostial lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Kelbæk, Henning; Kløvgaard, Lene;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of implantation of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) in the ostium of coronary arteries.......To investigate the efficacy of implantation of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) in the ostium of coronary arteries....

  7. Quantitation of maxillary remodeling. 1. A description of osseous changes relative to superimposition on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Ben-Bassat, Y; West, E E

    1987-01-01

    Lateral skull radiographs for a set of 31 human subjects were examined using computer-aided methods in an attempt to quantify modal trends of maxillary remodeling during the mixed dentition and adolescent growth periods. Cumulative changes in position of anterior nasal spine (ANS), posterior nasal spine (PNS), and Point A are reported at annual intervals relative to superimposition on previously placed maxillary metallic implants. This in vivo longitudinal study confirms at a high level of confidence earlier findings by Enlow, Björk, Melsen, and others to the effect that the superior surface of the maxilla remodels downward during the period of growth and development being investigated. However, the inter-individual variability is relatively large, the mean magnitudes of change are relatively small, and the rate of change appears to diminish by 13.5 years. For the 19 subjects for whom data were available for the time interval from 8.5 to 15.5 years, mean downward remodeling at PNS was 2.50 mm with a standard deviation of 2.23 mm. At ANS, corresponding mean value was 1.56 mm with a standard deviation of 2.92 mm. Mean rotation of the ANS-PNS line relative to the implant line was 1.1 degree in the "forward" direction. However, this rotational change was particularly variable with a standard deviation of 4.6 degrees and a range of 11.3 degrees "forward" to 6.7 degrees "backward." The study provides strong evidence that the palate elongates anteroposteriorly mainly by the backward remodeling of structures located posterior to the region in which the implants were placed. There is also evidence that supports the idea of modal resorptive remodeling at ANS and PNS, but here the data are somewhat more equivocal. It appears likely, but not certain, that there are real differences in the modal patterns of remodeling between treated and untreated subjects. Because of problems associated with overfragmentation of the sample, sex differences were not investigated.

  8. Massive silicon or germanium detectors at cryogenic temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggio, C. [Dip. Fisica dell' Universita di Ferrara and INFN, via del Paradiso 12, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bressi, G. [INFN, sez.Pavia, Via U. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Carugno, G. [INFN, sez. Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Feltrin, E. [INFN, Lab. Naz. Legnaro, Via dell' Universita 1, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)]. E-mail: feltrin@lnl.infn.it; Galeazzi, G. [INFN, Lab. Naz. Legnaro, Via dell' Universita 1, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2006-11-30

    Several massive silicon and germanium home-made detectors, working at cryogenic temperature, have been studied. They are the benchmarking schemes to check the possibility of realizing a semiconductor time projection chamber that could have various interesting applications in weak interaction problems. Reported here are the first results on investigations of charge collection efficiency and metal-semiconductor contact hardness. The leakage current, total depletion voltage and alpha or gamma spectroscopy are presented.

  9. Comparison of fracture toughness of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic cement retained implant crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S; Chowdhary, R

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the fracture toughness of cement-retained implant-supported metal-ceramic molar crown with that of all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using IPS Empress 2 and yttria-stabilized zirconia copings. An dental implant and abutment was embedded in a clear polymethyl methacrylate model. A wax pattern reproducing the anatomy and dimension of a mandibular molar was made using inlay wax. Copings were made from the manufacturers guidelines for zirconia, metal ceramic and empress crown, in total of 21 copings, which were built for the crowns with metal layering ceramics specified by the manufacturers. The polymethylmethacrylate block-implant abutment complex was mounted on universal testing machine, and a static continuos vertical compressive load with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min was applied. The breaking load and the peak load (in kilo Newtons) were recorded. The fractures for group I (zirconia-ceramic) and group II (metal-ceramic) occurred on the mesio-buccal aspect of the crowns involving the veneered ceramic layer while the catastrophic/bulk fracture was not observed. The mean value of breaking load for zirconia-ceramic, metal-ceramic and IPS-empress 2 was 3.4335, 3.071 and 1.0673 kN respectively. The mean value of peak load for zirconia-ceramic, metal-ceramic and IPS-empress 2 was 4.7365, 3.2757 and 1.566 kN respectively. It can be concluded that the zirconia-ceramic crown with the fracture toughness of 4.7365 ± 2.2676 kN has sufficient strength to allow clinical testing of these crowns as an alternative for metal-ceramic crowns (3.2757 ± 0.4681 kN).

  10. Release of cobalt and chromium ions into the serum following implantation of the metal-on-metal Maverick-type artificial lumbar disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeh, Alexander; Planert, Michael; Siegert, Gabriele; Lattke, Peter; Held, Andreas; Hein, Werner

    2007-02-01

    Cross-sectional study of 10 patients to measure the serum levels of cobalt and chromium after TDA. To investigate the release of cobalt and chromium ions into the serum following implantation of the metal-on-metal Maverick-type artificial lumbar disc. In total hip endoprosthetics and consequently for TDA (total disc arthroplasty), metal-on-metal combinations are used with the aim of reducing wear debris. In metal-on-metal TDA the release of metal ions has until now been secondary to the main discussion. We investigated the serum cobalt and chromium concentration following implantation of 15 Maverick TDAs (monosegmental L5-S1, n = 5; bisegmental L4-L5 and L5-S1, n = 5; average age, 36.5 years). Five healthy subjects (no metal implants) acted as a control group. The measurements of the metals were carried out using the HITACHI Z-8200 AAS polarized Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer after an average of 14.8 months. The concentrations of cobalt and chromium ions in the serum amounted on average to 4.75 microg/L (SD, 2.71) for cobalt and 1.10 microg/L (SD, 1.24) for chromium. Compared with control group, both the chromium and cobalt levels in the serum showed significant increases (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0120). At follow-up,the Oswestry Disability Score was on average significantly decreased by 24.4 points (L5-S1) (t test, P < 0.05) and by 26.8 points (L4-S1) (t test, P < 0.05). The improved clinical situation is also represented by a significant decrease of the Visual Analog Pain Scale of 42.2 points after the follow-up (t test, P < 0.05). Significant systemic release of Cr/Co was proven in the serum compared with the control group. The concentrations of Cr/Co measured in the serum are similar in terms of their level to the values measured in THA metal-on-metal combinations or exceed these values given in the literature. Long-term implication of this metal exposure is unknown and should be studied further.

  11. Metal-ion release from titanium and TiN coated implants in rat bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, F. (Dipt. di Meccanica Strutturale, Univ. degli Studi di Trento (Italy)); Miotello, A. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. degli Studi di Trento (Italy)); Pavloski, L. (CSM, Trento (Italy)); Galvanetto, E. (Dipt. di Meccanica Strutturale, Univ. degli Studi di Trento (Italy)); Moschini, G. (INFN-Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Galassini, S. (INFN-Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy)); Passi, P. (Dental School, Univ. of Padua (Italy)); Bogdanovic, S. (R. Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Fazinic, S. (R. Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Jaksic, M. (R. Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Valkovic, V. (R. Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia) IAEA Seibersdorf Labs., Wien (Austria))

    1993-06-01

    Titanium is a good material for dental and orthopaedic implants, but many authors reported that it releases ions into the surrounding tissues and into the serum. Titanium nitride has good mechanical properties and chemical inertless and may be employed as an implant coating material. In this experiment, pure titanium and SiO[sub 2] coated with TiN implants were inserted in the tibia of rats. After thirty days, the bones were taken and examined by a proton microprobe. TiN-coated implants showed a lower ion release into the bone compared with pure titanium. This suggests that TiN may be a good coating for endosseous implants. (orig.)

  12. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single...

  13. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  14. Nanoscale size dependence on pulsed laser sintering of hydroxyapatite/titanium particles on metal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Martin Yi; Cheng, Gary J.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoscale size effects on pulsed laser coating of hydroxyapatite/titanium nanoparticles (nanoTi) on metal substrate is discussed in this article. Laser coating method has recently been developed to coat bioceramics material on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Laser-coated bioceramics implants have several advantages due to the use of nanosized materials: strong interfacial bonding strength, good biocompatibility and potentially longer lifetime cycle. These advantages benefit from intrinsic properties of nanoparticles. Size effects on melting point, heat capacity, thermal, and electrical conductivities have been discussed. Multiphysics model is built to reveal the mechanism of laser coating process. Two submodules are included in the model: electromagnetic module to represent the laser-nanoparticle interactions and heat transfer module to simulate the heat conduction. Both simulation and experimental results showed that nanoTi, functioning as nanoheaters, effectively enhances the laser coating sinterability. For large nanoTi (>100 nm), sinterability enhancement mainly attributes to the stronger laser-particle interactions due to higher plasmon resonance; for small nanoparticles (<100 nm), not only stronger laser-nanoparticle interactions, reduction on melting point also contributes to sinterability enhancement.

  15. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation preceded by routine prestenting with a bare metal stent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demkow, Marcin; Biernacka, Elzbieta Katarzyna; Spiewak, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) with routine prestenting with a bare metal stent (BMS). Background: PPVI is a relatively new method of treating patients with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). Results of PPVI performed...... X-ray to screen for device integrity. Results: PPVI was performed with no serious complications in all patients (n = 10, mean age 26.8 ± 4.0 years, 60% males). In nine patients with significant pulmonary stenosis, peak right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) gradient was reduced from a mean of 80......% ± 1% (P = 0.0008). Relief of RVOT obstruction and restoration of pulmonary valve competence were associated with significant decrease in right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (125.5 ± 48.6 to 109.2 ± 42.9 mL/m2; P = 0.002 and 68.4 ± 41.5 vs. 50.9 ± 40.6 mL/m2; P = 0...

  16. Strained Germanium-Tin (GeSn) P-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors Featuring High Effective Hole Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Wang, Hongjuan; Cheng, Buwen; Han, Genquan

    2015-06-01

    Compressively strained and p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are fabricated with low-temperature surface passivation. High crystallinity GeSn films epitaxially grown on a Ge(001) substrate are used for the device fabrication. The impacts of the Sn composition on the subthreshold swing , threshold voltage , on-state current , and effective hole mobility of the devices are investigated. GeSn pMOSFETs with different Sn compositions show a similar , indicating almost the same midgap density of interface states . A positive shift of with an increase of the Sn composition is observed. A pMOSFET exhibits a significant improvement in as compared to a device with a lower Sn composition, which is due to the superior hole mobility in a device with a higher Sn composition. pMOSFETs achieve a peak effective hole mobility of , which is much higher than that of devices. The enhancement of the compressive strain and chemical effect in the channel region with increased Sn composition leads to an improvement of.

  17. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Bioavailability research presents an essential tool, in modern phytoremediation and phytomining technologies, allowing the estimation of plant available fractions of elements in soils. However, up to date, sufficient interdisciplinary knowledge on the biogeochemically impacted behavior of specific target elements, in particular Ge and REEs in mining affected soils and their uptake into strategically used plants is lacking. This presented work is focused on a correlation study between the concentrations of selected heavy metals, Ge and REEs in soils formed on the top of the dump-field of Davidschacht and the corresponding their concentrations in 12 vascular plant species. The mine-dump of Davidschacht, situated in the Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) municipality area was chosen as the study area, which has been considered to be a high contaminated enclave, due to the mining history of the region. In total 12 sampling sites with differing composition of plant species were selected. At each sampling site soil samples from a soil depth of 0 - 10 cm and samples of plant material (shoots) were taken. The soil samples were analysed for total concentration of elements, pH (H2O) and consequently analysed by 4-step sequential extraction (SE) to determine fractions of elements that are mobile (fraction 1), acid soluble (pH 5) (fraction 2), bound to organic and oxidizable matter (fraction 3) and bound to amorphic oxides (fraction 4). The plant material was decomposed by hydrofluoric acid in order to extract the elements. Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and digestion solutions were analysed by ICP-MS. For all species bioconcentration factor (BCF) was calculated of the total concentration of elements in order to investigate the bioaccumulation potential. Arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were chosen as the representative heavy metals. Within the REEs neodymium (Nd) and cerium (Ce) were selected as representatives for all REEs, since Nd and Ce correlated significant

  18. Long-Term Outcome After Drug-Eluting Versus Bare-Metal Stent Implantation in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmvang, Lene; Kelbæk, Henning Skov; Kaltoft, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the long-term effects of drug-eluting stent (DES) compared with bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.......This study sought to compare the long-term effects of drug-eluting stent (DES) compared with bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention....

  19. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. Methods A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information) among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Results Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration). Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C). Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. Conclusions The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants. PMID:22230200

  20. Immediate, non-submerged, root-analogue direct laser metal sintering (DLMS) implants: a 1-year prospective study on 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; De Franco, Michele; Caprioglio, Alberto; Macchi, Aldo; Piattelli, Adriano; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the 1-year survival and success rate of root-analogue direct laser metal sintering (DLMS) implants, placed into the extraction sockets of 15 patients. DLMS is a technology which allows solids with complex geometry to be fabricated by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model; the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer-by-layer, the desired object. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMS process, allow the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAIs). CBCT images of 15 non-restorable premolars (eight maxilla; seven mandible) were acquired and transformed into 3D models: from these, custom-made, root-analogue DLMS implants with integral abutment were fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the RAIs were placed in the sockets and restored with a single crown. One year after implant placement, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed: success criteria included absence of pain, suppuration, and exudation; absence of implant mobility and absence of continuous peri-implant radiolucency; distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact implants were lost, for a survival rate of 100 %. All implants were stable, with no signs of infection. The good conditions of the peri-implant tissues were confirmed by the radiographic examination, with a mean DIB of 0.7 mm (±0.2). The possibility of fabricating custom-made, RAI DLMS implants opens new interesting horizons for immediate placement of dental implants.

  1. The effect of metal ion implantation on the surface mechanical properties of Mylar (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.; Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Yao, X.; Brown, I.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    1993-12-31

    Ion implantation of polymers leads to the formation of new carbonaceous materials, the revolution during implantation of various species consists of (1) ion beam induced damage: chain scission, crosslinking, molecular emission of volatile elements and compounds, stoichiometric change in the surface layer of pristine polymers; and (2) chemical effect between ion and target materials: microalloying and precipitation. Literature regarding ion implanted polymers shows that the reorganisation of the carbon network after implantation can dramatically modify several properties of pristine polymers solubility, molecular weight, and electrical, optical and mechanical properties. However, ion implantation of polymers is actually a very complex interaction which depends on not only ion species, implantation condition, but also polymer type and specific structure. In this paper the effect of Ag or Ti ions implantation on surface mechanical properties of PET (polyethylenne terephthalate) polymer is reported. There was a clear deterioration in wear resistance after implantation of both Ag and Ti ions. It is suggested that the increment of wear after implantation may result from not only ion damage but also chemical effect between ion and target material. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  2. Study on the local atomic structure of germanium in organic germanium compounds by EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Organic germanium compounds have been extensively applied in medicine as tonics,In this paper,the local structures of two organic germanium compounds,carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide and polymeric germanium glutamate,were determined by EXAFS.The structure parameters including coordination numbers and bond lengths were reported,and possible structure patterns were discussed.

  3. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  4. Harmonic Lattice Dynamics of Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelin, G.

    1974-07-01

    The phonon dispersion relations of the DELTA-, LAMBDA-, and SIGMA-directions of germanium at 80 K are analysed in terms of current harmonic lattice dynamical models. On the basis of this experience, a new model is proposed which gives a unified account of the strong points of the previous models. The principal elements of the presented theory are quasiparticle bond charges combined with a valence force field.

  5. Black Germanium fabricated by reactive ion etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steglich, Martin; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    A reactive ion etching technique for the preparation of statistical "Black Germanium" antireflection surfaces, relying on self-organization in a Cl2 etch chemistry, is presented. The morphology of the fabricated Black Germanium surfaces is the result of a random lateral distribution of pyramidal etch pits with heights around (1450 ± 150) nm and sidewall angles between 80° and 85°. The pyramids' base edges are oriented along the crystal directions of Germanium, indicating a crystal anisotropy of the etching process. In the Vis-NIR, the tapered Black Germanium surface structure suppresses interface reflection to structure in optoelectronics and IR optics.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of bismuth germanium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    A method for the hydrothermal synthesis of bismuth germanium oxide comprises dissolving a bismuth precursor (e.g., bismuth nitrate pentahydrate) and a germanium precursor (e.g., germanium dioxide) in water and heating the aqueous solution to an elevated reaction temperature for a length of time sufficient to produce the eulytite phase of bismuth germanium oxide (E-BGO) with high yield. The E-BGO produced can be used as a scintillator material. For example, the air stability and radioluminescence response suggest that the E-BGO can be employed for medical applications.

  7. Structural Design Parameters for Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jon; Rogers, Richard; Baker, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A* 1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu. Thus the fracture toughness was similar on the 100, 110, and 111 planes, however, measurements associated with randomly oriented grinding cracks were 6 to 30 higher. Crack extension in ring loaded disks occurred on the 111 planes due to both the lower fracture energy and the higher stresses on stiff 111 planes. Germanium exhibits a Weibull scale effect, but does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n 100), implying that design for quasi static loading can be performed with scaled strength statistics. Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.69 0.02 MPam (megapascals per square root meter) and a Weibull modulus of m 6 2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, average fracture strength should be greater than 40 megapascals. Aggregate, polycrystalline elastic constants are Epoly 131 gigapascals, vpoly 0.22.

  8. Toward Patient Specific Long Lasting Metallic Implants for Mandibular Segmental Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges

    Mandibular defects may result from tumor resection, trauma, or inflammation. The goals of mandibular reconstruction surgeries are to restore mandible function and aesthetics. To this end, surgeons use a combination of bone grafts and metallic implants. These implants have drastically different mechanical properties than the surrounding bone. As a result, the stress distribution in the mandible changes after surgery. The long-term abnormal stress/strain distribution may lead to either graft failure due to bone resorption as a result of stress shielding, or hardware failure due to stress concentrations. During the healing period of six to nine months it is important that complete immobilization, bringing mandibular micro-motion down to the level of 200-500 mum during chewing, is achieved. After this period it is desired that bone undergo normal stress for long-term success of the treatment. Although current high stiffness fixation hardware accomplishes this immobilization during the healing period, the hardware continues to alter the normal stress-strain trajectory seen during chewing once the engrafted bone heals. Over the long-term, the immobilized and stress-shielded engrafted bone tends to resorb. On the other hand, hardware fracturing or/and screw loosening is observed as the stress is concentrated at certain locations on the hardware. Equally as important is the permanent loss of chewing power due to the altered stress-strain relationships. The first stage of this research is to study the problems encountered following a mandibular segmental defect reconstructive surgery. To this end, we constructed a finite element model of a healthy mandible, which includes cortical and cancellous bone, teeth (enamel and dentin components), and the periodontal ligament. Using this model, we studied a healthy adult mandible under maximum molar bite force for stress, strain, displacement, and reaction force distribution. For mandibular segmental defect reconstruction the

  9. In vitro assessment of tissue heating near metallic medical implants by exposure to pulsed radio frequency diathermy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggera, P. S.; Witters, D. M.; von Maltzahn, G.; Bassen, H. I.

    2003-09-01

    A patient with bilateral implanted neurostimulators suffered significant brain tissue damage, and subsequently died, following diathermy treatment to hasten recovery from teeth extraction. Subsequent MRI examinations showed acute deterioration of the tissue near the deep brain stimulator (DBS) lead's electrodes which was attributed to excessive tissue heating induced by the diathermy treatment. Though not published in the open literature, a second incident was reported for a patient with implanted neurostimulators for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. During a diathermy treatment for severe kyphosis, the patient had a sudden change in mental status and neurological deficits. The diathermy was implicated in causing damage to the patient's brain tissue. To investigate if diathermy induced excessive heating was possible with other types of implantable lead systems, or metallic implants in general, we conducted a series of in vitro laboratory tests. We obtained a diathermy unit and also assembled a controllable laboratory exposure system. Specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements were performed using fibre optic thermometry in proximity to the implants to determine the rate of temperature rise using typical diathermy treatment power levels. Comparisons were made of the SAR measurements for a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) lead, a pacemaker lead and three types of bone prosthesis (screws, rods and a plate). Findings indicate that temperature changes of 2.54 and 4.88 °C s-1 with corresponding SAR values of 9129 and 17 563 W kg-1 near the SCS and pacemaker electrodes are significantly higher than those found in the proximity of the other metallic implants which ranged from 0.04 to 0.69 °C s-1 (129 to 2471 W kg-1). Since the DBS leads that were implanted in the reported human incidents have one-half the electrode surface area of the tested SCS lead, these results imply that tissue heating at rates at least equal to or up to twice as much as those reported here for

  10. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  11. Comparison of Fatigue Properties and Fatigue Crack Growth Rates of Various Implantable Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu Okazaki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue strength, effects of a notch on the fatigue strength, and fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy were compared with those of other implantable metals. Zr, Nb, and Ta are important alloying elements for Ti alloys for attaining superior long-term corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The highly biocompatible Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy exhibited an excellent balance between strength and ductility. Its notched tensile strength was much higher than that of a smooth specimen. The strength of 20% cold-worked commercially pure (C.P. grade 4 Ti was close to that of Ti alloy. The tension-to-tension fatigue strength of an annealed Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta rod at 107 cycles was approximately 740 MPa. The fatigue strength of this alloy was much improved by aging treatment after solution treatment. The fatigue strengths of C.P. grade 4 Ti and stainless steel were markedly improved by 20% cold working. The fatigue strength of Co-Cr-Mo alloy was markedly increased by hot forging. The notch fatigue strengths of 20% cold-worked C.P. grade 4 Ti, and annealed and aged Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta, and annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloys were less than those of the smooth specimens. The fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta was the same as that of Ti-6Al-4V. The fatigue crack growth rate in 0.9% NaCl was the same as that in air. Stainless steel and Co-Cr-Mo-Ni-Fe alloy had a larger stress-intensity factor range (ΔK than Ti alloy.

  12. Oxidative removal of implanted photoresists and barrier metals in semiconductor processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rajkumar

    Chemical systems containing oxidants are widely used at various stages in semiconductor processing, particularly for wet cleaning and polishing applications. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to oxidative removal of materials in the Front-End-Of-Line (FEOL) and Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processes during IC fabrication. In the first part of this study, stripping of photoresists exposed to high dose of ions (1E16 As/cm2) was investigated in activated hydrogen peroxide systems. Stripping of photoresists (PR) exposed to high dose (>1E15/cm2) ion beams is one of the most challenging steps in FEOL processing. This is due to unreactive crust layer that forms on the resist surface during ion implantation. The use of hydrogen peroxide systems activated by metal ion or UV light, for disrupting crust formed on deep UV resist to enable complete removal of crust as well as underlying photoresist was investigated. A systematic evaluation of variables such as hydrogen peroxide and metal ion concentration, UV intensity, temperature and time was conducted and an optimal formulation capable of attacking the crust was developed. A two step process involving pretreatment with activated hydrogen peroxide solution, followed by treatment with sulfuric acid-hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) was developed for complete removal of crusted resist films. In the second part of this study, electrochemically enhanced abrasive removal of Ta/TaN films was investigated in solutions containing 2,5 dihydroxy benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and potassium iodate (KIO3). This method known as Electrically-assisted Chemical Mechanical Planarization (ECMP) is generating a lot of interest in IC manufacturing. Ta/TaN films were abraded at low pressures (tantalum and tantalum nitride removal rates of ˜170 A0/min and ˜200 A 0/min, respectively have been obtained at a current density of 1 mA/cm 2. The use of benzotriazole as a copper inhibitor was required to obtain Ta to Cu

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Distortion and Targeting Errors from Strong Rare Earth Metal Magnetic Dental Implant Requiring Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong-Cheol, Park; Chong Sik, Lee; Seok Min, Kim; Eu Jene, Choi; Do Hee, Lee; Jung Kyo, Lee

    2016-12-22

    Recently, the use of magnetic dental implants has been re-popularized with the introduction of strong rare earth metal, for example, neodymium, magnets. Unrecognized magnetic dental implants can cause critical magnetic resonance image distortions. We report a case involving surgical failure caused by a magnetic dental implant. A 62-year-old man underwent deep brain stimulation for medically insufficiently controlled Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging performed for the first deep brain stimulation showed that the overdenture was removed. However, a dental implant remained and contained a neodymium magnet, which was unrecognized at the time of imaging; the magnet caused localized non-linear distortions that were the largest around the dental magnets. In the magnetic field, the subthalamic area was distorted by a 4.6 mm right shift and counter clockwise rotation. However, distortions were visually subtle in the operation field and small for distant stereotactic markers, with approximately 1-2 mm distortions. The surgeon considered the distortion to be normal asymmetry or variation. Stereotactic marker distortion was calculated to be in the acceptable range in the surgical planning software. Targeting errors, approximately 5 mm on the right side and 2 mm on the left side, occurred postoperatively. Both leads were revised after the removal of dental magnets. Dental magnets may cause surgical failures and should be checked and removed before stereotactic surgery. Our findings should be considered when reviewing surgical precautions and making distortion-detection algorithm improvements.

