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Sample records for metal extraction processes

  1. Microbiological metal extraction processes

    Torma, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    Application of biotechnological principles in the mineral processing, especially in hydrometallurgy, has created new opportunities and challenges for these industries. During the 1950's and 60's, the mining wastes and unused complex mineral resources have been successfully treated in bacterial assisted heap and dump leaching processes for copper and uranium. The interest in bio-leaching processes is the consequence of economic advantages associated with these techniques. For example, copper can be produced from mining wastes for about 1/3 to 1/2 of the costs of copper production by the conventional smelting process from high-grade sulfide concentrates. The economic viability of bio leaching technology lead to its world wide acceptance by the extractive industries. During 1970's this technology grew into a more structured discipline called 'bio hydrometallurgy'. Currently, bio leaching techniques are ready to be used, in addition to copper and uranium, for the extraction of cobalt, nickel, zinc, precious metals and for the desulfurization of high-sulfur content pyritic coals. As a developing technology, the microbiological leaching of the less common and rare metals has yet to reach commercial maturity. However, the research in this area is very active. In addition, in a foreseeable future the biotechnological methods may be applied also for the treatment of high-grade ores and mineral concentrates using adapted native and/or genetically engineered microorganisms. (author)

  2. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  3. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  4. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  5. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  6. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT's proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE's inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of DOE sites

  7. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  8. Continuous process for selective metal extraction with an ionic liquid

    Parmentier, D.; Paradis, S.; Metz, S.J.; Wiedmer, S.K.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This work describes for the first time a continuous process for selective metal extraction with an ionic liquid (IL) at room temperature. The hydrophobic fatty acid based IL tetraoctylphosphonium oleate ([P8888][oleate]) was specifically chosen for its low viscosity and high selectivity towards

  9. Extraction process

    Rendall, J.S.; Cahalan, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for extracting at least two desired constituents from a mineral, using a liquid reagent which produces the constituents, or compounds thereof, in separable form and independently extracting those constituents, or compounds. The process is especially valuable for the extraction of phosphoric acid and metal values from acidulated phosphate rock, the slurry being contacted with selective extractants for phosphoric acid and metal (e.g. uranium) values. In an example, uranium values are oxidized to uranyl form and extracted using an ion exchange resin. (U.K.)

  10. Pseudomacrocyclic effect in extraction processes of metal salts by polyethers from nitric acid solutions

    Yakshin, V.V.; Vilkova, O.M.; Kotlyar, S.A.; Kamalov, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of macrocyclic (ME) and pseudmacrocyclic effects (PME), originating by conduct of the metal salt extraction processes (Cs, Sr, In, Zr, Cd, etc) from nitric acid solutions through linear and cyclic polyethers, containing 5 or 6 atoms of ether oxygen and having close molecular masses (290-360), is carried out. It is shown that ordinary ethers practically do not extract the studied metals from nitric acid solutions. By transfer from linear polyethers to their macrocyclic analogs the ME impact is expressed clearly enough: the separation coefficient value grows by tens and hundred times. At the some time the PME role in the extraction processes of metal nitrates through crown-ethers with alkyl and groups is expressed less clearly

  11. Bio-processing of solid wastes and secondary resources for metal extraction – A review

    Lee, Jae-chun; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Review focuses on bio-extraction of metals from solid wastes of industries and consumer goods. ► Bio-processing of certain effluents/wastewaters with metals is also included in brief. ► Quantity/composition of wastes are assessed, and microbes used and leaching conditions included. ► Bio-recovery using bacteria, fungi and archaea is highlighted for resource recycling. ► Process methodology/mechanism, R and D direction and scope of large scale use are briefly included. - Abstract: Metal containing wastes/byproducts of various industries, used consumer goods, and municipal waste are potential pollutants, if not treated properly. They may also be important secondary resources if processed in eco-friendly manner for secured supply of contained metals/materials. Bio-extraction of metals from such resources with microbes such as bacteria, fungi and archaea is being increasingly explored to meet the twin objectives of resource recycling and pollution mitigation. This review focuses on the bio-processing of solid wastes/byproducts of metallurgical and manufacturing industries, chemical/petrochemical plants, electroplating and tanning units, besides sewage sludge and fly ash of municipal incinerators, electronic wastes (e-wastes/PCBs), used batteries, etc. An assessment has been made to quantify the wastes generated and its compositions, microbes used, metal leaching efficiency etc. Processing of certain effluents and wastewaters comprising of metals is also included in brief. Future directions of research are highlighted.

