WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal fabrication printing

  1. Metal nanoparticle direct inkjet printing for low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Nam, Koo Hyun; Chung, Jaewon; Hotz, Nico; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials is a key technology toward ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. We demonstrate low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication by direct inkjet printing of metal nanoparticles (NPs) as a versatile, direct 3D metal structuring approach representing an alternative to conventional vacuum deposition and photolithographic methods. Metal NP ink was inkjet-printed to exploit the large melting temperature drop of the nanomaterial and the ease of the NP ink formulation. Parametric studies on the basic conditions for stable 3D inkjet printing of NP ink were carried out. Furthermore, diverse 3D metal microstructures, including micro metal pillar arrays, helices, zigzag and micro bridges were demonstrated and electrical characterization was performed. Since the process requires low temperature, it carries substantial potential for fabrication of electronics on a plastic substrate

  2. Direct Fabrication of Inkjet-Printed Dielectric Film for Metal-Insulator-Metal Capacitors

    Cho, Cheng-Lin; Kao, Hsuan-ling; Wu, Yung-Hsien; Chang, Li-Chun; Cheng, Chun-Hu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an inkjet-printed dielectric film that used a polymer-based SU-8 ink was fabricated for use in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitor. Thermal treatment of the inkjet-printed SU-8 polymer film affected its surface morphology, chemical structure, and surface wettability. A 20-min soft-bake at 60°C was applied to eliminate inkjet-printed bubbles and ripples. The ultraviolet-exposed SU-8 polymer film was crosslinked at temperatures between 120°C and 220°C and became disordered at 270°C, demonstrated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. A maximum SU-8 polymer film hard-bake temperature of 120°C was identified, and a printing process was subsequently employed because the appropriate water contact angle of the printed film was 79°. Under the appropriate inkjet printing conditions, the two-transmission-line method was used to extract the dielectric and electrical properties of the SU-8 polymer film, and the electrical behavior of the fabricated MIM capacitor was also characterized.

  3. Ultrafast Laser Engraving Method to Fabricate Gravure Plate for Printed Metal-Mesh Touch Panel

    Weiyuan Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to engrave gravure plate with fine lines structures, conventional art used lithography with dry/wet etching. Lithography with dry/wet etching method allows to engrave lines with smooth concave shape, but its disadvantages include difficulty in controlling aspect ratio, high and uniform in large size process, substrate material limitation due to etching solution availability, and process complexity. We developed ultra-fast laser technology to directly engrave a stainless plate, a gravure plate, to be used for fabricating 23 in. metal-mesh touch panel by gravure offset printing process. The technology employs high energy pulse to ablate materials from a substrate. Because the ultra-fast laser pulse duration is shorter than the energy dissipation time between material lattices, there is no heating issue during the ablation process. Therefore, no volcano-type protrusion on the engraved line edges occurs, leading to good printing quality. After laser engraving, we then reduce surface roughness of the gravure plate using electro-polishing process. Diamond like carbon (DLC coating layer is then added onto the surface to increase scratch resistance. We show that this procedure can fabricate gravure plate for gravure offset printing process with minimum printing linewidth 10.7 μm. A 23 in. metal-mesh pattern was printed using such gravure plate and fully functional touch panel was demonstrated in this work.

  4. Facile 3D Metal Electrode Fabrication for Energy Applications via Inkjet Printing and Shape Memory Polymer

    Roberts, R C; Wu, J; Li, D C; Hau, N Y; Chang, Y H; Feng, S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple 3D metal electrode fabrication technique via inkjet printing onto a thermally contracting shape memory polymer (SMP) substrate. Inkjet printing allows for the direct patterning of structures from metal nanoparticle bearing liquid inks. After deposition, these inks require thermal curing steps to render a stable conductive film. By printing onto a SMP substrate, the metal nanoparticle ink can be cured and substrate shrunk simultaneously to create 3D metal microstructures, forming a large surface area topology well suited for energy applications. Polystyrene SMP shrinkage was characterized in a laboratory oven from 150-240°C, resulting in a size reduction of 1.97-2.58. Silver nanoparticle ink was patterned into electrodes, shrunk, and the topology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Zinc-Silver Oxide microbatteries were fabricated to demonstrate the 3D electrodes compared to planar references. Characterization was performed using 10M potassium hydroxide electrolyte solution doped with zinc oxide (57g/L). After a 300s oxidation at 3Vdc, the 3D electrode battery demonstrated a 125% increased capacity over the reference cell. Reference cells degraded with longer oxidations, but the 3D electrodes were fully oxidized for 4 hours, and exhibited a capacity of 5.5mA-hr/cm 2 with stable metal performance

  5. Direct metal transfer printing on flexible substrate for fabricating optics functional devices

    Jiang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Feng; Shi, Zhenwu; Chen, Linsen; Peng, Changsi

    2015-11-01

    New functional materials and devices based on metal patterns can be widely used in many new and expanding industries,such as flat panel displays, alternative energy,sensors and so on. In this paper, we introduce a new transfer printing method for fabricating metal optics functional devices. This method can directly transfer a metal pattern from a polyethylene terephthalate (PET)supported UV or polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern to another PET substrate. Purely taking advantage of the anaerobic UV curing adhesive (a-UV) on PET substrate, metal film can be easily peeled off from micro/nano-structured surface. As a result, metal film on the protrusion can be selectively transferred onto the target substrate, to make it the metal functional surface. But which on the bottom can not be transferred. This method provides low cost fabrication of metal thin film devices by avoiding high cost lithography process. Compared with conventional approach, this method can get more smooth rough edges and has wider tolerance range for the original master mold. Future developments and potential applications of this metal transfer method will be addressed.

  6. Antenna Fabrication using 3D printing techniques

    Elibiary, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focuses to explore the use of additive manufacturing (AM) techniques to fabricate various radio frequency (RF) devices. 3D printing, a term used for AM has evolved to the point where it is being introduced into various industries, one of these, discussed in this thesis is the fabrication of antennas for the aim to reduce manufacturing costs and time.\\ud The aim is to investigate the performance and reliability of a modified low-cost 3D printer to print plastic and metal simultaneo...

  7. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Metallic Surface by Wire Electrical Discharge Machining for Seamless Roll-to-Roll Printing

    Jin-Young So

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposal of a direct one-step method to fabricate a multi-scale superhydrophobic metallic seamless roll mold. The mold was fabricated using the wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM technique for a roll-to-roll imprinting application to produce a large superhydrophobic surface. Taking advantage of the exfoliating characteristic of the metallic surface, nano-sized surface roughness was spontaneously formed while manufacturing the micro-sized structure: that is, a dual-scale hierarchical structure was easily produced in a simple one-step fabrication with a large area on the aluminum metal surface. This hierarchical structure showed superhydrophobicity without chemical coating. A roll-type seamless mold for the roll-to-roll process was fabricated through engraving the patterns on the cylindrical substrate, thereby enabling to make a continuous film with superhydrophobicity.

  8. Inkjet Printing of 3D Metallic Silver Complex Microstructures

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Sridhar, Ashok; Dimitrov, D.

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief

  9. Functional electronic screen printing – electroluminescent smart fabric watch

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Beeby, Steve; Tudor, John

    2013-01-01

    Motivation for screen printed smart fabrics.Introduce functional electronic screen printing on fabrics.Printed smart fabric watch design.Printing process for electroluminescent watch.Demonstration video.Conclusions and further work.Examples of other screen printed smart fabrics.

  10. 3D Microstructural Architectures for Metal and Alloy Components Fabricated by 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Technologies

    Martinez, E.; Murr, L. E.; Amato, K. N.; Hernandez, J.; Shindo, P. W.; Gaytan, S. M.; Ramirez, D. A.; Medina, F.; Wicker, R. B.

    The layer-by-layer building of monolithic, 3D metal components from selectively melted powder layers using laser or electron beams is a novel form of 3D printing or additive manufacturing. Microstructures created in these 3D products can involve novel, directional solidification structures which can include crystallographically oriented grains containing columnar arrays of precipitates characteristic of a microstructural architecture. These microstructural architectures are advantageously rendered in 3D image constructions involving light optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations. Microstructural evolution can also be effectively examined through 3D image sequences which, along with x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis in the x-y and x-z planes, can effectively characterize related crystallographic/texture variances. This paper compares 3D microstructural architectures in Co-base and Ni-base superalloys, columnar martensitic grain structures in 17-4 PH alloy, and columnar copper oxides and dislocation arrays in copper.

  11. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Ko, Seung H; Pan Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Luscombe, Christine K; Frechet, Jean M J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates

  12. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  13. Printed metal back electrodes for R2R fabricated polymer solar cells studied using the LBIC technique

    Krebs, Frederik C; Søndergaard, Roar; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The performance of printable metal back electrodes for polymer solar cells were investigated using light beam induced current (LBIC) mapping of the final solar cell device after preparation to identify the causes of poor performance. Three different types of silver based printable metal inks were...

  14. Fabrication of ultra-fine nanostructures using edge transfer printing.

    Xue, Mianqi; Li, Fengwang; Cao, Tingbing

    2012-03-21

    The exploration of new methods and techniques for application in diverse fields, such as photonics, microfluidics, biotechnology and flexible electronics is of increasing scientific and technical interest for multiple uses over distance of 10-100 nm. This article discusses edge transfer printing--a series of unconventional methods derived from soft lithography for nanofabrication. It possesses the advantages of easy fabrication, low-cost and great serviceability. In this paper, we show how to produce exposed edges and use various materials for edge transfer printing, while nanoskiving, nanotransfer edge printing and tunable cracking for nanogaps are introduced. Besides this, different functional materials, such as metals, inorganic semiconductors and polymers, as well as localised heating and charge patterning, are described here as unconventional "inks" for printing. Edge transfer printing, which can effectively produce sub-100 nm scale ultra-fine structures, has broad applications, including metallic nanowires as nanoelectrodes, semiconductor nanowires for chemical sensors, heterostructures of organic semiconductors, plasmonic devices and so forth. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  15. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  16. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    De Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-01-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps. (paper)

  17. Batch fabrication of disposable screen printed SERS arrays.

    Qu, Lu-Lu; Li, Da-Wei; Xue, Jin-Qun; Zhai, Wen-Lei; Fossey, John S; Long, Yi-Tao

    2012-03-07

    A novel facile method of fabricating disposable and highly reproducible surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) arrays using screen printing was explored. The screen printing ink containing silver nanoparticles was prepared and printed on supporting materials by a screen printing process to fabricate SERS arrays (6 × 10 printed spots) in large batches. The fabrication conditions, SERS performance and application of these arrays were systematically investigated, and a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(-13) M for rhodamine 6G could be achieved. Moreover, the screen printed SERS arrays exhibited high reproducibility and stability, the spot-to-spot SERS signals showed that the intensity variation was less than 10% and SERS performance could be maintained over 12 weeks. Portable high-throughput analysis of biological samples was accomplished using these disposable screen printed SERS arrays.

  18. CORROSION ANALYSIS OF METALLIZED FILMS AFTER PRINTING

    Mr. Dhirender*1, Mr. Rajeev2 & Mr.Manoj3

    2017-01-01

    Print quality has always been a point of strong concern among printers and consumers. Metalized films have gain a wide spread popularity among printers because of its low cost and high usages in food packaging applications. But sometimes corrosion spoils the printed products causing huge financial loss to the printers or customers.This paper throws light on major causes of corrosion on metallized films and possible remedies for the same. The metallized films with polyester base were base coat...

  19. Fabrication of palladium-based microelectronic devices by microcontact printing

    Wolfe, Daniel B.; Love, J. Christopher; Paul, Kateri E.; Chabinyc, Michael L.; Whitesides, George M.

    2002-01-01

    This letter demonstrates the patterning of thin films of metallic palladium by microcontact printing (μCP) of octadecanethiol, and the use of the patterned films in the fabrication of a functional sensor. This technique was also used to prepare templates of palladium for the electroless deposition of copper. The resistivity of the palladium and copper microstructures was 13.8 and 2.8 μΩ cm, respectively; these values are approximately 40% larger than the values for the pure bulk metals. Palladium patterned into serpentine wires using μCP functioned as a hydrogen sensor with sensitivity of 0.03 vol % H 2 in N 2 , and a response time of ∼10 s (at room temperature)

  20. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  1. XPS and NRA investigations during the fabrication of gold nanostructured functionalized screen-printed sensors for the detection of metallic pollutants

    Jasmin, Jean-Philippe; Miserque, Frédéric; Dumas, Eddy; Vickridge, Ian; Ganem, Jean-Jacques; Cannizzo, Caroline; Chaussé, Annie

    2017-03-01

    An all covalent nanostructured lead sensor was built by the successive grafting of gold nanoparticles and carboxylic ligands at the surface of self-adhesive carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). Surface analysis techniques were used in each step in order to investigate the structuration of this sensor. The self-adhesive surfaces were made from the electrochemical grafting of p-phenylenediamine at the surface of the SPEs via diazonium salts chemistry. The quantity of grafted aniline functions, estimated by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) performed with p-phenylenediamine labelled with 15N isotope, is in agreement with an almost complete coverage of the electrode surface. The subsequent diazotization of the aniline functions at the surface of the SPEs was performed; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to consider a quantitative conversion of the aniline functions into diazonium moieties. The spontaneous grafting of gold nanoparticles on the as-obtained reactive surfaces ensures the nanostructuration of the material, and XPS studies showed that the covalent bonding of the gold nanoparticles at the surface of the SPEs induces a change both in the Au-4f (gold nanoparticles) and Cl-2p (carbon ink) core level signals. These unusual observations are explained by an interaction between the carbon ink constituting the substrate and the gold nanoparticles. Heavy and toxic metals are considered of major environmental concern because of their non-biodegradability. In a final step, the grafting of the carboxylic ligands at the surface of the SPEs and an accumulation step in the presence of lead(II) cations allowed us to evidence the interest of nanostructured materials as metallic pollutants sensors.

  2. Inkjet Printing and Ebeam Sintering Approach to Fabrication of GHz Meta material Absorber

    Park, J. W.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, Y. P.; Park, I. S.; Kang, J. H.; Lim, Jongwoo; Kim, Jonghee; Kim, Hyotae

    2013-01-01

    Metamaterial absorber structure of GHz range is fabricated by inkjet printing and e-beam sintering. The inkjet printing is of interest, which give the easier and quicker way to fabricate large scale metamaterials than the approaches by the lithographic process, Furthermore it is more suitable to make flexible electronics, which has yet been great technologic trend. Usual post process of inkjet printing is the sintering to ensure solvent-free from the printed pattern and to its better conductivity comparable to the ordinary vacuum deposition process. E-beam irradiation sintering of the pattern is promising because it is inherently local and low temperature process. The main procedure of metamaterials fabrication is printing a resonator structure with lossy metal such as Ag or Au. We designed two types of Ag based multiband absorber which are double and quadruple bands. Those adsorber patterns are printed on polyimide substrate with commercially available Ag ink (DGP 40LT-15C, 25C). The absorbance performance of fabricated metamaterials is characterized by Hewlett-Packard E836B network analyzer in microwave anechoic chamber. The conductivity enhancement after e-beam or other sintering process is checked by measuring sheet resistance. The absorbance of the fabricated metamaterial is measured around 60% for the types designed. The absorbance is not high enough to practical use, which is attributed to low conductivity of the printed pattern. The spectrum shows, however, quite interesting large broadness, which come in the interval between each pack absorbance, witch needs further study. Though the extent of its effectiveness of inkjet printing in metamaterials needs more experimental studies, the demonstrated capability of quick and large area fabrication to flexible substrate is excellent

  3. XPS and NRA investigations during the fabrication of gold nanostructured functionalized screen-printed sensors for the detection of metallic pollutants

    Jasmin, Jean-Philippe; Miserque, Frédéric; Dumas, Eddy; Vickridge, Ian; Ganem, Jean-Jacques; Cannizzo, Caroline; Chaussé, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionalized nanostructured SPEs were made by multi-step diazonium salt chemistry. • Investigation of SPEs surface by XPS and NRA shows monolayer coverage by aminobenzyl groups. • Complete conversion of aminobenzyl groups into diazonium functions was also evidenced. • Covalent grafting of AuNPs onto SPEs lead to an unusual modification of Au-4f core level spectrum. • Ligand and lead signals showed the interest of nanostructurated SPEs for trace metals detection. - Abstract: An all covalent nanostructured lead sensor was built by the successive grafting of gold nanoparticles and carboxylic ligands at the surface of self-adhesive carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). Surface analysis techniques were used in each step in order to investigate the structuration of this sensor. The self-adhesive surfaces were made from the electrochemical grafting of p-phenylenediamine at the surface of the SPEs via diazonium salts chemistry. The quantity of grafted aniline functions, estimated by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) performed with p-phenylenediamine labelled with "1"5N isotope, is in agreement with an almost complete coverage of the electrode surface. The subsequent diazotization of the aniline functions at the surface of the SPEs was performed; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to consider a quantitative conversion of the aniline functions into diazonium moieties. The spontaneous grafting of gold nanoparticles on the as-obtained reactive surfaces ensures the nanostructuration of the material, and XPS studies showed that the covalent bonding of the gold nanoparticles at the surface of the SPEs induces a change both in the Au-4f (gold nanoparticles) and Cl-2p (carbon ink) core level signals. These unusual observations are explained by an interaction between the carbon ink constituting the substrate and the gold nanoparticles. Heavy and toxic metals are considered of major environmental concern because of their non

  4. XPS and NRA investigations during the fabrication of gold nanostructured functionalized screen-printed sensors for the detection of metallic pollutants

    Jasmin, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-Université Evry Val d’Essonne-CEA, 1 rue du père Jarlan, 91025 Evry Cedex (France); Miserque, Frédéric [Den-Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Matériaux dans leur Environnement (SCCME), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dumas, Eddy [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, CNRS-Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, 78035 Versailles (France); Vickridge, Ian; Ganem, Jean-Jacques [INSP, UMR 7588, CNRS- Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840 75252 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Cannizzo, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.cannizzo@univ-evry.fr [Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-Université Evry Val d’Essonne-CEA, 1 rue du père Jarlan, 91025 Evry Cedex (France); Chaussé, Annie [Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, UMR 8587, CNRS-Université Evry Val d’Essonne-CEA, 1 rue du père Jarlan, 91025 Evry Cedex (France)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • Functionalized nanostructured SPEs were made by multi-step diazonium salt chemistry. • Investigation of SPEs surface by XPS and NRA shows monolayer coverage by aminobenzyl groups. • Complete conversion of aminobenzyl groups into diazonium functions was also evidenced. • Covalent grafting of AuNPs onto SPEs lead to an unusual modification of Au-4f core level spectrum. • Ligand and lead signals showed the interest of nanostructurated SPEs for trace metals detection. - Abstract: An all covalent nanostructured lead sensor was built by the successive grafting of gold nanoparticles and carboxylic ligands at the surface of self-adhesive carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). Surface analysis techniques were used in each step in order to investigate the structuration of this sensor. The self-adhesive surfaces were made from the electrochemical grafting of p-phenylenediamine at the surface of the SPEs via diazonium salts chemistry. The quantity of grafted aniline functions, estimated by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) performed with p-phenylenediamine labelled with {sup 15}N isotope, is in agreement with an almost complete coverage of the electrode surface. The subsequent diazotization of the aniline functions at the surface of the SPEs was performed; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to consider a quantitative conversion of the aniline functions into diazonium moieties. The spontaneous grafting of gold nanoparticles on the as-obtained reactive surfaces ensures the nanostructuration of the material, and XPS studies showed that the covalent bonding of the gold nanoparticles at the surface of the SPEs induces a change both in the Au-4f (gold nanoparticles) and Cl-2p (carbon ink) core level signals. These unusual observations are explained by an interaction between the carbon ink constituting the substrate and the gold nanoparticles. Heavy and toxic metals are considered of major environmental concern because of their non

  5. Fabrication of a printed capacitive air-gap touch sensor

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Seo, Hwiwon; Lee, Sangyoon

    2018-05-01

    Unlike lithography-based processes, printed electronics does not require etching, which makes it difficult to fabricate electronic devices with an air gap. In this study, we propose a method to fabricate capacitive air-gap touch sensors via printing and coating. First, the bottom electrode was fabricated on a flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate using roll-to-roll gravure printing with silver ink. Then poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was spin coated to form a sacrificial layer. The top electrode was fabricated on the sacrificial layer by spin coating with a stretchable silver ink. The sensor samples were then put in a tetrabutylammonium (TBAF) bath to generate the air gap by removing the sacrificial layer. The capacitance of the samples was measured for verification, and the results show that the capacitance increases in proportion to the applied force from 0 to 2.5 N.

  6. Novel materials for electronic device fabrication using ink-jet printing technology

    Kumashiro, Yasushi; Nakako, Hideo; Inada, Maki; Yamamoto, Kazunori; Izumi, Akira; Ishihara, Masamichi

    2009-01-01

    Novel materials and a metallization technique for the printed electronics were studied. Insulator inks and conductive inks were investigated. For the conductive ink, the nano-sized copper particles were used as metallic sources. These particles were prepared from a copper complex by a laser irradiation process in the liquid phase. Nano-sized copper particles were consisted of a thin copper oxide layer and a metal copper core wrapped by the layer. The conductive ink showed good ink-jettability. In order to metallize the printed trace of the conductive ink on a substrate, the atomic hydrogen treatment was carried out. Atomic hydrogen was generated on a heated tungsten wire and carried on the substrate. The temperature of the substrate was up to 60 deg. C during the treatment. After the treatment, the conductivity of a copper trace was 3 μΩ cm. It was considered that printed wiring boards can be easily fabricated by employing the above materials.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of aerosol-jet printed strain sensors for multifunctional composite structures

    Zhao, Da; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Mei; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben

    2012-11-01

    Traditional multifunctional composite structures are produced by embedding parasitic parts, such as foil sensors, optical fibers and bulky connectors. As a result, the mechanical properties of the composites, especially the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), could be largely undermined. In the present study, we demonstrated an innovative aerosol-jet printing technology for printing electronics inside composite structures without degrading the mechanical properties. Using the maskless fine feature deposition (below 10 μm) characteristics of this printing technology and a pre-cure protocol, strain sensors were successfully printed onto carbon fiber prepregs to enable fabricating composites with intrinsic sensing capabilities. The degree of pre-cure of the carbon fiber prepreg on which strain sensors were printed was demonstrated to be critical. Without pre-curing, the printed strain sensors were unable to remain intact due to the resin flow during curing. The resin flow-induced sensor deformation can be overcome by introducing 10% degree of cure of the prepreg. In this condition, the fabricated composites with printed strain sensors showed almost no mechanical degradation (short beam shearing ILSS) as compared to the control samples. Also, the failure modes examined by optical microscopy showed no difference. The resistance change of the printed strain sensors in the composite structures were measured under a cyclic loading and proved to be a reliable mean strain gauge factor of 2.2 ± 0.06, which is comparable to commercial foil metal strain gauge.

  8. Fabrication of integrated metallic MEMS devices

    Yalcinkaya, Arda Deniz; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A simple and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication technique for microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices is presented. The fabrication technology makes use of electroplated metal layers. Among the fabricated devices, high quality factor microresonators are characteri......A simple and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication technique for microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices is presented. The fabrication technology makes use of electroplated metal layers. Among the fabricated devices, high quality factor microresonators...

  9. Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems.

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Viitala, Tapani; Ihalainen, Petri; Genina, Natalja; Peltonen, Jouko; Sandler, Niklas

    2013-12-01

    There has been increased activity in the field recently regarding the development and research on various printing techniques in fabrication of dosage forms and drug delivery systems. These technologies may offer benefits and flexibility in manufacturing, potentially paving the way for personalized dosing and tailor-made dosage forms. In this review, the most recent observations and advancements in fabrication of drug delivery systems by utilizing printing technologies are summarized. A general overview of 2D printing techniques is presented including a review of the most recent literature where printing techniques are used in fabrication of drug delivery systems. The future perspectives and possible impacts on formulation strategies, flexible dosing and personalized medication of using printing techniques for fabrication of drug delivery systems are discussed. It is evident that there is an urgent need to meet the challenges of rapidly growing trend of personalization of medicines through development of flexible drug-manufacturing approaches. In this context, various printing technologies, such as inkjet and flexography, can play an important role. Challenges on different levels exist and include: i) technological development of printers and production lines; ii) printable formulations and carrier substrates; iii) quality control and characterization; and iv) regulatory perspectives.

  10. High-Performance Screen-Printed Thermoelectric Films on Fabrics.

    Shin, Sunmi; Kumar, Rajan; Roh, Jong Wook; Ko, Dong-Su; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Kim, Sang Il; Yin, Lu; Schlossberg, Sarah M; Cui, Shuang; You, Jung-Min; Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wang, Joseph; Chen, Renkun

    2017-08-04

    Printing techniques could offer a scalable approach to fabricate thermoelectric (TE) devices on flexible substrates for power generation used in wearable devices and personalized thermo-regulation. However, typical printing processes need a large concentration of binder additives, which often render a detrimental effect on electrical transport of the printed TE layers. Here, we report scalable screen-printing of TE layers on flexible fiber glass fabrics, by rationally optimizing the printing inks consisting of TE particles (p-type Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 or n-type Bi 2 Te 2.7 Se 0.3 ), binders, and organic solvents. We identified a suitable binder additive, methyl cellulose, which offers suitable viscosity for printability at a very small concentration (0.45-0.60 wt.%), thus minimizing its negative impact on electrical transport. Following printing, the binders were subsequently burnt off via sintering and hot pressing. We found that the nanoscale defects left behind after the binder burnt off became effective phonon scattering centers, leading to low lattice thermal conductivity in the printed n-type material. With the high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity, the screen-printed TE layers showed high room-temperature ZT values of 0.65 and 0.81 for p-type and n-type, respectively.

  11. A microelectromechanical accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques

    Rogers, J. E.; Ramadoss, R.; Ozmun, P. M.; Dean, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive-type accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques is presented. A Kapton polymide film is used as the structural layer for fabricating the MEMS accelerometer. The accelerometer proof mass along with four suspension beams is defined in the Kapton polyimide film. The proof mass is suspended above a Teflon substrate using a spacer. The deflection of the proof mass is detected using a pair of capacitive sensing electrodes. The top electrode of the accelerometer is defined on the top surface of the Kapton film. The bottom electrode is defined in the metallization on the Teflon substrate. The initial gap height is determined by the distance between the bottom electrode and the Kapton film. For an applied external acceleration (normal to the proof mass), the proof mass deflects toward or away from the fixed bottom electrode due to inertial force. This deflection causes either a decrease or increase in the air-gap height thereby either increasing or decreasing the capacitance between the top and the bottom electrodes. An example PCB MEMS accelerometer with a square proof mass of membrane area 6.4 mm × 6.4 mm is reported. The measured resonant frequency is 375 Hz and the Q-factor in air is 0.52.

  12. A microelectromechanical accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques

    Rogers, J E; Ramadoss, R; Ozmun, P M; Dean, R N

    2008-01-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive-type accelerometer fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques is presented. A Kapton polymide film is used as the structural layer for fabricating the MEMS accelerometer. The accelerometer proof mass along with four suspension beams is defined in the Kapton polyimide film. The proof mass is suspended above a Teflon substrate using a spacer. The deflection of the proof mass is detected using a pair of capacitive sensing electrodes. The top electrode of the accelerometer is defined on the top surface of the Kapton film. The bottom electrode is defined in the metallization on the Teflon substrate. The initial gap height is determined by the distance between the bottom electrode and the Kapton film. For an applied external acceleration (normal to the proof mass), the proof mass deflects toward or away from the fixed bottom electrode due to inertial force. This deflection causes either a decrease or increase in the air-gap height thereby either increasing or decreasing the capacitance between the top and the bottom electrodes. An example PCB MEMS accelerometer with a square proof mass of membrane area 6.4 mm × 6.4 mm is reported. The measured resonant frequency is 375 Hz and the Q-factor in air is 0.52

  13. Metallurgy: No more tears for metal 3D printing

    Todd, Iain

    2017-09-01

    3D printing could revolutionize manufacturing processes involving metals, but few industrially useful alloys are compatible with the technique. A method has been developed that might open up the 3D printing of all metals. See Letter p.365

  14. Recent Advancements in Liquid Metal Flexible Printed Electronics: Properties, Technologies, and Applications

    Xuelin Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview on typical properties, technologies, and applications of liquid metal based flexible printed electronics. The core manufacturing material—room-temperature liquid metal, currently mainly represented by gallium and its alloys with the properties of excellent resistivity, enormous bendability, low adhesion, and large surface tension, was focused on in particular. In addition, a series of recently developed printing technologies spanning from personal electronic circuit printing (direct painting or writing, mechanical system printing, mask layer based printing, high-resolution nanoimprinting, etc. to 3D room temperature liquid metal printing is comprehensively reviewed. Applications of these planar or three-dimensional printing technologies and the related liquid metal alloy inks in making flexible electronics, such as electronical components, health care sensors, and other functional devices were discussed. The significantly different adhesions of liquid metal inks on various substrates under different oxidation degrees, weakness of circuits, difficulty of fabricating high-accuracy devices, and low rate of good product—all of which are challenges faced by current liquid metal flexible printed electronics—are discussed. Prospects for liquid metal flexible printed electronics to develop ending user electronics and more extensive applications in the future are given.

  15. 3D printing with metals

    Ribeiro, António Fernando

    1998-01-01

    Rapid Prototyping is a recently developed technique that ‘prints’ a component, instead of manufacturing it in traditional terms, by using materials ranging from photopolymers to thermoplastics, including paper. Since these materials are in most cases not suitable for assessement purposes a new approach has been created. It has similar ‘build up’ technique but uses metal as raw material. The process entails the use of a gas metal arc fusion welding robot which deposits successive layers of met...

  16. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticle-Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrodes for the Evaluation of Hydrogen Peroxide Content in Teeth Whitening Strips

    Popa, Adriana; Abenojar, Eric C.; Vianna, Adam; Buenviaje, Czarina Y. A.; Yang, Jiahua; Pascual, Cherrie B.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment in which students synthesize Ag, Au, and Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and use them to modify screen printed carbon electrodes for the electroanalysis of the hydrogen peroxide content in commercially available teeth whitening strips is described. This experiment is designed for two 3-h laboratory periods and can be adapted for…

  17. Optical fabrication of lightweighted 3D printed mirrors

    Herzog, Harrison; Segal, Jacob; Smith, Jeremy; Bates, Richard; Calis, Jacob; De La Torre, Alyssa; Kim, Dae Wook; Mici, Joni; Mireles, Jorge; Stubbs, David M.; Wicker, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM) 3D printing technologies were utilized to create lightweight, optical grade mirrors out of AlSi10Mg aluminum and Ti6Al4V titanium alloys at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The mirror prototypes were polished to meet the λ/20 RMS and λ/4 P-V surface figure requirements. The intent of this project was to design topologically optimized mirrors that had a high specific stiffness and low surface displacement. Two models were designed using Altair Inspire software, and the mirrors had to endure the polishing process with the necessary stiffness to eliminate print-through. Mitigating porosity of the 3D printed mirror blanks was a challenge in the face of reconciling new printing technologies with traditional optical polishing methods. The prototypes underwent Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) and heat treatment to improve density, eliminate porosity, and relieve internal stresses. Metal 3D printing allows for nearly unlimited topological constraints on design and virtually eliminates the need for a machine shop when creating an optical quality mirror. This research can lead to an increase in mirror mounting support complexity in the manufacturing of lightweight mirrors and improve overall process efficiency. The project aspired to have many future applications of light weighted 3D printed mirrors, such as spaceflight. This paper covers the design/fab/polish/test of 3D printed mirrors, thermal/structural finite element analysis, and results.

  18. Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Viitala, Tapani; Ihalainen, Petri

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There has been increased activity in the field recently regarding the development and research on various printing techniques in fabrication of dosage forms and drug delivery systems. These technologies may offer benefits and flexibility in manufacturing, potentially paving the way...... for personalized dosing and tailor-made dosage forms.\

  19. Composites of 3D-Printed Polymers and Textile Fabrics*

    Martens, Yasmin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    3D printing belongs to the rapidly emerging technologies of our time. Due to its recent drawback - the technology is relatively slow compared with other primary shaping methods, such as injection molding -, 3D printing is often not used for creating complete large components but to add specific features to existing larger objects. One of the possibilities to create such composites with an additional value consists in combining 3D printed polymers with textile fabrics. Several attempts have been made to enhance the adhesion between both materials, a task which is still challenging for diverse material combinations. Our paper reports about new experiments combining 3D printed embossed designs, snap fasteners and zip fasteners with different textile base materials, showing the possibilities and technical limits of these novel composites.

  20. Inkjet printing and inkjet infiltration of functional coatings for SOFCs fabrication

    Tomov Rumen I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing fabrication and modification of electrodes and electrolytes of SOFCs were studied. Electromagnetic print-heads were utilized to reproducibly dispense droplets of inks at rates of several kHz on demand. Printing parameters including pressure, nozzle opening time and drop spreading were studied in order to optimize the inks jetting and delivery. Scanning electron microscopy revealed highly conformal ~ 6-10 μm thick dense electrolyte layers routinely produced on cermet and metal porous supports. Open circuit voltages ranging from 0.95 to 1.01 V, and a maximum power density of ~180 mW.cm−2 were measured at 750 °C on Ni-8YSZ/YSZ/LSM single cell 50×50 mm in size. The effect of anode and cathode microstructures on the electrochemical performance was investigated. Two - step fabrication of the electrodes using inkjet printing infiltration was implemented. In the first step the porous electrode scaffold was created printing suspension composite inks. During the second step inkjet printing infiltration was utilized for controllable loading of active elements and a formation of nano-grid decorations on the scaffolds radically reducing the activation polarization losses of both electrodes. Symmetrical cells of both types were characterized by impedance spectroscopy in order to reveal the relation between the microstructure and the electrochemical performance.

  1. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  2. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  3. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed.

  4. Fabrication of a roller type PDMS stamp using SU-8 concave molds and its application for roll contact printing

    Park, Jongho; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-01-01

    Continuous fabrication of micropatterns at low-cost is attracting attention in various applications within industrial fields. To meet such demands, we have demonstrated a roll contact printing technique, using roller type polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Roller type PDMS stamps for roll contact printing were fabricated using a custom-made metal support and SU-8 microstructures fabricated on concave substrates as a mold. The molding/casting method which we developed here provided faster and easier fabrication than conventional methods for roller type stamps. Next, roll contact printing was performed using fabricated roller type PDMS stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Patterns with minimum widths of 3 μm and 2.1 μm were continuously fabricated for each stage, respectively. In addition, the relationship between applied pressures and dimensional changes of roll contact printed patterns was investigated. Finally, we confirmed that roll contact printing and the new fabrication method for roller stamps presented in this study demonstrated the feasibility for industrial applications. (paper)

  5. 3-D printing of liquid metals for stretchable and flexible conductors

    Trlica, Chris; Parekh, Dishit Paresh; Panich, Lazar; Ladd, Collin; Dickey, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    3-D printing is an emerging technology that has been used primarily on small scales for rapid prototyping, but which could also herald a wider movement towards decentralized, highly customizable manufacturing. Polymers are the most common materials to be 3-D printed today, but there is great demand for a way to easily print metals. Existing techniques for 3-D printing metals tend to be expensive and energy-intensive, and usually require high temperatures or pressures, making them incompatible with polymers, organics, soft materials, and biological materials. Here, we describe room temperature liquid metals as complements to polymers for 3-D printing applications. These metals enable the fabrication of soft, flexible, and stretchable devices. We survey potential room temperature liquid metal candidates and describe the benefits of gallium and its alloys for these purposes. We demonstrate the direct printing of a liquid gallium alloy in both 2-D and 3-D and highlight the structures and shapes that can be fabricated using these processes.

  6. Fit of interim crowns fabricated using photopolymer-jetting 3D printing.

    Mai, Hang-Nga; Lee, Kyu-Bok; Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2017-08-01

    The fit of interim crowns fabricated using 3-dimensional (3D) printing is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fit of interim crowns fabricated using photopolymer-jetting 3D printing and to compare it with that of milling and compression molding methods. Twelve study models were fabricated by making an impression of a metal master model of the mandibular first molar. On each study model, interim crowns (N=36) were fabricated using compression molding (molding group, n=12), milling (milling group, n=12), and 3D polymer-jetting methods. The crowns were prepared as follows: molding group, overimpression technique; milling group, a 5-axis dental milling machine; and polymer-jetting group using a 3D printer. The fit of interim crowns was evaluated in the proximal, marginal, internal axial, and internal occlusal regions by using the image-superimposition and silicone-replica techniques. The Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the results among groups (α=.05). Compared with the molding group, the milling and polymer-jetting groups showed more accurate results in the proximal and marginal regions (P3D printing significantly enhanced the fit of interim crowns, particularly in the occlusal region. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Mei, Ying; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Kindy, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell–cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. (paper)

  8. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  9. Patterned Liquid Metal Contacts for Printed Carbon Nanotube Transistors.

    Andrews, Joseph B; Mondal, Kunal; Neumann, Taylor V; Cardenas, Jorge A; Wang, Justin; Parekh, Dishit P; Lin, Yiliang; Ballentine, Peter; Dickey, Michael D; Franklin, Aaron D

    2018-05-14

    Flexible and stretchable electronics are poised to enable many applications that cannot be realized with traditional, rigid devices. One of the most promising options for low-cost stretchable transistors are printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, a major limiting factor in stretchable CNT devices is the lack of a stable and versatile contact material that forms both the interconnects and contact electrodes. In this work, we introduce the use of eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) liquid metal for electrical contacts to printed CNT channels. We analyze thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated using two different liquid metal deposition techniques-vacuum-filling polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel structures and direct-writing liquid metals on the CNTs. The highest performing CNT-TFT was realized using vacuum-filled microchannel deposition with an in situ annealing temperature of 150 °C. This device exhibited an on/off ratio of more than 10 4 and on-currents as high as 150 μA/mm-metrics that are on par with other printed CNT-TFTs. Additionally, we observed that at room temperature the contact resistances of the vacuum-filled microchannel structures were 50% lower than those of the direct-write structures, likely due to the poor adhesion between the materials observed during the direct-writing process. The insights gained in this study show that stretchable electronics can be realized using low-cost and solely solution processing techniques. Furthermore, we demonstrate methods that can be used to electrically characterize semiconducting materials as transistors without requiring elevated temperatures or cleanroom processes.

  10. The Danish fabricated metal industry:

    Hansen, Teis

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the knowledge on innovation processes in low- and medium-low-tech industries. Today, industries characterised as high-tech are perceived to be central to economic development, as the research intensity shields them from competition from low-wage countries....... This is less the case for low-tech industries, but their economic importance continues to be large, however. It is thus interesting to analyse how they manage to remain competitive. The analysis focuses on a case study of the fabricated metal industry by identifying the innovation strategies followed by firms...... located in a part of Jutland, where this industry has experienced growth. It is found that the ability to create tailor-made solutions is central to the competitiveness of these medium-low-tech firms. Knowledge is thus highly important, yet in different ways than for high-tech industries. This illustrates...

  11. The Fabrication of Non-Implant 3D Printed Nose

    Chuan Yong Leng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-surgical rhinoplasty procedures which involves the use of injectable derma fillers are highly risky as patients are susceptible to side effects and complications that may cause unwanted changes in their appearance. This research explores an alternative method of non-surgical rhinoplasty for patients seeking augmentation of the nose with the use of three-dimensional (3D printing. Most rhinoplasty procedures are conducted with the intention of enhancing the aesthetical features of the nose, a 3D model nose was designed based on the combination of the average and the ideal aesthetic parameters of the Northern European Caucasians and South Asia Chinese nose. The modelling of nose is done using the SolidWorks CAD software. An initial design was sketched in a polygon mesh form and further improved on. Different printing materials and infill densities were compared to determine the suitable printing technique. The final nose model is then printed using the Ultimaker 3D printer using Polylactic acid (PLA with an infill density of 100% at a thickness of 1.4 mm. An inner layer to the 3D printed nose was developed for comfortable attachment of the nose model to human skin. The inner layer was fabricated using agar gelatine. Experiments were carried out to increase the strength and adhesiveness of the gelatine so that it could adhere to the human skin and the PLA surface. Tensile and adhesive strength tests were carried out to determine the suitable gel composition for the attachment of the nose to the user’s face. The key outcome from the experiments using natural gelatine was capability of gel to act as an inner layer for the temporary attachment of the 3D nose model to the human skin

  12. Photoreactive and Metal-Platable Copolymer Inks for High-Throughput, Room-Temperature Printing of Flexible Metal Electrodes for Thin-Film Electronics.

    Yu, You; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Yaokang; Li, Kan; Yan, Casey; Wei, Xiaoling; Chen, Lina; Zhen, Hongyu; Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Shengdong; Zheng, Zijian

    2016-06-01

    Photoreactive and metal-platable copolymer inks are reported for the first time to allow high-throughput printing of high-performance flexible electrodes at room temperature. This new copolymer ink accommodates various types of printing technologies, such as soft lithography molding, screen printing, and inkjet printing. Electronic devices including resistors, sensors, solar cells, and thin-film transistors fabricated with these printed electrodes show excellent electrical performance and mechanical flexibility. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  14. A miniature rigid/flex salinity measurement device fabricated using printed circuit processing techniques

    Broadbent, H A; Ketterl, T P; Reid, C S

    2010-01-01

    The design, fabrication and initial performance of a single substrate, miniature, low-cost conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) sensor board with interconnects are presented. In combination these sensors measure ocean salinity. The miniature CTD device board was designed and fabricated as the main component of a 50 mm × 25 mm × 25 mm animal-attached biologger. The board was fabricated using printed circuit processes and consists of two distinct regions on a continuous single liquid crystal polymer substrate: an 18 mm × 28 mm rigid multi-metal sensor section and a 72 mm long flexible interconnect section. The 95% confidence intervals for the conductivity, temperature and pressure sensors were demonstrated to be ±0.083 mS cm −1 , 0.01 °C, and ±0.135 dbar, respectively.

  15. Screen printing technology applied to silicon solar cell fabrication

    Thornhill, J. W.; Sipperly, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The process for producing space qualified solar cells in both the conventional and wraparound configuration using screen printing techniques was investigated. Process modifications were chosen that could be easily automated or mechanized. Work was accomplished to optimize the tradeoffs associated with gridline spacing, gridline definition and junction depth. An extensive search for possible front contact metallization was completed. The back surface field structures along with the screen printed back contacts were optimized to produce open circuit voltages of at least an average of 600 millivolts. After all intended modifications on the process sequence were accomplished, the cells were exhaustively tested. Electrical tests at AMO and 28 C were made before and after boiling water immersion, thermal shock, and storage under conditions of high temperature and high humidity.

  16. A Stretchable Electromagnetic Absorber Fabricated Using Screen Printing Technology.

    Jeong, Heijun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2017-05-21

    A stretchable electromagnetic absorber fabricated using screen printing technology is proposed in this paper. We used a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate to fabricate the stretchable absorber since PDMS exhibits good dielectric properties, flexibility, and restoring capabilities. DuPont PE872 (DuPont, Wilmington, CT, USA), a stretchable silver conductive ink, was used for the screen printing technique. The reflection coefficient of the absorber was measured using a vector network analyzer and a waveguide. The proposed absorber was designed as a rectangular patch unit cell, wherein the top of the unit cell acted as the patch and the bottom formed the ground. The size of the patch was 8 mm × 7 mm. The prototype of the absorber consisted of two unit cells such that it fits into the WR-90 waveguide (dimensions: 22.86 mm × 10.16 mm) for experimental measurement. Before stretching the absorber, the resonant frequency was 11 GHz. When stretched along the x -direction, the resonant frequency shifted by 0.1 GHz, from 11 to 10.9 GHz, demonstrating 99% absorption. Furthermore, when stretched along the y -direction, the resonant frequency shifted by 0.6 GHz, from 11 to 10.4 GHz, demonstrating 99% absorption.

  17. Cliché fabrication method using precise roll printing process with 5 um pattern width

    Shin, Yejin; Kim, Inyoung; Oh, Dong-Ho; Lee, Taik-Min

    2016-09-01

    Among the printing processes for printed electronic devices, gravure offset and reverse offset method have drawn attention for its fine pattern printing possibility. These printing methods use cliché, which has critical effect on the final product precision and quality. In this research, a novel precise cliché replica method is proposed. It consists of copper sputtering, precise mask pattern printing with 5 um width using reverse offset printing, Ni electroplating, lift-off, etching, and DLC coating. We finally compare the fabricated replica cliché with the original one and print out precise patterns using the replica cliché.

  18. In-situ fabrication of flexible vertically integrated electronic circuits by inkjet printing

    Wang Zhuo; Wu Wenwen; Yang Qunbao; Li Yongxiang; Noh, Chang-Ho

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a facile approach for fabricating flexible vertically integrated electronic circuits is demonstrated. A desktop inkjet printer was modified and employed to print silver precursor on a polymer-coated buffer substrates. In-situ reaction was taken place and a conducting line was formed without need of a high temperature treatment. Through this process, several layers of metal integrated circuits were deposited sequentially with polymer buffer layers sandwiched between each layer. Hence, vertically integrated electronic components of diodes, solar cells, flexible flat panel displays, and electrochromic devices can be built with this simple and low-cost technique.

  19. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  20. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  1. 3D printed metal molds for hot embossing plastic microfluidic devices.

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Do, Truong; Kwon, Patrick; Lillehoj, Peter B

    2017-01-17

    Plastics are one of the most commonly used materials for fabricating microfluidic devices. While various methods exist for fabricating plastic microdevices, hot embossing offers several unique advantages including high throughput, excellent compatibility with most thermoplastics and low start-up costs. However, hot embossing requires metal or silicon molds that are fabricated using CNC milling or microfabrication techniques which are time consuming, expensive and required skilled technicians. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the fabrication of plastic microchannels using 3D printed metal molds. Through optimization of the powder composition and processing parameters, we were able to generate stainless steel molds with superior material properties (density and surface finish) than previously reported 3D printed metal parts. Molds were used to fabricate poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) replicas which exhibited good feature integrity and replication quality. Microchannels fabricated using these replicas exhibited leak-free operation and comparable flow performance as those fabricated from CNC milled molds. The speed and simplicity of this approach can greatly facilitate the development (i.e. prototyping) and manufacture of plastic microfluidic devices for research and commercial applications.

  2. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  3. Effect of chitosan on resist printing of cotton fabrics with reactive dyes

    The concentration of chitosan, types of resist agent, curing temperature and curing time were varied to determine their effects on resist-printed cotton fabrics. An optimal chitosan concentration of 1.6% resulted in the greatest resist effect on printed cotton fabrics. For mixtures, a 6:4 ratio of citric acid : chitosan and an 8:2 ...

  4. Screen-Printing Fabrication and Characterization of Stretchable Electronics.

    Suikkola, Jari; Björninen, Toni; Mosallaei, Mahmoud; Kankkunen, Timo; Iso-Ketola, Pekka; Ukkonen, Leena; Vanhala, Jukka; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2016-05-13

    This article focuses on the fabrication and characterization of stretchable interconnects for wearable electronics applications. Interconnects were screen-printed with a stretchable silver-polymer composite ink on 50-μm thick thermoplastic polyurethane. The initial sheet resistances of the manufactured interconnects were an average of 36.2 mΩ/◽, and half the manufactured samples withstood single strains of up to 74%. The strain proportionality of resistance is discussed, and a regression model is introduced. Cycling strain increased resistance. However, the resistances here were almost fully reversible, and this recovery was time-dependent. Normalized resistances to 10%, 15%, and 20% cyclic strains stabilized at 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7. We also tested the validity of our model for radio-frequency applications through characterization of a stretchable radio-frequency identification tag.

  5. Screen-Printing Fabrication and Characterization of Stretchable Electronics

    Suikkola, Jari; Björninen, Toni; Mosallaei, Mahmoud; Kankkunen, Timo; Iso-Ketola, Pekka; Ukkonen, Leena; Vanhala, Jukka; Mäntysalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the fabrication and characterization of stretchable interconnects for wearable electronics applications. Interconnects were screen-printed with a stretchable silver-polymer composite ink on 50-μm thick thermoplastic polyurethane. The initial sheet resistances of the manufactured interconnects were an average of 36.2 mΩ/◽, and half the manufactured samples withstood single strains of up to 74%. The strain proportionality of resistance is discussed, and a regression model is introduced. Cycling strain increased resistance. However, the resistances here were almost fully reversible, and this recovery was time-dependent. Normalized resistances to 10%, 15%, and 20% cyclic strains stabilized at 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7. We also tested the validity of our model for radio-frequency applications through characterization of a stretchable radio-frequency identification tag. PMID:27173424

  6. Ordered metal nanotube arrays fabricated by PVD.

    Marquez, F; Morant, C; Campo, T; Sanz, J M; Elizalde, E

    2010-02-01

    In this work we report a simple method to fabricate ordered arrays of metal nanotubes. This method is based on the deposition of a metal by PVD onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The dimensions of the synthesized nanotubes depend both on the AAO template and on the deposited metal. In fact, it is observed that the aspect ratios of the nanotubes clearly depend significantly on the metal, ranging from 0.6 (Fe) to at least 3 (Zr).

  7. Templated Dry Printing of Conductive Metal Nanoparticles

    Rolfe, David Alexander

    Printed electronics can lower the cost and increase the ubiquity of electrical components such as batteries, sensors, and telemetry systems. Unfortunately, the advance of printed electronics has been held back by the limited minimum resolution, aspect ratio, and feature fidelity of present printing techniques such as gravure, screen printing and inkjet printing. Templated dry printing offers a solution to these problems by patterning nanoparticle inks into templates before drying. This dissertation shows advancements in two varieties of templated dry nanoprinting. The first, advective micromolding in vapor-permeable templates (AMPT) is a microfluidic approach that uses evaporation-driven mold filling to create submicron features with a 1:1 aspect ratio. We will discuss submicron surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made through this process, and the refinement process in the template manufacturing process necessary to make these devices. We also present modeling techniques that can be applied to future AMPT templates. We conclude with a modified templated dry printing that improves throughput and isolated feature patterning by transferring dry-templated features with laser ablation. This method utilizes surface energy-defined templates to pattern features via doctor blade coating. Patterned and dried features can be transferred to a polymer substrate with an Nd:YAG MOPA fiber laser, and printed features can be smaller than the laser beam width.

  8. Rapid Three-Dimensional Printing in Water Using Semiconductor-Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles as Photoinitiators.

    Pawar, Amol Ashok; Halivni, Shira; Waiskopf, Nir; Ben-Shahar, Yuval; Soreni-Harari, Michal; Bergbreiter, Sarah; Banin, Uri; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2017-07-12

    Additive manufacturing processes enable fabrication of complex and functional three-dimensional (3D) objects ranging from engine parts to artificial organs. Photopolymerization, which is the most versatile technology enabling such processes through 3D printing, utilizes photoinitiators that break into radicals upon light absorption. We report on a new family of photoinitiators for 3D printing based on hybrid semiconductor-metal nanoparticles. Unlike conventional photoinitiators that are consumed upon irradiation, these particles form radicals through a photocatalytic process. Light absorption by the semiconductor nanorod is followed by charge separation and electron transfer to the metal tip, enabling redox reactions to form radicals in aerobic conditions. In particular, we demonstrate their use in 3D printing in water, where they simultaneously form hydroxyl radicals for the polymerization and consume dissolved oxygen that is a known inhibitor. We also demonstrate their potential for two-photon polymerization due to their giant two-photon absorption cross section.

  9. Internet of "printed" Things: low-cost fabrication of autonomous sensing nodes by inkjet printing

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    "What if electronics devices are printed using an inkjet printer even at home?" "What if those devices no longer need a battery?" I will introduce two enabling technologies for the Internet of Things concept. 1. Instant Inkjet Circuits: A low cost, fast and accessible technology to support the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. We demonstrated that "sintering-free" silver nano particle ink with a commodity inkjet printer can be used to fabricate printed circuit board and high-frequency applications such as antennas and sensors. The technology is now commercialized by AgIC, Inc. 2. Wireless Power: Although large amounts of data can be exchanged over a wireless communication link, mobile devices are still tethered by power cables. We are trying to solve this problem by two different approaches: energy harvesting. A simple circuitry comprised of diodes and capacitor can convert ambient radio signals into DC current. Our research revealed the signals from TV tower located 6.5km apart could be used to feed 100 microwatts to power microcontrollers.

  10. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  11. Improvements in the fabrication of metallic fuels

    Tracy, D.B.; Henslee, S.P.; Dodds, N.E.; Longua, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is currently developing a new liquid-metal-cooled breeder reactor known as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR represents the state of the art in metal-fueled reactor technology. Improvements in the fabrication of metal fuel, discussed in this paper, will support ANL-West's (ANL-W) fully remote fuel cycle facility, which is an integral part of the IFR concept

  12. Improvements in fabrication of metallic fuels

    Tracy, D.B.; Henslee, S.P.; Dodds, N.E.; Longua, K.J.

    1989-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new liquid- metal cooled breeder reactor known as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). IFR fuels represent the state-of-the-art in metal-fueled reactor technology. Improvements in the fabrication of metal fuel, to be discussed below, will support the fully remote fuel cycle facility that as an integral part of the IFR concept will be demonstrated at the EBR-II site. 3 refs

  13. Qualitative Investigation of Some Locally Produced Printed Fabrics ...

    The results obtained showed that the locally produced fabrics exhibited comparably better end – use performance characteristics in terms of fabric weight per square meter, fabric flammability, and linear density. While the foreign fabrics are better in terms of Crease recovery, fabric handle, fabric sett, fabric shrinkage, and ...

  14. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs)

    Carrico, James D.; Traeden, Nicklaus W.; Aureli, Matteo; Leang, Kam K.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique in which electroactive polymer filament material is used to build soft active 3D structures, layer by layer. Specifically, the unique actuation and sensing properties of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are exploited in 3D printing to create electroactive polymer structures for application in soft robotics and bio-inspired systems. The process begins with extruding a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. The filament is then used by a custom-designed 3D printer to manufacture the desired soft polymer structures, layer by layer. Since at this stage the 3D-printed samples are not yet electroactive, a chemical functionalization process follows, consisting in hydrolyzing the precursor samples in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide. Upon functionalization, metal electrodes are applied on the samples through an electroless plating process, which enables the 3D-printed IPMC structures to be controlled by voltage signals for actuation (or to act as sensors). This innovative AM process is described in detail and the performance of 3D printed IPMC actuators is compared to an IPMC actuator fabricated from commercially available Nafion sheet material. The experimental results show comparable performance between the two types of actuators, demonstrating the potential and feasibility of creating functional 3D-printed IPMCs.

  15. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs)

    Carrico, James D; Traeden, Nicklaus W; Leang, Kam K; Aureli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique in which electroactive polymer filament material is used to build soft active 3D structures, layer by layer. Specifically, the unique actuation and sensing properties of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are exploited in 3D printing to create electroactive polymer structures for application in soft robotics and bio-inspired systems. The process begins with extruding a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. The filament is then used by a custom-designed 3D printer to manufacture the desired soft polymer structures, layer by layer. Since at this stage the 3D-printed samples are not yet electroactive, a chemical functionalization process follows, consisting in hydrolyzing the precursor samples in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide. Upon functionalization, metal electrodes are applied on the samples through an electroless plating process, which enables the 3D-printed IPMC structures to be controlled by voltage signals for actuation (or to act as sensors). This innovative AM process is described in detail and the performance of 3D printed IPMC actuators is compared to an IPMC actuator fabricated from commercially available Nafion sheet material. The experimental results show comparable performance between the two types of actuators, demonstrating the potential and feasibility of creating functional 3D-printed IPMCs. (paper)

  16. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays for Cell Immobilization Using Automated Microcontact Printing.

    Foncy, Julie; Estève, Aurore; Degache, Amélie; Colin, Camille; Cau, Jean Christophe; Malaquin, Laurent; Vieu, Christophe; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are generally produced by conventional microarrayer, i.e., by contact or inkjet printing. Microcontact printing represents an alternative way of deposition of biomolecules on solid supports but even if various biomolecules have been successfully microcontact printed, the production of biomolecule microarrays in routine by microcontact printing remains a challenging task and needs an effective, fast, robust, and low-cost automation process. Here, we describe the production of biomolecule microarrays composed of extracellular matrix protein for the fabrication of cell microarrays by using an automated microcontact printing device. Large scale cell microarrays can be reproducibly obtained by this method.