  14. Analyzer-based imaging technique in tomography of cartilage and metal implants: A study at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coan, Paola [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: coan@esrf.fr; Mollenhauer, Juergen [Naturwissenschaftliches und Medizinisches Institut (NMI) an der Universitaet Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); TETEC AG, Aspenhaustr. 25, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Department of Biochemistry, Rush University Medical Center, 1653 W. Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)], E-mail: Juergen.Mollenhauer@nmi.de; Wagner, Andreas [Department of Orthopaedics of the University of Jena, Rudolf-Elle-Hospital Eisenberg, Klosterlausnitzer Strasse 81, 07607 Eisenberg (Germany)], E-mail: a.wagner@krankenhaus-eisenberg.de; Muehleman, Carol [Department of Biochemistry, Rush University Medical Center, 1653 W. Congress Parkway, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)], E-mail: carol_muehleman@rush.edu; Bravin, Alberto [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: bravin@esrf.fr

    2008-12-15

    Monitoring the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) and the effects of therapy during clinical trials is still a challenge for present clinical imaging techniques since they present intrinsic limitations and can be sensitive only in case of advanced OA stages. In very severe cases, partial or complete joint replacement surgery is the only solution for reducing pain and restoring the joint functions. Poor imaging quality in practically all medical imaging technologies with respect to joint surfaces and to metal implant imaging calls for the development of new techniques that are sensitive to stages preceding the point of irreversible damage of the cartilage tissue. In this scenario, X-ray phase contrast modalities could play an important role since they can provide improved contrast compared to conventional absorption radiography, with a similar or even reduced tissue radiation dose. In this study, the analyzer-based imaging (ABI), a technique sensitive to the X-ray refraction and permitting a high scatter rejection, has been successfully applied in vitro on excised human synovial joints and sheep implants. Pathological and healthy joints as well as metal implants have been imaged in projection and computed tomography ABI mode at high resolution and clinically compatible doses (<10 mGy). Volume rendering and segmentation permitted visualization of the cartilage from volumetric CT-scans. The results demonstrate that ABI can provide an unequivocal non-invasive diagnosis of the state of disease of the joint and be considered a new tool in orthopaedic research.

  15. Vacuum brazing of alumina ceramic to titanium for biomedical implants using pure gold as the filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad S.

    One of the many promising applications of metal/ceramic joining is in biomedical implantable devices. This work is focused on vacuum brazing of C.P titanium to 96% alumina ceramic using pure gold as the filler metal. A novel method of brazing is developed where resistance heating of C.P titanium is done inside a thermal evaporator using a Ta heating electrode. The design of electrode is optimized using Ansys resistive heating simulations. The materials chosen in this study are biocompatible and have prior history in implantable devices approved by FDA. This research is part of Boston Retinal implant project to make a biocompatible implantable device (www.bostonretina.org). Pure gold braze has been used in the construction of single terminal feedthrough in low density hermetic packages utilizing a single platinum pin brazed to an alumina or sapphire ceramic donut (brazed to a titanium case or ferrule for many years in implantable pacemakers. Pure gold (99.99%) brazing of 96% alumina ceramic with CP titanium has been performed and evaluated in this dissertation. Brazing has been done by using electrical resistance heating. The 96% alumina ceramic disk was manufactured by high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) processing while the Ti ferrule and gold performs were purchased from outside. Hermetic joints having leak rate of the order of 1.6 x 10-8 atm-cc/ sec on a helium leak detector were measured. Alumina ceramics made by HTCC processing were centreless grounded utilizing 800 grit diamond wheel to provide a smooth surface for sputtering of a thin film of Nb. Since pure alumina demonstrates no adhesion or wetting to gold, an adhesion layer must be used on the alumina surface. Niobium (Nb), Tantalum (Ta) and Tungsten (W) were chosen for evaluation since all are refractory (less dissolution into molten gold), all form stable oxides (necessary for adhesion to alumina) and all are readily thin film deposited as metals. Wetting studies are also performed to determine the

  16. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical......To restore oral functions in patients with missing teeth, single-tooth implants are a well-documented treatment option. Along with high survival rates, aesthetic factors have become an important clinical outcome variable for evaluating treatment success of implant-supported restorations. Thus...... studies have reported on aesthetic, biological, biomechanical and patient-reported outcomes of implant-supported single-tooth restorations of various biomaterials. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the clinical performance of zirconia-based implant-supported single-tooth restorations...

  17. Prevention of droplet condensation on metal surfaces by means of ion implantation; Einstellung von Tropfenkondensation an metallischen Oberflaechen durch Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, M.H.; Froeba, A.P.; Leipertz, A. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (DE). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik (LTT)

    2006-07-01

    Droplet condensation affects heat transfer more than film condensation, which is more common on metal surfaces, owing to the fact that droplet runoff makes wall surfaces locally condensate-free. There have been many research activities on how to achieve long-term stability of droplet condensation on metals in order to make use of it in technical applications. Coating methods involving materials of poor wettability were investigated which however have low long-term stability and also result in enhanced resistance to thermal conductivity, which would partly compensate the positive effect of droplet condensation. This contribution describes the research that has been going on at LTT Erlangen for a decade, in which the surface of the base metal is modified by ion implantation. (orig.)

  18. Soluble ions more than particulate cobalt-alloy implant debris induce monocyte costimulatory molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines critical to metal-induced lymphocyte reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Marco S; Pennekamp, Peter H; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim J

    2010-06-15

    Aseptic osteolysis has been associated with excessive immune reactivity to particulate implant debris; however, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that underlie implant debris reactivity remain incompletely understood. Although particulate debris has been implicated as the major type of implant debris mediating macrophage-induced osteolysis, the degree to which metal ions affect a proinflammatory response (if at all) remains unknown. We hypothesized that both soluble and particulate metal implant debris will induce proinflammatory responses in human monocytes resulting in cytokine production and elevated expression of T cell costimulatory molecules, facilitating adaptive immune responses. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the response of a human monocyte cell line (THP-1), isolated primary human monocytes and PBMCs challenged with Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles and soluble cobalt, chromium, molybdenum, and nickel ions. Our results indicate that soluble cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum can induce monocyte up-regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86, ICAM-1) in human monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, cobalt, molybdenum ions, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy particles similarly induce elevated secretion of IL-1beta, TNFalpha, and IL-6. Antibody blockade of CD80 and CD86, crucial secondary molecules for adaptive responses, abrogated lymphocyte reactivity to metal challenge in metal reactive subjects. Also the addition of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), (which indirectly blocks pro-IL-1beta and thus IL-1beta release), significantly reduced lymphocyte reactivity in metal-reactive subjects. Thus, both soluble and particulate metal implant debris induce monocyte/macrophage proinflammatory responses that are metal and individual specific. This suggests metal-induced up-regulation of costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production is necessary to induce lymphocyte activation/proliferation to metal implant debris.

  19. High performance germanium MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraswat, Krishna [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)]. E-mail: saraswat@stanford.edu; Chui, Chi On [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Krishnamohan, Tejas [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kim, Donghyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nayfeh, Ammar [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Pethe, Abhijit [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Ge is a very promising material as future channel materials for nanoscale MOSFETs due to its high mobility and thus a higher source injection velocity, which translates into higher drive current and smaller gate delay. However, for Ge to become main-stream, surface passivation and heterogeneous integration of crystalline Ge layers on Si must be achieved. We have demonstrated growth of fully relaxed smooth single crystal Ge layers on Si using a novel multi-step growth and hydrogen anneal process without any graded buffer SiGe layer. Surface passivation of Ge has been achieved with its native oxynitride (GeO {sub x}N {sub y} ) and high-permittivity (high-k) metal oxides of Al, Zr and Hf. High mobility MOSFETs have been demonstrated in bulk Ge with high-k gate dielectrics and metal gates. However, due to their smaller bandgap and higher dielectric constant, most high mobility materials suffer from large band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) leakage currents and worse short channel effects. We present novel, Si and Ge based heterostructure MOSFETs, which can significantly reduce the BTBT leakage currents while retaining high channel mobility, making them suitable for scaling into the sub-15 nm regime. Through full band Monte-Carlo, Poisson-Schrodinger and detailed BTBT simulations we show a dramatic reduction in BTBT and excellent electrostatic control of the channel, while maintaining very high drive currents in these highly scaled heterostructure DGFETs. Heterostructure MOSFETs with varying strained-Ge or SiGe thickness, Si cap thickness and Ge percentage were fabricated on bulk Si and SOI substrates. The ultra-thin ({approx}2 nm) strained-Ge channel heterostructure MOSFETs exhibited >4x mobility enhancements over bulk Si devices and >10x BTBT reduction over surface channel strained SiGe devices.

  20. Molecular identification of foreign inclusions in inflammatory tissue surrounding metal implants by Fourier transform laser microprobe mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nollin, S; Poels, K; Van Vaeck, L; De Clerck, N; Bakker, A; Duwel, V; Vandevelde, D; Van Marck, E

    1997-01-01

    Fourier transform laser microprobe mass spectrometry (FT LMMS) is a novel technique for micro-analysis of solids with a lateral resolution in the 5 microns range. One of the major advantages of the technique is the capability to perform characterisation of the molecular composition of both organic and inorganic compounds. The information is directly deduced from the signals without the aid of reference spectra. FT LMMS was applied to the characterisation of black tissue fragments in a biopsy from a patient, in which a constrained condylar nodular knee system was implanted ten years ago. The tissue contained numerous foreign giant cells with a black non-birefringent pigment in their cytoplasm. FT LMMS analysis allowed us to detect directly by means of molecular signals, that the debris consisted primarily of titanium oxide and not metallic titanium, while the implant itself only contained titanium.

  1. Laser synthesis of germanium tin alloys on virtual germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, S.; Conde, J. C.; Benedetti, A.; Serra, C.; Werner, J.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Buca, D.; Holländer, B.; Mantl, S.; Chiussi, S.

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of heteroepitaxial germanium tin (GeSn) alloys using excimer laser processing of a thin 4 nm Sn layer on Ge has been demonstrated and studied. Laser induced rapid heating, subsequent melting, and re-solidification processes at extremely high cooling rates have been experimentally achieved and also simulated numerically to optimize the processing parameters. "In situ" measured sample reflectivity with nanosecond time resolution was used as feedback for the simulations and directly correlated to alloy composition. Detailed characterization of the GeSn alloys after the optimization of the processing conditions indicated substitutional Sn concentration of up to 1% in the Ge matrix.

  2. Zirconia- versus metal-based, implant-supported abutments and crowns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana

    studies have reported on aesthetic, biological, biomechanical and patient-reported outcomes of implant-supported single-tooth restorations of various biomaterials. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the clinical performance of zirconia-based implant-supported single-tooth restorations...... was to test the reliability and validity of six aesthetic parameters used at the Copenhagen Dental School to assess the aesthetic outcome of implant-supported restorations. The aims of study III and IV were to compare the influence of different abutment and crown materials on biological, biomechanical...

  3. Randomized clinical trial of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F; Clark, Arthur E; Shuster, Jonathan J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52-75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a three-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD, and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher's exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure (p = 0.68), and connector height (p = 0

  4. Randomized Clinical Trial of Implant-Supported Ceramic-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Clark, Arthur E.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the survival rates over time of implant-supported ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic prostheses as a function of core-veneer thickness ratio, gingival connector embrasure design, and connector height. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study involving 55 patients missing three teeth in either one or two posterior areas. These patients (34 women; 21 men; age range 52–75 years) were recruited for the study to receive a 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Two implants were placed for each of the 72 FDPs in the study. The implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech), which were made of titanium, were grit blasted. A gold-shaded, custom-milled titanium abutment (Atlantis, Astra Tech), was secured to each implant body. Each of the 72 FDPs in 55 patients were randomly assigned based on one of the following options: (1) A. Material: ceramic-ceramic (Yttria-stabilized zirconia core, pressable fluorapatite glass-ceramic, IPS e.max ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar Vivadent) B. metal-ceramic (palladium-based noble alloy, Capricorn, Ivoclar Vivadent, with press-on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic veneer, IPS InLine POM, Ivoclar Vivadent); (2) occlusal veneer thickness (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm); (3) curvature of gingival embrasure (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mm diameter); and (4) connector height (3, 4, and 5 mm). FDPs were fabricated and cemented with dual-cure resin cement (RelyX, Universal Cement, 3M ESPE). Patients were recalled at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. FDPs were examined for cracks, fracture, and general surface quality. Results Recall exams of 72 prostheses revealed 10 chipping fractures. No fractures occurred within the connector or embrasure areas. Two-sided Fisher’s exact tests showed no significant correlation between fractures and type of material system (p = 0.51), veneer thickness (p = 0.75), radius of curvature of gingival embrasure

  5. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients: fixed - removable - combined? Metal - ceramics - all - ceramics? Implants? Anything goes! Part 2: two case studies represent the fixed, respectively the combined fixed-removable prosthetic restoration by utilization of implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    The prosthetic rehabilitation of two partially edentulous patients is presented: one Patient was restored by permanent crowns and bridges attached to natural teeth and to implants, the second was treated by crowns attached to natural teeth and removable implant- supported prostheses. Depending on esthetic requirements and the localization of preparation margins all- or metal-ceramics were used for single crowns, metal-ceramics was used for bridges. In general, a well coordinated cooperation of dentist, surgeon and dental technician in treatment planning and realization is required for a successful prosthetic rehabilitation.

  6. Implants for surgery -- Metallic materials -- Part 3: Wrought titanium 6-aluminium 4-vanadium alloy

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    Specifies the characteristics of, and corresponding test methods for, the wrought titanium alloy known as titanium 6-aluminium 4-vanadium alloy (Ti 6-Al 4-V alloy) for use in the manufacture of surgical implants.

  7. Multimodality Imaging of the Long-term Vascular Responses Following Implantation of Metallic and Bioresorbable Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.D. Gkogkas (Vasileios)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The pattern of vascular responses following stent/scaffold implantation in conventional interventional practice has been assessed by coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography and manifests as in-stent vascular response (focal or dif

  8. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, W.P.S.L.; Mantilaka, M.M.M.G.P.G.; Chathuranga Senarathna, K.G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Herath, H.M.T.U. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Premachandra, T.N. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Ranasinghe, C.S.K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.P.V.J. [Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Rajapakse, R.M.G., E-mail: rmgr@pdn.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, 20400 Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Bandara, I.M.C.C.D. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia); Singh, Sanjleena [Central Analytical Research Facility, Institute of Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane 4001, QLD (Australia)

    2016-06-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO{sub 2} thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value. - Highlights: • Colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods are prepared by a novel method. • Surfaces of titanium metal plates are modified by self-forming TiO{sub 2} thin-films. • Prostheses are prepared by coating hydroxyapatite on surface modified Ti metal. • Bioactivity and noncytotoxicity are increased with surface modifications.

  9. Successful treatment of coronary artery pseudoaneurysm by graft stent, which developed after the implantation of bare metal stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utku Şenol

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although coronary artery pseudoaneurysm which couldoccur following percutaneous coronary interventions is arare complication, it can be mortal. As soon as the pseudoaneurysmis diagnosed, it should be treated by percutaneousintervention or surgery. Graft stent implantationis a preferred treatment for appropriate patients. In thiscase report, we presented a successful treatment of coronaryartery pseudoaneurysm by graft stent; which developedafter the implantation of bare metal stent into theleft anterior descending coronary artery. J Clin Exp Invest2013; 4 (1: 126-129Key words: Coronary artery, pseudoaneurysm, graft stent

  10. Germanium multiphase equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, S. D.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, G.; Kress, J. D.; Rudin, S. P.

    2014-05-01

    A new SESAME multiphase germanium equation of state (EOS) has been developed utilizing the best available experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The equilibrium EOS includes the Ge I (diamond), the Ge II (β-Sn) and the liquid phases. The foundation of the EOS is based on density functional theory calculations which are used to determine the cold curve and the Debye temperature. Results are compared to Hugoniot data through the solid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. We propose some experiments to better understand the dynamics of this element.

  11. Application of vacuum reduction and chlorinated distillation to enrich and prepare pure germanium from coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-01-05

    Germanium, as strategic reserve metal, plays critical role in high-tech industry. However, a contradiction of increasing consumption and scarcity of germanium resource is becoming more and more prominent. This paper proposed an integrated process to recycle germanium from coal fly ash. This technological process mainly consisted of two procedures: vacuum reduction with the purposes of enriching germanium and chlorinated distillation with the purposes of purifying germanium. Several highlights are summarized as follows: (i) Separation principle and reaction mechanism were discussed to understand this integrated process. (ii) Optimum designs and product analysis were developed to guide industrial recycling. The appropriate parameters for vacuum reduction process on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM) were 920.53°C and 259.63Pa, with 16.64wt.% reductant, and for the chlorinated distillation process, adding 8mol/l HCl and L/S 7, 8wt.% MnO2. The global recovery rate of germanium was 83.48±0.36% for the integrated process. (iii) This process overcomes the shortages of traditional process and shows its efficiency and environmental performance. It is significant in accordance with the "Reduce, Reuse and Recycle Principle" for solid waste and further provides a new opportunity for germanium recovery from waste by environment-friendly way.

  12. Immediate loading of mandibular overdentures supported by one-piece, direct metal laser sintering mini-implants: a short-term prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Francesco G; Caprioglio, Alberto; Levrini, Luca; Farronato, Davide; Zecca, Piero A; Mangano, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Only a few studies have dealt with immediately loaded, unsplinted mini-implants supporting ball attachment-retained mandibular overdentures (ODs). The aim of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes of ball attachment-retained mandibular ODs supported by one-piece, unsplinted, immediately loaded, direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) mini-implants. Over a 4-year period (2009 to 2012), all patients referred to the Dental Clinic, University of Varese, and to a private practice for treatment with mandibular ODs were considered for inclusion in this study. Each patient received three or four DMLS mini-implants. Immediately after implant placement, a mandibular OD was connected to the implants. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed, including the following outcome measures: 1) implant failures; 2) peri-implant marginal bone loss; and 3) complications. Statistical analysis was conducted using a life-table analysis. A total of 231 one-piece DMLS mini-implants were inserted in 62 patients. After 4 years of loading, six implants failed, giving an overall cumulative survival rate of 96.9%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact was 0.38 ± 0.25 and 0.62 ± 0.20 mm at the 1- and 4-year follow-up examinations, respectively. An incidence of 6.0% of biologic complications was reported; prosthetic complications were more frequent (12.9%). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the immediate loading of one-piece, unsplinted, DMLS titanium mini-implants by means of ball attachment-supported mandibular ODs is a successful treatment procedure. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to confirm these results.

  13. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws.

  14. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deligianni, X. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology; Bieri, O. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Elke, R. [Orthomerian, Basel (Switzerland); Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T. [Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm{sup 3} ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  15. Schottky contacts in germanium nanowire network devices synthesized from nickel seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, R. C.; Rodrigues, A. D.; Leite, E. R.; Chiquito, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents reliable process to the synthesis of germanium nanowires by the vapor-liquid-solid method using nickel as an alternative catalyst to gold, the most commonly used metal, without toxic gas precursors. The structural study showed single-crystalline germanium nanowires with diamond structure, lengths of tens of microns and diameters smaller than 40 nm. The reduced dimensions of the nanowires led to phonons localization effect, with correlation lengths of the same order of the nanowires diameters. Additionally, the analysis of electronic properties of metal-nanowire-metal devices indicated the presence of Schottky barriers, whose values depend linearly on temperature. This linear dependence was assigned to the tunneling process through an insulator layer (mostly GeOx) at the metal-semiconductor interface. These results point to the existence of another channel for electrons transference from metal to semiconductor being very significant to electronic devices fabrication.

  16. Electrical properties of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures with low-energy Ge-implanted and annealed thin gate oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Normand, P.; Holliger, P.

    2008-03-01

    The electrical characteristics of low-energy (3keV) Ge-implanted and, subsequently, thermal annealed SiO2 layers are investigated through capacitance-voltage (C-V ) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. Particular emphasis is placed on the properties of such gate oxides for memory applications. Capacitance measurements at flatband voltage before and after the application of constant voltage stress in the accumulation regime indicate that the charge trapping behavior of the devices undergoes a major change after annealing at temperatures higher than 910°C. The latter change is identified as a relocation of Ge atoms mainly toward the upper portion of the oxide with a significant fraction of them leaving the oxide; a finding in harmony with secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. The interface trap density (Dit) for the thin (9-12nm) implanted oxides decreases with increasing annealing temperature, approaching at 950°C the Dit levels in the mid-1010eV-1cm-2 range of the nonimplanted samples. At elevated annealing temperatures (>1000°C), the device C-V characteristics are substantially disturbed. In this case, the presence of electrically active Ge atoms at an extended depth in the substrate modifies the intrinsic electrical properties of the n-Si substrate, lending a p-type conductivity character to the device high-frequency C-V curves. Substrate electrical modification is interpreted through a model that takes into account the formation of a SiO2/Ge-rich-Si /n-Si system. The SiO2/Ge-rich-Si interface presents very low Dit levels as revealed by conductance loss characteristics. The present study suggests that a combination of Ge implantation into SiO2 films and thermal annealing may be exploited in damage-free SiGe epitaxial growth technology based on Ge implantation.

  17. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Helium Bubble Implantation in Metal Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bufford, Daniel Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Snow, Clark Sheldon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Here we investigated the microstructural response of various Pd physically vapor deposited films and Er and ErD2 samples prepared from neutron Tube targets to implanted He via in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscopy and subsequent in situ annealing experiments. Small bubbles formed in both systems during implantation, but did not grow with increasing fluence or a short duration room temperature aging (weeks). Annealing produced large cavities with different densities in the two systems. The ErD2 showed increased cavity nucleation compared to Er. The spherical bubbles formed from high fluence implantation and rapid annealing in both Er and ErD2 cases differed from microstructures of naturally aged tritiated samples. Further work is still underway to determine the transition in bubble shape in the Er samples, as well as the mechanism for evolution in Pd films.

  18. Study rationale and protocol: prospective randomized comparison of metal ion concentrations in the patient's plasma after implantation of coated and uncoated total knee prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Klaus-Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any metal placed in a biological environment undergoes corrosion. Thus, with their large metallic surfaces, TKA implants are particularly prone to corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions into the human body which may cause local and systemic toxic effects and hypersensitivity reactions, and increase cancer risk. To address this problem, a new 7-layer zirconium coating developed especially for cobalt-chrome orthopaedic implants was tested biomechanically and found to lower metal ion release. The purpose of the proposed clinical trial is to compare the metal ion concentration in patients' plasma before and after implantation of a coated or uncoated TKA implant. Methods/Design In this randomised controlled trial, 120 patients undergoing primary TKA will be recruited at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University Hospital in Dresden, Germany, and randomised to either the coated or uncoated prosthesis. Outcome assessments will be conducted preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months and 5 years postoperatively. The primary clinical endpoint will be the chromium ion concentration in the patient's plasma after 1 and 5 years. Secondary outcomes include cobalt, molybdenum and nickel ion concentrations after 1 and 5 years, allergy testing for hypersensitivity against one of these metals, the Knee Society Score to assess clinical and physical function of the knee joint, the self-assessment Oxford Score and the Short Form 36 quality of live questionnaire. Discussion The metal ion concentration in the patient's plasma has been shown to increase after TKA, its eventual adverse effects being widely debated. In the light of this discussion, ways to reduce metal ion release from orthopaedic implants should be studied in detail. The results of this investigation may lead to a new method to achieve this goal. Trials register Clinicaltrials registry NCT00862511

  19. Study rationale and protocol: prospective randomized comparison of metal ion concentrations in the patient's plasma after implantation of coated and uncoated total knee prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützner, Jörg; Dinnebier, Gerd; Hartmann, Albrecht; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Kirschner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Any metal placed in a biological environment undergoes corrosion. Thus, with their large metallic surfaces, TKA implants are particularly prone to corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions into the human body which may cause local and systemic toxic effects and hypersensitivity reactions, and increase cancer risk. To address this problem, a new 7-layer zirconium coating developed especially for cobalt-chrome orthopaedic implants was tested biomechanically and found to lower metal ion release. The purpose of the proposed clinical trial is to compare the metal ion concentration in patients' plasma before and after implantation of a coated or uncoated TKA implant. Methods/Design In this randomised controlled trial, 120 patients undergoing primary TKA will be recruited at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University Hospital in Dresden, Germany, and randomised to either the coated or uncoated prosthesis. Outcome assessments will be conducted preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months and 5 years postoperatively. The primary clinical endpoint will be the chromium ion concentration in the patient's plasma after 1 and 5 years. Secondary outcomes include cobalt, molybdenum and nickel ion concentrations after 1 and 5 years, allergy testing for hypersensitivity against one of these metals, the Knee Society Score to assess clinical and physical function of the knee joint, the self-assessment Oxford Score and the Short Form 36 quality of live questionnaire. Discussion The metal ion concentration in the patient's plasma has been shown to increase after TKA, its eventual adverse effects being widely debated. In the light of this discussion, ways to reduce metal ion release from orthopaedic implants should be studied in detail. The results of this investigation may lead to a new method to achieve this goal. Trials register Clinicaltrials registry NCT00862511 PMID:19828019

  20. AMS INSIGHT--absorbable metal stent implantation for treatment of below-the-knee critical limb ischemia: 6-month analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, Marc; Peeters, Patrick; D'Archambeau, Olivier; Hendriks, Jeroen; Pilger, Ernst; Düber, Christoph; Zeller, Thomas; Gussmann, Andreas; Lohle, Paul N M; Minar, Erich; Scheinert, Dierk; Hausegger, Klaus; Schulte, Karl-Ludwig; Verbist, Jürgen; Deloose, Koen; Lammer, J

    2009-05-01

    Endoluminal treatment of infrapopliteal artery lesions is a matter of controversy. Bioabsorbable stents are discussed as a means to combine mechanical prevention of vessel recoil with the advantages of long-term perspectives. The possibility of not having a permanent metallic implant could permit the occurrence of positive remodeling with lumen enlargement to compensate for the development of new lesions. The present study was designed to investigate the safety of absorbable metal stents (AMSs) in the infrapopliteal arteries based on 1- and 6-month clinical follow-up and efficacy based on 6-month angiographic patency. One hundred seventeen patients with 149 lesions with chronic limb ischemia (CLI) were randomized to implantation of an AMS (60 patients, 74 lesions) or stand-alone percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA; 57 patients, 75 lesions). Seven PTA-group patients "crossed over" to AMS stenting. The study population consisted of patients with symptomatic CLI (Rutherford categories 4 and 5) and de novo stenotic (>50%) or occlusive atherosclerotic disease of the infrapopliteal arteries who presented with a reference diameter of between 3.0 and 3.5 mm and a lesion length of <15 mm. The primary safety endpoint was defined as absence of major amputation and/or death within 30 days after index intervention and the primary efficacy endpoint was the 6-month angiographic patency rate as confirmed by core-lab quantitative vessel analysis. The 30-day complication rate was 5.3% (3/57) and 5.0% (3/60) in patients randomized for PTA alone and PTA followed by AMS implantation, respectively. On an intention-to-treat basis, the 6-month angiographic patency rate for lesions treated with AMS (31.8%) was significantly lower (p = 0.013) than the rate for those treated with PTA (58.0%). Although the present study indicates that the AMS technology can be safely applied, it did not demonstrate efficacy in long-term patency over standard PTA in the infrapopliteal vessels.