  12. Association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation processes for metal recovery

    Puget, Flavia P.; Mendonca, Luciano A. de; Massarani, Giulio

    2000-01-01

    From the batch solvent extraction process, in this work it has been carried out a preliminary study aiming the determination of the optimal operating conditions for zirconium recovery (10 ppm) using alamine 336 (tricaprylylamine) as extractor. The results have shown that the extraction takes place instantaneously (5s of manual agitation) and that at pH around 2.0 the extraction efficiency is up to 98-99% for an aqueous/organic phase volumetric ratio of 10. Based on these results, it is proposed to evaluate the possibility of using of a pioneering technology for metal recovery at low concentrations, using a experimental set-up that associates standard solvent extraction process with liquid-liquid flotation process. (author)

  13. CONTINUOUS CHELATION-EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF METALS

    Thomas, J.R.; Hicks, T.E.; Rubin, B.; Crandall, H.W.

    1959-12-01

    A continuous process is presented for separating metal values and groups of metal values from each other. A complex mixture. e.g., neutron-irradiated uranium, can be resolved into component parts. In the present process the values are dissolved in an acidic solution and adjusted to the proper oxidation state. Thenceforth the solution is contacted with an extractant phase comprising a fluorinated beta -diketone in an organic solvent under centain pH conditions whereupon plutonium and zirconium are extracted. Plutonium is extracted from the foregoing extract with reducing aqueous solutions or under specified acidic conditions and can be recovered from the aqueous solution. Zirconium is then removed with an oxalic acid aqueous phase. The uranium is recovered from the residual original solution using hexone and hexone-diketone extractants leaving residual fission products in the original solution. The uranium is extracted from the hexone solution with dilute nitric acid. Improved separations and purifications are achieved using recycled scrub solutions and the "self-salting" effect of uranyl ions.

  14. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of β-diketones, halogenated β-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs

  15. Bio-processing of solid wastes and secondary resources for metal extraction - A review.

    Lee, Jae-Chun; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2012-01-01

    Metal containing wastes/byproducts of various industries, used consumer goods, and municipal waste are potential pollutants, if not treated properly. They may also be important secondary resources if processed in eco-friendly manner for secured supply of contained metals/materials. Bio-extraction of metals from such resources with microbes such as bacteria, fungi and archaea is being increasingly explored to meet the twin objectives of resource recycling and pollution mitigation. This review focuses on the bio-processing of solid wastes/byproducts of metallurgical and manufacturing industries, chemical/petrochemical plants, electroplating and tanning units, besides sewage sludge and fly ash of municipal incinerators, electronic wastes (e-wastes/PCBs), used batteries, etc. An assessment has been made to quantify the wastes generated and its compositions, microbes used, metal leaching efficiency etc. Processing of certain effluents and wastewaters comprising of metals is also included in brief. Future directions of research are highlighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Extraction of metal values

    Dalton, R F

    1988-10-19

    Metal values (especially uranium values) are extracted from aqueous solutions of metal oxyions in the absence of halogen ion using an imidazole of defined formula. Especially preferred extractants are 1-alkyl imidazoles and benzimidazoles having from 7 to 25 carbon atoms in the alkyl group.

  17. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  18. Proceedings of the International Symposium on quantitative description of metal extraction processes

    Themelis, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the H.H. Kellogg International Symposium. Topics include: Extractive metallurgy; Thermochemical phenomena in metallurgy; Thermodynamic modeling of metallurgical processes; and Transport and rate phenomena in metallurgical extraction

  19. Review of algorithms for modeling metal distribution equilibria in liquid-liquid extraction processes

    Lozano, L. J.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on general guidelines to be considered for application of least-squares routines and artificial neural networks (ANN in the estimation of metal distribution equilibria in liquid-liquid extraction process. The goal of the procedure in the statistical method is to find the values of the equilibrium constants (Kj for the reactions involved in the metal extraction which minimizes the differences between experimental distribution coefficient (Dexp and theoretical distribution coefficients according to the mechanism proposed (Dtheor- In the first part of the article, results obtained with the most frequently routine reported in the bibliography are compared with those obtained using the algorithms previously discussed. In the second part, the main features of a single back-propagation neural network for the same purpose are discussed, and the results obtained are compared with those obtained with the classical methods.