  17. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  18. Directed light fabrication of refractory metals

    Lewis, G.K.; Thoma, D.J.; Nemec, R.B.; Milewski, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a metal, rapid fabrication process that fuses metal powders to full density into a solid replica of a computer modeled component. It has been shown feasible for forming nearly any metal and also intermetallics to near net shape with a single process. DLF of refractory pure metals is feasible, bypassing the extensive series of conventional processing steps used for processing these high melting point materials. Tungsten, tantalum, and rhenium were processed and show a continuous resolidified microstructure. Porosity was a problem for the tantalum and rhenium powders produced by chemical reduction processes but not for the tungsten powder spherodized in a plasma arc. Chemical analysis of powder compared to the DLF deposit showed reductions in carbon, oxygen and hydrogen, indicating that process parameters may also be optimized for evolution of residual gases in the deposits

  19. Coffee-Ring Defined Short Channels for Inkjet-Printed Metal Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    Li, Yuzhi; Lan, Linfeng; Xiao, Peng; Sun, Sheng; Lin, Zhenguo; Song, Wei; Song, Erlong; Gao, Peixiong; Wu, Weijing; Peng, Junbiao

    2016-08-03

    Short-channel electronic devices several micrometers in length are difficult to implement by direct inkjet printing due to the limitation of position accuracy of the common inkjet printer system and the spread of functional ink on substrates. In this report, metal oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) with channel lengths of 3.5 ± 0.7 μm were successfully fabricated with a common inkjet printer without any photolithography steps. Hydrophobic CYTOP coffee stripes, made by inkjet-printing and plasma-treating processes, were utilized to define the channel area of TFTs with channel lengths as short as ∼3.5 μm by dewetting the inks of the source/drain (S/D) precursors. Furthermore, by introduction of an ultrathin layer of PVA to modify the S/D surfaces, the spreading of precursor ink of the InOx semiconductor layer was well-controlled. The inkjet-printed short-channel TFTs exhibited a maximum mobility of 4.9 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off ratio of larger than 10(9). This approach of fabricating short-channel TFTs by inkjet printing will promote the large-area fabrication of short-channel TFTs in a cost-effective manner.

  20. Fabrication of a wettability-gradient surface on copper by screen-printing techniques

    Huang, Ding-Jun; Leu, Tzong-Shyng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a screen-printing technique is utilized to fabricate a wettability-gradient surface on a copper substrate. The pattern definitions on the copper surface were freely fabricated to define the regions with different wettabilities, for which the printing definition technique was developed as an alternative to the existing costly photolithography techniques. This fabrication process using screen printing in tandem with chemical modification methods can easily realize an excellent wettability-gradient surface with superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity. Surface analyses were performed to characterize conditions in some fabrication steps. A water droplet movement sequence is provided to clearly demonstrate the droplet-driving effectiveness of the fabricated gradient surface. The droplet-driving efficiency offers a promising solution for condensation heat transfer applications in the foreseeable future. (paper)

  1. Fabrication of Fully Inkjet-Printed Vias and SIW Structures on Thick Polymer Substrates

    Kim, Sangkil; Shamim, Atif; Georgiadis, Apostolos; Aubert, Herve; Tentzeris, Manos M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel fully inkjet-printed via fabrication technology and various inkjet-printed substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) structures on thick polymer substrates are presented. The electrical properties of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) are thoroughly studied up to 8 GHz utilizing the T-resonator method, and inkjet-printable silver nanoparticle ink on PMMA is characterized. A long via fabrication process up to 1 mm utilizing inkjet-printing technology is demonstrated, and its characteristics are presented for the first time. The inkjet-printed vias on 0.8-mm-thick substrate have a resistance of ∼ 0.2~ Ω . An equivalent circuit model of the inkjet-printed stepped vias is also discussed. An inkjet-printed microstrip-to-SIW interconnect and an SIW cavity resonator utilizing the proposed inkjet-printed via fabrication process are also presented. The design of the components and the fabrication steps are discussed, and the measured performances over the microwave frequency range of the prototypes are presented.

  2. Fabrication of Fully Inkjet-Printed Vias and SIW Structures on Thick Polymer Substrates

    Kim, Sangkil

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, a novel fully inkjet-printed via fabrication technology and various inkjet-printed substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) structures on thick polymer substrates are presented. The electrical properties of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) are thoroughly studied up to 8 GHz utilizing the T-resonator method, and inkjet-printable silver nanoparticle ink on PMMA is characterized. A long via fabrication process up to 1 mm utilizing inkjet-printing technology is demonstrated, and its characteristics are presented for the first time. The inkjet-printed vias on 0.8-mm-thick substrate have a resistance of ∼ 0.2~ Ω . An equivalent circuit model of the inkjet-printed stepped vias is also discussed. An inkjet-printed microstrip-to-SIW interconnect and an SIW cavity resonator utilizing the proposed inkjet-printed via fabrication process are also presented. The design of the components and the fabrication steps are discussed, and the measured performances over the microwave frequency range of the prototypes are presented.

  3. Fabrication of drug-loaded hydrogels with stereolithographic 3D printing.

    Martinez, Pamela Robles; Goyanes, Alvaro; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2017-10-30

    3D printing (3DP) technologies have been attracting much recent interest as new methods of fabricating medicines and medical devices. Of the many types of 3DP available, stereolithographic (SLA) printing offers the unique advantage of being able to fabricate objects by cross-linking resins to form networked polymer matrices. Because water can be entrapped in these matrices, it is possible in principle to fabricate pre-wetted, drug-loaded hydrogels and devices. Here, SLA printing was used to prepare ibuprofen-loaded hydrogels of cross-linked polyethylene glycol diacrylate. Hydrogels containing up to 30% w/w water, and 10% w/w ibuprofen, were successfully printed. Dissolution profiles showed that drug release rates were dependent on water content, with higher water content hydrogels releasing drug faster. The conclusion is that SLA 3DP offers a new manufacturing route to pharmaceutical hydrogels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 3D printing conditions determination for feedstock used in fused filament fabrication (FFF of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    J. Gonzalez-Gutierez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused filament fabrication combined with debinding and sintering could be an economical process for 3D printing of metal parts. In this study, compounding, filament making and FFF processing of a feedstock material containing 55 vol. % of 17-4PH stainless steel powder and a multicomponent binder system are presented. For the FFF process, processing windows of the most significant parameters, such as range of extrusion temperatures (210 to 260 °C, flow rate multipliers (150 to 200 %, and 3D printing speed multipliers (60 to 100 % were determined for a constant printing bed temperature of 60 °C.

  5. Fabrication of micro metallic valve and pump

    Yang, Ming; Kabasawa, Yasunari; Ito, Kuniyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Fabrication of micro devices by using micro metal forming was proposed by the authors. We developed a desktop servo-press machine with precise tooling system. Precise press forming processes including micro forging and micro joining has been carried out in a progressive die. In this study, micro metallic valve and pump were fabricated by using the precise press forming. The components are made of sheet metals, and assembled in to a unit in the progressive die. A micro check-valve with a diameter of 3mm and a length of 3.2mm was fabricated, and the property of flow resistance was evaluated. The results show that the check valve has high property of leakage proof. Since the valve is a unit parts with dimensions of several millimeters, it has advantage to be adapted to various pump design. Here, two kinds of micro pumps with the check-valves were fabricated. One is diaphragm pump actuated by vibration of the diaphragm, and another is tube-shaped pump actuated by resonation. The flow quantities of the pumps were evaluated and the results show that both of the pumps have high pumping performance.

  6. Fabrication of digital microfluidic devices on flexible paper-based and rigid substrates via screen printing

    Yafia, Mohamed; Shukla, Saurabh; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a new fabrication method is presented for digital microfluidic (DMF) devices in which the electrodes are generated using the screen printing technique. This method is applicable to both rigid and flexible substrates. The proposed screen printing approach, as a batch printing technique, is advantageous to the widely reported DMF fabrication methods in terms of fabrication time, cost and capability of mass production. Screen printing provides an effective means for printing different types of conductive materials on a variety of substrates. Specifically, screen printing of conductive silver and carbon based inks is performed on paper, glass and wax paper. As a result, the fabricated DMF devices are characterized by being flexible, disposable and incinerable. Hence, the main advantage of screen printing carbon based inks on paper substrates is more pronounced for point-of-care applications that require a large number of low cost DMF chips, and laboratory setups that lack sophisticated microfabrication facilities. The resolution of the printed DMF electrodes generated by this technique is examined for proof of concept using manual screen printing, but higher resolution screens and automated machines are available off-the-shelf, if needed. Another contribution of this research is the improved actuation techniques that facilitate droplet transport in electrode configurations with relatively large electrode spacing to alleviate the disadvantage of lower resolution screens. Thus, we were able to reduce the cost of fabrication significantly without compromising the DMF performance. The paper-based devices have already shown to be effective in continuous microfluidics domain, so the investigation of their applicability in DMF systems is worthwhile. With this in mind, successful integration of a paper-based microchannel with paper-based digital microfluidic chip is demonstrated in this work.

  7. Fabrication of digital microfluidic devices on flexible paper-based and rigid substrates via screen printing

    Yafia, Mohamed; Shukla, Saurabh; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new fabrication method is presented for digital microfluidic (DMF) devices in which the electrodes are generated using the screen printing technique. This method is applicable to both rigid and flexible substrates. The proposed screen printing approach, as a batch printing technique, is advantageous to the widely reported DMF fabrication methods in terms of fabrication time, cost and capability of mass production. Screen printing provides an effective means for printing different types of conductive materials on a variety of substrates. Specifically, screen printing of conductive silver and carbon based inks is performed on paper, glass and wax paper. As a result, the fabricated DMF devices are characterized by being flexible, disposable and incinerable. Hence, the main advantage of screen printing carbon based inks on paper substrates is more pronounced for point-of-care applications that require a large number of low cost DMF chips, and laboratory setups that lack sophisticated microfabrication facilities. The resolution of the printed DMF electrodes generated by this technique is examined for proof of concept using manual screen printing, but higher resolution screens and automated machines are available off-the-shelf, if needed. Another contribution of this research is the improved actuation techniques that facilitate droplet transport in electrode configurations with relatively large electrode spacing to alleviate the disadvantage of lower resolution screens. Thus, we were able to reduce the cost of fabrication significantly without compromising the DMF performance. The paper-based devices have already shown to be effective in continuous microfluidics domain, so the investigation of their applicability in DMF systems is worthwhile. With this in mind, successful integration of a paper-based microchannel with paper-based digital microfluidic chip is demonstrated in this work. (note)

  8. Generation of micro-sized conductive lines on glass fibre fabrics by inkjet printing

    Balda Irurzun, Unai; Dutschk, Victoria; Calvimontes, Alfredo; Akkerman, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Micro-sized lines were inkjet printed on glass fibre fabrics using different droplet spacing. A conductive ink containing silver nanoparticles was used in this study. Glass fibre fabrics were differently pre-treated to avoid spontaneous spreading of the ink dispersion. The sample topography was

  9. Quantitative analysis and optimization of gravure printed metal ink, dielectric, and organic semiconductor films.

    Higgins, Stuart G; Boughey, Francesca L; Hills, Russell; Steinke, Joachim H G; Muir, Beinn V O; Campbell, Alasdair J

    2015-03-11

    Here we demonstrate the optimization of gravure printed metal ink, dielectric, and semiconductor formulations. We present a technique for nondestructively imaging printed films using a commercially available flatbed scanner, combined with image analysis to quantify print behavior. Print speed, cliché screen density, nip pressure, the orientation of print structures, and doctor blade extension were found to have a significant impact on the quality of printed films, as characterized by the spreading of printed structures and variation in print homogeneity. Organic semiconductor prints were observed to exhibit multiple periodic modulations, which are correlated to the underlying cell structure.

  10. Smart textile framework: Photochromic and fluorescent cellulosic fabric printed by strontium aluminate pigment.

    Khattab, Tawfik A; Rehan, Mohamed; Hamouda, Tamer

    2018-09-01

    Smart clothing can be defined as textiles that respond to a certain stimulus accompanied by a change in their properties. A specific class herein is the photochromic and fluorescent textiles that change color with light. A photochromic and fluorescent cotton fabric based on pigment printing is obtained. Such fabric is prepared by aqueous-based pigment-binder printing formulation containing inorganic pigment phosphor characterized by good photo- and thermal stability. It exhibits optimal excitation wavelength (365 nm) results in color and fluorescence change of the fabric surface. To prepare the transparent pigment-binder composite film, the phosphor pigment must be well-dispersed via physical immobilization without their aggregation. The pigment-binder paste is applied successfully onto cotton fabric using screen printing technique followed by thermal fixation. After screen-printing, a homogenous photochromic film is assembled on a cotton substrate surface, which represents substantial greenish-yellow color development as indicated by CIE Lab color space measurements under ultraviolet light, even at a pigment concentration of 0.08 wt% of the printing paste. The photochromic cotton fabric exhibit three excitation peaks at 272, 325 and 365 nm and three emission peaks at 418, 495 and 520 nm. The fluorescent optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, elemental mapping, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fluorescence emission and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic data of the printed cotton fabric are described. The printed fabric showed a reversible and rapid photochromic response during ultra-violet excitation without fatigue. The fastness properties including washing, crocking, perspiration, sublimation/heat, and light are described. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D Printed Wearable Sensors with Liquid Metals for the Pose Detection of Snakelike Soft Robots.

    Zhou, Luyu; Gao, Qing; Zhan, Jun-Fu; Xie, Chao-Qi; Fu, Jianzhong; He, Yong

    2018-06-18

    Liquid metal-based flexible sensors, which utilize advanced liquid conductive material to serve as sensitive element, is emerging as a promising solution to measure large deformations. Nowadays, one of the biggest challenges for precise control of soft robots is the detection of their real time positions. Existing fabrication methods are unable to fabricate flexible sensors that match the shape of soft robots. In this report, we firstly described a novel 3D printed multi-function inductance flexible and stretchable sensor with liquid metals (LMs), which is capable of measuring both axial tension and curvature. This sensor is fabricated with a developed coaxial liquid metal 3D printer by co-printing of silicone rubber and LMs. Due to the solenoid shape, this sensor can be easily installed on snakelike soft robots and can accurately distinguish different degrees of tensile and bending deformation. We determined the structural parameters of the sensor and proved its excellent stability and reliability. As a demonstration, we used this sensor to measure the curvature of a finger and feedback the position of endoscope, a typical snakelike structure. Because of its bending deformation form consistent with the actual working status of the soft robot and unique shape, this sensor has better practical application prospects in the pose detection.

  12. Screen printing of a capacitive cantilever-based motion sensor on fabric using a novel sacrificial layer process for smart fabric applications

    Wei, Yang; Torah, Russel; Yang, Kai; Beeby, Steve; Tudor, John

    2013-01-01

    Free-standing cantilevers have been fabricated by screen printing sacrificial and structural layers onto a standard polyester cotton fabric. By printing additional conductive layers, a complete capacitive motion sensor on fabric using only screen printing has been fabricated. This type of free-standing structure cannot currently be fabricated using conventional fabric manufacturing processes. In addition, compared to conventional smart fabric fabrication processes (e.g. weaving and knitting), screen printing offers the advantages of geometric design flexibility and the ability to simultaneously print multiple devices of the same or different designs. Furthermore, a range of active inks exists from the printed electronics industry which can potentially be applied to create many types of smart fabric. Four cantilevers with different lengths have been printed on fabric using a five-layer structure with a sacrificial material underneath the cantilever. The sacrificial layer is subsequently removed at 160 °C for 30 min to achieve a freestanding cantilever above the fabric. Two silver electrodes, one on top of the cantilever and the other on top of the fabric, are used to capacitively detect the movement of the cantilever. In this way, an entirely printed motion sensor is produced on a standard fabric. The motion sensor was initially tested on an electromechanical shaker rig at a low frequency range to examine the linearity and the sensitivity of each design. Then, these sensors were individually attached to a moving human forearm to evaluate more representative results. A commercial accelerometer (Microstrain G-link) was mounted alongside for comparison. The printed sensors have a similar motion response to the commercial accelerometer, demonstrating the potential of a printed smart fabric motion sensor for use in intelligent clothing applications. (paper)

  13. Screen printing of a capacitive cantilever-based motion sensor on fabric using a novel sacrificial layer process for smart fabric applications

    Wei, Yang; Torah, Russel; Yang, Kai; Beeby, Steve; Tudor, John

    2013-07-01

    Free-standing cantilevers have been fabricated by screen printing sacrificial and structural layers onto a standard polyester cotton fabric. By printing additional conductive layers, a complete capacitive motion sensor on fabric using only screen printing has been fabricated. This type of free-standing structure cannot currently be fabricated using conventional fabric manufacturing processes. In addition, compared to conventional smart fabric fabrication processes (e.g. weaving and knitting), screen printing offers the advantages of geometric design flexibility and the ability to simultaneously print multiple devices of the same or different designs. Furthermore, a range of active inks exists from the printed electronics industry which can potentially be applied to create many types of smart fabric. Four cantilevers with different lengths have been printed on fabric using a five-layer structure with a sacrificial material underneath the cantilever. The sacrificial layer is subsequently removed at 160 °C for 30 min to achieve a freestanding cantilever above the fabric. Two silver electrodes, one on top of the cantilever and the other on top of the fabric, are used to capacitively detect the movement of the cantilever. In this way, an entirely printed motion sensor is produced on a standard fabric. The motion sensor was initially tested on an electromechanical shaker rig at a low frequency range to examine the linearity and the sensitivity of each design. Then, these sensors were individually attached to a moving human forearm to evaluate more representative results. A commercial accelerometer (Microstrain G-link) was mounted alongside for comparison. The printed sensors have a similar motion response to the commercial accelerometer, demonstrating the potential of a printed smart fabric motion sensor for use in intelligent clothing applications.

  14. Applications of ion plating in metals fabrication

    Bell, R.T.; Thompson, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Use of ion plating at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to solve problems encountered in metals fabrication and processing are discussed. Three typical areas are covered. The first is the use of strike coats on various substrates for subsequent electrodeposition. The second area in which ion plating is shown to contribute to a process is in cold welding or room temperature bonding of metals. The third application involves plating U to promote safe handling, fission-product retention, and corrosion protection in nuclear reactors

  15. Applications for Gradient Metal Alloys Fabricated Using Additive Manufacturing

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Borgonia, John Paul C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Suh, Eric J.; Mulder, jerry L.; Gardner, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, additive manufacturing (AM) techniques have been developed that may shift the paradigm of traditional metal production by allowing complex net-shaped hardware to be built up layer-by-layer, rather than being machined from a billet. The AM process is ubiquitous with polymers due to their low melting temperatures, fast curing, and controllable viscosity, and 3D printers are widely available as commercial or consumer products. 3D printing with metals is inherently more complicated than with polymers due to their higher melting temperatures and reactivity with air, particularly when heated or molten. The process generally requires a high-power laser or other focused heat source, like an electron beam, for precise melting and deposition. Several promising metal AM techniques have been developed, including laser deposition (also called laser engineered net shaping or LENS® and laser deposition technology (LDT)), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and electron beam free-form (EBF). These machines typically use powders or wire feedstock that are melted and deposited using a laser or electron beam. Complex net-shape parts have been widely demonstrated using these (and other) AM techniques and the process appears to be a promising alternative to machining in some cases. Rather than simply competing with traditional machining for cost and time savings, the true advantage of AM involves the fabrication of hardware that cannot be produced using other techniques. This could include parts with "blind" features (like foams or trusses), parts that are difficult to machine conventionally, or parts made from materials that do not exist in bulk forms. In this work, the inventors identify that several AM techniques can be used to develop metal parts that change composition from one location in the part to another, allowing for complete control over the mechanical or physical properties. This changes the paradigm for conventional metal fabrication, which relies on an

  16. Fabrication of imitative cracks by 3D printing for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    Noritaka Yusa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that 3D printing technology offers a simple, easy, and cost-effective method to fabricate artificial flaws simulating real cracks from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. The method does not attempt to produce a flaw whose morphology mirrors that of a real crack but instead produces a relatively simple artificial flaw. The parameters of this flaw that have dominant effects on eddy current signals can be quantitatively controlled. Three artificial flaws in type 316L austenitic stainless steel plates were fabricated using a powderbed-based laser metal additive manufacturing machine. The three artificial flaws were designed to have the same length, depth, and opening but different branching and electrical contacts between flaw surfaces. The flaws were measured by eddy current testing using an absolute type pancake probe. The signals due to the three flaws clearly differed from each other although the flaws had the same length and depth. These results were supported by subsequent destructive tests and finite element analyses.

  17. Fabrication and electrical characterization of partially metallized vias fabricated by inkjet

    Khorramdel, B; Mäntysalo, M

    2016-01-01

    Through silicon vias (TSVs), acting as vertical interconnections, play an important role in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) 3D wafer level packaging. Today, taking advantage of nanoparticle inks, inkjet technologies as local filling methods could be used to plate the inside the vias with a conductive material, rather than using a current method, such as chemical vapor deposition or electrolytic growth. This could decrease the processing time, cost and waste material produced. In this work, we have fabricated and demonstrated electrical characterization of TSVs with a top diameter of 85 μm, and partially metallized on their inside walls using silver nanoparticle ink and drop-on-demand inkjet printing. Electrical measurement showed that the resistance of a single via with a void free coverage from top to bottom could be less than 4 Ω, which is still acceptable for MEMS applications. (paper)

  18. Fabrication and electrical characterization of partially metallized vias fabricated by inkjet

    Khorramdel, B.; Mäntysalo, M.

    2016-04-01

    Through silicon vias (TSVs), acting as vertical interconnections, play an important role in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) 3D wafer level packaging. Today, taking advantage of nanoparticle inks, inkjet technologies as local filling methods could be used to plate the inside the vias with a conductive material, rather than using a current method, such as chemical vapor deposition or electrolytic growth. This could decrease the processing time, cost and waste material produced. In this work, we have fabricated and demonstrated electrical characterization of TSVs with a top diameter of 85 μm, and partially metallized on their inside walls using silver nanoparticle ink and drop-on-demand inkjet printing. Electrical measurement showed that the resistance of a single via with a void free coverage from top to bottom could be less than 4 Ω, which is still acceptable for MEMS applications.

  19. Metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical terahertz waveguides.

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Anthony, Jessienta; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2015-12-28

    We investigate guidance of Terahertz (THz) radiation in metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1 THz. Our experimental results obtained from THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements are in very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We observe single-mode, low loss and low dispersive propagation of THz radiation in metallic helical waveguides over a broad bandwidth. The 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides have substantially extended the bandwidth of a low loss dielectric tube waveguide as observed from the experimental and simulation results. The high flexibility of the helical design allows an easy incorporation into bench top THz devices.

  20. The fabrication, characterisation and electrochemical investigation of screen-printed graphene electrodes.

    Randviir, Edward P; Brownson, Dale A C; Metters, Jonathan P; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2014-03-14

    We report the fabrication, characterisation (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and ATR) and electrochemical implementation of novel screen-printed graphene electrodes. Electrochemical characterisation of the fabricated graphene electrodes is undertaken using an array of electroactive redox probes and biologically relevant analytes, namely: potassium ferrocyanide(II), hexaammine-ruthenium(III) chloride, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), L-ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine hydrochloride (DA). The electroanalytical capabilities of the fabricated electrodes are also considered towards the sensing of AA and DA. The electrochemical and (electro)analytical performances of the fabricated screen-printed graphene electrodes are considered with respect to the relative surface morphologies and material compositions (elucidated via SEM, Raman, XPS and ATR spectroscopy), the density of electronic states (% global coverage of edge-plane like sites/defects) and the specific fabrication conditions utilised. Comparisons are made between two screen-printed graphene electrodes and alternative graphite based screen-printed electrodes. The graphene electrodes are fabricated utilising two different commercially prepared 'graphene' inks, which have long screen ink lifetimes (>3 hours), thus this is the first report of a true mass-reproducible screen-printable graphene ink. Through employment of appropriate controls/comparisons we are able to report a critical assessment of these screen-printed graphene electrodes. This work is of high importance and demonstrates a proof-of-concept approach to screen-printed graphene electrodes that are highly reproducible, paving the way for mass-producible graphene sensing platforms in the future.

  1. Rapid and high throughput fabrication of high temperature stable structures through PDMS transfer printing

    Hohenberger, Erik; Freitag, Nathan; Korampally, Venumadhav

    2017-07-01

    We report on a facile and low cost fabrication approach for structures—gratings and enclosed nanochannels, through simple solution processed chemistries in conjunction with nanotransfer printing techniques. The ink formulation primarily consisting of an organosilicate polymeric network with a small percentage of added 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane crosslinker allows one to obtain robust structures that are not only stable towards high temperature processing steps as high as 550 °C but also exhibit exceptional stability against a host of organic solvent washes. No discernable structure distortion was observed compared to the as-printed structures (room temperature processed) when printed structures were subjected to temperatures as high as 550 °C. We further demonstrate the applicability of this technique towards the fabrication of more complex nanostructures such as enclosed channels through a double transfer method, leveraging the exceptional room temperature cross-linking ability of the printed structures and their subsequent resistance to dissolution in organic solvent washes. The exceptional temperature and physico-chemical stability of the nanotransfer printed structures makes this a useful fabrication tool that may be applied as is, or integrated with conventional lithographic techniques for the large area fabrication of functional nanostructures and devices.

  2. A novel and simple method of printing flexible conductive circuits on PET fabrics

    Wang, Zehong; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Zhikang; Yu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple preparation of nano-silver conductive ink was proposed. • Conductive pattern was printed on PET fabrics without heat sintering. • The surface resistivity of printed pattern is low to 0.197 Ω cm. - Abstract: Flexible conductive circuits on PET fabrics were fabricated by a simple approach. Firstly, well dispersed nano-silver colloids with average size of 87 nm were synthesized with poly (vinyl pyrrolidone). Then, by adding polyurethane and thickening agent into these colloids, Ag NP-based ink was produced and printed on PET fabrics by screen printing. Conductive patterns were achieved through the swelling process of polyurethane and the decrease of contact resistance between nano-silver particles when immersed in dichloromethane (DCM) and diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DMDAAC) mixed solution. After it was dried at 40 °C,the surface resistivity was about 0.197 Ω cm with width 1.9 mm, and thickness 20 μm. Moreover, the effects of different DCM contents on the conductivity and the film forming ability have been investigated. We believe these foundings will provide some important analysis for printing flexible conductive circuits on textiles.

  3. A novel and simple method of printing flexible conductive circuits on PET fabrics

    Wang, Zehong; Wang, Wei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Jiang, Zhikang [Saintyear Holding Group Co., Ltd. (China); Yu, Dan, E-mail: vchtian@163.com [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science & Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Saintyear Holding Group Co., Ltd. (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A simple preparation of nano-silver conductive ink was proposed. • Conductive pattern was printed on PET fabrics without heat sintering. • The surface resistivity of printed pattern is low to 0.197 Ω cm. - Abstract: Flexible conductive circuits on PET fabrics were fabricated by a simple approach. Firstly, well dispersed nano-silver colloids with average size of 87 nm were synthesized with poly (vinyl pyrrolidone). Then, by adding polyurethane and thickening agent into these colloids, Ag NP-based ink was produced and printed on PET fabrics by screen printing. Conductive patterns were achieved through the swelling process of polyurethane and the decrease of contact resistance between nano-silver particles when immersed in dichloromethane (DCM) and diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DMDAAC) mixed solution. After it was dried at 40 °C,the surface resistivity was about 0.197 Ω cm with width 1.9 mm, and thickness 20 μm. Moreover, the effects of different DCM contents on the conductivity and the film forming ability have been investigated. We believe these foundings will provide some important analysis for printing flexible conductive circuits on textiles.

  4. Fluorescence detector for capillary separations fabricated by 3D printing

    Přikryl, Jan; Foret, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 24 (2014), s. 11951-11956 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0182 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311201 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : 3D print * additive manufacturing * fluorescence * LIF * LED Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  5. Fused-filament 3D printing (3DP) for fabrication of tablets.

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Buanz, Asma B M; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2014-12-10

    The use of fused-filament 3D printing (FF 3DP) to fabricate individual tablets is demonstrated. The technology permits the manufacture of tablets containing drug doses tailored to individual patients, or to fabrication of tablets with specific drug-release profiles. Commercially produced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) filament was loaded with a model drug (fluorescein) by swelling of the polymer in ethanolic drug solution. A final drug-loading of 0.29% w/w was achieved. Tablets of PVA/fluorescein (10 mm diameter) were printed using a 3D printer. It was found that changing the degree of infill percentage in the printer software varied the weight and volume of the printed tablets. The tablets were mechanically strong and no significant thermal degradation of the active occurred during printing. Dissolution tests were conducted in modified Hank's buffer. The results showed release profiles were dependent on the infill percentage used to print the tablet. The study indicates that FF 3DP has the potential to offer a new solution for fabricating personalized-dose medicines or unit dosage forms with controlled-release profiles. In addition, the low cost of FDM printers means the paradigm of extemporaneous or point-of-use manufacture of personalized-dose tablets is both feasible and attainable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inkjet printing metals on flexible materials for plastic and paper electronics

    Al-Shamery, K.; Raut, N. C.

    2018-01-01

    Inorganic printed electronics is now recognized as an area of tremendous commercial, potential and technical progress. Many research groups are actively involved worldwide in developing metal nanoparticle inks and precursors for printing inorganic/organic materials using different printing....... Besides some examples demonstrating aspects on ink formulation via patterning solid surfaces such as glass and silicon oxide, special emphasis will be placed on compatibility for usage in plastic and paper electronics. Printing of nanoparticles of copper, silver, gold etc. will be discussed...... and will be compared to printing of a variety of metal-organic precursor inks. Finally, a brief account on exemplary applications using the printed inorganic nanoparticles/materials is provided....

  7. Screen-printed electrode for alkali-metal thermoelectric converter

    Hashimoto, T.; Shibata, K.; Tsuchida, K.; Kato, A. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    An alkali-metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) is a device for the direct conversion of thermal to electric energy. An AMTEC contains sodium as working fluid and is divided into a high-temperature region (900-1300 K) and a low-temperature region (400-800 K) by [beta]''-alumina solid electrolyte. A high-performance electrode for an AMTEC must have good electrical conductivity, make a strong physical bond with low contact resistance to [beta]''-alumina, be highly permeable to sodium vapour, resist corrosion by sodium and have a low rate of evaporation at the operating temperature of the AMTEC. We have previously investigated the interaction of nitrides and carbides of some transition-metals (groups IV, V and VI) with [beta],[beta]''-alumina or liquid sodium (about 700degC) with the objective of finding a better electrode material for an AMTEC. The results showed that TiN, TiC, NbN and NbC were good candidates for AMTEC electrodes. We also showed that porous TiN film with low resistance can be prepared by the screen-printing method. In the present work the porous NbN film was prepared by the screen-printing method and the performance as the electrode of an AMTEC was examined. For comparison, the performance of TiN and Mo electrodes prepared by the screen-printing method was also examined. (author).

  8. Controlled Fabrication of Metallic Electrodes with Atomic Separation

    Morpurgo, A.; Robinson, D.; M. Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    We report a new technique for fabricating metallic electrodes on insulating substrates with separations on the 1 nm scale. The fabrication technique, which combines lithographic and electrochemical methods, provides atomic resolution without requiring sophisticated instrumentation. The process is...

  9. Engineered Metallic Nanostructures: Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications

    Bohloul, Arash

    Metallic nanostructures have garnered a great deal of attention due to their fascinating optical properties, which differ from the bulk metal. They have been proven to exceed expectations in wide variety of applications including chemical and biological sensing. Nevertheless, high-throughput and low cost nanofabrication techniques are required to implant metallic nanostructures in widespread applications. With that vision, this thesis presents a versatile and reliable method for scalable fabrication of gold nanostructures. In this approach, a plasma-treated ordered array of polystyrene nanospheres acts as an initial mask. The key step in this process is the vapor-deposition of nickel as a sacrificial mask. Thereby, gold nanostructures are directly formed on the substrate through the nickel mask. This is an easy, powerful, and straightforward method that offers several degrees of freedom to precisely control the shape and size of nanostructures. We made a library of nanostructures including gold nanocrescents, double crescents, nanorings, and nanodisks with the ability to tune the size in the range of 150 to 650 nm. The fabricated nanostructures are highly packed and uniformly cover the centimeter scale substrate. The optical properties of metallic nanostructures were extensively studied by a combination of UV-Vis-NIR and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies, and correlation between optical response and geometrical parameters were investigated. In the next part of this thesis, highly sensitive surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) analysis was demonstrated on gold nanocrescent arrays. Theoretical modeling was confirmed that these substrates provide highly dense and strong hot-spots over the substrate, which is required for surface enhanced spectroscopic studies. Gold nanocrescent arrays exhibit highly tunable plasmon resonance to cover desired molecular vibrational bands. These substrates experimentally illustrated 3 orders of magnitude

  10. Fabrication of Robust Biomolecular Patterns by Reactive Microcontact Printing on NHS Ester Containing Polymer Films

    Feng, C.L.; Vancso, Gyula J.; Schönherr, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The fabrication of robust biomolecule microarrays by reactive microcontact printing (CP) on spin-coated thin films of poly(N-hydroxysuccinimidyl methacrylate) (PNHSMA) on oxidized silicon and glass is described. The approach combines the advantages of activated polymer thin films as coupling layers,

  11. Fused Deposition Modeling 3D Printing for (Bio)analytical Device Fabrication : Procedures, Materials, and Applications

    Salentijn, Gert Ij; Oomen, Pieter E; Grajewski, Maciej; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the use of fused deposition modeling (FDM) in a (bio)analytical/lab-on-a-chip research laboratory is described. First, the specifications of this 3D printing method that are important for the fabrication of (micro)devices were characterized for a benchtop FDM 3D printer. These include

  12. Patterned carbon nanotubes fabricated by the combination of microcontact printing and diblock copolymer micelles.

    Xu, Peng; Ji, Xin; Qi, Junlei; Yang, Hongmin; Zheng, Weitao; Abetz, Volker; Jiang, Shimei; Shen, Jiacong

    2010-01-01

    A convenient approach to synthesize patterned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of three morphologies on printed substrates by combination of microcontact printing (microCP) and a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process is presented. Micelles of polystyrene-block-poly-(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) in toluene were used as nanoreactors to fabricate FeCl3 in the core domains, and the complex solution was used as an ink to print films with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps, different morphologies (porous, dots and stripes patterns) of the FeCl3-loaded micellar films were left onto silicon substrates after printed. After removing the polymer by thermal decomposition, the left iron oxide cluster arrays on the substrate were used as catalysts for the growth of CNTs by the process of PECVD, where the CNTs uniformly distributed on the substrates according to the morphologies of patterned catalysts arrays.

  13. The fabrication and characterization of inkjet-printed polyaniline nanoparticle films

    Morrin, Aoife; Ngamna, Orawan; O'Malley, Eimer; Kent, Nigel; Moulton, Simon E.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Smyth, Malcolm R.; Killard, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of electrodes modified with conducting polymer nanoparticle films, produced via inkjet printing. The polyaniline nanoparticle formulations were deposited via a desktop inkjet printer onto screen-printed carbon-paste electrodes (SPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and gold-PET and their morphology studied at a range of length scales using profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The deposited films were found to form continuous polymer films depending upon film thickness, which was in turn dependent on the number of prints performed. The inkjet-printed films exhibited a smooth morphology on the SPEs at the micro-dimensional scale, as a result of the aggradation and coalescing of the nanoparticles upon deposition. The resulting modified electrodes were both conductive and electroactive, possessing good reversible polyaniline electrochemistry. Such a combination of materials and processing offers the potential of producing a range of low cost, solid state devices such as sensors, actuators and electrochromic devices

  14. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    Sun, Kai [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Ruixin [Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military and Medical Sciences, No. 106, Wandong Street, Hedong District, Tianjin 300000 (China); Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Sun, Yufu [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Hui [Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154 Anshan Road, Tianjin, TJ 300052 (China)

    2016-09-02

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  15. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  16. Fabrication of Non-Implant 3D Printed Skin

    Chuan Yong Leng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many bandages tend to be harmful when being removed from the human skin. This is a crucial issue, especially faced by burn victims. When bandages are removed from the burn wound, they tend to be harmful by peeling off the newly formed layer of skin over the burn wound. Such nature causes the patient to endure a longer recovery time with additional pain. The objective of this project is to 3D print artificial skin for the victims of burn wounds by using natural gelation. The main aim for creating the artificial skin will be used in place of the current burn wound treatment techniques of dressing the wounds in bandages. The inner layer of this skin was lined with a natural adhesive, a thin layer of agar-agar, which has been reinforced with crushed eggshells to increase its adhesive strength and durability. The synthesized gel contained non adhesive behavior, yet aids in wound healing abilities. Applying hydrocolloids ensures that the wound is kept cool and the gel also ensures efficient heat transfer. This was done so that less sweating occurs on the patient. Based on the experiments that were conducted, the results conclude that the best ratio of artificial skin layer would be 2:1 of agar gel: crushed eggshells. This golden ratio of gel: crushed eggshells for the longest period of time for attachment on the skin without sweating, is achieved. The skin will be printed using Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS. The colour of the skin and the shape of the skin was individually designed for each specific patient. The inner gel has the capabilities of reducing the rehabilitation time, without compromising the comfort of the patient. This approach has the potential to be used as a new method to treat burn wounds..

  17. Fabrication of conductive copper patterns using reactive inkjet printing followed by two-step electroless plating

    Chen, Jin-Ju; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yan [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China); Sowade, Enrico; Baumann, Reinhard R. [Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz, 09126 (Germany); Feng, Zhe-Sheng, E-mail: fzs@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Copper patterns were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and two-step electroless plating. • Cu particles produced via reactive inkjet printing act as catalyst for copper electroless plating. • High conductivity can be obtained without many printing passes and high temperature sintering. • This approach can largely avoid nozzle-clogging problems. • This approach presents a potential way in the flexible printed electronics with simple process. - Abstract: A simple and low-cost process for fabricating conductive copper patterns on flexible polyimide substrates was demonstrated. Copper catalyst patterns were first produced on polyimide substrates using reactive inkjet printing of Cu (II)-bearing ink and reducing ink, and then the conductive copper patterns were generated after a two-step electroless plating procedure. The copper layers were characterized by optical microscope, SEM, XRD and EDS. Homogeneously distributed copper nanoclusters were found in the catalyst patterns. A thin copper layer with uniform particle size was formed after first-step electroless plating, and a thick copper layer of about 14.3 μm with closely packed structure and fine crystallinity was produced after second-step electroless plating. This resulting copper layer had good solderability, reliable adhesion strength and a low resistivity of 5.68 μΩ cm without any sintering process.

  18. Fabrication of conductive copper patterns using reactive inkjet printing followed by two-step electroless plating

    Chen, Jin-Ju; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yan; Sowade, Enrico; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Feng, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Copper patterns were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and two-step electroless plating. • Cu particles produced via reactive inkjet printing act as catalyst for copper electroless plating. • High conductivity can be obtained without many printing passes and high temperature sintering. • This approach can largely avoid nozzle-clogging problems. • This approach presents a potential way in the flexible printed electronics with simple process. - Abstract: A simple and low-cost process for fabricating conductive copper patterns on flexible polyimide substrates was demonstrated. Copper catalyst patterns were first produced on polyimide substrates using reactive inkjet printing of Cu (II)-bearing ink and reducing ink, and then the conductive copper patterns were generated after a two-step electroless plating procedure. The copper layers were characterized by optical microscope, SEM, XRD and EDS. Homogeneously distributed copper nanoclusters were found in the catalyst patterns. A thin copper layer with uniform particle size was formed after first-step electroless plating, and a thick copper layer of about 14.3 μm with closely packed structure and fine crystallinity was produced after second-step electroless plating. This resulting copper layer had good solderability, reliable adhesion strength and a low resistivity of 5.68 μΩ cm without any sintering process.

  19. Fabrication of interdigitated electrodes by inkjet printing technology for apllication in ammonia sensing

    Le, Duy Dam; Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Nhien; Doan, Duc Chanh Tin; Dang, Thi My Dung; Dang, Mau Chien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper interdigitated electrodes for gas sensors were fabricated by inkjet printing technology. Silver electrodes were inkjet printed on Si/SiO 2 substrates instead of traditional photolithography method. The inkjet printing parameters to obtain desired dimensions, thickness of the electrodes and distance between the interdigitated electrodes were optimized in this study. The fabricated interdigitated silver electrodes were tested for application in ammonia gas sensors. Conductive polyaniline (PANI) layer was coated on the silver interdigitated electrodes by drop-coating. Ammonia detection of the PANI-coated chips was characterized with a gas measurement system in which humidity and ammonia concentrations were well-controlled. The electrical conductivity of the PANI films coated on the electrodes was measured when the PANI films were exposed to nitrogen and ammonia. The conductivity of the PANI films decreased significantly due to the deprotonation process of PANI upon ammonia expodure. The recovery time was about 15 min by heating up the polymer chip at 60 °C. The results showed that the silver electrodes fabricated by inkjet printing technique could be used as a sensor platform for ammonia detection. (paper)

  20. Using Intraoral Scanning Technology for Three-Dimensional Printing of Kennedy Class I Removable Partial Denture Metal Framework: A Clinical Report.

    Hu, Feng; Pei, Zhenhua; Wen, Ying

    2017-11-16

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are used to restore missing teeth and are traditionally fabricated using the lost-wax casting technique. The casting process is arduous, time-consuming, and requires a skilled technician. The development of intraoral scanning and 3D printing technology has made rapid prototyping of the RPD more achievable. This article reports a completed case of direct fabrication of a maxillary RPD metal framework (Kennedy Class I) using intraoral scanning and 3D printing techniques. Acceptable fit and satisfactory clinical outcome were demonstrated. Intraoral scanning and 3D printing for fabrication of the RPD metal framework is a useful alternative to conventional impression and casting techniques, especially for patients suffering from nasal obstruction or intolerance. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Passive UHF RFID Tags with Specific Printed Antennas for Dielectric and Metallic Objects Applications

    K. Siakavara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Design process and respective results for the synthesis of specific Radiofrequency Identification(RFID tag antennas, suitable for dielectric and metallic objects, are presented. The antennas were designed for the UHF(865MHz-869MHz band and their basic configuration is that of the printed spiral type. Six modification steps to the classical spiral layout are proposed and it was proved that they can lead to tags with high readability and reading distances up to 10m when designed for dielectric object and up to 7m in the case of metallic objects. The results of the measurements of the fabricated tags are explained via theoretical evaluations which take into account reflection phenomena, that are present in a real environment at which the tags are used.

  2. Printing-based fabrication method using sacrificial paper substrates for flexible and wearable microfluidic devices

    Chung, Daehan; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2017-11-01

    We present a simple, fast, and inexpensive new printing-based fabrication process for flexible and wearable microfluidic channels and devices. Microfluidic devices are fabricated on textiles (fabric) for applications in clothing-based wearable microfluidic sensors and systems. The wearable and flexible microfluidic devices are comprised of water-insoluable screen-printable plastisol polymer. Sheets of paper are used as sacrificial substrates for multiple layers of polymer on the fabric’s surface. Microfluidic devices can be made within a short time using simple processes and inexpensive equipment that includes a laser cutter and a thermal laminator. The fabrication process is characterized to demonstrate control of microfluidic channel thickness and width. Film thickness smaller than 100 micrometers and lateral dimensions smaller than 150 micrometers are demonstrated. A flexible microfluidic mixer is also developed on fabric and successfully tested on both flat and curved surfaces at volumetric flow rates ranging from 5.5-46 ml min-1.

  3. A novel fabrication method of carbon electrodes using 3D printing and chemical modification process.

    Tian, Pan; Chen, Chaoyang; Hu, Jie; Qi, Jin; Wang, Qianghua; Chen, Jimmy Ching-Ming; Cavanaugh, John; Peng, Yinghong; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng

    2017-11-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technique in the field of biomedical engineering and electronics. This paper presents a novel biofabrication method of implantable carbon electrodes with several advantages including fast prototyping, patient-specific and miniaturization without expensive cleanroom. The method combines stereolithography in additive manufacturing and chemical modification processes to fabricate electrically conductive carbon electrodes. The stereolithography allows the structures to be 3D printed with very fine resolution and desired shapes. The resin is then chemically modified to carbon using pyrolysis to enhance electrochemical performance. The electrochemical characteristics of 3D printing carbon electrodes are assessed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The specific capacitance of 3D printing carbon electrodes is much higher than the same sized platinum (Pt) electrode. In-vivo electromyography (EMG) recording, 3D printing carbon electrodes exhibit much higher signal-to-noise ratio (40.63 ± 7.73) than Pt electrodes (14.26 ± 6.83). The proposed biofabrication method is envisioned to enable 3D printing in many emerging applications in biomedical engineering and electronics.

  4. Fabrication of Composite Filaments with High Dielectric Permittivity for Fused Deposition 3D Printing.

    Wu, Yingwei; Isakov, Dmitry; Grant, Patrick S

    2017-10-23

    Additive manufacturing of complex structures with spatially varying electromagnetic properties can enable new applications in high-technology sectors such as communications and sensors. This work presents the fabrication method as well as microstructural and dielectric characterization of bespoke composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing of microwave devices with a high relative dielectric permittivity ϵ = 11 in the GHz frequency range. The filament is composed of 32 vol % of ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ) micro-particles in a polymeric acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) matrix. An ionic organic ester surfactant was added during formulation to enhance the compatibility between the polymer and the BaTiO 3 . To promote reproducible and robust printability of the fabricated filament, and to promote plasticity, dibutyl phthalate was additionally used. The combined effect of 1 wt % surfactant and 5 wt % plasticizer resulted in a uniform, many hundreds of meters, continuous filament of commercial quality capable of many hours of uninterrupted 3D printing. We demonstrate the feasibility of using the high dielectric constant filament for 3D printing through the fabrication of a range of optical devices. The approach herein may be used as a guide for the successful fabrication of many types of composite filament with varying functions for a broad range of applications.

  5. Fabrication of Composite Filaments with High Dielectric Permittivity for Fused Deposition 3D Printing

    Yingwei Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of complex structures with spatially varying electromagnetic properties can enable new applications in high-technology sectors such as communications and sensors. This work presents the fabrication method as well as microstructural and dielectric characterization of bespoke composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM 3D printing of microwave devices with a high relative dielectric permittivity ϵ = 11 in the GHz frequency range. The filament is composed of 32 vol % of ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO 3 micro-particles in a polymeric acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS matrix. An ionic organic ester surfactant was added during formulation to enhance the compatibility between the polymer and the BaTiO 3 . To promote reproducible and robust printability of the fabricated filament, and to promote plasticity, dibutyl phthalate was additionally used. The combined effect of 1 wt % surfactant and 5 wt % plasticizer resulted in a uniform, many hundreds of meters, continuous filament of commercial quality capable of many hours of uninterrupted 3D printing. We demonstrate the feasibility of using the high dielectric constant filament for 3D printing through the fabrication of a range of optical devices. The approach herein may be used as a guide for the successful fabrication of many types of composite filament with varying functions for a broad range of applications.

  6. The fabrication of ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors by roll-transfer printing

    Chang, Yi-Kuei; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-05-01

    A method with the potential to fabricate large-area nanowire field-effect transistors (NW-FETs) was demonstrated in this study. Using a high-speed roller (20-80 cm min-1), transfer printing was successfully employed to transfer vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires grown on a donor substrate to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp and then print the ordered ZnO nanowire arrays on the received substrate for the fabrication of NW-FETs. ZnO NW-FETs fabricated by this method exhibit high performances with a threshold voltage of around 0.25 V, a current on/off ratio as high as 105, a subthreshold slope of 360 mV/dec, and a field-effect mobility of around 90 cm2 V-1 s-1. The excellent device characteristics suggest that the roll-transfer printing technique, which is compatible with the roll-to-roll (R2R) process and operated in atmosphere, has a good potential for the high-speed fabrication of large-area nanowire transistors for flexible devices and flat panel displays.

  7. The fabrication of ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors by roll-transfer printing

    Chang, Y-K; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-01-01

    A method with the potential to fabricate large-area nanowire field-effect transistors (NW-FETs) was demonstrated in this study. Using a high-speed roller (20-80 cm min -1 ), transfer printing was successfully employed to transfer vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires grown on a donor substrate to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp and then print the ordered ZnO nanowire arrays on the received substrate for the fabrication of NW-FETs. ZnO NW-FETs fabricated by this method exhibit high performances with a threshold voltage of around 0.25 V, a current on/off ratio as high as 10 5 , a subthreshold slope of 360 mV/dec, and a field-effect mobility of around 90 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . The excellent device characteristics suggest that the roll-transfer printing technique, which is compatible with the roll-to-roll (R2R) process and operated in atmosphere, has a good potential for the high-speed fabrication of large-area nanowire transistors for flexible devices and flat panel displays.

  8. The fabrication of ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors by roll-transfer printing

    Chang, Y-K; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hong@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2009-05-13

    A method with the potential to fabricate large-area nanowire field-effect transistors (NW-FETs) was demonstrated in this study. Using a high-speed roller (20-80 cm min{sup -1}), transfer printing was successfully employed to transfer vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires grown on a donor substrate to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp and then print the ordered ZnO nanowire arrays on the received substrate for the fabrication of NW-FETs. ZnO NW-FETs fabricated by this method exhibit high performances with a threshold voltage of around 0.25 V, a current on/off ratio as high as 10{sup 5}, a subthreshold slope of 360 mV/dec, and a field-effect mobility of around 90 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The excellent device characteristics suggest that the roll-transfer printing technique, which is compatible with the roll-to-roll (R2R) process and operated in atmosphere, has a good potential for the high-speed fabrication of large-area nanowire transistors for flexible devices and flat panel displays.

  9. Fabrication of malleable three-dimensional-printed customized bolus using three-dimensional scanner.

    Jae Won Park

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D-printed customized bolus (3D bolus can be used for radiotherapy application to irregular surfaces. However, bolus fabrication based on computed tomography (CT scans is complicated and also delivers unwanted irradiation. Consequently, we fabricated a bolus using a 3D scanner and evaluated its efficacy. The head of an Alderson Rando phantom was scanned with a 3D scanner. The 3D surface data were exported and reconstructed with Geomagic Design X software. A 3D bolus of 5-mm thickness designed to fit onto the nose was printed with the use of rubber-like printing material, and a radiotherapy plan was developed. We successfully fabricated the customized 3D bolus, and further, a CT simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D bolus to the nose. There was no air gap between the bolus and the phantom surface. The percent depth dose (PDD curve of the phantom with the 3D bolus showed an enhanced surface dose when compared with that of the phantom without the bolus. The PDD of the 3D bolus was comparable with that of a commercial superflab bolus. The radiotherapy plan considering the 3D bolus showed improved target coverage when compared with that without the bolus. Thus, we successfully fabricated a customized 3D bolus for an irregular surface using a 3D scanner instead of a CT scanner.

  10. Optical fibre sensing in metals by embedment in 3D printed metallic structures

    Maier, R. R. J.; Havermann, D.; Schneller, O.; Mathew, J.; Polyzos, D.; MacPherson, W. N.; Hand, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing of structural components in metals has potential to revolutionise the manufacturing industry. Embedded sensing in such structures opens a route towards SMART metals, providing added functionality, intelligence and enhanced performance in many components. Such embedded sensors would be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures by utilizing regenerated fibre Bragg gratings and in-fibre Fabry-Perot cavities.

  11. High-Throughput Fabrication of Nanocomplexes Using 3D-Printed Micromixers

    Bohr, Adam; Boetker, Johan; Wang, Yingya

    2017-01-01

    3D printing allows a rapid and inexpensive manufacturing of custom made and prototype devices. Micromixers are used for rapid and controlled production of nanoparticles intended for therapeutic delivery. In this study, we demonstrate the fabrication of micromixers using computational design and 3D...... via bulk mixing. Moreover, each micromixer could process more than 2 liters per hour with unaffected performance and the setup could easily be scaled-up by aligning several micromixers in parallel. This demonstrates that 3D printing can be used to prepare disposable high-throughput micromixers...... printing, which enable a continuous and industrial scale production of nanocomplexes formed by electrostatic complexation, using the polymers poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate). Several parameters including polymer concentration, flow rate, and flow ratio were...

  12. Controllable Impregnation Via Inkjet Printing for the Fabrication of Solid Oxide Cell Air Electrodes

    Da'as, E. H.; Irvine, J. T. S.; Traversa, Enrico; Boulfrad, S.

    2013-01-01

    The impregnation method has been considered as one of the most successful techniques for the fabrication of highly efficient electrodes for solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells (SOCs) at the lab scale. However, because the impregnation is usually performed manually, its irreproducibility remains a major problem that can be solved by using controllable techniques, such as inkjet printing. In this paper, lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air electrodes were prepared by infiltrating YSZ porous bodies with LSM precursor solution using inkjet printing, followed by annealing at 800°C for 2 hours. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of the LSM phase, which was in the form of nanoparticles with size in the 50-70 nm range on the YSZ walls, as revealed by FEG-SEM observations. The effect of printing parameters on the distribution of the impregnated phase was investigated and discussed.

  13. Controllable Impregnation Via Inkjet Printing for the Fabrication of Solid Oxide Cell Air Electrodes

    Da'as, E. H.

    2013-10-07

    The impregnation method has been considered as one of the most successful techniques for the fabrication of highly efficient electrodes for solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells (SOCs) at the lab scale. However, because the impregnation is usually performed manually, its irreproducibility remains a major problem that can be solved by using controllable techniques, such as inkjet printing. In this paper, lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air electrodes were prepared by infiltrating YSZ porous bodies with LSM precursor solution using inkjet printing, followed by annealing at 800°C for 2 hours. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of the LSM phase, which was in the form of nanoparticles with size in the 50-70 nm range on the YSZ walls, as revealed by FEG-SEM observations. The effect of printing parameters on the distribution of the impregnated phase was investigated and discussed.

  14. A new method of fabricating a blend scaffold using an indirect three-dimensional printing technique

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyungseok; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Jeong Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo; Shim, Jung Hee; Choi, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and effectiveness, the physical blending of polymers is considered to be a practical strategy for developing a versatile scaffold having desirable mechanical and biochemical properties. In the present work, an indirect three-dimensional (i3D) printing technique was proposed to fabricate a 3D free-form scaffold using a blend of immiscible materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin. The i3D printing technique includes 3D printing of a mold and a sacrificial molding process. PCL/chloroform and gelatin/water were physically mixed to prepare the blend solution, which was subsequently injected into the cavity of a 3D printed mold. After solvent removal and gelatin cross-linking, the mold was dissolved to obtain a PCL–gelatin (PG) scaffold, with a specific 3D structure. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that PCL masses and gelatin fibers in the PG scaffold homogenously coexisted without chemical bonding. Compression tests confirmed that gelatin incorporation into the PCL enhanced its mechanical flexibility and softness, to the point of being suitable for soft-tissue engineering, as opposed to pure PCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells, cultured on a PG scaffold, exhibited enhanced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation and tissue formation, compared with those on a PCL scaffold. The i3D printing technique can be used to blend a variety of materials, facilitating 3D scaffold fabrication for specific tissue regeneration. Furthermore, this convenient and versatile technique may lead to wider application of 3D printing in tissue engineering. (paper)

  15. A new method of fabricating a blend scaffold using an indirect three-dimensional printing technique.

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Hyungseok; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Jeong Hun; Shim, Jung Hee; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-03

    Due to its simplicity and effectiveness, the physical blending of polymers is considered to be a practical strategy for developing a versatile scaffold having desirable mechanical and biochemical properties. In the present work, an indirect three-dimensional (i3D) printing technique was proposed to fabricate a 3D free-form scaffold using a blend of immiscible materials, such as polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin. The i3D printing technique includes 3D printing of a mold and a sacrificial molding process. PCL/chloroform and gelatin/water were physically mixed to prepare the blend solution, which was subsequently injected into the cavity of a 3D printed mold. After solvent removal and gelatin cross-linking, the mold was dissolved to obtain a PCL-gelatin (PG) scaffold, with a specific 3D structure. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that PCL masses and gelatin fibers in the PG scaffold homogenously coexisted without chemical bonding. Compression tests confirmed that gelatin incorporation into the PCL enhanced its mechanical flexibility and softness, to the point of being suitable for soft-tissue engineering, as opposed to pure PCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells, cultured on a PG scaffold, exhibited enhanced in vitro chondrogenic differentiation and tissue formation, compared with those on a PCL scaffold. The i3D printing technique can be used to blend a variety of materials, facilitating 3D scaffold fabrication for specific tissue regeneration. Furthermore, this convenient and versatile technique may lead to wider application of 3D printing in tissue engineering.

  16. Inkjet printing for biosensor fabrication: combining chemistry and technology for advanced manufacturing.

    Li, Jia; Rossignol, Fabrice; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-06-21

    Inkjet printing is emerging at the forefront of biosensor fabrication technologies. Parallel advances in both ink chemistry and printers have led to a biosensor manufacturing approach that is simple, rapid, flexible, high resolution, low cost, efficient for mass production, and extends the capabilities of devices beyond other manufacturing technologies. Here we review for the first time the factors behind successful inkjet biosensor fabrication, including printers, inks, patterning methods, and matrix types. We discuss technical considerations that are important when moving beyond theoretical knowledge to practical implementation. We also highlight significant advances in biosensor functionality that have been realised through inkjet printing. Finally, we consider future possibilities for biosensors enabled by this novel combination of chemistry and technology.