  1. Silver nanoparticles and growth factors incorporated hydroxyapatite coatings on metallic implant surfaces for enhancement of osteoinductivity and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chao-Ming; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Ke-Feng; Meng, Fan-Zhi; Jiang, Ou; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Zhi, Wei; Fang, Li-Ming

    2014-06-11

    Research on incorporation of both growth factors and silver (Ag) into hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metallic implant surfaces for enhancing osteoinductivity and antibacterial properties is a challenging work. Generally, Ag nanoparticles are easy to agglomerate and lead to a large increase in local Ag concentration, which could potentially affect cell activity. On the other hand, growth factors immobilization requires mild processing conditions so as to maintain their activities. In this study, bone morphology protein-2 (BMP-2) and Ag nanoparticle contained HA coatings were prepared on Ti surfaces by combining electrochemical deposition (ED) of Ag and electrostatic immobilization of BMP-2. During the ED process, chitosan (CS) was selected as the stabilizing agent to chelate Ag ions and generate Ag nanoparticles that are uniformly distributed in the coatings. CS also reduces Ag toxicity while retaining its antibacterial activity. Afterwards, a BMP/heparin solution was absorbed on the CS/Ag/HA coatings. Consequently, BMP-2 was immobilized on the coatings by the electrostatic attraction between CS, heparin, and BMP-2. Sustained release of BMP-2 and Ag ions from HA coatings was successfully demonstrated for a long period. Results of antibacterial tests indicate that the CS/Ag/HA coatings have high antibacterial properties against both Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. Osteoblasts (OB) culture reveals that the CS/Ag/HA coatings exhibit good biocompatibility. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) culture indicates that the BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings have good osteoinductivity and promote the differentiation of BMSCs. Ti bars with BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings were implanted into the femur of rabbits to evaluate the osteoinductivity of the coatings. Results indicate that BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings favor bone formation in vivo. In summary, this study presents a convenient and effective method for the incorporation of growth factors and antibacterial agents into HA coatings. This

  2. Homo and hetero epitaxy of Germanium using isobutylgermane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attolini, G. [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Fontanini, Parma (Italy); Bosi, M. [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Fontanini, Parma (Italy)], E-mail: bosi@imem.cnr.it; Musayeva, N.; Pelosi, C.; Ferrari, C.; Arumainathan, S. [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Fontanini, Parma (Italy); Timo, G. [CESI Ricerca S.P.A., Via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: Gianluca.Timo@cesiricerca.it

    2008-11-03

    Nominally undoped Ge epitaxial layers were deposited on Ge and GaAs substrates by means of Metal-Organic Vapor Phase (MOVPE) using a novel Germanium source, isobutylgermane (iBuGe), by Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials LLC (USA). High Resolution X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were combined to characterize the layers. Ge layers were deposited using AsH{sub 3} as a surfactant and several growth procedures were tested. The use of arsine reduced the growth rate and also significantly improved the epitaxial quality and surface roughness.

  3. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  4. In vitro reactivity to implant metals demonstrates a person-dependent association with both T-cell and B-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallab, Nadim James; Caicedo, Marco; Epstein, Rachel; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2010-02-01

    Hypersensitivity to metallic implants remains relatively unpredictable and poorly understood. We initially hypothesized that metal-induced lymphocyte proliferation responses to soluble metal challenge (ions) are mediated exclusively by early T-cell activation (not B-cells), typical of a delayed-type-hypersensitivity response. We tested this by comparing proliferation (6 days) of primary lymphocytes with early T-cell and B-cell activation (48 h) in three groups of subjects likely to demonstrate elevated metal reactivity: group 1 (n = 12) history of metal sensitivity with no implant; group 2a (n = 6) well performing metal-on-metal THRs, and group 2b (n = 20) subjects with poorly performing metal-on-polymer total joint arthroplasties (TJA). Group 1 showed 100% (12/12) metal reactivity (stimulation index > 2) to Ni. Groups 2a and 2b were 83% (5/6) and 75% (15/22) metal reactive (to Co, Cr, or Ni), respectively. Of the n = 32 metal-reactive subjects to Co, Cr, or Ni (SI > 2), n = 22/32 demonstrated >2-fold elevations in % of T-cell or B-cell activation (CD25+, CD69+) to metal challenge when compared with untreated control. 18/22 metal-activated subjects demonstrated an exclusively T-cell or B-cell activation response to metal challenge, where 6/18 demonstrated exclusively B-cell activation and 12/18 demonstrated a T-cell only response, as measured by surface activation markers CD25+ and CD69+. However, there was no direct correlation (R(2) metal reactivity than did subject-dependent results of flow-cytometry analysis of T-cell or B-cell activation. The high incidence of lymphocyte reactivity and activation indicate that more complex than initially hypothesized immune responses may contribute to the etiology of debris-induced osteolysis in metal-sensitive individuals.

  5. Preparation of bone-implants by coating hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on self-formed titanium dioxide thin-layers on titanium metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, W P S L; Mantilaka, M M M G P G; Chathuranga Senarathna, K G; Herath, H M T U; Premachandra, T N; Ranasinghe, C S K; Rajapakse, R P V J; Rajapakse, R M G; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Mahalingam, S; Bandara, I M C C D; Singh, Sanjleena

    2016-06-01

    Preparation of hydroxyapatite coated custom-made metallic bone-implants is very important for the replacement of injured bones of the body. Furthermore, these bone-implants are more stable under the corrosive environment of the body and biocompatible than bone-implants made up of pure metals and metal alloys. Herein, we describe a novel, simple and low-cost technique to prepare biocompatible hydroxyapatite coated titanium metal (TiM) implants through growth of self-formed TiO2 thin-layer (SFTL) on TiM via a heat treatment process. SFTL acts as a surface binder of HA nanoparticles in order to produce HA coated implants. Colloidal HA nanorods prepared by a novel surfactant-assisted synthesis method, have been coated on SFTL via atomized spray pyrolysis (ASP) technique. The corrosion behavior of the bare and surface-modified TiM (SMTiM) in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium is also studied. The highest corrosion rate is found to be for the bare TiM plate, but the corrosion rate has been reduced with the heat-treatment of TiM due to the formation of SFTL. The lowest corrosion rate is recorded for the implant prepared by heat treatment of TiM at 700 °C. The HA-coating further assists in the passivation of the TiM in the SBF medium. Both SMTiM and HA coated SMTiM are noncytotoxic against osteoblast-like (HOS) cells and are in high-bioactivity. The overall production process of bone-implant described in this paper is in high economic value.

  6. Metal-on-metal hip prostheses and systemic health: a cross-sectional association study 8 years after implantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Prentice

    Full Text Available There is public concern over the long term systemic health effects of metal released from hip replacement prostheses that use large-diameter metal-on-metal bearings. However, to date there has been no systematic study to determine which organs may be at risk, or the magnitude of any effect. We undertook a detailed cross-sectional health screen at a mean of 8 years after surgery in 35 asymptomatic patients who had previously received a metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoMHR versus 35 individually age and sex matched asymptomatic patients who had received a conventional hip replacement. Total body bone mineral density was 5% higher (mean difference 0.05 g/cm², P = 0.02 and bone turnover was 14% lower (TRAP 5b, mean difference -0.56IU/L, P = 0.006; osteocalcin, mean difference -3.08 ng/mL, P = 0.03 in the hip resurfacing versus conventional hip replacement group. Cardiac ejection fraction was 7% lower (mean absolute difference -5%, P = 0.04 and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was 6% larger (mean difference 2.7 mm, P = 0.007 in the hip resurfacing group versus those patients who received a conventional hip replacement. The urinary fractional excretion of metal was low (cobalt 5%, chromium 1.5% in patients with MoMHR, but creatinine clearance was normal. Diuretic prescription was associated with a 40% increase in the fractional excretion of chromium (mean difference 0.5%, P = 0.03. There was no evidence of difference in neuropsychological, renal tubular, hepatic or endocrine function between groups (P>0.05. Our findings of differences in bone and cardiac function between patient groups suggest that chronic exposure to low elevated metal concentrations in patients with well-functioning MoMHR prostheses may have systemic effects. Long-term epidemiological studies in patients with well-functioning metal on metal hip prostheses should include musculoskeletal and cardiac endpoints to quantitate the risk of clinical disease.

  7. Silicon Germanium Quantum Well Solar Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quantum-well structures embodied on single crystal silicon germanium drastically enhanced carrier mobilities.  The cell-to-cell circuits of quantum-well PV...

  8. In operandi observation of dynamic annealing: A case study of boron in germanium nanowire devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleśnik-Gray, Maria M.; Krstić, Vojislav, E-mail: vojislav.krstic@fau.de [Department of Physics, Chair for Applied Physics, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), and AMBER at CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Sorger, Christian; Weber, Heiko B. [Department of Physics, Chair for Applied Physics, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Biswas, Subhajit; Holmes, Justin D. [Materials Chemistry and Analysis Group, Department of Chemistry, Tyndall Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), and AMBER at CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2015-06-08

    We report on the implantation of boron in individual, electrically contacted germanium nanowires with varying diameter and present a technique that monitors the electrical properties of a single device during implantation of ions. This method gives improved access to study the dynamic annealing ability of the nanowire at room temperature promoted by its quasi-one-dimensional confinement. Based on electrical data, we find that the dopant activation efficiency is nontrivially diameter dependent. As the diameter decreases, a transition from a pronounced dynamic-annealing to a radiation-damage dominated regime is observed.

  9. Evaluation of Ni-free Zr–Cu–Fe–Al bulk metallic glass for biomedical implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Kai, Wu [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► A Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} bulk metallic glass (BMG) with 50 GPa elastic modulus was used. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had lower metal ion release rate than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had better proteins adsorption than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG has a high potential for biomedical implant applications. -- Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including the chemical composition, metal ion release, protein adsorption, and cell adhesion, of a Ni-free Zr-based (Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10}) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with low elastic modulus for biomedical implant applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify the surface chemical composition and the protein (albumin and fibronectin) adsorption of the specimen. The metal ions released from the specimen in simulated blood plasma and artificial saliva solutions were measured using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The cell adhesion, in terms of the morphology, focal adhesion complex, and skeletal arrangement, of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscope observations and immunofluorescent staining. For comparison purposes, the above-mentioned tests were also carried out on the widely used biomedical metal, Ti. The results showed that the main component on the outermost surface of the amorphous Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG was ZrO{sub 2} with small amounts of Cu, Al, and Fe oxides. The released metal ions from Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG were well below the critical concentrations that cause negative biological effects. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG had a greater adsorption capacity for albumin and fibronectin than that of commercial biomedical Ti. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG surface showed an attached cell number similar

  10. Block-step asymmetry 5 years after large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty is related to lower muscle mass and leg power on the implant side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, M H; Stilling, M; Lorenzen, N D; Jakobsen, S S; Soballe, K; Mechlenburg, I

    2014-06-01

    Metal-on-metal articulations mimic the human hip anatomy, presumably lower dislocation rates and increase the range-of-motion. This study aims to measure the muscle mass and power of both legs in patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, and to investigate their effect on block-step test, spatio-temporal gait parameters and self-reported function. Twenty-eight patients (7 women), mean age 50 (28-68) years, participated in a 5-7 year follow-up. Patients had received one type unilateral large-head metal-on-metal total hip articulation, all of which were well-functioning at follow-up. Mean muscle mass was measured by the total-body Dual energy X-ray Absorption scans, and muscle power was measured in a leg extensor power rig. Block-step test and spatio-temporal gait parameters were measured with an inertial measurement unit. Self-reported function was assessed by the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. We found a significant difference between the mean muscle mass of the implant-side leg and the non-implant-side leg in hip, thigh and calf areas (Pmuscle power (P=0.025). Correlations between mean muscle mass and mean muscle power were significant for both the implant-side leg (r=0.45, P=0.018) and the non-implant-side leg (r=0.51, P=0.007). The difference in mean muscle power between legs correlated with block-step test asymmetry during ascending (r=0.40, P=0.047) and descending (r=0.53, P=0.006). Correlations between self-reported function and power of the implant-side leg were not significant. Young patients have not fully regained muscle mass, muscle power and function 5-7 years after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Transverse maxillary and mandibular growth during and after Bionator therapy: study with metallic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Costa Monini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated posteroanterior cephalograms before and after treatment and long term follow-up of Class II division 1 patients treated with bionator. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to demonstrate the transverse growth of maxilla and mandible during and after bionator therapy. METHODS: Measurement of transverse dimensions between posterior maxillary and mandibular implants, as well as the distances between the buccal, gonial and antegonial points were recorded. Measurements were analyzed at three periods: T1 = before bionator therapy, T2 = after bionator therapy and T3 = 5.74 years after T2. RESULTS: There was statistically significant transverse increase due to growth and/or treatment for all variables, except for the distance between the anterior maxillary implants. CONCLUSIONS: During the study period only the anterior maxillary area did not show transverse growth.

  12. [Implant placement with metal ceramic restorations in a patient with type II diabetes and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S V; Markina, M S

    2013-01-01

    In out-patient dental care a history of somatic pathology is of vital importance. Unfortunately patients are not always compliant enough not understanding the impact of somatic pathology on dental treatment. The current paper presents a case of dental implant placement and splint bridge fixation in a patient with type II diabetes and asthma. The authors summarize the most useful recommendations for treatment and follow-up of such patients.

  13. Some features of ion mixing during simultaneous ion implantation and deposition of metallic coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Pogrebnyak, A D; Mikhalev, A D; Shablya, V T; Yanovskij, V P

    2001-01-01

    The results on the Ta, Cu ions implantation into the aluminium substrate by simultaneous deposition of these ions in the form of coatings are presented. The complex structure of these coatings from the given elements in the substrate, as well as the increase in the microhardness, adhesion and corrosion resistance growth are determined. It is shown on the basis of the results of the secondary ions energy distribution, that intermetallic phases are formed in the substrate surface layer

  14. Review of cobalt toxicokinetics following oral dosing: Implications for health risk assessments and metal-on-metal hip implant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvermoes, Brooke E; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent L; Unice, Kenneth M

    2015-05-01

    Cobalt (Co) can stimulate erythropoietin production in individuals at doses exceeding 25 mg CoCl2/day. Co has also been shown to exert effects on the thyroid gland, heart and nervous system at sufficient doses. The biological activity of Co is dictated by the concentration of free (unbound) ionic Co(2+). Blood concentrations, as well as, urinary excretion rates of Co are reliable biomarkers for systemic Co exposure. A recent series of human volunteer Co-supplement studies simultaneously measured Co blood and urine concentrations, as well as, Co speciation in serum, and a number of biochemical and clinical parameters. It was found in these studies that peak Co whole blood concentration as high as 117 μg/L were not associated with changes in hematological parameters such as increased red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hgb) or hematocrit (Hct) levels, nor with changes in cardiac, neurological or, thyroid function. Using a Co biokinetic model, the estimated Co systemic tissue concentrations (e.g., liver, kidney, and heart) following 90-days of Co-dietary supplementation with ∼1 mg Co/day were found to be similar to estimated tissue concentrations in implant patients after 10 years of exposure at continuous steady state Co blood concentration of ∼10 μg/L. This study is the first to present modeled Co tissue concentrations at various doses following sub-chronic and chronic exposure. The modeled steady state tissue Co concentrations in combination with the data on adverse health effects in humans should help in the characterization of potential hazards associated with increased blood Co concentrations due to exposure to dietary supplements or cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) containing implants.

  15. Stent malapposition, as a potential mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuma, Takumi, E-mail: higuma@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp; Abe, Naoki; Hanada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2014-04-15

    A 90-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. He had a history of post-infarction angina pectoris 79 months ago and had a bare-metal stent (BMS) implanted in the proximal left anterior descending artery at our hospital. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated thrombotic occlusion in the previously stented segment. After catheter thrombectomy, antegrade flow was restored, but 90% stenosis with haziness persisted in the proximal and distal portions of the previously stented segment. Intravascular ultrasound imaging showed interstrut cavities or stent malapposition at the proximal and distal sites of stented segment. In close proximity to the sites, residual thrombi were also observed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated neither lipid-laden neointimal tissue nor rupture but clearly demonstrated residual thrombus adjacent to the malapposed region in addition to the stent malapposition. PCI with balloon was successfully performed and stent apposition was confirmed by OCT. Stent malapposition is an unusual mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after BMS implantation. OCT can clearly reveal the etiology of stent thrombosis.

  16. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-06-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints.

  17. Hydroxyapatite-lignin composite as a metallic implant-bone tissue osseointegration improver: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luciani Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate biocompatibility, osteoconduction and osseointegration of a pasty composite of hydroxyapatite (20% and lignin (80% as a promoter of metal implant and bone tissue integration. An intramedullary Schanz pin was implanted in both tibias of fifteen bitches. In the left tibia, the pin was coated with the biomaterial at the time of surgery. Marrow cavity was also filled with the biomaterial. Right limb did not receive the biomaterial, then constituting the control group. Tibias were harvested from five animals at 8, 60 and 150 days after surgery; three of them were analyzed by histological and biomechanical assessment and the two remaining tibias by X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the biomaterial is biocompatible, with osteoconductivity and osseointegration properties. Histological analysis and diffractograms showed the presence of hydroxyapatite in samples in all periods, although the presence of organic material of low crystallinity was variable. There was no statistical difference in the forces required for removal of the biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osseointegration, it was not able to promote a better intramedullary pin anchorage.

  18. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Custom-Built Implant Manufactured in Titanium Alloy by Direct Metal Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Larosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Custom-built implants manufacture has always presented difficulties which result in high cost and complex fabrication, mainly due to patients’ anatomical differences. The solution has been to produce prostheses with different sizes and use the one that best suits each patient. Additive manufacturing technology, incorporated into the medical field in the late 80's, has made it possible to obtain solid biomodels facilitating surgical procedures and reducing risks. Furthermore, this technology has been used to produce implants especially designed for a particular patient, with sizes, shapes, and mechanical properties optimized, for different areas of medicine such as craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this work, the microstructural and mechanical properties of Ti6Al4V samples produced by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS are studied. The microstructural and mechanical characterizations have been made by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness and tensile tests. Samples produced by DMLS have a microstructure constituted by hexagonal α′ martensite with acicular morphology. An average microhardness of 370 HV was obtained and the tensile tests showed ultimate strength of 1172 MPa, yield strength of 957 MPa, and elongation at rupture of 11%.

  19. STUDY OF THE NUCLEAR PHENOMENA IN THE LOW ENERGY (60--360 keV) PROTON BEAM IMPLANTATION ON METALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tie-shan; Zhu Yong-tai; Wang Zhi-guo; Li Song-lin; Wang Shu-jin; Jin Gen-ming

    2000-01-01

    A series of studies on the nuclear interaction and its effects in solidsduring proton implantation were performed in the energy region between60 and 360keV. Some charged particle products were observed in theimplantation experiments on metal samples such as deuterated titanium,titanium alloy, titanium foil on molybdenum substrate, molybdenum andstainless steel, etc.. The energies of the charged particle products areabout 3.9, 5.6 and 8.4MeV, respectively. These particles were identifiedas alpha particles with both detector telescope and absorptionmeasurements. These three kinds of alpha products were found fromdifferent proton sub-barrier reactions. The exciting curve of thisreaction increases exponentially with the growth of proton energy in theenergy region from 90 to 330keV. The radiation damages induced by thenuclear products in the sample have been studied with scanning electronmicroscopy technique. The possible surface damages induced by them wereobserved evidently. The origin of the nuclear reactions and their effecton implantation are discussed.

  20. Tribo-biological deposits on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene total hip implants retrieved from patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhiwei; Tian, Yi-Xing; Yue, Wen; Yang, Lei; Li, Qunyang

    2016-01-01

    Artificial total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective orthopaedic surgeries that has been used for decades. However, wear of the articulating surfaces is one of the key failure causes limiting the lifetime of total hip implant. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to explore the composition and formation mechanism of the tribo-layer on the articulating surfaces of metal-on-polyethylene (MoPE) implants retrieved from patients. Results showed that, in contrast to conventional understanding, the attached tribo-layer contained not only denatured proteins but also a fraction of polymer particles. The formation of the tribo-layer was believed to relate to lubrication regime, which was supposed to be largely affected by the nature of the ultra-high-molecule-weight-polyethylene (UHMWPE). Wear and formation of tribo-layer could be minimized in elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime when the UHMWPE was less stiff and have a morphology containing micro-pits; whereas the wear was more severe and tribo-layer formed in boundary lubrication. Our results and analyses suggest that enhancing interface lubrication may be more effective on reducing wear than increasing the hardness of material. This finding may shed light on the design strategy of artificial hip joints. PMID:27345704

  1. Performances of low-dose dual-energy CT in reducing artifacts from implanted metallic orthopedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); De Waure, Chiara; Calabro, Giovanna Elisa [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Research Centre for Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Rome (Italy); Finkenstaedt, Tim [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the performances of dose-reduced dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in decreasing metallic artifacts from orthopedic devices compared with dose-neutral DECT, dose-neutral single-energy computed tomography (SECT), and dose-reduced SECT. Thirty implants in 20 consecutive cadavers underwent both SECT and DECT at three fixed CT dose indexes (CTDI): 20.0, 10.0, and 5.0 mGy. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV, and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. In each group, the image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visually rating and by measuring the maximum streak artifact respectively. The comparison between SECT and OPTkeV evaluated overall within all groups showed a significant difference (p <0.001), with OPTkeV images providing better images. Comparing OPTkeV with the other DECT images, a significant difference was shown (p <0.001), with OPTkeV and 130-keV images providing the qualitatively best results. The OPTkeV images of 5.0-mGy acquisitions provided percentages of images with scores 1 and 2 of 36 % and 30 % respectively, compared with 0 % and 33.3 % of the corresponding SECT images of 10- and 20-mGy acquisitions. Moreover, DECT reconstructions at the OPTkeV of the low-dose group showed higher CT numbers than the SECT images of dose groups 1 and 2. This study demonstrates that low-dose DECT permits a reduction of artifacts due to metallic implants to be obtained in a similar manner to neutral-dose DECT and better than reduced or neutral-dose SECT. (orig.)

  2. Dramatic Changes in Thermoelectric Power of Germanium under Pressure: Printing n–p Junctions by Applied Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikov, Igor V.; Morozova, Natalia V.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.

    2017-03-01

    Controlled tuning the electrical, optical, magnetic, mechanical and other characteristics of the leading semiconducting materials is one of the primary technological challenges. Here, we demonstrate that the electronic transport properties of conventional single-crystalline wafers of germanium may be dramatically tuned by application of moderate pressures. We investigated the thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient) of p– and n–type germanium under high pressure to 20 GPa. We established that an applied pressure of several GPa drastically shifts the electrical conduction to p–type. The p–type conduction is conserved across the semiconductor-metal phase transition at near 10 GPa. Upon pressure releasing, germanium transformed to a metastable st12 phase (Ge-III) with n–type semiconducting conductivity. We proposed that the unusual electronic properties of germanium in the original cubic-diamond-structured phase could result from a splitting of the “heavy” and “light” holes bands, and a related charge transfer between them. We suggested new innovative applications of germanium, e.g., in technologies of printing of n–p and n–p–n junctions by applied stress. Thus, our work has uncovered a new face of germanium as a ‘smart’ material.

  3. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  4. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  5. Effects of metal implants on whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements of bone mineral content and body composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giangregorio, L.M. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Kinesiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Webber, C.E. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: webber@hhsc.ca

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of metal implants on measurements of bone mineral content and body composition by x-ray-based dual-photon absorptiometry. Four whole-body dual-photon absorptiometry scans were performed on 13 participants with metal rods either present or absent during the scans. The influence of the amount of metal (50 g, 100 g and 150 g), the proximity of the metal rod to the x-ray source and the reproducibility of any metal-induced effects were evaluated by altering the position or the size of the metal rod used, or both. The presence of metal rods weighing 100 g or 150 g significantly increased reported total body mass and bone mineral content (p < 0.034). Soft-tissue mass was increased when the scan included the 100-g rod (p < 0.003). The proximity of the metal to the x-ray source did not have a significant influence on the body composition changes induced by the metal. The effects of the metal rods on body composition variables were reproducible. The presence of metal rods inflated body composition variables measured by dual-photon absorptiometry; however, the effects are reproducible during repeat scans of an individual patient. Metal had the largest impact on whole-body bone mineral content, causing errors of 1.5%-3%. (author)

  6. Sulfonated chitosan and dopamine based coatings for metallic implants in contact with blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo, Clayton S; Chevallier, Pascale; Vaz, Juliana M; Vieira, Rodrigo S; Mantovani, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Thrombosis and calcification constitute the main clinical problems when blood-interacting devices are implanted in the body. Coatings with thin polymer layers represent an acknowledged strategy to modulate interactions between the material surface and the blood environment. To ensure the implant success, at short-term the coating should limit platelets adhesion and delay the clot formation, and at long-term it should delay the calcification process. Sulfonated chitosan, if compared to native chitosan, shows the unique ability to reduce proteins adsorption, decrease thrombogenic properties and limit calcification. In this work, stainless steel surfaces, commonly used for cardiovascular applications, were coated with sulfonated chitosan, by using dopamine and PEG as anchors, and the effect of these grafted surfaces on platelet adhesion, clot formation as well as on calcification were investigated. Surface characterization techniques evidenced that the coating formation was successful, and the sulfonated chitosan grafted sample exhibited a higher roughness and hydrophilicity, if compared to native chitosan one. Moreover, sulfonated surface limited platelet activation and the process of clot formation, thus confirming its high biological performances in blood. Calcium deposits were also lower on the sulfonated chitosan sample compared to the chitosan one, thus showing that calcification was minimal in presence of sulfonate groups. In conclusion, this sulfonated-modified surface has potential to be as blood-interacting material. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The development of Ti6Al4V based anti bacterial dental implant modified with TiO2 nanotube arrays doped silver metal (Ag)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Bachtiar, B. M.; Wulan, P. P. D. K.; Setiadi, Sari, D. P.