    El trabajo presenta las líneas generales a considerar para la estimación del equilibrio de distribución de metales en procesos de extracción líquido-líquido, según dos métodos: algoritmo clásico de mínimos cuadrados y redes neuronales artificiales. El objetivo del procedimiento, en el caso del método estadístico, es encontrar los valores de las constantes de equilibrio (Kj para las reacciones involucradas en la extracción del metal, que minimizan las diferencias entre el coeficiente de distribución experimental y el coeficiente de distribución teórico, de acuerdo al mecanismo propuesto. En la primera parte del artículo se comparan los resultados obtenidos a partir de los algoritmos usados más habitualmente en la bibliografía, con los datos obtenidos mediante el algoritmo previamente descrito. En la segunda parte, se presentan las características fundamentales para aplicar una red neuronal sencilla con algoritmo back-propagation y los

  20. Application of liquid metals for the extraction of solid metals

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid metals dissolve several solid metals in considerable amounts at moderate temperatures. The dissolution processes may be based upon simple physical solubility, formation of intermetallic phases. Even chemical reactions are often observed in which non-metallic elements might be involved. Thus, the capacity to dissolve metals and chemical properties of the liquid metals play a role in these processes. Besides the solubility also chemical properties and thermochemical data are of importance. The dissolution of metals in liquid metals can be applied to separate the solutes from other metals or non-metallic phases. Relatively noble metals can be chemically reduced by the liquid phases. Such solution processes can be applied in the extractive metallurgy, for instance to extract metals from metallic waste. The recycling of metals is of high economical and ecological importance. Examples of possible processes are discussed. (author)

  1. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  2. Processing of copper anodic-slimes for extraction of valuable metals.

    Amer, A M

    2003-01-01

    This work focuses on processing of anodic slimes obtained from an Egyptian copper electrorefining plant. The anodic slimes are characterized by high concentrations of copper, lead, tin and silver. The proposed hydrometallurgical process consists of two leaching stages for the extraction of copper (H(2)SO(4)-O(2)) and silver (thiourea-Fe3+), and pyrometallurgical treatment of the remaining slimes for production of Pb-Sn soldering alloy. Factors affecting both the leaching and smelting stages were studied.

  3. Development of a surfactant liquid membrane extraction process for the cleansing of industrial aqueous effluents containing metallic cation traces

    Rapaumbya Akaye, Guy-Roland

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a process of surfactant liquid membrane extraction to purify industrial waste solution containing Cu(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II) (about 0,1 g/L). The extractant is the ammonium salt of Cyanex 306 and Aliquat 336. The first part of this work deals with the study of the liquid-liquid extraction of the metals. The efficiency of the extractant has been shown for the extraction of each metal alone and for Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the case of a mixture of the three metals. During this study we have observed that Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II) (which is not extracted by the salt of Cyanex 301) in presence of Cu(II) and the quaternary ammonium salt (Aliquat 336). The optimisation of the experimental conditions for the discontinuous surfactant liquid membrane process led us to choose the following composition of the emulsion: 1,5 % of Cyanex 301 salt, 2,5 % of ECA 4360, dodecan. The internal phase is an aqueous solution containing 3,5 mol/L of NaOH and 0,5 mol/L tri-ethanolamin The residual concentration of Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the external phase is very low. In the case of iron, only 60 % are extracted because of the reduction phenomenon (10 % in liquid-liquid extraction). The realisation of the continuous process in pulsed column, after optimisation of hydrodynamics conditions, leads to similar results. In stationary conditions, we obtain a raffinate containing less than 0,5 mg/L of Cu(II) and Zn(II) and 36 mg/L of iron. The internal phase contains about 2 g/L of Cu(II) an Zn(II). We tried and minimize the reduction of Fe(III) in surfactant liquid membrane process. Less than 16 % of iron cannot be reduced. This leads to a purification of only 84 % In the basis of these results, processes of purification have been proposed for effluents of various composition. They enable to purify the effluent and besides to concentrate the pollutants about twenty times. (author) [fr

  4. Simultaneous application of chemical oxidation and extraction processes is effective at remediating soil Co-contaminated with petroleum and heavy metals.