  17. Recovery of high purity precious metals from printed circuit boards

    Park, Young Jun; Fray, Derek J.

    2009-01-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) have an inherent value because of the precious metal content. For an effective recycling of WPCB, it is essential to recover the precious metals. This paper reports a promising method to recover the precious metals. Aqua regia was used as a leachant and the ratio between metals and leachant was fixed at 1/20 (g/ml). Silver is relatively stable so the amount of about 98 wt.% of the input was recovered without an additional treatment. Palladium formed a red precipitate during dissolution, which were consisted of Pd(NH 4 ) 2 Cl 6 . The amount precipitated was 93 wt.% of the input palladium. A liquid-liquid extraction with toluene was used to extract gold selectively. Also, dodecanethiol and sodium borohydride solution were added to make gold nanoparticles. Gold of about 97 wt.% of the input was recovered as nanoparticles which was identified with a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy through selected area electron diffraction and nearest-neighbor lattice spacing.

  18. Large-area compatible fabrication and encapsulation of inkjet-printed humidity sensors on flexible foils with integrated thermal compensation

    Molina-Lopez, F; Quintero, A Vásquez; Mattana, G; Briand, D; De Rooij, N F

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the simultaneous fabrication of ambient relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors arrays, inkjet-printed on flexible substrates and subsequently encapsulated at foil level. These sensors are based on planar interdigitated capacitors with an inkjet-printed sensing layer and meander-shaped resistors. Their combination allows the compensation of the RH signals variations at different temperatures. The whole fabrication of the system is carried out at foil level and involves the utilization of additive methods such as inkjet-printing and electrodeposition. Electrodeposition of the printed lines resulted in an improvement of the thermoresistors. The sensors have been characterized and their performances analyzed. The encapsulation layer does not modify the performances of the sensors in terms of sensitivity or response time. This work demonstrates the potential of inkjet-printing in the large-area fabrication of light-weight and cost-efficient gas sensors on flexible substrates. (paper)

  19. Large core plastic planar optical splitter fabricated by 3D printing technology

    Prajzler, Václav; Kulha, Pavel; Knietel, Marian; Enser, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and optical properties of large core multimode optical polymer splitter fabricated using fill up core polymer in substrate that was made by 3D printing technology. The splitter was designed by the beam propagation method intended for assembling large core waveguide fibers with 735 μm diameter. Waveguide core layers were made of optically clear liquid adhesive, and Veroclear polymer was used as substrate and cover layers. Measurement of optical losses proved that the insertion optical loss was lower than 6.8 dB in the visible spectrum.

  20. Fabrication and characterisation of ceramics via low-cost DLP 3D printing

    Giftymol Varghese; Mónica Moral; Miguel Castro-García; Juan José López-López; Juan Ramón Marín-Rueda; Vicente Yagüe-Alcaraz; Lorena Hernández-Afonso; Juan Carlos Ruiz-Morales; Jesus Canales-Vázquez

    2018-01-01

    A stereolithography-based additive manufacturing technique has been used for the fabrication of advanced ceramics. A customised 3D printer using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) projector as UV source has been built to fabricate green bodies from photosensitive resins loaded with 25–60 wt% of alumina, 3- and 8-YSZ. The 3D-printed bodies were then sintered in the 1200–1500 °C and exhibited thermal stability. As expected, higher ceramic loadings rendered objects with higher density for a given ...

  1. Packaging Printing Today

    Stanislav Bolanča; Igor Majnarić; Kristijan Golubović

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. T...

  2. The fabrication of front electrodes of Si solar cell by dispensing printing

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Ryu, Sung-Soo; Shin, Dongwook; Shin, Jung-Han; Jeong, Jwa-Jin; Kim, Hyeong-Jun; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose the process for the front silver electrode by employing dispensing method. ► The dispensing method is a non-contact printing process. ► The electrode by dispensing method has more uniform and narrower shape. ► The dispensing method helped to enhance the efficiency of solar cell by 0.8% absolute. - Abstract: The dispensing printing was applied to fabricate the front electrodes of silicon solar cell. In this method, a micro channel nozzle and normal Ag paste were employed. The aspect ratio and line width of electrodes could be controlled by the process variables such as the inner diameter of nozzle, dispensing speed, discharge pressure, and the gap between wafer and nozzle. For the nozzle with the inner diameter of 50 μm, the line width and aspect ratio of electrode were under 90 μm and more than ∼0.2, respectively. When comparing the efficiency of solar cell prepared by conventional screen printing and the dispensing printing, the latter exhibited 19.1%, which is 0.8% absolute higher than the former even with the same Ag paste. This is because the electrode by dispensing printing has uniform aspect ratio and narrow line width over the length of electrode.

  3. Fabrication of Trabecular Bone-Templated Tissue-Engineered Constructs by 3D Inkjet Printing.

    Vanderburgh, Joseph P; Fernando, Shanik J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Guelcher, Scott A

    2017-11-01

    3D printing enables the creation of scaffolds with precisely controlled morphometric properties for multiple tissue types, including musculoskeletal tissues such as cartilage and bone. Computed tomography (CT) imaging has been combined with 3D printing to fabricate anatomically scaled patient-specific scaffolds for bone regeneration. However, anatomically scaled scaffolds typically lack sufficient resolution to recapitulate the 3D constructs are fabricated via a new micro-CT/3D inkjet printing process. It is shown that this process reproducibly fabricates bone-templated constructs that recapitulate the anatomic site-specific morphometric properties of trabecular bone. A significant correlation is observed between the structure model index (a morphometric parameter related to surface curvature) and the degree of mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells, with more concave surfaces promoting more extensive osteoblast differentiation and mineralization compared to predominately convex surfaces. These findings highlight the significant effects of trabecular architecture on osteoblast function. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Internet of ''printed'' Things: low-cost fabrication of autonomous sensing nodes by inkjet printing

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    ''What if electronics devices are printed using an inkjet printer even at home?'' ''What if those devices no longer need a battery?'' I will introduce two enabling technologies for the Internet of Things concept. 1. Instant Inkjet Circuits: A low cost, fast and accessible technology to support the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. We demonstrated that ''sintering-free'' silver nano particle ink with a commodity inkjet printer can be used to fabricate printed circuit board and high-frequency applications such as antennas and sensors. The technology is now commercialized by AgIC, Inc. 2. Wireless Power: Although large amounts of data can be exchanged over a wireless communication link, mobile devices are still tethered by power cables. We are trying to solve this problem by two different approaches: energy harvesting. A simple circuitry comprised of diodes and capacitor can convert ambient radio signals into DC current. Our research revealed the signals from TV tower located 6.5km apart could be used to feed 100 microwatts to power microcontrollers

  5. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW–LDPE–SA Binder System

    Luquan Ren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW–LDPE–SA. The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity.

  6. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW–LDPE–SA Binder System

    Ren, Luquan; Zhou, Xueli; Song, Zhengyi; Zhao, Che; Liu, Qingping; Xue, Jingze; Li, Xiujuan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW–LDPE–SA). The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity. PMID:28772665

  7. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW-LDPE-SA Binder System.

    Ren, Luquan; Zhou, Xueli; Song, Zhengyi; Zhao, Che; Liu, Qingping; Xue, Jingze; Li, Xiujuan

    2017-03-16

    Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW-LDPE-SA). The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity.

  8. The Use of 3D Metal Printing (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) in Removable Prosthodontics.

    Laverty, Dominic P; Thomas, Matthew B M; Clark, Paul; Addy, Liam D

    2016-11-01

    The use of 3D printing is expanding and it is envisaged that it will have an increasing presence within dentistry. Having an appreciation and understanding of such technology is therefore paramount. It is currently used to produce a variety of dental objects/prostheses. This paper briefly looks at 3D printing in dentistry and specifically describes the use of the direct metal laser sintering 3D printing technique in the production of cobalt chromium removable prosthesis frameworks. Clinical relevance: Understanding the different technologies that can and are being used within the dental field is important, particularly as it is a rapidly changing field. Having an understanding of such technologies will allow practitioners to utilize such technologies appropriately in the management of their patients.

  9. Micro-ball lens structure fabrication based on drop on demand printing the liquid mold

    Zhu, Xiaoyang, E-mail: zhuxy1026@163.com; Zhu, Li, E-mail: zhuli@njust.edu.cn; Chen, Hejuan; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The glycerol micro-ball droplet was introduced to be as liquid mold to fabricate micro-ball lens. • A molding process was used to fabricate the micro-ball lens and the scales of them can be controlled. • The accurate molding process is mainly attributed to the ultrahigh adhesion of the treated substrate. • The micro-ball lenses with contact angle of 120° and 150° were fabricated, analyzed and discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, we demonstrated a simple micro-ball lens array (MBLA) fabrication method using a drop-on-demand (DOD) droplet printing technique and liquid mold. The micro-ball droplet array on the hydrophobic surface is used as the liquid mold to fabricate the MBLA. The ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate is ascribed to the Wenzel state of the micro-ball droplet, while the replication process with low position error is attributed to the ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate and the high viscosity of the micro-ball droplet and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) liquid. The micro-ball lenses (MBLs) with a contact angle of 120° and 150° were fabricated and the important fabrication details were discussed. The optical performance and scanning electron microscope (SEM) data of the MBLs showed that the MBLs had high quality surface morphology and good optical performance.

  10. Fabrication of terahertz metamaterials using electrohydrodynamic jet printing for sensitive detection of yeast

    Tenggara, Ayodya Pradhipta; Byun, Doyoung; Park, S J; Ahn, Y H; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of terahertz metamaterial sensor for the accurate and on-site detection of yeast using electrohydrodynamic jet printing, which is inexpensive, simple, and environmentally friendly. The very small sized pattern up to 5 µ m-width of electrical split ring resonator unit structures could be printed on a large area on both a rigid substrate and flexible substrate, i.e. silicon wafer and polyimide film using the drop on demand technique to eject liquid ink containing silver nanoparticles. Experimental characterization and simulation were performed to study their performances in detecting yeast of different weights. It was shown that the metamaterial sensor fabricated on a flexible polyimide film had higher sensitivity by more than six times than the metamaterial sensor fabricated on a silicon wafer, due to the low refractive index of the PI substrate and due to the extremely thin substrate thickness which lowers the effective index further. The resonance frequency shift saturated when the yeast weights were 145 µ g and 215 µ g for metamaterial structures with gap size 6.5 µ m fabricated on the silicon substrate and on the polyimide substrate, respectively. (paper)

  11. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control

  12. Microlens fabrication by replica molding of frozen laser-printed droplets

    Surdo, Salvatore; Diaspro, Alberto; Duocastella, Martí

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we synergistically combine laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) and replica molding for the fabrication of microlenses with control of their geometry and size independent of the material or substrate used. Our approach is based on a multistep process in which liquid microdroplets of an aqueous solution are first printed on a substrate by LIFT. Following a freezing step, the microdroplets are used as a master to fabricate a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. A subsequent replica molding step enables the creation of microlenses and microlens arrays on arbitrary selected substrates and by using different curable polymers. Thus, our method combines the rapid fabrication capabilities of LIFT and the perfectively smooth surface quality of the generated microdroplets, with the advantages of replica molding in terms of parallelization and materials flexibility. We demonstrate our strategy by generating microlenses of different photocurable polymers and by characterizing their optical and morphological properties.

  13. Printing Outside the Box: Additive Manufacturing Processes for Fabrication of Large Aerospace Structures

    Babai, Majid; Peters, Warren

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of propulsion elements. Liquid rocket engines (LREs) are comprised of a thrust chamber and nozzle extension as illustrated in figure 1 for the J2X upper stage engine. Development of the J2X engine, designed for the Ares I launch vehicle, is currently being incorporated on the Space Launch System. A nozzle extension is attached to the combustion chamber to obtain the expansion ratio needed to increase specific impulse. If the nozzle extension could be printed as one piece using free-form additive manufacturing (AM) processes, rather than the current method of forming welded parts, a considerable time savings could be realized. Not only would this provide a more homogenous microstructure than a welded structure, but could also greatly shorten the overall fabrication time. The main objective of this study is to fabricate test specimens using a pulsed arc source and solid wire as shown in figure 2. The mechanical properties of these specimens will be compared with those fabricated using the powder bed, selective laser melting technology at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. As printed components become larger, maintaining a constant temperature during the build process becomes critical. This predictive capability will require modeling of the moving heat source as illustrated in figure 3. Predictive understanding of the heat profile will allow a constant temperature to be maintained as a function of height from substrate while printing complex shapes. In addition, to avoid slumping, this will also allow better control of the microstructural development and hence the properties. Figure 4 shows a preliminary comparison of the mechanical properties obtained.

  14. Fabrication and characterisation of ceramics via low-cost DLP 3D printing

    Varghesea, G.; Moral, M.; Castro-García, M.; López-López, J.J.; Marín-Rueda, J.R.; Yagüe-Alcaraz, V.; Hernández-Afonso, L.; Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Canales-Vázquez, J.

    2018-01-01

    Astereolithography-based additive manufacturing technique has been used for the fabrication of advanced ceramics. A customised 3D printer using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) projector as UV source has been built to fabricate green bodies from photosensitive resins loaded with 25–60wt% of alumina, 3- and 8-YSZ. The 3D-printed bodies were then sintered in the 1200–1500°C and exhibited thermal stability. As expected, higher ceramic loadings rendered objects with higher density for a given sintering temperature. The limit of solid loading in the resin is approximately 60% and beyond those contents, the extra ceramic appears as powder loosely adhered to the sintered objects. Photogrammetry was used to evaluate the accuracy of the 3D printing process and highlighted a marked deviation between the CAD model and the resulting object, particularly in the top part of the specimens, possibly due to the use of volatile solvents which cause changes in the photoresins used. Nevertheless, that problem may be overcome by thermostatising the printer vat and/or using solvents with higher boiling point. The results obtained suggest the potential application of low cost DLP 3D printing techniques to process ceramics for a number of applications including ceramic fuel cells, piezoelectrics, dental applications, etc. [es

  15. Using Three-Dimensional Printing to Fabricate a Tubing Connector for Dilation and Evacuation.

    Stitely, Michael L; Paterson, Helen

    2016-02-01

    This is a proof-of-concept study to show that simple instrumentation problems encountered in surgery can be solved by fabricating devices using a three-dimensional printer. The device used in the study is a simple tubing connector fashioned to connect two segments of suction tubing used in a surgical procedure where no commercially available product for this use is available through our usual suppliers in New Zealand. A cylindrical tubing connector was designed using three-dimensional printing design software. The tubing connector was fabricated using the Makerbot Replicator 2X three-dimensional printer. The connector was used in 15 second-trimester dilation and evacuation procedures. Data forms were completed by the primary operating surgeon. Descriptive statistics were used with the expectation that the device would function as intended in all cases. The three-dimensional printed tubing connector functioned as intended in all 15 instances. Commercially available three-dimensional printing technology can be used to overcome simple instrumentation problems encountered during gynecologic surgical procedures.

  16. Fabrication and characterisation of ceramics via low-cost DLP 3D printing

    Giftymol Varghese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A stereolithography-based additive manufacturing technique has been used for the fabrication of advanced ceramics. A customised 3D printer using a Digital Light Processing (DLP projector as UV source has been built to fabricate green bodies from photosensitive resins loaded with 25–60 wt% of alumina, 3- and 8-YSZ. The 3D-printed bodies were then sintered in the 1200–1500 °C and exhibited thermal stability. As expected, higher ceramic loadings rendered objects with higher density for a given sintering temperature. The limit of solid loading in the resin is approximately 60% and beyond those contents, the extra ceramic appears as powder loosely adhered to the sintered objects. Photogrammetry was used to evaluate the accuracy of the 3D printing process and highlighted a marked deviation between the CAD model and the resulting object, particularly in the top part of the specimens, possibly due to the use of volatile solvents which cause changes in the photoresins used. Nevertheless, that problem may be overcome by thermostatising the printer vat and/or using solvents with higher boiling point. The results obtained suggest the potential application of low cost DLP 3D printing techniques to process ceramics for a number of applications including ceramic fuel cells, piezoelectrics, dental applications, etc.

  17. Study on temperature and near-infrared driving characteristics of hydrogel actuator fabricated via molding and 3D printing.

    Zhao, Qian; Liang, Yunhong; Ren, Lei; Qiu, Feng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2018-02-01

    A hydrogel material system which was fit for molding and 3D printing was developed to fabricate bilayer hydrogel actuators with controllable temperature and near infrared laser responses. Polymerization on interface boundary of layered structure enhanced the bonding strength of hydrogel actuators. By utilizing anisotropic of microstructure along with thickness direction, bilayer hydrogel actuators fabricated via molding realized intelligent bending/shrinking responses, which guided the preparation of hydrogel ink for 3D printing. In-situ free radical polymerization under vacuum realized the solidification of printed hydrogel actuators with graphene oxide. Based on anisotropic swelling/deswelling behaviors of precise structure fabricated via 3D printing, the printed bilayer hydrogel actuators achieved temperature and near infrared laser responsive deformation. Changes of programmable printing path effectively resulted in corresponding deformation patterns. Combination of advantages of molding and 3D printing can promote the design and fabrication of hydrogel actuators with high mechanical strength, response speed and deformation ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D Printing of Photocurable Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite for Fabrication of Complex Architectures via Stereolithography.

    Palaganas, Napolabel B; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; de Leon, Al Christopher C; Palaganas, Jerome O; Pangilinan, Katrina D; Lee, Yan Jie; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2017-10-04

    The advantages of 3D printing on cost, speed, accuracy, and flexibility have attracted several new applications in various industries especially in the field of medicine where customized solutions are highly demanded. Although this modern fabrication technique offers several benefits, it also poses critical challenges in materials development suitable for industry use. Proliferation of polymers in biomedical application has been severely limited by their inherently weak mechanical properties despite their other excellent attributes. Earlier works on 3D printing of polymers focus mainly on biocompatibility and cellular viability and lack a close attention to produce robust specimens. Prized for superior mechanical strength and inherent stiffness, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) from abaca plant is incorporated to provide the necessary toughness for 3D printable biopolymer. Hence, this work demonstrates 3D printing of CNC-filled biomaterial with significant improvement in mechanical and surface properties. These findings may potentially pave the way for an alternative option in providing innovative and cost-effective patient-specific solutions to various fields in medical industry. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first successful demonstration of 3D printing of CNC nanocomposite hydrogel via stereolithography (SL) forming a complex architecture with enhanced material properties potentially suited for tissue engineering.

  19. A study of liberation and separation process of metals from printed circuit boards (PCBs) scrap

    Noorliyana, H.A.; Zaheruddin, K.; Mohd Fazlul Bari; M. Sri Asliza; Nurhidayah, A.Z.; Kamarudin, H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the metallic elements are covered with or encapsulated by various plastic or ceramic materials on printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment process allowing their liberation and separation is first needed in order to facilitate their efficient extraction with hydrometallurgy route. Even though many studies have been performed on the mechanical pre-treatment processing for the liberation and separation of the metallic components of printed circuit boards scrap, further studies are required to pave the way for efficient recycling of waste printed circuit boards through a combination of mechanical pre-treatment and hydrometallurgical technology. In this work, a fundamental study has been carried out on the mechanical pre-treatment that is necessary to recover metallic concentrates from printed circuit boards scraps. The most important problem is to separate or release particles from the associated gangue minerals at the possible liberation particle size. The distribution of metallic elements has been also investigated in relation to the particle size of the milled printed circuit boards. The samples of printed circuit boards were separated into the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions by Rare-earth Roll Magnetic separator. Thereafter, the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were separated to heavy fraction (metallic elements) and light fraction (plastic) by Mozley Laboratory Table Separator. The recovery ratios and the evaluation of the metallic concentrates recovered by each separation process were also investigated. This study is expected to provide useful data for the efficient mechanical separation of metallic components from printed circuit boards scraps. (author)

  20. Cotton fabrics with UV blocking properties through metal salts deposition

    Emam, Hossam E.; Bechtold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Introducing metal salt based UV-blocking properties into cotton fabric. • A quite simple technique used to produce wash resistant UV-absorbers using different Cu-, Zn- and Ti-salts. • Good UPF was obtained after treatment with Cu and Ti salts, and ranged between 11.6 and 14. • The efficiency of the deposited metal oxides is compared on molar basis. - Abstract: Exposure to sunlight is important for human health as this increases the resistance to diverse pathogens, but the higher doses cause skin problems and diseases. Hence, wearing of sunlight protective fabrics displays a good solution for people working in open atmosphere. The current study offered quite simple and technically feasible ways to prepare good UV protection fabrics based on cotton. Metal salts including Zn, Cu and Ti were immobilized into cotton and oxidized cotton fabrics by using pad-dry-cure technique. Metal contents on fabrics were determined by AAS; the highest metal content was recorded for Cu-fabric and it was 360.6 mmol/kg after treatment of oxidized cotton with 0.5 M of copper nitrate. Ti contents on fabrics were ranged between 168.0 and 200.8 mmol/kg and it showed the lowest release as only 38.1–46.4% leached out fabrics after five laundry washings. Metal containing deposits were specified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. UV-transmission radiation over treated fabrics was measured and ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) was calculated. UPF was enhanced after treatment with Cu and Ti salts to be 11.6 and 14, respectively. After five washings, the amount of metal (Cu or Ti) retained indicates acceptable laundering durability.

  1. Investigation of the fabrication parameters of thick film metal oxide-polymer pH electrodes

    Gac, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development of an optimum material and fabrication process for the production of thick film pH electrodes. These devices consist of low cost, miniature and rugged pH sensors formed by screen printing a metal oxide bearing paste onto a high temperature (∼850 deg C) fired metal back contact supported on a standard alumina substrate. The pH sensitive metal oxide layer must be fabricated at relatively low temperatures (<300 deg C) in order to maintain the pH sensitivity of the layer and hence requires the use of a suitably stable low temperature curing binder. Bespoke fabricated inks are derived from a Taguchi style factorial experimental plans in which, different binder types, curing temperatures, hydration level and percentage mixtures of different metal oxides and layer thicknesses were investigated. The pH responses of 18 printed electrodes per batch were assessed in buffer solutions with respect to a commercial reference electrode forming a complete potentiometric circuit. The evaluation criteria used in the study included the device-to-device variation in sensitivity of the pH sensors and their sensitivity variation as a function of time. The results indicated the importance of the choice of binder type in particular on the performance characteristics. Reproducible device-to-device variation in sensitivity was determined for the best inks found, whatever the ink fabrication batch. A reduction in the sensitivity variation with time has been determined using the mathematical models derived from an experimental plan. The lack of reproducibility of the sensitivity magnitude, regardless of the ink manufacturing batch, seems to be a recurrent problem with prototype inks. Experimental sub-Nernstian responses are discussed in the light of possible pH mechanisms. (author)

  2. Applications of Open Source GMAW-Based Metal 3-D Printing

    Yuenyong Nilsiam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The metal 3-D printing market is currently dominated by high-end applications, which make it inaccessible for small and medium enterprises, fab labs, and individual makers who are interested in the ability to prototype and additively manufacture final products in metal. Recent progress led to low-cost open-source metal 3-D printers using a gas metal arc welding (GMAW-based print head. This reduced the cost of metal 3-D printers into the range of desktop prosumer polymer 3-D printers. Consequent research established good material properties of metal 3-D printed parts with readily-available weld filler wire, reusable substrates, thermal and stress properties, toolpath planning, bead-width control, mechanical properties, and support for overhangs. These previous works showed that GMAW-based metal 3-D printing has a good adhesion between layers and is not porous inside the printed parts, but they did not proceed far enough to demonstrate applications. In this study, the utility of the GMAW approach to 3-D printing is investigated using a low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer and a converted Computer Numerical Control router machine to make useful parts over a range of applications including: fixing an existing part by adding a 3-D metal feature, creating a product using the substrate as part of the component, 3-D printing in high resolution of useful objects, near net objects, and making an integrated product using a combination of steel and polymer 3-D printing. The results show that GMAW-based 3-D printing is capable of distributed manufacturing of useful products for a wide variety of applications for sustainable development.

  3. Design and testing of RFID sensor tag fabricated using inkjet-printing and electrodeposition

    Chien Dang, Mau; Son Nguyen, Dat; Dung Dang, Thi My; Tedjini, Smail; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric

    2014-06-01

    The passive RFID tag with an added sensing function is of interest to many applications. In particular, applications where RFID tagging is already considered to be the next step, such as food items, are a specific target. This paper demonstrates a flexible RFID tag sensor fabricated using a low cost technique with an added zero-cost sensing function. It is more specifically applied to the sensing of degradable food, in particular beef meat in our demonstrated example. To reach this, the antenna is designed in such a way to be sensitive to the variation of the dielectric permittivity of the meat over time. The design of the sensing tag as well as its fabrication process are described. The fabrication involves inkjet printing of a silver nanoparticle based ink on a commercial low cost PET film to create a seed layer. It is followed by a copper electrodeposition step on top of the silver pattern to complete the tag to obtain the desired thickness and conductivity of the tag antenna. The results of the electrical tests showed that with the inkjet printing-electrodeposition combination it is possible to produce flexible electrically conductive patterns for practical RFID applications. The tag was then tested in close-to-real-world conditions and it is demonstrated that it can provide a sensing function to detect the consumption limit of the packaged beef.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging-three-dimensional printing technology fabricates customized scaffolds for brain tissue engineering

    Feng Fu; Chong Chen; Sai Zhang; Ming-liang Zhao; Xiao-hong Li; Zhe Qin; Chao Xu; Xu-yi Chen; Rui-xin Li; Li-na Wang; Ding-wei Peng; Hong-tao Sun; Yue Tu

    2017-01-01

    Conventional fabrication methods lack the ability to control both macro- and micro-structures of generated scaffolds. Three-dimensional printing is a solid free-form fabrication method that provides novel ways to create customized scaffolds with high precision and accuracy. In this study, an electrically controlled cortical impactor was used to induce randomized brain tissue defects. The overall shape of scaffolds was designed using rat-specific anatomical data obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, and the internal structure was created by computer- aided design. As the result of limitations arising from insufficient resolution of the manufacturing process, we magnified the size of the cavity model prototype five-fold to successfully fabricate customized collagen-chitosan scaffolds using three-dimensional printing. Results demonstrated that scaffolds have three-dimensional porous structures, high porosity, highly specific surface areas, pore connectivity and good internal characteristics. Neural stem cells co-cultured with scaffolds showed good viability, indicating good biocompatibility and biodegradability. This technique may be a promising new strategy for regenerating complex damaged brain tissues, and helps pave the way toward personalized medicine.

  5. Fabrication of In Vitro Cancer Microtissue Array on Fibroblast-Layered Nanofibrous Membrane by Inkjet Printing

    Tae-Min Park

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In general, a drug candidate is evaluated using 2D-cultured cancer cells followed by an animal model. Despite successful preclinical testing, however, most drugs that enter human clinical trials fail. The high failure rates are mainly caused by incompatibility between the responses of the current models and humans. Here, we fabricated a cancer microtissue array in a multi-well format that exhibits heterogeneous and batch-to-batch structure by continuous deposition of collagen-suspended Hela cells on a fibroblast-layered nanofibrous membrane via inkjet printing. Expression of both Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 was higher in cancer microtissues than in fibroblast-free microtissues. The fabricated microtissues were treated with an anticancer drug, and high drug resistance to doxorubicin occurred in cancer microtissues but not in fibroblast-free microtissues. These results introduce an inkjet printing fabrication method for cancer microtissue arrays, which can be used for various applications such as early drug screening and gradual 3D cancer studies.

  6. Plated copper front side metallization on printed seed-layers for silicon solar cells

    Kraft, Achim

    2015-01-01

    A novel copper front side metallization architecture for silicon solar cells based on a fine printed silver seed-layer, plated with nickel, copper and silver, is investigated. The work focuses on the printing of fine seed-layers with low silver consumption, the corrosion of the printed seed-layers by the interaction with electrolyte solutions and the encapsulation material on module level and on the long term stability of the cells due to copper migration. The investigation of the correlation...

  7. A microband lactate biosensor fabricated using a water-based screen-printed carbon ink.

    Rawson, F J; Purcell, W M; Xu, J; Pemberton, R M; Fielden, P R; Biddle, N; Hart, J P

    2009-01-15

    The present study demonstrated for the first time that screen-printed carbon microband electrodes fabricated from water-based ink can readily detect H(2)O(2) and that the same ink, with the addition of lactate oxidase, can be used to construct microband biosensors to measure lactate. These microband devices were fabricated by a simple cutting procedure using conventional sized screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) containing the electrocatalyst cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC). These devices were characterised with H(2)O(2) using several electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammograms were found to be sigmoidal; a current density value of 4.2 mA cm(-2) was obtained. A scan rate study revealed that the mass transport mechanism was a mixture of radial and planar diffusion. However, a further amperometric study under quiescent and hydrodynamic conditions indicated that radial diffusion predominated. A chronoamperometric study indicated that steady-state currents were obtained with these devices for a variety of H(2)O(2) concentrations and that the currents were proportional to the analyte concentration. Lactate microband biosensors were then fabricated by incorporating lactate oxidase into the water-based formulation prior to printing and then cutting as described. Voltammograms demonstrated that lactate oxidase did not compromise the integrity of the electrode for H(2)O(2) detection. A potential of +400 mV was selected for a calibration study, which showed that lactate could be measured over a dynamic range of 1-10mM which was linear up to 6mM; a calculated lower limit of detection of 289 microM was ascertained. This study provides a platform for monitoring cell metabolism in-vitro by measuring lactate electrochemically via a microband biosensor.

  8. Fabrication of tough epoxy with shape memory effects by UV-assisted direct-ink write printing.

    Chen, Kaijuan; Kuang, Xiao; Li, Vincent; Kang, Guozheng; Qi, H Jerry

    2018-03-07

    3D printing of epoxy-based shape memory polymers with high mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability and chemical resistance is highly desirable for practical applications. However, thermally cured epoxy in general is difficult to print directly. There have been limited numbers of successes in printing epoxy but they suffer from relatively poor mechanical properties. Here, we present an ultraviolet (UV)-assisted 3D printing of thermally cured epoxy composites with high tensile toughness via a two-stage curing approach. The ink containing UV curable resin and epoxy oligomer is used for UV-assisted direct-ink write (DIW)-based 3D printing followed by thermal curing of the part containing the epoxy oligomer. The UV curable resin forms a network by photo polymerization after the 1st stage of UV curing, which can maintain the printed architecture at an elevated temperature. The 2nd stage thermal curing of the epoxy oligomer yields an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) composite with highly enhanced mechanical properties. It is found that the printed IPN epoxy composites enabled by the two-stage curing show isotropic mechanical properties and high tensile toughness. We demonstrated that the 3D-printed high-toughness epoxy composites show good shape memory properties. This UV-assisted DIW 3D printing via a two-stage curing method can broaden the application of 3D printing to fabricate thermoset materials with enhanced tensile toughness and tunable properties for high-performance and functional applications.

  9. Comparison between mixed and spatially separated remote phosphor fabricated via a screen-printing process

    Kim, Byung-Ho; Hwang, Jonghee; Lee, Young Jin; Kim, Jin-Ho; Jeon, Dae-Woo; Lee, Mi Jai

    2016-08-01

    We developed a fabrication method for remote phosphor by a screen-printing process, using green phosphor, red phosphor, and thermally stable glass frit. The glass frit was introduced for long-term stability. The optical properties of the remote phosphor were observed via an integrating sphere; the photoluminescence spectrum dramatically changed on incorporating a minor amount of the red phosphor. These unique optical properties were elucidated using four factors: phosphor ratio, scattering induced by packing density, light intensity per unit volume, and reabsorption. The thermal stability of the remote phosphor was investigated at 500°C, demonstrating its outstanding thermal properties.

  10. Printing-based fabrication method using sacrificial paper substrates for flexible and wearable microfluidic devices

    Chung, Daehan; Gray, Bonnie L

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple, fast, and inexpensive new printing-based fabrication process for flexible and wearable microfluidic channels and devices. Microfluidic devices are fabricated on textiles (fabric) for applications in clothing-based wearable microfluidic sensors and systems. The wearable and flexible microfluidic devices are comprised of water-insoluable screen-printable plastisol polymer. Sheets of paper are used as sacrificial substrates for multiple layers of polymer on the fabric’s surface. Microfluidic devices can be made within a short time using simple processes and inexpensive equipment that includes a laser cutter and a thermal laminator. The fabrication process is characterized to demonstrate control of microfluidic channel thickness and width. Film thickness smaller than 100 micrometers and lateral dimensions smaller than 150 micrometers are demonstrated. A flexible microfluidic mixer is also developed on fabric and successfully tested on both flat and curved surfaces at volumetric flow rates ranging from 5.5–46 ml min −1 . (paper)

  11. Applications of Open Source GMAW-Based Metal 3-D Printing

    Yuenyong Nilsiam; Paul G. Sanders; Joshua M. Pearce

    2018-01-01

    The metal 3-D printing market is currently dominated by high-end applications, which make it inaccessible for small and medium enterprises, fab labs, and individual makers who are interested in the ability to prototype and additively manufacture final products in metal. Recent progress led to low-cost open-source metal 3-D printers using a gas metal arc welding (GMAW)-based print head. This reduced the cost of metal 3-D printers into the range of desktop prosumer polymer 3-D printers. Consequ...

  12. Flexible high-κ/Metal gate metal/insulator/metal capacitors on silicon (100) fabric

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2013-10-01

    Implementation of memory on bendable substrates is an important step toward a complete and fully developed notion of mechanically flexible computational systems. In this paper, we have demonstrated a simple fabrication flow to build metal-insulator-metal capacitors, key components of dynamic random access memory, on a mechanically flexible silicon (100) fabric. We rely on standard microfabrication processes to release a thin sheet of bendable silicon (area: 18 {\\ m cm}2 and thickness: 25 \\\\mu{\\ m m}) in an inexpensive and reliable way. On such platform, we fabricated and characterized the devices showing mechanical robustness (minimum bending radius of 10 mm at an applied strain of 83.33% and nominal strain of 0.125%) and consistent electrical behavior regardless of the applied mechanical stress. Furthermore, and for the first time, we performed a reliability study suggesting no significant difference in performance and showing an improvement in lifetime projections. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  13. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    Visser, C.W.; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified

  14. Fabrication of friction-reducing texture surface by selective laser melting of ink-printed (SLM-IP) copper (Cu) nanoparticles(NPs)

    Wang, Xinjian; Liu, Junyan; Wang, Yang; Fu, Yanan

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a process of selective laser melting of ink-printed (SLM-IP) copper (Cu) nanoparticles(NPs) for the fabrication of full dense Cu friction-reducing texture on the metallic surface in ambient condition. This technique synthesizes pure Cu by chemical reduction route using an organic solvent during laser melting in the atmosphere environment, and provides a flexible additive manufacture approach to form complex friction-reduction texture on the metallic surface. Microtextures of ring and disc arrays have been fabricated on the stainless steel surface by SLM-IP Cu NPs. The friction coefficient has been measured under the lubricating condition of the oil. Disc texture surface (DTS) has a relatively low friction coefficient compared with ring texture surface (RTS), Cu film surface (Cu-FS) and the untreated substrate. The study suggests a further research on SLM-IP approach for complex microstructure or texture manufacturing, possibly realizing its advantage of flexibility.

  15. Characteristics of via-hole interconnections fabricated by using an inkjet printing method

    Yang, Yong Suk; You, In Kyu; Koo, Jae Bon; Lee, Sang Seok; Lim, Sang Chul; Kang, Seong Youl; Noh, Yong Young

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a familiar technique that creates and releases droplets of fluid on demand and precisely deposits those droplets on a substrate. It has received increased attention for its novelty and ability to produce patterned and template material structures. In the application of electronic interconnection fabrication, drop-on-demand inkjet printers especially offer the advantages of contactless printing and eliminat the use of a die or photomask. In this study, we created a via-hole interconnecting structure through a polymer insulator layer by using an inkjet printing. When the droplets of Ag ink were dropped onto a PMMA/Au/Cr/SiO 2 /Si area and the Ag film was annealed at high temperatures, the Ag ink containing solvents penetrated into the PMMA layer and generated the conducting paths between the top Ag and the bottom Au electrodes by partial dissolution and swelling of the polymer. The surface and the cross-sectional topologies of the formed via-holes were investigated by using an optical microscope and a field emission transmission electron microscope.

  16. Particle image velocimetry measurements in an anatomical vascular model fabricated using inkjet 3D printing

    Aycock, Kenneth I.; Hariharan, Prasanna; Craven, Brent A.

    2017-11-01

    For decades, the study of biomedical fluid dynamics using optical flow visualization and measurement techniques has been limited by the inability to fabricate transparent physical models that realistically replicate the complex morphology of biological lumens. In this study, we present an approach for producing optically transparent anatomical models that are suitable for particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a common 3D inkjet printing process (PolyJet) and stock resin (VeroClear). By matching the index of refraction of the VeroClear material using a room-temperature mixture of water, sodium iodide, and glycerol, and by printing the part in an orientation such that the flat, optical surfaces are at an approximately 45° angle to the build plane, we overcome the challenges associated with using this 3D printing technique for PIV. Here, we summarize our methodology and demonstrate the process and the resultant PIV measurements of flow in an optically transparent anatomical model of the human inferior vena cava.

  17. Digitaliseret 3D-print i metal åbner ny verden for industrien

    Lassen, Lisbeth

    2018-01-01

    Indenfor dansk produktionsindustri er 3D-print i metal stadig et nyt og relativt uprøvet område, hvor man i høj grad mangler digitale redskaber til at håndtere produktionen.......Indenfor dansk produktionsindustri er 3D-print i metal stadig et nyt og relativt uprøvet område, hvor man i høj grad mangler digitale redskaber til at håndtere produktionen....

  18. Screen-printed electrodes made of a bismuth nanoparticle porous carbon nanocomposite applied to the determination of heavy metal ions

    Niu, Pengfei; Gich, Martí; Roig, Anna; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Navarro- Hernández, Carla; Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the simplified fabrication and on the characterization of bismuth-based screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for use in heavy metal detection. A nanocomposite consisting of bismuth nanoparticles and amorphous carbon was synthesized by a combined one-step sol-gel and pyrolysis process and milled down to a specific particle size distribution as required for the preparation of an ink formulation to be used in screen printing. The resulting electrochemical devices were applied to the detection of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions in water samples. The porous structure of carbon and the high surface area of the bismuth nanoparticles allow for the detection of Pb(II) and Cd(II) at concentration levels below 4 ppb. The application of the SPEs was demonstrated by quantifying these ions in tap drinking water and wastewater collected from an influent of an urban wastewater treatment plant. (author)

  19. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-01-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants. (paper)

  20. Reproduction of Bela Krajina Ornaments on Linen Fabrics by Screen Printing

    Tatjana Rijavec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Decorated Bela Krajina (White Carniolan towels called “otirači” are historical textiles, which represent an important cultural heritage of the Slovenian nation. This article presents the research of the suitability of the screen printing technique for reproducing ornaments from Bela Krajina towels, originally made with a technique called “tkaničenje”. The basic characteristics of woven fabrics, the colours of ornaments from Bela Krajina towels and the linen fabric, suitable for kitchen textiles, were analysed. Two Bela Krajina motifs were chosen for the decoration, namely a diamond and an eight-arm star. A comparison of the the colour diff erences, DE*ab , of the replica ornaments and the ornaments on the original towels made in blue and red colours showed a good match even after washing. It was confi rmed that the screen printing technique is suitable for decorating linen textiles with the original Bela Krajina ornaments, wherein the ornaments retaining their aesthetic and message values.

  1. Simple and Versatile 3D Printed Microfluidics Using Fused Filament Fabrication.

    Alex J L Morgan

    Full Text Available The uptake of microfluidics by the wider scientific community has been limited by the fabrication barrier created by the skills and equipment required for the production of traditional microfluidic devices. Here we present simple 3D printed microfluidic devices using an inexpensive and readily accessible printer with commercially available printer materials. We demonstrate that previously reported limitations of transparency and fidelity have been overcome, whilst devices capable of operating at pressures in excess of 2000 kPa illustrate that leakage issues have also been resolved. The utility of the 3D printed microfluidic devices is illustrated by encapsulating dental pulp stem cells within alginate droplets; cell viability assays show the vast majority of cells remain live, and device transparency is sufficient for single cell imaging. The accessibility of these devices is further enhanced through fabrication of integrated ports and by the introduction of a Lego®-like modular system facilitating rapid prototyping whilst offering the potential for novices to build microfluidic systems from a database of microfluidic components.

  2. Simple and Versatile 3D Printed Microfluidics Using Fused Filament Fabrication.

    Morgan, Alex J L; Hidalgo San Jose, Lorena; Jamieson, William D; Wymant, Jennifer M; Song, Bing; Stephens, Phil; Barrow, David A; Castell, Oliver K

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of microfluidics by the wider scientific community has been limited by the fabrication barrier created by the skills and equipment required for the production of traditional microfluidic devices. Here we present simple 3D printed microfluidic devices using an inexpensive and readily accessible printer with commercially available printer materials. We demonstrate that previously reported limitations of transparency and fidelity have been overcome, whilst devices capable of operating at pressures in excess of 2000 kPa illustrate that leakage issues have also been resolved. The utility of the 3D printed microfluidic devices is illustrated by encapsulating dental pulp stem cells within alginate droplets; cell viability assays show the vast majority of cells remain live, and device transparency is sufficient for single cell imaging. The accessibility of these devices is further enhanced through fabrication of integrated ports and by the introduction of a Lego®-like modular system facilitating rapid prototyping whilst offering the potential for novices to build microfluidic systems from a database of microfluidic components.

  3. Evaluation of Capacitive Markers Fabricated by 3D Printing, Laser Cutting and Prototyping

    Julian Kreimeier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With Tangible User Interfaces, the computer user is able to interact in a fundamentally different and more intuitive way than with usual 2D displays. By grasping real physical objects, information can also be conveyed haptically, i.e., the user not only sees information on a 2D display, but can also grasp physical representations. To recognize such objects (“tangibles” it is skillful to use capacitive sensing, as it happens in most touch screens. Thus, real objects can be located and identified by the touch screen display automatically. Recent work already addressed such capacitive markers, but focused on their coding scheme and automated fabrication by 3D printing. This paper goes beyond the fabrication by 3D printers and, for the first time, applies the concept of capacitive codes to laser cutting and another immediate prototyping approach using modeling clay. Beside the evaluation of additional properties, we adapt recent research results regarding the optimized detection of tangible objects on capacitive screens. As a result of our comprehensive study, the detection performance is affected by the type of capacitive signal processing (respectively the device and the geometry of the marker. 3D printing revealed to be the most reliable technique, though laser cutting and immediate prototyping of markers showed promising results. Based on our findings, we discuss individual strengths of each capacitive marker type.

  4. Three-Dimensional (3D Printing of Polymer-Metal Hybrid Materials by Fused Deposition Modeling

    Susanna Fafenrot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fused deposition modeling (FDM is a three-dimensional (3D printing technology that is usually performed with polymers that are molten in a printer nozzle and placed line by line on the printing bed or the previous layer, respectively. Nowadays, hybrid materials combining polymers with functional materials are also commercially available. Especially combinations of polymers with metal particles result in printed objects with interesting optical and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of objects printed with two of these metal-polymer blends were compared to common poly (lactide acid (PLA printed objects. Tensile tests and bending tests show that hybrid materials mostly containing bronze have significantly reduced mechanical properties. Tensile strengths of the 3D-printed objects were unexpectedly nearly identical with those of the original filaments, indicating sufficient quality of the printing process. Our investigations show that while FDM printing allows for producing objects with mechanical properties similar to the original materials, metal-polymer blends cannot be used for the rapid manufacturing of objects necessitating mechanical strength.

  5. Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing of Polymer-Metal Hybrid Materials by Fused Deposition Modeling.

    Fafenrot, Susanna; Grimmelsmann, Nils; Wortmann, Martin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-10-19

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a three-dimensional (3D) printing technology that is usually performed with polymers that are molten in a printer nozzle and placed line by line on the printing bed or the previous layer, respectively. Nowadays, hybrid materials combining polymers with functional materials are also commercially available. Especially combinations of polymers with metal particles result in printed objects with interesting optical and mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of objects printed with two of these metal-polymer blends were compared to common poly (lactide acid) (PLA) printed objects. Tensile tests and bending tests show that hybrid materials mostly containing bronze have significantly reduced mechanical properties. Tensile strengths of the 3D-printed objects were unexpectedly nearly identical with those of the original filaments, indicating sufficient quality of the printing process. Our investigations show that while FDM printing allows for producing objects with mechanical properties similar to the original materials, metal-polymer blends cannot be used for the rapid manufacturing of objects necessitating mechanical strength.

  6. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Active Skin Antenna with 3D Printing Array Framework

    Jinzhu Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An active skin antenna with structural load-bearing and electromagnetic functions is usually installed in the structural surface of mobile vehicles such as aircrafts, warships, and high-speed train. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a novel active skin antenna which consists of an encapsulation shell, antenna skin, and RF and beam control circuits. The antenna skin which consists of the facesheet, honeycomb, array framework, and microstrip antenna elements was designed by using Bayesian optimization, in order to improve the design efficiency. An active skin antenna prototype with 32 microstrip antenna elements was fabricated by using a hybrid manufacturing method. In this method, 3D printing technology was applied to fabricate the array framework, and the different layers were bonded to form the final antenna skin by using traditional composite process. Some experimental testing was conducted, and the testing results validate the feasibility the proposed antenna skin structure. The proposed design and fabrication technique is suitable for the development of conformal load-bearing antenna or smart skin antenna installed in the structural surface of aircraft, warships, and armored vehicles.

  7. Fabrication of metallic channel-containing UO2 fuels

    Yang, Jae Ho; Song, Kun Woo; Kim, Keon Sik; Jung, Youn Ho

    2004-01-01

    The uranium dioxide is widely used as a fuel material in the nuclear industry, owing to many advantages. But it has a disadvantage of having the lowest thermal conductivity of all kinds of nuclear fuels; metal, carbide, nitride. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel is enhanced by making, so called, the CERMET (ceramic-metal) composite which consists of both continuous body of highly thermal-conducting metal and UO 2 islands. The CERMET fuel fabrication technique needs metal phase of at least 30%, mostly more than 50%, of the volume of the pellet in order to keep the metal phase interconnected. This high volume fraction of metal requires such a high enrichment of U that the parasitic effect of metal should be compensated. Therefore, it is attractive to develop an innovative composite fuel that can form continuous metal phase with a small amount of metal. In this investigation, a feasibility study was made on how to make such an innovative fuel. Candidate metals (W, Mo, Cr) were selected, and fabrication process was conceptually designed from thermodynamic calculations. We have experimentally found that a metal phase envelops perfectly UO 2 grains, forming continuous channel throughout the pellet, and improving the thermal conductivity of pellet

  8. Fabrication of bimetallic microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors on paper by screen printing.

    Qu, Lu-Lu; Song, Qi-Xia; Li, Yuan-Ting; Peng, Mao-Pan; Li, Da-Wei; Chen, Li-Xia; Fossey, John S; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-08-20

    Au-Ag bimetallic microfluidic, dumbbell-shaped, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors were fabricated on cellulose paper by screen printing. These printed sensors rely on a sample droplet injection zone, and a SERS detection zone at either end of the dumbbell motif, fabricated by printing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) successively with microscale precision. The microfluidic channel was patterned using an insulating ink to connect these two zones and form a hydrophobic circuit. Owing to capillary action of paper in the millimeter-sized channels, the sensor could enable self-filtering of fluids to remove suspended particles within wastewater without pumping. This sensor also allows sensitive SERS detection, due to advantageous combination of the strong surface enhancement of Ag NPs and excellent chemical stability of Au NPs. The SERS performance of the sensors was investigated by employing the probe rhodamine 6G, a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1×10(-13)M and an enhancement factor of 8.6×10(6) could be achieved. Moreover, the dumbbell-shaped bimetallic sensors exhibited good stability with SERS performance being maintained over 14 weeks in air, and high reproducibility with less than 15% variation in spot-to-spot SERS intensity. Using these dumbbell-shaped bimetallic sensors, substituted aromatic pollutants in wastewater samples could be quantitatively analyzed, which demonstrated their excellent capability for rapid trace pollutant detection in wastewater samples in the field without pre-separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucose biosensor based on disposable electrochemical paper-based transducers fully fabricated by screen-printing.

    Lamas-Ardisana, P J; Martínez-Paredes, G; Añorga, L; Grande, H J

    2018-06-30

    This paper describes a new approach for the massive production of electrochemical paper-based analytical devices (ePADs). These devices are fully fabricated by screen-printing technology and consist of a lineal microfluidic channel delimited by hydrophobic walls (patterned with diluted ultraviolet screen-printing ink in chromatographic paper grade 4) and a three-electrode system (printed with carbon and/or Ag/AgCl conductive inks). The printing process was characterised and optimized for pattern each layer with only one squeeze sweep. These ePADs were used as transducers to develop a glucose biosensor. Ionic strength/pH buffering salts, electrochemical mediator (ferricyanide) and enzyme (glucose dehydrogenase FAD-dependent) were separately stored along the microfluidic channel in order to be successively dissolved and mixed after the sample dropping at the entrance. The analyses required only 10 µl and the biosensors showed good reproducibility (RSD = 6.2%, n = 10) and sensitivity (0.426 C/M cm 2 ), wide linear range (0.5-50 mM; r 2 = 0.999) and low limit of detection (0.33 mM). Furthermore, the new biosensor was applied for glucose determination in five commercial soft-drinks without any sample treatment before the analysis. These samples were also analysed with a commercial enzymatic-kit assay. The results indicated that both methods provide accurate results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  11. 3D metal droplet printing development and advanced materials additive manufacturing

    Lawrence E. Murr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While commercial additive manufacturing processes involving direct metal wire or powder deposition along with powder bed fusion technologies using laser and electron beam melting have proliferated over the past decade, inkjet printing using molten metal droplets for direct, 3D printing has been elusive. In this paper we review the more than three decades of development of metal droplet generation for precision additive manufacturing applications utilizing advanced, high-temperature metals and alloys. Issues concerning process optimization, including product structure and properties affected by oxidation are discussed and some comparisons of related additive manufactured microstructures are presented.

  12. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process

    Senda, Yasuhide; Mori, Yukihide

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the plant concept of metal fuel fabrication system (38tHM/y) using casting process in electrolytic recycle, which based on recent studies of its equipment design and quality control system. And we estimate the cost of its construction and operation, including costs of maintenance, consumed hardware and management of waste. The content of this work is as follows. (1) Designing of fuel fabrication equipment: We make material flow diagrams of the fuel fabrication plant and rough designs of the injection casting furnace, demolder and inspection equipment. (2) Designing of resolution system of liquid waste, which comes from analytical process facility. Increased analytical items, we rearrange analytical process facility, estimate its chemicals and amount of waste. (3) Arrangement of equipments: We made a arrangement diagram of the metal fuel fabrication equipments in cells. (4) Estimation of cost data: We estimated cost to construct the facility and to operate it. (author)

  13. Natural uranium metallic fuel elements: fabrication and operating experience

    Hammad, F.H.; Abou-Zahra, A.A.; Sharkawy, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The main reactor types based on natural uranium metallic fuel element, particularly the early types, are reviewed in this report. The reactor types are: graphite moderated air cooled, graphite moderated gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactors. The design features, fabrication technology of these reactor fuel elements and the operating experience gained during reactor operation are described and discussed. The interrelation between operating experience, fuel design and fabrication was also discussed with emphasis on improving fuel performance. (author)

  14. Fabrication of In(0.75)Zn(1.5)Sn(1.0) (IZTO) Thin-Film Transistors Using Solution-Processable Materials and PZT Inkjet-Printing.

    Lee, Tai-Kuang; Liuand, Chao-Te; Lee, Wen-Hsi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Thin Film Transistors (TFTs) have been studied widely because of potential applications in low cost, low-temperature process and flexible displays. They can be fabricated by easy processes based on solution methods. But the mobility of organic TFTs is lower and the threshold voltage is higher than amorphous Si TFTs. In order to enhance the channel mobility and satisfy with the requirement of low-cost fabrication, we prepare a low-cost, mask-free, reduced material wastage, deposited technology using transparent, directly printable, air-stable semiconductor slurries and dielectric solutions. In our investigations, we attempt to obtain a high performance and low-cost TFT via preparing materials, designing device structure, and using PZT inkjet-printing technology. A stable and non-precipitated metal oxide ink with appropriate doping was prepared for the fabrication of an InxZn1.5Sn1.0 (IZTO) by PZT inkjet-printing. The soluble direct-printing process is a powerful tool for material research and implies that the printable materials and the printing technology enable the use of all-printed low-cost flexible displays and other transparent electronic applications. Transparent materials including dielectric PVP, conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) and active IZTO were employed into the fabrication of our PZT inkjet-printing process. After annealed at 180 °C, The experimental all-printed TFT exhibit the carrier mobility of 0.194 cm2/Vs, sub-threshold slope of 20 V/decade, and the threshold voltage of 5 V, initially. All-inkjet-printed films have great transparency, potentially in transparent electronics and the transmittance pattern in visible part of the spectrum (400–700 nm) is over 80%.

  15. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  16. Fabricating high-resolution offset color-filter black matrix by integrating heterostructured substrate with inkjet printing

    Lu, Guo-Shin; You, Po-Chin; Lin, Kai-Lun; Hong, Chien-Chong; Liou, Tong-Miin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a self-aligning ink by integrating an inkjet printing technique and heterostructures to fabricate a black matrix with a micrometer-scale tunable thickness. The black matrix is a grid-like structure used in color filters. Traditionally, a black matrix has been fabricated using photolithography techniques, the disadvantages of which are high material consumption, less fabrication flexibility, complex processing procedures, and high chemical pollution. Inkjet printing technology has garnered attention because of its low material costs, high fabrication flexibility, and reduced processing procedures and pollution. In this study, a fabricating process combining an inkjet printing technique with heterostructures to form stripe-arranged and delta-arranged thickness-tunable black matrices has been demonstrated. The deformation and self-aligning process of ink droplet impingement onto gutters are driven by designed heterogeneous surface properties. The minimum track width attained is 10 µm, which is competitive for color filter resolutions for thin-film transistor liquid crystal displays. The developed technology surmounts the bottlenecks of inkjet printing resolution, and saves more than 75% black material than modern photolithography. (paper)

  17. Fabrication of dielectrophoretic microfluidic chips using a facile screen-printing technique for microparticle trapping

    Wee, Wei Hong; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Li, Zedong; Hu, Jie; Xu, Feng; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles finds wide applications in numerous fields. Microfluidic chips based on a dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique hold several advantages for trapping microparticles, such as fast result processing, a small amount of sample required, high spatial resolution, and high accuracy of target selection. There is an unmet need to develop DEP microfluidic chips on different substrates for different applications in a low cost, facile, and rapid way. This study develops a new facile method based on a screen-printing technique for fabrication of electrodes of DEP chips on three types of substrates (i.e. polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), poly(ethylene terephthalate) and A4 paper). The fabricated PMMA-based DEP microfluidic chip was selected as an example and successfully used to trap and align polystyrene microparticles in a suspension and cardiac fibroblasts in a cell culture solution. The developed electrode fabrication method is compatible with different kinds of DEP substrates, which could expand the future application field of DEP microfluidic chips, including new forms of point-of care diagnostics and trapping circulating tumor cells. (paper)

  18. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth. PMID:26202477

  19. Preparation of 3D Printed Divertor Mock-up Design and Fabrication

    Lee, Dong Won; Park, Sung Dae; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Suk Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The divertor for fusion reactor is known to be able to remove the extreme heat flux up to 10 MW/m2 and the various type of divertors have been developed for enhancing the heat transfer such as hypervapotron, twisted tape insertion, screwed tube, and so on. In order to overcome this limitation, 3D printing method is considered to be used in the fusion reactor divertor design in present study. With the advantages of the 3D printing, the various shapes of the inner divertor cooling tube are investigated to enhance the turbulence of coolant and to reduce the pressure drop. The metallic powder of the fusion reactor candidate material is produced as the preliminary step for using in 3D printer. The material is a reduced activation ferritic-matensitic steel named as ARAA (Advanced Reduced Activation Alloy) which have been independently developed in Korea. Gas atomization method was used to make the spherical particles with average diameter of 100 μm. Several candidates were presented to achieve the excellent heat removal capacity and the low pressure drop. Thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to confirm the effects of the inner cooling tube geometry with a conventional CFD code, ANSYS-CFX v14.5. The modified screw type called as a rail type twisted tube was presented through the optimization process. This complicated tube could be made by 3D printing technology. (metallic powder). Thermal-hydraulic analysis was conducted to compare the 3 type geometric divertor. A rail type twisted tube has good heat transfer performance in comparison with a conventional twisted tube. The pressure drop of a rail type twisted tube was reduced about 36% compared with a conventional twisted tube.