    2017-05-01

    The development of Ti6Al4V based anti bacterial dental implant, modified with dopanted silver metal (Ag) TiO2 nanotube arrays (TiNTAs), is studied in this research. The condition inside the mouth is less foton energy, the dental implant material need to be modified with silver metal (Ag) dopanted TiNTAs. Modified TiNTAs used silver metal dopanted with Photo Assisted Deposition (PAD) method can be used as an electron trapper and produced hydroxyl radical, therefore it has antibacterial properties. The verification of antibacterial properties developed with biofilm static test using Streptococcus mutans bacteria model within 3 and 16 hours incubation, was characterized with XRD and SEM-EDX. Properties test result that resisting the biofilm growth effectively is TiNTAs/Ag/0,15, with 97,62 % disinfection bacteria sampel.

  8. Pragmatic approach to the clinical work-up of patients with putative allergic disease to metallic orthopaedic implants before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Menné, T; Schalock, P C;

    2011-01-01

    on in the work-up of patients with putative allergic complications following surgery. Few studies have investigated whether subjects with metal contact allergy have increased risk of developing complications following orthopaedic implant insertion. Metal allergy might in a minority increase the risk......, and as surgeons may refer patients with complications following total joint arthroplasty for diagnostic work-up, there is a continuous need for updated guidelines. This review presents published evidence for patch testing prior to surgery and proposes tentative diagnostic criteria which clinicians can rely...... testing prior to surgery unless the patient has already had implant surgery with complications suspected to be allergic or has a history of clinical metal intolerance of sufficient magnitude to be of concern to the patient or a health provider. The clinical work-up of a patient suspected of having...

  9. Properties of Ion-Implanted and Diffused Photodetectors of Germanium and Germanium-Silicon Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    the solution of the Schroedinger equation for the single electron is a set of states which can be occupied by the single electron or any other...solutions into the Schroedinger equation are solved by standard procedures and appropriate boundary conditions are applied. Legitimate solutions are those...periodicity of the lattice. The Schroedinger equation 41 4 takes the form d2 + [ ko + yf(x)] (x) 0 (39) dx 2 where k is related to the total energy as

  10. Recovering germanium from coal ash by chlorination with ammonium chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new process of enriching germanium from coal ash was developed. The process involves in mixing the coal ash and ammonium chloride and then roasting the mixture to produce germanium chloride that is then absorbed by dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrolyzed to germanium oxide. The germanium recovery reached to 80.2% at the optimum condition: mass ratio of NH4Cl/coal ash is 0.15, roasting temperature 400℃ and roasting time 90 min.

  11. A 3-year prospective study of implant-supported, single-tooth restorations of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic materials in patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to describe outcome variables of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic implant-supported, single-tooth restorations. A total of 59 patients (mean age: 27.9 years) with tooth agenesis and treated with 98 implant-supported single-tooth restorations were included in this study. Two patients did not attend baseline examination, but all patients were followed for 3 years. The implants supported 52 zirconia, 21 titanium and 25 gold alloy abutments, which retained 64 all-ceramic and 34 metal-ceramic crowns. At baseline and 3-year follow-up examinations, the biological outcome variables such as survival rate of implants, marginal bone level, modified Plaque Index (mPlI), modified Sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI) and biological complications were registered. The technical outcome variables included abutment and crown survival rate, marginal adaptation of crowns, cement excess and technical complications. The aesthetic outcome was assessed by using the Copenhagen Index Score, and the patient-reported outcomes were recorded using the OHIP-49 questionnaire. The statistical analyses were mainly performed by using mixed model of ANOVA for quantitative data and PROC NLMIXED for ordinal categorical data. The 3-year survival rate was 100% for implants and 97% for abutments and crowns. Significantly more marginal bone loss was registered at gold-alloy compared to zirconia abutments (P = 0.040). The mPlI and mBI were not significantly different at three abutment materials. The frequency of biological complications was higher at restorations with all-ceramic restorations than metal-ceramic crowns. Loss of retention, which was only observed at metal-ceramic crowns, was the most frequent technical complication, and the marginal adaptations of all-ceramic crowns were significantly less optimal than metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0.020). The professional-reported aesthetic outcome demonstrated significantly superior colour match of all-ceramic over metal

  12. Design and health care: a study of virtual design and direct metal lasersintering of titanium alloy for the production of customized facial implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Kindlein Junior

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The increase in life expectancy and a great number ofaccidents lead to higher demand for medical products,including corrective implants. Patients with tumors or traumas need to replace injured areas in order to restore their aesthetic and structural function. Currently, the available craniofacial implants present a standard geometry and seldom generate satisfactory results. Customized implants, on theother hand, are designed to conform exactly to individual patient’s anatomy. This way, the use of customized implantscan show beneficial effects to the patient and the surgicalteam. In this study, the design and manufacturing of customized implant prior to surgery were described. Implant shape and functional requirements were established by digitaldata based on CT-scans and mirroring operations. The designprocess of customized mandible prosthesis is illustrated as well as its manufacturing process (direct metal laser sinteringand quality control. Laser sintering process and its constraints for the production of customized implants in titanium alloy(Ti-6Al-4V with complex geometry and internal structures are reported.

  13. Efficacy and safety of drug-eluting stent implantation for the treatment of in-stent restenosis occurring within bare-metal stent and drug-eluting stent*

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Heng; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Wei; He, Qing; Han, Zhi-hua; He, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation is the primary treatment modality for bare-metal stent (BMS) in-stent restenosis (ISR), little is known about the efficacy and safety profile of DES in the treatment of DES-ISR. The goal of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes following DES treatment for BMS-ISR and DES-ISR. Methods: Rates of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were compared in 97 consecutive patients who underwent DES implantation for the treatment of ISR (...

  14. Droplet-free high-density metal ion source for plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Keiji [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: nakamura@solan.chubu.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Hiroaki [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Yukimura, Ken [Department of Electrical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    This paper reports on plasma parameters and ion composition of droplet-free Zr ion source for plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Zirconium (Zr) ions were obtained by ionizing sputtered Zr atoms in inductively-coupled argon discharge. The characteristics of plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature were typical ones of such a inductive discharge, and the plasma parameters were not significantly influenced by mixing the sputtered Zr atoms into the plasma. Actually, the main ionic component was still Ar{sup +} ions, and the ion density ratio of [Zr{sup +}]/[Ar{sup +}] was as low as {approx}8%. Increase in sputtering rate of the Zr source will be necessary to improve the ion density ratio.

  15. Flexible photodetectors on plastic substrates by use of printing transferred single-crystal germanium membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Shin, Jonghyun; Qin, Guoxuan; Sun, Lei; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Lagally, Max G.; Celler, George K.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2009-01-01

    This letter presents studies of multiwavelength flexible photodetectors on a plastic substrate by use of printing transferred single-crystal germanium (Ge) membranes. Ge membranes of 250nm thickness with selectively ion-implantation doped regions were released from a germanium-on-insulator substrate and integrated with a 175-μm-thick polyethylene terephthalate substrate via a dry printing technique. Photodiodes configured in lateral p-i-n configuration using the flexible Ge membranes with an intrinsic region width of 10μm exhibit an external quantum efficiency that varies from 5% at 411nm to 42% at 633nm under -1V bias condition. These results demonstrate the potential of utilizing single-crystal Ge-membrane photodiodes for imaging applications and as solar cells on objects with arbitrary curvatures and shapes.

  16. Dissolution chemistry and biocompatibility of silicon- and germanium-based semiconductors for transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Kyun; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Kyungmin; Hwang, Suk-Won; Cheng, Huanyu; Shin, Jiho; Chung, Sangjin; Kim, Minjin; Yin, Lan; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2015-05-01

    Semiconducting materials are central to the development of high-performance electronics that are capable of dissolving completely when immersed in aqueous solutions, groundwater, or biofluids, for applications in temporary biomedical implants, environmentally degradable sensors, and other systems. The results reported here include comprehensive studies of the dissolution by hydrolysis of polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, silicon-germanium, and germanium in aqueous solutions of various pH values and temperatures. In vitro cellular toxicity evaluations demonstrate the biocompatibility of the materials and end products of dissolution, thereby supporting their potential for use in biodegradable electronics. A fully dissolvable thin-film solar cell illustrates the ability to integrate these semiconductors into functional systems.

  17. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  18. Galvanic displacement of metals on semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Melanie; Kelly, Joel A.; Henderson, Eric J.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.

    2009-11-01

    We report the galvanic displacement (GD) of germanium from germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) with silver. The Ge-NCs are synthesized by reductive thermal processing of germanium suboxide sol-gel prepolymers. Thermal processing yields size-controlled oxide-embedded Ge-NCs, which are liberated by dissolution of the germanium oxide matrix in water. Subsequent exposure of the freestanding Ge-NCs to aqueous solutions of AgNO3 leads to deposition of silver nanostructures by GD. The resulting metal structures were analyzed by XRD, XPS, TEM and EDX, confirming deposition of elemental silver in a variety of shapes and sizes.

  19. Galvanic displacement of metals on semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Melanie; Kelly, Joel A; Henderson, Eric J; Veinot, Jonathan G C, E-mail: jveinot@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    We report the galvanic displacement (GD) of germanium from germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) with silver. The Ge-NCs are synthesized by reductive thermal processing of germanium suboxide sol-gel prepolymers. Thermal processing yields size-controlled oxide-embedded Ge-NCs, which are liberated by dissolution of the germanium oxide matrix in water. Subsequent exposure of the freestanding Ge-NCs to aqueous solutions of AgNO{sub 3} leads to deposition of silver nanostructures by GD. The resulting metal structures were analyzed by XRD, XPS, TEM and EDX, confirming deposition of elemental silver in a variety of shapes and sizes.

  20. Front End Spectroscopy ASIC for Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Eric

    Large-area, tracking, semiconductor detectors with excellent spatial and spectral resolution enable exciting new access to soft (0.2-5 MeV) gamma-ray astrophysics. The improvements from semiconductor tracking detectors come with the burden of high density of strips and/or pixels that require high-density, low-power, spectroscopy quality readout electronics. CMOS ASIC technologies are a natural fit to this requirement and have led to high-quality readout systems for all current semiconducting tracking detectors except for germanium detectors. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly NCT, at University of California Berkeley and the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) at Goddard Space Flight Center utilize germanium cross-strip detectors and are on the forefront of NASA's Compton telescope research with funded missions of long duration balloon flights. The development of a readout ASIC for germanium detectors would allow COSI to replace their discrete electronics readout and would enable the proposed Gamma-Ray Explorer (GRX) mission utilizing germanium strip-detectors. We propose a 3-year program to develop and test a germanium readout ASIC to TRL 5 and to integrate the ASIC readout onto a COSI detector allowing a TRL 6 demonstration for the following COSI balloon flight. Our group at NRL led a program, sponsored by another government agency, to produce and integrate a cross-strip silicon detector ASIC, designed and fabricated by Dr. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The ASIC was designed to handle the large (>30 pF) capacitance of three 10 cm^2 detectors daisy-chained together. The front-end preamplifier, selectable inverter, shaping times, and gains make this ASIC compatible with a germanium cross-strip detector as well. We therefore have the opportunity and expertise to leverage the previous investment in the silicon ASIC for a new mission. A germanium strip detector ASIC will also require precise timing of the signals at

  1. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  2. Preparation of Metal-Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Films by Magnetron Sputtering and Plasma Source Ion Implantation and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Flege

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC films were prepared by a combination of plasma source ion implantation (PSII and reactive magnetron sputtering. Two metals were used that differ in their tendency to form carbide and possess a different sputter yield, that is, Cu with a relatively high sputter yield and Ti with a comparatively low one. The DLC film preparation was based on the hydrocarbon gas ethylene (C2H4. The preparation technique is described and the parameters influencing the metal content within the film are discussed. Film properties that are changed by the metal addition, such as structure, electrical resistivity, and friction coefficient, were evaluated and compared with those of pure DLC films as well as with literature values for Me-DLC films prepared with a different hydrocarbon gas or containing other metals.

  3. Laser and electron‐beam powder‐bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-01-01

    ...) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design...

  4. In-Situ Cleaning, Passivation, Functionalization, and Atomic Layer Deposition on Germanium and Silicon-Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Osborn, Tobin Adar

    In recent years, germanium (Ge) and silicon-germanium (SiGe) have drawn significant interest as replacements of conventional silicon in the search for alternative materials for use in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices due to their high electron and hole mobilities. In order to effectively implement Ge or SiGe as a replacement for silicon, two major challenges must be overcome: non-disruptive cleaning and surface passivation/functionalization. As electrical devices are increasingly scaled, it becomes especially crucial to effectively clean each unit cell on the Ge/SiGe surface without causing major disruption or damage to the surface. If air-induced defects or contaminants persist on the surface after cleaning, these defect sites may be un-reactive for functionalization and thereby will hinder device performance and/or the ability to aggressively scale device size. If a cleaning method is too aggressive leaving a rough or disordered surface, this can lower the mobility at the interface which will worsen device performance. For these reasons, it is necessary to develop a non-disruptive cleaning process that cleans each unit cell leaving a flat, ordered, and reactive surface. Once the Ge or SiGe surface is cleaned, in order to achieve a good electrical quality interface and a high nucleation density on the surface, all surface atoms must be passivated and functionalized allowing for aggressive device scaling. The interface must remain electrically passive in order to not inhibit electrical performance of the device. This study uses scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to develop and analyze a completely in-situ non-disruptive cleaning method of the Ge surface using H2O2(g) and atomic hydrogen. After cleaning, the Ge or SiGe surface is passivated and functionalized using H2O2(g) as a method to improve upon the conventional H2O(g) passivation method by more than

  5. Status report on the International Germanium Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Miley, H.S.; Reeves, J.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T.; Collar, J.I.; Guerard, C.K. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States); Courant, H.; Ruddick, K. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kirpichnikov, I.V.; Starostin, A.S. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Teoreticheskoj i Eksperimental`noj Fiziki; Garcia, E.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Puimedon, J.; Saenz, C.; Salinas, A.; Sarasa, M.L.; Villar, J.A. [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain); Osetrov, S.B.; Pomansky, A.A.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Vasiliev, S.I. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij; Pogosov, V.S.; Tamanyan, A.G. [Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst., Erevan (Armenia)

    1992-06-01

    Phase II detector fabrication for the International Germanium Experiment is awaiting resolution of technical details observed during Phase I. Measurements of fiducial volume, configuration of the tansistor-reset preamplifier stage, and sources of background are discussed. Cosmogenic {sup 7}Be is measured in germanium. Radium contamination in electroformed copper reported. The 2{nu} double- beta decay half-life of {sup 76}Ge measured with a Phase I detector is in reasonable agreement with previously reported values. No events are observed in the vicinity of the O{nu} double-beta decay energy.

  6. Neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaio, N. P.; Rodder, M.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Six slices of ultra-pure germanium were irradiated with thermal neutron fluences between 7.5 x 10 to the 16th and 1.88 x 10 to the 18th per sq cm. After thermal annealing the resistivity was measured down to low temperatures (less than 4.2 K) and found to follow the relationship rho = rho sub 0 exp(Delta/T) in the hopping conduction regime. Also, several junction FETs were tested for noise performance at room temperature and in an insulating housing in a 4.2 K cryostat. These FETs will be used as first stage amplifiers for neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers.

  7. Impending rupture of saphenous vein graft aneurysm with floating fractured bare metal stent treated by coil embolization and covered stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Atsuko; Kurita, Tairo; Kato, Osamu; Suzuki, Takahiko

    2016-11-01

    Aneurysmal degeneration of a saphenous vein graft (SVG) is a rare, but potentially fatal complication of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In this case report, a patient that had undergone prior CABG surgery and bare metal stent (BMS) implantation at the site of a stenotic SVG lesion presented at our hospital with chest pain, and an SVG aneurysm was detected at the previous BMS implantation site. In addition, the implanted BMS was fractured and floating in the SVG aneurysm. The SVG aneurysm was successfully occluded by percutaneous intervention, using a combination of distal covered stent deployment at the site of the anastomosis between the native coronary artery and the SVG and proximal coil embolization of the aneurysm.

  8. SU-E-J-58: Dosimetric Verification of Metal Artifact Effects: Comparison of Dose Distributions Affected by Patient Teeth and Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Kang, S; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Pediatrics and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford (United States); Park, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Daejeon Sun Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Implant-supported dentures seem particularly appropriate for the predicament of becoming edentulous and cancer patients are no exceptions. As the number of people having dental implants increased in different ages, critical dosimetric verification of metal artifact effects are required for the more accurate head and neck radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical analysis of the metal(streak and dark) artifact, and to evaluate dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of patients with the patient teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. Methods: The phantom comprises cylinder which is shaped to simulate the anatomical structures of a human head and neck. Through applying various clinical cases, made phantom which is closely allied to human. Developed phantom can verify two classes: (i)closed mouth (ii)opened mouth. RapidArc plans of 4 cases were created in the Eclipse planning system. Total dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions is prescribed to the whole planning target volume (PTV) using 6MV photon beams. Acuros XB (AXB) advanced dose calculation algorithm, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and progressive resolution optimizer were used in dose optimization and calculation. Results: In closed and opened mouth phantom, because dark artifacts formed extensively around the metal implants, dose variation was relatively higher than that of streak artifacts. As the PTV was delineated on the dark regions or large streak artifact regions, maximum 7.8% dose error and average 3.2% difference was observed. The averaged minimum dose to the PTV predicted by AAA was about 5.6% higher and OARs doses are also 5.2% higher compared to AXB. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that AXB dose calculation involving high-density materials is more accurate than AAA calculation, and AXB was superior to AAA in dose predictions beyond dark artifact/air cavity portion when compared against the measurements.

  9. Metal-ion release from titanium and TiN coated implants in rat bonerefid="FN1">*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F.; Miotello, A.; Pavloski, L.; Galvanetto, E.; Moschini, G.; Galassini, S.; Passi, P.; Bogdanović, S.; Fazinić, S.; Jaksić, M.; Valković, V.

    1993-06-01

    Titanium is a good material for dental and orthopaedic implants, but many authors reported that it releases ions into the surrounding tissues and into the serum. Titanium nitride has good mechanical properties and chemical inertless and may be employed as an implant coating material. In this experiment, pure titanium and SiO 2 coated with TiN implants were inserted in the tibia of rats. After thirty days, the bones were taken and examined by a proton microprobe. TiN-coated implants showed a lower ion release into the bone compared with pure titanium. This suggests that TiN may be a good coating for endosseous implants.

  10. Temperature changes associated with radiofrequency exposure near authentic metallic implants in the head phantom-a near field simulation study with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matikka, H; Lappalainen, R [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kuopio Campus, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Keshvari, J, E-mail: hanna.virtanen@uef.f, E-mail: reijo.lappalainen@uef.f, E-mail: jafar.keshvari@nokia.co [Corporate development office, Nokia Corporation, Linnoitustie 6, 02600 Espoo (Finland)

    2010-10-07

    Along with increased use of wireless communication devices operating in the radiofrequency (RF) range, concern has been raised about the related possible health risks. Among other concerns, the interaction of medical implants and RF devices has been studied in order to assure the safety of implant carriers under various exposure conditions. In the RF range, the main established quantitative effect of electromagnetic (EM) fields on biological tissues is heating due to vibrational movements of water molecules. The temperature changes induced in tissues also constitute the basis for the setting of RF exposure limits and recommendations. In this study, temperature changes induced by electromagnetic field enhancements near passive metallic implants have been simulated in the head region. Furthermore, the effect of the implant material on the induced temperature change was evaluated using clinically used metals with the highest and the lowest thermal conductivities. In some cases, remarkable increases in maximum temperatures of tissues (as much as 8 {sup 0}C) were seen in the near field with 1 W power level whereas at lower power levels significant temperature increases were not observed.

  11. Temperature changes associated with radiofrequency exposure near authentic metallic implants in the head phantom—a near field simulation study with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikka (formerly Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2010-10-01

    Along with increased use of wireless communication devices operating in the radiofrequency (RF) range, concern has been raised about the related possible health risks. Among other concerns, the interaction of medical implants and RF devices has been studied in order to assure the safety of implant carriers under various exposure conditions. In the RF range, the main established quantitative effect of electromagnetic (EM) fields on biological tissues is heating due to vibrational movements of water molecules. The temperature changes induced in tissues also constitute the basis for the setting of RF exposure limits and recommendations. In this study, temperature changes induced by electromagnetic field enhancements near passive metallic implants have been simulated in the head region. Furthermore, the effect of the implant material on the induced temperature change was evaluated using clinically used metals with the highest and the lowest thermal conductivities. In some cases, remarkable increases in maximum temperatures of tissues (as much as 8 °C) were seen in the near field with 1 W power level whereas at lower power levels significant temperature increases were not observed.

  12. Photoluminescence and semiconducting behavior of Fe, Co, Ni and Cu implanted in heavy metal oxide glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Marzouk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions (0.5 wt% of Fe2O3, CoO, NiO or CuO doped heavy metal oxide glasses having chemical composition of 60PbO·20Bi2O3·20 MxOy mol% (where MxOy = B2O3 or SiO2 or P2O5 were prepared by conventional melt annealing method. Combined optical and photoluminescence properties have been measured and employed to evaluate the prepared glassy samples. From the absorption edge data, the values of the optical band gap Eopt, Urbach energy (ΔE and refractive index were calculated to estimate semiconducting behavior. Photoluminescence and values of the optical energy gap were found to be dependent on the glass composition. The variations of the photoluminescence intensity, values of optical band gap, Urbach energy and refractive index gave an indication to use the prepared glasses for design of novel functional optical materials with higher optical performance.

  13. Cytokine induction of sol–gel-derived TiO2 and SiO2 coatings on metallic substrates after implantation to rat femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Wiktor; Marycz, Krzysztof; Krzak, Justyna; Pezowicz, Celina; Dragan, Szymon Feliks

    2017-01-01

    Material surface is a key determinant of host response on implanted biomaterial. Therefore, modification of the implant surface may optimize implant–tissue reactions. Inflammatory reaction is inevitable after biomaterial implantation, but prolonged inflammation may lead to adverse reactions and subsequent implant failure. Proinflammatory activities of cytokines like interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are attractive indicators of these processes and ultimately characterize biocompatibility. The objective of the study was to evaluate local cytokine production after implantation of stainless steel 316L (SS) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silica (SiO2) coatings prepared by sol–gel method. Biomaterials were implanted into rat femur and after 12 weeks, bones were harvested. Bone–implant tissue interface was evaluated; immunohistochemical staining was performed to identify IL-6, TNF-α, and Caspase-1. Histomorphometry (AxioVision Rel. 4.6.3 software) of tissue samples was performed in order to quantify the cytokine levels. Both the oxide coatings on SS and Ti6Al4V significantly reduced cytokine production. However, the lowest cytokine levels were observed in TiO2 groups. Cytokine content in uncoated groups was lower in Ti6Al4V than in SS, although coating of either metal reduced cytokine production to similar levels. Sol–gel TiO2 or SiO2 coatings reduced significantly the production of proinflammatory cytokines by local tissues, irrespective of the material used as a substrate, that is, either Ti6Al4V or SS. This suggests lower inflammatory response, which directly points out improvement of materials’ biocompatibility. PMID:28280331

  14. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  15. Aluminum, gallium, germanium, copper, and phosphorus complexes of meso-triaryltetrabenzocorrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarico, Giuseppe; Nardis, Sara; Naitana, Mario L; Vicente, M Graça H; Kadish, Karl M; Chen, Ping; Prodi, Luca; Genovese, Damiano; Paolesse, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    5,10,15-Triaryltetrabenzocorrole complexes of aluminum, gallium, germanium, and phosphorus were synthesized by coordination of these metal ions in the preformed triaryltetrabenzocorrole macrocycle, opening a way to the investigation of different metal complexes. The UV-vis spectra of these derivatives exhibit a red shift and broadening of all absorption bands because of the π-extended aromatic system and distortion of the molecular framework. The electrochemical and photophysical behaviors of the free base and the metal complexes of meso-triaryltetrabenzocorrole were investigated and characterized.

  16. Interstitial oxygen in germanium and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artacho, E.; Yndurain, F. [Instituto Nicolas Cabrera and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-III Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pajot, B. [Groupe de Physique des Solides (Unite Associee au CNRS), Tour 23, Universite Denis Diderot, 2 Place Jussieu, 75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ramirez, R.; Herrero, C.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Khirunenko, L.I. [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, 252650 Kiev 22 (Ukraine); Itoh, K.M. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223 (Japan); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The microscopic structure of interstitial oxygen in germanium and its associated dynamics are studied both experimentally and theoretically. The infrared absorption spectrum is calculated with a dynamical matrix model based on first-principles total-energy calculations describing the potential energy for the nuclear motions. Spectral features and isotope shifts are calculated and compared with available experimental results. From new spectroscopic data on natural and on quasimonoisotopic germanium samples, new isotope shifts have been obtained and compared with the theoretical predictions. The low-energy spectrum is analyzed in terms of a hindered rotor model. A fair understanding of the center is achieved, which is then compared with interstitial oxygen in silicon. The oxygen atom is nontrivially quantum delocalized both in silicon and in germanium, but the physics is shown to be very different: while the Si-O-Si quasimolecule is essentially linear, the Ge-O-Ge structure is puckered. The delocalization in a highly anharmonic potential well of oxygen in silicon is addressed using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations, for comparison with the oxygen rotation in germanium. The understanding achieved with this new information allows us to explain the striking differences between both systems, in both the infrared and the far-infrared spectral regions, and the prediction of the existence of hidden vibrational modes, never directly observed experimentally, but soundly supported by the isotope-shift analysis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Interstitial oxygen in germanium and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; Ynduráin, Félix; Pajot, Bernard; Ramírez, Rafael; Herrero, Carlos P.; Khirunenko, Ludmila I.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1997-08-01

    The microscopic structure of interstitial oxygen in germanium and its associated dynamics are studied both experimentally and theoretically. The infrared absorption spectrum is calculated with a dynamical matrix model based on first-principles total-energy calculations describing the potential energy for the nuclear motions. Spectral features and isotope shifts are calculated and compared with available experimental results. From new spectroscopic data on natural and on quasimonoisotopic germanium samples, new isotope shifts have been obtained and compared with the theoretical predictions. The low-energy spectrum is analyzed in terms of a hindered rotor model. A fair understanding of the center is achieved, which is then compared with interstitial oxygen in silicon. The oxygen atom is nontrivially quantum delocalized both in silicon and in germanium, but the physics is shown to be very different: while the Si-O-Si quasimolecule is essentially linear, the Ge-O-Ge structure is puckered. The delocalization in a highly anharmonic potential well of oxygen in silicon is addressed using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations, for comparison with the oxygen rotation in germanium. The understanding achieved with this new information allows us to explain the striking differences between both systems, in both the infrared and the far-infrared spectral regions, and the prediction of the existence of hidden vibrational modes, never directly observed experimentally, but soundly supported by the isotope-shift analysis.