    Yoo, Jong-Chan; Lee, Chadol; Lee, Jeung-Sun; Baek, Kitae

    2017-01-15

    Chemical extraction and oxidation processes to clean up heavy metals and hydrocarbon from soil have a higher remediation efficiency and take less time than other remediation processes. In batch extraction/oxidation process, 3% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) could remove approximately 70% of the petroleum and 60% of the Cu and Pb in the soil, respectively. In particular, petroleum was effectively oxidized by H 2 O 2 without addition of any catalysts through dissolution of Fe oxides in natural soils. Furthermore, heavy metals bound to Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides could be extracted by metal-EDTA as well as Fe-EDTA complexation due to the high affinity of EDTA for metals. However, the strong binding of Fe-EDTA inhibited the oxidation of petroleum in the extraction-oxidation sequential process because Fe was removed during the extraction process with EDTA. The oxidation-extraction sequential process did not significantly enhance the extraction of heavy metals from soil, because a small portion of heavy metals remained bound to organic matter. Overall, simultaneous application of oxidation and extraction processes resulted in highly efficient removal of both contaminants; this approach can be used to remove co-contaminants from soil in a short amount of time at a reasonable cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced extraction of heavy metals in the two-step process with the mixed culture of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Chang, Young-Cheol; Choi, DuBok; Kikuchi, Shintaro

    2012-01-01

    For biological extraction of heavy metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, different bacteria were investigated. The extraction rates of heavy metals using Lactobacillusbulgaricus and Streptococcusthermophilus were highest. The chemical extraction rates were depended on the amounts of pyruvic acid and lactic acid. Especially, the extraction rates using mixed pyruvic acid and lactic acid were increased compared to those of sole one. They were also enhanced in the mixed culture of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. To improve the extraction of CCA, a two-step processing procedure with the mixed culture of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus was conducted. A maximum of 93% of copper, 86.5% of chromium, and 97.8% of arsenic were extracted after 4 days. These results suggest that a two-step process with the mixed culture of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus is most effective to extract heavy metals from CCA treated wood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of extraction equilibria for several metals in the development of a process designed to recover aluminum and other metals from coal combustion ash

    Seeley, F.G.; McDowell, W.J.; Felker, L.K.; Kelmers, A.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory-scale tests of several methods for the recovery of resource materials from fly ash have led to the development of a sinter/dilute acid leach method (Calsinter process) in which fly ash is sintered with a source of calcium oxide (CaCO/sub 3/, CaSO/sub 4/, CaO, and/or limestone flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge) at 1000 to 1200/sup 0/C, followed by a two-stage leach of the sintered solids with dilute sulfuric acid. Recovery of aluminum from this leach solution in a relatively pure form requires that several contaminants, particularly iron, must be separated from the aluminum before it can be precipitated. Therefore, distribution coefficients for iron (III) and 16 other metal ions have been determined in the liquid-liquid extraction system: Primene JM-T - toluene versus aqueous ammonium sulfate (and sodium sulfate) as a function of sulfate, acid, metal ion, and amine sulfate concentration. A study of iron (III) loading equilibria as a function of time indicated that equilibrium was essentially achieved in 1 h; however, some changes, probably in the nature of the extracted species, occurred over a period of approximately 20 h. Iron (III) extraction results obtained under various sulfate concentration matrix conditions suggested the formation of an aqueous complex of ferric ammonium sulfate, which depressed iron distribution to the organic phase. Extraction isotherms for Ag, As, Cd, Cr, and Fe all exhibit linearity at low loading conditions with unit slopes, including the same degree of association of the metal ion species in both the organic and the aqueous phase. Other metal ions for which distribution coefficients are reported are: Ba, Mg, Mn, Na, K, P, Pb, Th, Ti, and U.