  20. Preparation of 3D Printed Divertor Mock-up Design and Fabrication

    Lee, Dong Won; Park, Sung Dae; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Suk Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak

    2016-01-01

    The divertor for fusion reactor is known to be able to remove the extreme heat flux up to 10 MW/m2 and the various type of divertors have been developed for enhancing the heat transfer such as hypervapotron, twisted tape insertion, screwed tube, and so on. In order to overcome this limitation, 3D printing method is considered to be used in the fusion reactor divertor design in present study. With the advantages of the 3D printing, the various shapes of the inner divertor cooling tube are investigated to enhance the turbulence of coolant and to reduce the pressure drop. The metallic powder of the fusion reactor candidate material is produced as the preliminary step for using in 3D printer. The material is a reduced activation ferritic-matensitic steel named as ARAA (Advanced Reduced Activation Alloy) which have been independently developed in Korea. Gas atomization method was used to make the spherical particles with average diameter of 100 μm. Several candidates were presented to achieve the excellent heat removal capacity and the low pressure drop. Thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to confirm the effects of the inner cooling tube geometry with a conventional CFD code, ANSYS-CFX v14.5. The modified screw type called as a rail type twisted tube was presented through the optimization process. This complicated tube could be made by 3D printing technology. (metallic powder). Thermal-hydraulic analysis was conducted to compare the 3 type geometric divertor. A rail type twisted tube has good heat transfer performance in comparison with a conventional twisted tube. The pressure drop of a rail type twisted tube was reduced about 36% compared with a conventional twisted tube

  1. Wear Resistance of 3D Printing Resin Material Opposing Zirconia and Metal Antagonists

    Ji-Man Park

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing offers many advantages in dental prosthesis manufacturing. This study evaluated the wear resistance of 3D printing resin material compared with milling and conventional resin materials. Sixty substrate specimens were prepared with three types of resin materials: 3D printed resin, milled resin, and self-cured resin. The 3D printed specimens were printed at a build angle of 0° and 100 μm layer thickness by digital light processing 3D printing. Two kinds of abraders were made of zirconia and CoCr alloy. The specimens were loaded at 5 kg for 30,000 chewing cycles with vertical and horizontal movements under thermocycling condition. The 3D printed resin did not show significant difference in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear compared to the milled and the self-cured resins. No significant difference was revealed depending on the abraders in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear. In SEM views, the 3D printed resin showed cracks and separation of inter-layer bonds when opposing the metal abrader. The results suggest that the 3D printing using resin materials provides adequate wear resistance for dental use.

  2. Wear Resistance of 3D Printing Resin Material Opposing Zirconia and Metal Antagonists.

    Park, Ji-Man; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Joo-Hee

    2018-06-20

    3D printing offers many advantages in dental prosthesis manufacturing. This study evaluated the wear resistance of 3D printing resin material compared with milling and conventional resin materials. Sixty substrate specimens were prepared with three types of resin materials: 3D printed resin, milled resin, and self-cured resin. The 3D printed specimens were printed at a build angle of 0° and 100 μm layer thickness by digital light processing 3D printing. Two kinds of abraders were made of zirconia and CoCr alloy. The specimens were loaded at 5 kg for 30,000 chewing cycles with vertical and horizontal movements under thermocycling condition. The 3D printed resin did not show significant difference in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear compared to the milled and the self-cured resins. No significant difference was revealed depending on the abraders in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear. In SEM views, the 3D printed resin showed cracks and separation of inter-layer bonds when opposing the metal abrader. The results suggest that the 3D printing using resin materials provides adequate wear resistance for dental use.

  3. 3D printing scanning electron microscopy sample holders: A quick and cost effective alternative for custom holder fabrication.

    Gabriel N Meloni

    Full Text Available A simple and cost effective alternative for fabricating custom Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM sample holders using 3D printers and conductive polylactic acid filament is presented. The flexibility of the 3D printing process allowed for the fabrication of sample holders with specific features that enable the high-resolution imaging of nanoelectrodes and nanopipettes. The precise value of the inner semi cone angle of the nanopipettes taper was extracted from the acquired images and used for calculating their radius using electrochemical methods. Because of the low electrical resistivity presented by the 3D printed holder, the imaging of non-conductive nanomaterials, such as alumina powder, was found to be possible. The fabrication time for each sample holder was under 30 minutes and the average cost was less than $0.50 per piece. Despite being quick and economical to fabricate, the sample holders were found to be sufficiently resistant, allowing for multiple uses of the same holder.

  4. Fabrication of a Textile-Based Wearable Blood Leakage Sensor Using Screen-Offset Printing

    Ken-ichi Nomura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate a wearable blood leakage sensor on a cotton textile by combining two newly developed techniques. First, we employ a screen-offset printing technique that avoids blurring, short circuiting between adjacent conductive patterns, and electrode fracturing to form an interdigitated electrode structure for the sensor on a textile. Furthermore, we develop a scheme to distinguish blood from other substances by utilizing the specific dielectric dispersion of blood observed in the sub-megahertz frequency range. The sensor can detect blood volumes as low as 15 μL, which is significantly lower than those of commercially available products (which can detect approximately 1 mL of blood and comparable to a recently reported value of approximately 10 μL. In this study, we merge two technologies to develop a more practical skin-friendly sensor that can be applied for safe, stress-free blood leakage monitoring during hemodialysis.

  5. Field analysis and enhancement of multi-pole magnetic components fabricated on printed circuit board

    Chiu, K.-C.; Chen, C.-S.

    2007-01-01

    A multi-pole magnetic component magnetized with a fine magnetic pole pitch of less than 1 mm is very difficult to achieve by using traditional methods. Moreover, it requires a precise mechanical process and a complicated magnetization system. Different fine magnetic pole pitches of 300, 350 and 400 μm have been accomplished on 9-pole magnetic components through the printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing technology. Additionally, another fine magnetic pole pitch of 500 μm was also fabricated on a dual-layered (DL) wire circuit structure to investigate the field enhancement. After measurements, a gain factor of 1.37 was obtained in the field strength. The field variations among different magnetic pole pitches were analyzed in this paper

  6. Application of Characterization, Modeling, and Analytics Towards Understanding Process Structure Linkages in Metallic 3D Printing (Postprint)

    2017-08-01

    METALLIC 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) M.A. Groeber, E. Schwalbach, S. Donegan, K. Chaput, T. Butler, and J. Miller AFRL/RX 27 JULY...MODELING, AND ANALYTICS TOWARDS UNDERSTANDING PROCESS- STRUCTURE LINKAGES IN METALLIC 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b...characterization, modelling, and analytics towards understanding process-structure linkages in metallic 3D printing M A Groeber, E Schwalbach, S Donegan, K

  7. [Fabrication and accuracy research on 3D printing dental model based on cone beam computed tomography digital modeling].

    Zhang, Hui-Rong; Yin, Le-Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yan, Li-Yi; Wang, Ning; Liu, Gang; An, Xiao-Li; Liu, Bin

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to build a digital dental model with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), to fabricate a virtual model via 3D printing, and to determine the accuracy of 3D printing dental model by comparing the result with a traditional dental cast. CBCT of orthodontic patients was obtained to build a digital dental model by using Mimics 10.01 and Geomagic studio software. The 3D virtual models were fabricated via fused deposition modeling technique (FDM). The 3D virtual models were compared with the traditional cast models by using a Vernier caliper. The measurements used for comparison included the width of each tooth, the length and width of the maxillary and mandibular arches, and the length of the posterior dental crest. 3D printing models had higher accuracy compared with the traditional cast models. The results of the paired t-test of all data showed that no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). Dental digital models built with CBCT realize the digital storage of patients' dental condition. The virtual dental model fabricated via 3D printing avoids traditional impression and simplifies the clinical examination process. The 3D printing dental models produced via FDM show a high degree of accuracy. Thus, these models are appropriate for clinical practice.

  8. Fabrication and optimisation of a fused filament 3D-printed microfluidic platform

    Tothill, A M; Partridge, M; James, S W; Tatam, R P

    2017-01-01

    A 3D-printed microfluidic device was designed and manufactured using a low cost ($2000) consumer grade fusion deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printer. FDM printers are not typically used, or are capable, of producing the fine detailed structures required for microfluidic fabrication. However, in this work, the optical transparency of the device was improved through manufacture optimisation to such a point that optical colorimetric assays can be performed in a 50 µ l device. A colorimetric enzymatic cascade assay was optimised using glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase for the oxidative coupling of aminoantipyrine and chromotropic acid to produce a blue quinoneimine dye with a broad absorbance peaking at 590 nm for the quantification of glucose in solution. For comparison the assay was run in standard 96 well plates with a commercial plate reader. The results show the accurate and reproducible quantification of 0–10 mM glucose solution using a 3D-printed microfluidic optical device with performance comparable to that of a plate reader assay. (paper)

  9. Triple-Layer Vascular Grafts Fabricated by Combined E-Jet 3D Printing and Electrospinning.

    Huang, Ruiying; Gao, Xiangkai; Wang, Jian; Chen, Haoxiang; Tong, Chunyi; Tan, Yongjun; Tan, Zhikai

    2018-05-29

    Small-diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts are urgently needed for clinic arterial substitute. To simulate the structures and functions of natural blood vessels, we designed a novel triple-layer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous vascular graft by combining E-jet 3D printing and electrospinning techniques. The resultant vascular graft consisted of an interior layer comprising 3D-printed highly aligned strong fibers, a middle layer made by electrospun densely fibers, and an exterior structure composed of mixed fibers fabricated by co-electrospraying. The biocompatible triple-layer graft was used for in vivo implantation, and results demonstrated that the longitudinally-aligned fibers within the lumen of the graft could enhance the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, while maintained good mechanical properties. The exterior layer provided a pathway that encouraged cells to migrate into the scaffold after implantation. This experimental graft overcame the limitations of conventionally electrospun vascular grafts of inadequate porosity and lowly cell penetration. The unique structure of the triple-layer vascular graft promoted cell growth and infiltration in vivo, thus provided an encouraging substitute for in situ tissue engineering.

  10. Overlay of semi-dried functional layers in offset printing for rapid and high-precision fabrication of flexible TFTs

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi; Koutake, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    We achieved a reduction in the misregistration of overlying patterns printed on a flexible plastic film and a drastically shorter processing time with fully printed thin-film transistor (TFT) fabrication. This was achieved using a newly developed wet-on-wet (WoW) printing process wherein a subsequent layer can be printed on a previous semi-dried (not-sintered) layer. In the WoW process, as examined by rheological measurements, a semi-dried (highly solidified) state of ink was attained before transferring by utilizing the solvent uptake of a PDMS blanket in offset printing to ensure the structural integrity of the ink layer, and to reduce the inter-contamination of adjoining layers. Loss-on-drying tests and resistivity measurements indicated that molecular penetration at the boundary of adjoining layers with a length of c.a. 70 nm occurred in the WoW process; however, with thicker electrodes, we successfully fabricated a WoW-processed TFT whose performance was comparable with a TFT formed by a conventional printing process. (paper)

  11. Overlay of semi-dried functional layers in offset printing for rapid and high-precision fabrication of flexible TFTs

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi; Koutake, Masayoshi; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2014-03-01

    We achieved a reduction in the misregistration of overlying patterns printed on a flexible plastic film and a drastically shorter processing time with fully printed thin-film transistor (TFT) fabrication. This was achieved using a newly developed wet-on-wet (WoW) printing process wherein a subsequent layer can be printed on a previous semi-dried (not-sintered) layer. In the WoW process, as examined by rheological measurements, a semi-dried (highly solidified) state of ink was attained before transferring by utilizing the solvent uptake of a PDMS blanket in offset printing to ensure the structural integrity of the ink layer, and to reduce the inter-contamination of adjoining layers. Loss-on-drying tests and resistivity measurements indicated that molecular penetration at the boundary of adjoining layers with a length of c.a. 70 nm occurred in the WoW process; however, with thicker electrodes, we successfully fabricated a WoW-processed TFT whose performance was comparable with a TFT formed by a conventional printing process.

  12. Fabricating High-Quality 3D-Printed Alloys for Dental Applications

    Min-Ho Hong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metal additive manufacturing (AM, especially selective laser melting (SLM, has been receiving particular attention because metallic functional structures with complicated configurations can be effectively fabricated using the technique. However, there still exist some future challenges for the fabrication of high-quality SLM products for dental applications. First, the surface quality of SLM products should be further improved by standardizing the laser process parameters or by appropriately post-treating the surface. Second, it should be guaranteed that dental SLM restorations have good dimensional accuracy and, in particular, a good marginal fit. Third, a definitive standard regarding building and scanning strategies, which affect the anisotropy, should be established to optimize the mechanical properties and fatigue resistance of SLM dental structures. Fourth, the SLM substructure’s bonding and support to veneering ceramic should be further studied to facilitate the use of esthetic dental restorations. Finally, the biocompatibility of SLM dental alloys should be carefully examined and improved to minimize the potential release of toxic metal ions from the alloys. Future research of SLM should focus on solving the above challenges, as well as on fabricating dental structures with “controlled” porosity.

  13. Fabrication and Microstructure of Metal-Metal Syntactic Foams

    Nadler, J

    1998-01-01

    .... The composite microstructure consists of thin-wall, hollow Fe-Cr stainless steel spheres cast in various metal matrices including aluminum alloys 6061, 7075, 413, magnesium alloy AZ31B, and unalloyed...

  14. Energy efficiency improvement target for SIC 34 - fabricated metal products

    Byrer, T. G.; Billhardt, C. F.; Farkas, M. S.

    1977-03-15

    A March 15, 1977 revision of a February 15, 1977 document on the energy improvement target for the Fabricated Metal Products industry (SIC 34) is presented. A net energy savings in 1980 of 24% as compared with 1972 energy consumption in SIC 34 is considered a realistic goal. (ERA citation 04:045008)

  15. 3D printing for health & wealth: Fabrication of custom-made medical devices through additive manufacturing

    Colpani, Alessandro; Fiorentino, Antonio; Ceretti, Elisabetta

    2018-05-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) differs from traditional manufacturing technologies by its ability to handle complex shapes with great design flexibility. These features make the technique suitable to fabricate customized components, particularly answering specific custom needs. Although AM mainly referred to prototyping, nowadays the interest in direct manufacturing of actual parts is growing. This article shows the application of AM within the project 3DP-4H&W (3D Printing for Health & Wealth) which involves engineers and physicians for developing pediatric custom-made medical devices to enhance the fulfilling of the patients specific needs. In the project, two types of devices made of a two-component biocompatible silicone are considered. The first application (dental field) consists in a device for cleft lip and palate. The second one (audiological field) consists in an acoustic prosthesis. The geometries of the devices are based on the anatomy of the patient that is obtained through a 3D body scan process. For both devices, two different approaches were planned, namely direct AM and indirect Rapid Tooling (RT). In particular, direct AM consists in the FDM processing of silicone, while RT consists in molds FDM fabrication followed by silicone casting. This paper presents the results of the RT method that is articulated in different phases: the acquisition of the geometry to be realized, the design of the molds taking into account the casting feasibility (as casting channel, vents, part extraction), the realization of molds produced through AM, molds surface chemical finishing, pouring and curing of the silicone. The fabricated devices were evaluated by the physicians team that confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed procedure in fabricating the desired devices. Moreover, the procedure can be used as a general method to extend the range of applications to any custom-made device for anatomic districts, especially where complex shapes are present (as tracheal or

  16. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.

  17. Determination of the resistance of fabric printed with triclosan microcapsules to the action of soil micro-flora

    Golja, B.; Forte Tavčer, P.

    2017-10-01

    Microcapsules with a pressure-sensitive melamine-formaldehyde wall and triclosan core were printed to 100% cotton fabric with screen printing technique. Previous research showed excellent antibacterial activity (estimated for E. Coli and S. Aureus) of such fabric, so our aim in this research was to determine its resistance to the action of microorganisms present in the soil. The soil burial test was conducted. The breaking strength of the buried samples was measured and also the scanning electron microscope analysis was done. The results showed that none of the samples are resistant to decay. It is evident from SEM micrographs that on all of the buried samples greater morphological changes occur due to the functions of the soil microflora. It can be concluded that the samples printed with triclosan microcapsules are biodegradable which is environmentally preferable.

  18. Fabricating Optical Fiber Imaging Sensors Using Inkjet Printing Technology: a pH Sensor Proof-of-Concept

    Carter, J C; Alvis, R M; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Wilson, T S; McBride, M T; Myrick, M L; Cox, W R; Grove, M E; Colston, B W

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using Drop-on-Demand microjet printing technology for fabricating imaging sensors by reproducibly printing an array of photopolymerizable sensing elements, containing a pH sensitive indicator, on the surface of an optical fiber image guide. The reproducibility of the microjet printing process is excellent for microdot (i.e. micron-sized polymer) sensor diameter (92.2 {+-} 2.2 microns), height (35.0 {+-} 1.0 microns), and roundness (0.00072 {+-} 0.00023). pH sensors were evaluated in terms of pH sensing ability ({le}2% sensor variation), response time, and hysteresis using a custom fluorescence imaging system. In addition, the microjet technique has distinct advantages over other fabrication methods, which are discussed in detail.

  19. Natural printed silk substrate circuit fabricated via surface modification using one step thermal transfer and reduction graphene oxide

    Cao, Jiliang; Huang, Zhan; Wang, Chaoxia

    2018-05-01

    Graphene conductive silk substrate is a preferred material because of its biocompatibility, flexibility and comfort. A flexible natural printed silk substrate circuit was fabricated by one step transfer of graphene oxide (GO) paste from transfer paper to the surface of silk fabric and reduction of the GO to reduced graphene oxide (RGO) using a simple hot press treatment. The GO paste was obtained through ultrasonic stirring exfoliation under low temperature, and presented excellent printing rheological properties at high concentration. The silk fabric was obtained a surface electric resistance as low as 12.15 KΩ cm-1, in the concentration of GO 50 g L-1 and hot press at 220 °C for 120 s. Though the whiteness and strength decreased with the increasing of hot press temperature and time slowly, the electric conductivity of RGO surface modification silk substrate improved obviously. The surface electric resistance of RGO/silk fabrics increased from 12.15 KΩ cm-1 to 18.05 KΩ cm-1, 28.54 KΩ cm-1 and 32.53 KΩ cm-1 after 10, 20 and 30 washing cycles, respectively. The results showed that the printed silk substrate circuit has excellent washability. This process requires no chemical reductant, and the reduction efficiency and reduction degree of GO is high. This time-effective and environmentally-friendly one step thermal transfer and reduction graphene oxide onto natural silk substrate method can be easily used to production of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based flexible printed circuit.

  20. Fabrication of thin yttria-stabilized-zirconia dense electrolyte layers by inkjet printing for high performing solid oxide fuel cells

    Esposito, Vincenzo; Gadea, Christophe; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present how a low-cost HP Deskjet 1000 inkjet printer was used to fabricate a 1.2 mm thin, dense and gas tight 16 cm2 solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) electrolyte. The electrolyte was printed using an ink made of highly diluted (

  1. Scanning probe lithography for fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays

    Jung, B.; Jo, W.; Gwon, M.J.; Lee, E.; Kim, D.-W.

    2010-01-01

    We report fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays by scanning probe microscopic indentation. A thin poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer was spin-coated on Si substrates with thickness of 70 nm. Nanometer-size pore arrays were formed by indenting the PMMA layer using a cantilever of a scanning probe microscope. Protuberances with irregular boundaries appeared during the indentation process. Control of approach and pulling-out speed during indentation was able to dispose of the protrusions. Ti metal films were deposited on the patterned PMMA layers by a radio-frequency sputtering method and subsequently lifted off to obtain metal nanodot arrays. The fabricated metal nanodot arrays have 200 nm of diameter and 500 nm of interdistance, which corresponds to a density of 4x10 8 /cm 2 . Scanning probe-based measurement of current-voltage (I-V) behaviors for a single Ti metal nanodot showed asymmetric characteristics. Applying external bias is likely to induce oxidation of Ti metal, since the conductance decreased and volume change of the dots was observed. I-V behaviors of Ti metal nanodots by conventional e-beam lithography were also characterized for comparison.

  2. Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with "Green" Metals for Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Toxic Elements.

    Economou, Anastasios

    2018-03-29

    This work reviews the field of screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with "green" metals for electrochemical stripping analysis of toxic elements. Electrochemical stripping analysis has been established as a useful trace analysis technique offering many advantages compared to competing optical techniques. Although mercury has been the preferred electrode material for stripping analysis, the toxicity of mercury and the associated legal requirements in its use and disposal have prompted research towards the development of "green" metals as alternative electrode materials. When combined with the screen-printing technology, such environment-friendly metals can lead to disposable sensors for trace metal analysis with excellent operational characteristics. This review focuses on SPEs modified with Au, Bi, Sb, and Sn for stripping analysis of toxic elements. Different modification approaches (electroplating, bulk modification, use of metal precursors, microengineering techniques) are considered and representative applications are described. A developing related field, namely biosensing based on stripping analysis of metallic nanoprobe labels, is also briefly mentioned.

  3. Fabrication of non-dissolving analgesic suppositories using 3D printed moulds.

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Ruan, Xucong; Li, Hairui; Kathuria, Himanshu; Du, Guang; Kang, Lifeng

    2016-11-20

    Conventional suppositories sometimes fail in exerting their therapeutic activity as the base materials melt inside body cavities. Also they are not suitable to provide long term treatment. Biomedical grade silicone elastomers may be used to fabricate non-dissolvable suppositories to overcome these disadvantages. We kneaded 4 analgesics into the 2 kinds of silicone polymers at 1%, 5% and 10% drug loading, respectively, to test their mechanical properties and drug release profiles. The optimized drug-polymer combinations were used to fabricate suppositories, and three dimensional printing (3DP) was used to create the suppository moulds. Subsequently, the drug release profiles and biocompatibility of the suppositories were studied. It was found that, the mechanical properties of the drug laden silicone elastomers and the rate of drug release from the elastomers can be tuned by varying drug-polymer combinations. The silicone elastomers containing 1% (w/w) and 5% (w/w) diclofenac sodium were the optimal formulations with prolonged drug release and biocompatibility at cellular level. These properties, together with complex geometries offered by 3DP technique, potentially made the non-dissolving suppositories promising therapeutic agents for personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Printing and Curing of Conductive Ink Track on Fabric using Syringe Deposition System with DLP Projector and Hot Plate

    Khirotdin Rd. Khairilhijra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Printing is a technique to transfer ink onto substrates to create pattern and syringe deposition system has shown some great potential in printing due to its ability to produce filamentary bead tracks which is important concerning conductivity and easily adopted on conformal surfaces which could not be realized by conventional technique. Fabrics with integrated electrical features able to create intelligent articles and may potentially open up new perspective areas of application in textile printing. However, the applicability of this technique on fabrics remains unknown which the ink used has to meet certain requirements including high electrical conductivity, resistance to oxidation, dry out without clogging, good adhesion with suitable viscosity and surface tension. Thus, there is a need to do this study which is to determine the feasibility of syringe deposition system to print a conductive ink tracks using silver epoxy-based conductive ink on fabric substrate via lycra material. This study is also aim to investigate the feasibility of using DLP projector with hot plate as another source of heat to be used in curing the ink tracks on fabric. The effect of printing and curing parameters to the characteristics and conductivity of the ink track is investigated. Several mechanical and electrical tests were also administered to determine the cure, hardness, adhesion and resistance level of the ink tracks. The results obtained were as expected which higher printing speed and lower deposition height used, a narrower and thinner ink tracks were produced. Sample with 4 mm/s of printing speed and deposition height of 1 mm resulted in dimension closer to the targeted dimension. The longer curing time and higher temperature used, a lower resistance is produced. The lowest resistance achieved is 0.9 Ω cured at 150°C for 60 minutes. The conductivity of the ink track was affected by curing process and cross-sectional area of the ink track. It is proven

  5. Separation of the metallic and non-metallic fraction from printed circuit boards employing green technology

    Estrada-Ruiz, R.H., E-mail: rhestrada@itsaltillo.edu.mx; Flores-Campos, R., E-mail: rcampos@itsaltillo.edu.mx; Gámez-Altamirano, H.A., E-mail: hgamez@itsaltillo.edu.mx; Velarde-Sánchez, E.J., E-mail: ejvelarde@itsaltillo.edu.mx

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Small sizes of particles are required in order to separate the different fractions. • Inverse flotation process is an efficient green technology to separate fractions. • Superficial air velocity is the main variable in the inverse flotation process. • Inverse flotation is a green process because the pulṕs pH is 7.0 during the test. - Abstract: The generation of electrical and electronic waste is increasing day by day; recycling is attractive because of the metallic fraction containing these. Nevertheless, conventional techniques are highly polluting. The comminution of the printed circuit boards followed by an inverse flotation process is a clean technique that allows one to separate the metallic fraction from the non-metallic fraction. It was found that particle size and superficial air velocity are the main variables in the separation of the different fractions. In this way an efficient separation is achieved by avoiding the environmental contamination coupled with the possible utilization of the different fractions obtained.

  6. Fabrication of particulate metal fuel for fast burner reactors

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Lee, Sun Yong; Kim, Jong Hwan; Woo, Yoon Myung; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chan Bok

    2012-01-01

    U Zr metallic fuel for sodium cooled fast reactors is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, remote fabrication capability in a shielded hot cell should be prepared. Moreover, generation of long lived radioactive wastes and loss of volatile species should be minimized during the recycled fuel fabrication step. Therefore, innovative fuel concepts should be developed to address the fabrication challenges pertaining to TRU while maintaining good performances of metallic fuel. Particulate fuel concepts have already been proposed and tested at several experimental fast reactor systems and vipac ceramic fuel of RIAR, Russia is one of the examples. However, much less work has been reported for particulate metallic fuel development. Spherical uranium alloy particles with various diameters can be easily produced by the centrifugal atomization technique developed by KAERI. Using the atomized uranium and uranium zirconium alloy particles, we fabricated various kinds of powder pack, powder compacts and sintered pellets. The microstructures and properties of the powder pack and pellets are presented

  7. Dental implant customization using numerical optimization design and 3-dimensional printing fabrication of zirconia ceramic.

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lin, Yuan-Min

    2017-05-01

    This study proposes a new methodology for dental implant customization consisting of numerical geometric optimization and 3-dimensional printing fabrication of zirconia ceramic. In the numerical modeling, exogenous factors for implant shape include the thread pitch, thread depth, maximal diameter of implant neck, and body size. Endogenous factors are bone density, cortical bone thickness, and non-osseointegration. An integration procedure, including uniform design method, Kriging interpolation and genetic algorithm, is applied to optimize the geometry of dental implants. The threshold of minimal micromotion for optimization evaluation was 100 μm. The optimized model is imported to the 3-dimensional slurry printer to fabricate the zirconia green body (powder is bonded by polymer weakly) of the implant. The sintered implant is obtained using a 2-stage sintering process. Twelve models are constructed according to uniform design method and simulated the micromotion behavior using finite element modeling. The result of uniform design models yields a set of exogenous factors that can provide the minimal micromotion (30.61 μm), as a suitable model. Kriging interpolation and genetic algorithm modified the exogenous factor of the suitable model, resulting in 27.11 μm as an optimization model. Experimental results show that the 3-dimensional slurry printer successfully fabricated the green body of the optimization model, but the accuracy of sintered part still needs to be improved. In addition, the scanning electron microscopy morphology is a stabilized t-phase microstructure, and the average compressive strength of the sintered part is 632.1 MPa. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Metal matrix composite fabrication processes for high performance aerospace structures

    Ponzi, C.

    A survey is conducted of extant methods of metal matrix composite (MMC) production in order to serve as a basis for prospective MMC users' selection of a matrix/reinforcement combination, cost-effective primary fabrication methods, and secondary fabrication techniques for the achievement of desired performance levels. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of structural fittings, control-surface connecting rods, hypersonic aircraft air inlet ramps, helicopter swash plates, and turbine rotor disks. Methods for technical and cost analysis modeling useful in process optimization are noted.

  9. Fabrication of metallic fuel for fast breeder reactor

    Saify, M.T.; Jha, S.K.; Abdulla, K.K.; Kumar, Arbind; Mittal, R.K.; Prasad, R.S.; Mahule, N.; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium oxide fuelled PHWRs comprises of first stage of Indian nuclear power programme. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors fuelled by Pu (from PHWR's) form the second stage. A shorter reactor doubling time is essential in order to accelerate the nuclear power growth in India. Metallic fuels are known to provide shorter doubling times, necessitating to be used as driver fuel for fast breeder reactors. One of the fabrication routes for metallic fuels having random grain orientation, is injection casting technique. The technique finds its basis in an elementary physical concept - the possibility of supporting a liquid column within a tube, by the application of a pressure difference across the liquid interface inside and outside the tube. At AFD, BARC a facility has been set-up for injection casting of uranium rods in quartz tube moulds, demoulding of cast rods, end-shearing of rods and an automated inspection system for inspection of fuel rods with respect to mass, length, diameter and diameter variation along the length and internal and external porosities/voids. All the above facilities have been set-up in glove boxes and have successfully been used for fabrication of uranium bearing fuel rods. The facility has been designed for fabrication and inspection of Pu-bearing metallic fuels also, if required

  10. Fabrication of Arrays of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes by Shadow Evaporation

    Dickey, Michael D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Smythe, Elizabeth J.; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The

  11. Poster - 38: On the physical and dosimetric properties of 3D printed electron bolus fabricated using polylactic acid

    Sasaki, David; Jensen, Martin; Rickey, Daniel W; Dubey, Arbind; Harris, Chad; McCurdy, Boyd [CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: 3D printing technology could simplify and improve electron bolus fabrication. The purpose of this study was to characterize the density, dimensional accuracy, uniformity, and attenuation of PLA boluses fabricated with a low-cost 3D printer. Methods: Several solid square slabs were printed with specific requested dimensions and 100% infill using different fill patterns. These pieces were imaged using an x-ray flat panel imager in order to check for uniformity of the prints. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured downstream of the slabs in solid water using a parallel plate chamber and compared to measurements in water in order to characterize attenuation. The dimensions of the PLA slabs were measured using digital calipers. The slabs were also weighed to find their density. Results: The fill pattern used to create boluses can affect the attenuation of the bolus. Fill patterns should be chosen carefully and quality assurance should be done for each printed piece. PLA causes the electron PDD to shift towards shallower depths, compared to water, by 1.7 mm for each centimeter of PLA. Agreement with design dimensions was within 1 mm in the plane of the printer bed, and within 1/3 of a millimeter (roughly the thickness of a single layer), perpendicular to the printer bed. Average density was in the range 1.20 – 1.22. Conclusions: 3D printing shows great promise for use in fabricating electron bolus. This work indicates that printed PLA can be a suitable material provided the increased attenuation is properly accounted for.

  12. Fabricating a Shell-Core Delayed Release Tablet Using Dual FDM 3D Printing for Patient-Centred Therapy.

    Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Pereira, Beatriz C; Arafat, Basel; Cieszynska, Milena; Isreb, Abdullah; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2017-02-01

    Individualizing gastric-resistant tablets is associated with major challenges for clinical staff in hospitals and healthcare centres. This work aims to fabricate gastric-resistant 3D printed tablets using dual FDM 3D printing. The gastric-resistant tablets were engineered by employing a range of shell-core designs using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and methacrylic acid co-polymer for core and shell structures respectively. Filaments for both core and shell were compounded using a twin-screw hot-melt extruder (HME). CAD software was utilized to design a capsule-shaped core with a complementary shell of increasing thicknesses (0.17, 0.35, 0.52, 0.70 or 0.87 mm). The physical form of the drug and its integrity following an FDM 3D printing were assessed using x-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and HPLC. A shell thickness ≥0.52 mm was deemed necessary in order to achieve sufficient core protection in the acid medium. The technology proved viable for incorporating different drug candidates; theophylline, budesonide and diclofenac sodium. XRPD indicated the presence of theophylline crystals whilst budesonide and diclofenac sodium remained amorphous in the PVP matrix of the filaments and 3D printed tablets. Fabricated tablets demonstrated gastric resistant properties and a pH responsive drug release pattern in both phosphate and bicarbonate buffers. Despite its relatively limited resolution, FDM 3D printing proved to be a suitable platform for a single-process fabrication of delayed release tablets. This work reveals the potential of dual FDM 3D printing as a unique platform for personalising delayed release tablets to suit an individual patient's needs.

  13. Poster - 38: On the physical and dosimetric properties of 3D printed electron bolus fabricated using polylactic acid

    Sasaki, David; Jensen, Martin; Rickey, Daniel W; Dubey, Arbind; Harris, Chad; McCurdy, Boyd

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: 3D printing technology could simplify and improve electron bolus fabrication. The purpose of this study was to characterize the density, dimensional accuracy, uniformity, and attenuation of PLA boluses fabricated with a low-cost 3D printer. Methods: Several solid square slabs were printed with specific requested dimensions and 100% infill using different fill patterns. These pieces were imaged using an x-ray flat panel imager in order to check for uniformity of the prints. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured downstream of the slabs in solid water using a parallel plate chamber and compared to measurements in water in order to characterize attenuation. The dimensions of the PLA slabs were measured using digital calipers. The slabs were also weighed to find their density. Results: The fill pattern used to create boluses can affect the attenuation of the bolus. Fill patterns should be chosen carefully and quality assurance should be done for each printed piece. PLA causes the electron PDD to shift towards shallower depths, compared to water, by 1.7 mm for each centimeter of PLA. Agreement with design dimensions was within 1 mm in the plane of the printer bed, and within 1/3 of a millimeter (roughly the thickness of a single layer), perpendicular to the printer bed. Average density was in the range 1.20 – 1.22. Conclusions: 3D printing shows great promise for use in fabricating electron bolus. This work indicates that printed PLA can be a suitable material provided the increased attenuation is properly accounted for.

  14. Waste printing paper as analogous adsorbents for heavy metals in ...

    user

    heavy metals uptake from aqueous solutions but the recovery efficacy as economic and environmental ... system. 1 . Wastes containing metals are directly or indirectly discharge into the environment ... According to World health Organization. 5.

  15. High performance inkjet-printed metal oxide thin film transistors via addition of insulating polymer with proper molecular weight

    Sun, Dawei; Chen, Cihai; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Xiaomin; Chen, Huipeng; Guo, Tailiang

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of metal oxide thin film transistor (MOTFT) arrays using the inkjet printing process has caused tremendous interest for low-cost and large-area flexible electronic devices. However, the inkjet-printed MOTFT arrays usually exhibited a non-uniform geometry due to the coffee ring effect, which restricted their commercial application. Therefore, in this work, a strategy is reported to control the geometry and enhance device performance of inkjet-printed MOTFT arrays by the addition of an insulating polymer to the precursor solution prior to film deposition. Moreover, the impact of the polymer molecular weight (MW) on the geometry, chemical constitution, crystallization, and MOTFT properties of inkjet-printed metal oxide depositions was investigated. The results demonstrated that with an increase of MW of polystyrene (PS) from 2000 to 200 000, the coffee ring was gradually faded and the coffee ring effect was completely eliminated when MW reached 200 000, which is associated with the enhanced viscosity with the insulating polymer, providing a high resistance to the outward capillary flow, which facilitated the depinning of the contact line, leading to the elimination of the coffee ring. More importantly, the carrier mobility increased significantly from 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 up to 13.7 cm2 V-1 s-1 as PS MW increased from 2000 to 200 000, which was about 3 times that of the pristine In2O3 TFTs. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that PS doping of In2O3 films not only frustrated crystallization but also altered chemical constitution by enhancing the formation of the M-O structure, both of which facilitated the carrier transport. These results demonstrated that the simple polymer additive process provides a promising method that can efficiently control the geometry of MO arrays during inkjet printing and maximize the device performance of MOTFT arrays, which showed great potential for the application in next

  16. Fabrication and properties of gallium metallic photonic crystals

    Kozhevnikov, V.F.; Diwekar, M.; Kamaev, V.P.; Shi, J.; Vardeny, Z.V.

    2003-01-01

    Gallium metallic photonic crystals with 100% filling factor have been fabricated via infiltration of liquid gallium into opals of 300-nm silica spheres using a novel high pressure-high temperature technique. The electrical resistance of the Ga-opal crystals was measured at temperatures from 10 to 280 K. The data obtained show that Ga-opal crystals are metallic network with slightly smaller temperature coefficient of resistivity than that for bulk gallium. Optical reflectivity of bulk gallium, plain opal and several Ga-opal crystals were measured at photon energies from 0.3 to 6 eV. A pronounced photonic stop band in the visible spectral range was found in both the plain and Ga infiltrated opals. The reflectivity spectra also show increase in reflectivity below 0.6 eV; which we interpret as a significantly lower effective plasma frequency of the metallic mesh in the infiltrated opal compare to the plasma frequency in the pure metal

  17. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites for soft robotics

    Carrico, James D.; Leang, Kam K.

    2017-04-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are used to create three-dimensional structures with complex shapes and features from polymer and/or metal materials. For example, fused filament three-dimensional (3D) printing utilizes non-electroactive polymers, such as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA), to build structures and components in a layer-by-layer fashion for a wide variety of applications. Presented here is a summary of recent work on a fused filament 3D-printing technique to create 3D ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) structures for applications in soft robotics. The 3D printing technique overcomes some of the limitations of existing manufacturing processes for creating IPMCs, such as limited shapes and sizes and time-consuming manufacturing steps. In the process described, first a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) is extruded into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. Then, a custom-designed 3D printer is described that utilizes the precursor filament to manufacture custom-shaped structures. Finally, the 3D-printed samples are functionalized by hydrolyzing them in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by application of platinum electrodes. Presented are example 3D-printed single and multi-degree-of-freedom IPMC actuators and characterization results, as well as example soft-robotic devices to demonstrate the potential of this process.

  18. Evaluation of internal fit of interim crown fabricated with CAD/CAM milling and 3D printing system.

    Lee, Wan-Sun; Lee, Du-Hyeong; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2017-08-01

    This study is to evaluate the internal fit of the crown manufactured by CAD/CAM milling method and 3D printing method. The master model was fabricated with stainless steel by using CNC machine and the work model was created from the vinyl-polysiloxane impression. After scanning the working model, the design software is used to design the crown. The saved STL file is used on the CAD/CAM milling method and two types of 3D printing method to produce 10 interim crowns per group. Internal discrepancy measurement uses the silicon replica method and the measured data are analyzed with One-way ANOVA to verify the statistic significance. The discrepancy means (standard deviation) of the 3 groups are 171.6 (97.4) µm for the crown manufactured by the milling system and 149.1 (65.9) and 91.1 (36.4) µm, respectively, for the crowns manufactured with the two types of 3D printing system. There was a statistically significant difference and the 3D printing system group showed more outstanding value than the milling system group. The marginal and internal fit of the interim restoration has more outstanding 3D printing method than the CAD/CAM milling method. Therefore, the 3D printing method is considered as applicable for not only the interim restoration production, but also in the dental prosthesis production with a higher level of completion.

  19. Silica needle template fabrication of metal hollow microneedle arrays

    Zhu, M W; Li, H W; Chen, X L; Tang, Y F; Lu, M H; Chen, Y F

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery through hollow microneedle (HMN) arrays has now been recognized as one of the most promising techniques because it minimizes the shortcomings of the traditional drug delivery methods and has many exciting advantages—pain free and tunable release rates, for example. However, this drug delivery method has been hindered greatly from mass clinical application because of the high fabrication cost of HMN arrays. Hence, we developed a simple and cost-effective procedure using silica needles as templates to massively fabricate HMN arrays by using popular materials and industrially applicable processes of micro- imprint, hot embossing, electroplating and polishing. Metal HMN arrays with high quality are prepared with great flexibility with tunable parameters of area, length of needle, size of hollow and array dimension. This efficient and cost-effective fabrication method can also be applied to other applications after minor alterations, such as preparation of optic, acoustic and solar harvesting materials and devices

  20. Silica needle template fabrication of metal hollow microneedle arrays

    Zhu, M. W.; Li, H. W.; Chen, X. L.; Tang, Y. F.; Lu, M. H.; Chen, Y. F.

    2009-11-01

    Drug delivery through hollow microneedle (HMN) arrays has now been recognized as one of the most promising techniques because it minimizes the shortcomings of the traditional drug delivery methods and has many exciting advantages—pain free and tunable release rates, for example. However, this drug delivery method has been hindered greatly from mass clinical application because of the high fabrication cost of HMN arrays. Hence, we developed a simple and cost-effective procedure using silica needles as templates to massively fabricate HMN arrays by using popular materials and industrially applicable processes of micro- imprint, hot embossing, electroplating and polishing. Metal HMN arrays with high quality are prepared with great flexibility with tunable parameters of area, length of needle, size of hollow and array dimension. This efficient and cost-effective fabrication method can also be applied to other applications after minor alterations, such as preparation of optic, acoustic and solar harvesting materials and devices.

  1. Effect of chitosan on resist printing of cotton fabrics with reactive dyes

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... levels may cause the dyes to form a partial covalent bond with chitosan, thereby diminishing the resist-printing effect. In such a case, the resist printing would not be linear as a function of chitosan concentration. Red 184 exhibited the highest resist-printing effect, followed by. Blue 204 and Yellow 143.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of all-covalent nanocomposite functionalized screen-printed voltammetric sensors

    Jasmin, Jean-Philippe; Cannizzo, Caroline; Dumas, Eddy; Chaussé, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Screen printed electrodes were covalently functionalized by gold nanoparticles. • The covalent grafting of AuNPs was achieved via diazonium salt chemistry. • Two grafting methods and two types of AuNPs were compared. • Carboxylate ligands were grafted on these nanostructured electrodes. • Good preliminary responses towards lead analysis were obtained by SW-ASV. - Abstract: We report in this paper an all-covalent method to obtain highly nanostructured carbon screen printed electrodes (SPEs) bearing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized by complexing groups using diazonium salts chemistry. SPEs were first modified with 4-aminophenyl functions (SPE-Ph-NH 2 ). The amino moieties were then converted into diazonium salts (SPE-Ph-N 2 + Cl − ). These reactive SPEs were then used to immobilize AuNPs by electrochemical or spontaneous method. The spontaneous method proved to be a more efficient grafting approach. Two types of AuNPs suspensions were compared: AuNPs obtained via the well-known Turkevich method, citrate-stabilized and having a diameter of about 20 nm, and AuNPs obtained by the method recently described by Eah et al., stabilizer-free with an average diameter of 4 nm. We show that the size of the Au-NPs, their concentration and their surface properties are key parameters that affect the electrochemical properties of the final nanostructured SPEs. The covalent grafting of 4-carboxyphenyl ligands through diazonium chemistry, able to complex metallic cations, at the surface of SPE-Ph-AuNPs allowed their use for the detection of Pb(II). Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Rutherford Backscattering and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used to characterize these nanostructured materials

  3. Fabrication of a 3D Printing Definitive Obturator Prosthesis: a Clinical Report

    Georgios Kouveliotis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Digital technologies related to imaging and manufacturing provide the clinician with a wide variety of treatment options. Stereolithography (SLA offers a simple and predictable way for an accurate reconstruction of congenital or acquired defects. Clinical case: A 65-years old cancer patient with non- keratinized squamous cell carcinoma of left maxillary sinus came for a prosthetic clinical evaluation. A bilateral maxillectomy was performed and the treatment plan included definite obturator prosthesis for the upper arch. CT data and 3D planning software were used to create a 3D printing plastic model of the defect. A wax pattern of the hollow bulb was fabricated and cured with heatcured silicone soft liner. A final impression was obtained with the hollow bulb placed intraorally. The master cast was duplicated and the new cast was invested and reflasked. The flasks were opened, wax was boiled out and some space was created in the internal part of the obturator. Transparent heat cured acrylic resin was sandwiched with, at the inner part of the bulb, improving the retention between the acrylic denture base and the silicone based soft lining material. The patient was then placed on a 6-month recall. The five-year follow up consists of a chair side relining, when needed, of the definite removable prostheses. Conclusion: Maxillofacial surgery patients may develop postoperative complications such as trismus and pain. In these cases, the combination of digital technology and conventional techniques provide an accurate prosthetic restoration.

  4. The Use of Particulate Injection Moulding for Fabrication of Sports and Leisure Equipment from Titanium Metals

    Paul D. Ewart

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Advanced materials such as metal alloys, carbon fibre composites and engineered polymers have improved athlete performances in all sporting applications. Advances in manufacturing has enabled increases in design complexity and the ability to rapidly prototype bespoke products using additive manufacturing also known as 3D printing. Another recent fabrication method widely used by medical, electronics and armaments manufacturers is particulate injection moulding. This process uses exact quantities of the required material, in powder form, minimising resource and energy requirements in comparison to conventional manufacturing techniques. The process utilises injection moulding techniques and tooling methods developed and used in the plastics industry. It can produce highly complex component geometries with excellent repeatability and reduced cost where volume manufacturing is required. This is especially important when considering materials such as titanium that are not only expensive in comparison to other metals but are difficult to process by regular machining and fabrication methods. This work presents a review of titanium use in the sporting sector with a focus on sporting devices and equipment. It also proposes that the sports engineering sector could increase performance and enable improvements in safety by switching to design methods appropriate to processing via the particulate injection moulding route.

  5. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  6. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2017-12-05

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  7. Fabrication of a Highly Aligned Neural Scaffold via a Table Top Stereolithography 3D Printing and Electrospinning.

    Lee, Se-Jun; Nowicki, Margaret; Harris, Brent; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly emerging technique in the field of tissue engineering to fabricate extremely intricate and complex biomimetic scaffolds in the range of micrometers. Such customized 3D printed constructs can be used for the regeneration of complex tissues such as cartilage, vessels, and nerves. However, the 3D printing techniques often offer limited control over the resolution and compromised mechanical properties due to short selection of printable inks. To address these limitations, we combined stereolithography and electrospinning techniques to fabricate a novel 3D biomimetic neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure and embedded aligned fibers. By employing two different types of biofabrication methods, we successfully utilized both synthetic and natural materials with varying chemical composition as bioink to enhance biocompatibilities and mechanical properties of the scaffold. The resulting microfibers composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer and PCL mixed with gelatin were embedded in 3D printed hydrogel scaffold. Our results showed that 3D printed scaffolds with electrospun fibers significantly improve neural stem cell adhesion when compared to those without the fibers. Furthermore, 3D scaffolds embedded with aligned fibers showed an enhancement in cell proliferation relative to bare control scaffolds. More importantly, confocal microscopy images illustrated that the scaffold with PCL/gelatin fibers greatly increased the average neurite length and directed neurite extension of primary cortical neurons along the fiber. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to create unique 3D neural tissue constructs by combining 3D bioprinting and electrospinning techniques.

  8. Gravure-Offset Printed Metallization of Multi-Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells with Low Metal-Line Width for Mass Production.

    Lee, Jonghwan; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    The gravure offset method has been developed toward an industrially viable printing technique for electronic circuitry. In this paper, a roller type gravure offset manufacturing process was developed to fabricate fine line for using front electrode for solar cells. In order to obtain the optimum metallization printing lines, thickness of 20 μm which is narrow line is required. The main targets are the reduction of metallized area to reduce the shading loss, and a high conductivity to transport the current as loss free as possible out of the cell. However, it is well known that there is a poor contact resistance between the front Ag electrode and the n(+) emitter. Nickel plating was conducted to prevent the increase of contact resistance and the increase of fill factor (FF). The performance of n-Si/Ag (seed layer)/Ni solar cells were observed in 609 mV of open circuit voltage, 35.54 mA/cm2 of short circuit current density, 75.75% of fill factor, and 16.04% of conversion efficiency.

  9. The fabrication of short metallic nanotubes by templated electrodeposition

    Chienwen, Huang; Hao Yaowu, E-mail: yhao@uta.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76051 (United States)

    2009-11-04

    Template-based electrochemical synthesis has widely been used to produce metal nanowires and nanorods. Commercially available filtration membranes, such as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and polycarbonate track etch membranes, have commonly been utilized as hard templates for this purpose. In this process, a thick metal film is usually sputtered or vacuum evaporated onto one side of the membrane to block the pores and serve as the working electrode for the subsequent electrodeposition. Here, we show that during the deposition of the metal electrode for AAO membranes, the electrode metal diffuses into the pores and is deposited on the pore walls which leads to preferential electrodeposition of metal on the walls and therefore forms metal tubes. This phenomenon has been utilized to fabricate short nanotubes by carefully controlling the electrodeposition conditions. The process is a straightforward method for any electroplatable materials to form nanoscale tubular structures. The effects of working electrodes and electrodeposition conditions on the formation of tubular structures are discussed in detail. A new mechanism based on this simple fact is proposed to explain the formation of Ni tubes by Ni-Cu co-deposition. Also, we demonstrate how to distinguish magnetic nanotubes from nanorods by a simple magnetic measurement.

  10. The fabrication of short metallic nanotubes by templated electrodeposition

    Huang Chienwen; Hao Yaowu

    2009-01-01

    Template-based electrochemical synthesis has widely been used to produce metal nanowires and nanorods. Commercially available filtration membranes, such as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and polycarbonate track etch membranes, have commonly been utilized as hard templates for this purpose. In this process, a thick metal film is usually sputtered or vacuum evaporated onto one side of the membrane to block the pores and serve as the working electrode for the subsequent electrodeposition. Here, we show that during the deposition of the metal electrode for AAO membranes, the electrode metal diffuses into the pores and is deposited on the pore walls which leads to preferential electrodeposition of metal on the walls and therefore forms metal tubes. This phenomenon has been utilized to fabricate short nanotubes by carefully controlling the electrodeposition conditions. The process is a straightforward method for any electroplatable materials to form nanoscale tubular structures. The effects of working electrodes and electrodeposition conditions on the formation of tubular structures are discussed in detail. A new mechanism based on this simple fact is proposed to explain the formation of Ni tubes by Ni-Cu co-deposition. Also, we demonstrate how to distinguish magnetic nanotubes from nanorods by a simple magnetic measurement.

  11. Fabrication of subwavelength metallic structures by using a metal direct imprinting process

    Hsieh, C W; Hsiung, H Y; Lu, Y T; Sung, C K; Wang, W H

    2007-01-01

    This work employs a metal direct imprinting process, which possesses the characteristics of simplicity, low-cost and high resolution, for the fabrication of subwavelength structures on a metallic thin film. Herein, the mould featuring periodic line structures is manufactured by using E-beam lithography and followed by a dry etching process; meanwhile, the thin film is fabricated by sputtering Al on a silicon substrate. AFM section analyses are employed to measure imprinting depths of the subwavelength metallic structures and it is found that the uniformity of the imprinting depths is affected by the designed patterns, the material property of thin film and mould deformation. The process temperature and the mould filling that influence the transferred quality are investigated. In addition, TEM is also utilized to examine defects in the subwavelength metallic structures. Finally, good quality subwavelength metallic structures are fabricated under a pressure of 300 MPa for 60 s at room temperature. In this study, we have demonstrated that subwavelength metallic structures with a minimum linewidth of less than 100 nm on the Al thin film are successfully constructed by the metal direct imprinting process

  12. Pulsed Photoinitiated Fabrication of Inkjet Printed Titanium Dioxide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Thin Films.

    Bourgeois, Briley; Luo, Sijun; Riggs, Brian; Ji, Yaping; Adireddy, Shiva; Schroder, Kurt; Farnsworth, Stan; Chrisey, Douglas B; Escarra, Matthew

    2018-05-08

    This work reports a new technique for scalable and low temperature processing of nanostructured-TiO2 thin films, allowing for practical manufacturing of TiO2 based devices such as perovskite solar cells at low temperature or on flexible substrates. Dual layers of dense and mesoporous TiO2/graphitic oxide nanocomposite films are synthesized simultaneously using inkjet printing and pulsed photonic irradiation. Investigation of process parameters including precursor concentration (10-20 wt%) and exposure fluence (4.5-8.5 J/cm2) reveals control over crystalline quality, graphitic oxide phase, film thickness, dendrite density, and optical properties. Raman spectroscopy shows the E¬g peak, characteristic of anatase phase titania, increases in intensity with higher photonic irradiation fluence, suggesting increased crystallinity through higher fluence processing. Film thickness and dendrite density is shown to increase with precursor concentration in the printed ink. The dense base layer thickness was controlled between 20 nm to 80 nm. The refractive index of the films is determined by ellipsometry to be 1.92 +/- 0.08 at 650 nm. Films exhibit an energy weighted optical transparency of 91.1%, in comparison to 91.3% of a thermally processed film, when in situ carbon materials were removed. Transmission and diffuse reflectance are used to determine optical band gaps of the films ranging from 2.98 eV to 3.38 eV in accordance with the photonic irradiation fluence and suggests tunability of TiO2 phase composition. The sheet resistance of the synthesized films is measured to be 14.54 +/- 1.11 Ω/□ and 28.90 +/- 2.24 Ω/□ for films as-processed and after carbon removal, respectively, which is comparable to high temperature processed TiO2 thin films. The studied electrical and optical properties of the light processed films show comparable results to traditionally processed TiO2 while offering the distinct advantages of scalable manufacturing, low-temperature processing

  13. Digital Textile Printing

    Moltchanova, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly evolving technology of digital printing opens new opportunities on many markets. One of them is the printed fabric market where printing companies as well as clients benefit from new printing methods. This thesis focuses on the digital textile printing technology and its implementation for fabric-on-demand printing service in Finland. The purpose of this project was to study the technology behind digital textile printing, areas of application of this technology, the requirements ...

  14. Digital laser printing of metal/metal-oxide nano-composites with tunable electrical properties

    Zenou, M; Kotler, Z; Sa’ar, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the electrical properties of aluminum structures printed by the laser forward transfer of molten, femtoliter droplets in air. The resulting printed material is an aluminum/aluminum-oxide nano-composite. By controlling the printing conditions, and thereby the droplet volume, its jetting velocity and duration, it is possible to tune the electrical resistivity to a large extent. The material resistivity depends on the degree of oxidation which takes place during jetting and on the formation of electrical contact points as molten droplets impact the substrate. Evidence for these processes is provided by FIB cross sections of printed structures. (paper)

  15. SU-C-213-02: Characterizing 3D Printing in the Fabrication of Variable Density Phantoms

    Madamesila, J; McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, J; Khan, R [The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this work, we present characterization, process flow, quality control and application of 3D fabricated low density phantoms for radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods: A Rostock delta 3D printer using polystyrene filament of diameter 1.75 mm was used to print geometric volumes of 2×2×1 cm{sup 3} of varying densities. The variable densities of 0.1 to 0.75 g/cm {sup 3} were created by modulating the infill. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. The time required to print these volumes was also recorded. Using the calibration, two low density cones (0.19, 0.52 g/cm{sup 3}) were printed and benchmarked against commercially available phantoms. The dosimetric validation of the low density scaling of Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) was performed by using a 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} slab of 10×10×2.4 cm{sup 3} with EBT3 GafChromic film. The gamma analysis at 3%/3mm criteria were compared for the measured and computed dose planes. Results: Analysis of the volume of air pockets in the infill resulted in a reasonable uniformity for densities 0.4 to 0.75 g/cm{sup 3}. Printed phantoms with densities below 0.4 g/cm{sup 3} exhibited a higher ratio of air to polystyrene resulting in large non-uniformity. Compared to the commercial inserts, good agreement was observed only for the printed 0.52 g/cm{sup 3} cone. Dosimetric comparison for a printed low density volume placed in-between layers of solid water resulted in >95% gamma agreement between AAA calculated dose planes and measured EBT3 films for a 6MV 5×5 cm{sup 2} clinical beam. The comparison showed disagreement in the penumbra region. Conclusion: In conclusion, 3D printing technology opens the door to desktop fabrication of variable density phantoms at economical prices in an efficient manner for the quality assurance needs of a small clinic.