  18. Direct laser metal sintering as a new approach to fabrication of an isoelastic functionally graded material for manufacture of porous titanium dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, T; Mangano, C; Sammons, R L; Mangano, F; Macchi, A; Piattelli, A

    2008-11-01

    This work focuses on a titanium alloy implants incorporating a gradient of porosity, from the inner core to the outer surface, obtained by laser sintering of metal powder. Surface appearance, microstructure, composition, mechanical properties and fractography were evaluated. All the specimens were prepared by a selective laser sintering procedure using a Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder with a particle size of 1-10 microm. The morphological and chemical analyses were performed by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The flexure strength was determined by a three-point bend test using a universal testing machine. The surface roughness was investigated using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The surface roughness variation was statistically evaluated by use of a Chi square test. A p value of metal core consisted of columnar beta grains with alpha and beta laths within the grains. The alloy was composed of 90.08% Ti, 5.67% Al and 4.25% V. The Young's modulus of the inner core material was 104+/-7.7 GPa; while that of the outer porous material was 77+/-3.5 GPa. The fracture face showed a dimpled appearance typical of ductile fracture. In conclusion, laser metal sintering proved to be an efficient means of construction of dental implants with a functionally graded material which is better adapted to the elastic properties of the bone. Such implants should minimize stress shielding effects and improve long-term performance.

  19. Influence of Fluoride Content of Artificial Saliva on Metal Release from 17-4 PH Stainless Steel Foam for Dental Implant Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilven Mutlu; Enver Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Highly porous 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for implant applications was produced by space holder technique.Metal release and weight loss from 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were investigated in fluoride added artificial saliva environment by static immersion test.An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was employed to measure the concentrations of various metal ions.Effects of fluoride content of artificial saliva on metal release and weight loss from the steel foams were investigated.Effects of immersion time,pH value and process parameters on the weight loss and metal release were determined.Pore morphology,pore size and mechanical properties of the 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were also characterized.

  20. Specific features of phase transformations in germanium monotelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigvava, A.D.; Gabedava, A.A.; Kunchuliya, Eh.D.; Shvangiradze, R.R.

    1981-12-01

    Phase transformations in germanium monotelluride are studied using DRON-0.5 and DRON-1 plants with high-temperature chamber GPVT-1500 at Cu, Ksub(..cap alpha..) radiation. It is shown that in the whole homogeneity range ..cap alpha.. GeTe is a metastable phase which is formed under the conditions of fast cooling of alloy from temperatures >=Tsub(cub) (temperature of transition in cubic crystal system). An equilibrium ..gamma..-phase is obtained by annealing of dispersed powders and metal-ceramic specimens of alloys with 50.3; 50.6; 50.9 at % Te. Lattice parameters of rhombic ..gamma..-phase do not depend on tellurium content in initial ..cap alpha..- phase. ..cap alpha --> gamma.. transformation is observed at any temperature less than Tsub(cub) with the change of alloy composition, namely tellurium precipitation. ..gamma..-phase transforms into ..beta.. at higher temperatures than ..cap alpha..-phase.

  1. Towards monolithic integration of germanium light sources on silicon chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinichi; Zaher Al-Attili, Abdelrahman; Oda, Katsuya; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Germanium (Ge) is a group-IV indirect band gap semiconductor, and therefore bulk Ge cannot emit light efficiently. However, the direct band gap energy is close to the indirect one, and significant engineering efforts are being made to convert Ge into an efficient gain material monolithically integrated on a Si chip. In this article, we will review the engineering challenges of developing Ge light sources fabricated using nano-fabrication technologies compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processes. In particular, we review recent progress in applying high-tensile strain to Ge to reduce the direct band gap. Another important technique is doping Ge with donor impurities to fill the indirect band gap valleys in the conduction band. Realization of carrier confinement structures and suitable optical cavities will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss possible applications of Ge light sources in potential photonics-electronics convergent systems.

  2. The impact of low-Z and high-Z metal implants in IMRT: A Monte Carlo study of dose inaccuracies in commercial dose algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadea, Maria Francesca, E-mail: mfspadea@unicz.it [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro 88100, Italy and Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Verburg, Joost Mathias; Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Fondazione CNAO, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of low-Z and high-Z metallic implants on IMRT plans. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of three patients were analyzed to study effects due to the presence of Titanium (low-Z), Platinum and Gold (high-Z) inserts. To eliminate artifacts in CT images, a sinogram-based metal artifact reduction algorithm was applied. IMRT dose calculations were performed on both the uncorrected and corrected images using a commercial planning system (convolution/superposition algorithm) and an in-house Monte Carlo platform. Dose differences between uncorrected and corrected datasets were computed and analyzed using gamma index (Pγ{sub <1}) and setting 2 mm and 2% as distance to agreement and dose difference criteria, respectively. Beam specific depth dose profiles across the metal were also examined. Results: Dose discrepancies between corrected and uncorrected datasets were not significant for low-Z material. High-Z materials caused under-dosage of 20%–25% in the region surrounding the metal and over dosage of 10%–15% downstream of the hardware. Gamma index test yielded Pγ{sub <1}>99% for all low-Z cases; while for high-Z cases it returned 91% < Pγ{sub <1}< 99%. Analysis of the depth dose curve of a single beam for low-Z cases revealed that, although the dose attenuation is altered inside the metal, it does not differ downstream of the insert. However, for high-Z metal implants the dose is increased up to 10%–12% around the insert. In addition, Monte Carlo method was more sensitive to the presence of metal inserts than superposition/convolution algorithm. Conclusions: The reduction in terms of dose of metal artifacts in CT images is relevant for high-Z implants. In this case, dose distribution should be calculated using Monte Carlo algorithms, given their superior accuracy in dose modeling in and around the metal. In addition, the knowledge of the composition of metal inserts improves the accuracy of

  3. In Vitro Analyses of the Toxicity, Immunological, and Gene Expression Effects of Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Wear Debris and Co Ions Derived from Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Posada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement has proven to be an extremely successful and cost-effective means of relieving arthritic pain and improving quality of life for recipients. Wear debris-induced osteolysis is, however, a major limitation and causes orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. During the last few years, there has been increasing concern about metal-on-metal (MoM hip replacements regarding adverse reactions to metal debris associated with the MoM articulation. Even though MoM-bearing technology was initially aimed to extend the durability of hip replacements and to reduce the requirement for revision, they have been reported to release at least three times more cobalt and chromium ions than metal-on-polyethylene (MoP hip replacements. As a result, the toxicity of metal particles and ions produced by bearing surfaces, both locally in the periprosthetic space and systemically, became a concern. Several investigations have been carried out to understand the mechanisms responsible for the adverse response to metal wear debris. This   review aims at summarising in vitro analyses of the toxicity, immunological, and gene expression effects of cobalt ions and wear debris derived from MoM hip implants.

  4. Structure and magnetism of transition-metal implanted dilute magnetic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Lino; Temst, K; Araújo, JP; Wahl, U

    The discovery of a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in which ferromagnetism is carrier-mediated and persists above room temperature is a critical step towards the development of semiconductor-based spintronics. Among the many types of DMS materials which have been investigated, the current research interest can be narrowed down to two main classes of materials: (1) narrow-gap III-V semiconductors, mostly GaAs and InAs, doped with Mn; (2) wide-gap oxides and nitrides doped with 3d transition metals, mostly Mn- and Co-doped ZnO and Mn-doped GaN. With a number of interesting functionalities deriving from the carrier-mediated ferromagnetism and demonstrated in various proof-of-concept devices, Mn-doped GaAs has become, among DMS materials, one of the best candidates for technological application. However, despite major developments over the last 15 years, the maximum Curie temperature (185 K) remains well below room temperature. On the other hand, wide-gap DMS materials appear to exhibit ferromagnetic behavior...

  5. Quantitation of maxillary remodeling. 2. Masking of remodeling effects when an "anatomical" method of superimposition is used in the absence of metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Ben-Bassat, Y; West, E E

    1987-06-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying the differences in the perceived pattern of maxillary remodeling that are observed when different methods are used to superimpose maxillary images in roentgenographic cephalometrics. In a previous article, we reported cumulative changes in the positions of anterior nasal spine (ANS), posterior nasal spine (PNS), and Point A for a sample of 31 subjects with maxillary metallic implants. Measurements had been made on lateral cephalograms taken at annual intervals relative to superimposition on the implants. In the present article, we quantify the differences in the perceived displacement of the same landmarks in the same sample when a standard "anatomical best bit" rule was used in lieu of superimposition on the implants. The anatomical best fit superimposition as herein defined was found in this sample to lose important information on the downward remodeling of the superior surface of the maxilla that had been detected when the implant superimposition was used. In fact, we observed a small artifactual upward displacement of the ANS-PNS line. In the anteroposterior direction, the tendency toward backward displacement of skeletal landmarks through time that had been detected with the implant superimposition was replaced by a small forward displacement of ANS and Point A together with reduced backward displacement of PNS. To the extent that the implant superimposition is to be considered the true and correct one, the anatomical best fit superimposition appears to understate the true downward remodeling of the palate by an average of about 0.3 and 0.4 mm per year, although this value differs at different ages and timepoints. The anatomical best fit superimposition also misses entirely the small mean tendency toward backward remodeling that was observed when the implant superimposition was used. In situations in which there are no implants, clinicians and research workers must necessarily continue to use anatomically

  6. Comparison of organic and inorganic germanium compounds in cellular radiosensitivity and preparation of germanium nanoparticles as a radiosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hsing; Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Yang, Pei-Ming; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Perng, Tsong-Pyng; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the radiosensitizing effect between organic and inorganic germanium compounds and to investigate whether nanometer-sized germanium particles can act as radiosensitizers. Bis (2-carboxyethylgermanium) sesquioxide (Ge-132), germanium oxide (GeO(2)) and germanium nanoparticles were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Cellular DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay, confocal microscopy and the cellular level of phospho-histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX). Nanometer-sized germanium particles were fabricated. They have a similar radiosensitizing effect as that of GeO(2). Conversely, Ge-132 did not enhance the radiosensitivity of cells. Comet assay was employed to evaluate the level of DNA damage and confirmed that inorganic germanium compounds enhanced cellular radiosensitivity. Notably, the comet assay indicated that the nanoparticle itself caused a higher level of DNA damage. The possibility that germanium nanoparticles per se caused DNA damage was ruled out when the cellular level of gamma-H2AX was examined. We demonstrated that inorganic but not organic germanium compounds exerted radiosensitizing effect in cells. Nanometer-sized germanium particles were fabricated and were able to enhance the radiosensitivity of cells. Confounding effect may occur when comet assay is used to estimate the level of DNA damage in the presence of germanium nanoparticles.

  7. Evaluation and automatic correction of metal-implant-induced artifacts in MR-based attenuation correction in whole-body PET/MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, G; Maus, J; Hofheinz, F; Petr, J; Lougovski, A; Beuthien-Baumann, B; Platzek, I; van den Hoff, J

    2014-06-07

    The aim of this paper is to describe a new automatic method for compensation of metal-implant-induced segmentation errors in MR-based attenuation maps (MRMaps) and to evaluate the quantitative influence of those artifacts on the reconstructed PET activity concentration. The developed method uses a PET-based delineation of the patient contour to compensate metal-implant-caused signal voids in the MR scan that is segmented for PET attenuation correction. PET emission data of 13 patients with metal implants examined in a Philips Ingenuity PET/MR were reconstructed with the vendor-provided method for attenuation correction (MRMap(orig), PET(orig)) and additionally with a method for attenuation correction (MRMap(cor), PET(cor)) developed by our group. MRMaps produced by both methods were visually inspected for segmentation errors. The segmentation errors in MRMap(orig) were classified into four classes (L1 and L2 artifacts inside the lung and B1 and B2 artifacts inside the remaining body depending on the assigned attenuation coefficients). The average relative SUV differences (ε(rel)(av)) between PET(orig) and PET(cor) of all regions showing wrong attenuation coefficients in MRMap(orig) were calculated. Additionally, relative SUV(mean) differences (ε(rel)) of tracer accumulations in hot focal structures inside or in the vicinity of these regions were evaluated. MRMap(orig) showed erroneous attenuation coefficients inside the regions affected by metal artifacts and inside the patients' lung in all 13 cases. In MRMap(cor), all regions with metal artifacts, except for the sternum, were filled with the soft-tissue attenuation coefficient and the lung was correctly segmented in all patients. MRMap(cor) only showed small residual segmentation errors in eight patients. ε(rel)(av) (mean ± standard deviation) were: (-56 ± 3)% for B1, (-43 ± 4)% for B2, (21 ± 18)% for L1, (120 ± 47)% for L2 regions. ε(rel) (mean ± standard deviation) of hot focal structures were: (-52

  8. Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Breast Implants Breast Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Breast implants are medical devices that are implanted under the ...

  9. Phosphate conversion coating reduces the degradation rate and suppresses side effects of metallic magnesium implants in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Tavares, Ana; Evertz, Florian; Kieke, Marc; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Eifler, Rainer; Weizbauer, Andreas; Willbold, Elmar; Jürgen Maier, Hans; Glasmacher, Birgit; Behrens, Peter; Hauser, Hansjörg; Mueller, Peter P

    2016-05-06

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties for the development of degradable implants. However, rapid implant corrosion and gas accumulations in tissue impede clinical applications. With time, the implant degradation rate is reduced by a highly biocompatible, phosphate-containing corrosion layer. To circumvent initial side effects after implantation it was attempted to develop a simple in vitro procedure to generate a similarly protective phosphate corrosion layer. To this end magnesium samples were pre-incubated in phosphate solutions. The resulting coating was well adherent during routine handling procedures. It completely suppressed the initial burst of corrosion and it reduced the average in vitro magnesium degradation rate over 56 days almost two-fold. In a small animal model phosphate coatings on magnesium implants were highly biocompatible and abrogated the appearance of gas cavities in the tissue. After implantation, the phosphate coating was replaced by a layer with an elemental composition that was highly similar to the corrosion layer that had formed on plain magnesium implants. The data demonstrate that a simple pre-treatment could improve clinically relevant properties of magnesium-based implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  10. Open-cellular metal implant design and fabrication for biomechanical compatibility with bone using electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L E

    2017-02-27

    Implant history extends more than 4000 years in antiquity, with biocompatible alloy implants extending over only 70 years. Over the past several decades, total hip and knee replacements of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys have exhibited post implantation life spans extending over 15 years; limited by infection, loosening, stress-shielding-related bone resorption and other mechanical failures. With the advent of additive manufacturing technologies, such as electron beam melting (EBM) over the past decade, personalized, patient-specific; porous (open-cellular) implant components can be manufactured, and the integration of chemical, biological and mechanical methods is able to optimize strategies for improving long-term clinical outcomes. This review outlines these strategies, which include enhanced osseointegration and vascularization prospects, and provides some evidence for, and examples of, clinical trials representative of millions of implant surgeries world-wide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Proximity gettering of C3H5 carbon cluster ion-implanted silicon wafers for CMOS image sensors: Gettering effects of transition metal, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Kazunari; Kadono, Takeshi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko

    2016-12-01

    A new technique is described for manufacturing silicon wafers with the highest capability yet reported for gettering transition metallic, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities in CMOS image sensor fabrication. It is demonstrated that this technique can implant wafers simultaneously with carbon and hydrogen elements that form the projection range by using hydrocarbon compounds. Furthermore, these wafers can getter oxygen impurities out-diffused from the silicon substrate to the carbon cluster ion projection range during heat treatment. Therefore, they can reduce the formation of transition metals and oxygen-related defects in the device active regions and improve electrical performance characteristics, such as dark current and image lag characteristics. The new technique enables the formation of high-gettering-capability sinks for transition metals, oxygen, and hydrogen impurities under device active regions of CMOS image sensors. The wafers formed by this technique have the potential to significantly reduce dark current in advanced CMOS image sensors.

  12. Cytokine induction of sol–gel-derived TiO2 and SiO2 coatings on metallic substrates after implantation to rat femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanski W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wiktor Urbanski,1 Krzysztof Marycz,2 Justyna Krzak,3 Celina Pezowicz,4 Szymon Feliks Dragan1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Wroclaw University Hospital, 2Electron Microscope Laboratory, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 3Institute of Materials Science and Applied Mechanics, 4Division of Biomedical Engineering and Experimental Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw, Poland Abstract: Material surface is a key determinant of host response on implanted biomaterial. Therefore, modification of the implant surface may optimize implant–tissue reactions. Inflammatory reaction is inevitable after biomaterial implantation, but prolonged inflammation may lead to adverse reactions and subsequent implant failure. Proinflammatory activities of cytokines like interleukin (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α are attractive indicators of these processes and ultimately characterize biocompatibility. The objective of the study was to evaluate local cytokine production after implantation of stainless steel 316L (SS and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V biomaterials coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2 and silica (SiO2 coatings prepared by sol–gel method. Biomaterials were implanted into rat femur and after 12 weeks, bones were harvested. Bone–implant tissue interface was evaluated; immunohistochemical staining was performed to identify IL-6, TNF-α, and Caspase-1. Histomorphometry (AxioVision Rel. 4.6.3 software of tissue samples was performed in order to quantify the cytokine levels. Both the oxide coatings on SS and Ti6Al4V significantly reduced cytokine production. However, the lowest cytokine levels were observed in TiO2 groups. Cytokine content in uncoated groups was lower in Ti6Al4V than in SS, although coating of either metal reduced cytokine production to similar levels. Sol–gel TiO2 or SiO2 coatings reduced significantly the production of proinflammatory cytokines by local tissues

  13. The International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) in 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avignone, F.T. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)); Brodzinski, R.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)); Collar, J.I. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)); Courant, H. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)); Garcia, E. (University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Guerard, C.K. (University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)); Hensley, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)); Kirpichnikov, I.V. (Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117 259 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Klimenko, A.A. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Baksan Neutrino Observatory, 361 609 Neutrino (Russian Federation)); Morales, A. (University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Morales, J. (University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Miley, H.S. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA

    1994-05-01

    The data collected from the first set of three IGEX enriched germanium detectors have been analyzed. The best background obtained was less than 0.3counts/keV/kg/y near 2MeV, obtained in the Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, USA. Data combined from all the detectors yield T[sub 1/2][sup 0][>=]qslant1.0x10[sup 24]y (90% CL). The first detector produced in the second phase of the experiment is a 2.15kg germanium crystal of 2.16keV FWHM at 1332keV. Several experiences with the first group of detectors have led to improvements in the mechanical design of the copper cryostat. Also, low background materials research done in the last two years has lowered the specific activity of the electroformed copper. The new detector is currently operating in the Homestake gold mine. ((orig.))

  14. The International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) in 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avignone, F. T.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Collar, J. I.; Courant, H.; Garcia, E.; Guerard, C. K.; Hensley, W. K.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Klimenko, A. A.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Miley, H. S.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Osetrov, S. B.; Pogosov, V. S.; Pomansky, A. A.; Puimedon, J.; Reeves, J. H.; Ruddick, K.; Saenz, C.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M. L.; Smolnikov, A. A.; Starostin, A. S.; Tamanyan, A. G.; Umatov, V. I.; Vasiliev, S. I.; Villar, J. A.

    1994-05-01

    The data collected from the first set of three IGEX enriched germanium detectors have been analyzed. The best background obtained was less than 0.3 counts/keV/kg/y near 2 MeV, obtained in the Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD, USA. Data combined from all the detectors yield T{1}/{2}0τ ≥ 1.0 × 10 24y (90% CL) . The first detector produced in the second phase of the experiment is a 2.15 kg germanium crystal of 2.16 keV FWHM at 1332 keV. Several experiences with the first group of detectors have led to improvements in the mechanical design of the copper cryostat. Also, low background materials research done in the last two years has lowered the specific activity of the electroformed copper. The new detector is currently operating in the Homestake gold mine.

  15. Epitaxial silicon and germanium on buried insulator heterostructures and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarczuk, N. A.; Copel, M.; Guha, S.; Narayanan, V.; Preisler, E. J.; Ross, F. M.; Shang, H.

    2003-12-01

    Future microelectronics will be based upon silicon or germanium-on-insulator technologies and will require an ultrathin (<10 nm), flat silicon or germanium device layer to reside upon an insulating oxide grown on a silicon wafer. The most convenient means of accomplishing this is by epitaxially growing the entire structure on a silicon substrate. This requires a high quality crystalline oxide and the ability to epitaxially grow two dimensional, single crystal films of silicon or germanium on top of this oxide. We describe a method based upon molecular beam epitaxy and solid-phase epitaxy to make such structures and demonstrate working field-effect transistors on germanium-on-insulator layers.

  16. Smooth germanium nanowires prepared by a hydrothermal deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei1977@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhao, H.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tan, W. [Henkel Huawei Electronics Co. Ltd., Lian' yungang, Jiangsu 222006 (China); Yu, H.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Chen, Y.W. [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Fan, C.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Zhang, Qian-Feng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Smooth germanium nanowires were prepared using Ge and GeO{sub 2} as the starting materials and Cu sheet as the substrate by a simple hydrothermal deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations show that the germanium nanowires are smooth and straight with uniform diameter of about 150 nm in average and tens of micrometers in length. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum of the germanium nanowires display that the germanium nanowires are mainly composed of cubic diamond phase. PL spectrum shows a strong blue light emission at 441 nm. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  17. Selective Rutherford backscattering techniques in the study of transition-metal implanted YBa{sub 2}C{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.W.; Russell, G.J. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Cohen, D.D.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Using a metal-vapor vacuum arc ion source, several as-grown, large single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 17} zinc, nickel and iron ions. After implantation the crystal was subjected to two anneal cycles that has allowed to examine crystal structure, superconducting transitions and composition, through X-ray diffraction, rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and AC susceptibility measurements respectively. Although RBS discriminates strongly against light elements, such as oxygen, the use of resonant reaction {sup 16}O ({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.4 MeV was beneficial, as its cross section is nearly 23 times that of the rutherford cross section. 4 figs.

  18. Research progress of Si-based germanium materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwen, Cheng; Cheng, Li; Zhi, Liu; Chunlai, Xue

    2016-08-01

    Si-based germanium is considered to be a promising platform for the integration of electronic and photonic devices due to its high carrier mobility, good optical properties, and compatibility with Si CMOS technology. However, some great challenges have to be confronted, such as: (1) the nature of indirect band gap of Ge; (2) the epitaxy of dislocation-free Ge layers on Si substrate; and (3) the immature technology for Ge devices. The aim of this paper is to give a review of the recent progress made in the field of epitaxy and optical properties of Ge heterostructures on Si substrate, as well as some key technologies on Ge devices. High crystal quality Ge epilayers, as well as Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells with high Ge content, were successfully grown on Si substrate with a low-temperature Ge buffer layer. A local Ge condensation technique was proposed to prepare germanium-on-insulator (GOI) materials with high tensile strain for enhanced Ge direct band photoluminescence. The advances in formation of Ge n+p shallow junctions and the modulation of Schottky barrier height of metal/Ge contacts were a significant progress in Ge technology. Finally, the progress of Si-based Ge light emitters, photodetectors, and MOSFETs was briefly introduced. These results show that Si-based Ge heterostructure materials are promising for use in the next-generation of integrated circuits and optoelectronic circuits. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 61036003, 61435013) and the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (No. 2013CB632103).

  19. Platinum germanium ordering in UPtGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Pöttgen, Rainer; Lander, Gerry H.; Rebizant, Jean

    2001-09-01

    The non-centrosymmetric structure of UPtGe was investigated by X-ray diffraction on both powders and single crystals: EuAuGe type, Imm2, a=432.86(5), b=718.81(8), c=751.66(9) pm, wR2=0.0738 for 399 F2 values and 22 variables. The platinum and germanium atoms form two-dimensional layers of puckered Pt 3Ge 3 hexagons with short PtGe intralayer distances of 252 and 253 pm. These condensed two-dimensionally infinite nets are interconnected to each other via weak PtPt contacts with bond distances of 300 pm. The two crystallographically independent uranium atoms are situated above and below the six-membered platinum-germanium rings. The U1 atoms have six closer germanium neighbors while the U2 atoms have six closer platinum neighbors. The group-subgroup relation with the KHg 2 type structure is presented.