  7. Biotechnology for the extractive metals industries

    Brierley, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Biotechnology is an alternative process for the extraction of metals, the beneficiation of ores, and the recovery of metals from aqueous systems. Currently, microbial-based processes are used for leaching copper and uranium, enhancing the recovery of gold from refractory ores, and treating industrial wastewater to recover metal values. Future developments, emanating from fundamental and applied research and advances through genetic engineering, are expected to increase the use and efficiency of these biotechnological processes.

  8. Complementary experimental-simulational study of surfactant micellar phase in the extraction process of metallic ions: Effects of temperature and salt concentration

    Soto-Ángeles, Alan Gustavo; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, María del Rosario; Soto-Figueroa, César; Vicente, Luis

    2018-02-01

    The thermoresponsive micellar phase behaviour that exhibits the Triton-X-100 micelles by temperature effect and addition of salt in the extraction process of metallic ions was explored from mesoscopic and experimental points. In the theoretical study, we analyse the formation of Triton-X-100 micelles, load and stabilization of dithizone molecules and metallic ions extraction inside the micellar core at room temperature; finally, a thermal analysis is presented. In the experimental study, the spectrophotometric outcomes confirm the solubility of the copper-dithizone complex in the micellar core, as well as the extraction of metallic ions of aqueous environment via a cloud-point at 332.2 K. The micellar solutions with salt present a low absorbance value compared with the micellar solutions without salt. The decrease in the absorbance value is attributed to a change in the size of hydrophobic region of colloidal micelles. All transitory stages of extraction process are discussed and analysed in this document.

  9. Metals extraction from sea water

    Chryssostomidis, C.; Larue, G.J.; Morgan, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    A method and system for continuously extracting metals from sea water by deploying adsorber sheets in a suitable current of sea water, recovering the adsorber sheets after they become loaded with metal and eluting the metal from the recovered sheets. The system involves the use of hollow, perforated bobbins on which the sheets are rolled as they are recovered and through which elutant is introduced

  10. Development of bioleaching: proteomics and genomics approach in metals extraction process

    M. Azizur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Microbes are key components of the structure and function of bioleaching process. Increasing consciousness of the role of microbes has led to a quick growth of descriptive and investigational studies of their abundance and activities. However, the detail information of complex functional molecules contain in promising microbes which are very important for understanding microbial processes in bioleaching, are lacking. Therefore, molecular functions of microbes in the bioleaching process are ve...

  11. Recent trends in metals extraction

    Regel-Rosocka, M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available After near 70 years of practical usage, solvent extraction is a perfectly mastered technique of separation, widely used on an industrial scale for the separation of metals mainly from raw materials. However, currently, in the era of depleting natural resources and increasingly less accessible deposits, environmental restrictions, etc., an increasing interest, both from social and economical constrains, is being directed at the extraction of metals from the secondary sources (such as batteries, electronic scrap. In many cases, solvent extraction, due to its operational characteristics, can be considered as the Best Available Technology for the purpose of separating multielemental metal solutions. This paper provides a brief overview of past achievements and present scenario of solvent extraction investigations and developments, describing some recently commissioned solvent extraction plants, whereas the Skorpion Zinc plant (Namibia for zinc extraction from raw materials and caesium removal from radioactive High Level Wastes (HLWs are told over in detail as case studies. The paper also presents some proposals for the use of liquid-liquid extraction to separate metal ions from secondary sources (e.g. cobalt from industrial waste streams. The review highlights the emerging use of ionic liquids as new extractants for metals, providing an insight into this exciting research field. Despite its detractors, solvent extraction has entered in force into XXI century as a leading separation technology for metals.Después de casi 70 años de uso práctico, la extracción líquido-líquido o extracción con disolventes es una técnica de separación muy evolucionada, utilizándose a escala industrial en el beneficio de metales obtenidos de diversas materias primas. Sin embargo, con el agotamiento de los recursos naturales y el aumento de depósitos minerales de más difícil acceso, restricciones medio ambientales, etc., ha aumentado el interés, tanto desde

  12. Heavy-metal extraction from sewage sludge using phosphorous-based salts: optimization process with Na2H2P2O7.

    Navarro-González, Milagros; Ortega-López, Vanesa; Lópéz-Fernández, Juana I; Amo-Salas, Mariano; González-Carcedo, Salvador