  16. SU-C-213-02: Characterizing 3D Printing in the Fabrication of Variable Density Phantoms

    Madamesila, J; McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, J; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, we present characterization, process flow, quality control and application of 3D fabricated low density phantoms for radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods: A Rostock delta 3D printer using polystyrene filament of diameter 1.75 mm was used to print geometric volumes of 2×2×1 cm 3 of varying densities. The variable densities of 0.1 to 0.75 g/cm 3 were created by modulating the infill. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. The time required to print these volumes was also recorded. Using the calibration, two low density cones (0.19, 0.52 g/cm 3 ) were printed and benchmarked against commercially available phantoms. The dosimetric validation of the low density scaling of Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) was performed by using a 0.5 g/cm 3 slab of 10×10×2.4 cm 3 with EBT3 GafChromic film. The gamma analysis at 3%/3mm criteria were compared for the measured and computed dose planes. Results: Analysis of the volume of air pockets in the infill resulted in a reasonable uniformity for densities 0.4 to 0.75 g/cm 3 . Printed phantoms with densities below 0.4 g/cm 3 exhibited a higher ratio of air to polystyrene resulting in large non-uniformity. Compared to the commercial inserts, good agreement was observed only for the printed 0.52 g/cm 3 cone. Dosimetric comparison for a printed low density volume placed in-between layers of solid water resulted in >95% gamma agreement between AAA calculated dose planes and measured EBT3 films for a 6MV 5×5 cm 2 clinical beam. The comparison showed disagreement in the penumbra region. Conclusion: In conclusion, 3D printing technology opens the door to desktop fabrication of variable density phantoms at economical prices in an efficient manner for the quality assurance needs of a small clinic

  17. Three-dimensional metallic opals fabricated by double templating

    Yan Qingfeng; Nukala, Pavan; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report a simple and cost-effective double templating method for fabricating large-area three-dimensional metallic photonic crystals of controlled thickness. A self-assembled polystyrene opal was used as the first template to fabricate a silica inverse opal on a gold-coated glass substrate via sol-gel processing. Gold was subsequently infiltrated to the pores of the silica inverse opal using electrochemical deposition. A high-quality three-dimensional gold photonic crystal was obtained after removal of the secondary template (silica inverse opal). The effects of template sphere size and deposition current density on the gold growth rate, and the resulting morphology and growth mechanism of the gold opal, were investigated.

  18. International conference on design, fabrication and economy of metal structures

    Farkas, József

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the International Conference on Design, Fabrication and Economy of Metal Structures held on 24-26 April 2013 in Miskolc, Hungary which contain 99 papers covering: Structural optimization Thin-walled structures Stability Fatigue Frames Fire Fabrication Welding technology Applications Steel-concrete composite Special problems The authors are from 23 different countries, ensuring that the themes covered are of worldwide interest and importance. The International Institute of Welding (IIW), the International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (ISSMO), the TÁMOP 4.2.1.B-10/2/KONV-2010-0001 project entitled “Increasing the quality of higher education through the development of research - development and innovation program at the University of Miskolc supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund” and many other sponsors helped organizers to collect these valuable studies, the results of which will provoke discussion, and provide an i...

  19. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter [Danish Polymer Centre, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wolff, Anders, E-mail: anders.wolff@nanotech.dtu.dk [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  20. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  1. Fabrication of Polymer Solar Cells Using Aqueous Processing for All Layers Including the Metal Back Electrode

    Søndergaard, Roar; Helgesen, Martin; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent...

  2. Fabrication and characterization of gels with integrated channels using 3D printing with microfluidic nozzle for tissue engineering applications.

    Attalla, R; Ling, C; Selvaganapathy, P

    2016-02-01

    The lack of a simple and effective method to integrate vascular network with engineered scaffolds and tissue constructs remains one of the biggest challenges in true 3D tissue engineering. Here, we detail the use of a commercially available, low-cost, open-source 3D printer modified with a microfluidic print-head in order to develop a method for the generation of instantly perfusable vascular network integrated with gel scaffolds seeded with cells. The print-head features an integrated coaxial nozzle that allows the fabrication of hollow, calcium-polymerized alginate tubes that can be easily patterned using 3D printing techniques. The diameter of the hollow channel can be precisely controlled and varied between 500 μm - 2 mm by changing applied flow rates or print-head speed. These channels are integrated into gel layers with a thickness of 800 μm - 2.5 mm. The structural rigidity of these constructs allows the fabrication of multi-layered structures without causing the collapse of hollow channels in lower layers. The 3D printing method was fully characterized at a range of operating speeds (0-40 m/min) and corresponding flow rates (1-30 mL/min) were identified to produce precise definition. This microfluidic design also allows the incorporation of a wide range of scaffold materials as well as biological constituents such as cells, growth factors, and ECM material. Media perfusion of the channels causes a significant viability increase in the bulk of cell-laden structures over the long-term. With this setup, gel constructs with embedded arrays of hollow channels can be created and used as a potential substitute for blood vessel networks.

  3. Directed light fabrication of refractory metals and alloys

    Fonseca, J.C.; Lewis, G.K.; Dickerson, P.G.; Nemec, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers deposition of refractory pure metals and alloys using the Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) process and represents progress in depositing these materials through September 1998. In extending the DLF process technology to refractory metals for producing fully dense, structurally sound deposits, several problems have become evident. (1) Control of porosity in DLF-deposited refractory metal is difficult because of gases, apparently present in commercially purchased refractory metal powder starting materials. (2) The radiant heat from the molten pool during deposition melts the DLF powder feed nozzle. (3) The high reflectivity of molten refractory metals, at the Nd-YAG laser wavelength (1.06microm), produces damaging back reflections to the optical train and fiber optic delivery system that can terminate DLF processing. (4) The current limits on the maximum available laser power to prevent back reflection damage limit the parameter range available for densification of refractory metals. The work to date concentrated on niobium, W-25Re, and spherodized tungsten. Niobium samples, made from hydride-dehydride powder, had minimal gas porosity and the deposition parameters were optimized; however, test plates were not made at this time. W-25Re samples, containing sodium and potassium from a precipitation process, were made and porosity was a problem for all samples although minimized with some process parameters. Deposits made from potassium reduced tungsten that was plasma spherodized were made with minimized porosity. Results of this work indicate that further gas analysis of starting powders and de-gassing of starting powders and/or gas removal during deposition of refractory metals is required

  4. Directed light fabrication of refractory metals and alloys

    Fonseca, J.C.; Lewis, G.K.; Dickerson, P.G.; Nemec, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers work performed under Order No. FA0000020 AN Contract DE-AC12-76SN00052 for deposition of refractory pure metals and alloys using the Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) process and represents the progress in depositing these materials through September 1998. In extending the DLF process technology to refractory metals for producing fully dense, structurally sound deposits, several problems have become evident. 1. Control of porosity in DLF-deposited refractory metal is difficult because of gases, apparently present in commercially purchased refractory metal powder starting materials. 2. The radiant heat from the molten pool during deposition melts the DLF powder feed nozzle. 3. The high reflectivity of molten refractory metals, at the Nd-YAG laser wavelength (1.06microm), produces damaging back reflections to the optical train and fiber optic delivery system that can terminate DLF processing. 4. The current limits on the maximum available laser power to prevent back reflection damage limit the parameter range available for densification of refractory metals. The work to date concentrated on niobium, W-25Re, and spherodized tungsten. Niobium samples, made from hydride-dehydride powder, had minimal gas porosity and the deposition parameters were optimized; however, test plates were not made at this time. W-25Re samples, containing sodium and potassium from a precipitation process, were made and porosity was a problem for all samples although minimized with some process parameters. Deposits made from potassium reduced tungsten that was plasma spherodized were made with minimized porosity. Results of this work indicate that further gas analysis of starting powders and de-gassing of starting powders and/or gas removal during deposition of refractory metals is required

  5. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...... on top of an oxidized aluminum gate. We achieve sufficient gate coupling to access more than ten charge states of individual gold nanoparticles (5–15 nm in diameter). The devices are sufficiently stable to permit spectroscopic studies of the electron-in-a-box level spectra within the nanoparticle as its...

  6. SU-E-T-419: Fabricating Cerrobend Grids with 3D Printing for Spatially Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    Zhu, X; Driewer, J; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Li, S; Zhang, Q; Zhang, M; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Cullip, T; Chang, S [UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy has promising applications in the radiation treatment of bulky and large tumors. However, research and applications of grid therapy is limited by the accessibility of the specialized blocks that produce the grid of pencil-like radiation beams. In this study, a Cerrobend grid block was fabricated using a 3D printing technique. Methods: A grid block mold was designed with divergent tubes following beam central rays. The mold was printed using a resin with the working temperature below 230 °C. The melted Cerrobend liquid at 120°oC was cast into the resin mold to yield a block with a thickness of 7.4 cm. The grid had a hexagonal pattern, with each pencil beam diameter of 1.4 cm at the iso-center plane; the distance between the beam centers was 2 cm. The dosimetric properties of the grid block were studied using radiographic film and small field dosimeters. Results: the grid block was fabricated to be mounted at the third accessory mount of a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator. Fabricating a grid block using 3D printing is similar to making cutouts for traditional radiotherapy photon blocks, with the difference being that the mold was created by a 3D printer rather than foam. In this study, the valley-to-peak ratio for a 6MV photon grid beam was 20% at dmax, and 30% at 10 cm depth, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a novel process for implementing grid radiotherapy using 3D printing techniques. Compared to existing approaches, our technique combines reduced cost, accessibility, and flexibility in customization with efficient delivery. This lays the groundwork for future studies to improve our understanding of the efficacy of grid therapy and apply it to improve cancer treatment.

  7. SU-E-T-419: Fabricating Cerrobend Grids with 3D Printing for Spatially Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    Zhu, X; Driewer, J; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Li, S; Zhang, Q; Zhang, M; Zhou, S; Cullip, T; Chang, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Grid therapy has promising applications in the radiation treatment of bulky and large tumors. However, research and applications of grid therapy is limited by the accessibility of the specialized blocks that produce the grid of pencil-like radiation beams. In this study, a Cerrobend grid block was fabricated using a 3D printing technique. Methods: A grid block mold was designed with divergent tubes following beam central rays. The mold was printed using a resin with the working temperature below 230 °C. The melted Cerrobend liquid at 120°oC was cast into the resin mold to yield a block with a thickness of 7.4 cm. The grid had a hexagonal pattern, with each pencil beam diameter of 1.4 cm at the iso-center plane; the distance between the beam centers was 2 cm. The dosimetric properties of the grid block were studied using radiographic film and small field dosimeters. Results: the grid block was fabricated to be mounted at the third accessory mount of a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator. Fabricating a grid block using 3D printing is similar to making cutouts for traditional radiotherapy photon blocks, with the difference being that the mold was created by a 3D printer rather than foam. In this study, the valley-to-peak ratio for a 6MV photon grid beam was 20% at dmax, and 30% at 10 cm depth, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a novel process for implementing grid radiotherapy using 3D printing techniques. Compared to existing approaches, our technique combines reduced cost, accessibility, and flexibility in customization with efficient delivery. This lays the groundwork for future studies to improve our understanding of the efficacy of grid therapy and apply it to improve cancer treatment

  8. 3D Metal Printing - Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Frameworks of Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prosthesis.

    Revilla León, M; Klemm, I M; García-Arranz, J; Özcan, M

    2017-09-01

    An edentulous patient was rehabilitated with maxillary metal-ceramic and mandibular metal-resin implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Metal frameworks of the FDPs were fabricated using 3D additive manufacturing technologies utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) processes. Both SLM and EBM technologies were employed in combination with computer numerical control (CNC) post-machining at the implant interface. This report highlights the technical and clinical protocol for fabrication of FDPs using SLM and EBM additive technologies. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  9. Towards fabrication of 3D printed medical devices to prevent biofilm formation

    Sandler, Niklas; Salmela, Ida; Fallarero, Adyary

    2014-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies is transforming the way that materials are turned into functional devices. We demonstrate in the current study the incorporation of anti-microbial nitrofurantoin in a polymer carrier material and subsequent 3D printing of a model structure...

  10. Surface modification of cotton fabrics by gas plasmas for color strength and adhesion by inkjet ink printing

    Pransilp, Porntapin; Pruettiphap, Meshaya; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan; Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Both O_2 and N_2 plasma increased cotton surface wettability and higher K/S. • SF6 plasma gave hydrophobicity on cotton surface and increased contact angle to 138°. • Plasma treatment on cotton fabric produced surface roughness. • XPS confirmed the generation of new functional groups on cotton fabric. • Wettability and surface roughness controlled K/S and good ink adhesion. - Abstract: Surface properties of cotton fabric were modified by three types of gas plasma pretreatment, namely, oxygen (O_2), nitrogen (N_2) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF_6), to improve ink absorption of water-based pigmented inkjet inks and color reproduction of the treated surfaces. Effects of gas plasma exposure parameters of power, exposure time and gas pressure on surface physical and chemical properties of the treated fabrics were investigated. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was used to identify changes in functional groups on the fabric surface while AFM (atomic force microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to reveal surface topography of the fabric. Color spectroscopic technique was used to investigate changes in color strength caused by different absorptions of the printed fabrics. The O_2 plasma treatments produced new functional groups, −O−C−O/C=O and O−C=O while N_2 plasma treatments produced additionally new functional groups, C−N and O=C−NH, onto the fabric surface which increased hydrophilic properties and surface energy of the fabric. For cotton fabric treated with SF_6 plasma, the fluorine functionalization was additionally found on the surface. Color strength values (K/S) increased when compared with those of the untreated fabrics. SF_6 plasma-treated fabrics were hydrophobic and caused less ink absorption. Fabric surface roughness caused by plasma etching increased fabric surface areas, captured more ink, and enhanced a larger ink color gamut and ink adhesion. Cotton fabrics exhibited higher

  11. Fabrication of Metallic Quantum Dot Arrays For Nanoscale Nonlinear Optics

    McMahon, M. D.; Hmelo, A. B.; Lopez Magruder, R., III; Weller Haglund, R. A., Jr.; Feldman, L. C.

    2003-03-01

    Ordered arrays of metal nanocrystals embedded in or sequestered on dielectric hosts have potential applications as elements of nonlinear or near-field optical circuits, as sensitizers for fluorescence emitters and photo detectors, and as anchor points for arrays of biological molecules. Metal nanocrystals are strongly confined electronic systems with size-, shape and spatial orientation-dependent optical responses. At the smallest scales (below about 15 nm diameter), their band structure is drastically altered by the small size of the system, and the reduced population of conduction-band electrons. Here we report on the fabrication of two-dimensional ordered metallic nanocrystal arrays, and one-dimensional nanocrystal-loaded waveguides for optical investigations. We have employed strategies for synthesizing metal nanocrystal composites that capitalize on the best features of focused ion beam (FIB) machining and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The FIB generates arrays of specialized sites; PLD vapor deposition results in the directed self-assembly of Ag nanoparticles nucleated at the FIB generated sites on silicon substrates. We present results based on the SEM, AFM and optical characterization of prototype composites. This research has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-01ER45916.

  12. 3D Printing of NinjaFlex Filament onto PEDOT:PSS-Coated Textile Fabrics for Electroluminescence Applications

    Tadesse, Melkie Getnet; Dumitrescu, Delia; Loghin, Carmen; Chen, Yan; Wang, Lichuan; Nierstrasz, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) is the property of a semiconductor material pertaining to emitting light in response to an electrical current or a strong electric field. The purpose of this paper is to develop a flexible and lightweight EL device. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to observe the thermal degradation behavior of NinjaFlex. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid)—PEDOT:PSS—with ethylene glycol (EG) was coated onto polyester fabric where NinjaFlex was placed onto the coated fabric using three-dimensional (3D) printing and phosphor paste, and BendLay filaments were subsequently coated via 3D printing. Adhesion strength and flexibility of the 3D-printed NinjaFlex on textile fabrics were investigated. The TGA results of the NinjaFlex depict no weight loss up to 150°C and that the NinjaFlex was highly conductive with a surface resistance value of 8.5 ohms/sq.; the coated fabric exhibited a uniform surface appearance as measured and observed by using four-probe measurements and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, at 60% PEDOT:PSS. The results of the adhesion test showed that peel strengths of 4160 N/m and 3840 N/m were recorded for polyester and cotton specimens, respectively. No weight loss was recorded following three washing cycles of NinjaFlex. The bending lengths were increased by only a factor of 0.082 and 0.577 for polyester and cotton samples at 0.1-mm thickness, respectively; this remains sufficiently flexible to be integrated into textiles. The prototype device emitted light with a 12-V alternating current power supply.

  13. A Water-Based Silver-Nanowire Screen-Print Ink for the Fabrication of Stretchable Conductors and Wearable Thin-Film Transistors.

    Liang, Jiajie; Tong, Kwing; Pei, Qibing

    2016-07-01

    A water-based silver-nanowire (AgNW) ink is formulated for screen printing. Screen-printed AgNW patterns have uniform sharp edges, ≈50 μm resolution, and electrical conductivity as high as 4.67 × 10(4) S cm(-1) . The screen-printed AgNW patterns are used to fabricate a stretchable composite conductor, and a fully printed and intrinsically stretchable thin-film transistor array is also realized. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  15. Chest-wall reconstruction with a customized titanium-alloy prosthesis fabricated by 3D printing and rapid prototyping.

    Wen, Xiaopeng; Gao, Shan; Feng, Jinteng; Li, Shuo; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Guangjian

    2018-01-08

    As 3D printing technology emerge, there is increasing demand for a more customizable implant in the repair of chest-wall bony defects. This article aims to present a custom design and fabrication method for repairing bony defects of the chest wall following tumour resection, which utilizes three-dimensional (3D) printing and rapid-prototyping technology. A 3D model of the bony defect was generated after acquiring helical CT data. A customized prosthesis was then designed using computer-aided design (CAD) and mirroring technology, and fabricated using titanium-alloy powder. The mechanical properties of the printed prosthesis were investigated using ANSYS software. The yield strength of the titanium-alloy prosthesis was 950 ± 14 MPa (mean ± SD), and its ultimate strength was 1005 ± 26 MPa. The 3D finite element analyses revealed that the equivalent stress distribution of each prosthesis was unifrom. The symmetry and reconstruction quality contour of the repaired chest wall was satisfactory. No rejection or infection occurred during the 6-month follow-up period. Chest-wall reconstruction with a customized titanium-alloy prosthesis is a reliable technique for repairing bony defects.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of 3D-Printed Highly-Porous 3D LiFePO4 Electrodes by Low Temperature Direct Writing Process

    Changyong Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available LiFePO4 (LFP is a promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. In this study, low temperature direct writing (LTDW-based 3D printing was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D LFP electrodes for the first time. LFP inks were deposited into a low temperature chamber and solidified to maintain the shape and mechanical integrity of the printed features. The printed LFP electrodes were then freeze-dried to remove the solvents so that highly-porous architectures in the electrodes were obtained. LFP inks capable of freezing at low temperature was developed by adding 1,4 dioxane as a freezing agent. The rheological behavior of the prepared LFP inks was measured and appropriate compositions and ratios were selected. A LTDW machine was developed to print the electrodes. The printing parameters were optimized and the printing accuracy was characterized. Results showed that LTDW can effectively maintain the shape and mechanical integrity during the printing process. The microstructure, pore size and distribution of the printed LFP electrodes was characterized. In comparison with conventional room temperature direct ink writing process, improved pore volume and porosity can be obtained using the LTDW process. The electrochemical performance of LTDW-fabricated LFP electrodes and conventional roller-coated electrodes were conducted and compared. Results showed that the porous structure that existed in the printed electrodes can greatly improve the rate performance of LFP electrodes.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of 3D-Printed Highly-Porous 3D LiFePO₄ Electrodes by Low Temperature Direct Writing Process.

    Liu, Changyong; Cheng, Xingxing; Li, Bohan; Chen, Zhangwei; Mi, Shengli; Lao, Changshi

    2017-08-10

    LiFePO₄ (LFP) is a promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. In this study, low temperature direct writing (LTDW)-based 3D printing was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) LFP electrodes for the first time. LFP inks were deposited into a low temperature chamber and solidified to maintain the shape and mechanical integrity of the printed features. The printed LFP electrodes were then freeze-dried to remove the solvents so that highly-porous architectures in the electrodes were obtained. LFP inks capable of freezing at low temperature was developed by adding 1,4 dioxane as a freezing agent. The rheological behavior of the prepared LFP inks was measured and appropriate compositions and ratios were selected. A LTDW machine was developed to print the electrodes. The printing parameters were optimized and the printing accuracy was characterized. Results showed that LTDW can effectively maintain the shape and mechanical integrity during the printing process. The microstructure, pore size and distribution of the printed LFP electrodes was characterized. In comparison with conventional room temperature direct ink writing process, improved pore volume and porosity can be obtained using the LTDW process. The electrochemical performance of LTDW-fabricated LFP electrodes and conventional roller-coated electrodes were conducted and compared. Results showed that the porous structure that existed in the printed electrodes can greatly improve the rate performance of LFP electrodes.

  18. 3D Printing Factors Important for the Fabrication of Polyvinylalcohol Filament-Based Tablets.

    Tagami, Tatsuaki; Fukushige, Kaori; Ogawa, Emi; Hayashi, Naomi; Ozeki, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printers have been applied in many fields, including engineering and the medical sciences. In the pharmaceutical field, approval of the first 3D-printed tablet by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2015 has attracted interest in the manufacture of tablets and drugs by 3D printing techniques as a means of delivering tailor-made drugs in the future. In current study, polyvinylalcohol (PVA)-based tablets were prepared using a fused-deposition-modeling-type 3D printer and the effect of 3D printing conditions on tablet production was investigated. Curcumin, a model drug/fluorescent marker, was loaded into PVA-filament. We found that several printing parameters, such as the rate of extruding PVA (flow rate), can affect the formability of the resulting PVA-tablets. The 3D-printing temperature is controlled by heating the print nozzle and was shown to affect the color of the tablets and their curcumin content. PVA-based infilled tablets with different densities were prepared by changing the fill density as a printing parameter. Tablets with lower fill density floated in an aqueous solution and their curcumin content tended to dissolve faster. These findings will be useful in developing drug-loaded PVA-based 3D objects and other polymer-based articles prepared using fused-deposition-modeling-type 3D printers.

  19. Note: A 3D-printed alkali metal dispenser

    Norrgard, E. B.; Barker, D. S.; Fedchak, J. A.; Klimov, N.; Scherschligt, J.; Eckel, S.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate and characterize a source of Li atoms made from direct metal laser sintered titanium. The source's outgassing rate is measured to be 5(2) × 10-7 Pa L s-1 at a temperature T = 330 °C, which optimizes the number of atoms loaded into a magneto-optical trap. The source loads ≈107 7Li atoms in the trap in ≈1 s. The loaded source weighs 700 mg and is suitable for a number of deployable sensors based on cold atoms.

  20. Fabrication of corner cube array retro-reflective structure with DLP-based 3D printing technology

    Riahi, Mohammadreza

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the fabrication of a corner cube array retro-reflective structure is presented by using DLP-based 3D printing technology. In this additive manufacturing technology a pattern of a cube corner array is designed in a computer and sliced with specific software. The image of each slice is then projected from the bottom side of a reservoir, containing UV cure resin, utilizing a DLP video projector. The projected area is cured and attached to a base plate. This process is repeated until the entire part is made. The best orientation of the printing process and the effect of layer thicknesses on the surface finish of the cube has been investigated. The thermal reflow surface finishing and replication with soft molding has also been presented in this article.

  1. SU-E-T-61: A Practical Process for Fabricating Passive Scatter Proton Beam Modulation Compensation Filters Using 3D Printing

    Zhao, T; Drzymala, R [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to devise a practical fabrication process for passive scatter proton beam compensation filters (CF) that is competitive in time, cost and effort using 3D printing. Methods: DICOM compensator filter files for a proton beam were generated by our Eclipse (Varian, Inc.) treatment planning system. The compensator thickness specifications were extracted with in-house software written in Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) code and written to a text file which could be read by the Rhinoceros 5, computer-aided design (CAD) package (Robert McNeel and Associates), which subsequently generated a smoothed model in a STereoLithographic also known as a Standard Tesselation Language file (STL). The model in the STL file was subsequently refined using Netfabb software and then converted to printing instructions using Cura. version 15.02.1. for our 3D printer. The Airwolf3D, model HD2x, fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer (Airwolf3D.com) was used for our fabrication system with a print speed of 150mm per second. It can print in over 22 different plastic filament materials in a build volume of 11” x 8” x 12”. We choose ABS plastic to print the 3D model of the imprint for our CFs. Results: Prints of the CF could be performed at a print speed of 70mm per second. The time to print the 3D topology for the CF for the 14 cm diameter snout of our Mevion 250 proton accelerator was less than 3 hours. The printed model is intended to subsequently be used as a mold to imprint a molten wax cylindrical to form the compensation after cooling. The whole process should be performed for a typical 3 beam treatment plan within a day. Conclusion: Use of 3D printing is practical and can be used to print a 3D model of a CF within a few hours.

  2. SU-E-T-61: A Practical Process for Fabricating Passive Scatter Proton Beam Modulation Compensation Filters Using 3D Printing

    Zhao, T; Drzymala, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to devise a practical fabrication process for passive scatter proton beam compensation filters (CF) that is competitive in time, cost and effort using 3D printing. Methods: DICOM compensator filter files for a proton beam were generated by our Eclipse (Varian, Inc.) treatment planning system. The compensator thickness specifications were extracted with in-house software written in Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) code and written to a text file which could be read by the Rhinoceros 5, computer-aided design (CAD) package (Robert McNeel and Associates), which subsequently generated a smoothed model in a STereoLithographic also known as a Standard Tesselation Language file (STL). The model in the STL file was subsequently refined using Netfabb software and then converted to printing instructions using Cura. version 15.02.1. for our 3D printer. The Airwolf3D, model HD2x, fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printer (Airwolf3D.com) was used for our fabrication system with a print speed of 150mm per second. It can print in over 22 different plastic filament materials in a build volume of 11” x 8” x 12”. We choose ABS plastic to print the 3D model of the imprint for our CFs. Results: Prints of the CF could be performed at a print speed of 70mm per second. The time to print the 3D topology for the CF for the 14 cm diameter snout of our Mevion 250 proton accelerator was less than 3 hours. The printed model is intended to subsequently be used as a mold to imprint a molten wax cylindrical to form the compensation after cooling. The whole process should be performed for a typical 3 beam treatment plan within a day. Conclusion: Use of 3D printing is practical and can be used to print a 3D model of a CF within a few hours

  3. Progress of alternative sintering approaches of inkjet-printed metal inks and their application for manufacturing of flexible electronic devices

    Wünscher, S.; Abbel, R.; Perelaer, J.; Schubert, U.S.

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined high resolution structures with excellent electrical conductivities are key components of almost every electronic device. Producing these by printing metal based conductive inks on polymer foils represents an important step forward towards the manufacturing of plastic electronic

  4. Marginal and internal fit of pressed lithium disilicate inlays fabricated with milling, 3D printing, and conventional technologies.

    Homsy, Foudda R; Özcan, Mutlu; Khoury, Marwan; Majzoub, Zeina A K

    2017-09-29

    The subtractive and additive computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) of lithium disilicate partial coverage restorations is poorly documented. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the marginal and internal fit accuracy of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic inlays fabricated with conventional, milled, and 3-dimensional (3D) printed wax patterns. A dentoform mandibular first molar was prepared for a mesio-occlusal ceramic inlay. Five groups of 15 inlays were obtained through conventional impression and manual wax pattern (group CICW); conventional impression, laboratory scanning of the stone die, CAD-CAM milled wax blanks (group CIDW) or 3D printed wax patterns (group CI3DW); and scanning of the master preparation with intraoral scanner and CAD-CAM milled (group DIDW) or 3D printed wax patterns (group DI3DW). The same design was used to produce the wax patterns in the last 4 groups. The replica technique was used to measure marginal and internal adaptation by using stereomicroscopy. Mixed-model ANOVA was used to assess differences according to the groups and discrepancy location (α=.05). Group DIDW showed the smallest marginal discrepancy (24.3 μm) compared with those of groups CICW (45.1 μm), CIDW (33.7 μm), CI3DW (39.8 μm), and DI3DW (39.7 μm) (Pimpressions and subtractive milling of wax patterns resulted in better marginal and internal fit accuracy than either conventional impression/fabrication or additive 3D manufacturing. Three-dimensional printed wax patterns yielded fit values similar to those of the conventionally waxed inlays. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simple approach for the fabrication of screen-printed carbon-based electrode for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis

    Petroni, Jacqueline Marques; Lucca, Bruno Gabriel; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for the fabrication of screen-printed based electrodes for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis (ME) devices. The procedure developed is quite simple and does not require expensive instrumentation or sophisticated protocols commonly employed on the production of amperometric sensors, such as photolithography or sputtering steps. The electrodes were fabricated through manual deposition of home-made conductive carbon ink over patterned acrylic substrate. Morphological structure and electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The produced amperometric sensors were coupled to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchips at end-channel configuration in order to evaluate their analytical performance. For this purpose, electrophoretic experiments were carried out using nitrite and ascorbic acid as model analytes. Separation of these substances was successfully performed within 50s with good resolution (R = 1.2) and sensitivities (713.5 pA/μM for nitrite and 255.4 pA/μM for ascorbate). The reproducibility of the fabrication method was evaluated and revealed good values concerning the peak currents obtained (8.7% for nitrite and 9.3% for ascorbate). The electrodes obtained through this method exhibited satisfactory lifetime (ca. 400 runs) over low fabrication cost (less than $1 per piece). The feasibility of the proposed device for real analysis was demonstrated through the determination of nitrite concentration levels in drinking water samples. Based on the results achieved, the approach proposed here shows itself as an interesting alternative for simple fabrication of carbon-based electrodes. Furthermore, the devices indicate great promise for other kind of analytical applications involving ME devices. - Highlights: • A novel method to fabricate screen-printed electrodes for amperometric detection in ME is demonstrated. • No sophisticated

  6. Simple approach for the fabrication of screen-printed carbon-based electrode for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis

    Petroni, Jacqueline Marques [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS, 79074-460 (Brazil); Lucca, Bruno Gabriel, E-mail: bruno.lucca@ufes.br [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, São Mateus, ES, 29932-540 (Brazil); Ferreira, Valdir Souza [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS, 79074-460 (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    This paper describes a simple method for the fabrication of screen-printed based electrodes for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis (ME) devices. The procedure developed is quite simple and does not require expensive instrumentation or sophisticated protocols commonly employed on the production of amperometric sensors, such as photolithography or sputtering steps. The electrodes were fabricated through manual deposition of home-made conductive carbon ink over patterned acrylic substrate. Morphological structure and electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The produced amperometric sensors were coupled to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchips at end-channel configuration in order to evaluate their analytical performance. For this purpose, electrophoretic experiments were carried out using nitrite and ascorbic acid as model analytes. Separation of these substances was successfully performed within 50s with good resolution (R = 1.2) and sensitivities (713.5 pA/μM for nitrite and 255.4 pA/μM for ascorbate). The reproducibility of the fabrication method was evaluated and revealed good values concerning the peak currents obtained (8.7% for nitrite and 9.3% for ascorbate). The electrodes obtained through this method exhibited satisfactory lifetime (ca. 400 runs) over low fabrication cost (less than $1 per piece). The feasibility of the proposed device for real analysis was demonstrated through the determination of nitrite concentration levels in drinking water samples. Based on the results achieved, the approach proposed here shows itself as an interesting alternative for simple fabrication of carbon-based electrodes. Furthermore, the devices indicate great promise for other kind of analytical applications involving ME devices. - Highlights: • A novel method to fabricate screen-printed electrodes for amperometric detection in ME is demonstrated. • No sophisticated

  7. High efficient plastic solar cells fabricated with a high-throughput gravure printing method

    Kopola, P.; Jin, H.; Tuomikoski, M.; Maaninen, A.; Hast, J. [VTT, Kaitovaeylae 1, FIN-90571 Oulu (Finland); Aernouts, T. [IMEC, Organic PhotoVoltaics, Polymer and Molecular Electronics, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Guillerez, S. [CEA-INES RDI, 50 Avenue Du Lac Leman, 73370 Le Bourget Du Lac (France)

    2010-10-15

    We report on polymer-based solar cells prepared by the high-throughput roll-to-roll gravure printing method. The engravings of the printing plate, along with process parameters like printing speed and ink properties, are studied to optimise the printability of the photoactive as well as the hole transport layer. For the hole transport layer, the focus is on testing different formulations to produce thorough wetting of the indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate. The challenge for the photoactive layer is to form a uniform layer with optimal nanomorphology in the poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. This results in a power conversion efficiency of 2.8% under simulated AM1.5G solar illumination for a solar cell device with gravure-printed hole transport and a photoactive layer. (author)

  8. Laser printed organic semiconductor PQT-12 for bottom-gate organic thin-film transistors: Fabrication and characterization

    Makrygianni, M. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Iroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); National Technical University of Athens, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Iroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Ainsebaa, A. [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Department of Flexible Electronics, CMP-EMSE, MOC, 13541 Gardanne (France); Nagel, M. [EMPA Swiss Federal Lab. for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dubendorf (Switzerland); Sanaur, S. [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Department of Flexible Electronics, CMP-EMSE, MOC, 13541 Gardanne (France); Raptis, Y.S. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Iroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Zergioti, I., E-mail: zergioti@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Iroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Tsamakis, D. [National Technical University of Athens, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Iroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Smooth printing of semiconducting π-conjugated polymer patterns for BG-BC OTFTs. • Well-ordering of PQT-12 when diluted in a high-boiling-point solvent yielding good interface properties. • No significant change in polymer chain orientation observed between LIFT printed patterns. • Reliable solid phase printing technique for thin, organic large area electronics applications, in a well-defined manner. - Abstract: In this work, we report on the effect of laser printed Poly (3,3‴-didodecyl quarter thiophene) on its optical, structural and electrical properties for bottom-gate/bottom-contact organic thin-film transistors applications. This semiconducting π-conjugated polymer was solution-deposited (spin-coated) on a donor substrate and transferred by means of solid phase laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique on SiO{sub 2}/Si receiver substrates to form the active material. This article presents a detailed study of the electrical properties of the fabricated transistors by measuring the parasitic resistances for gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) as source-drain electrodes, for optimizing OTFTs in terms of contacts. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that it is possible to control the polymer microstructure through the choice of solvent. Also, no significant change in polymer chain orientation was observed between two printed patterns at 90 and 130 mJ/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by Raman spectra. The results demonstrate hole mobility values of (2.6 ± 1.3) × 10{sup −2} cm{sup 2}/Vs, and lower parasitic resistance for dielectric surface roughness around 1.2 nm and Pt electrodes. Higher performances are correlated to i) the well-ordering of PQT-12 surface when a high-boiling-point solvent is used and ii) the less limitating Pt source/drain electrodes. This analytical study proves that solid phase LIFT printing is a reliable technology for the fabrication of thin, organic large area electronics in a well-defined manner.

  9. Laser printed organic semiconductor PQT-12 for bottom-gate organic thin-film transistors: Fabrication and characterization

    Makrygianni, M.; Ainsebaa, A.; Nagel, M.; Sanaur, S.; Raptis, Y.S.; Zergioti, I.; Tsamakis, D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Smooth printing of semiconducting π-conjugated polymer patterns for BG-BC OTFTs. • Well-ordering of PQT-12 when diluted in a high-boiling-point solvent yielding good interface properties. • No significant change in polymer chain orientation observed between LIFT printed patterns. • Reliable solid phase printing technique for thin, organic large area electronics applications, in a well-defined manner. - Abstract: In this work, we report on the effect of laser printed Poly (3,3‴-didodecyl quarter thiophene) on its optical, structural and electrical properties for bottom-gate/bottom-contact organic thin-film transistors applications. This semiconducting π-conjugated polymer was solution-deposited (spin-coated) on a donor substrate and transferred by means of solid phase laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique on SiO_2/Si receiver substrates to form the active material. This article presents a detailed study of the electrical properties of the fabricated transistors by measuring the parasitic resistances for gold (Au) and platinum (Pt) as source-drain electrodes, for optimizing OTFTs in terms of contacts. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that it is possible to control the polymer microstructure through the choice of solvent. Also, no significant change in polymer chain orientation was observed between two printed patterns at 90 and 130 mJ/cm"2 as confirmed by Raman spectra. The results demonstrate hole mobility values of (2.6 ± 1.3) × 10"−"2 cm"2/Vs, and lower parasitic resistance for dielectric surface roughness around 1.2 nm and Pt electrodes. Higher performances are correlated to i) the well-ordering of PQT-12 surface when a high-boiling-point solvent is used and ii) the less limitating Pt source/drain electrodes. This analytical study proves that solid phase LIFT printing is a reliable technology for the fabrication of thin, organic large area electronics in a well-defined manner.

  10. Adaptation of pharmaceutical excipients to FDM 3D printing for the fabrication of patient-tailored immediate release tablets.

    Sadia, Muzna; Sośnicka, Agata; Arafat, Basel; Isreb, Abdullah; Ahmed, Waqar; Kelarakis, Antonios; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2016-11-20

    This work aims to employ fused deposition modelling 3D printing to fabricate immediate release pharmaceutical tablets with several model drugs. It investigates the addition of non-melting filler to methacrylic matrix to facilitate FDM 3D printing and explore the impact of (i) the nature of filler, (ii) compatibility with the gears of the 3D printer and iii) polymer: filler ratio on the 3D printing process. Amongst the investigated fillers in this work, directly compressible lactose, spray-dried lactose and microcrystalline cellulose showed a level of degradation at 135°C whilst talc and TCP allowed consistent flow of the filament and a successful 3D printing of the tablet. A specially developed universal filament based on pharmaceutically approved methacrylic polymer (Eudragit EPO) and thermally stable filler, TCP (tribasic calcium phosphate) was optimised. Four model drugs with different physicochemical properties were included into ready-to-use mechanically stable tablets with immediate release properties. Following the two thermal processes (hot melt extrusion (HME) and fused deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printing), drug contents were 94.22%, 88.53%, 96.51% and 93.04% for 5-ASA, captopril, theophylline and prednisolone respectively. XRPD indicated that a fraction of 5-ASA, theophylline and prednisolone remained crystalline whilst captopril was in amorphous form. By combining the advantages of thermally stable pharmaceutically approved polymers and fillers, this unique approach provides a low cost production method for on demand manufacturing of individualised dosage forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of Sintering Time and Holding Time for 3D Printing of Fe-Based Metallic Glasses

    Wenzheng Wu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fe-based metallic glasses are amorphous alloys with high strength, high hardness, and excellent corrosion resistance; however, the immaturity of processing methods has prevented their wide application in industrial production. Fe-based metallic glass parts were manufactured employing pneumatic injection additive manufacturing in this study. An evenly dispersed and stable Fe-based metallic glass powder slurry with a solids content of 50% was prepared firstly. Then the Fe-based metallic glass parts were printed. The printed parts were dried, debinded, and sintered for strengthening. The deformations of the printed parts and sintered parts relative to the original model were then analyzed by a 3D scanning reconstruction method. The slightly average bulging and sunken deformation of the printed parts and sintered parts confirmed the good printing accuracy of the pneumatic injection manufacture system. The effects of the sintering temperature and holding time on the properties of the sintered parts were studied. For a sintering temperature of 580 °C and holding time of 1 h, the surface quality of the sintered parts was better. The sintering of 3D-printed Fe-based metallic glass parts was preliminarily realized in this study, and the feasibility of preparing Fe-based metallic glass using pneumatic injection additive manufacture was verified.

  12. Low-cost fabrication and performance testing of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micromixers using an improved print-and-Peel (PAP) method

    Abagon, Ma. Victoria; Buendia, Neil Daniel; Jasper Caracas, Corine; July Yap, Kristian

    2018-03-01

    The research presents different configurations of microfluidic mixers made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fabricated using an improved, low-cost print-and-peel (PAP) method. Processes, such as mixing, operated in the micro scale allow decreased equipment size-to-production capacity ratio and decreased energy consumption per unit product. In the study, saturated solutions of blue and yellow food dyes were introduced inside the channels using a LEGO® improvised microsyringe pump. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the average depth of the fabricated micromixers which was found to be around 14 ¼m. The flows were observed and images were taken using a light microscope. The color intensities of the images were then measured using MATLAB®. From the relationship between color intensity and concentration, the mixing indices were calculated and found to be 0.9435 to 0.9941, which falls within the standard mixing index range (0.8 - 1.0) regardless of the flow rate and the configuration of the micromixer as verified through the two-way ANOVA. From the cost analysis, the cost of the device fabricated in this study is a hundred-fold less than expenses from standard fabrication procedures. Hence, the fabricated device provides an alternative for micromixers produced from expensive and conventional lithographic methods.

  13. Screen-printed electrodes for environmental monitoring of heavy metal ions: a review

    Barton, John; González García, María Begoña; Hernández Santos, David; Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo; Ribotti, Alberto; Magni, Paolo; McCaul, Margaret; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, zinc and copper are among the most important pollutants because of their non-biodegradability and toxicity above certain thresholds. Here, we review methods for sensing heavy metal ions (HMI) in water samples using screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) as transducers. The review (with 107 refs.) starts with an introduction into the topic, and this is followed by sections on (a) mercury-coated SPEs, (b) bismuth-coated SPEs, (c) gold-coated SPEs (d) chemically modified and non-modified carbon SPEs, (e) enzyme inhibition-based SPEs, and (f) an overview of commercially available electrochemical portable heavy metal analyzers. The review reveals the significance of SPEs in terms of decentralized and of in situ analysis of heavy metal ions in environmental monitoring. (author)

  14. Enrichment of the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards by a mechanical separation process using a stamp mill

    Yoo, Jae-Min; Jeong, Jinki; Yoo, Kyoungkeun; Lee, Jae-chun; Kim, Wonbaek

    2009-01-01

    Printed circuit boards incorporated in most electrical and electronic equipment contain valuable metals such as Cu, Ni, Au, Ag, Pd, Fe, Sn, and Pb. In order to employ a hydrometallurgical route for the recycling of valuable metals from printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment step is needed. In this study, the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards have been enriched using a mechanical separation process. Waste printed circuit boards shredded to 5.0 mm. The fractions of milled printed circuit boards of size 5.0 mm fraction and the heavy fraction were subjected to two-step magnetic separation. Through the first magnetic separation at 700 Gauss, 83% of the nickel and iron, based on the whole printed circuit boards, was recovered in the magnetic fraction, and 92% of the copper was recovered in the non-magnetic fraction. The cumulative recovery of nickel-iron concentrate was increased by a second magnetic separation at 3000 Gauss, but the grade of the concentrate decreased remarkably from 76% to 56%. The cumulative recovery of copper concentrate decreased, but the grade increased slightly from 71.6% to 75.4%. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of the mechanical separation process consisting of milling/size classification/gravity separation/two-step magnetic separation for enriching metallic components such as Cu, Ni, Al, and Fe from waste printed circuit boards

  15. Bioleaching of metals from printed circuit boards supported with surfactant-producing bacteria

    Karwowska, Ewa; Andrzejewska-Morzuch, Dorota; Łebkowska, Maria; Tabernacka, Agnieszka; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Telepko, Alicja; Konarzewska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bioleaching of metals from printed circuit boards by BSAC-producing bacteria was estimated. • Aeration increased the release of all metals in medium with sulphur and biosurfactant. • Increase in Cu, Pb, Ni and Cr removal rate was observed at 37 °C in acidic medium. -- Abstract: This study has evaluated the possibility of bioleaching zinc, copper, lead, nickel, cadmium and chromium from printed circuit boards by applying a culture of sulphur-oxidising bacteria and a mixed culture of biosurfactant-producing bacteria and sulphur-oxidising bacteria. It was revealed that zinc was removed effectively both in a traditional solution acidified by a way of microbial oxidation of sulphur and when using a microbial culture containing sulphur-oxidising and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. The average process efficiency was 48% for Zn dissolution. Cadmium removal was similar in both media, with a highest metal release of 93%. For nickel and copper, a better effect was obtained in the acidic medium, with a process effectiveness of 48.5% and 53%, respectively. Chromium was the only metal that was removed more effectively in the bioleaching medium containing both sulphur-oxidising and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Lead was removed from the printed circuit boards with very low effectiveness (below 0.5%). Aerating the culture medium with compressed air increased the release of all metals in the medium with sulphur and biosurfactant, and of Ni, Cu, Zn and Cr in the acidic medium. Increasing the temperature of the medium (to 37 °C) had a more significant impact in the acidic environment than in the neutral environment

  16. Bioleaching of metals from printed circuit boards supported with surfactant-producing bacteria

    Karwowska, Ewa, E-mail: ewa.karwowska@is.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Biology Division, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653 Warsaw (Poland); Andrzejewska-Morzuch, Dorota; Łebkowska, Maria [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Biology Division, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653 Warsaw (Poland); Tabernacka, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.tabernacka@is.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Biology Division, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653 Warsaw (Poland); Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Telepko, Alicja; Konarzewska, Agnieszka [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Nowowiejska 20, 00-653 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Bioleaching of metals from printed circuit boards by BSAC-producing bacteria was estimated. • Aeration increased the release of all metals in medium with sulphur and biosurfactant. • Increase in Cu, Pb, Ni and Cr removal rate was observed at 37 °C in acidic medium. -- Abstract: This study has evaluated the possibility of bioleaching zinc, copper, lead, nickel, cadmium and chromium from printed circuit boards by applying a culture of sulphur-oxidising bacteria and a mixed culture of biosurfactant-producing bacteria and sulphur-oxidising bacteria. It was revealed that zinc was removed effectively both in a traditional solution acidified by a way of microbial oxidation of sulphur and when using a microbial culture containing sulphur-oxidising and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. The average process efficiency was 48% for Zn dissolution. Cadmium removal was similar in both media, with a highest metal release of 93%. For nickel and copper, a better effect was obtained in the acidic medium, with a process effectiveness of 48.5% and 53%, respectively. Chromium was the only metal that was removed more effectively in the bioleaching medium containing both sulphur-oxidising and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Lead was removed from the printed circuit boards with very low effectiveness (below 0.5%). Aerating the culture medium with compressed air increased the release of all metals in the medium with sulphur and biosurfactant, and of Ni, Cu, Zn and Cr in the acidic medium. Increasing the temperature of the medium (to 37 °C) had a more significant impact in the acidic environment than in the neutral environment.

  17. Experimental Exploration of Metal Cable as Reinforcement in 3D Printed Concrete.

    Bos, Freek P; Ahmed, Zeeshan Y; Jutinov, Evgeniy R; Salet, Theo A M

    2017-11-16

    The Material Deposition Method (MDM) is enjoying increasing attention as an additive method to create concrete mortar structures characterised by a high degree of form-freedom, a lack of geometrical repetition, and automated construction. Several small-scale structures have been realised around the world, or are under preparation. However, the nature of this construction method is unsuitable for conventional reinforcement methods to achieve ductile failure behaviour. Sometimes, this is solved by combining printing with conventional casting and reinforcing techniques. This study, however, explores an alternative strategy, namely to directly entrain a metal cable in the concrete filament during printing to serve as reinforcement. A device is introduced to apply the reinforcement. Several options for online reinforcement media are compared for printability. Considerations specific to the manufacturing process are discussed. Subsequently, pull-out tests on cast and printed specimens provide an initial characterisation of bond behaviour. Bending tests furthermore show the potential of this reinforcement method. The bond stress of cables in printed concrete was comparable to values reported for smooth rebar but lower than that of the same cables in cast concrete. The scatter in experimental results was high. When sufficient bond length is available, ductile failure behaviour for tension parallel to the filament direction can be achieved, even though cable slip occurs. Further improvements to the process should pave the way to achieve better post-crack resistance, as the concept in itself is feasible.

  18. PZT Films Fabricated by Metal Organic Decomposition Method

    Sobolev, Vladimir; Ishchuk, Valeriy

    2014-03-01

    High quality lead zirconate titanate films have been fabricated on different substrates by metal organic decomposition method and their ferroelectric properties have been investigated. Main attention was paid to studies of the influence of the buffer layer with conditional composition Pb1.3(Zr0.5Ti0.5) O3 on the properties of Pb(Zr0.5Ti0.5) O3 films fabricated on the polycrystalline titanium and platinum substrates. It is found that in the films on the Pt substrate (with or without the buffer layer) the dependencies of the remanent polarization and the coercivity field on the number of switching cycles do not manifest fatigue up to 109 cycles. The remanent polarization dependencies for films on the Ti substrate with the buffer layer containing an excess of PbO demonstrate an fundamentally new feature that consists of a remanent polarization increase after 108 switching cycles. The increase of remanent polarization is about 50% when the number of cycles approaches 1010, while the increase of the coercivity field is small. A monotonic increase of dielectric losses has been observed in all cases.

  19. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Kuldeep, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto

    2016-01-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention...... in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique...... to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random...

  20. Design and fabrication of metal-insulator-metal diode for high frequency applications

    Azad, Ibrahim; Ram, Manoj K.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias

    2017-02-01

    Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes play significant role in high speed electronics where high frequency rectification is needed. Quantum based tunneling mechanism helps MIM diodes to rectify at high frequency signals. Rectenna, antenna coupled MIM diodes are becoming popular due to their potential use as IR detectors and energy harvesters. Because of small active area, MIM diodes could easily be incorporated into integrated circuits (IC's). The objective of the work is to design and develop MIM diodes for high frequency rectification. In this work, thin insulating layer of ZnO was fabricated using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique which facilitates ultrathin thin, uniform and pinhole free fabrication of insulating layer. The ZnO layer was synthesized from organic precursor of zinc acetate layer. The optimization in the LB technique of fabrication process led to fabricate MIM diodes with high non-linearity and sensitivity. Moreover, the top and bottom electrodes as well as active area of the diodes were patterned using UV-tunneling conduction mechanism. The highest sensitivity of the diode was measured around 37 (A/W), and the rectification ratio was found around 36 under low applied bias at +/-100 mV.

  1. Low temperature fabrication of magnesium phosphate cement scaffolds by 3D powder printing.

    Klammert, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Reuther, Tobias; Müller, Frank A; Zorn, Katharina; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Synthetic bone replacement materials are of great interest because they offer certain advantages compared with organic bone grafts. Biodegradability and preoperative manufacturing of patient specific implants are further desirable features in various clinical situations. Both can be realised by 3D powder printing. In this study, we introduce powder-printed magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) structures, accompanied by a neutral setting reaction by printing farringtonite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2)) powder with ammonium phosphate solution as binder. Suitable powders were obtained after sintering at 1100°C for 5 h following 20-40 min dry grinding in a ball mill. Depending on the post-treatment of the samples, compressive strengths were found to be in the range 2-7 MPa. Cytocompatibility was demonstrated in vitro using the human osteoblastic cell line MG63.

  2. Fabrication of Metallic Fuel Slugs for Irradiation Experiments in Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    Saify, M.T.; Jha, S.K.; Abdulla, K.K.; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of Metallic fuels for future FBR: → High heavy metal atom density; → Higher thermal conductivity at room temperature that increases with temperature; → Metal fuels can be relatively easily fabricated with close dimensional tolerances; → They have excellent compatibility with liquid metal coolants

  3. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    Mitra Asadi-Eydivand

    Full Text Available The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat

  4. Printed Nano Cu and NiSi Contacts and Metallization for Solar Cell Modules

    Carmody, Michael John [Intrinsiq Materials Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-10-11

    There has long been a desire to replace the front-side silver contacts in silicon solar cells. There are two driving forces to do this. First, silver is an expensive precious metal. Secondly, the process to use silver requires that it be formulated into screen print pastes that need a lead-containing glass frit, and the use of lead is forbidden in many parts of the world. Because of the difficulty in replacing these pastes and the attendant processes, lead exemptions have granted to solar cells. Copper has been the replacement metal of choice because it is significantly cheaper than silver and is very close to silver in electrical conductivity. Using processes which do not use lead, obviates it as an environmental contaminant. However, copper cannot be in contact with the silicon of the cell since it migrates through the silicon and causes defects which severely damage the efficiency of the cell. Hence, a conductive barrier must be placed between the copper and silicon and nickel, and especially nickel silicide, have been shown to be materials of choice. However, nickel must be sputtered and annealed to create the nickel silicide barrier, and copper has either been sputtered or plated. All of these processes require expensive, specialized equipment and plating uses environmentally unfriendly chemicals. Therefore, Intrinsiq proposed using printed nano nickel silicide ink (which we had previously invented) and printed nano copper ink to create these electrodes and barriers. We found that nano copper ink could be readily printed and sintered under a reducing atmosphere to give highly conductive grids. We further showed that nano nickel silicide ink could be readily jetted into grids on top of the silicon cell. It could then be annealed to create a barrier. However, it was found that the combination of printed NiSi and printed Cu did not give contact resistivity good enough to produce efficient cells. Only plated copper on top of the printed NiSi gave useful contact

  5. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy

    Wu Weigang; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Sun Jianhua; Liu Yudong, E-mail: Zheng-qx@163.co [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2009-12-15

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  6. A novel, disposable, screen-printed amperometric biosensor for glucose in serum fabricated using a water-based carbon ink.

    Crouch, Eric; Cowell, David C; Hoskins, Stephen; Pittson, Robin W; Hart, John P

    2005-11-15

    Screen-printed amperometric glucose biosensors have been fabricated using a water-based carbon ink. The enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) and the electro-catalyst cobalt phthalocyanine were mixed with the carbon ink prior to the screen-printing process; therefore, biosensors are prepared in a one-step fabrication procedure. Optimisation of the biosensor performance was achieved by studying the effects of pH, buffer strength, and applied potential on the analytical response. Calibration studies were performed under optimum conditions, using amperometry in stirred solution, with an operating potential of +500 mV versus SCE. The sensitivity was found to be 1170 nA mM(-1), with a linear range of 0.025-2 mM; the former represents the detection limit. The disposable amperometric biosensor was evaluated by carrying out replicate determinations on a sample of bovine serum. This was achieved by the method of multiple standard additions and included a correction for background currents arising from oxidizable serum components. The mean serum concentration was calculated to be 8.63 mM and compared well with the supplier's value of 8.3 mM; the coefficient of variation was calculated to be 3.3% (n=6).

  7. A programmed release multi-drug implant fabricated by three-dimensional printing technology for bone tuberculosis therapy

    Wu Weigang; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Sun Jianhua; Liu Yudong

    2009-01-01

    In the world, bone tuberculosis is still very difficult to treat and presents a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we utilized 3D printing technology to fabricate a programmed release multi-drug implant for bone tuberculosis therapy. The construction of the drug implant was a multi-layered concentric cylinder divided into four layers from the center to the periphery. Isoniazid and rifampicin were distributed individually into the different layers in a specific sequence of isoniazid-rifampicin-isoniazid-rifampicin. The drug release assays in vitro and in vivo showed that isoniazid and rifampicin were released orderly from the outside to the center to form the multi-drug therapeutic alliance, and the peak concentrations of drugs were detected in sequence at 8 to 12 day intervals. In addition, no negative effect on the proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was detected during the cytocompatibility assay. Due to its ideal pharmacologic action and cytocompatibility, the programmed release multi-drug implant with a complex construction fabricated by 3D printing technology could be of interest in prevention and treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  8. Digital Inkjet Textile Printing

    Wang, Meichun

    2017-01-01

    Digital inkjet textile printing is an emerging technology developed with the rise of the digital world. It offers a possibility to print high-resolution images with unlimited color selection on fabrics. Digital inkjet printing brings a revolutionary chance for the textile printing industry. The history of textile printing shows the law how new technology replaces the traditional way of printing. This indicates the future of digital inkjet textile printing is relatively positive. Differen...

  9. Leaching of metals from large pieces of printed circuit boards using citric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Jadhav, Umesh; Su, C; Hocheng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the leaching of metals from large pieces of computer printed circuit boards (CPCBs) was studied. A combination of citric acid (0.5 M) and 1.76 M hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) was used to leach the metals from CPCB piece. The influence of system variables such as H 2 O 2 concentration, concentration of citric acid, shaking speed, and temperature on the metal leaching process was investigated. The complete metal leaching was achieved in 4 h from a 4 × 4 cm CPCB piece. The presence of citric acid and H 2 O 2 together in the leaching solution is essential for complete metal leaching. The optimum addition amount of H 2 O 2 was 5.83 %. The citric acid concentration and shaking speed had an insignificant effect on the leaching of metals. The increase in the temperature above 30 °C showed a drastic effect on metal leaching process.

  10. Characterization of Printed Circuit Boards for Metal and Energy Recovery after Milling and Mechanical Separation

    Waldir A. Bizzo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The proper disposal of electrical and electronic waste is currently a concern of researchers and environmental managers not only because of the large volume of such waste generated, but also because of the heavy metals and toxic substances it contains. This study analyzed printed circuit boards (PCBs from discarded computers to determine their metal content and characterized them as solid waste and fuel. The analysis showed that PCBs consist of approximately 26% metal, made up mainly of copper, lead, aluminum, iron and tin, as well as other heavy metals such as cadmium and nickel. Comparison with the results of other studies indicated that the concentration of precious metals (gold and silver has declined over time. Analysis of the leachate revealed high concentrations of cadmium and lead, giving the residue the characteristics of hazardous waste. After milling the PCBs, we found that larger amounts of metal were concentrated in smaller fractions, while the lightest fraction, obtained by density separation, had a gross calorific value of approximately 11 MJ/kg, although with a high ash content. Milling followed by density separation proved potentially useful for recovery of metals and energy-rich fractions.

  11. Fabrication of scalable and structured tissue engineering scaffolds using water dissolvable sacrificial 3D printed moulds

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Larsen, Layla Bashir; Trifol Guzman, Jon

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in producing large scale engineered tissue is the lack of ability to create large highly perfused scaffolds in which cells can grow at a high cell density and viability. Here, we explore 3D printed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a sacrificial mould in a polymer casting...