  20. Short versus prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy duration after bare-metal stent implantation: 2-month landmark analysis from the CREDO-Kyoto registry cohort-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Masahiro; Morimoto, Takeshi; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Kadota, Kazushige; Ando, Kenji; Shiomi, Hiroki; Toyota, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Hirotoshi; Ono, Koh; Shizuta, Satoshi; Tamura, Takashi; Inoko, Moriaki; Inada, Tsukasa; Shirotani, Manabu; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Aoyama, Takeshi; Onodera, Tomoya; Suwa, Satoru; Takeda, Teruki; Inoue, Katsumi; Kimura, Takeshi

    2016-09-19

    One-month duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) has widely been adopted after bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in the real clinical practice. However, it has not been adequately addressed yet whether DAPT for only 1-month could provide sufficient protection from ischemic events beyond 1-month after BMS implantation. We assessed the effects of short DAPT relative to prolonged DAPT on clinical outcomes with the landmark analysis at 2 month after BMS implantation. Among 13,058 consecutive patients enrolled in the CREDO-Kyoto registry cohort-2, this study population consisted of 4905 patients treated with BMS only in whom the information on the status of antiplatelet therapy was available at 2 month after stent implantation [single-antiplatelet therapy (SAPT) group: N = 2575 (acute myocardial infarction (AMI): N = 1257, and non-AMI: N = 1318), and DAPT group: N = 2330 (AMI: N = 1304, and non-AMI: N = 1026)]. Cumulative 3-year incidence of the primary outcome measure (a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, definite stent thrombosis, and GUSTO moderate/severe bleeding) was not significantly different between the SAPT and DAPT groups (9.8 versus 10.6 %, P = 0.34). After adjusting confounders, the risk of SAPT relative to DAPT for the primary outcome measure remained insignificant in the entire cohort (HR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.79-1.19, P = 0.77), and in both AMI and non-AMI strata without any significant interaction between clinical presentation (AMI versus non-AMI) and the effect of SAPT relative to DAPT (P interaction = 0.56). In conclusion, short DAPT <2 month after BMS implantation was as safe as prolonged DAPT ≥2-month in both AMI and non-AMI patients.

  1. Adverse reactions to metal on polyethylene implants: Highly destructive lesions related to elevated concentration of cobalt and chromium in synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltit, Felipe; Assiri, Ali; Garbuz, Donald; Duncan, Clive; Masri, Bassam; Greidanus, Nelson; Bell, Robert; Sharma, Manju; Cox, Michael; Wang, Rizhi

    2017-07-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) are the primary cause of failure of metal on metal (MoM) hip implants, and fewer but not negligible number cases of nonmodular metal on polyethylene (MoP) implants. In this study, we analyzed 17 cases of MoP ALTR, and equal number of MoM, by histological observation, cobalt and chromium concentration in serum and synovial fluid and cytokine analysis in ALTR tissues. ALTRs in MoP are highly necrotic, affecting larger areas than MoM ALTRs. Degenerative changes in blood vessels' wall were seen in all MoP ALTRs. The concentration of cobalt and chromium was higher in synovial fluid but lower in serum of MoP patients compared to MoM patients. Elevated concentrations of chemokines were observed in ALTR tissues. We conclude that ALTRs in MoP systems are highly necrotizing lesions that seem to have a similar development to ALTRs in MoM. Alteration of vessels wall seems to have a role in the tissues necrosis, as well as the elevated concentration of cobalt and chromium in synovial fluid of MoP patients. Chemokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALTR and constitute possible diagnostic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1876-1886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 内镜置入胆道金属支架治疗肝门部胆管癌%Endoscopic metal stent implantation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞勇; 田伏洲; 张炳印; 汤礼军

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of endoscopic self-expandable metal stent implantation for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods The clinical data of 73 patients with hilar cholangiocar-cinoma who had received endoscopic metal stent implantation at the General Hospital of PLA Chengdu Command from July 2004 to July 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. The success rate of stent implantation, effective rate of jaundice release, duration of patency of the stent, survival time and postoperative complications were analyzed. Results Among the patients, 70 were successfully implanted with the stents. Unilateral metal stents were implan-ted in 62 patients, bilateral metal stents in three patients, and metal + plastic stents in five patients. The effective rate of jaundice release was 87% (61/70), the median duration of patency of the stent was 190 days, and the median survival time was 246 hours. Seven patients had complications of cholangitis, three had pancreatitis and two had bleeding. Conclusions The advantages of endoscopic metal stent implantation include minimal trauma and good efficacy in alleviating jaundice. It is the option of choice for the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction in patients with inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma.%目的 探讨通过内镜置入自膨式胆道金属支架治疗肝门部胆管癌的疗效.方法 回顾性分析2004年7月至2009年7月成都军区总医院收治的73例肝门部胆管癌患者行内镜胆道金属支架置入术的操作成功率、减黄有效率、支架通畅时间和生存时间以及术后并发症.结果 支架置入成功70例,3例失败.其中单金属支架置入62例,双侧金属支架置入3例,金属支架+塑料支架置人5例.减黄有效率为87%(61/70),中位支架通畅时间为190 d,中位生存时间为246 d.术后发生胆管炎7例,胰腺炎3例,出血2例.结论 内镜置入自膨式胆道金属支架治疗肝门部胆管癌创伤小、减黄效果好,可作为无法

  3. Biological insertion of nanostructured germanium and titanium oxides into diatom biosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffryes, Clayton S.

    There is significant interest in titanium oxide and germanium-silicon oxide nanocomposites for optoelectronic, photocatalytic, and solar cell applications. The ability of the marine diatom Pinnularia sp. to uptake soluble metal oxides from cell culture medium, and incorporate them into the micro- and nano-structure of their amorphous silica cell walls, called frustules, was evaluated using an engineered photobioreactor system. The effects of metal oxides on the structural and elemental properties of the frustule were also evaluated. Diatom cell cultures grown in 5 L photobioreactors were initially charged with 0.5 mM of soluble silicon, Si(OH)4, an obligate substrate required for frustule fomation. Upon exhaustion of Si(OH)4 cells were exposed to the mixed pulse-addition of soluble silicon and germanium or co-perfusion addition of soluble silicon and titanium, which were incorporated into the frustules. Metals composition of the cell culture medium, diatom biomass and purified frustules were measured, as was the local elemental composition within the frustule pores and the metal oxide crystallinity. Diatom frustules having a germanium composition of 1.6 wt % were devoid of the native intra-pore structures and possessed enhanced photoluminescence and electroluminescence when compared to frustules without Ge. Diatoms cultivated in the presence of soluble titanium incorporated amorphous titania into the frustule, which maintained native structure even when local TiO2 concentrations within the nanopores approached 60 wt. %. Titanium oxide could also be biomimetically deposited directly within the diatom nanopores by adsorbing poly-L-lysine to the diatom biosilica where it catalyzed the soluble titanium precursor Ti-BALDH into amorphous titania nanoparticles. Both biogenic and biomimetic titania could be converted to anatase titanium by thermal annealing. It was determined that nanostructured metal oxide composites can be fabricated biomimetically or in cell culture to

  4. The Biological Effects of Combining Metals in a Posterior Spinal Implant: In Vivo Model Development Report of the First Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Farnsworth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Combinations of metal implants (stainless steel (SS, titanium (Ti, and cobalt chrome (CC were placed in porcine spines. After 12 months, tissue response and implant corrosion were compared between mixed and single metal junctions. Objective. Model development and an attempt to determine any detriment of combining different metals in posterior spinal instrumentation. Methods. Yucatan mini-pigs underwent instrumentation over five unfused lumbar levels. A SS rod and a Ti rod were secured with Ti and SS pedicle screws, SS and Ti crosslinks, SS and CC sublaminar wires, and Ti sublaminar cable. The resulting 4 SS/SS, 3 Ti/Ti, and 11 connections between dissimilar metals per animal were studied after 12 months using radiographs, gross observation, and histology (foreign body reaction (FBR, metal particle count, and inflammation analyzed. Results. Two animals had constructs in place for 12 months with no complications. Histology of tissue over SS/SS connections demonstrated 11.1 ± 7.6 FBR cells, 2.1 ± 1.7 metal particles, and moderate to extensive inflammation. Ti/Ti tissue showed 6.3 ± 3.8 FBR cells, 5.2 ± 6.7 particles, and no to extensive inflammation (83% extensive. Tissue over mixed components had 14.1 ± 12.6 FBR cells and 13.4 ± 27.8 particles. Samples surrounding wires/cables versus other combinations demonstrated FBR (12.4 ± 13.5 versus 12.0 ± 9.6 cells, P = 0.96, particles (19.8 ± 32.6 versus 4.3 ± 12.7, P = 0.24, and inflammation (50% versus 75% extensive, P = 0.12. Conclusions. A nonfusion model was developed to study corrosion and analyze biological responses. Although no statistical differences were found in overlying tissue response to single versus mixed metal combinations, galvanic corrosion between differing metals is not ruled out. This pilot study supports further investigation to answer concerns when mixing metals in spinal constructs.

  5. Investigation of Intermixing/Implantation in Pulsed Laser Deposited Metallic Cr/Ni80Fe20 and Ni80Fe20/Polypyrrole Multilayer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Usenobong Benjamin; George, Nyakno Jimmy; Ekanem, Aniekan Martin; Emah, Joseph Bassey

    2016-10-01

    Cr/Ni80Fe20 and Ni80Fe20/Polypyrrole multilayer thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum and in Argon background gas at different pressures. Intermixing/implantation at their interfaces were investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis. Surface morphology (step height and roughness) of these samples were carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic property (saturation magnetic flux) measurement by hysteresis loop tracer. The magnetic and surface morphology characterisations were used to calculate the interfacial mixing and/or implantation depth which have been found to agree with direct measured values. A correlation of these intermixing depths with Monte Carlo simulations of ion bombardment in the deposition process, using Stopping range of ion in matter (SRIM) incorporated with Transport of ion in matter (TRIM) gave the energy of the most implanted ionic species in a very simple way. Under high vacuum pressure, intermixing/implantation depth at the interfaces was high and occurs due to the presence of energetic species in the ablated plasma plume. With Argon gas background of increasing pressure, a reduction in energetic species energy is followed with a decrease in intermixing/implantation depth and the scattering of the ablated species leads to a decrease in the growth rate of Cr. An Argon background gas pressure of 20 mTorr gave the kinetic energy of the most energetic Cr species as 150 eV (from simulation) with 0.61 nm intermixing/implantation depth, while the vacuum pressure of 1.3 × 10- 7 Torr gave the most energetic Cr energy as 3.2 keV with 2.38 nm depth of intermixing. Vacuum pressure 5 × 10- 7 Torr with deposition of Permalloy (Py) Ni80Fe20 into polypyrrole gave measured intermixing/implantation depths of 6.81 nm with Ni80Fe20 energy of about 800 eV. The surface of the Py/polypyrrole (Ppy) was very rough at vacuum pressure 5 × 10- 3 Torr

  6. Investigation of Intermixing/Implantation in Pulsed Laser Deposited Metallic Cr/Ni80Fe20 and Ni80Fe20/Polypyrrole Multilayer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Usenobong Benjamin; George, Nyakno Jimmy; Ekanem, Aniekan Martin; Emah, Joseph Bassey

    2016-12-01

    Cr/Ni80Fe20 and Ni80Fe20/Polypyrrole multilayer thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum and in Argon background gas at different pressures. Intermixing/implantation at their interfaces were investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis. Surface morphology (step height and roughness) of these samples were carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic property (saturation magnetic flux) measurement by hysteresis loop tracer. The magnetic and surface morphology characterisations were used to calculate the interfacial mixing and/or implantation depth which have been found to agree with direct measured values. A correlation of these intermixing depths with Monte Carlo simulations of ion bombardment in the deposition process, using Stopping range of ion in matter (SRIM) incorporated with Transport of ion in matter (TRIM) gave the energy of the most implanted ionic species in a very simple way. Under high vacuum pressure, intermixing/implantation depth at the interfaces was high and occurs due to the presence of energetic species in the ablated plasma plume. With Argon gas background of increasing pressure, a reduction in energetic species energy is followed with a decrease in intermixing/implantation depth and the scattering of the ablated species leads to a decrease in the growth rate of Cr. An Argon background gas pressure of 20 mTorr gave the kinetic energy of the most energetic Cr species as 150 eV (from simulation) with 0.61 nm intermixing/implantation depth, while the vacuum pressure of 1.3 × 10- 7 Torr gave the most energetic Cr energy as 3.2 keV with 2.38 nm depth of intermixing. Vacuum pressure 5 × 10- 7 Torr with deposition of Permalloy (Py) Ni80Fe20 into polypyrrole gave measured intermixing/implantation depths of 6.81 nm with Ni80Fe20 energy of about 800 eV. The surface of the Py/polypyrrole (Ppy) was very rough at vacuum pressure 5 × 10- 3 Torr

  7. The Evolution and Fabrication of Implant-supported Full-arch Hybrid Prostheses. From Conventional Casted Metal to an All-Ceramic Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzer, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Implant-supported, full-arch hybrid prostheses have developed from cast-metal frameworks with acrylic or porcelain to all-ceramic zirconia frameworks. CAD/CAM manufacturing removed the inaccuracies seen with casting and made use of zirconia possible. The materials and processes for prosthodontic fabrication are explained. Zirconia is highly opaque and versatile. However, porcelain-veneered zirconia frameworks have shown higher enamel wear, among other problems. Lithium disilicate has been shown to be more translucent than zirconia. Improved stained and more translucent zirconia frameworks have been produced as well. These promising new methods have gained popularity, but long-term studies are scarce and, thus, more research is required.

  8. Germanium: From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2006-06-14

    Germanium, element No.32, was discovered in 1886 by Clemens Winkler. Its first broad application was in the form of point contact Schottky diodes for radar reception during WWII. The addition of a closely spaced second contact led to the first all-solid-state electronic amplifier device, the transistor. The relatively low bandgap, the lack of a stable oxide and large surface state densities relegated germanium to the number 2 position behind silicon. The discovery of the lithium drift process, which made possible the formation of p-i-n diodes with fully depletable i-regions several centimeters thick, led germanium to new prominence as the premier gamma-ray detector. The development of ultra-pure germanium yielded highly stable detectors which have remained unsurpassed in their performance. New acceptors and donors were discovered and the electrically active role of hydrogen was clearly established several years before similar findings in silicon. Lightly doped germanium has found applications as far infrared detectors and heavily Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium is used in thermistor devices operating at a few milliKelvin. Recently germanium has been rediscovered by the silicon device community because of its superior electron and hole mobility and its ability to induce strains when alloyed with silicon. Germanium is again a mainstream electronic material.

  9. Ultraviolet-light-induced processes in germanium-doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented for the interaction of ultraviolet (UV) light with germanium-doped silica glass. It is assumed that germanium sites work as gates for transferring the excitation energy into the silica. In the material the excitation induces forbidden transitions to two different defect states...

  10. AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors with reduced leakage current and enhanced breakdown voltage using aluminum ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shichuang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Fu, Kai, E-mail: kfu2009@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: cqchen@mail.hust.edu.cn; Yu, Guohao; Zhang, Zhili; Song, Liang; Deng, Xuguang; Li, Shuiming; Sun, Qian; Cai, Yong; Zhang, Baoshun [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Qi, Zhiqiang; Dai, Jiangnan; Chen, Changqing, E-mail: kfu2009@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: cqchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-01-04

    This letter has studied the performance of AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors on silicon substrate with GaN buffer treated by aluminum ion implantation for insulating followed by a channel regrown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. For samples with Al ion implantation of multiple energies of 140 keV (dose: 1.4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}) and 90 keV (dose: 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}), the OFF-state leakage current is decreased by more than 3 orders and the breakdown voltage is enhanced by nearly 6 times compared to the samples without Al ion implantation. Besides, little degradation of electrical properties of the 2D electron gas channel is observed where the maximum drain current I{sub DSmax} at a gate voltage of 3 V was 701 mA/mm and the maximum transconductance g{sub mmax} was 83 mS/mm.

  11. Ultrafast palladium diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan Ali

    2015-01-01

    The slow transport of dopants through crystal lattices has hindered the development of novel devices. Typically atoms are contained within deep potential energy wells which necessitates multiple attempts to hop between minimum energy positions. This is because the bonds that constrain atoms are strongest at the minimum positions. As they hop between sites the bonds must be broken, only to re-form as the atoms slide into adjacent minima. Here we demonstrate that the Pd atoms introduced into the Ge lattice behave differently. They retain bonds as the atoms shift across so that at the energy maximum between sites Pd still exhibits strong bonding characteristics. This reduces the energy maximum to almost nothing (a migration energy of only 0.03 eV) and means that the transport of Pd through the Ge lattice is ultrafast. We scrutinize the bonding characteristics at the atomic level using quantum mechanical simulation tools and demonstrate why Pd behaves so differently to other metals we investigated (i.e. Li, Cu, Ag, Pt and Au). Consequently, this fundamental understanding can be extended to systems where extremely rapid diffusion is desired, such as radiation sensors, batteries and solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. Penile Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the discussion with your doctor. Types of penile implants There are two main types of penile implants: ... might help reduce the risk of infection. Comparing implant types When choosing which type of penile implant ...

  13. Bioceramics for implant coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A Campbell

    2003-11-01

    Early research in this field focused on understanding the biomechanical properties of metal implants, but recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has led to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first CaP coatings were produced via vapor phase processes, but more recently solution-based and biomimetic methods have emerged. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  14. MAJORANA Collaboration's Experience with Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Abgrall, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, III, F. T. [University of South Carolina/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Barabash, A.S. [Institute of Theoretical & Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow, Russia; Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Galindo-Uribarri, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Radford, D. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Romero-Romero, E. [UTK/ORNL; Varner, R. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL; Yu, C.-H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Majorana, [MAJORANA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Majorana Demonstrator project is to search for 0v beta beta decay in Ge-76. Of all candidate isotopes for 0v beta beta, Ge-76 has some of the most favorable characteristics. Germanium detectors are a well established technology, and in searches for 0v beta beta, the high purity germanium crystal acts simultaneously as source and detector. Furthermore, p-type germanium detectors provide excellent energy resolution and a specially designed point contact geometry allows for sensitive pulse shape discrimination. This paper will summarize the experiences the MAJORANA collaboration made with enriched germanium detectors manufactured by ORTEC (R)(R). The process from production, to characterization and integration in MAJORANA mounting structure will be described. A summary of the performance of all enriched germanium detectors will be given.

  15. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hardemark, B; Hynning, E [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  16. Silicon/Germanium Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a well-established method to grow low-dimensional structures for research applications. MBE has given many contributions to the rapid expanding research-area of nano-technology and will probably continuing doing so. The MBE equipment, dedicated for Silicon/Germanium (Si/Ge) systems, at Karlstads University (Kau) has been studied and started for the first time. In the work of starting the system, all the built in interlocks has been surveyed and connected, and t...

  17. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhead, S. D., E-mail: S.Rhead@warwick.ac.uk; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shah, V. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sotomayor Torres, C. M. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  18. Radiation piezoelectric effect in germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.

    1977-06-01

    Irradiation with ionizing particles of a germanium single crystal and uniaxial deformation at right-angles to the particle beam produced an electric field and a corresponding emf due to the radiation piezoelectric effect. Measurements were carried out when such a single crystal was irradiated with ..cap alpha.. particles and protons. The piezoelectric emf increased linearly with the compressive stress and the ..cap alpha..-particle flux intensity. The emf depended weakly on the particle energy. The observed effect was due to the anisotropy resulting from uniaxial deformation.

  19. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  20. A new adsorbent of a Ce ion-implanted metal-organic framework (MIL-96) with high-efficiency Ce utilization for removing fluoride from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuan; Deng, Shuangshuang; Peng, Fumin; Luo, Tao

    2017-02-14

    A novel Ce(iii) ion-implanted aluminum-trimesic metal-organic framework (Ce-MIL-96) was synthesized for the first time via alcohol-solvent incipient wetness impregnation. Compared to previously reported Ce-contained adsorbents, the fluoride adsorption performance of the new ion-implanted metal-organic framework demonstrated much higher adsorption capacity and more efficient regeneration of Ce. In a wide pH range of 3 to 10, Ce-MIL-96 maintained constant adsorption performance for fluoride, and the residual Ce and Al in the treated solution were below the safe limits in drinking water. The maximum adsorption capacity of Ce-MIL-96 was 38.65 mg g(-1) at 298 K. Excluding the contribution of MIL-96, the maximum adsorption capacity of Ce ions was 269.75 mg g(-1), which demonstrated that the service efficiency of cerium in Ce-MIL-96 is about 6 times that in Ce2O3, nearly 10 times that in Ce-mZrp, and double that in Mn-Ce oxides. There was no significant influence on fluoride removal by Ce-MIL-96 due to the presence of chloride, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate or phosphate. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of Ce-MIL-96 remained at more than 70% after nine cycles of adsorption-desorption. Due to this excellent adsorption performance and its regeneration properties, Ce-MIL-96 is a promising adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from groundwater.

  1. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, R.; Winklhofer, S.; Andreisek, G.; Alkadhi, H.; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Osterhoff, G.; Wanner, G.A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Fortunati, M. [The Spine Center, Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, {kappa} = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. (orig.)

  2. Patency of paclitaxel-eluting versus bare metal stents long term after implantation in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Maarten A; Van Nooijen, Ferdinand C; Laarman, Gerrit J; Suttorp, Maarten J; Tijssen, Jan G; Slagboom, Ton; Patterson, Mark S; Van Der Schaaf, Rene J; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Amoroso, Giovanni; Dirksen, Maurits T

    2011-11-01

    Drug-eluting stents effectively inhibit neointimal hyperplasia within the first year, thereby reducing the need for repeat revascularization. However, a delayed pattern of restenosis might be more prominent in drug-eluting stents compared to bare metal stents (BMSs). The extent of restenosis of paclitaxel-eluting stents (PESs) long term after implantation in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction is currently unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate very late luminal loss (VLLL) of PESs used in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction compared to BMSs. A total of 116 patients (61 with PESs and 55 with BMSs) initially included in the Paclitaxel Eluting Stent Versus Conventional Stent in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (PASSION) trial and who were free from previous lesion failure underwent angiographic follow-up. Off-line quantitative coronary analysis of the angiogram immediately after stent implantation and at follow-up was performed. The primary end point was VLLL within the stent. The presence of binary restenosis was defined as diameter stenosis >50% as a secondary end point. The mean interval between stent implantation and follow-up was 4.1 ± 0.5 years in both stent groups. In-stent VLLL was 0.12 mm (interquartile range -0.03 to 0.42) in the PES group versus 0.30 mm (interquartile range 0.08 to 0.69) in the BMS group (p = 0.011). In-segment binary restenosis was found in 4 patients (6.6%) with a PES and 6 patients (10.9%) with a BMS (p = 0.40). In conclusion, angiographic follow-up 4 years after implantation in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction showed that in patients prospectively randomized to PESs or BMSs, VLLL was low in both stent groups. PESs were associated with lower VLLL than BMSs, and the observed rate of binary restenosis was not significantly different between the 2 stent groups.

  3. Comportamiento metalúrgico de mini implantes de Ti-6Al-4V como anclaje temporal en aplicaciones de ortodoncia

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Mendoza-Bravo; José Antonio Arias-González; Doris Ivette Villalobos-Vera; Héctor Ruiz-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    El uso de mini implantes como sistema de anclaje temporal en ortodoncia, es una técnica relativamente nueva que permite el movimiento de los dientes de una manera eficiente y predecible. A pesar de que se han empezado a utilizar en diversos países como Alemania, Japón y Corea del Sur, aún existe la necesidad de analizar y dar a conocer las ventajas de este procedimiento sobre los tratamientos tradicionales. En este trabajo se analizó la integridad de mini implantes fabricados de una aleación ...

  4. Effects of Germanium on Movement of Dislocations in p-Type Czochralski Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By indentation at room temperature followed by annealing at high temperatures, the pinning effect of germanium on dislocations in germanium-doped Czochralski silicon was investigated. Experimental results show that the dislocations in germanium-doped Czochralski silicon move shorter and slower than those in Czochralski silicon undoping with germanium when the concentration of germanium is over 1×1018 cm-3. The retarding velocity of dislocations is contributed to the dislocations pinning effect of the strain field introduced by the high concentration germanium, and the Ge4B cluster and the oxygen precipitation those are preferred to form at higher concentration germanium.

  5. Cryogenic readout techniques for germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benato, G. [University of Zurich, (Switzerland); Cattadori, C. [INFN - Milano Bicocca, (Italy); Di Vacri, A. [INFN LNGS, (Italy); Ferri, E. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy); D' Andrea, V.; Macolino, C. [GSSI/INFN LNGS, (Italy); Riboldi, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano/INFN Milano, (Italy); Salamida, F. [Universita Milano Bicocca/INFN Milano Bicocca, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    High Purity Germanium detectors are used in many applications, from nuclear and astro-particle physics, to homeland security or environment protection. Although quite standard configurations are often used, with cryostats, charge sensitive amplifiers and analog or digital acquisition systems all commercially available, it might be the case that a few specific applications, e.g. satellites, portable devices, cryogenic physics experiments, etc. also require the development of a few additional or complementary techniques. An interesting case is for sure GERDA, the Germanium Detector Array experiment, searching for neutrino-less double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN - Italy. In GERDA the entire detector array, composed of semi-coaxial and BEGe naked crystals, is operated suspended inside a cryostat filled with liquid argon, that acts not only as cooling medium and but also as an active shield, thanks to its scintillation properties. These peculiar circumstances, together with the additional requirement of a very low radioactive background from all the materials adjacent to the detectors, clearly introduce significant constraints on the design of the Ge front-end readout electronics. All the Ge readout solutions developed within the framework of the GERDA collaboration, for both Phase I and Phase II, will be briefly reviewed, with their relative strength and weakness compared together and with respect to ideal Ge readout. Finally, the digital processing techniques developed by the GERDA collaboration for energy estimation of Ge detector signals will be recalled. (authors)

  6. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  7. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  8. Comparison of electron and hole charge-discharge dynamics in germanium nanocrystal flash memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akca, Imran B.; Dâna, Aykutlu; Aydinli, Atilla; Turan, Rasit

    2008-02-01

    Electron and hole charge and discharge dynamics are studied on plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown metal-oxide-silicon germanium nanocrystal flash memory devices. Electron and hole charge and discharge currents are observed to differ significantly and depend on annealing conditions chosen for the formation of nanocrystals. At low annealing temperatures, holes are seen to charge slower but to escape faster than electrons. They discharge slower than electrons when annealing temperatures are raised. The results suggest that discharge currents are dominated by the interface layer acting as a quantum well for holes and by direct tunneling for elec-trons.