    2017-09-01

    Land application is one of the important disposal alternatives for sewage sludge, but availability of potential toxic metals often restricts its uses. Three phosphorous-based salts (Na 2 H 2 P 2 O 7 , K 4 P 2 O 7 , KH 2 PO 4 ) were studied as potential metal extractants. The conclusions of the research were that greater extractive efficiency is achieved through a 30-min process of vertical shaking with disodium diacid pyrophosphate - Na 2 H 2 P 2 O 7 - at a concentration of 0.2 M at pH 2. Alternatively, the optimized process with oscillating shaking equipment would require 60 min. In both cases the average of set of extracted metals is around 50%. A second extraction process with potassium pyrophosphate - K 4 P 2 O 7 at pH 6 achieved the reduction of further total amounts of metal, upper 65% with respect to the initial content. In this way the sludge could be used in land applications, with restrictions on each soil, according to the limit values specified in the future regulations.

  13. Noble metal extraction and sorption concentrating

    Petrukhin, O.M.; Malofeeva, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    Works performed in the USSR Academy of Sciences GEOCHI laboratory of extraction methods and devoted to selectivity problems of extraction and sorption methods of platinum metal, cadmium and indium concentrating in analytical chemistry are discussed. On choosing complexino. reagent main attention is paid to the selectivity variation based on different stability of metal complexes. Platinum metals are extracted in the form of ion associates when usinq hard, mainly oxyqen-containing, extractants. Coordination-solvated metal complexes are extracted white usinq extractants containing sulfur, trivalent phosphorus and aromatic nitroqen as donor anions. Selectivity is maximum for sulfur- and nitroren-containinq extractants and sorbents. In case of the group extraction of platinum metals sorption is preferable and in case of selective extraction of individual metals, especially, in case of need of relative concentratinq extraction is preferable

  14. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  15. A Sustainable and Selective Roasting and Water-Leaching Process to Simultaneously Extract Valuable Metals from Low-Grade Ni-Cu Matte

    Cui, Fuhui; Mu, Wenning; Wang, Shuai; Xin, Haixia; Xu, Qian; Zhai, Yuchun

    2018-03-01

    Due to stringent environmental requirements and the complex occurrence of valuable metals, traditional pyrometallurgical methods are unsuitable for treating low-grade nickel-copper matte. A clean and sustainable two-stage sulfating roasting and water-leaching process was used to simultaneously extract valuable metals from low-grade nickel-copper matte. Ammonium and sodium sulfate were used as sulfating agents. The first roasting temperature, mass ratio of ammonium sulfate to matte, roasting time, dosage of sodium sulfate, second roasting temperature and leaching temperature were studied. Under optimal conditions, 98.89% of Ni, 97.48% of Cu and 95.82% of Co, but only 1.34% of Fe, were extracted. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to reveal the sulfating mechanism during the roasting process.

  16. Ferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes ferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  17. Nonferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes nonferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  18. Actinide metal processing

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  19. A double metal process

    Hawley, F.; Vasche, G.; Caywood, J.M.; Houck, B.; Boyce, J.; Tso, L.

    1988-01-01

    A dual layer metallization process is studied using a Tungsten 10% Titanium/Molybdenum sandwich (TiW/Mo) first metal with an Al/.5% Cu for the second metal. This metallization process has: 1) very reliable shallow junction contacts without junction spiking, 2) very high electromigration resistance and (3) A very smooth defect free surface throughout the process. Contact resistance of 50 and 30 ohm-um2 for P and N type silicon respectively is achieved. The TiW/Mo film stress is studied and an optimum condition for low compressive stress is defined. The TiW/Mo is etched using a corrosion free etch process. Electromigration data is presented showing TiW/Mo to be at least an order of magnitude better than Al/Si. The intermetal oxide layer is a planarized sandwich of LTO/SOG/LTO providing a smooth positive slope surface for the Metal 2. Metal l/Metal 2 via resistances are studied with 1.25 ohm-um2 values obtained

  20. Adsorption of acid-extractable organics from oil sands process-affected water onto biomass-based biochar: Metal content matters.