  12. Surface processing and ageing behavior of silk fabrics treated with atmospheric-pressure plasma for pigment-based ink-jet printing

    Zhang, Chunming; Wang, Libing; Yu, Miao; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2018-03-01

    Pigment inkjet printing has highlighted the advantages of cost-effective, short production cycle and environment-friendly. However, patterns directly printed with pigment inks usually have low color yields and blurry images which are caused by bleeding phenomenon. This work presents an atmospheric-pressure plasma method for improving the pigment-based ink-jet printing performance of silk fabrics. The effects of surface changes induced are discussed, with data derived from morphological study by atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurement. Ink-jet printing experiments were conducted to study the influence of measured changes on anti-bleeding property and color strength of treated and original samples. The ageing experiment indicates that the modified silk fabrics should be printed within 24 h after plasma processing for maximum color yields. This study explores an effective approach for the atmospheric-pressure plasma, which can provide its significant use in improving the surface properties and ink-jet printing performance of fabrics.

  13. Feasibility of fabricating personalized 3D-printed bone grafts guided by high-resolution imaging

    Hong, Abigail L.; Newman, Benjamin T.; Khalid, Arbab; Teter, Olivia M.; Kobe, Elizabeth A.; Shukurova, Malika; Shinde, Rohit; Sipzner, Daniel; Pignolo, Robert J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.

    2017-03-01

    Current methods of bone graft treatment for critical size bone defects can give way to several clinical complications such as limited available bone for autografts, non-matching bone structure, lack of strength which can compromise a patient's skeletal system, and sterilization processes that can prevent osteogenesis in the case of allografts. We intend to overcome these disadvantages by generating a patient-specific 3D printed bone graft guided by high-resolution medical imaging. Our synthetic model allows us to customize the graft for the patients' macro- and microstructure and correct any structural deficiencies in the re-meshing process. These 3D-printed models can presumptively serve as the scaffolding for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) engraftment in order to facilitate bone growth. We performed highresolution CT imaging of a cadaveric human proximal femur at 0.030-mm isotropic voxels. We used these images to generate a 3D computer model that mimics bone geometry from micro to macro scale represented by STereoLithography (STL) format. These models were then reformatted to a format that can be interpreted by the 3D printer. To assess how much of the microstructure was replicated, 3D-printed models were re-imaged using micro-CT at 0.025-mm isotropic voxels and compared to original high-resolution CT images used to generate the 3D model in 32 sub-regions. We found a strong correlation between 3D-printed bone volume and volume of bone in the original images used for 3D printing (R2 = 0.97). We expect to further refine our approach with additional testing to create a viable synthetic bone graft with clinical functionality.

  14. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  15. Treatment of Wastewater from Electroplating, Metal Finishing and Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants Volume 4.

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    One of four manuals dealing with the operation of wastewater plants, this document was designed to address the treatment of wastewater from electroplating, metal finishing, and printed circuit board manufacturing. It emphasizes how to operate and maintain facilities which neutralize acidic and basic waters; treat waters containing metals; destroy…

  16. Fabrication of long linear arrays of plastic optical fibers with squared ends for the use of code mark printing lithography

    Horiuchi, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Jun; Suzuki, Yuta; Iwasaki, Jun-ya

    2017-05-01

    Two dimensional code marks are often used for the production management. In particular, in the production lines of liquid-crystal-display panels and others, data on fabrication processes such as production number and process conditions are written on each substrate or device in detail, and they are used for quality managements. For this reason, lithography system specialized in code mark printing is developed. However, conventional systems using lamp projection exposure or laser scan exposure are very expensive. Therefore, development of a low-cost exposure system using light emitting diodes (LEDs) and optical fibers with squared ends arrayed in a matrix is strongly expected. In the past research, feasibility of such a new exposure system was demonstrated using a handmade system equipped with 100 LEDs with a central wavelength of 405 nm, a 10×10 matrix of optical fibers with 1 mm square ends, and a 10X projection lens. Based on these progresses, a new method for fabricating large-scale arrays of finer fibers with squared ends was developed in this paper. At most 40 plastic optical fibers were arranged in a linear gap of an arraying instrument, and simultaneously squared by heating them on a hotplate at 120°C for 7 min. Fiber sizes were homogeneous within 496+/-4 μm. In addition, average light leak was improved from 34.4 to 21.3% by adopting the new method in place of conventional one by one squaring method. Square matrix arrays necessary for printing code marks will be obtained by piling the newly fabricated linear arrays up.

  17. Measurement of Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness of Woven Fabrics Containing Metallic Yarns by Mobile Devices

    Erhan Kenan ÇEVEN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce an alternative method to evaluate the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (EMSE of woven fabrics containing metal wires. For experimental measurements, hybrid silk viscose yarns containing metal wires were first produced. Conductive test fabrics were then produced using the hybrid weft yarns and polyester warp yarns. The produced fabrics were separated in two parts and laminated together after rotating one fabric by 90 degrees to create a grid structure. The laminated fabrics were then folded by several times to create multiple layers such as 2,4,8,12,16. The EMSE of the multiple layered fabrics was measured over GSM signals received by a mobile device. For EMSE evaluation, the mobile device was placed between the laminated fabrics. The EMSE values of the fabrics were then calculated in accordance with the power variations of GSM signals.

  18. A Fully Inkjet Printed 3D Honeycomb Inspired Patch Antenna

    McKerricher, Garret; Titterington, Don; Shamim, Atif

    2015-01-01

    by inkjet printing in this work. This is the first demonstration of a fully 3D Multijet printing process with integrated polymer and metal. A 2.4 GHz patch antenna is successfully fabricated with good performance proving the viability of the process

  19. Optimising 3D printed concrete structures using topology optimisation

    Martens, P.; Mathot, M.; Bos, F.P.; Coenders, J.; Hordijk, D.A.; Luković, M.

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing and 3D printing are rapidly developing digital fabrication techniques (Lu et al. 2015). After the first steps in small scale printing of metals (Frazier 2014) and plastics (Gibson et al. 2014) have been made, research from various groups around the world is now also focusing

  20. Microplasma fabrication: from semiconductor technology for 2D-chips and microfluidic channels to rapid prototyping and 3D-printing of microplasma devices

    Shatford, R.; Karanassios, Vassili

    2014-05-01

    Microplasmas are receiving attention in recent conferences and current scientific literature. In our laboratory, microplasmas-on-chips proved to be particularly attractive. The 2D- and 3D-chips we developed became hybrid because they were fitted with a quartz plate (quartz was used due to its transparency to UV). Fabrication of 2D- and 3D-chips for microplasma research is described. The fabrication methods described ranged from semiconductor fabrication technology, to Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining, to 3D-printing. These methods may prove to be useful for those contemplating in entering microplasma research but have no access to expensive semiconductor fabrication equipment.

  1. Simple approach for the fabrication of screen-printed carbon-based electrode for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis.

    Petroni, Jacqueline Marques; Lucca, Bruno Gabriel; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2017-02-15

    This paper describes a simple method for the fabrication of screen-printed based electrodes for amperometric detection on microchip electrophoresis (ME) devices. The procedure developed is quite simple and does not require expensive instrumentation or sophisticated protocols commonly employed on the production of amperometric sensors, such as photolithography or sputtering steps. The electrodes were fabricated through manual deposition of home-made conductive carbon ink over patterned acrylic substrate. Morphological structure and electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The produced amperometric sensors were coupled to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchips at end-channel configuration in order to evaluate their analytical performance. For this purpose, electrophoretic experiments were carried out using nitrite and ascorbic acid as model analytes. Separation of these substances was successfully performed within 50s with good resolution (R = 1.2) and sensitivities (713.5 pA/μM for nitrite and 255.4 pA/μM for ascorbate). The reproducibility of the fabrication method was evaluated and revealed good values concerning the peak currents obtained (8.7% for nitrite and 9.3% for ascorbate). The electrodes obtained through this method exhibited satisfactory lifetime (ca. 400 runs) over low fabrication cost (less than $1 per piece). The feasibility of the proposed device for real analysis was demonstrated through the determination of nitrite concentration levels in drinking water samples. Based on the results achieved, the approach proposed here shows itself as an interesting alternative for simple fabrication of carbon-based electrodes. Furthermore, the devices indicate great promise for other kind of analytical applications involving ME devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transfer printing techniques for materials assembly and micro/nanodevice fabrication.

    Carlson, Andrew; Bowen, Audrey M; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2012-10-09

    Transfer printing represents a set of techniques for deterministic assembly of micro-and nanomaterials into spatially organized, functional arrangements with two and three-dimensional layouts. Such processes provide versatile routes not only to test structures and vehicles for scientific studies but also to high-performance, heterogeneously integrated functional systems, including those in flexible electronics, three-dimensional and/or curvilinear optoelectronics, and bio-integrated sensing and therapeutic devices. This article summarizes recent advances in a variety of transfer printing techniques, ranging from the mechanics and materials aspects that govern their operation to engineering features of their use in systems with varying levels of complexity. A concluding section presents perspectives on opportunities for basic and applied research, and on emerging use of these methods in high throughput, industrial-scale manufacturing. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Application of vacuum metallurgy to separate pure metal from mixed metallic particles of crushed waste printed circuit board scraps.

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2008-10-15

    The principle of separating pure metal from mixed metallic particles (MMPs) byvacuum metallurgy is that the vapor pressures of various metals at the same temperature are different As a result, the metal with high vapor pressure and low boiling point can be separated from the mixed metals through distillation or sublimation, and then it can be recycled through condensation under a certain condition. The vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) of MMPs of crushed waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) has been studied in this paper. Theoretical analyses show that the MMPs (copper, zinc, bismuth, lead, and indium, for example) can be separated by vacuum metallurgy. The copper particles (0.15-0.20 mm) and zinc particles (<0.30 mm) were chosen to simulate the MMPs of crushed WPCBs. Experimental results show that the separated efficiency of zinc in the copper-rich particles achieves 96.19 wt % when the vacuum pressure is 0.01-0.10 Pa, the heating temperature is 1123 K, and the heating time is 105 min. Under this operation condition, the separated efficiency of zinc in the copper-rich particles from crushed WPCBs achieves 97.00 wt % and the copper purity increases from 90.68 to 99.84 wt %.

  4. Inkjet Printing as High-Throughput Technique for the Fabrication of NiCo2O4 Films

    Reyna Dianela Bacelis-Martínez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its distinctive physicochemical properties, nickel-cobalt mixed oxide (NiCo2O4 has become a promising and innovative material for applications in many technological fields. The design of fast and reliable techniques for the deposition of this material is essential in the development of applications. In this work, NiCo2O4 films were successfully prepared by an inkjet printing technique using a suitable ink obtained from metal nitrates in a glycerol-water mixture. In order to deposit well-defined and uniform film patterns, the instrumental parameters such as drop spacing and inkjet voltage have been explored. The pure crystalline bimetallic nickel cobaltite oxide is obtained at 500°C with a homogeneous compositional distribution along the film. The average thickness observed by scanning electron microscopy is around 490 nm, whereas X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the film surface presents mixed oxidation states for both metals: Co2+, Co3+, Ni2+, and Ni3+. The electrocatalytic performance of inkjet-printed NiCo2O4 films for the water oxidation reaction is comparable with earlier reports.

  5. Fabrication of arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes by shadow evaporation.

    Dickey, Michael D; Weiss, Emily A; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Chiechi, Ryan C; Capasso, Federico; Whitesides, George M

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for fabricating uniform arrays of metal and metal oxide nanotubes with controlled heights and diameters. The technique involves depositing material onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template using a collimated electron beam evaporation source. The evaporating material enters the porous openings of the AAO membrane and deposits onto the walls of the pores. The membrane is tilted with respect to the column of evaporating material, so the shadows cast by the openings of the pores onto the inside walls of the pores define the geometry of the tubes. Rotation of the membrane during evaporation ensures uniform deposition inside the pores. After evaporation, dissolution of the AAO in base easily removes the template to yield an array of nanotubes connected by a thin backing of the same metal or metal oxide. The diameter of the pores dictates the diameter of the tubes, and the incident angle of evaporation determines the height of the tubes. Tubes up to approximately 1.5 mum in height and 20-200 nm in diameter were fabricated. This method is adaptable to any material that can be vapor-deposited, including indium-tin oxide (ITO), a conductive, transparent material that is useful for many opto-electronic applications. An array of gold nanotubes produced by this technique served as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: the Raman signal (per molecule) from a monolayer of benzenethiolate was a factor of approximately 5 x 10(5) greater than that obtained using bulk liquid benzenethiol.

  6. Fabrication, characterization and screen printing of conductive ink based on carbon@Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Shuanglei; Zhang, Shaofeng; Zhang, Hongbo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2014-08-01

    The large-scale synthesis and characterization of carbon-core/Ag-shell (C@Ag) nanoparticles by the successive reduction of silver ammonia are described. The resultant C@Ag nanoparticles had a mean core diameter of 360 nm and a controllable shell thickness from 10 to 40 nm by simple adjustments of repeat coating times. Various analysis techniques confirmed that the carbon cores were fully covered by Ag nanoshells. The results also show that C/Ag composite nanomaterials-based conductive inks, which can be easily produced on a large scale and possess outstanding electronic properties, have great potential for the convenient fabrication of flexible and low-cost carbon-based electronic devices and replace the traditional pure silver paste, by using a simple screen printing technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low temperature fabrication of conductive silver lines and dots via transfer-printing and nanoimprinting lithography techniques

    Wu, Chun-Chang; Hsu, Steve Lien-Chung; Chiu, Ching-Wei; Wu, Jung-Tang

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have developed novel methods to fabricate conductive silver tracks and dots directly from silver nitrate solution by transfer-printing and nanoimprinting lithography techniques, which are inexpensive and can be scaled down to the nanometer scale. The silver nitrate precursor can be reduced in ethylene glycol vapor to form silver at low temperatures. Energy dispersive spectrometric analysis results indicate that the silver nitrate has been converted to silver completely. In order to obtain smooth and continuous conductive patterned silver features with high resolution, the silver lines with widths of a few tens of micrometers to nanometers were patterned by using a spin-coating approach. Using a 14 M silver nitrate solution, continuous silver conductive lines with a resistivity of 8.45 × 10 −5 Ω cm has been produced. (paper)

  8. Conformable liquid metal printed epidermal electronics for smart physiological monitoring and simulation treatment

    Wang, Xuelin; Zhang, Yuxin; Guo, Rui; Wang, Hongzhang; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Conformable epidermal printed electronics enabled from gallium-based liquid metals (LMs), highly conductive and low-melting-point alloys, are proposed as the core to achieving immediate contact between skin surface and electrodes, which can avoid the skin deformation often caused by conventional rigid electrodes. When measuring signals, LMs can eliminate resonance problems with shorter time to reach steady state than Pt and gelled Pt electrodes. By comparing the contact resistance under different working conditions, it is demonstrated that both ex vivo and in vivo LM electrode-skin models have the virtues of direct and immediate contact with skin surface without the deformation encountered with conventional rigid electrodes. In addition, electrocardio electrodes composed of conformable LM printed epidermal electronics are adopted as smart devices to monitor electrocardiogram signals of rabbits. Furthermore, simulation treatment for smart defibrillation offers a feasible way to demonstrate the effect of liquid metal electrodes (LMEs) on the human body with less energy loss. The remarkable features of soft epidermal LMEs such as high conformability, good conductivity, better signal stability, and fine biocompatibility represent a critical step towards accurate medical monitoring and future smart treatments.

  9. New technology for recovering residual metals from nonmetallic fractions of waste printed circuit boards.

    Zhang, Guangwen; He, Yaqun; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Xing; Xia, Wencheng

    2017-06-01

    Recycling of waste printed circuit boards is important for environmental protection and sustainable resource utilization. Corona electrostatic separation has been widely used to recycle metals from waste printed circuit boards, but it has poor separation efficiency for finer sized fractions. In this study, a new process of vibrated gas-solid fluidized bed was used to recycle residual metals from nonmetallic fractions, which were treated using the corona electrostatic separation technology. The effects of three main parameters, i.e., vibration frequency, superficial air flow velocity, and fluidizing time on gravity segregation, were investigated using a vibrating gas-solid fluidized bed. Each size fraction had its own optimum parameters. Corresponding to their optimal segregation performance, the products from each experiment were analyzed using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). From the results, it can be seen that the metal recoveries of -1+0.5mm, -0.5+0.25mm, and -0.25mm size fractions were 86.39%, 82.22% and 76.63%, respectively. After separation, each metal content in the -1+0.5 or -0.5+0.25mm size fraction reduced to 1% or less, while the Fe and Cu contents are up to 2.57% and 1.50%, respectively, in the -0.25mm size fraction. Images of the nonmetallic fractions with a size of -0.25mm indicated that a considerable amount of clavate glass fibers existed in these nonmetallic fractions, which may explain why fine particles had the poorest segregation performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A., E-mail: ja.conesa@ua.es; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO{sub 2005}-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) is studied. • Important differences were found at the different experimental conditions. • Emission of brominated pollutants is much higher than that of chlorinated. • Metal enhances emission of halogenated compounds. • An increase in the temperature produces the destruction of pollutants.

  11. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A.; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO 2005 -TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) is studied. • Important differences were found at the different experimental conditions. • Emission of brominated pollutants is much higher than that of chlorinated. • Metal enhances emission of halogenated compounds. • An increase in the temperature produces the destruction of pollutants

  12. Inexpensive, rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices using overhead transparencies and a laser print, cut and laminate fabrication method.

    Thompson, Brandon L; Ouyang, Yiwen; Duarte, Gabriela R M; Carrilho, Emanuel; Krauss, Shannon T; Landers, James P

    2015-06-01

    We describe a technique for fabricating microfluidic devices with complex multilayer architectures using a laser printer, a CO2 laser cutter, an office laminator and common overhead transparencies as a printable substrate via a laser print, cut and laminate (PCL) methodology. The printer toner serves three functions: (i) it defines the microfluidic architecture, which is printed on the overhead transparencies; (ii) it acts as the adhesive agent for the bonding of multiple transparency layers; and (iii) it provides, in its unmodified state, printable, hydrophobic 'valves' for fluidic flow control. By using common graphics software, e.g., CorelDRAW or AutoCAD, the protocol produces microfluidic devices with a design-to-device time of ∼40 min. Devices of any shape can be generated for an array of multistep assays, with colorimetric detection of molecular species ranging from small molecules to proteins. Channels with varying depths can be formed using multiple transparency layers in which a CO2 laser is used to remove the polyester from the channel sections of the internal layers. The simplicity of the protocol, availability of the equipment and substrate and cost-effective nature of the process make microfluidic devices available to those who might benefit most from expedited, microscale chemistry.

  13. Conformal Pad-Printing Electrically Conductive Composites onto Thermoplastic Hemispheres: Toward Sustainable Fabrication of 3-Cents Volumetric Electrically Small Antennas.

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Yang, Cheng; Lin, Ziyin; Liu, Jingping; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Bo; Wong, Ching Ping

    2015-01-01

    Electrically small antennas (ESAs) are becoming one of the key components in the compact wireless devices for telecommunications, defence, and aerospace systems, especially for the spherical one whose geometric layout is more closely approaching Chu's limit, thus yielding significant bandwidth improvements relative to the linear and planar counterparts. Yet broad applications of the volumetric ESAs are still hindered since the low cost fabrication has remained a tremendous challenge. Here we report a state-of-the-art technology to transfer electrically conductive composites (ECCs) from a planar mould to a volumetric thermoplastic substrate by using pad-printing technology without pattern distortion, benefit from the excellent properties of the ECCs as well as the printing-calibration method that we developed. The antenna samples prepared in this way meet the stringent requirement of an ESA (ka is as low as 0.32 and the antenna efficiency is as high as 57%), suggesting that volumetric electronic components i.e. the antennas can be produced in such a simple, green, and cost-effective way. This work can be of interest for the development of studies on green and high performance wireless communication devices.

  14. The challenge of screen printed Ag metallization on nano-scale poly-silicon passivated contacts for silicon solar cells

    Jiang, Lin; Song, Lixin; Yan, Li; Becht, Gregory; Zhang, Yi; Hoerteis, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Passivated contacts can be used to reduce metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon solar cells, and are obtained increasing attentions by PV industries in recent years. The reported thicknesses of passivated contact layers are mostly within tens of nanometer range, and the corresponding metallization methods are realized mainly by plating/evaporation technology. This high cost metallization cannot compete with the screen printing technology, and may affect its market potential comparing with the presently dominant solar cell technology. Very few works have been reported on screen printing metallization on passivated contact solar cells. Hence, there is a rising demand to realize screen printing metallization technology on this topic. In this work, we investigate applying screen printing metallization pastes on poly-silicon passivated contacts. The critical challenge for us is to build low contact resistance that can be competitive to standard technology while restricting the paste penetrations within the thin nano-scale passivated contact layers. The contact resistivity of 1.1mohm-cm2 and the open circuit voltages > 660mV are achieved, and the most appropriate thickness range is estimated to be around 80 150nm.

  15. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Printed Composite Scaffolds Prepared with Different Fabrication Methods

    Szlązak K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An optimal method for composites preparation as an input to rapid prototyping fabrication of scaffolds with potential application in osteochondral tissue engineering is still needed. Scaffolds in tissue engineering applications play a role of constructs providing appropriate mechanical support with defined porosity to assist regeneration of tissue. The aim of the presented study was to analyze the influence of composite fabrication methods on scaffolds mechanical properties. The evaluation was performed on polycaprolactone (PCL with 5 wt% beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP scaffolds fabricated using fused deposition modeling (FDM. Three different methods of PCL-TCP composite preparation: solution casting, particles milling, extrusion and injection were used to provide material for scaffold fabrication. The obtained scaffolds were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope, x-ray micro computed tomography, thermal gravimetric analysis and static material testing machine. All of the scaffolds had the same geometry (cylinder, 4×6 mm and fiber orientation (0/60/120°. There were some differences in the TCP distribution and formation of the ceramic agglomerates in the scaffolds. They depended on fabrication method. The use of composites prepared by solution casting method resulted in scaffolds with the best combination of compressive strength (5.7±0.2 MPa and porosity (48.5±2.7 %, both within the range of trabecular bone.

  16. Fabrication of individual alginate-TCP scaffolds for bone tissue engineering by means of powder printing.

    Castilho, Miguel; Rodrigues, Jorge; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Pereira, Manuel; Moseke, Claus; Groll, Jürgen; Ewald, Andrea; Vorndran, Elke

    2015-01-06

    The development of polymer-calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tailored architectures and properties has great potential for bone regeneration. Herein, we aimed to improve the functional performance of brittle ceramic scaffolds by developing a promising biopolymer-ceramic network. For this purpose, two strategies, namely, direct printing of a powder composition consisting of a 60:40 mixture of α/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder and alginate powder or vacuum infiltration of printed TCP scaffolds with an alginate solution, were tracked. Results of structural characterization revealed that the scaffolds printed with 2.5 wt% alginate-modified TCP powders presented a uniformly distributed and interfusing alginate TCP network. Mechanical results indicated a significant increase in strength, energy to failure and reliability of powder-modified scaffolds with an alginate content in the educts of 2.5 wt% when compared to pure TCP, as well as to TCP scaffolds containing 5 wt% or 7.5 wt% in the educts, in both dry and wet states. Culture of human osteoblast cells on these scaffolds also demonstrated a great improvement of cell proliferation and cell viability. While in the case of powder-mixed alginate TCP scaffolds, isolated alginate gels were formed between the calcium phosphate crystals, the vacuum-infiltration strategy resulted in the covering of the surface and internal pores of the TCP scaffold with a thin alginate film. Furthermore, the prediction of the scaffolds' critical fracture conditions under more complex stress states by the applied Mohr fracture criterion confirmed the potential of the powder-modified scaffolds with 2.5 wt% alginate in the educts as structural biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Fabrication of individual alginate-TCP scaffolds for bone tissue engineering by means of powder printing

    Castilho, Miguel; Rodrigues, Jorge; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Pereira, Manuel; Moseke, Claus; Groll, Jürgen; Ewald, Andrea; Vorndran, Elke

    2015-01-01

    The development of polymer-calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tailored architectures and properties has great potential for bone regeneration. Herein, we aimed to improve the functional performance of brittle ceramic scaffolds by developing a promising biopolymer–ceramic network. For this purpose, two strategies, namely, direct printing of a powder composition consisting of a 60:40 mixture of α/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder and alginate powder or vacuum infiltration of printed TCP scaffolds with an alginate solution, were tracked. Results of structural characterization revealed that the scaffolds printed with 2.5 wt% alginate-modified TCP powders presented a uniformly distributed and interfusing alginate TCP network. Mechanical results indicated a significant increase in strength, energy to failure and reliability of powder-modified scaffolds with an alginate content in the educts of 2.5 wt% when compared to pure TCP, as well as to TCP scaffolds containing 5 wt% or 7.5 wt% in the educts, in both dry and wet states. Culture of human osteoblast cells on these scaffolds also demonstrated a great improvement of cell proliferation and cell viability. While in the case of powder-mixed alginate TCP scaffolds, isolated alginate gels were formed between the calcium phosphate crystals, the vacuum-infiltration strategy resulted in the covering of the surface and internal pores of the TCP scaffold with a thin alginate film. Furthermore, the prediction of the scaffolds’ critical fracture conditions under more complex stress states by the applied Mohr fracture criterion confirmed the potential of the powder-modified scaffolds with 2.5 wt% alginate in the educts as structural biomaterial for bone tissue engineering. (paper)

  18. Design and Fabrication of Kidney Phantoms for Internal Radiation Dosimetry Using 3D Printing Technology.

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Schlögl, Susanne; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Currently, the validation of multimodal quantitative imaging and absorbed dose measurements is impeded by the lack of suitable, commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms of variable sizes and shapes. To demonstrate the potential of 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for quantitative SPECT/CT imaging, a set of kidney dosimetry phantoms and their spherical counterparts was designed and manufactured with a fused-deposition-modeling 3D printer. Nuclide-dependent SPECT/CT calibration factors were determined to assess the accuracy of quantitative imaging for internal renal dosimetry. A set of 4 single-compartment kidney phantoms with filling volumes between 8 and 123 mL was designed on the basis of the outer kidney dimensions provided by MIRD pamphlet 19. After the phantoms had been printed, SPECT/CT acquisitions of 3 radionuclides ( 99m Tc, 177 Lu, and 131 I) were obtained and calibration constants determined for each radionuclide-volume combination. A set of additionally manufactured spheres matching the kidney volumes was also examined to assess the influence of phantom shape and size on the calibration constants. A set of refillable, waterproof, and chemically stable kidneys and spheres was successfully manufactured. Average calibration factors for 99m Tc, 177 Lu, and 131 I were obtained in a large source measured in air. For the largest phantom (122.9 mL), the volumes of interest had to be enlarged by 1.2 mm for 99m Tc, 2.5 mm for 177 Lu, and 4.9 mm for 131 I in all directions to obtain calibration factors comparable to the reference. Although partial-volume effects were observed for decreasing phantom volumes (percentage difference of up to 9.8% for the smallest volume [8.6 mL]), the difference between corresponding sphere-kidney pairs was small (3D printing is a promising prototyping technique for geometry-specific calibration of SPECT/CT systems. Although the underlying radionuclide and the related collimator have a major influence on the calibration

  19. Structural and electrical characteristics of high-k/metal gate metal oxide semiconductor capacitors fabricated on flexible, semi-transparent silicon (100) fabric

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2013-02-12

    In pursuit of flexible computers with high performance devices, we demonstrate a generic process to fabricate 10 000 metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) with semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-k/metal gate stacks on widely used, inexpensive bulk silicon (100) wafers and then using a combination of iso-/anisotropic etching to release the top portion of the silicon with the already fabricated devices as a mechanically flexible (bending curvature of 133 m−1), optically semi-transparent silicon fabric (1.5 cm × 3 cm × 25 μm). The electrical characteristics show 3.7 nm effective oxide thickness, −0.2 V flat band voltage, and no hysteresis from the fabricated MOSCAPs.

  20. Structural and electrical characteristics of high-k/metal gate metal oxide semiconductor capacitors fabricated on flexible, semi-transparent silicon (100) fabric

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Sevilla, Galo T.

    2013-01-01

    In pursuit of flexible computers with high performance devices, we demonstrate a generic process to fabricate 10 000 metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) with semiconductor industry's most advanced high-k/metal gate stacks on widely used, inexpensive bulk silicon (100) wafers and then using a combination of iso-/anisotropic etching to release the top portion of the silicon with the already fabricated devices as a mechanically flexible (bending curvature of 133 m−1), optically semi-transparent silicon fabric (1.5 cm × 3 cm × 25 μm). The electrical characteristics show 3.7 nm effective oxide thickness, −0.2 V flat band voltage, and no hysteresis from the fabricated MOSCAPs.

  1. Fabricating Simple Wax Screen-Printing Paper-Based Analytical Devices to Demonstrate the Concept of Limiting Reagent in Acid- Base Reactions

    Namwong, Pithakpong; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a low-cost, simple, and rapid fabrication of paper-based analytical devices (PADs) using a wax screen-printing method is reported here. The acid-base reaction is implemented in the simple PADs to demonstrate to students the chemistry concept of a limiting reagent. When a fixed concentration of base reacts with a gradually…

  2. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  3. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites - A computational simulation

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with nonlinear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  4. Three-dimensional Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Framework Coated with Cu-BTC Metal-organic Frameworks for the Removal of Methylene Blue

    Wang, Zongyuan; Wang, Jiajun; Li, Minyue; Sun, Kaihang; Liu, Chang-jun

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing was applied for the fabrication of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) framework. Functionalization of the ABS framework was then performed by coating of porous Cu-BTC (BTC = benzene tricarboxylic acid) metal-organic frameworks on it using a step-by-step in-situ growth. The size of the Cu-BTC particles on ABS was ranged from 200 nm to 900 nm. The Cu-BTC/ABS framework can take up most of the space of the tubular reactor that makes the adsorption effective with no need of stirring. Methylene blue (MB) can be readily removed from aqueous solution by this Cu-BTC/ABS framework. The MB removal efficiency for solutions with concentrations of 10 and 5 mg/L was 93.3% and 98.3%, respectively, within 10 min. After MB adsorption, the Cu-BTC/ABS composite can easily be recovered without the need for centrifugation or filtration and the composite is reusable. In addition the ABS framework can be recovered for subsequent reuse. A significant advantage of 3D-printed frameworks is that different frameworks can be easily fabricated to meet the needs of different applications. This is a promising strategy to synthesize new frameworks using MOFs and polymers to develop materials for applications beyond adsorption. PMID:25089616

  5. Slicing algorithms for multi-axis 3-D metal printing of overhangs

    Lee, Kyu Bok; Jee, Hae Seong

    2015-01-01

    A group of 3D metal printing or Additive metal manufacturing (AMM) processes, officially categorized as 'directed energy deposition (DED)' according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) classification, has enabled the building of full dense metallic tools and parts using metal powders precisely delivered and controlled with no powder bed. Mold making and metalworking are being taken in an entirely new direction. The overhang/undercut problem in DED processes, as much as other Additive manufacturing (AM) processes, has long remained unsolved, and the ones equipped with more than 3-axis tool mechanism turn out to be capable of depositing overhang/undercut features onto the part to be made. Multi-axis machines introduced for resolving the problem, however, require advanced preprocess software support for the process management that controls multi-axis tool paths. This study proposes slicing algorithms, sophisticatedly designed for the control of the tool paths on a 5-axis base table, to build overhang/undercut features. A methodical approach, using an auto-partitioning algorithm for generating three-dimensional layer (3DL) information, is proposed in this study, and various overhang features, as case studies, have been investigated and implemented by using the proposed method.

  6. Slicing algorithms for multi-axis 3-D metal printing of overhangs

    Lee, Kyu Bok; Jee, Hae Seong [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    A group of 3D metal printing or Additive metal manufacturing (AMM) processes, officially categorized as 'directed energy deposition (DED)' according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) classification, has enabled the building of full dense metallic tools and parts using metal powders precisely delivered and controlled with no powder bed. Mold making and metalworking are being taken in an entirely new direction. The overhang/undercut problem in DED processes, as much as other Additive manufacturing (AM) processes, has long remained unsolved, and the ones equipped with more than 3-axis tool mechanism turn out to be capable of depositing overhang/undercut features onto the part to be made. Multi-axis machines introduced for resolving the problem, however, require advanced preprocess software support for the process management that controls multi-axis tool paths. This study proposes slicing algorithms, sophisticatedly designed for the control of the tool paths on a 5-axis base table, to build overhang/undercut features. A methodical approach, using an auto-partitioning algorithm for generating three-dimensional layer (3DL) information, is proposed in this study, and various overhang features, as case studies, have been investigated and implemented by using the proposed method.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of selective laser melting printed Ti–6Al–4V alloys subjected to heat treatment for customized implants design

    Mengke Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective laser melting (SLM is a promising technique capable of rapidly fabricating customized implants having desired macro- and micro-structures by using computer-aided design models. However, the SLM-based products often have non-equilibrium microstructures and partial surface defects because of the steep thermal gradients and high solidification rates that occur during the laser melting. To meet clinical requirements, a heat treatment was used to tailor the physiochemical properties, homogenize the metallic microstructures, and eliminate surface defects, expecting to improve the cytocompatibility in vitro. Compared with the as-printed Ti–6Al–4V substrate, the heat-treated substrate had a more hydrophilic, rougher and more homogeneous surface, which should promote the early cell attachment, proliferation and osseointegration. More importantly, a crystalline rutile TiO2 layer formed during the heat treatment, which should greatly promote the biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of the implant. Compared to the untreated surfaces, the adhesion and proliferation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs on heat-treated substrates were significantly enhanced, implying an excellent cytocompatibility after annealing. Therefore, these findings provide an alternative to biofunctionalized SLM-based Ti–6Al–4V implants with optimized physiochemical properties and biocompatibility for orthopedic and dental applications.

  8. Understanding the Thermal Properties of Precursor-Ionomers to Optimize Fabrication Processes for Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMCs

    Sarah Trabia

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs are one of many smart materials and have ionomer bases with a noble metal plated on the surface. The ionomer is usually Nafion, but recently Aquivion has been shown to be a promising alternative. Ionomers are available in the form of precursor pellets. This is an un-activated form that is able to melt, unlike the activated form. However, there is little study on the thermal characteristics of these precursor ionomers. This lack of knowledge causes issues when trying to fabricate ionomer shapes using methods such as extrusion, hot-pressing, and more recently, injection molding and 3D printing. To understand the two precursor-ionomers, a set of tests were conducted to measure the thermal degradation temperature, viscosity, melting temperature, and glass transition. The results have shown that the precursor Aquivion has a higher melting temperature (240 °C than precursor Nafion (200 °C and a larger glass transition range (32–65°C compared with 21–45 °C. The two have the same thermal degradation temperature (~400 °C. Precursor Aquivion is more viscous than precursor Nafion as temperature increases. Based on the results gathered, it seems that the precursor Aquivion is more stable as temperature increases, facilitating the manufacturing processes. This paper presents the data collected to assist researchers in thermal-based fabrication processes.

  9. Super Lightweight, Metal Rubber Fabric for Extreme Space Environments, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has fabricated revolutionary nanostructured, yet macroscale, multifunctional Metal RubberTM films via layer-by-layer, molecular self-assembly, which...

  10. Forging of metallic nano-objects for the fabrication of submicron-size components

    Roesler, J; Mukherji, D; Schock, K; Kleindiek, S

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, nanoscale fabrication has developed considerably, but the fabrication of free-standing nanosize components is still a great challenge. The fabrication of metallic nanocomponents utilizing three basic steps is demonstrated here. First, metallic alloys are used as factories to produce a metallic raw stock of nano-objects/nanoparticles in large numbers. These objects are then isolated from the powder containing thousands of such objects inside a scanning electron microscope using manipulators, and placed on a micro-anvil or a die. Finally, the shape of the individual nano-object is changed by nanoforging using a microhammer. In this way free-standing, high-strength, metallic nano-objects may be shaped into components with dimensions in the 100 nm range. By assembling such nanocomponents, high-performance microsystems can be fabricated, which are truly in the micrometre scale (the size ratio of a system to its component is typically 10:1)

  11. Nanogels for Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Applications and Their Fabrication Using 3D Printing Technologies

    Hyunah Cho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanogels are hydrogels formed by connecting nanoscopic micelles dispersed in an aqueous medium, which give an opportunity for incorporating hydrophilic payloads to the exterior of the micellar networks and hydrophobic payloads in the core of the micelles. Biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanogels have been explored for tissue regeneration, wound healing, surgical device, implantation, and peroral, rectal, vaginal, ocular, and transdermal drug delivery. Although it is still in the early stages of development, due to the increasing demands of precise nanogel production to be utilized for personalized medicine, biomedical applications, and specialized drug delivery, 3D printing has been explored in the past few years and is believed to be one of the most precise, efficient, inexpensive, customizable, and convenient manufacturing techniques for nanogel production.

  12. Nanogels for Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Applications and Their Fabrication Using 3D Printing Technologies

    Cho, Hyunah; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    2018-01-01

    Nanogels are hydrogels formed by connecting nanoscopic micelles dispersed in an aqueous medium, which give an opportunity for incorporating hydrophilic payloads to the exterior of the micellar networks and hydrophobic payloads in the core of the micelles. Biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanogels have been explored for tissue regeneration, wound healing, surgical device, implantation, and peroral, rectal, vaginal, ocular, and transdermal drug delivery. Although it is still in the early stages of development, due to the increasing demands of precise nanogel production to be utilized for personalized medicine, biomedical applications, and specialized drug delivery, 3D printing has been explored in the past few years and is believed to be one of the most precise, efficient, inexpensive, customizable, and convenient manufacturing techniques for nanogel production. PMID:29462901

  13. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  14. Printing Fabrication of Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells and In Situ Morphology Characterization.

    Liu, Feng; Ferdous, Sunzida; Wan, Xianjian; Zhu, Chenhui; Schaible, Eric; Hexemer, Alexander; Wang, Cheng; Russell, Thomas P

    2017-01-29

    Polymer-based materials hold promise as low-cost, flexible efficient photovoltaic devices. Most laboratory efforts to achieve high performance devices have used devices prepared by spin coating, a process that is not amenable to large-scale fabrication. This mismatch in device fabrication makes it difficult to translate quantitative results obtained in the laboratory to the commercial level, making optimization difficult. Using a mini-slot die coater, this mismatch can be resolved by translating the commercial process to the laboratory and characterizing the structure formation in the active layer of the device in real time and in situ as films are coated onto a substrate. The evolution of the morphology was characterized under different conditions, allowing us to propose a mechanism by which the structures form and grow. This mini-slot die coater offers a simple, convenient, material efficient route by which the morphology in the active layer can be optimized under industrially relevant conditions. The goal of this protocol is to show experimental details of how a solar cell device is fabricated using a mini-slot die coater and technical details of running in situ structure characterization using the mini-slot die coater.

  15. Antimicrobial and thermal properties of metal complexes of grafted fabrics with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation

    Hassan, M.S.; Attia, R.M.; Zohdy, M.H.; Khalil, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Cotton, cotton/ ET blend and PET fabrics were treated against microbial effect by radiation -induced grafting of acrylic acid followed by metal complexation with some divalent transition metal ions like Co (l l), Ni(l l) and Cu(l l).The microbial resistance was evaluated by testing the mechanical properties of the treated fabrics after burring for one and two weeks in a moist soil reach with microorganisms. Also, the structural damage of the fabrics caused by biodegradation was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the effect of this treatment on the thermal decomposition behaviour was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). On the basis of microbial studies, it was found that the metal complexation of the grafted fabrics with acrylic acid enhanced the microbial resistance of the fabrics and the microbial resistance could be arranged according to the complexed metal ions as follows: copper> nickel> cobalt. Also, the thermal stability of different fabrics could be arranged as follow: grafted fabrics complexes with Cu (l l) grafted fabrics complexes with Co (l l)

  16. Antimicrobial and Thermal Properties of Metal Complexes of Grafted Fabrics with Acrylic Acid by Gamma Irradiation

    Hassan, M.S.; Attia, R.M.; Zohdy, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Cotton, cotton/PET blend and PET fabrics were treated against microbial effect by radiation - induced grafting of acrylic acid followed by metal complexation with some divalent transition metal ions Co (II), Ni (II) and Cu (II). The microbial resistance was evaluated by testing the mechanical properties of the treated fabrics after burring for one and two weeks in a moist soil reach with microorganisms. Also, the growth of microorganisms was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the effect of this treatment on the thermal decomposition behavior was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). On the basis of microbial studies, it was found that the metal complexation of the grafted fabrics with acrylic acid enhanced the antimicrobial resistance of the fabrics and the antimicrobial resistance could be arranged according to the metal ions as follows: copper> nickel> cobalt. Also, the thermal stability of different fabrics could be arranged as follow: grafted fabrics complexed with Cu (II) > grafted fabrics complexed with Ni (II) > grafted fabrics complexed with Co (II)

  17. Adhesion and failure analysis of metal-polymer interface in flexible printed circuits boards

    Park, Sanghee; Kim, Ye Chan; Choi, Kisuk; Chae, Heeyop; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-12-01

    As device miniaturization in microelectronics is currently requested in the development of high performance device, which usually include highly-integrated metal-polyimide multilayer structures. A redistribution layer (RDL) process is currently emerging as one of the most advance fabrication techniques for on-chip interconnect and packaging. One of the major issues in this process is the poor adhesion of the metal-polyimide interfaces particularly in flexible circuit boards due to the flexibility and bendability of devices. In this study, low pressure O2 plasma treatment was investigated to improve the adhesion of metal-polyimide interfaces, using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment. We identified that the adhesion of metal-polyimide interfaces was greatly improved by the surface roughness control providing 46.1 MPa of shear force in the ball shear test after O2 plasma treatment, compared 14.2 MPa without O2 plasma treatment. It was seemingly due to the fact that the adhesion in metal-polyimide interfaces was improved by a chemical conversion of C=O to C-O bonds and by a ring opening reaction of imide groups, which was confirmed with FT-IR analysis. In the finite element numerical analysis of metal-polyimide interfaces, the O2 plasma treated interface showed that the in-plane stress distribution and the vertical directional deformation agreed well with real failure modes in flexible circuits manufacturing.

  18. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products

  19. Microtransfer printing of metal ink patterns onto plastic substrates utilizing an adhesion-controlled polymeric donor layer

    Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Min-Kyu; Bae, Jeong Min; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for transfer-printed electrode patterns onto flexible/plastic substrates, specifically intended for metal ink that requires a high sintering temperature. Typically, metal-ink-based electrodes cannot be picked up for microtransfer printing because the adhesion between the electrodes and the donor substrate greatly increases after the sintering process due to the binding materials. We introduced a polymeric donor layer between the printed electrodes and the donor substrate and effectively reduced the adhesion between the Ag pattern and the polymeric donor layer by controlling the interfacial contact area. After completing a wet-etching process for the polymeric donor layer, we obtained Ag patterns supported on the fine polymeric anchor structures; the Ag patterns could be picked up onto the stamp surface even after the sintering process by utilizing the viscoelastic properties of the elastomeric stamp with a pick-up velocity control. The proposed method enables highly conductive metal-ink-based electrode patterns to be applied on thermally weak plastic substrates via an all-solution process. Metal electrodes transferred onto a film showed superior electrical and mechanical stability under the bending stress test required for use in printed flexible electronics. (paper)

  20. [COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN AND ELECTRON BEAMMELTING RAPID PROTOTYPING METAL THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNOLOGY FOR PREPARATION OF INDIVIDUALIZED FEMORAL PROSTHESIS].

    Liu, Hongwei; Weng, Yiping; Zhang, Yunkun; Xu, Nanwei; Tong, Jing; Wang, Caimei

    2015-09-01

    To study the feasibility of preparation of the individualized femoral prosthesis through computer assisted design and electron beammelting rapid prototyping (EBM-RP) metal three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. One adult male left femur specimen was used for scanning with 64-slice spiral CT; tomographic image data were imported into Mimics15.0 software to reconstruct femoral 3D model, then the 3D model of individualized femoral prosthesis was designed through UG8.0 software. Finally the 3D model data were imported into EBM-RP metal 3D printer to print the individualized sleeve. According to the 3D model of individualized prosthesis, customized sleeve was successfully prepared through the EBM-RP metal 3D printing technology, assembled with the standard handle component of SR modular femoral prosthesis to make the individualized femoral prosthesis. Customized femoral prosthesis accurately matching with metaphyseal cavity can be designed through the thin slice CT scanning and computer assisted design technology. Titanium alloy personalized prosthesis with complex 3D shape, pore surface, and good matching with metaphyseal cavity can be manufactured by the technology of EBM-RP metal 3D printing, and the technology has convenient, rapid, and accurate advantages.

  1. Microcontact printing of monodiamond nanoparticles: an effective route to patterned diamond structure fabrication.

    Zhuang, Hao; Song, Bo; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2011-10-04

    By combining microcontact printing with a nanodiamond seeding technique, a precise micrometer-sized chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond pattern have been obtained. On the basis of the guidance of basic theoretical calculations, monodisperse detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) were chosen as an "ink" material and oxidized poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was selected to serve as a stamp because it features a higher interaction energy with the DNDs compared to that of the original PDMS. The adsorption kinetics shows an approximately exponential law with a maximum surface DND density of 3.4 × 10(10) cm(-2) after 20 min. To achieve a high transfer ratio of DNDs from the PDMS stamp to a silicon surface, a thin layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was spin coated onto the substrates. A microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system was used to synthesize the CVD diamond on the seeded substrate areas. Precise diamond patterns with a low expansion ratio (3.6%) were successfully prepared after 1.5 h of deposition. Further increases in the deposition time typically lead to a high expansion rate (∼0.8 μm/h). The general pattern shape, however, did not show any significant change. Compared with conventional diamond pattern deposition methods, the technique described here offers the advantages of being simple, inexpensive, damage-free, and highly compatible, rendering it attractive for a broad variety of industrial applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Antifungal activity of fabrics knitted by metalized Silver/Polyester composite yarn

    Özkan, İ.; Duru Baykal, P.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, antifungal properties of fabric knitted from metalized silver/polyester composite yarn were investigated. Intermingling is an alternative technique for yarn blending process. Yarns having different features can be combined by feeding the same intermingling jet. This process is defined as commingling. In the study, intermingling process was used to produce metalized silver/polyester composite yarn. Commingled yarns were knitted to single jersey fabrics by IPM brand sample type circular knitting machine. Antifungal activity test was applied to samples against Aspergillus Niger according to AATCC 30 test procedure. It has been identified that the application provides antifungal activity to fabric.

  3. A fully printed ferrite nano-particle ink based tunable antenna

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Inkjet printing or printing in general has emerged as a very attractive method for the fabrication of low cost and large size electronic systems. However, most of the printed designs rely on nano-particle based metallic inks which are printed on conventional microwave substrates. In order to have a fully printed fabrication process, the substrate also need to be printed. In this paper, a fully printed multi-layer process utilizing custom Fe2O3 based magnetic ink and a silver organic complex (SOC) ink is demonstrated for tunable antennas applications. The ink has been characterized for high frequency and magnetostatic properties. Finally as a proof of concept, a microstrip patch antenna is realized using the proposed fabrication technique which shows a tuning range of 12.5 %.

  4. Imprinting of metal receptors into multilayer polyelectrolyte films: fabrication and applications in marine antifouling

    Puniredd, S.R.; Janczewski, D.; Go, D.P.; Zhu, X.; Guo, S.; Teo, S.L-M.; Lee, S.S.C.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric films constructed using the layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication process were employed as a platform for metal ion immobilization and applied as a marine antifouling coating. The novel Cu2+ ion imprinting process described is based on the use of metal ion templates and LbL multilayer covalent

  5. Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques

    Wang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Ho-Lin; Wu, Yu-Che; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the transient transport phenomenon during the pile up of molten lead-free solder via the inkjet printing method. With regard to the droplet impact velocity, the distance from nozzle to substrate can be controlled by using the pulse voltage and distance control apparatus. A high-speed digital camera was used to record the solder impact and examine the accuracy of the pile up. These impact conditions correspond to We  =  2.1–15.1 and Oh  =  5.4  ×  10 −3 –3.8  ×  10 −3 . The effects of impact velocity and relative distance between two types of molten droplets on the shape of the impact mode are examined. The results show that the optimal parameters of the distance from nozzle to substrate and the spreading factor in this experiment are 0.5 mm and 1.33. The diameter, volume and velocity of the inkjet solder droplet are around 37–65 μ m, 25–144 picoliters, and 2.0–3.7 m s −1 , respectively. The vertical and inclined column structures of molten lead-free solder can be fabricated using piezoelectric ink-jet printing systems. The end-shapes of the 3D micro structure have been found to be dependent upon the distance from nozzle to substrate and the impact velocity of the molten lead-free solder droplet. (paper)

  6. Bacterial contamination of fabric and metal-bead identity card lanyards: A cross-sectional study

    Thomas Pepper

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In healthcare, fabric or metal-bead lanyards are universally used for carrying identity cards. However there is little information on microbial contamination with potential pathogens that may readily re-contaminate disinfected hands. We examined 108 lanyards from hospital staff. Most grew skin flora but 7/108 (6% had potentially pathogenic bacteria: four grew methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, and four grew probable fecal flora: 3 Clostridium perfringens and 1 Clostridium bifermentans (one lanyard grew both S. aureus and C. bifermentans. Unused (control lanyards had little or no such contamination. The median duration of lanyard wear was 12 months (interquartile range 3–36 months. 17/108 (16% of the lanyards had reportedly undergone decontamination including wiping with alcohol, chlorhexidine or chlorine dioxide; and washing with soap and water or by washing machine. Metal-bead lanyards had significantly lower median bacterial counts than those from fabric lanyards (1 vs. 4 CFU/cm2; Mann–Whitney U = 300.5; P < 0.001. 12/32 (38% of the metal-bead lanyards grew no bacteria, compared with 2/76 (3% of fabric lanyards. We recommend that an effective decontamination regimen be instituted by those who use fabric lanyards, or that fabric lanyards be discarded altogether in preference for metal-bead lanyards or clip-on identity cards. Keywords: Lanyard, Contamination, Identity card, Metal, Fabric

  7. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  8. Fabrication of graphene/gold-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen

    Chan, K.F. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Lim, H.N., E-mail: janetlimhn@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Shams, N. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Jayabal, S.; Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N.M. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-01-01

    Immunosensors based on gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were successfully synthesized using an electrochemical deposition method. The modified SPEs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the morphology and composition of AuNPs and rGO. Both the FESEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the AuNPs were successfully anchored on the thin film of rGO deposited on the surface of the SPEs. Characterization with a ferri–ferrocyanide couple [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−/4−}] showed that the electron transfer kinetic between the analyte and electrode was enhanced after the modification with the AuNPs/rGO composite on the electrode surface, in addition to increasing the effective surface area of the electrode. The modified SPE was immobilized with a sandwich type immunosensor to mimic the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The modified SPE that was fortified with the sandwich type immunosensor exhibited double electrochemical responses in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with linear ranges of 0.5–50 ng/mL and 250–2000 ng/mL and limits of detection of 0.28 ng/mL and 181.5 ng/mL, respectively. - Highlights: • An AuNP/rGO-modified SPE is prepared via an in-situ electrodeposition method. • It is introduced in a sandwich-type immunoassay for the detection of CEA. • The LODs for CEA are 0.28 ng/mL for 0.5–25 ng/mL, and 181.5 ng/mL for 250–2000 ng/mL.

  9. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  10. Fabrication of large area homogeneous metallic nanostructures for optical sensing using colloidal lithography

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple and reproducible method for fabricating large area metal films with inter-connected nanostructures using a combination of colloidal lithography, metal deposition and a template stripping technique. The method is generic in the sense that it is possible to produce a variety...... to fabricate metal films with inter-connected nanostructures consisting of either partial spherical shells or the inverted structures: spherical cavities. The substrates are characterized by optical reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy. We demonstrate, in the case of partial spherical shells...

  11. Imprinting of metal receptors into multilayer polyelectrolyte films: fabrication and applications in marine antifouling

    Puniredd, S.R.; Janczewski, D.; Go, D.P.; Zhu, X.; Guo, S.; Teo, S.L-M.; Lee, S.S.C.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric films constructed using the layer-by-layer (LbL) fabrication process were employed as a platform for metal ion immobilization and applied as a marine antifouling coating. The novel Cu2+ ion imprinting process described is based on the use of metal ion templates and LbL multilayer covalent cross-linking. Custom synthesized, peptide mimicking polycations composed of histidine grafted poly(allylamine) (PAH) to bind metal ions, and methyl ester containing polyanions for convenient cross...

  12. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Ramsey, Philip B.; Juntz, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  13. Implementation of virtual models from sheet metal forming simulation into physical 3D colour models using 3D printing

    Junk, S.

    2016-08-01

    Today the methods of numerical simulation of sheet metal forming offer a great diversity of possibilities for optimization in product development and in process design. However, the results from simulation are only available as virtual models. Because there are any forming tools available during the early stages of product development, physical models that could serve to represent the virtual results are therefore lacking. Physical 3D-models can be created using 3D-printing and serve as an illustration and present a better understanding of the simulation results. In this way, the results from the simulation can be made more “comprehensible” within a development team. This paper presents the possibilities of 3D-colour printing with particular consideration of the requirements regarding the implementation of sheet metal forming simulation. Using concrete examples of sheet metal forming, the manufacturing of 3D colour models will be expounded upon on the basis of simulation results.

  14. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  15. Accuracy evaluation of metal copings fabricated by computer-aided milling and direct metal laser sintering systems.

    Park, Jong-Kyoung; Lee, Wan-Sun; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2015-04-01

    To assess the marginal and internal gaps of the copings fabricated by computer-aided milling and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) systems in comparison to casting method. Ten metal copings were fabricated by casting, computer-aided milling, and DMLS. Seven mesiodistal and labiolingual positions were then measured, and each of these were divided into the categories; marginal gap (MG), cervical gap (CG), axial wall at internal gap (AG), and incisal edge at internal gap (IG). Evaluation was performed by a silicone replica technique. A digital microscope was used for measurement of silicone layer. Statistical analyses included one-way and repeated measure ANOVA to test the difference between the fabrication methods and categories of measured points (α=.05), respectively. The mean gap differed significantly with fabrication methods (P<.001). Casting produced the narrowest gap in each of the four measured positions, whereas CG, AG, and IG proved narrower in computer-aided milling than in DMLS. Thus, with the exception of MG, all positions exhibited a significant difference between computer-aided milling and DMLS (P<.05). Although the gap was found to vary with fabrication methods, the marginal and internal gaps of the copings fabricated by computer-aided milling and DMLS fell within the range of clinical acceptance (<120 µm). However, the statistically significant difference to conventional casting indicates that the gaps in computer-aided milling and DMLS fabricated restorations still need to be further reduced.

  16. A Novel Designed Bioreactor for Recovering Precious Metals from Waste Printed Circuit Boards

    Jujun, Ruan; Jie, Zheng; Jian, Hu; Zhang, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    For recovering precious metals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), a novel hybrid technology including physical and biological methods was developed. It consisted of crushing, corona-electrostatic separation, and bioleaching. Bioleaching process is the focus of this paper. A novel bioreactor for bioleaching was designed. Bioleaching was carried out using Pseudomonas chlororaphis. Bioleaching experiments using mixed particles of Au and Cu were performed and leachate contained 0.006 mg/L, 2823 mg/L Au+ and Cu2+ respectively. It showed when Cu existed, the concentrations of Au were extremely small. This provided the feasibility to separate Cu from Au. The method of orthogonal experimental design was employed in the simulation bioleaching experiments. Experimental results showed the optimized parameters for separating Cu from Au particles were pH 7.0, temperature 22.5 °C, and rotation speed 80 r/min. Based on the optimized parameters obtained, the bioreactor was operated for recovering mixed Au and Cu particles. 88.1 wt.% of Cu and 76.6 wt.% of Au were recovered. The paper contributed important information to recover precious metals from waste PCBs. PMID:26316021

  17. Polymer Surface Engineering for Efficient Printing of Highly Conductive Metal Nanoparticle Inks.

    Agina, Elena V; Sizov, Alexey S; Yablokov, Mikhail Yu; Borshchev, Oleg V; Bessonov, Alexander A; Kirikova, Marina N; Bailey, Marc J A; Ponomarenko, Sergei A

    2015-06-10

    An approach to polymer surface modification using self-assembled layers (SALs) of functional alkoxysilanes has been developed in order to improve the printability of silver nanoparticle inks and enhance adhesion between the metal conducting layer and the flexible polymer substrate. The SALs have been fully characterized by AFM, XPS, and WCA, and the resulting printability, adhesion, and electrical conductivity of the screen-printed metal contacts have been estimated by cross-cut tape test and 4-point probe measurements. It was shown that (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane SALs enable significant adhesion improvements for both aqueous- and organic-based silver inks, approaching nearly 100% for PEN and PDMS substrates while exhibiting relatively low sheet resistance up to 0.1 Ω/sq. It was demonstrated that SALs containing functional -SH or -NH2 end groups offer the opportunity to increase the affinity of the polymer substrates to silver inks and thus to achieve efficient patterning of highly conductive structures on flexible and stretchable substrates.