  9. A new approach for transition metal free magnetic SiC: Defect induced magnetism after self-ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummari, Venkata Chandra Sekhar

    SiC has become an attractive wide bandgap semiconductor due to its unique physical and electronic properties and is widely used in high temperature, high frequency, high power and radiation resistant applications. SiC has been used as an alternative to Si in harsh environments such as in the oil industry, nuclear power systems, aeronautical, and space applications. SiC is also known for its polytypism and among them 3C-SiC, 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC are the most common polytypes used for research purposes. Among these polytypes 4H-SiC is gaining importance due to its easy commercial availability with a large bandgap of 3.26 eV at room temperature. Controlled creation of defects in materials is an approach to modify the electronic properties in a way that new functionality may result. SiC is a promising candidate for defect-induced magnetism on which spintronic devices could be developed. The defects considered are of room temperature stable vacancy types, eliminating the need for magnetic impurities, which easily diffuse at room temperature. Impurity free vacancy type defects can be created by implanting the host atoms of silicon or carbon. The implantation fluence determines the defect density, which is a critical parameter for defect induced magnetism. Therefore, we have studied the influence of low fluence low energy silicon and carbon implantation on the creation of defects in n-type 4H-SiC. The characterization of the defects in these implanted samples was performed using the techniques, RBS-channeling and Raman spectroscopy. We have also utilized these characterization techniques to analyze defects created in much deeper layers of the SiC due to implantation of high energy nitrogen ions. The experimentally determined depths of the Si damage peaks due to low energy (60 keV) Si and C ions with low fluences (disorders calculated along the c-axis (LO mode) and perpendicular to c-axis (TO mode) in 4H-SiC are found to be similar. Furthermore, the results obtained from

  10. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  11. The Genesis of Lincang Germanium Deposit—A Preliminary Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡瑞忠; 叶造军; 等

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of the Lincang germanium deposit is discussed in the light of the spatial distribution of Ge-rich coal and siliceous rocks,the sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite in the Ge-rich coal,the variation of Ge abundance in the coal seams and the geochemical characteristics of the siliceous rocks.The results show that the siliceous rocks intercalated with the coal seamw were deposited from a hyrothermal medium through which germanium was enriched in the coal beds.The primary source of germanium is thought to be the Gerich granite in the basement of the sedimentary basin.

  12. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering and Computing, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece); Schwingenschlögl, U. [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  13. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants : a phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harnish, Roy; Prevrhal, Sven; Alavi, Abass; Zaidi, Habib; Lang, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom h

  14. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants : a phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harnish, Roy; Prevrhal, Sven; Alavi, Abass; Zaidi, Habib; Lang, Thomas F.

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom

  15. Wear particles derived from metal hip implants induce the generation of multinucleated giant cells in a 3-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debargh K Dutta

    Full Text Available Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1-5 micron wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size and in the propidium iodide (PI uptake (DNA intercalating dye was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP, which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs

  16. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten

    2011-01-01

    inflammatory reactions were registered at AC restorations. Two technical complications, one loss of retention and one chipping of veneering porcelain were recorded at two metal-ceramic crowns. The marginal adaptation of the all-ceramic crowns was significantly less optimal than the metal-ceramic crowns (P = 0...

  17. 去金属伪影序列对胸腰椎体金属植入患者磁共振影像的影响%To Metal Artifacts Sequence MRI in Patients Implanted for Thoracolumbar Vertebrae Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代自伦; 黄声丽

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究去金属伪影序列对胸腰椎体金属植入患者磁共振影像的影响。方法选取2014年1月-2015年1月期间我院接受治疗的25例胸腰椎(腰椎、胸椎)金属植入物患者,对所有患者进行胸腰椎磁共振常规序列和去金属伪影序列扫描,并使用配对t检验对两种序列检查的扫描时间和图像质量评分进行分析和比较。结果去金属伪影序列图像上金属植入物的周边软组织信号丢失减轻,且常规序列的图像模糊和变形情况较去金属伪影序列图像严重。常规序列图像质量评分为(3.56±0.53)分,去金属伪影序列图像质量评分为(4.22±0.67)分,比较两组间差异统计学具有意义(p<0.05)。腰椎金属伪影序列检查时间为11min53s,常规序列检查时间为9min16s,比较两组间差异统计学具有意义(p<0.05)。胸椎去金属伪影序列检查的时间为12min45s,常规序列检查时间为8min16s,比较两组间差异统计学具有意义(p<0.05)。结论去金属伪影序列检查技术能够显著改善图像的质量,并减轻金属植入物的磁共振伪影,对金属植入物患者的脊柱磁共振影响有十分重要的意义。%Objective To explore to metal artifacts sequence thoracic vertebrae in patients with metal implants affect magnetic resonance images.Methods January 2014 -2015 period January hospital treated 25 cases of thoracolumbar spine (lumbar, thoracic) in patients with metallic implants, all patients with thoracolumbar conventional MRI sequences and go metal artifact scanning sequence, and using paired t test for two sequences check scanning time and image quality scores were analyzed and compared. Results Signal to the surrounding soft tissue image sequences metal artifacts loss mitigation metal implants, and the image is blurred and deformation sequence compared to conventional metal artifacts serious image sequences. General sequence of image quality score of (3.56±0

  18. Germanium 70: a gamma ray detector for astrophysics; Le germanium 70: un detecteur de rayons gamma en astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durouchoux, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    A thorough study concerning the background noise generated from the germanium detectors used in astrophysics spatial experiences, is presented. These detectors, selected for their energy high definition, are sensitive to cosmic radiations that activate some isotopes contained in the natural germanium and induce background noise through a beta+ decay. This noise component may be notably reduced with utilization of {sup 70}Ge isotope enriched detectors, which do not present such interactions. The predictions have been verified through space tests conducted from Australia in 1992. Preliminary results and prospectives for astrophysics application of the Germanium 70 isotope, are discussed. 6 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  19. Ion implantation in silicon to facilitate testing of photonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Graham T.; Milosevic, Milan M.; Chen, Xia; Cao, Wei; Littlejohns, Callum G.; Wang, Hong; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Thomson, David J.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, we have presented results on the development of erasable gratings in silicon to facilitate wafer scale testing of photonics circuits via ion implantation of germanium. Similar technology can be employed to develop a range of optical devices that are reported in this paper. Ion implantation into silicon causes radiation damage resulting in a refractive index increase, and can therefore form the basis of multiple optical devices. We demonstrate the principle of a series of devices for wafers scale testing and have also implemented the ion implantation based refractive index change in integrated photonics devices for device trimming.

  20. In situ fabrication of silver nanoparticle-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on metallic titanium surface for bacteriostatic and biocompatible implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Wang, Dongzhou; Liu, Hong; Boughton, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    A silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer was synthesized in situ on a metallic titanium substrate. In the synthesis approach, a layer of sodium titanate nanotubes is first prepared on the titanium surface by using a hydrothermal method. Silver nitrate solution is absorbed into the nanotube channels by immersing a dried nanotube layer in silver nitrate solution. Finally, silver ions are reduced by glucose, leading to the in situ growth of AgNPs in the hydrogen titanate nanotube channels. Long-term silver release and bactericidal experiments demonstrated that the effective silver release and effective antibacterial period of the titanium foil with a AgNP-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on the surface can extend to more than 15 days. This steady and prolonged release characteristic is helpful to promote a long-lasting antibacterial capability for the prevention of severe infection after surgery. A series of antimicrobial and biocompatible tests have shown that the sandwich nanostructure with a low level of silver loading exhibits a bacteriostatic rate as high as 99.99%, while retaining low toxicity for cells and possessing high osteogenic potential. Titanium foil with a AgNP-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on the surface that is fabricated with low-cost surface modification methods is a promising implantable material that will find applications in artificial bones, joints, and dental implants.

  1. Comparative assessment of “plaque/media” change on three modalities of IVUS immediately after implantation of either everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold or everolimus-eluting metallic stent in Absorb II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zeng (Yaping); R. Cavalcante (Rafael); E. Tenekecioglu (Erhan); P. Suwannasom (Pannipa); Y. Sotomi (Yohei); C. Collet (Carlos); M. Abdelghani (Mohammad); H. Jonker (Hans); Digne, F. (Franck); Horstkotte, D. (Dieter); Zehender, M. (Manfred); Indolfi, C. (Ciro); F. Saia (Francesco); Fiorilli, R. (Rosario); B. Chevalier (Bernard); L. Bolognese (Leonardo); Goicolea, J. (Javier); Nie, S. (Shaoping); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); On Behalf Of The Investigators Of Absorb Ii Study,

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the study to assess the comparability of immediate changes in plaque/media volume (PV) on three modalities of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) after implantation of either bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) or everolimus-eluting metallic stent (EES) in Absorb II Study. T

  2. Positron annihilation in neutron-irradiated germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Bardyshev, I.I.; Erchak, D.P.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tsyganov, A.D.

    1979-04-01

    The annealing of radiation defects in a germanium single crystal irradiated with 10/sup 18/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ was studied by positron annihilation, ESR, and resistivity measurements. It was found that positrons are trapped by radiation defects. The intensity of the narrow component of the angular correlation of the annihilation radiation yielded the concentration of defect clusters in the irradiated sample n/sub d/approx. =3 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. Three characteristic annealing stages were identified. At 160--200 /sup 0/C, point defects were annealed within the crystal. At 200--320 /sup 0/C, there was ''loosening'' of the clusters, and the charge state of the defects changed. At 320--550 /sup 0/C, the clusters were annealed.

  3. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Lucia [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GeDet-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β{sup +} decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen molecules in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, M. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: martin.hiller@physik.phy.tu-dresden.de; Lavrov, E.V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-04-01

    Single-crystalline germanium samples exposed to hydrogen and/or deuterium plasma are studied by Raman scattering. Two bands at 1980 and 4155cm{sup -1} are assigned to local vibrational modes of Ge-H and H{sub 2}, respectively. Polarization sensitive Raman scattering spectra suggest that the plasma treatment results in {l_brace}111{r_brace} platelets whose basic units are Ge-H bonds. The signal at 4155cm{sup -1} is shown to result from molecular hydrogen trapped within these platelets. Another broad Raman signal around 3930cm{sup -1} seems to be due to H{sub 2} trapped in some other type of voids formed during the plasma treatment. Two sharp peaks at 3826 and 3834cm{sup -1} are assigned to ortho- and para-H{sub 2} trapped at the interstitial T site.

  5. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  6. Restenosis in coronary bare metal stents. Importance of time to follow-up: a comparison of coronary angiograms 6 months and 4 years after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Helqvist, Steffen; Kløvgaard, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Angiographic late lumen loss measured 6 to 9 month after bare metal stent implantation in the coronary arteries is a validated restenosis parameter. Design. We performed a second angiographic follow-up after 4 years in event free survivors from the DANSTENT trial cohort. Results....... Quantitative comparison of paired coronary angiograms at 6 months and 4 years showed a reduction of late loss from 0.68+/-0.52mm to 0.42 (+/-0.52) (mean difference 0.26 (0.17 to 0.36), p...% confidence interval: -0.34mm to -0.14mm, pstenosis decreased from 24.8+/-14.2% to 18.6+/-9.3% (mean difference 6.16%, 95% confidence interval: 2.82 to 9.48%, p=0.0006). This observed spontaneous decrease of instent restenosis corresponds to a 19% increase of minimal cross...

  7. Solid solubility of germanium in silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Hamed [Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Weber, Ludger, E-mail: ludger.weber@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-09-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solvus line in the binary Ag-Ge system has been assessed based on measurements of electrical resistivity and specific gravity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two measurement techniques yield close agreement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data found in this contribution indicate lower solid solubility than in previous assessments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Redlich-Kister parameters have been evaluated to describe the solvus line. - Abstract: The solid solubility of germanium in silver has been measured in the temperature range of 520 K to 913 K via measurements of density and of electrical conductivity of two near-eutectic Ag-Ge alloys. The atomic fraction of germanium in solid solution varied between 0.014 and 0.089 over the mentioned range of temperature and an extrapolated maximum solubility of 0.093 at the eutectic temperature of 924 K is found. For samples with spheroidized Ge-particles before the equilibrium heat treatments at low temperature for 24 or 48 h, thermodynamic equilibrium was supposedly not achieved at temperatures below 723 K. Much longer heat treatments (tens of days) on the significantly finer as-cast microstructure allowed to reach equilibrium probably down to 600 K. Independently of whether thermodynamic equilibrium was reached or not the electrical conductivity and the density measurements yielded good agreement typically within a few tenth of percent of atomic Ge-concentration in solid solution in {alpha}-Ag for a given temperature. The results are close to, yet consistently slightly lower than, the values given by Owen and Rowland on which the current assessment of the solvus in the Ag-Ge binary is based. More recent results by Filipponi and co-workers are clearly not in agreement with the data presented here.

  8. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  9. Quantum devices in silicon/silicon germanium heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinker, Keith A.

    This thesis presents the fabrication and characterization of silicon/silicon-germanium quantum wells, quantum dots, and quantum point contacts. These systems are promising for quantum computing applications due to the long predicted spin lifetimes. In addition, the valley states in Si/SiGe two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) are a novel phenomenon in regards to nanostructures, and characterizing these states is also necessary for potential computing applications. However, working with these heterostructures---especially in regards to metal Schottky gating---has proved historically challenging such that single electron transistors had not been achieved at the onset of this research. The first quantum dots in Si/SiGe are presented, defined completely by CF4 reactive ion etch without the use of metal gates. Etch-defined 2DEG side gates are used to modulate the potential of the quantum dot. Results for various metal gating schemes are also presented, culminating in the first Schottky-gated quantum dots in Si/SiGe. Differing from the etch-defined dots, the tunnel junctions of the metal-etch hybrid dot are fully tunable by the voltage applied to the top gates. Hall measurements of multiple heterostructures are presented, providing evidence that many of the challenges associated with gating Si/SiGe can be attributed to undepleted dopants in the supply layer. These dopants screen the top gates but can be detected as a parallel conduction channel in Hall measurements taken at a 2 K. A fully top-gate defined quantum dot was fabricated on an optimized Si/SiGe heterostructure, and the single particle excited states were resolved for the first time in Si/SiGe. Finally, quantum point contacts were defined by metal top gates, and the conduction was mapped out over a large range of magnetic field and voltages on the gates. The positions of the conductance steps are used to extract the valley splitting---a quantity that had been measured in a bulk 2DEG but not in a nanostructure

  10. Additive manufacturing technology (direct metal laser sintering) as a novel approach to fabricate functionally graded titanium implants: preliminary investigation of fabrication parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Starr, Thomas L; Harris, Bryan T; Zandinejad, Amirali; Morton, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the preliminary findings of the mechanical properties of functionally graded titanium with controlled distribution of porosity and a reduced Young's modulus on the basis of a computeraided design (CAD) file, using the rapid-prototyping, direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. Sixty specimens of Ti-6Al-4V were created using a DMLS machine (M270) following the standard for tensile testing of metals. One group was fabricated with only 170 W of laser energy to create fully dense specimens (control group). The remaining specimens all featured an outer fully dense "skin" layer and a partially sintered porous inner "core" region. The outer "skin" of each specimen was scanned at 170 W and set at a thickness of 0.35, 1.00, or 1.50 mm for different specimen groups. The inner "core" of each specimen was scanned at a lower laser power (43 or 85 W). The partially sintered core was clearly visible in all specimens, with somewhat greater porosity with the lower laser power. However, the amount of porosity in the core region was not related to the laser power alone; thinner skin layers resulted in higher porosity for the same power values in the core structure. The lowest Young's modulus achieved, 35 GPa, is close to that of bone and was achieved with a laser power of 43 W and a skin thickness of 0.35 mm, producing a core that comprised 74% of the total volume. Additive manufacturing technology may provide an efficient alternative way to fabricate customized dental implants based on a CAD file with a functionally graded structure that may minimize stress shielding and improve the long-term performance of dental implants.

  11. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  13. Optical gain in single tensile-strained germanium photonic wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kersauson, M; El Kurdi, M; David, S; Checoury, X; Fishman, G; Sauvage, S; Jakomin, R; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Boucaud, P

    2011-09-12

    We have investigated the optical properties of tensile-strained germanium photonic wires. The photonic wires patterned by electron beam lithography (50 μm long, 1 μm wide and 500 nm thick) are obtained by growing a n-doped germanium film on a GaAs substrate. Tensile strain is transferred in the germanium layer using a Si₃N₄ stressor. Tensile strain around 0.4% achieved by the technique corresponds to an optical recombination of tensile-strained germanium involving light hole band around 1690 nm at room temperature. We show that the waveguided emission associated with a single tensile-strained germanium wire increases superlinearly as a function of the illuminated length. A 20% decrease of the spectral broadening is observed as the pump intensity is increased. All these features are signatures of optical gain. A 80 cm⁻¹ modal optical gain is derived from the variable strip length method. This value is accounted for by the calculated gain material value using a 30 band k · p formalism. These germanium wires represent potential building blocks for integration of nanoscale optical sources on silicon.

  14. Hip Resurfacing Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Sambri, Andrea; Mazzotti, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the advantages of hip resurfacing. 2. Describe the disadvantages of hip resurfacing. 3. Identify the population in which hip resurfacing is most often indicated. 4. Demonstrate how to properly postoperatively manage patients with metal-on-metal prostheses. Hip resurfacing offers a suitable solution for young patients affected by hip disease who have high function demands and good bone quality. Bone stock preservation, restoration of the normal proximal femur anatomy, the lack of stress shielding, and the possibility of resuming sporting activity are proven advantages of hip resurfacing. However, there are some disadvantages, such as fracture of the femoral neck, onset of neck narrowing, and possible complications due to the metal-on-metal bearings, including pseudotumors, peri-implant osteolysis, and chronic elevation of metal ions in serum levels. Recent data suggest that the ideal candidate for hip resurfacing is an active male, younger than 65 years, with primary or posttraumatic osteoarthritis, and with a femoral head diameter larger than 50 to 54 mm. Based on these selection criteria, the literature reports implant survival to be similar to that of total hip arthroplasty. The current authors' experience confirms a low failure rate and excellent functional outcomes, with metal ion serum levels becoming stable over time in well-functioning implants. Proper surgical technique, correct patient selection, and the right choice of a well-established prosthetic model are essential elements for the long-term success of these implants.

  15. Semiconductor applications of plasma immersion ion implantation technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Rajkumar; Dinesh Kumar; P J George

    2002-11-01

    Many semiconductor integrated circuit manufacturing processes require high dose of implantation at very low energies. Conventional beam line ion implantation system suffers from low beam current at low energies, therefore, cannot be used economically for high dose applications. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is emerging as a potential technique for such implantations. This method offers high dose rate irrespective of implantation energy. In the present study nitrogen ions were implanted using PIII in order to modify the properties of silicon and some refractory metal films. Oxidation behaviour of silicon was observed for different implantation doses. Diffusion barrier properties of refractory barrier metals were studied for copper metallization.

  16. Effect of microstructure on the dry sliding friction behavior of CoCrMo alloys used in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, R; Bobyn, J D; Medley, J B; Yue, S

    2006-02-01

    The microstructure and its effect on the friction behavior of a medical grade wrought cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy for surgical implants were studied in this work. In particular, the effects of compression and carbon (C) content on the above characteristics were analyzed. Increasing amounts of deformation resulted in a decrease in the number of annealing twins in the microstructures. In addition, there was an increase in the volume fraction of the hexagonal closed-packed (HCP) phase due to a strain-induced transformation (SIT) from the metastable face-centered cubic (FCC) phase. The high C (HC) alloy had a lower volume fraction of this SIT phase. Friction studies conducted on these alloys revealed a higher coefficient of friction for the HC alloy and no significant effect of SIT on the friction characteristics. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A virtual sinogram method to reduce dental metallic implant artefacts in computed tomography-based attenuation correction for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Objective Attenuation correction of PET data requires accurate determination of the attenuation map (mu map), which represents the spatial distribution of linear attenuation coefficients of different tissues at 511 keV. The presence of high-density metallic dental filling material in head and neck X

  18. Germanium separation and purification by leaching and precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saeid Bayat; Sajjad Aghazadeh; Mohammad Noaparast; Mahdi Gharabaghi; Behrooz Taheri

    2016-01-01

    In this research work, extraction and purification of germanium from zinc leach residues (ZLR) were investigated. The results of ICP, XRF, and atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS) tests show that contents of germanium, iron, lead, and zinc within the leaching residue were 105×10−6, 3.53%, 10.35%, and 8.8%, respectively. XRD results indicate that the main minerals were in different forms of sulfates (CaSO4·2H2O, PbSO4 and ZnSO4·6H2O), silicate (SiO2), and oxide (Fe2O3). Dissolution of leaching filter cake was carried out using 5 parameters and each in 4 levels (acid concentration, temperature, time, liquid-to-solid ratio, and stirring speed) by Taguchi method (L16), and then optimization of the effective parameters by response surface method. Under optimum conditions, zinc and germanium dissolution efficiencies were 88.71% and 8%, respectively. Leaching tests with sulfuric acid (added di-ammonium oxalate monohydrate) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) on the residues obtained from previous-stage sulfuric acid dissolution, yielded germanium and iron recoveries of 83%, 88%, 40%, and 90%, respectively. Thus, leaching experiment with sulfuric acid (added di-ammonium oxalate monohydrate) was superior to that with hydrochloric acid due to high and low extraction amounts of germanium and iron, respectively. Precipitation experiments revealed that germanium purification with tannic acid presented a better result compared to sodium hydroxide and ammonia. Under optimum conditions, contents of germanium and iron in the solution after precipitation were 0.1505% and 14.7% with precipitation yields of 91% and 52%, respectively.

  19. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develope a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four top-illuminated, 32x32 germanium sub-arrays...

  20. Hydrogen Bonding in Hydrogenated Amorphous Germanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Abo-Ghazala; S. Al Hazmy

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) were prepared by radio frequency glow discharge deposition at various substrate temperatures. The hydrogen distribution and bonding structure in a-Ge:H were discussed based on infrared absorption data. The correlation between infrared absorption spectra and hydrogen effusion measurements was used to determine the proportionality constant for each vibration mode of the Ge-H bonds. The results reveal that the bending mode appearing at 835 cm?1 is associated with the Ge-H2 (dihydride) groups on the internal surfaces of voids. While 1880 cm?1 is assigned to vibrations of Ge-H (monohydride) groups in the bulk, the 2000 cm?1 stretching mode is attributed to Ge-H and Ge-H2 bonds located on the surfaces of voids. For films associated with bending modes in the infrared spectra, the proportionality constant values of the stretching modes near 1880 and 2000 cm?1 are found to be lower than those of films which had no corresponding bending modes.

  1. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; de Oliveira, H.F.; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses. PMID:26017344

  2. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, G.G. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Kinoshita, A. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coração, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, H.F. de; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L. [Serviço de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, O. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-26

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses.

  3. TiO2 nanotubes: N-ion implantation at low-dose provides noble-metal-free photocatalytic H2-evolution activity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xuemei; Liu, Ning; Nguyen, Nhat Truong; Zolnhofer, Eva M; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Killian, Manuela S; Meyer, Karsten; Frey, Lothar; Schmuki, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose nitrogen implantation induces in TiO2 nanotubes a co-catalytic activity for photocatalytic H2-evolution. The use of an ion implantation process leads to a N-implanted zone only at the top part of the tubes. The coupling of this top layer and the underlying non-implanted part of the nanotubes strongly contributes to an efficient carrier separation and thus to a significantly enhanced H2 generation.

  4. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  5. Transition metal impurities on the bond-centered site in Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Decoster, S; De Vries, B; Emmerich, H; Wahl, U; Correia, J G; Vantomme, A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the lattice location of ion implanted Fe, Cu, and Ag impurities in germanium from a combined approach of emission channeling experiments and ab initio total energy calculations. Following common expectation, a fraction of these transition metals (TMs) was found on the substitutional Ge position. Less expected is the observation of a second fraction on the sixfold coordinated bond-centered site. Ab initio calculated heats of formation suggest this is the result of the trapping of a vacancy by a substitutional TM impurity, spontaneously forming an impurity-vacancy complex in the split-vacancy configuration. We also present an approach to displace the TM impurities from the electrically active substitutional site to the bond-centered site.

  6. Inkjet printing of Chitlac-nanosilver--a method to create functional coatings for non-metallic bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganga, Sara; Moritz, Niko; Kolakovic, Ruzica; Jakobsson, Kristina; Nyman, Johan O; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Travan, Andrea; Crosera, Matteo; Donati, Ivan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Sandler, Niklas

    2014-12-01

    Biostable fiber-reinforced composites, based on bisphenol-A-dimethacrylate and triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate thermoset polymer matrix reinforced with E-glass fibers have been successfully used in cranial reconstructions and the material has been approved for clinical use. As a further refinement of these implants, antimicrobial, non-cytotoxic coatings on the composites were created by an immersion procedure driven by strong electrostatic interactions. Silver nanoparticles (nAg) were immobilized in lactose-modified chitosan (Chitlac) to prepare the bacteriostatic coatings. Herein, we report the use of inkjet technology (a drop-on-demand inkjet printer) to deposit functional Chitlac-nAg coatings on the thermoset substrates. Characterization methods included scanning electron microscopy, scanning white light interferometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. Inkjet printing enabled the fast and flexible functionalization of the thermoset surfaces with controlled coating patterns. The coatings were not impaired by the printing process: the kinetics of silver release from the coatings created by inkjet printing and conventional immersion technique was similar. Further research is foreseen to optimize printing parameters and to tailor the characteristics of the coatings for specific clinical applications.