    Bhuiyan, Tazul I; Tak, Jin K; Sessarego, Sebastian; Harfield, Don; Hill, Josephine M

    2017-02-01

    The impact of biochar properties on acid-extractable organics (AEO) adsorption from oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) was studied. Biochar from wheat straw with the highest ash content (14%) had the highest adsorption capacity (0.59 mg/g) followed by biochar from pulp mill sludge, switchgrass, mountain pine, hemp shives, and aspen wood. The adsorption capacity had no obvious trend with surface area, total pore volume, bulk polarity and aromaticity. The large impact of metal content was consistent with the carboxylates (i.e., naphthenate species) in the OSPW binding to the metals (mainly Al and Fe) on the carbon substrate. Although the capacity of biochar is still approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of a commercial activated carbon, confirming the property (i.e., metal content) that most influenced AEO adsorption, may allow biochar to become competitive with activated carbon after normalizing for cost, especially if this cost includes environmental impacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Solvent extraction of noble metals by formazans

    Grote, M.; Hueppe, U.; Kettrup, A.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction properties of ion-pairs composed of quaternary ammonium cations and a sulphonated formazan were compared with those of an unsulphonated formazan, for various solvent media. In dichloromethane the combined system behaves as a 'coloured anion-exchanger', with displacement of the sulphonated formazan, whereas in toluene Pd(II) and Ag(I) are extracted as the metal formazan chelates from aqueous medium. The rates of extraction are remarkably higher than with the simple extractants. Because of the higher stability only the simple chelating extraction systems afford satisfactory separation of Pd(II) from excess of Pt(IV) and of Ag(I) from Cu(II). The extracted metals can be stripped and the extractant regenerated. (author)

  2. Progress in vacuum metal extraction, refining and consolidation

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mukherjee, T.K.; Sharma, B.P.

    1973-01-01

    The unique achievements in the process metallurgy of rare metals in the past quarter century should largely be attributed to advances in vacuum technology. New standards for high purity, increasing demand for pure metals and alloys for established applications, and steady improvement in sophistication and capacity of vacuum furnaces have provided the stimulus for developing and expanding vacuum metal extraction processes, and also exploring totally new processes. The paper discusses the thermochemistry of vacuum metallurgy, carbothermic and metallothermic reduction reactions, consolidation and refining by vacuum arc melting, electron beam melting and high temperature high vacuum sintering, and ultrapurification, with special reference to the reactive and refractory metals of Group IV to VI. (author)

  3. Plant extraction process

    2006-01-01

    A method for producing a plant extract comprises incubating a plant material with an enzyme composition comprising a lipolytic enzyme.......A method for producing a plant extract comprises incubating a plant material with an enzyme composition comprising a lipolytic enzyme....

  4. Primary metals extraction by liquid membranes

    Subramanian, K.N.

    1980-01-01

    The extraction of copper and uranium by liquid membranes is presented. The recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid is described. The development of this process has progressed through three stages, firstly the chemistry of uranium extraction as it pertains to liquid membrane systems. This was followed by continuous extraction tests on fresh black acid and on aged acid. Results on a 1 litre/minute pilot plant demonstrated that the process could be operated with a minimum of feed pretreatment and about 90% of uranium could be extracted. The extraction of copper from copper leach liquors is also described. (U.K.)

  5. Resinous constituent extracting process

    Sayer, W F

    1947-10-07

    The method of recovering oily constituents from coal or oil shale comprising the saturation of coal or oil shale in a sealed vessel with an organic solution having a boiling point at atmospheric pressure of not exceeding 220/sup 0/C, elevating the temperature within the vessel to a temperature below the cracking temperature of the constituents and maintaining the pressure within the vessel below 51 pounds, to extract the oily material from the coal or oil shale and subsequently separating the solvent from the oily material.