  18. The ultrasonically assisted metals recovery treatment of printed circuit board waste sludge by leaching separation.

    Xie, Fengchun; Li, Haiying; Ma, Yang; Li, Chuncheng; Cai, Tingting; Huang, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Gaoqing

    2009-10-15

    This paper provides a practical technique that realized industrial scale copper and iron separation from printed circuit board (PCB) waste sludge by ultrasonically assisted acid leaching in a low cost, low energy consumption and zero discharge of wastes manner. The separation efficiencies of copper and iron from acid leaching with assistance of ultrasound were compared with the one without assistance of ultrasound and the effects of the leaching procedure, pH value, and ultrasonic strength have been investigated in the paper. With the appropriate leaching procedure, a final pH of 3.0, an ultrasonic generator power of 160 W (in 1l tank), leaching time of 60 min, leaching efficiencies of copper and iron had reached 97.83% and 1.23%, respectively. Therefore the separation of copper and iron in PCB waste sludge was virtually achieved. The lab results had been successfully applied to the industrial scaled applications in a heavy metal recovery plant in city of Huizhou, China for more than two years. It has great potentials to be used in even the broad metal recovery practices.

  19. An automated design and fabrication pipeline for improving the strength of 3D printed artifacts under tensile loading

    Al, Can Mert; Yaman, Ulas

    2018-05-01

    In the scope of this study, an alternative automated method to the conventional design and fabrication pipeline of 3D printers is developed by using an integrated CAD/CAE/CAM approach. It increases the load carrying capacity of the parts by constructing heterogeneous infill structures. Traditional CAM software of Additive Manufacturing machinery starts with a design model in STL file format which only includes data about the outer boundary in the triangular mesh form. Depending on the given infill percentage, the algorithm running behind constructs the interior of the artifact by using homogeneous infill structures. As opposed to the current CAM software, the proposed method provides a way to construct heterogeneous infill structures with respect to the Von Misses stress field results obtained from a finite element analysis. Throughout the work, Rhinoceros3D is used for the design of the parts along with Grasshopper3D, an algorithmic design tool for Rhinoceros3D. In addition, finite element analyses are performed using Karamba3D, a plug-in for Grasshopper3D. According to the results of the tensile tests, the method offers an improvement of load carrying capacity about 50% compared to traditional slicing algorithms of 3D printing.

  20. Microcontact printing technology as a method of fabrication of patterned self-assembled monolayers for application in nanometrology

    Pałetko, Piotr; Moczała, Magdalena; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2013-07-01

    This paper is focused on manufacture technology of molecular self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using microcontact printing (μCP) techniqe. This technique, due to its low-cost and simplicity, is a very attractive one for further development of molecular electronics and nanotechnology. The SAM can be produced on gold or silicon oxide using thiol and silane based chemistry respectively[1]. The μCP techniques allow the imposition of molecular structures in specific areas. The chemical properties of the fabricated layers depend on the functional groups of tail molecules. Such structures can be used as chemical receptors or as interface between the substrate and the biosensor receptors [2]. Architecture of the tail molecule determines the chemical reactivity and hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties. In addition it modifies the tribological properties [4] and electrical structure parameters, such as contact potential diference (CPD) [5]. The height of the SAM structure containing carbon chain is highly dependent on the length and type of binding molecules to the substrate, which enables application of the μCP SAM structures in height metrology. The results of these studies will be presented in the work.

  1. From Microscale Devices to 3D Printing: Advances in Fabrication of 3D Cardiovascular Tissues

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; Ogle, Brenda; Berry, Joel; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Current strategies for engineering cardiovascular cells and tissues have yielded a variety of sophisticated tools for studying disease mechanisms, for development of drug therapies, and for fabrication of tissue equivalents that may have application in future clinical use. These efforts are motivated by the need to extend traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems into 3D to more accurately replicate in vivo cell and tissue function of cardiovascular structures. Developments in microscale devices and bioprinted 3D tissues are beginning to supplant traditional 2D cell cultures and pre-clinical animal studies that have historically been the standard for drug and tissue development. These new approaches lend themselves to patient-specific diagnostics, therapeutics, and tissue regeneration. The emergence of these technologies also carries technical challenges to be met before traditional cell culture and animal testing become obsolete. Successful development and validation of 3D human tissue constructs will provide powerful new paradigms for more cost effective and timely translation of cardiovascular tissue equivalents. PMID:28057791

  2. Packaging Printing Today

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  3. Modeling and fabrication of lithium polymer ion batteries designed for wireless sensor network applications and printed directly on device

    Steingart, Daniel Artemis

    CVD produce excellent thin film microstructures, but face considerable problems with regard to stress build up as thickness grows beyond 10 mum. When total battery area is constrained to 1 cm2 a single electrode thickness of 10 mum is simply insufficient to create a useful battery. The second major issue is processing temperature. The processes that are used to deposit most thin film battery materials require temperatures greater than 300°C [3], which is greater than the temperature most CMOS devices can withstand. While electrical engineers may get around this by (1) using a separate chip for the battery or (2) use the battery as the substrate to build the device both cases would require more packaging to protect the batteries, to some degree defeating the purpose of reducing the packaging. To overcome this obstacle, a new method to place the materials necessary to make a battery on a chip has been developed. This process was done at room temperature, at packaging to protect the batteries, to some degree defeating the purpose of reducing the packaging. To overcome this obstacle, a new method to place the materials necessary to make a battery on a chip has been developed. This process is done at room temperature, at atmospheric pressure, and with thicknesses great enough to provide significantly more capacity than thin film solutions. The method uses tools used to apply adhesives, traditionally, including screen-printing and pneumatic extrusion. These methods produce structures that in theory should provide the energy and power density available in large-scale batteries (a feat heretofore not replicated by thin film fabrication methods) and with improvements in solid polymer electrolytes, may provide the necessary power density. These tools can be used to produce capacitors as well, which can help in load leveling the battery, thereby increasing both discharge time and cycle life. Finally, in the course of this research conventional battery test equipment was either

  4. Synthesis of a nano-silver metal ink for use in thick conductive film fabrication applied on a semiconductor package.

    Lai Chin Yung

    Full Text Available The success of printing technology in the electronics industry primarily depends on the availability of metal printing ink. Various types of commercially available metal ink are widely used in different industries such as the solar cell, radio frequency identification (RFID and light emitting diode (LED industries, with limited usage in semiconductor packaging. The use of printed ink in semiconductor IC packaging is limited by several factors such as poor electrical performance and mechanical strength. Poor adhesion of the printed metal track to the epoxy molding compound is another critical factor that has caused a decline in interest in the application of printing technology to the semiconductor industry. In this study, two different groups of adhesion promoters, based on metal and polymer groups, were used to promote adhesion between the printed ink and the epoxy molding substrate. The experimental data show that silver ink with a metal oxide adhesion promoter adheres better than silver ink with a polymer adhesion promoter. This result can be explained by the hydroxyl bonding between the metal oxide promoter and the silane grouping agent on the epoxy substrate, which contributes a greater adhesion strength compared to the polymer adhesion promoter. Hypotheses of the physical and chemical functions of both adhesion promoters are described in detail.

  5. Fabrication and properties of meso-macroporous electrodes screen-printed from mesoporous titania nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Ma Liang; Liu Min; Peng Tianyou; Fan Ke; Lu Lanlan; Dai Ke

    2009-01-01

    A meso-macroporous TiO 2 film electrode was fabricated by using mesoporous TiO 2 (m-TiO 2 ) nanoparticles through a screen-printing technique in order to efficiently control the main fabrication step of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The qualities of the screen-printed m-TiO 2 films were characterized by means of spectroscopy, electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and photoelectrochemical measurements. Under the optimal paste composition and printing conditions, the DSSC based on the meso-macroporous m-TiO 2 film electrode exhibits an energy conversion efficiency of 4.14%, which is improved by 1.70% in comparison with DSSC made with commercially available nonporous TiO 2 nanoparticles (P25, Degussa) electrode printed with a similar paste composition. The meso-macroporous structure within the m-TiO 2 film is of great benefit to the dye adsorption, light absorption and the electrolyte transportation, and then to the improvement of the overall energy conversion efficiency of DSSC.

  6. 3D printing for the design and fabrication of polymer-based gradient scaffolds.

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Smith, Brandon T; Watson, Emma; Arumugasaamy, Navein; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-07-01

    To accurately mimic the native tissue environment, tissue engineered scaffolds often need to have a highly controlled and varied display of three-dimensional (3D) architecture and geometrical cues. Additive manufacturing in tissue engineering has made possible the development of complex scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures. As such, architectural details that were previously unattainable or irreproducible can now be incorporated in an ordered and organized approach, further advancing the structural and chemical cues delivered to cells interacting with the scaffold. This control over the environment has given engineers the ability to unlock cellular machinery that is highly dependent upon the intricate heterogeneous environment of native tissue. Recent research into the incorporation of physical and chemical gradients within scaffolds indicates that integrating these features improves the function of a tissue engineered construct. This review covers recent advances on techniques to incorporate gradients into polymer scaffolds through additive manufacturing and evaluate the success of these techniques. As covered here, to best replicate different tissue types, one must be cognizant of the vastly different types of manufacturing techniques available to create these gradient scaffolds. We review the various types of additive manufacturing techniques that can be leveraged to fabricate scaffolds with heterogeneous properties and discuss methods to successfully characterize them. Additive manufacturing techniques have given tissue engineers the ability to precisely recapitulate the native architecture present within tissue. In addition, these techniques can be leveraged to create scaffolds with both physical and chemical gradients. This work offers insight into several techniques that can be used to generate graded scaffolds, depending on the desired gradient. Furthermore, it outlines methods to determine if the designed gradient was achieved. This review

  7. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  8. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  9. 3D printing technologies for electrochemical energy storage

    Zhang, Feng; Wei, Min; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Swart, Benjamin; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Chi

    2017-10-01

    Fabrication of electrodes and electrolytes play an important role in promoting the performance of electrochemical energy storage (EES) devices such as batteries and supercapacitors. Traditional fabrication techniques have limited capability in controlling the geometry and architecture of the electrode and solid-state electrolytes, which would otherwise compromise the performance. 3D printing, a disruptive manufacturing technology, has emerged as an innovative approach to fabricating EES devices from nanoscale to macroscale and from nanowatt to megawatt, providing great opportunities to accurately control device geometry (e.g., dimension, porosity, morphology) and structure with enhanced specific energy and power densities. Moreover, the additive manufacturing nature of 3D printing provides excellent controllability of the electrode thickness with much simplified process in a cost effective manner. With the unique spatial and temporal material manipulation capability, 3D printing can integrate multiple nanomaterials in the same print, and multi-functional EES devices (including functional gradient devices) can be fabricated. Herein, we review recent advances in 3D printing of EES devices. We focused on two major 3D printing technologies including direct writing and inkjet printing. The direct material deposition characteristics of these two processes enable them to print on a variety of flat substrates, even a conformal one, well suiting them to applications such as wearable devices and on-chip integrations. Other potential 3D printing techniques such as freeze nano-printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, binder jetting, laminated object manufacturing, and metal 3D printing are also introduced. The advantages and limitations of each 3D printing technology are extensively discussed. More importantly, we provide a perspective on how to integrate the emerging 3D printing with existing technologies to create structures over multiple length scale from

  10. Thermal and mechanical properties of aluminized fabrics for use in ferrous metal handling operations.

    Wren, J E; Scott, W D; Bates, C E

    1977-11-01

    Protective garments are normally worn in molten handling operations to provide some protection against molten metal splashes. These garments are also intended to provide protection against radiant heat, and they should be as heat resistant and comfortable as possible. Asbestos-based fabrics have been employed for many years, but recently some concern has been expressed over possible asbestos exposure. This program was undertaken to explore the ability of several types of fabrics to resist heat transfer during molten metal impact. A molten metal splash test, along with standard methods for determining tensile strength, flame resistance, and abrasion-flexing resistance were used to evaluate several classes of protective fabrics. The results indicate that there are materials available that offer equal or better mechanical properties and thermal protection compared to aluminized asbestos.

  11. Rapid selective metal patterning on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fabricated by capillarity-assisted laser direct write

    Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2011-08-12

    In this study we demonstrate a novel approach for the rapid fabricating micro scale metal (silver) patterning directly on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. Silver nanoparticles were sintered on PDMS to form conductive metal films using laser direct write (LDW) technology. To achieve good metal film quality, a capillarity-assisted laser direct writing (CALDW) of nanoparticle suspensions on a low surface energy material (PDMS) was utilized. Experimental results showed controllable electrical conductivities and good film properties of the sintered silver patterns. This study reveals an advanced method of metal patterning on PDMS, and proposes a new research application of LDW in a nanoparticle colloidal environment. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. SU-E-J-49: Design and Fabrication of Custom 3D Printed Phantoms for Radiation Therapy Research and Quality Assurance

    Jenkins, C; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The rapid proliferation of affordable 3D printing techniques has enabled the custom fabrication of items ranging from paper weights to medical implants. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing the technology for developing novel phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance (QA) procedures. Methods A phantom for measuring the geometric parameters of linear accelerator (LINAC) on-board imaging (OBI) systems was designed using SolidWorks. The design was transferred to a 3D printer and fabricated using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique. Fiducials were embedded in the phantom by placing 1.6 mm diameter steel balls in predefined holes and securing them with silicone. Several MV and kV images of the phantom were collected and the visibility and geometric accuracy were evaluated. A second phantom, for use in the experimental evaluation of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dosimeter, was designed to secure several applicator needles in water. The applicator was fabricated in the same 3D printer and used for experiments. Results The general accuracy of printed parts was determined to be 0.1 mm. The cost of materials for the imaging and QA phantoms were $22 and $5 respectively. Both the plastic structure and fiducial markers of the imaging phantom were visible in MV and kV images. Fiducial marker locations were determined to be within 1mm of desired locations, with the discrepancy being attributed to the fiducial attachment process. The HDR phantom secured the applicators within 0.5 mm of the desired locations. Conclusion 3D printing offers an inexpensive method for fabricating custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance. While the geometric accuracy of such parts is limited compared to more expensive methods, the phantoms are still highly functional and provide a unique opportunity for rapid fabrication of custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy QA and research.

  13. SU-E-J-49: Design and Fabrication of Custom 3D Printed Phantoms for Radiation Therapy Research and Quality Assurance

    Jenkins, C; Xing, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The rapid proliferation of affordable 3D printing techniques has enabled the custom fabrication of items ranging from paper weights to medical implants. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing the technology for developing novel phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance (QA) procedures. Methods A phantom for measuring the geometric parameters of linear accelerator (LINAC) on-board imaging (OBI) systems was designed using SolidWorks. The design was transferred to a 3D printer and fabricated using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique. Fiducials were embedded in the phantom by placing 1.6 mm diameter steel balls in predefined holes and securing them with silicone. Several MV and kV images of the phantom were collected and the visibility and geometric accuracy were evaluated. A second phantom, for use in the experimental evaluation of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dosimeter, was designed to secure several applicator needles in water. The applicator was fabricated in the same 3D printer and used for experiments. Results The general accuracy of printed parts was determined to be 0.1 mm. The cost of materials for the imaging and QA phantoms were $22 and $5 respectively. Both the plastic structure and fiducial markers of the imaging phantom were visible in MV and kV images. Fiducial marker locations were determined to be within 1mm of desired locations, with the discrepancy being attributed to the fiducial attachment process. The HDR phantom secured the applicators within 0.5 mm of the desired locations. Conclusion 3D printing offers an inexpensive method for fabricating custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance. While the geometric accuracy of such parts is limited compared to more expensive methods, the phantoms are still highly functional and provide a unique opportunity for rapid fabrication of custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy QA and research

  14. Fabrication of Metallic Microneedle by Electroplating and Sharpening of it by Electrochemical Etching

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Tanaka, Takahiro; Takaoki, Yutaka; Izumi, Hayato; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Masato; Aoyagi, Seiji

    Aiming at the use in low-invasive medical treatments, this paper reports a fabrication of metallic microneedle, which has a three-dimensionally sharp tip. Compared to a silicon or polymer needle which we previously proposed, a metallic needle has toughness to evade breakage. Even if it is broken, it does not become small pieces thanks to its ductility, which increases the safety for a human body. A nickel needle was fabricated using electroplating, followed by sharpening it by electrochemical etching. A smooth tip surface is obtained due to electrochemical etching reactions. Sharpness and smoothness of the tip are effective for easy insertion in the viewpoint of large stress concentration and small friction, respectively. An experiment of inserting the fabricated needle into an artificial skin of silicone rubber was carried out. The resistance force during insertion was much reduced compared to that of commercial stainless needle (23 G: shank diameter 650 µm). Although a fabricated metallic needle was inserted and pulled-out for several times, it was not broken in any trial. By changing the angle between object surface and needle axis, the insertion experiments were carried out. Fabricated nickel needle was not broken for any angle, while silicon needle was broken in case the angle is small, i.e., the needle is much inclined from normal direction of the surface, which ensures the safety of metallic microneedle to human body in the viewpoint of breakage.

  15. Metal-bending brake facilitates lightweight, close-tolerance fabrication

    Ercoline, A. L.; Wilton, K. B.

    1964-01-01

    A lightweight, metal bending brake ensures very accurate bends. Features of the brake that adapt it for making complex reverse bends to close tolerances are a pronounced relief or cutaway of the underside of the bodyplate combined with modification in the leaf design and its suspension.

  16. Fabrication of metallic nanowires with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    Kramer, N.; Kramer, N.; Birk, H.; Jorritsma, J.; Schönenberger, C.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure to pattern thin metal films on a nanometer scale with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in air is reported. A 30 nm film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a‐Si:H) is deposited on a 10 nm film of TaIr. Applying a negative voltage between the STM tip and the a‐Si:H film

  17. Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with “Green” Metals for Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Toxic Elements

    Anastasios Economou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews the field of screen-printed electrodes (SPEs modified with “green” metals for electrochemical stripping analysis of toxic elements. Electrochemical stripping analysis has been established as a useful trace analysis technique offering many advantages compared to competing optical techniques. Although mercury has been the preferred electrode material for stripping analysis, the toxicity of mercury and the associated legal requirements in its use and disposal have prompted research towards the development of “green” metals as alternative electrode materials. When combined with the screen-printing technology, such environment-friendly metals can lead to disposable sensors for trace metal analysis with excellent operational characteristics. This review focuses on SPEs modified with Au, Bi, Sb, and Sn for stripping analysis of toxic elements. Different modification approaches (electroplating, bulk modification, use of metal precursors, microengineering techniques are considered and representative applications are described. A developing related field, namely biosensing based on stripping analysis of metallic nanoprobe labels, is also briefly mentioned.

  18. Patterning of metallic electrodes on flexible substrates for organic thin-film transistors using a laser thermal printing method

    Chen, Kun-Tso; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Ho, Jeng-Rong; Chen, Chih-Kant; Liu, Sung-Ho; Liao, Jin-Long; Cheng, Hua-Chi

    2011-01-01

    We report on a laser thermal printing method for transferring patterned metallic thin films on flexible plastic substrates using a pulsed CO 2 laser. Aluminium and silver line patterns, with micrometre scale resolution on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates, are shown. The printed electrodes demonstrate good conductivity and fulfil the properties for bottom-contact organic thin-film transistors. In addition to providing the energy for transferring the film, the absorption of laser light results in a rise in the temperature of the film and the substrate. This also further anneals the film and softens the plastic substrate. Consequently, it is possible to obtain a film with better surface morphology and with its film thickness implanted in part into the plastic surface. This implantation reveals excellent characteristics in adhesion and flexure resistance. Being feasible to various substrates and executable at ambient temperatures renders this approach a potential alternative for patterning metallic electrodes.

  19. Direct fabrication of rigid microstructures on a metallic roller using a dry film resist

    Jiang, Liang-Ting; Huang, Tzu-Chien; Chang, Chih-Yuan; Ciou, Jian-Ren; Yang, Sen-Yeu; Huang, Po-Hsun

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to fabricate a metallic roller mold with microstructures on its surface using a dry film resist (DFR). The DFR is laminated uniformly onto the curvy surface of a copper roller. After that, the micro-scale photoresist on the surface of the roller can be patterned by non-planar lithography using a flexible film photomask, followed by ferric chloride wet etching to obtain the desired microstructures. This method overcomes the uniformity issue of photoresist coating on rollers, and solves the molds sliding problem during the embossing process because the microstructures are fabricated directly on the roller surface. Furthermore, the rigid metallic roller mold has excellent strength durability and temperature endurance, which can be used in roller hot embossing with a high embossing pressure. The fabricated microstructure roller mold is used as a mold in the hybrid extrusion roller embossing process and successfully fabricates uniform micro-scale prominent line arrays on PC films. This result proves that the roller fabricated by this method can be successfully used in roller embossing for microstructure mass production. The excellent flatness of dry film resist laminating is the key in this fabrication process. The flexible film photomask can be easily designed using CAD software; this roller fabrication method enhances the design flexibility and reduces the cost and time

  20. Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with “Green” Metals for Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Toxic Elements

    Anastasios Economou

    2018-01-01

    This work reviews the field of screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with “green” metals for electrochemical stripping analysis of toxic elements. Electrochemical stripping analysis has been established as a useful trace analysis technique offering many advantages compared to competing optical techniques. Although mercury has been the preferred electrode material for stripping analysis, the toxicity of mercury and the associated legal requirements in its use and disposal have ...

  1. On Surface Losses in Direct Metal Laser Sintering Printed Millimeter and Submillimeter Waveguides

    Holmberg, Max; Dancila, Dragos; Rydberg, Anders; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Jansson, Ulf; Marattukalam, Jithin James; Johansson, Niklas; Andersson, Joakim

    2018-06-01

    Different lengths of WR3 (220-330 GHz) and WR10 (75-110 GHz) waveguides are fabricated through direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The losses in these waveguides are measured and modelled using the Huray surface roughness model. The losses in WR3 are around 0.3 dB/mm and in WR10 0.05 dB/mm. The Huray equation model is accounting relatively good for the attenuation in the WR10 waveguide but deviates more in the WR3 waveguide. The model is compared to finite element simulations of the losses assuming an approximate surface structure similar to the resulting one from the DMLS process.

  2. Potential assisted fabrication of metal-ceramic composite coatings

    Knote, A.; Schindler, U.; Krueger, H.G.; Kern, H.

    2003-01-01

    A possibility to produce uniform metal-ceramic composite coatings with a high content of ceramic particles up to 60 vol.% will be presented in this study. This method includes a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electrolytic deposition by several steps. A yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (Tosoh TZ-8Y) was first electrophoretically deposited on a ferritic steel plate and then sintered by 1100 C to an open porous layer. In the next step nickel was electrodeposited into the pores of the layer. By a final annealing step it was possible to improve the bonding of the composit coating on the substrate by diffusion of the metal components. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  3. Fabrication of metallic honeycomb panels for reusable TPS - structures

    Tabernig, B.; Thierfelder, W.; Alber, H.; Sudmeijer, K.

    2001-01-01

    The manufacturing technology with specific regard to high temperature brazing was developed to fabricate a honeycomb panel consisting of a thin-sectioned PM 2000 core material sandwiched on both sides with PM 1000 face sheets. For brazing the PM 1000 / PM 2000 panel the braze alloy PdNi was selected due to the best oxidation behavior while good mechanical properties and wetting behavior compared with other tested filler alloys. To examine the concept of a hybrid PM 1000/2000 panel as a stiffened skin panel a number of engineering test samples of sub-scale and two full-size panels were fabricated at Plansee AG and supplied to Fokker Space for testing under representative in-service conditions. Engineering tests showed that the test samples were rather insensitive to temperature gradients even at temperature differences between the face sheets of 550 o C. The engineering test samples exhibited no plastic deformation after testing at different heating rates ranging from 5 to 40 o C/s and at temperature profiles representative for two flights. The requirement for the designed application regarding impact properties at low as well as high speed were met. Impact at low speed with an energy of 8 J did not cause any cracks. Hail tests where ice bullets were fired with speeds to 208 m/s at different angles from 25 o to 90 o C against the test piece showed no damage at 25 o and caused slight indentation at 45 o and cracks at 90 o , which demonstrated a good performance for the fly through a hail cloud without any problems. In tests to determine the response of a full-size panel to a number of simulated thermo-mechanical flight load cycles the panel passed 50 cycles successfully without damage. (author)

  4. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  5. Recycling of non-metallic fractions from waste printed circuit boards: A review

    Guo Jiuyong; Guo Jie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xu Zhenming, E-mail: zmxu@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2009-09-15

    The major economic driving force for recycling of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is the value of the metallic fractions (MFs) of PCBs. The non-metallic fractions (NMFs), which take up almost 70 wt% of waste PCBs, were treated by combustion or land filling in the past. However, combustion of the NMFs will cause the formation of highly toxic polybrominated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) while land filling of the NMFs will lead to secondary pollution caused by heavy metals and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) leaching to the groundwater. Therefore, recycling of the NMFs from waste PCBs is drawing more and more attention from the public and the governments. Currently, how to recycle the NMFs environmental soundly has become a significant topic in recycling of waste PCBs. In order to fulfill the better resource utilization of the NMFs, the compositions and characteristics of the NMFs, methods and outcomes of recycling the NMFs from waste PCBs and analysis and treatment for the hazardous substances contained in the NMFs were reviewed in this paper. Thermosetting resin matrix composites, thermoplastic matrix composites, concrete and viscoelastic materials are main applications for physical recycling of the NMFs. Chemical recycling methods consisting of pyrolysis, gasification, supercritical fluids depolymerization and hydrogenolytic degradation can be used to convert the NMFs to chemical feedstocks and fuels. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) can be used to determine the toxicity characteristic (TC) of the NMFs and to evaluate the environmental safety of products made from the recycled NMFs. It is believed that physical recycling of the NMFs has been a promising recycling method. Much more work should be done to develop comprehensive and industrialized usage of the NMFs recycled by physical methods. Chemical recycling methods have the advantages in eliminating hazardous substances

  6. Recycling of non-metallic fractions from waste printed circuit boards: A review

    Guo Jiuyong; Guo Jie; Xu Zhenming

    2009-01-01

    The major economic driving force for recycling of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is the value of the metallic fractions (MFs) of PCBs. The non-metallic fractions (NMFs), which take up almost 70 wt% of waste PCBs, were treated by combustion or land filling in the past. However, combustion of the NMFs will cause the formation of highly toxic polybrominated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) while land filling of the NMFs will lead to secondary pollution caused by heavy metals and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) leaching to the groundwater. Therefore, recycling of the NMFs from waste PCBs is drawing more and more attention from the public and the governments. Currently, how to recycle the NMFs environmental soundly has become a significant topic in recycling of waste PCBs. In order to fulfill the better resource utilization of the NMFs, the compositions and characteristics of the NMFs, methods and outcomes of recycling the NMFs from waste PCBs and analysis and treatment for the hazardous substances contained in the NMFs were reviewed in this paper. Thermosetting resin matrix composites, thermoplastic matrix composites, concrete and viscoelastic materials are main applications for physical recycling of the NMFs. Chemical recycling methods consisting of pyrolysis, gasification, supercritical fluids depolymerization and hydrogenolytic degradation can be used to convert the NMFs to chemical feedstocks and fuels. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) can be used to determine the toxicity characteristic (TC) of the NMFs and to evaluate the environmental safety of products made from the recycled NMFs. It is believed that physical recycling of the NMFs has been a promising recycling method. Much more work should be done to develop comprehensive and industrialized usage of the NMFs recycled by physical methods. Chemical recycling methods have the advantages in eliminating hazardous substances

  7. Surface Modification and Nanojunction Fabrication with Molecular Metal Wires

    2012-12-21

    single - crystal X-ray diffraction studies of 2 and 3. Both the single - crystal structural data of 2 and 3 and the spectroscopic/voltammetric data...structure, magnetic properties, and single -molecule conductance of two new trinuclear metal string complexes, [Ni3(dzp)4(NCS)2] (2) and [ Co3 (dzp)4(NCS...modifying the crystallization conditions. The [s- Co3 (dpa)4(Cl)2] contains a symmetrical tricobalt framework with identical Co–Co bond lengths (2.34 Å

  8. Fabrication of a multi-walled metal pipe

    Shimamune, Koji; Toda, Saburo; Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    In concentrically arranged metal pipes for simulated fuel elements in the form of a multi-walled pipe, their one end lengthens gradually in the axial direction from inner and outer pipes toward a central pipe for easy adjustment of deformation which occurs when the pipes are drawn. A plastic electrical insulator is disposed between adjacent pipes. Each end of the pipes is equipped with an annular flexible stopper which is allowed to travel in the axial direction so as to prevent the insulator from falling during drawing work. At the other end, all pipes are constricted and joined to each other to thereby form the desired multi-walled pipe. (Mikami, T.)

  9. Fabrication of Multiple-Layered Hydrogel Scaffolds with Elaborate Structure and Good Mechanical Properties via 3D Printing and Ionic Reinforcement.

    Wang, Xiaotong; Wei, Changzheng; Cao, Bin; Jiang, Lixia; Hou, Yongtai; Chang, Jiang

    2018-05-30

    A major challenge in three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogels is the fabrication of stable constructs with high precision and good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Existing methods typically feature complicated reinforcement steps or use potentially toxic components, such as photocuring polymers and crosslinking reagents. In this study, we used a thermally sensitive hydrogel, hydroxybutyl chitosan (HBC), for 3D-printing applications. For the first time, we demonstrated that this modified polysaccharide is affected by the specific ion effect. As the salt concentration was increased and stronger kosmotropic anions were used, the lower critical solution temperature of the HBC decreased and the storage modulus was improved, indicating a more hydrophobic structure and stronger molecular chain interactions. On the basis of the thermosensitivity and the ion effects of HBC, a 25-layered hydrogel scaffold with strong mechanical properties and an elaborate structure was prepared via a 3D-printing method and one-step ionic post-treatment. In particular, the scaffold treated with 10% NaCl solution exhibited a tunable elastic modulus of 73.2 kPa to 40 MPa and excellent elastic recovery, as well as biodegradability and cytocompatibility, suggesting the potential for its applications to cartilage tissue repair. By simply controlling the temperature and salt concentrations, this novel approach provides a convenient and green route to improving the structural accuracy and regulating the properties of 3D-printed hydrogel constructs.

  10. Fabrication of ultrahigh density metal-cell-metal crossbar memory devices with only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures

    Zong, Baoyu; Goh, J. Y.; Guo, Zaibing; Luo, Ping; Wang, Chenchen; Qiu, Jinjun; Ho, Pin; Chen, Yunjie; Zhang, Mingsheng; Han, Guchang

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach to the fabrication of metal-cell-metal trilayer memory devices was demonstrated by using only two cycles of lithography and dry-etch procedures. The fabricated ultrahigh density crossbar devices can be scaled down to ≤70 nm in half

  11. Organic-Inorganic Graphite and Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Based Composites for 3D Printing

    Catalan Gonzalez, Jorge Alfredo

    This project was multipronged to help fuse together topics of additive manufacturing and two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, and studying the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites produced. The composites are made from the thermoplastic polymer acting as a matrix and the graphite and 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) serving as the filler or reinforcement. Different concentrations of TMD's were added to the matrix to study the effect of composition on the mechanical and electrical properties. To shed insights into the mechanical properties, test coupons were produced as "dog bone" structures for tensile testing using the ASTM D638 type 5 standard, which were printed with the aid of a Lulzbot TAZ 6 3D printer. In the same way, two-terminal resistor-like structures were printed to test the electrical properties inherent to the composites. From the measurements conducted, polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG)--graphite composites had a yield strength (YS) ≈ 50 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength (UTS) ≈ 30 MPa and had a better ductility (strain to rupture ≈ 8%) compared to theacrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) composite counterparts. Also, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) had a more positive effect than tungsten disulfide (WS2), since the strength was retained while the ductility was increased at low loadings of the material. Strain levels were measured to be 30%-120% when adding 1 wt% of MoS2 and WS2. On the other hand, with high additions of MoS2 and WS2 (15 and 20 wt%) ductility was completely lost since no plastic deformation occurred during the testing. Moreover, PETG - graphite resistor-like structures were 3-dimensional (3D) printed and tested with the help of a semiconductor parameter analyzer. All samples were tested at different radius of curvatures (0 cm-1, 0.072 cm-1, 0.087 cm-1, 0.112 cm-1, 0.157 cm-1, and 0.262 cm -1) which showed a composite that was strain insensitive. The obtained average conductivity and resistivity

  12. 3D scanning and 3D printing as innovative technologies for fabricating personalized topical drug delivery systems.

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Det-Amornrat, Usanee; Wang, Jie; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-07-28

    Acne is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease with high prevalence. In this work, the potential of 3D printing to produce flexible personalised-shape anti-acne drug (salicylic acid) loaded devices was demonstrated by two different 3D printing (3DP) technologies: Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA). 3D scanning technology was used to obtain a 3D model of a nose adapted to the morphology of an individual. In FDM 3DP, commercially produced Flex EcoPLA™ (FPLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) filaments were loaded with salicylic acid by hot melt extrusion (HME) (theoretical drug loading - 2% w/w) and used as feedstock material for 3D printing. Drug loading in the FPLA-salicylic acid and PCL-salicylic acid 3D printed patches was 0.4% w/w and 1.2% w/w respectively, indicating significant thermal degradation of drug during HME and 3D printing. Diffusion testing in Franz cells using a synthetic membrane revealed that the drug loaded printed samples released printed as a nose-shape mask by FDM 3DP, but the PCL-salicylic acid filament was not. In the SLA printing process, the drug was dissolved in different mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) that were solidified by the action of a laser beam. SLA printing led to 3D printed devices (nose-shape) with higher resolution and higher drug loading (1.9% w/w) than FDM, with no drug degradation. The results of drug diffusion tests revealed that drug diffusion was faster than with the FDM devices, 229 and 291μg/cm(2) within 3h for the two formulations evaluated. In this study, SLA printing was the more appropriate 3D printing technology to manufacture anti-acne devices with salicylic acid. The combination of 3D scanning and 3D printing has the potential to offer solutions to produce personalised drug loaded devices, adapted in shape and size to individual patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy: A review

    Manohar, Guttikonda; Dey, Abhijit; Pandey, K. M.; Maity, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    Now a day's metal matrix components are used in may industries and it finds the applications in many fields so, to make it as better performable materials. So, the need to increase the mechanical properties of the composites is there. As seen from previous studies major problem faced by the MMC's are wetting, interface bonding between reinforcement and matrix material while they are prepared by conventional methods like stir casting, squeeze casting and other techniques which uses liquid molten metals. So many researchers adopt PM to eliminate these defects and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites. Powder metallurgy is one of the better ways to prepare composites and Nano composites. And the major problem faced by the conventional methods are uniform distribution of the reinforcement particles in the matrix alloy, many researchers tried to homogeneously dispersion of reinforcements in matrix but they find it difficult through conventional methods, among all they find ultrasonic dispersion is efficient. This review article is mainly concentrated on importance of powder metallurgy in homogeneous distribution of reinforcement in matrix by ball milling or mechanical milling and how powder metallurgy improves the mechanical properties of the composites.

  14. Fabrication of a 40-inch diameter ceramic to metal seal for PLT

    Lewin, G.; Mullaney, D.

    1976-01-01

    The design and fabrication details for the ceramic to metal seal for PLT are presented. The method used for the successful casting and firing of the 90% Al 2 O 3 ceramic body and the subsequent grinding and brazing of the ceramic to 430 S.S. are discussed

  15. Large scale metal-free synthesis of graphene on sapphire and transfer-free device fabrication.

    Song, Hyun Jae; Son, Minhyeok; Park, Chibeom; Lim, Hyunseob; Levendorf, Mark P; Tsen, Adam W; Park, Jiwoong; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2012-05-21

    Metal catalyst-free growth of large scale single layer graphene film on a sapphire substrate by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process at 950 °C is demonstrated. A top-gated graphene field effect transistor (FET) device is successfully fabricated without any transfer process. The detailed growth process is investigated by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies.

  16. Design and Characterization of a Fully Differential MEMS Accelerometer Fabricated Using MetalMUMPs Technology

    Hongwei Qu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fully differential single-axis accelerometer fabricated using the MetalMUMPs process. The unique structural configuration and common-centriod wiring of the metal electrodes enables a fully differential sensing scheme with robust metal sensing structures. CoventorWare is used in structural and electrical design and simulation of the fully differential accelerometer. The MUMPs foundry fabrication process of the sensor allows for high yield, good process consistency and provides 20 μm structural thickness of the sensing element, which makes the capacitive sensing eligible. In device characterization, surface profile of the fabricated device is measured using a Veeco surface profilometer; and mean and gradient residual stress in the nickel structure are calculated as approximately 94.7 MPa and −5.27 MPa/μm, respectively. Dynamic characterization of the sensor is performed using a vibration shaker with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured as 0.52 mV/g prior to off-chip amplification. Temperature dependence of the sensing capacitance is also characterized. A −0.021fF/°C is observed. The findings in the presented work will provide useful information for design of sensors and actuators such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and electrothermal actuators that are to be fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

  17. Design and characterization of a fully differential MEMS accelerometer fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

    Qu, Peng; Qu, Hongwei

    2013-05-02

    This paper presents a fully differential single-axis accelerometer fabricated using the MetalMUMPs process. The unique structural configuration and common-centriod wiring of the metal electrodes enables a fully differential sensing scheme with robust metal sensing structures. CoventorWare is used in structural and electrical design and simulation of the fully differential accelerometer. The MUMPs foundry fabrication process of the sensor allows for high yield, good process consistency and provides 20 μm structural thickness of the sensing element, which makes the capacitive sensing eligible. In device characterization, surface profile of the fabricated device is measured using a Veeco surface profilometer; and mean and gradient residual stress in the nickel structure are calculated as approximately 94.7 MPa and -5.27 MPa/μm, respectively. Dynamic characterization of the sensor is performed using a vibration shaker with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured as 0.52 mV/g prior to off-chip amplification. Temperature dependence of the sensing capacitance is also characterized. A -0.021fF/°C is observed. The findings in the presented work will provide useful information for design of sensors and actuators such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and electrothermal actuators that are to be fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

  18. Fabrication of WCp/NiBSi metal matrix composite by electron beam melting

    Peng, Hui, E-mail: penghui@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Chang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Guo, Hongbo, E-mail: guo.hongbo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Yuan, Yuan [Zhuzhou Seed Cemented Carbide Technology Co. Ltd, No. 1099 Xiangda Road, Zhuzhou, Hunan 412000 (China); Gong, Shengkai; Xu, Huibin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Material and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials & Performance (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, No. 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-01

    A blend of NiBSi and WC powders was used as raw material for fabricating a metal matrix composite (MMC) by electron beam melting (EBM). Dense and crack-free microstructure was produced with evenly distributed WC reinforcements. Mechanical properties, including macro- and micro-hardness, flexural strength, impact toughness and compressive strength, were investigated.

  19. Fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites using ultrasonic consolidation process

    Kong, C.Y.; Soar, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic consolidation (UC) has been used to embed thermally sensitive and damage intolerant fibres within aluminium matrix structures using high frequency, low amplitude, mechanical vibrations. The UC process can induce plastic flow in the metal foils being bonded, to allow the embedding of fibres at typically 25% of the melting temperature of the base metal and at a fraction of the clamping force when compared to fusion processes. To date, the UC process has successfully embedded Sigma silicon carbide (SiC) fibres, shape memory alloy wires and optical fibres, which are presented in this paper. The eventual aim of this research is targeted at the fabrication of adaptive composite structures having the ability to measure external stimuli and respond by adapting their structure accordingly, through the action of embedded active and passive functional fibres within a freeform fabricated metal-matrix structure. This paper presents the fundamental studies of this research to identify embedding methods and working range for the fabrication of adaptive composite structures. The methods considered have produced embedded fibre specimens in which large amounts of plastic flow have been observed, within the matrix, as it is deformed around the fibres, resulting in fully consolidated specimens without damage to the fibres. The microscopic observation techniques and macroscopic functionality tests confirms that the UC process could be applied to the fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites, where fusion techniques are not feasible and where a 'cold' process is necessary

  20. Mechanical anomaly impact on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on flexible silicon fabric

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Ghodsi Nasseri, Seyed Faizelldin; Bersuker, G.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    We report the impact of mechanical anomaly on high-κ/metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors built on flexible silicon (100) fabric. The mechanical tests include studying the effect of bending radius up to 5 mm minimum bending radius with respect

  1. Fabrication of WCp/NiBSi metal matrix composite by electron beam melting

    Peng, Hui; Liu, Chang; Guo, Hongbo; Yuan, Yuan; Gong, Shengkai; Xu, Huibin

    2016-01-01

    A blend of NiBSi and WC powders was used as raw material for fabricating a metal matrix composite (MMC) by electron beam melting (EBM). Dense and crack-free microstructure was produced with evenly distributed WC reinforcements. Mechanical properties, including macro- and micro-hardness, flexural strength, impact toughness and compressive strength, were investigated.

  2. Criticality safety studies for plutonium–uranium metal fuel pin fabrication facility

    Stephen, Neethu Hanna; Reddy, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Criticality safety limits for PUMP-F facility is identified. ► The fissile mass which can be handled safely during alloy preparation is 10.5 kg. ► The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely during injection casting is 53. ► The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely after fuel fabrication is 71. - Abstract: This study focuses on the criticality safety during the fabrication of fast reactor metal fuel pins comprising of the fuel type U–15Pu, U–19Pu and U–19Pu–6Zr in the Plutonium–Uranium Metal fuel Pin fabrication Facility (PUMP-F). Maximum amount of fissile mass which can be handled safely during master alloy preparation, Injection casting and fuel slug preparation following fuel pin fabrication were identified and fixed based on this study. In the induction melting furnace, the fissile mass can be limited to 10.5 kg. During fuel slug preparation and fuel pin fabrication, fuel slugs and pins were arranged in hexagonal and square lattices to identify the most reactive configuration. The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely after injection casting can be fixed to be 53, whereas after fuel fabrication it is 71

  3. Metal-mesh based transparent electrode on a 3-D curved surface by electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    Seong, Baekhoon; Yoo, Hyunwoong; Jang, Yonghee; Ryu, Changkook; Byun, Doyoung; Nguyen, Vu Dat

    2014-01-01

    Invisible Ag mesh transparent electrodes (TEs), with a width of 7 μm, were prepared on a curved glass surface by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. With a 100 μm pitch, the EHD jet printed the Ag mesh on the convex glass which had a sheet resistance of 1.49 Ω/□. The printing speed was 30 cm s −1 using Ag ink, which had a 10 000 cPs viscosity and a 70 wt% Ag nanoparticle concentration. We further showed the performance of a 3-D transparent heater using the Ag mesh transparent electrode. The EHD jet printed an invisible Ag grid transparent electrode with good electrical and optical properties with promising applications on printed optoelectronic devices. (technical note)

  4. Trial fabrication and preliminary characterization of electrical insulator for liquid metal system

    Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Rokuro

    1995-03-01

    In the design of the liquid metal blanket, MHD pressure drop is one of critical issues. Ceramic coating on the surface of structural material is considered as an electrical insulator to reduce the MHD pressure drop. Ceramic coating such as Y 2 O 3 is a promising electrical insulator due to its high electrical resistivity and good compatibility with liquid lithium. This report describes the trial fabrication and preliminary characterization of electrical insulator for a design study of the liquid metal system. From the results of trial fabrication and preliminary characterization, it is concluded that densified atmospheric plasma spray Y 2 O 3 coating with 410SS undercoating between 316SS substrate and Y 2 O 3 coating is suitable for Y 2 O 3 coating fabrication. (author)

  5. The Metal-Zirconia Implant Fixed Hybrid Full-Arch Prosthesis: An Alternative Technique for Fabrication.

    Stumpel, Lambert J; Haechler, Walter

    2018-03-01

    The metal-resin hybrid full-arch prosthesis has been a traditionally used type of restoration for full-arch implant fixed dentures. A newer development has centered around the use of monolithic zirconia or zirconia veneered with porcelain. Being a ceramic, zirconia has the potential for fracture. This article describes a technique that utilizes a metal substructure to support a chemically and mechanically resinbonded shell of zirconia. The workflow is discussed, ranging from in-office master cast fabrication to the CAD/ CAM production of the provisional and the definitive metal-zirconia prosthesis. The article also highlights the advantages and disadvantages of various materials used for hybrid prostheses.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of nickel nanowires deposited on metal substrate

    Rahman, I.Z.; Razeeb, K.M.; Rahman, M.A.; Kamruzzaman, Md.

    2003-01-01

    The present investigation is a part of ongoing systematic study of production and process development of nanometer scale arrays of magnetic wires on metal substrates. Nickel nanowires are grown in ordered anodic alumina templates using galvanostatic electrodeposition. In this paper we report on the growth of nanowires on the electrochemical cell parameters such as bath temperature, pH and time. Focused ion beam analysis revealed heterogeneous growth of nickel nanowires. X-ray diffraction spectrum showed that FCC nickel changed the preferred orientation from (2 2 0) at lower bath temperatures to (2 0 0) at higher bath temperatures. Magnetic measurement showed that coercive fields were higher for wires with smaller diameters. Magneto-impedance was measured as a function of applied magnetic field and wire diameter

  7. Fabrication and modification of metal nanocluster composites using ion and laser beams

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Osborne, D.H. Jr.; Magruder, R.H. III; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.; Townsend, P.D.; Hole, D.E.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Metal nanocluster composites have attractive properties for applications in nonlinear optics. However, traditional fabrication techniques -- using melt-glass substrates -- are severely constrained by equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics. This paper describes the fabrication of metal nanoclusters in both crystalline and glassy hosts by ion implantation and pulsed laser deposition. The size and size distribution of the metal nanoclusters can be modified by controlling substrate temperature during implantation, by subsequent thermal annealing, or by laser irradiation. The authors have characterized the optical response of the composites by absorption and third-order nonlinear-optical spectroscopies; electron and scanning-probe microscopies have been used to benchmark the physical characteristics of the composites. The outlook for controlling the structure and nonlinear optical response properties of these nanophase materials appears increasingly promising

  8. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured metallic arrays with multi-shapes in monolayer and bilayer

    Zhu Shaoli, E-mail: slzhu@ntu.edu.s [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering (Singapore); Fu Yongqi [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics (China)

    2010-06-15

    Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured metallic arrays with different shapes in monolayer and bilayer were presented in this article. Nano-rhombic, nano-hexagon, and nano-column metallic arrays with the tunable shapes and in-plane dimensions were fabricated by means of vertical reactive ion etching and nanosphere lithography. The nanosize range of nanoparticles is from 50 to 300 nm. Optical characterization of these arrays was performed experimentally by spectroscopy. Specifically, we compared spectra width at site of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the measured extinction spectra in the visible range to that of the traditional hexagonal-arranged triangular nanoparticles. The results show that the combination of vertical reactive ion etching and nanosphere lithography approach yields as tunable masks and provides an easy way for a flexible nanofabrication. These metallic arrays have narrower FWHM of the spectra which makes them potential applications in biosensors, data storage, and bioreactors.

  9. 3D inkjet printed radio frequency inductors and capacitors

    Vaseem, Mohammad

    2016-12-08

    Inkjet printing has emerged as an ideal method for the fabrication of low cost and efficient electronic systems. However, most of the printed designs at present utilize 2D inkjet printing of metallic inks on conventional substrates. In order to have fully printed RF components, the substrate must also be printed. 3D printing of polymers can be an ideal mechanism for printing substrates, however typically such materials cannot handle high sintering temperatures (>150 0C) required for nanoparticles based metallic inks. In this work, an all-inkjet printed process is demonstrated that utilizes 3D inkjet printing of a UV-cured dielectric material in combination with the printing of a particle free conductive silver organo-complex (SOC) ink for realization of inductors and capacitors. The processing temperature does not exceed 80 0C and still state of the art conductivity of 1×107 S/m is achieved. Both the conductive ink and dielectric have roughness values under 500 nm. The inductor and capacitor exhibit quality factors of 8 and 20 respectively in the high MHz and GHz regime.

  10. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    Karthik Tappa; Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka

    2018-01-01

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and c...

  11. Fabrication of ruthenium metal nanosheets via topotactic metallization of exfoliated ruthenate nanosheets.

    Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Sato, Jun; Saida, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Wataru; Ebina, Yasuo; Shibata, Tatsuo; Osada, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2013-03-04

    The metallization behavior of molecularly thin RuO2 nanosheets obtained from complete delamination of layered ruthenates was studied. Interestingly, the RuO2 nanosheets in a monolayer state topotactically transformed into a single layer of Ru atoms, i.e., ruthenium metal nanosheets, which can be regarded as a new family of nanosized metals.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of a magnetic micro-actuator based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS artificial cilium using 3D printing

    Liu, Fengli; Alici, Gursel; Zhang, Binbin; Beirne, Stephen; Li, Weihua

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes the use of a 3D extrusion printer to fabricate artificial magnetic cilium. The cilia are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with iron particles so that they remain slender and flexible. They can be driven by a magnetic field to closely mimic the behaviour of biological cilia. Doping iron particles to the polymers has already been done; however, to the best of our knowledge, printing such active and soft magnetic structures has not. The existing methods for manufacturing magnetic polymeric structures are complex and difficult to use for the fabrication of micro-sized high-aspect-ratio cilia. The 3D printing technique we propose here is simple and inexpensive compared to previously suggested fabrication methods. In this study, free-standing magnetic PDMS cilia were fabricated in different sizes up to 5 mm in length and 1 mm in width. The stress-strain curves of the PDMS cilia were experimentally obtained to quantify the effect of the concentration of the iron particles on the modulus of elasticity of the cilia. The higher the iron concentration, the higher the modulus of elasticity. We have quantified the characteristics of the cilia made of 40% w/w iron particles in PDMS. A single cilium (5 × 1 × 0.0035 mm) can output up to 27 μN blocking force under a magnetic field of 160 mT. These cilia can be used as a mixer in lap-on-chip applications and as the anchoring and propulsion legs of endoscopic capsule robots operating within the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Analytical expressions estimating the blocking force are established and compared with the experimental results.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a magnetic micro-actuator based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS artificial cilium using 3D printing

    Liu, Fengli; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua; Zhang, Binbin; Beirne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of a 3D extrusion printer to fabricate artificial magnetic cilium. The cilia are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with iron particles so that they remain slender and flexible. They can be driven by a magnetic field to closely mimic the behaviour of biological cilia. Doping iron particles to the polymers has already been done; however, to the best of our knowledge, printing such active and soft magnetic structures has not. The existing methods for manufacturing magnetic polymeric structures are complex and difficult to use for the fabrication of micro-sized high-aspect-ratio cilia. The 3D printing technique we propose here is simple and inexpensive compared to previously suggested fabrication methods. In this study, free-standing magnetic PDMS cilia were fabricated in different sizes up to 5 mm in length and 1 mm in width. The stress-strain curves of the PDMS cilia were experimentally obtained to quantify the effect of the concentration of the iron particles on the modulus of elasticity of the cilia. The higher the iron concentration, the higher the modulus of elasticity. We have quantified the characteristics of the cilia made of 40% w/w iron particles in PDMS. A single cilium (5 × 1 × 0.0035 mm) can output up to 27 μN blocking force under a magnetic field of 160 mT. These cilia can be used as a mixer in lap-on-chip applications and as the anchoring and propulsion legs of endoscopic capsule robots operating within the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Analytical expressions estimating the blocking force are established and compared with the experimental results. (paper)

  14. Semiconductor-Free Nonvolatile Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Metal Nanogaps Fabricated on Flexible Substrates via Adhesion Lithography

    Semple, James

    2017-01-02

    Electronic memory cells are of critical importance in modern-day computing devices, including emerging technology sectors such as large-area printed electronics. One technology that has being receiving significant interest in recent years is resistive switching primarily due to its low dimensionality and nonvolatility. Here, we describe the development of resistive switching memory device arrays based on empty aluminum nanogap electrodes. By employing adhesion lithography, a low-temperature and large-area compatible nanogap fabrication technique, dense arrays of memory devices are demonstrated on both rigid and flexible plastic substrates. As-prepared devices exhibit nonvolatile memory operation with stable endurance, resistance ratios >10⁴ and retention times of several months. An intermittent analysis of the electrode microstructure reveals that controlled resistive switching is due to migration of metal from the electrodes into the nanogap under the application of an external electric field. This alternative form of resistive random access memory is promising for use in emerging sectors such as large-area electronics as well as in electronics for harsh environments, e.g., space, high/low temperature, magnetic influences, radiation, vibration, and pressure.

  15. Semiconductor-Free Nonvolatile Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Metal Nanogaps Fabricated on Flexible Substrates via Adhesion Lithography

    Semple, James; Wyatt-Moon, Gwenhivir; Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; McLachlan, Martyn A.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2017-01-01

    Electronic memory cells are of critical importance in modern-day computing devices, including emerging technology sectors such as large-area printed electronics. One technology that has being receiving significant interest in recent years is resistive switching primarily due to its low dimensionality and nonvolatility. Here, we describe the development of resistive switching memory device arrays based on empty aluminum nanogap electrodes. By employing adhesion lithography, a low-temperature and large-area compatible nanogap fabrication technique, dense arrays of memory devices are demonstrated on both rigid and flexible plastic substrates. As-prepared devices exhibit nonvolatile memory operation with stable endurance, resistance ratios >10⁴ and retention times of several months. An intermittent analysis of the electrode microstructure reveals that controlled resistive switching is due to migration of metal from the electrodes into the nanogap under the application of an external electric field. This alternative form of resistive random access memory is promising for use in emerging sectors such as large-area electronics as well as in electronics for harsh environments, e.g., space, high/low temperature, magnetic influences, radiation, vibration, and pressure.

  16. Processing and Electromagnetic Shielding Properties of Multifunctional Metal Composite Knitted Fabric used as Socks

    Yu Zhicai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a type of bamboo charcoal polyester (BC-PET/antibacterial nylon(AN/stainless steel wire (SSW metal composite yarn was prepared with a hollow spindle spinning machine, which using the SSW as the core material, the BC-PET and AN as the outer and inner wrapped yarns, respectively. The wrapping numbers was set at 8.0turns/cm for the produced metal composite yarns. Furthermore, a type of plated knitted fabric was designed and produced by using the automatic jacquard knitting machine. The plated knitted fabric presents the BC-PET/AN/SSW metal composite yarn on the knitted fabric face and the crisscross-section polyester (CSP on the knit back. The effect of lamination numbers and angles on the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (EMSE were discussed in this study. EMSE measurement showed that the lamination angles will influence the EMSE, but not affect the air permeability. Finally, a novel EM shielding socks was designed with the produced plated knitted fabric. Finally, the performance of thermal resistance and evaporation resistance was also test usingThe sweating guarded hot plate apparatus.

  17. The marginal fit of selective laser melting-fabricated metal crowns: an in vitro study.

    Xu, Dan; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2014-12-01

    The selective laser melting technique is attracting interest in prosthetic dentistry. The marginal fit is a key criterion for fixed restorations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the marginal fit of cast cobalt-chromium alloy crowns versus the fit of selective laser melting-fabricated crowns. The marginal gap widths of 36 single crowns (18 selective laser melting-fabricated cobalt-chromium metal crowns and 18 cobalt-chromium cast crowns) were determined with a silicone replica technique. Each crown specimen was cut into 4 sections, and the marginal gap width of each cross section was evaluated by stereomicroscopy (× 100). The Student t test was used to evaluate whether significant differences occurred in the marginal gap widths between the selective laser melting-fabricated and cast cobalt-chromium metal crowns (α=.05). The mean marginal gap width of the cast crowns (170.19 μm) was significantly wider than that of the selective laser melting-fabricated crowns (102.86 μm). Selective laser melting-fabricate cobalt-chromium dental crowns found improved marginal gap widths compared with traditional cast crowns. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-area perovskite nanowire arrays fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll micro-gravure printing and doctor blading

    Hu, Qiao; Wu, Han; Sun, Jia; Yan, Donghang; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2016-02-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays with great potential applications in flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskite nanowires (PNWs) show great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, field-effect transistors and photodetectors. It is very meaningful to fabricate ordered, large-area PNW arrays and greatly accelerate their applications and commercialization in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, highly oriented and ultra-long methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) PNW array thin films were fabricated by large-scale roll-to-roll (R2R) micro-gravure printing and doctor blading in ambient environments (humility ~45%, temperature ~28 °C), which produced PNW lengths as long as 15 mm. Furthermore, photodetectors based on these PNWs were successfully fabricated on both silicon oxide (SiO2) and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and showed moderate performance. This study provides low-cost, large-scale techniques to fabricate large-area PNW arrays

  19. Invisible metal-grid transparent electrode prepared by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing

    Jang, Yonghee; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Jihoon

    2013-01-01

    Invisible Ag-grid transparent electrodes (TEs) were prepared by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing using Ag nano-particle inks. Ag-grid width less than 10 µm was achieved by the EHD jet printing, which was invisible to the naked eye. The Ag-grid line-to-line distance (pitch) was modulated in order to investigate the electrical and optical properties of the EHD jet-printed Ag-grid TEs. The decrease in the sheet resistance at the expense of the transmittance was observed as the Ag-grid pitch decreased. The figure of merit of Ag-grid TEs with various Ag-grid pitches was investigated in order to determine the optimum pitch condition for both electrical and optical properties. With the 150 µm Ag-grid pitch, the EHD jet-printed Ag-grid TE has the sheet resistance of 4.87 Ω sq −1 and the transmittance of 81.75% after annealing at 200 °C under near-infrared. Ag filling factor (FF) was defined to predict the electrical and optical properties of Ag-grid TEs. It was found that the measured electrical and optical properties were well simulated by the theoretical equations incorporating FF. The EHD jet-printed invisible Ag-grid TE with good electrical and optical properties implies its promising application to the printed optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  20. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  1. Scheme for the fabrication of ultrashort channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Appenzeller, J.; Martel, R.; Solomon, P.; Chan, K.; Avouris, Ph.; Knoch, J.; Benedict, J.; Tanner, M.; Thomas, S.; Wang, K. L.