  7. Application of an interface failure model to predict fatigue crack growth in an implanted metallic femoral stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Browne, M; Taylor, M; Gregson, P J

    2004-03-01

    A novel computational modelling technique has been developed for the prediction of crack growth in load bearing orthopaedic alloys subjected to fatigue loading. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has been used to define a three-dimensional fracture model, which explicitly models the opening, sliding and tearing process. This model consists of 3D nonlinear spring elements implemented in conjunction with a brittle material failure function, which is defined by the fracture energy for each nonlinear spring element. Thus, the fracture energy criterion is implicit in the brittle material failure function to search for crack initiation and crack development automatically. A degradation function is employed to reduce interfacial fracture properties corresponding to the number of cycles; thus fatigue lifetime can be predicted. Unlike other failure modelling methods, this model predicts the failure load, crack path and residual stiffness directly without assuming any pre-flaw condition. As an example, fatigue of a cobalt based alloy (CoCrMo) femoral stem is simulated. Experimental fatigue data was obtained from four point bending tests. The finite element model simulated a fully embedded implant with a constant point load. Comparison between the model and mechanical test results showed good agreement in fatigue crack growth rate.

  8. Black TiO2 nanotubes formed by high energy proton implantation show noble-metal-co-catalyst free photocatalytic H2-evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ning; Zhou, Xuemei; Venkatesan, Umamaheswari; Hartmann, Martin; Mačković, Mirza; Nakajima, Tomohiko; Spiecker, Erdmann; Osvet, Andres; Frey, Lothar; Schmuki, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    We apply high-energy proton ion-implantation to modify TiO2 nanotubes selectively at their tops. In the proton-implanted region we observe the creation of intrinsic co-catalytic centers for photocatalytic H2-evolution. We find proton implantation to induce specific defects and a characteristic modification of the electronic properties not only in nanotubes but also on anatase single crystal (001) surfaces. Nevertheless, for TiO2 nanotubes a strong synergetic effect between implanted region (catalyst) and implant-free tube segment (absorber) can be obtained.

  9. BaTiO3 integration with nanostructured epitaxial (100), (110), and (111) germanium for multifunctional devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudait, Mantu K; Zhu, Yan; Jain, Nikhil; Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Varghese, Ron; Priya, Shashank

    2013-11-13

    Ferroelectric-germanium heterostructures have a strong potential for multifunctional devices. Germanium (Ge) is attractive due to its higher electron and hole mobilities while ferroelectric BaTiO3 is promising due to its high relative permittivity, which can make next-generation low-voltage and low-leakage metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors. Here, we investigate the growth, structural, chemical, and band alignment properties of pulsed laser deposited BaTiO3 on epitaxial (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge layers. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy micrographs show the amorphous nature of the BaTiO3 layer and also show a sharp heterointerface between BaTiO3 and Ge. The appearance of strong Pendellösung oscillation fringes from high-resolution X-ray diffraction implies the presence of parallel and sharp heterointerfaces. The valence band offset relation of ΔEV(100) ≥ ΔEV(111) > ΔEV(110) and the conduction band offset relation of ΔE(C)(110) > ΔE(C)(111) ≥ ΔE(C)(100) on crystallographically oriented Ge offer significant advancement for designing new-generation ferroelectric-germanium-based multifunctional devices.

  10. Modeling of dislocation dynamics in germanium Czochralski growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, V. V.; Smirnov, A. D.; Kalaev, V. V.; Mamedov, V. M.; Sidko, A. P.; Podkopaev, O. I.; Kravtsova, E. D.; Shimansky, A. F.

    2017-06-01

    Obtaining very high-purity germanium crystals with low dislocation density is a practically difficult problem, which requires knowledge and experience in growth processes. Dislocation density is one of the most important parameters defining the quality of germanium crystal. In this paper, we have performed experimental study of dislocation density during 4-in. germanium crystal growth using the Czochralski method and comprehensive unsteady modeling of the same crystal growth processes, taking into account global heat transfer, melt flow and melt/crystal interface shape evolution. Thermal stresses in the crystal and their relaxation with generation of dislocations within the Alexander-Haasen model have been calculated simultaneously with crystallization dynamics. Comparison to experimental data showed reasonable agreement for the temperature, interface shape and dislocation density in the crystal between calculation and experiment.

  11. Graphene-like monolayer low-buckled honeycomb germanium film

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yezeng; Luo, Haibo; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Wei, Fuxiang; Meng, Qingkun; Yang, Weiming; Qi, Jiqiu

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the cooling process of two-dimensional liquid germanium under nanoslit confinement. The results clearly indicates that the liquid germanium undergoes an obvious liquid-solid phase transition to a monolayer honeycomb film with the decrease of temperature, accompanying the rapid change in potential energy, atomic volume, coordination number and lateral radial distribution function. During the solidification process, some hexagonal atomic islands first randomly emerge in the disordered liquid film and then grow up to stable crystal grains which keep growing and finally connect together to form a honeycomb polycrystalline film. It is worth noting that the honeycomb germanium film is low-buckled, quite different from the planar graphene.

  12. Next Generation Device Grade Silicon-Germanium on Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohns, Callum G.; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Mallinson, Christopher F.; Watts, John F.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Reed, Graham T.; Gardes, Frederic Y.

    2015-02-01

    High quality single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator has the potential to facilitate the next generation of photonic and electronic devices. Using a rapid melt growth technique we engineer tailored single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator structures with near constant composition over large areas. The proposed structures avoid the problem of laterally graded SiGe compositions, caused by preferential Si rich solid formation, encountered in straight SiGe wires by providing radiating elements distributed along the structures. This method enables the fabrication of multiple single crystal silicon-germanium-on-insulator layers of different compositions, on the same Si wafer, using only a single deposition process and a single anneal process, simply by modifying the structural design and/or the anneal temperature. This facilitates a host of device designs, within a relatively simple growth environment, as compared to the complexities of other methods, and also offers flexibility in device designs within that growth environment.

  13. Characterisation of a Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrientos, D., E-mail: diego_barrientos@usal.es [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, University of Salamanca (Spain); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C. [Nuclear Physics Group, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Quintana, B.; Sagrado, I.C. [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, University of Salamanca (Spain); Unsworth, C.; Moon, S.; Cresswell, J.R. [Nuclear Physics Group, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-21

    Characterisation of Germanium detectors used for gamma-ray tracking or medical imaging is one of the current goals in the Nuclear physics community. Good knowledge of detector response to different gamma radiations is needed for this purpose. In order to develop this task, Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques have been developed for different detector geometries or setups. In this work, we present the results of the application of PSA for a Canberra Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector. This detector was scanned across its front and bottom face using a fully digital data acquisition system; allowing to record detector charge pulse shapes from well defined positions with collimated sources of {sup 241}Am, {sup 22}Na and {sup 137}Cs. With the study of the data acquired, characteristics of the inner detector geometry like crystal limits or positions of contact and isolate can be found, as well as the direction of the axes for the Germanium crystal.

  14. Strontium-82 and Future Germanium-68 Production at the ARRONAX Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sounalet, T.; Michel, N.; Alliot, C.; Audouin, A.; Barbet, J.; Bonraisin, A. C.; Bortoli, Y.; Bossé, V.; Bourdeau, C.; Bouvet, G.; Buhour, J. M.; Cadiou, A.; Fresneau, S.; Guillamet, M.; Haddad, F.; Laizé, J.; Milleto, T.; Milon, F.; Mokili, M.; Montavon, G.

    2014-05-01

    The ARRONAX cyclotron is fully operational since the end of 2010. It delivers projectiles (p, d, α) at high energy (up to 70 MeV for protons) and high intensity(2*375μA for protons). The main fields of application of ARRONAX are radionuclide production for nuclear medicine and irradiation of inert or living materials for radiolysis and radio-biology studies. A large part of the beam time will be used to produce radionuclides for targeted radionuclide therapy (copper-67, scandium-47 and astatine-211) as well as for PET imaging (scandium-44, copper-64, strontium-82 for rubidium-82 generators, and germanium-68 for gallium-68 generators). Since June 2012, large scale production of 82Sr has started with rubidium chloride (RbCl) targets. Several improvements are being explored which consist of changing the target material from RbCl to Rb metal and introducing an additional target behind the rubidium assembly. Thus, a target alloy of nickel/gallium for germanium-68 production has been developed. It is obtained by electroplating and exhibits a better thermal behavior than the natural gallium target used in most production facilities.

  15. ZnO decorated germanium nanoparticles as anode materials in Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Song Yi; Lee, Tack Ho; Jeong, Jaeki; Kim, Dong Suk; Swihart, Mark T.; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Seongbeom

    2017-03-01

    Germanium exhibits high charge capacity and high lithium diffusivity, both are the key requirements for electrode materials in high performance lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, high volume expansion and segregation from the electrode during charge–discharge cycling have limited use of germanium in LIBs. Here, we demonstrate that ZnO decorated Ge nanoparticles (Ge@ZnO NPs) can overcome these limitations of Ge as an LIB anode material. We produced Ge NPs at high rates by laser pyrolysis of GeH4, then coated them with solution phase synthesized ZnO NPs. Half-cell tests revealed dramatically enhanced cycling stability and higher rate capability of Ge@ZnO NPs compared to Ge NPs. Enhancements arise from the core–shell structure of Ge@ZnO NPs as well as production of metallic Zn from the ZnO layer. These findings not only demonstrate a new surface treatment for Ge NPs, but also provide a new opportunity for development of high-rate LIBs.

  16. Electrochemical and morphological investigation of silver and zinc modified calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings on metallic implant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furko, M., E-mail: monika.furko@bayzoltan.hu [Bay Zoltán Nonprofit Ltd. for Applied Research, H-1116 Budapest, Fehérvári u. 130 (Hungary); Jiang, Y.; Wilkins, T.A. [Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Balázsi, C. [Bay Zoltán Nonprofit Ltd. for Applied Research, H-1116 Budapest, Fehérvári u. 130 (Hungary)

    2016-05-01

    In our research nanostructured silver and zinc doped calcium-phosphate (CaP) bioceramic coatings were prepared on commonly used orthopaedic implant materials (Ti6Al4V). The deposition process was carried out by the pulse current technique at 70 °C from electrolyte containing the appropriate amount of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} components. During the electrochemical deposition Ag{sup +} and Zn{sup 2+} ions were introduced into the solution. The electrochemical behaviour and corrosion rate of the bioceramic coatings were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in conventional Ringer's solution in a three electrode open cell. The coating came into contact with the electrolyte and corrosion occurred during immersion. In order to achieve antimicrobial properties, it is important to maintain a continuous release of silver ions into physiological media, while the bioactive CaP layer enhances the biocompatibility properties of the layer by fostering the bone cell growth. The role of Zn{sup 2+} is to shorten wound healing time. Morphology and composition of coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Differential thermal analyses (DTA) were performed to determine the thermal stability of the pure and modified CaP bioceramic coatings while the structure and phases of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. - Highlights: • Ag and Zn doped calcium phosphate (CaP) layers were electrochemically deposited. • Layer degradation was studied by EIS and potentiodynamic measurements. • The bioceramic coatings became passive after a period of immersion time. • Ag and Zn modified layer shows higher degradation rate compared to pure CaP coating.

  17. Does intravascular ultrasound provide clinical benefits for percutaneous coronary intervention with bare-metal stent implantation? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodi-Junqueira Lucas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI is still controversial despite several previously published meta-analyses. A meta-analysis to evaluate the controversial role of IVUS-guided PCI with bare-metal stenting was performed and a previous published meta-analysis was re-evaluated in order to clarify the discrepancy between results of these studies. Methods A systematic review was performed by an electronic search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Knowledge databases and by a manual search of reference lists for randomized controlled trials published until April 2011, with clinical outcomes and, at least, six months of clinical follow-up. A meta-analysis based on the intention to treat was performed with the selected studies. Results Five studies and 1,754 patients were included. There were no differences in death (OR = 1.86; 95% CI = 0.88-3.95; p = 0.10, non-fatal myocardial infarction (OR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.27-1.58; p = 0.35 and major adverse cardiac events (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.49-1.13; p = 0.16. An analysis of the previous published meta-analysis strongly suggested the presence of publication bias. Conclusions There is no evidence to recommend routine IVUS-guided PCI with bare-metal stent implantation. This may be explained by the paucity and heterogeneity of the studies published so far.

  18. Extraction separation of germanium with potassium iodide-1-propanol-germanium(Ⅳ)ternary complex%碘化钾-正丙醇-锗(Ⅳ)三元缔合物萃取分离锗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩金土; 司学芝; 张会杰; 马万山

    2012-01-01

    The extraction and separation behaviors of germanium by potassium iodide - 1-propanol -germanium (Ⅳ) complex and the separation conditions of some metal ions were studied. The results showed that sodium chloride could separate the 1-propanol aqueous solution into two phases. In phase separation process, the complex[GeI6,2- ][C3H7OH2+]2 formed from GeI6,2- (which was generated from germanium(Ⅳ) and potassium iodide) and protonized 1-propanol (C3H7OH2,+) could be fully extracted by 1-propanol phase. The extraction rate of germanium(Ⅳ) was higher than 98. 4% when the concentrations of 1-propanol,potassium iodide and sodium chloride were 30%(V/V) ,8. 0 × 10-3 mol/L and 0. 20 g/mL,respectively. Meanwhile,Zn2+ ,Fe2+ ,Mg2+ ,Ni2+ ,Co2+ ,Mn2+ ,Ag+ , Al3+ and Cr3+ could not be extracted,realizing the separation of germanium(Ⅳ) from these metal ions.%探讨了碘化钾-正丙醇-锗(Ⅳ)三元缔合物萃取分离锗的行为及与一些金属离子分离的条件.结果表明,氯化钠能将正丙醇的水溶液分成两相,在分相过程中,Ge(Ⅳ)与碘化钾生成的GeI62-与质子化正丙醇(C3H7OH2+)形成的缔合物[GeI62-][C3H7OH2+]2能被正丙醇相完全萃取.当正丙醇、碘化钾和氯化钠的浓度分别为30%(V/V)、8.0×10-3 mol/L、0.20 g/mL时,Ge(Ⅳ)的萃取率达到98.4%以上,Zn2+、Fe2+、Mg2+、Ni2+、Co2+、Mn2+、Ag+、Al3+和Cr3+基本不被萃取,实现了Ge(Ⅳ)与上述金属离子的分离.

  19. The GALATEA test-facility for High Purity Germanium Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Doenmez, B; Garbini, L; Irlbeck, S; Majorovits, B; Palermo, M; Schulz, O; Seitz, H; Stelzer, F

    2014-01-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses an infrared screened volume with a cooled detector inside. A system of three stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources as well as of a laser beam to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning.

  20. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  1. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M., E-mail: palermo@mpp.mpg.de; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-11

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  2. Tensile-strained germanium microdisks with circular Bragg reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kurdi, M.; Prost, M.; Ghrib, A.; Elbaz, A.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Picardi, G.; Ossikovski, R.; Boeuf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the combination of germanium microdisks tensily strained by silicon nitride layers and circular Bragg reflectors. The microdisks with suspended lateral Bragg reflectors form a cavity with quality factors up to 2000 around 2 μm. This represents a key feature to achieve a microlaser with a quasi-direct band gap germanium under a 1.6% biaxial tensile strain. We show that lowering the temperature significantly improves the quality factor of the quasi-radial modes. Linewidth narrowing is observed in a range of weak continuous wave excitation powers. We finally discuss the requirements to achieve lasing with these kind of structures.

  3. Comparative infrared study of silicon and germanium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraton, M. I.; Marchand, R.; Quintard, P.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon and germanium nitride (Si 3N 4 and Ge 3N 4) are isomorphic compounds. They have been studied in the β-phase which crystallises in the hexagonal system. The space group is P6 3/m (C 6h2). The IR transmission spectra of these two nitrides are very similar but the absorption frequencies of germanium nitride are shifted to the lower values in comparison with silicon nitride. We noted that the atomic mass effect is the only cause of this shift for the streching modes but not for the bending modes.

  4. Characterisation of two AGATA asymmetric high purity germanium capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colosimo, S.J., E-mail: sjc@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Moon, S.; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Harkness-Brennan, L.; Judson, D.S. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Nolan, P.J. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Unsworth, C. [Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    The AGATA spectrometer is an array of highly segmented high purity germanium detectors. The spectrometer uses pulse shape analysis in order to track Compton scattered γ-rays to increase the efficiency of nuclear spectroscopy studies. The characterisation of two high purity germanium detector capsules for AGATA of the same A-type has been performed at the University of Liverpool. This work will examine the uniformity of performance of the two capsules, including a comparison of the resolution and efficiency as well as a study of charge collection. The performance of the capsules shows good agreement, which is essential for the efficient operation of the γ-ray tracking array.

  5. In-depth TEM characterization of block copolymer pattern transfer at germanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Cian; Collins, Timothy W.; Kelly, Roisin A.; McCarthy, Eoin K.; Morris, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Dry plasma etching for the pattern transfer of mask features is fundamental to semiconductor processing and the development of device and electrically conducting elements becomes more challenging as features reach the deep nanoscale regime. In this work, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization were used to analyze the pattern transfer of graphoepitaxially aligned block copolymer (BCP) features to germanium (Ge) substrates as a function of time. The BCP patterns were converted into metal oxide hardmasks in order to affect good aspect ratios of the transferred features. An unusual interface layer between metal oxide nanowires and the germanium-on-insulator substrate was observed. EDX analysis shows that the origin of this interface layer is a result of the presence of a negative tone e-beam resist material, HSQ (hydrogen silsesquioxane). HSQ was employed as a guiding material to align line-space features of poly(styrene)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) BCP with 16 nm half-pitch topography. Additionally, the existence of a metal oxide layer (from the initial PS-b-P4VP film) is also shown through ex situ TEM and EDX characterization. Three dimensional modeling of features is also provided giving a unique insight into the arrangement and structure of BCP features prior to and after the pattern transfer process. The results presented in this article highlight the accuracy of high resolution electron microscopy and elemental mapping of BCP generated on-chip etch masks to observe and understand through-film features affecting pattern transfer.

  6. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  7. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... imaging (MRI) scans, to evaluate your inner ear anatomy. Cochlear implant surgery Cochlear implant surgery is usually performed as an outpatient procedure under general anesthesia. An incision is made behind the ear ...

  8. Metallic powder-bed based 3D printing of cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants: A state-of-the-art review on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X P; Tan, Y J; Chow, C S L; Tor, S B; Yeong, W Y

    2017-07-01

    Metallic cellular scaffold is one of the best choices for orthopaedic implants as a replacement of human body parts, which could improve life quality and increase longevity for the people needed. Unlike conventional methods of making cellular scaffolds, three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing opens up new possibilities to fabricate those customisable intricate designs with highly interconnected pores. In the past decade, metallic powder-bed based 3D printing methods emerged and the techniques are becoming increasingly mature recently, where selective laser melting (SLM) and selective electron beam melting (SEBM) are the two representatives. Due to the advantages of good dimensional accuracy, high build resolution, clean build environment, saving materials, high customisability, etc., SLM and SEBM show huge potential in direct customisable manufacturing of metallic cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants. Ti-6Al-4V to date is still considered to be the optimal materials for producing orthopaedic implants due to its best combination of biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This paper presents a state-of-the-art overview mainly on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of cellular Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds via SLM and SEBM methods. Current manufacturing limitations, topological shortcomings, uncertainty of biocompatible test were sufficiently discussed herein. Future perspectives and recommendations were given at the end. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term outcome after drug-eluting versus bare-metal stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 3-year follow-up of the randomized DEDICATION (Drug Elution and Distal Protection in Acute Myocardial Infarction) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Kelbaek, Henning; Thuesen, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).......The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)....

  10. Long-term outcome after drug-eluting versus bare-metal stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 3-year follow-up of the randomized DEDICATION (Drug Elution and Distal Protection in Acute Myocardial Infarction) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Kelbaek, Henning; Thuesen, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).......The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)....

  11. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  12. Ge Implantation to Improve Crystallinity and Productivity for Solid Phase Epitaxy Prepared by Atomic Mass Unit Cross Contamination-Free Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kong-Soo; Yoo, Dae-Han; Han, Jae-Jong; Son, Gil-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Hun; Noh, Ju-Hee; Kim, Seok-Jae; Kim, Yong-Kwon; You, Young-Sub; Hyung, Yong-Woo; Lee, Hyeon-Deok

    2006-11-01

    Germanium (Ge) ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial (SPE) regrowth. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19% of (100) signal, which might be due to the effect of pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) on silicon layer. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of n-channel metal oxide semiconductor (NMOS) transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers. It was confirmed that arsenic (As) atoms were incorporated into channel area during Ge ion implantation. Since the equipment for Ge PAI was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit (AMU) contamination during PAI of Ge with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of As with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use Ge isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination. It was effective to use enriched Ge source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity.

  13. 肩锁关节脱位重建:金属植入物的选择%Reconstruction of acromioclavicular joint dislocation: Selection of metal implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡宇; 王凯; 梁晶峰

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the metal implant internal fixation methods and implant selection of acromioclavicular joint dislocation,to evaluate the efficacy of clavicular hook plate in treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.METHODS: Using "clavicular hook plate; acromioclavicular joint dislocation; internal fixation" as the key words, a computer-based online search of PubMed database and VIP database from 1996 to 2010 was performed for articles about metal implants fixation for the dislocation of acromioclavicular joint, focusing on the acromioclavicular joint dislocation treatments and the choice of internal fixation implant, and clinical validation was conducted. Patients who were treated with AO/ASIF clavicular hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation and distal clavicle fractures in accordance with type Ⅲ- Ⅴ of Rockwood classification, were involved. Lazzcano score was applied to determine function.RESULTS : The present method of treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation includes a simple Kirschner wire internal fixation,Kirschner wire and tension band fixation, Bosworth method, coracoclavicular fixation between the wire, titanium wire cable instead of the wire fixation method, modified Weaver method, tendon or artificial ligament for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction,clavicular hook plate and so on, each has their advantages and disadvantages. Clinical validation showed that, 34 patients after treatment of AO/ASIF clavicular hook plate were visited for 12 months as a follow-up. No plate or screw loosed and broken. At 6-12 months, the implants were taken out, 2 cases exhibited acromioclavicular subluxation, coracoclavicular ligament repair was not performed. Assessment criteria was in accordance with Lazzcano scores, 30 cases were excellent and 4 cases were good.CONCLUSION: The clavicular hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation and distal clavicle fracture is a simple operation,with reliable fixation, less trauma, rapid

  14. Novel approach for n-type doping of HVPE gallium nitride with germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Patrick; Krupinski, Martin; Habel, Frank; Leibiger, Gunnar; Weinert, Berndt; Eichler, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel method for germanium doping of gallium nitride by in-situ chlorination of solid germanium during the hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE) process. Solid germanium pieces were placed in the doping line with a hydrogen chloride flow directed over them. We deduce a chlorination reaction taking place at 800 ° C , which leads to germanium chloroform (GeHCl3) or germanium tetrachloride (GeCl4). The reactor shows a germanium rich residue after in-situ chlorination experiments, which can be removed by hydrogen chloride etching. All gallium nitride crystals exhibit n-type conductivity, which shows the validity of the in-situ chlorination of germanium for doping. A complex doping profile is found for each crystal, which was assigned to a combination of localised supply of the dopant and sample rotation during growth and switch-off effects of the HVPE reactor.

  15. Positron implantation in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  16. Design and health care: a study of virtual design and direct metal lasersintering of titanium alloy for the production of customized facial implants

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy and a great number ofaccidents lead to higher demand for medical products,including corrective implants. Patients with tumors or traumas need to replace injured areas in order to restore their aesthetic and structural function. Currently, the available craniofacial implants present a standard geometry and seldom generate satisfactory results. Customized implants, on theother hand, are designed to conform exactly to individual patient’s anatomy. This way, the us...

  17. A randomized controlled trial comparing interim acrylic prostheses with and without cast metal base for immediate loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Eloana; Lee, Hyung Joo; Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Trevisan, Roseli Latenek; Luiz, Jaques; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial used resonance frequency analysis (RFA) to assess the effects of the presence or absence of a cast rigid bar splinting multiple implants in the stability of immediately loaded implants. Twenty-nine edentulous patients were randomly divided into two groups: G1 with full-arch implant-fixed prostheses and G2 with multiple implant splinting via acrylic resin denture bases. All implants were immediately loaded. RFA measurements assessed implant stability at three different times (T0--at baseline, T1--4 months, and T2--8 months. Wilcoxon and Friedman tests and a multivariate model with repeated measures for longitudinal data were used for statistical comparison (α = 0.05). Twenty-nine patients were assessed (G1 = 15 and G2 = 14). Implant and prostheses survival rates were 100% for both groups after the 8-month observation period and no significant differences in the mean ISQ values were found at the different implant stability assessment times (P > 0.05). The different splinting protocols did not appear to affect implant stability during the 8-month observation period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Direct observations of the vacancy and its annealing in germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotte, J.; Kilpeläinen, S.; Tuomisto, F.

    2011-01-01

    Weakly n-type doped germanium has been irradiated with protons up to a fluence of 3×1014 cm-2 at 35 K and 100 K in a unique experimental setup. Positron annihilation measurements show a defect lifetime component of 272±4 ps at 35 K in in situ positron lifetime measurements after irradiation at 100...

  19. Discovery of Gallium, Germanium, Lutetium, and Hafnium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, J L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Composite germanium monochromators - results for the TriCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, J.; Fischer, S.; Boehm, M.; Keller, L.; Horisberger, M.; Medarde, M.; Fischer, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Composite germanium monochromators are in the beginning of their application in neutron diffraction. We show here the importance of the permanent quality control with neutrons on the example of the 311 wafers which will be used on the single crystal diffractometer TriCS at SINQ. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  1. Noise and oscillations in gold-doped germanium photodiodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolwijn, P.T.; Rijst, C. v. d.; Ast, W.G. van; Lam, T.

    1967-01-01

    Considerable noise effects in excess of shot noise and oscillations found in commercially available, gold-doped germanium photodiodes have been investigated. The noise and oscillation effects occur in the photocurrent of reversely biased diodes at temperatures below about 100°K. The dependence of th

  2. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  3. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  4. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restric