    2000-01-01

    We present a scheme for the fabrication of ultrashort channel length metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) involving nanolithography and molecular-beam epitaxy. The active channel is undoped and is defined by a combination of nanometer-scale patterning and anisotropic etching of an n ++ layer grown on a silicon on insulator wafer. The method is self-limiting and can produce MOSFET devices with channel lengths of less than 10 nm. Measurements on the first batch of n-MOSFET devices fabricated with this approach show very good output characteristics and good control of short-channel effects. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. Fabrication of sub-micrometric metallic hollow-core structures by laser interference lithography

    Perez, Noemi; Tavera, Txaber [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra) Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Rodriguez, Ainara [CIC Microgune, Paseo Mikeletegi 48, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Ellman, Miguel; Ayerdi, Isabel; Olaizola, Santiago M. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra) Manuel de Lardizabal 15, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrays of hollow-core sub-micrometric structures are fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser interference lithography is used for the pattering of the resist sacrificial layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The removal of the sacrificial layer gives rise to metallic channels with a maximum crosssectional area of 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These structures can be used in nanofluidics. - Abstract: This work presents the fabrication of hollow-core metallic structures with a complete laser interference lithography (LIL) process. A negative photoresist is used as sacrificial layer. It is exposed to the pattern resulting from the interference of two laser beams, which produces a structure of photoresist lines with a period of 600 nm. After development of the resist, platinum is deposited on the samples by DC sputtering and the resist is removed with acetone. The resulting metallic structures consist in a continuous platinum film that replicates the photoresist relief with a hollow core. The cross section of the channels is up to 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2}. The fabricated samples are characterized by FESEM and FIB. This last tool helps to provide a clear picture of the shape and size of the channels. Conveniently dimensioned, this array of metallic submicrometric channels can be used in microfluidic or IC cooling applications.

  3. Fabrication of sub-micrometric metallic hollow-core structures by laser interference lithography

    Pérez, Noemí; Tavera, Txaber; Rodríguez, Ainara; Ellman, Miguel; Ayerdi, Isabel; Olaizola, Santiago M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Arrays of hollow-core sub-micrometric structures are fabricated. ► Laser interference lithography is used for the pattering of the resist sacrificial layer. ► The removal of the sacrificial layer gives rise to metallic channels with a maximum crosssectional area of 0.1 μm 2 . ► These structures can be used in nanofluidics. - Abstract: This work presents the fabrication of hollow-core metallic structures with a complete laser interference lithography (LIL) process. A negative photoresist is used as sacrificial layer. It is exposed to the pattern resulting from the interference of two laser beams, which produces a structure of photoresist lines with a period of 600 nm. After development of the resist, platinum is deposited on the samples by DC sputtering and the resist is removed with acetone. The resulting metallic structures consist in a continuous platinum film that replicates the photoresist relief with a hollow core. The cross section of the channels is up to 0.1 μm 2 . The fabricated samples are characterized by FESEM and FIB. This last tool helps to provide a clear picture of the shape and size of the channels. Conveniently dimensioned, this array of metallic submicrometric channels can be used in microfluidic or IC cooling applications.

  4. Controlled fabrication of semiconductor-metal hybrid nano-heterostructures via site-selective metal photodeposition

    Vela Becerra, Javier; Ruberu, T. Purnima A.

    2017-12-05

    A method of synthesizing colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures is disclosed. The method includes dissolving semiconductor nanorods in a solvent to form a nanorod solution, and adding a precursor solution to the nanorod solution. The precursor solution contains a metal. The method further includes illuminating the combined precursor and nanorod solutions with light of a specific wavelength. The illumination causes the deposition of the metal in the precursor solution onto the surface of the semiconductor nanorods.

  5. A novel fabrication method for surface integration of metal structures into polymers (SIMSIP)

    Carrion-Gonzalez, Hector

    Recently developed flexible electronics applications require that the thin metal films embedded on elastomer substrates also be flexible. These electronic systems are radically different in terms of performance and functionality than conventional silicon-based devices. A key question is whether the metal deposited on flexible films can survive large strains without rupture. Cumbersome macro-fabrication methods have been developed for functional and bendable electronics (e.g., interconnects) encapsulated between layers of polymer films. However, future electronic applications may require electronic flexible devices to be in intimate contact with curved surfaces (e.g., retinal implants) and to be robust enough to withstand large and repeated mechanical deformations. In this research, a novel technique for surface integration of metal structures into polymers (SIMSIP) was developed. Surface embedding, as opposed to placing metal on polymers, provides better adherence while leaving the surface accessible for contacts. This was accomplished by first fabricating the micro-scale metal patterns on a quartz or Teflon mother substrate, and then embedding them to a flexible polyimide thin film. The technique was successfully used to embed micro-metal structures of gold (Au), silver (Ag), and copper (Cu) into polyimide films without affecting the functional properties of the either the metals or the polymers. Experimental results confirm the successful surface-embedding of metal structures as narrow as 0.6 microm wide for different geometries commonly used in circuit design. Although similar approaches exist in literature, the proposed methodology provides a simpler and more reliable way of producing flexible circuits/electronics that is also suitable for high volume manufacturing. In order to demonstrate the flexibility of metal interconnects fabricated using the SIMSIP technique, multiple Au electrodes (5 microm and 2.5 microm wide) were tested using the X-theta bending

  6. Direct printed metal devices - The next level of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing applications in the orthodontic care

    Simon Graf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the whole world gets more digital, so do we. This article provides a basic know-how for the CAD/CAM-workflow for metallic orthodontic appliances. Demonstrating step-by-step how to design the appliance on a digital cast and laser-melting (3D metal printing it, till the final result, without any physical models.

  7. Printed photodetectors

    Pace, Giuseppina; Grimoldi, Andrea; Sampietro, Marco; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Photodetectors convert light pulses into electrical signals and are fundamental building blocks for any opto-electronic system adopting light as a probe or information carrier. They have widespread technological applications, from telecommunications to sensors in industrial, medical and civil environments. Further opportunities are plastic short-range communications systems, interactive large-area surfaces and light-weight, flexible, digital imagers. These applications would greatly benefit from the cost-effective fabrication processes enabled by printing technology. While organic semiconductors are the most investigated materials for printed photodetectors, and are the main focus of the present review, there are notable examples of other inorganic or hybrid printable semiconductors for opto-electronic systems, such as quantum-dots and nanowires. Here we propose an overview on printed photodetectors, including three-terminal phototransistors. We first give a brief account of the working mechanism of these light sensitive devices, and then we review the recent progress achieved with scalable printing techniques such as screen-printing, inkjet and other non-contact technologies in the development of all-printed or hybrid systems. (paper)

  8. Printed photodetectors

    Pace, Giuseppina; Grimoldi, Andrea; Sampietro, Marco; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Photodetectors convert light pulses into electrical signals and are fundamental building blocks for any opto-electronic system adopting light as a probe or information carrier. They have widespread technological applications, from telecommunications to sensors in industrial, medical and civil environments. Further opportunities are plastic short-range communications systems, interactive large-area surfaces and light-weight, flexible, digital imagers. These applications would greatly benefit from the cost-effective fabrication processes enabled by printing technology. While organic semiconductors are the most investigated materials for printed photodetectors, and are the main focus of the present review, there are notable examples of other inorganic or hybrid printable semiconductors for opto-electronic systems, such as quantum-dots and nanowires. Here we propose an overview on printed photodetectors, including three-terminal phototransistors. We first give a brief account of the working mechanism of these light sensitive devices, and then we review the recent progress achieved with scalable printing techniques such as screen-printing, inkjet and other non-contact technologies in the development of all-printed or hybrid systems.

  9. Fabrication of a nano-structured PbO2 electrode by using printing technology: surface characterization and application

    Kannan, K.; Muthuraman, G.; Cho, G.; Moon, I. S.

    2014-01-01

    This investigation aimed to introduce printing technology for the first time to prepare a nanostrucutured PbO 2 electrode and its application to a cerium redox transfer process. The new method of nano-size PbO 2 preparation demonstrated that nano-PbO 2 could be obtained in less time and at less cost at room temperature. The prepared nano-PbO 2 screen printed on a Ti electrode by three different compositions under similar conditions showed through surface and electrochemical analyses no adherence on Ti and no contact with other nano-PbO 2 particles. Gravure printing of nano-PbO 2 on a PET (poly ethylene thin) film at high pressure was done with two different compositions for the first time. The selective composition of 57.14 % nano-PbO 2 powder with 4.28 % carbon black and 38.58 % ECA (ethyl carbitol acetate) produced a film with a nanoporous structure with an electron transfer ability. Finally, the optimized gravure-printed nano-PbO 2 electrode was applied to the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) by using cyclic voltammetry. The gravure-printed nano-PbO 2 should pave the way to promising applications in electrochemical and sensor fields.

  10. Fabrication of a nano-structured PbO{sub 2} electrode by using printing technology: surface characterization and application

    Kannan, K.; Muthuraman, G.; Cho, G.; Moon, I. S. [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This investigation aimed to introduce printing technology for the first time to prepare a nanostrucutured PbO{sub 2} electrode and its application to a cerium redox transfer process. The new method of nano-size PbO{sub 2} preparation demonstrated that nano-PbO{sub 2} could be obtained in less time and at less cost at room temperature. The prepared nano-PbO{sub 2} screen printed on a Ti electrode by three different compositions under similar conditions showed through surface and electrochemical analyses no adherence on Ti and no contact with other nano-PbO{sub 2} particles. Gravure printing of nano-PbO{sub 2} on a PET (poly ethylene thin) film at high pressure was done with two different compositions for the first time. The selective composition of 57.14 % nano-PbO{sub 2} powder with 4.28 % carbon black and 38.58 % ECA (ethyl carbitol acetate) produced a film with a nanoporous structure with an electron transfer ability. Finally, the optimized gravure-printed nano-PbO{sub 2} electrode was applied to the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) by using cyclic voltammetry. The gravure-printed nano-PbO{sub 2} should pave the way to promising applications in electrochemical and sensor fields.

  11. Removing lead from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation: factorial design and removal mechanism.

    Li, Xingang; Gao, Yujie; Ding, Hui

    2013-10-01

    The lead removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation was optimized using experimental design, and a mathematical model was established to elucidate the removal mechanism. The variables studied in lead evaporation consisted of the chamber pressure, heating temperature, heating time, particle size and initial mass. The low-level chamber pressure was fixed at 0.1 Pa as the operation pressure. The application of two-level factorial design generated a first-order polynomial that agreed well with the data for evaporation efficiency of lead. The heating temperature and heating time exhibited significant effects on the efficiency, which was validated by means of the copper-lead mixture experiments. The optimized operating conditions within the region studied were the chamber pressure of 0.1 Pa, heating temperature of 1023 K and heating time of 120 min. After the conditions were employed to remove lead from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards, the efficiency was 99.97%. The mechanism of the effects was elucidated by mathematical modeling that deals with evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, and can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    Tsujimoto, K; Hirai, Y; Sugano, K; Tsuchiya, T; Tabata, O; Ban, K; Mizutani, N

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN 6 ), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460–490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches. (paper)

  13. Fabrication of Orientation-Controlled 3D Tissues Using a Layer-by-Layer Technique and 3D Printed a Thermoresponsive Gel Frame.

    Tsukamoto, Yoshinari; Akagi, Takami; Shima, Fumiaki; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we report the fabrication of orientation-controlled tissues similar to heart and nerve tissues using a cell accumulation and three-dimensional (3D) printing technique. We first evaluated the 3D shaping ability of hydroxybutyl chitosan (HBC), a thermoresponsive polymer, by using a robotic dispensing 3D printer. HBC polymer could be laminated to a height of 1124 ± 14 μm. Based on this result, we fabricated 3D gel frames of various shapes, such as square, triangular, rectangular, and circular, for shape control of 3D tissue and then normal human cardiac fibroblasts (NHCFs) coated with extracellular matrix nanofilms were seeded in the frames. Observation of shape-controlled tissues after 1 day of cultivation showed that the orientation of fibroblasts was in one direction when a short-sided, thin, rectangular-shaped frame was used. Next, we tried to fabricate orientation-controlled tissue with a vascular network by coculturing NHCF and normal human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. As a consequence of cultivation for 4 days, observation of cocultured tissue confirmed aligned cells and blood capillaries in orientation-controlled tissue. Our results clearly demonstrated that it would be possible to control the cell orientation by controlling the shape of the tissues by combining a cell accumulation technique and a 3D printing system. The results of this study suggest promising strategies for the fabrication of oriented 3D tissues in vitro. These tissues, mimicking native organ structures, such as muscle and nerve tissue with a cell alignment structure, would be useful for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications.

  14. Fabrication of conductive metallized nanostructures from self-assembled amphiphilic triblock copolymer templates: Nanospheres, nanowires, nanorings

    Zhu Jintao; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    Various metallized nanostructures (such as rings, wires with controllable lengths, spheres) have been successfully fabricated by coating metallic nanolayers onto soft nanotemplates through simple electroless methods. In particular, bimetallic nanostructures have been obtained by using simple methods. The multiple functional polymeric nanostructures were obtained through the self-assembly of polystyrene/poly(4-vinyl pyridine) triblock copolymer (P4VP-b-PS-b-P4VP) in selective media by changing the common solvent properties. By combining field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, it was confirmed that polymer/metal and bimetallic (Au at Ag) core-shell nanostructures could be achieved by chemical metal deposition method

  15. Microactuator production via high aspect ratio, high edge acuity metal fabrication technology

    Guckel, H.; Christenson, T. R.

    1993-01-01

    LIGA is a procession sequence which uses x-ray lithography on photoresist layers of several hundred micrometers to produce very high edge acuity photopolymer molds. These plastic molds can be converted to metal molds via electroplating of many different metals and alloys. The end results are high edge acuity metal parts with large structural heights. The LIGA process as originally described by W. Ehrfeld can be extended by adding a surface micromachining phase to produce precision metal parts which can be assembled to form three-dimensional micromechanisms. This process, SLIGA, has been used to fabricate a dynamometer on a chip. The instrument has been fully implemented and will be applied to tribology issues, speed-torque characterization of planar magnetic micromotors and a new family of sensors.

  16. Fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films by a combination of mechanochemical and screen-printing/sintering processes

    Wada, T.; Matsuo, Y.; Nomura, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Miyamura, A.; Chiba, Y.; Konagai, M.; Yamada, A.

    2006-01-01

    We prepared fine Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) powder suitable for screen printing using a mechanochemical process. Particulate precursors were deposited in a thin layer by a screen-printing technique, the remaining organic solvent was removed from the screen-printed CIGS film and finally the porous precursor layer was sintered into a dense polycrystalline film by atmospheric-pressure firing. The crystal structure of the film was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and the microstructure was observed in a SEM. The thickness of the film was 5-10 μm with a grain size of about 2 μm. The films were also observed in a TEM. The grain size of the as-prepared powder was less than 1 μm; however, it enlarged to 2-3 μm after firing at 575 C under a Se ambient. Preliminary CIGS solar cells with our standard Al grid/B-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/ CdS/CIGS/Mo/soda-lime glass structure were fabricated. An efficiency of 2.7%, a V oc of 0.325 V, a J sc of 28.3 mA/cm 2 and a FF of 0.295 was obtained. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. A bio-enabled maximally mild layer-by-layer Kapton surface modification approach for the fabrication of all-inkjet-printed flexible electronic devices

    Fang, Yunnan; Hester, Jimmy G. D.; Su, Wenjing; Chow, Justin H.; Sitaraman, Suresh K.; Tentzeris, Manos M.

    2016-12-01

    A bio-enabled, environmentally-friendly, and maximally mild layer-by-layer approach has been developed to surface modify inherently hydrophobic Kapton HN substrates to allow for great printability of both water- and organic solvent-based inks thus facilitating the full-inkjet-printing of flexible electronic devices. Different from the traditional Kapton surface modification approaches which are structure-compromising and use harsh conditions to target, and oxidize and/or remove part of, the surface polyimide of Kapton, the present Kapton surface modification approach targeted the surface electric charges borne by its additive particles, and was not only the first to utilize environmentally-friendly clinical biomolecules to build up a thin film of protamine-heparin complex on Kapton, but also the first to be conducted under minimally destructive and maximally mild conditions. Besides, for electrically charged ink particles, the present surface modification method can enhance the uniformity of the inkjet-printed films by reducing the “coffee ring effect”. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, reduced graphene oxide-based gas sensors, which were flexible, ultra-lightweight, and miniature-sized, were fully-inkjet-printed on surface modified Kapton HN films and tested for their sensitivity to dimethyl methylphosphonate (a nerve agent simulant). Such fabricated sensors survived a Scotch-tape peel test and were found insensitive to repeated bending to a small 0.5 cm radius.

  18. Increased sensitivity of 3D-Well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for infectious disease detection using 3D-printing fabrication technology.

    Singh, Harpal; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Le Van, An; Sugamata, Masami; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA -based diagnostics are considered the gold standard in the demonstration of various immunological reaction including in the measurement of antibody response to infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification with application potential in infectious disease outbreaks and individual patients' treatment and clinical care. The rapid prototyping of ELISA-based diagnostics using available 3D printing technologies provides an opportunity for a further exploration of this platform into immunodetection systems. In this study, a '3D-Well' was designed and fabricated using available 3D printing platforms to have an increased surface area of more than 4 times for protein-surface adsorption compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity in designing-product development-feedback cycle offered through 3D printing platforms provided an opportunity for its rapid assessment, in which a chemical etching process was used to make the surface hydrophilic followed by validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA for infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The higher sensitivity of the 3D-Well (3-folds higher) compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for laboratory or field diagnosis of infectious diseases including applications in other disciplines.

  19. Development of intertexture detection method on trace of heavy metals by using the tissue print binding assay method

    Umemiya, Yoshiaki; Hiraoka, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Yuri; Murakami, Yuriko; Kusaba, Shinnosuke; Honta, Chikako

    1999-01-01

    A method to identify and quantify rapidly metal jointed protein in living body texture by using a radioactive isotope (tissue print biding assay: TPBA) was developed to detect the protein induced by excess heavy metals. By this method, locality, presence states and time-elapsing change of heavy metals in each texture of soils and tree bodies were elucidated to make factor analysis possible on dynamics of the heavy metals in fruit garden. Iron among the heavy metals, form deficiency disease by increased pH of soil to generate typical chlorosis to leaves. In this case, as iron content in leaves reduced but chlorosis was generated, ti was found that iron related closely to metabolic process between roots and leaves. In this study, a peach tree grown at a garden was sampled to clarify soil around roots, and locality and absorptive transfer of iron in root portion and texture and to obtain some basic data for elucidation of metabolic physiological reaction of heavy metal jointed protein. (G.K.)

  20. Energy efficiency improvement target for SIC 34 - fabricated metal products. Revised target support document

    Byrer, T. G.; Billhardt, C. F.; Farkas, M. S.

    1977-02-15

    In accordance with section 374 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), Pub. L. 94-163, the Federal Energy Administration (FEA) proposed industrial energy efficiency improvement targets for the ten most energy-consumptive manufacturing industries in the U.S. Following public hearings and a review of the comments made, the final targets for Fabricated Metal Products (SIC 34) were established and are described. Using 1972 data on the energy consumed to produce specific metal products, it was concluded that a 24% reduction in energy consumption for SIC 34 is a viable goal for achievement by 1980. (ERA citation 04:045006)

  1. Characterization of complementary patterned metallic membranes produced simultaneously by a dual fabrication process

    Hao, Qingzhen; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Xiande; Zhao, Yanhui; Wang, Bei; Chiang, I.-Kao; Werner, Douglas H.; Crespi, Vincent; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-11-01

    An efficient technique is developed to fabricate optically thin metallic films with subwavelength patterns and their complements simultaneously. By comparing the spectra of the complementary films, we show that Babinet's principle nearly holds for these structures in the optical domain. Rigorous full-wave simulations are employed to verify the experimental observations. It is further demonstrated that a discrete-dipole approximation can qualitatively describe the spectral dependence of the metallic membranes on the geometry of the constituent particles as well as the illuminating polarization.

  2. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo

    2010-01-01

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  3. Fabricating Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Microcomponent by Suction Casting Using Silicon Micromold

    Zhijing Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A suction casting process for fabricating Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass microcomponent using silicon micromold has been studied. A complicated BMG microgear with 50 μm in module has been cast successfully. Observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that the cast microgear duplicates the silicon micromold including the microstructure on the surface. The amorphous state of the microgear is confirmed by transmission election microscopy. The nanoindentation hardness and elasticity modulus of the microgear reach 6.5 GPa and 94.5 GPa. The simulation and experimental results prove that the suction casting process with the silicon micromold is a promising one-step method to fabricate bulk metallic glass microcomponents with high performance for applications in microelectromechanical system.

  4. Fabrication of novel cryomill for synthesis of high purity metallic nanoparticles

    Kumar, Nirmal; Biswas, Krishanu

    2015-08-01

    The successful preparation of free standing metal nanoparticles with high purity in bulk quantity is the pre-requisite for any potential application. This is possible by using ball milling at cryogenic temperature. However, the most of ball mills available in the market do not allow preparing high purity metal nanoparticles by this route. In addition, it is not possible to carry out in situ measurements of process parameters as well as diagnostic of the process. In the present investigation, we present a detailed study on the fabrication of a cryomill, which is capable of avoiding contaminations in the product. It also provides in situ measurements and diagnostic of the low temperature milling process. Online monitoring of the milling temperature and observation of ball motion are the important aspects in the newly designed mill. The nanoparticles prepared using this fabricated mill have been found to be free standing and also free from contaminations.

  5. Fabrication of dissimilar metal electrodes with nanometer interelectrode distance for molecular electronic device characterization

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Carr, Dustin W.; Tiberio, Richard C.; Greenbaum, Elias; Simpson, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    We report a versatile process for the fabrication of dissimilar metal electrodes with a minimum interelectrode distance of less than 6 nm using electron beam lithography and liftoff pattern transfer. This technique provides a controllable and reproducible method for creating structures suited for the electrical characterization of asymmetric molecules for molecular electronics applications. Electrode structures employing pairs of Au electrodes and non-Au electrodes were fabricated in three different patterns. Parallel electrode structures 300 μm long with interelectrode distances as low as 10 nm, 75 nm wide electrode pairs with interelectrode distances less than 6 nm, and a multiterminal electrode structure with reproducible interelectrode distances of 8 nm were realized using this technique. The processing issues associated with the fabrication of these structures are discussed along with the intended application of these devices. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  6. Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaic Modules Fabricated via Halogen-Free Solvent System with Roll-to-Roll Compatible Scalable Printing Method.

    Heo, Youn-Jung; Jung, Yen-Sook; Hwang, Kyeongil; Kim, Jueng-Eun; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sehyun; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Donmin; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-11-15

    For the first time, the photovoltaic modules composed of small molecule were successfully fabricated by using roll-to-roll compatible printing techniques. In this study, blend films of small molecules, BTR and PC 71 BM were slot-die coated using a halogen-free solvent system. As a result, high efficiencies of 7.46% and 6.56% were achieved from time-consuming solvent vapor annealing (SVA) treatment and roll-to-roll compatible solvent additive approaches, respectively. After successful verification of our roll-to-roll compatible method on small-area devices, we further fabricated large-area photovoltaic modules with a total active area of 10 cm 2 , achieving a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.83%. This demonstration of large-area photovoltaic modules through roll-to-roll compatible printing methods, even based on a halogen-free solvent, suggests the great potential for the industrial-scale production of organic solar cells (OSCs).

  7. Fabrication and characterisation of embedded metal nanostructures by ion implantation with nanoporous anodic alumina masks

    Guan, Wei [NanoLAB, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Peng, Nianhua, E-mail: n.peng@surrey.ac.uk [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Surrey University, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, Christopher [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Surrey University, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Ghatak, Jay [NanoLAB, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Peng, Yong [NanoLAB, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, 222 Tianshui Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ross, Ian M. [Department of Electronic and Electric Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Bhatta, Umananda M.; Inkson, Beverley J.; Möbus, Günter [NanoLAB, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Lateral ordered Co, Pt and Co/Pt nanostructures were fabricated in SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates by high fluence metal ion implantation through periodic nanochannel membrane masks based on anodic aluminium oxides (AAO). The quality of nanopatterning transfer defined by various AAO masks in different substrates was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in both imaging and spectroscopy modes.

  8. Mechanical anomaly impact on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on flexible silicon fabric

    Ghoneim, Mohamed T.

    2014-06-09

    We report the impact of mechanical anomaly on high-κ/metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors built on flexible silicon (100) fabric. The mechanical tests include studying the effect of bending radius up to 5 mm minimum bending radius with respect to breakdown voltage and leakage current of the devices. We also report the effect of continuous mechanical stress on the breakdown voltage over extended periods of times.

  9. National machine guarding program: Part 1. Machine safeguarding practices in small metal fabrication businesses

    Parker, David L.; Yamin, Samuel C.; Brosseau, Lisa M.; Xi, Min; Gordon, Robert; Most, Ivan G.; Stanley, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Background Metal fabrication workers experience high rates of traumatic occupational injuries. Machine operators in particular face high risks, often stemming from the absence or improper use of machine safeguarding or the failure to implement lockout procedures. Methods The National Machine Guarding Program (NMGP) was a translational research initiative implemented in conjunction with two workers' compensation insures. Insurance safety consultants trained in machine guarding used standardize...

  10. Y-12 product improvements expected to reduce metal production costs and decrease fabrication losses

    Parker, Elaine; Hassler, Morris

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Y-12 National Security Complex supplies uranium metal and uranium oxide feed material that is then fabricated into fuel for research reactors around the world. Over the past two to three years, Y-12 has learned a great deal about its Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) product. The LEU is produced by taking U.S. surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and blending it with depleted or natural uranium. The surplus HEU comes from dismantled U.S. weapons parts that have been declared as surplus. Those research reactors that use LEU from Y-12 are making important contributions to international nuclear non-proliferation by using LEU rather than HEU, and by helping to disposition former weapons material. We clearly understand that our customers want to keep fuel costs as low as possible. We at Y-12 are making every effort to improve efficiencies in producing the uranium through standardizing the chemical specifications as well as the product mass and dimensional qualities. This paper will discuss the new standard specification that we have proposed to existing LEU metal customers and fuel fabricators. It will also cover Y-12's progress on a new mold-design that will result in a more uniform, higher quality product that is less expensive to produce. This new product is expected to decrease overall fabrication losses by 5-10%, depending on the fabricator's process. The paper will include planned activities and the schedule associated with implementation of the new specification and product form. (author)

  11. Metallizing porous scaffolds as an alternative fabrication method for solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P.

    2015-04-01

    A combination of electroless and electrolytic techniques is used to incorporate nickel into a porous Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.90 scaffold. First a porous backbone was screen printed into a YSZ electrolyte using an ink that contains sacrificial pore formers. Once sintered, the scaffold was coated with silver using Tollens' reaction followed by electrodeposition of nickel in a Watts bath. At high temperatures the silver forms droplets enabling direct contact between the gadolinia-doped ceria and nickel. Using impedance spectroscopy analysis in a symmetrical cell a total area specific resistance of 1 Ωcm2 at 700 °C in 97% H2 with 3% H2O was found, indicating the potential of this fabrication method for scaling up.

  12. [Quantitative evaluation of printing accuracy and tissue surface adaptation of mandibular complete denture polylactic acid pattern fabricated by fused deposition modeling technology].

    Deng, K H; Wang, Y; Chen, H; Zhao, Y J; Zhou, Y S; Sun, Y C

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the adaptation of polylactic acid (PLA) pattern of mandibular complete denture fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology. Methods: A mandibular complete denture digital model was designed through a complete denture design software based on a pair of standard maxillomandibular edentulous plaster model and their occlusion bases. Ten PLA mandibular complete dentures were printed with a FDM machine. The dentures were scanned with and without the plaster model using a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. In Geomagic software, the scanning data of printed dentures were registered to its computer aided design (CAD) data, and the printing error was analyzed using the multipoint registration command. For quantitatively evaluating the adaptation of the denture, the data of plaster model and PLA denture were registered to the whole data of denture located in the plaster model using the best-fit alignment command, the 3D deviation of the plaster model and tissue surface of the denture represent the space between them. The overall area was separated into three parts: primary stress-bearing area, secondary stress-bearing area and border seal area, and the average deviations of these three parts were measured. The values were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results: Compared with the CAD data, the printing error was (0.013±0.004) mm. The overall 3D deviation between PLA denture and plaster model was (0.164±0.033) mm, in which the primary stress-bearing area was (0.165± 0.045) mm, the secondary stress-bearing area was (0.153 ± 0.027) mm, the border seal area was (0.186 ± 0.043) mm. These showed a good fit in the majority parts of the FDM denture to the plaster model. No statistically significant difference was observed between the three areas ( F =1.857, P =0.175>0.05). Conclusions: Combined with the 3D scanning, CAD and FDM technology, a FDM 3D printing process of complete denture for injection moulding can be established

  13. Investigation of the performance behavior of a forward osmosis membrane system using various feed spacer materials fabricated by 3D printing technique.

    Yanar, Numan; Son, Moon; Yang, Eunmok; Kim, Yeji; Park, Hosik; Nam, Seung-Eun; Choi, Heechul

    2018-07-01

    Recently, feed spacer research for improving the performance of a membrane module has adopted three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. This study aims to improve the performance of membrane feed spacers by using various materials and incorporating 3D printing. The samples were fabricated after modeling with 3D computer-aided design (CAD) software to investigate the mechanical strength, water flux, reverse solute flux, and fouling performances. This research was performed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polypropylene (PP), and natural polylactic acid (PLA) as printing material, and the spacer model was produced using a diamond-shaped feed spacer, with a commercially available product as a reference. The 3D printed samples were initially compared in terms of size and precision with the 3D CAD model, and deviations were observed between the products and the CAD model. Then, the spacers were tested in terms of mechanical strength, water flux, reverse solute flux, and fouling (alginate-based waste water was used as a model foulant). Although there was not much difference among the samples regarding the water flux, better performances than the commercial product were obtained for reverse solute flux and fouling resistance. When comparing the prominent performance of natural PLA with the commercial product, PLA was found to have approximately 10% less fouling (based on foulant volume per unit area and root mean square roughness values), although it showed similar water flux. Thus, another approach has been introduced for using bio-degradable materials for membrane spacers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Flexible semi-transparent silicon (100) fabric with high-k/metal gate devices

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2013-01-07

    Can we build a flexible and transparent truly high performance computer? High-k/metal gate stack based metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor devices are monolithically fabricated on industry\\'s most widely used low-cost bulk single-crystalline silicon (100) wafers and then released as continuous, mechanically flexible, optically semi-transparent and high thermal budget compatible silicon fabric with devices. This is the first ever demonstration with this set of materials which allows full degree of freedom to fabricate nanoelectronics devices using state-of-the-art CMOS compatible processes and then to utilize them in an unprecedented way for wide deployment over nearly any kind of shape and architecture surfaces. Electrical characterization shows uncompromising performance of post release devices. Mechanical characterization shows extra-ordinary flexibility (minimum bending radius of 1 cm) making this generic process attractive to extend the horizon of flexible electronics for truly high performance computers. Schematic and photograph of flexible high-k/metal gate MOSCAPs showing high flexibility and C-V plot showing uncompromised performance. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Stacking metal nano-patterns and fabrication of moth-eye structure

    Taniguchi, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) can be used as a tool for three-dimensional nanoscale fabrication. In particular, complex metal pattern structures in polymer material are demanded as plasmonic effect devices and metamaterials. To fabricate of metallic color filter, we used silver ink and NIL techniques. Metallic color filter was composed of stacking of nanoscale silver disc patterns and polymer layers, thus, controlling of polymer layer thickness is necessary. To control of thickness of polymer layer, we used spin-coating of UV-curable polymer and NIL. As a result, ten stacking layers with 1000 nm layer thickness was obtained and red color was observed. Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) is the most effective technique for mass fabrication of antireflection structure (ARS) films. For the use of ARS films in mobile phones and tablet PCs, which are touch-screen devices, it is important to protect the films from fingerprints and dust. In addition, as the nanoscale ARS that is touched by the hand is fragile, it is very important to obtain a high abrasion resistance. To solve these problems, a UV-curable epoxy resin has been developed that exhibits antifouling properties and high hardness. The high abrasion resistance ARS films are shown to withstand a load of 250 g/cm2 in the steel wool scratch test, and the reflectance is less than 0.4%.

  16. Metallic powder-bed based 3D printing of cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants: A state-of-the-art review on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Tan, X P; Tan, Y J; Chow, C S L; Tor, S B; Yeong, W Y

    2017-07-01

    Metallic cellular scaffold is one of the best choices for orthopaedic implants as a replacement of human body parts, which could improve life quality and increase longevity for the people needed. Unlike conventional methods of making cellular scaffolds, three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing opens up new possibilities to fabricate those customisable intricate designs with highly interconnected pores. In the past decade, metallic powder-bed based 3D printing methods emerged and the techniques are becoming increasingly mature recently, where selective laser melting (SLM) and selective electron beam melting (SEBM) are the two representatives. Due to the advantages of good dimensional accuracy, high build resolution, clean build environment, saving materials, high customisability, etc., SLM and SEBM show huge potential in direct customisable manufacturing of metallic cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants. Ti-6Al-4V to date is still considered to be the optimal materials for producing orthopaedic implants due to its best combination of biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This paper presents a state-of-the-art overview mainly on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of cellular Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds via SLM and SEBM methods. Current manufacturing limitations, topological shortcomings, uncertainty of biocompatible test were sufficiently discussed herein. Future perspectives and recommendations were given at the end. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of Ultra-Thin Printed Organic TFT CMOS Logic Circuits Optimized for Low-Voltage Wearable Sensor Applications.

    Takeda, Yasunori; Hayasaka, Kazuma; Shiwaku, Rei; Yokosawa, Koji; Shiba, Takeo; Mamada, Masashi; Kumaki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Tokito, Shizuo

    2016-05-09

    Ultrathin electronic circuits that can be manufactured by using conventional printing technologies are key elements necessary to realize wearable health sensors and next-generation flexible electronic devices. Due to their low level of power consumption, complementary (CMOS) circuits using both types of semiconductors can be easily employed in wireless devices. Here, we describe ultrathin CMOS logic circuits, for which not only the source/drain electrodes but also the semiconductor layers were printed. Both p-type and n-type organic thin film transistor devices were employed in a D-flip flop circuit in the newly developed stacked structure and exhibited excellent electrical characteristics, including good carrier mobilities of 0.34 and 0.21 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-1), and threshold voltages of nearly 0 V with low operating voltages. These printed organic CMOS D-flip flop circuits exhibit operating frequencies of 75 Hz and demonstrate great potential for flexible and printed electronics technology, particularly for wearable sensor applications with wireless connectivity.

  18. Printed strain sensors for early damage detection in engineering structures

    Zymelka, Daniel; Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the analysis of strain measurements recorded using a screen-printed sensors array bonded to a metal plate and subjected to high strains. The analysis was intended to evaluate the capabilities of the printed strain sensors to detect abnormal strain distribution before actual defects (cracks) in the analyzed structures appear. The results demonstrate that the developed device can accurately localize the enhanced strains at the very early stage of crack formation. The promising performance and low fabrication cost confirm the potential suitability of the printed strain sensors for applications within the framework of structural health monitoring (SHM).

  19. Fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by spinodal dewetting of thin films: A high-throughput approach

    Michalak, William D.; Miller, James B. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15262 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Yolcu, Cem [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Gellman, Andrew J., E-mail: gellman@cmu.edu [U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15262 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Metal nanoparticles on structured supports are used in a variety of technological applications including biosensing, energy harvesting, and electronics. In every case, the functions and properties of the metallic nanostructures depend on both their composition and structure (i.e. size, shape, and spatial distribution). Among the challenges to the development of metal nanoparticles for these applications is the characterization of relationships between their structure and their functional properties over multiple structural degrees of freedom spanning a large range of values. In this work, a method for creating a morphological gradient of metal nanoparticles on a substrate is described. The approach, suited for high-throughput fabrication and characterization, is based on spinodal dewetting of a metallic thin film from its substrate. Through control of initial film thickness, anneal temperature, and anneal time, spinodal dewetting results in supported nanoparticles with well-defined and controlled structure. The approach is demonstrated through its application to preparation of Pd nanoparticles on a silicon nitride substrate. The morphologies of the particles were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. Free energy-based stability and topological analyses were used to confirm the dewetting mechanism. In addition, the stability theory provides a connection to the thermophysical properties of the resulting nanoparticle array. The dewetting approach is general to any metal/support system and provides an alternative, inexpensive, and robust means to rapidly create metal nanostructures with control of morphology. It shows promise for large scale production of metal nanoparticles structures, as well as understanding basic stability properties of thin metal films. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pd dewetting from SiN occurs by a spinodal dewetting mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dewetting occurs at temperatures well below the

  20. Fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by spinodal dewetting of thin films: A high-throughput approach

    Michalak, William D.; Miller, James B.; Yolcu, Cem; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles on structured supports are used in a variety of technological applications including biosensing, energy harvesting, and electronics. In every case, the functions and properties of the metallic nanostructures depend on both their composition and structure (i.e. size, shape, and spatial distribution). Among the challenges to the development of metal nanoparticles for these applications is the characterization of relationships between their structure and their functional properties over multiple structural degrees of freedom spanning a large range of values. In this work, a method for creating a morphological gradient of metal nanoparticles on a substrate is described. The approach, suited for high-throughput fabrication and characterization, is based on spinodal dewetting of a metallic thin film from its substrate. Through control of initial film thickness, anneal temperature, and anneal time, spinodal dewetting results in supported nanoparticles with well-defined and controlled structure. The approach is demonstrated through its application to preparation of Pd nanoparticles on a silicon nitride substrate. The morphologies of the particles were characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. Free energy-based stability and topological analyses were used to confirm the dewetting mechanism. In addition, the stability theory provides a connection to the thermophysical properties of the resulting nanoparticle array. The dewetting approach is general to any metal/support system and provides an alternative, inexpensive, and robust means to rapidly create metal nanostructures with control of morphology. It shows promise for large scale production of metal nanoparticles structures, as well as understanding basic stability properties of thin metal films. - Highlights: ► Pd dewetting from SiN occurs by a spinodal dewetting mechanism. ► Dewetting occurs at temperatures well below the melting point of Pd. ► Spinodal dewetting allows

  1. All-printed paper memory

    Lien, Derhsien

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal-insulator-metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. Laser-induced forward transfer of pure metals // Towards 3D printing

    Pohl, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing offers several advantages compared to conventional methods of production, such as an increased freedom of design and a toolless production suited for variable lot sizes. In particular the printing concept has gained momen- tum for rapid prototyping and manufacturing, since it

  3. A Fully Inkjet Printed 3D Honeycomb Inspired Patch Antenna

    McKerricher, Garret

    2015-07-16

    The ability to inkjet print three-dimensional objects with integrated conductive metal provides many opportunities for fabrication of radio frequency electronics and electronics in general. Both a plastic material and silver conductor are deposited by inkjet printing in this work. This is the first demonstration of a fully 3D Multijet printing process with integrated polymer and metal. A 2.4 GHz patch antenna is successfully fabricated with good performance proving the viability of the process. The inkjet printed plastic surface is very smooth, with less than 100 nm root mean square roughness. The printed silver nanoparticles are laser sintered to achieve adequate conductivity of 1e6 S/m while keeping the process below 80oC and avoiding damage to the polymer. The antenna is designed with a honeycomb substrate which minimizes material consumption. This reduces the weight, dielectric constant and dielectric loss which are all around beneficial. The antenna is entirely inkjet printed including the ground plane conductor and achieves an impressive 81% efficiency. The honeycomb substrate weighs twenty times less than a solid substrate. For comparison the honeycomb antenna provides an efficiency nearly 15% greater than a similarly fabricated antenna with a solid substrate.

  4. POLYMER COMPOSITE FILMS WITH SIZE-SELECTED METAL NANOPARTICLES FABRICATED BY CLUSTER BEAM TECHNIQUE

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Popok, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Formation of polymer films with size-selected silver and copper nanoparticles (NPs) is studied. Polymers are prepared by spin coating while NPs are fabricated and deposited utilizing a magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus. The particle embedding into the films is provided by thermal annealing...... after the deposition. The degree of immersion can be controlled by the annealing temperature and time. Together with control of cluster coverage the described approach represents an efficient method for the synthesis of thin polymer composite layers with either partially or fully embedded metal NPs....... Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition and thermal annealing allows to form ordered arrays of metal NPs on polymer films. Plasticity and flexibility of polymer host and specific properties added by coinage metal NPs open a way for different applications of such composite materials...

  5. Experimental validation of a simple, low-cost, T-junction droplet generator fabricated through 3D printing

    Donvito, Lidia; Galluccio, Laura; Lombardo, Alfio; Morabito, Giacomo; Nicolosi, Alfio; Reno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing has been recently proposed and assessed for continuous flow microfluidic devices. In this paper the focus is on a new application of this rapid and low cost method for microfluidic device prototyping: droplets production through a T-junction generator. The feasibility of this new methodology is assessed by means of an experimental study in which the statistical parameters which characterize the production of droplets are analyzed. Furthermore, this study assesses the validity of previous theoretical and experimental results, obtained for a PDMS T-junction droplet generator, also in the case of a 3D printed Acrylonitrile microfluidic chip. Finally, the feasibility of producing monodisperse droplets by analyzing the polydispersity index of the prepared droplets is demonstrated. (paper)

  6. Using virtual ridge augmentation and 3D printing to fabricate a titanium mesh positioning device: A novel technique letter.

    Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Alqahtani, Nasser; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Goodacre, Brian; Swamidass, Rajesh; Garbacea, Antoanela; Lozada, Jaime

    2018-05-02

    This technique describes a novel approach for planning and augmenting a large bony defect using a titanium mesh (TiMe). A 3-dimensional (3D) surgical model was virtually created from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and wax-pattern of the final prosthetic outcome. The required bone volume (horizontally and vertically) was digitally augmented and then 3D printed to create a bone model. The 3D model was then used to contour the TiMe in accordance with the digital augmentation. With the contoured / preformed TiMe on the 3D printed model a positioning jig was made to aid the placement of the TiMe as planned during surgery. Although this technique does not impact the final outcome of the augmentation procedure, it allows the clinician to virtually design the augmentation, preform and contour the TiMe, and create a positioning jig reducing surgical time and error.

  7. Experimental validation of a simple, low-cost, T-junction droplet generator fabricated through 3D printing

    Donvito, Lidia; Galluccio, Laura; Lombardo, Alfio; Morabito, Giacomo; Nicolosi, Alfio; Reno, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional printing has been recently proposed and assessed for continuous flow microfluidic devices. In this paper the focus is on a new application of this rapid and low cost method for microfluidic device prototyping: droplets production through a T-junction generator. The feasibility of this new methodology is assessed by means of an experimental study in which the statistical parameters which characterize the production of droplets are analyzed. Furthermore, this study assesses the validity of previous theoretical and experimental results, obtained for a PDMS T-junction droplet generator, also in the case of a 3D printed Acrylonitrile microfluidic chip. Finally, the feasibility of producing monodisperse droplets by analyzing the polydispersity index of the prepared droplets is demonstrated.

  8. Metal contact engineering and registration-free fabrication of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor integrated circuits using aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Wang, Chuan; Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Zhang, Jialu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-02-22

    Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) operation is very desirable for logic circuit applications as it offers rail-to-rail swing, larger noise margin, and small static power consumption. However, it remains to be a challenging task for nanotube-based devices. Here in this paper, we report our progress on metal contact engineering for n-type nanotube transistors and CMOS integrated circuits using aligned carbon nanotubes. By using Pd as source/drain contacts for p-type transistors, small work function metal Gd as source/drain contacts for n-type transistors, and evaporated SiO(2) as a passivation layer, we have achieved n-type transistor, PN diode, and integrated CMOS inverter with an air-stable operation. Compared with other nanotube n-doping techniques, such as potassium doping, PEI doping, hydrazine doping, etc., using low work function metal contacts for n-type nanotube devices is not only air stable but also integrated circuit fabrication compatible. Moreover, our aligned nanotube platform for CMOS integrated circuits shows significant advantage over the previously reported individual nanotube platforms with respect to scalability and reproducibility and suggests a practical and realistic approach for nanotube-based CMOS integrated circuit applications.

  9. Fabrication of metallic surfaces with long-term superhydrophilic property using one-stop laser method

    Guan, Y.C.; Luo, F.F.; Lim, G.C.; Hong, M.H.; Zheng, H.Y.; Qi, Bojin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • One-stop laser method is presented to fabricate superhydrophilic surface on metals. • Wettability study shows the longest superhydrophilic duration as more than 1 month. • Water-soluble compounds, polar functional groups and dual-scale structures were formed. • Surface roughness shows an amplification effect of the wetting behavior. - Abstract: A simple method for fabricating stable superhydrophilic surface at metallic substrates is reported. This technique comprises irradiating the surface with multiple laser pulses. Surface wettability can be taylored through controlling laser parameters and processing conditions. The substrates were selected as aluminum alloy and stainless steel. Physical morphology and chemical composition of laser-textured surfaces were characterized by SEM, XPS, and 3D profiler measurements. Results showed that the longest wettability duration was achieved as more than 1 month for stainless steel and more than 200 h for Al alloy, respectively. The possible mechanism of hydrophilic behavior of laser-textured surfaces was discussed. The effect of surface topography on superhydrophilicity property was also evaluated. This study presents a promising method in fabricating long-term superhydrophilic surfaces, which is useful for improving adhesion or achieving water-assisted flow in industrial applications as well as developing cell-based technologies in biomedical applications

  10. Fabrication and optimizing of metal nano silicate as toxic metal absorbent from sea water

    Solgi, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Pure Water, is a crucial demand of creature life. Following industrial development, extra amount of toxic metals such as chromium enters the environmental cycle through the sewage, which is considered as a serious threat for organisms. One of the modern methods of filtration and removal of contaminants in water, is applying Nano-technology. According to specific property of silicate materials, in this article we try to survey increased power in composites and various absorption in several mor...

  11. Method of fabricating zirconium metal for use in composite type fuel cans

    Imahashi, Hiromichi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Akabori, Kimihiko; Tada, Naofumi; Yasuda, Tetsuro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To mass produce zirconium metal for fuel cans with less radiation hardening. Method: Zirconium sponges as raw material are inserted in a hearth mold and a procedure of melting the zirconium sponges portionwise by using a melting furnace having electron beams as a heat source while moving the hearth is repeated at least for once. Then, the rod-like ingot after melting is melted again in a vacuum or inert gas atmosphere into an ingot of a low oxygen density capable of fabrication. A composite fuel can billet is formed by using the thus obtained zirconium ingot and a zircalloy, and a predetermined composite type fuel can is manufactured by way of hot extrusion and pipe drawing fabrication. The raw material usable herein is zirconium sponge with an oxygen density of 400 ppm or higher and the content of impurity other than oxygen is between 1000 - 5000 ppm in total, or the molten material thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Fabrication of three-dimensional freestanding metal micropipes for microfluidics and microreaction technology

    Lang, P; Neiß, S; Woias, P

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and novel fabrication process to produce three-dimensional freestanding metal micropipes. This process is based on conventional micromachining and electroless nickel plating inside a microfluidic channel of structured and stacked silicon substrates. The nickel micropipe resists an etching with KOH, which facilitates to fabricate freestanding, functional micropipes. The in-channel electroless plating achieves a continuous and homogeneous deposition of nickel and shows an accurate coating of small microstructures down to 20 µm. Furthermore, the deposited nickel layers possess a high tensile strength for bonding (>200–300 N mm −2 ), are chemically inert against fluorine gas and withstand pressures up to 6 bar. Thermal measurements have shown that released micropipes show better heat flux densities than embedded micropipes with 86% at a cooling flow rate of 16 ml h −1 . Hence, released micropipes feature accurate control of the temperature in the micropipe via a variance of the cooling fluid flow rate.

  13. Fabrication of BN/Al(-Mg) metal matrix composite (MMC) by pressureless infiltration technique

    Jung, W.G.; Kwon, H. [School of Advanced Materials Eng., Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    BN/Al(-Mg) metal matrix composite (MMC) was fabricated by the pressureless infiltration technique. The phase characterizations of the composites were analyzed using the SEM, TEM, EDS and EPMA on reaction products after the electrochemical dissolution of the matrix. It is confirmed that aluminum nitride (AlN) was formed by the reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and Al alloy melt. Plate type AlN and polyhedral type Mg(-Al) boride were formed by the reaction between Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}, BN and molten Al in the composite. The reaction mechanism in the fabrication of BN/Al(-Mg) MMC was derived from the phase analysis results and the thermodynamic investigation. (orig.)

  14. Recent developments in metal and alloy fabrication. Influence on the utilization

    1983-01-01

    The program of the colloquium includes three parts. In the first part are given developments of metals and alloys elaboration leading to a better productivity, a more precise chemical composition of alloys a greater homogeneity of micro and macrostructure and a decrease of inclusion contents. These improvement in quality are obtained by smelting, refining, ingot solidification and hot working (forging and rolling). The second part shows the consequences of fabrication processes on uses and analyses with more details these improvements by few examples: stainless steels for nuclear industry microalloyed steels, aluminum and titanium alloys. The third part treats chemical analysis to follow the evolution of alloy composition during fabrication and to modify eventually the composition of the melt. New analysis methods are necessary for their adjustment to the nature and the quantity of elements and obtain the required accuracy [fr

  15. 3D Printing, Ink Casting and Micromachined Lamination (3D PICLμM: A Makerspace Approach to the Fabrication of Biological Microdevices

    Avra Kundu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel benchtop-based microfabrication technology: 3D printing, ink casting, micromachined lamination (3D PICLμM for rapid prototyping of lab-on-a-chip (LOC and biological devices. The technology uses cost-effective, makerspace-type microfabrication processes, all of which are ideally suited for low resource settings, and utilizing a combination of these processes, we have demonstrated the following devices: (i 2D microelectrode array (MEA targeted at in vitro neural and cardiac electrophysiology, (ii microneedle array targeted at drug delivery through a transdermal route and (iii multi-layer microfluidic chip targeted at multiplexed assays for in vitro applications. The 3D printing process has been optimized for printing angle, temperature of the curing process and solvent polishing to address various biofunctional considerations of the three demonstrated devices. We have depicted that the 3D PICLμM process has the capability to fabricate 30 μm sized MEAs (average 1 kHz impedance of 140 kΩ with a double layer capacitance of 3 μF, robust and reliable microneedles having 30 μm radius of curvature and ~40 N mechanical fracture strength and microfluidic devices having 150 μm wide channels and 400 μm fluidic vias capable of fluid mixing and transmitted light microparticle visualization. We believe our 3D PICLμM is ideally suited for applications in areas such as electrophysiology, drug delivery, disease in a dish, organ on a chip, environmental monitoring, agricultural therapeutic delivery and genomic testing.

  16. Design, fabrication, and application of a directional thermal processing system for controlled devitrification of metallic glasses

    Meyer, Megan Anne Lamb

    The potential of using metallic glass as a pathway to obtaining novel morphologies and metastable phases has been garnering attention since their discovery. Several rapid solidification techniques; such as gas atomization, melt spinning, laser melting, and splat quenching produce amorphous alloys. A directional thermal processing system (DTPS) was designed, fabricated and characterized for the use of zone processing or gradient-zone processing of materials. Melt-spun CuZr metallic glass alloy was subjected to the DTPS and the relaxation and crystallization responses of the metallic glass were characterized. A range of processing parameters were developed and analyzed that would allow for devitrification to occur. The relaxation and crystallization responses were compared with traditional heat treatment methods of metallic glasses. The new processing method accessed equilibrium and non-equilibrium phases of the alloy and the structures were found to be controllable and sensitive to processing conditions. Crystallized fraction, crystallization onset temperature, and structural relaxation were controlled through adjusting the processing conditions, such as the hot zone temperature and sample velocity. Reaction rates computed from isothermal (TTT) transformation data were not found to be reliable, suggesting that the reaction kinetics are not additive. This new processing method allows for future studying of the thermal history effects of metallic glasses.

  17. Microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Device for the Determination of Hexavalent Chromium by Photolithographic Fabrication Using a Photomask Printed with 3D Printer.

    Asano, Hitoshi; Shiraishi, Yukihide

    2018-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) for the determination of hexavalent chromium (Cr VI ) in water samples. The μPADs were fabricated on paper by photolithography using a photomask printed with a 3D printer and functionalized with reagents for a colorimetric assay. In the μPAD, Cr VI reacts with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide to form a violet-colored complex. Images of μPADs were captured with a digital camera; then the red, green, and blue color intensity of each detection zone were measured using images processing software. The green intensity analysis was the best sensitive among the RGB color. A linear working range (40 - 400 ppm; R 2 = 0.981) between the Cr VI and green intensity was obtained with a detection limit of 30 ppm. All of the recoveries were between 94 and 109% in recovery studies on water samples, and good results were obtained.

  18. Nd:YAG laser annealing investigation of screen-printed CIGS layer on PET: Layer annealing method for photovoltaic cell fabrication process

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) ink was formulated from CIGS powder, polyvinyl butyral PVB, terpineol and polyester/polyamine co-polymeric dispersant KD-1. Thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on PET substrate using screen-printing followed by heat treatment using a Nd:YAG laser. The structure and morphology of the heated thin films were studied. The characterization of the CIGS powder, ink, and film was done using TGA, SEM, FIB, EDS, and XRD. TGA analysis shows that the CIGS ink is drying at 200 °C, which is well below the decomposition temperature of the PET substrate. It was observed by SEM that 20 pulses of 532nm and 60 mJ/cm2 Nd:YAG laser annealing causes atomic diffusion on the near surface area. Furthermore, FIB cross section images were utilized to monitor the effect of laser annealing in the depth of the layer. Laser annealing effects were compared to as deposited layer using XRD in reference to CIGS powder. The measurement shows that crystallinity of deposited CIGS is retained while EDS quantification and atomic ratio result in gradual loss of selenium as laser energy increases. The laser parameters were tuned in an effort to utilize laser annealing of screen-printed CIGS layer as a layer annealing method for solar cell fabrication process.

  19. Y-12 product improvements expected to reduce metal production costs and decrease fabrication losses

    Hassler, Morris E.

    2005-01-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) supplies uranium metal and uranium oxide feed material for fabrication into fuel for research reactors around the world. Over the past few years, Y-12 has continued to improve its Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) product. The LEU is produced by taking U.S. surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and blending it with depleted or natural uranium. The surplus HEU comes from dismantled U.S. weapons parts. Those research reactors that use LEU from Y-12 are making important contributions to international nuclear nonproliferation by using LEU rather than HEU, and helping to disposition former U.S. weapons material. It is clearly understood that the research reactor community must keep fuel costs as low as possible and Y-12 is making every effort to improve efficiencies in producing the uranium through standardizing the chemical specifications as well as the product mass and dimensional qualities. These production cost reductions allows for the U.S. to keep the LEU product price low even with the dramatic increase in the uranium enrichment and feed component market prices in the last few years. This paper will discuss a new standard specification that has been proposed to existing LEU metal customers and fuel fabricators. It will also cover Y-12's progress on a new mold-design that will result in a more uniform, higher quality product and eliminates two steps of the production process. This new product is expected to decrease fabrication losses by 5-10%, depending on the fabricator's process. The paper will include planned activities and the schedule associated with implementation of the new specification and product form. (author)

  20. Introduction to printed electronics

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.