  6. Extraction of fluoride metal complexes by octanols

    Baklanova, I.V.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Il'in, E.G.; Majorov, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    The extraction of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) by octanols, including 1-octanol, 2-octanol, and iso-octanol (2-ethylhexanol), was studied. The composition of the octanols and their solubility in various aqueous solutions were evaluated. The capacity of the octanols for tantalum(V) and niobium(V), the extraction properties of the octanols, the viscosity of extracts under conditions of metal fluoride extraction, and the temperature dependence of the viscosity of the octanols were studied. The composition of the extracted complexes was studied by IR and NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis, and the hydration-solvation mechanism of the extraction of tantalum(V) and niobium(V) was supported [ru

  7. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    Fuller, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  8. Sequential extraction of uranium metal contamination

    Murry, M.M.; Spitz, H.B.; Connick, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of uranium contaminated dirt collected from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill were analyzed for uranium using a sequential extraction protocol involving a series of five increasingly aggressive solvents. The quantity of uranium extracted from the contaminated dirt by each reagent can aid in predicting the fate and transport of the uranium contamination in the environment. Uranium was separated from each fraction using anion exchange, electrodeposition and analyzed by alpha spectroscopy analysis. Results demonstrate that approximately 77 % of the uranium was extracted using NH 4 Ac in 25 % acetic acid. (author)

  9. Extraterrestrial Metals Processing, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Extraterrestrial Metals Processing (EMP) system produces iron, silicon, and light metals from Mars, Moon, or asteroid resources in support of advanced human...

  10. Process for extracting oil shale

    1920-08-22

    A process is described for recovering bituminous material from oil shale, characterized in that the oil shale is extracted with wood spirits oil (byproduct of woodspirit rectification), if necessary in admixture with other solvents in the cold or the hot.

  11. Molten salt/metal extractions for recovery of transuranic elements

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (EFR) is an advanced reactor concept that incorporates metallic driver and blanket fuels, an inherently safe, liquid-sodium-cooled, pool-type, reactor design, and on-site pyrochemical reprocessing (including electrorefining) of spent fuels and wastes. This paper describes a pyrochemical method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to recover transuranic elements from the EFR electrorefiner process salt. The method uses multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and cadmium metal at high temperatures. The chemical basis of the salt extraction method, the test equipment, and a test plan are discussed

  12. Extraction of toxic and valuable metals from foundry sands

    Vite T, J.

    1996-01-01

    There were extracted valuable metals from foundry sands such as: gold, platinum, silver, cobalt, germanium, nickel and zinc among others, as well as highly toxic metals such as chromium, lead, vanadium and arsenic. The extraction efficiency was up to 100% in some cases. For this reason there were obtained two patents at the United States, patent number 5,356,601, in October 1994, given for the developed process and patent number 5,376,000, in December 1994, obtained for the equipment employed. Therefore, the preliminary parameters for the installation of a pilot plant have also been developed. (Author)

  13. Extraterrestrial Metals Processing, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Extraterrestrial Metals Processing (EMP) system produces ferrosilicon, silicon monoxide, a glassy mixed oxide slag, and smaller amounts of alkali earth...

  14. Metal extraction by amides of carboxylic acids

    Skorovarov, D.I.; Chumakova, G.M.; Rusin, L.I.; Ul'anov, V.S.; Sviridova, R.A.; Sviridov, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Extraction ability of various amides was studied. Data on extraction of rare earths, vanadium, molybdenum, rhenium, uranium, niobium, tantalum by N,N-dibutyl-amides of acetic, nonanic acids and fatly synthetic acids of C 7 -C 9 fractions are presented. Effect of salting-out agents, inorganic acid concentrations on extraction process was studied. Potential ability of using amides of carboxylic acids for extractional concentration of rare earths as well as for recovery and separation of iron, rhenium, vanadium, molybdenum, uranium, niobium, and tantalum was shown

  15. Near-Earth asteroids: Metals occurrence, extraction, and fabrication

    Westfall, Richard

    Near-earth asteroids occur in three principle types of orbits: Amor, Apollo, and Aten. Amor asteroids make relatively close (within 0.3 AU) approaches to the earth's orbit, but do not actually overlap it. Apollo asteroids spend most of their time outside the earth's orbital path, but at some point of close approach to the sun, they cross the orbit of the earth. Aten asteroids are those whose orbits remain inside the earth's path for the majority of their time, with semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU. Near-earth orbit asteroids include: stones, stony-irons, irons, carbonaceous, and super-carbonaceous. Metals within these asteroids include: iron, nickel, cobalt, the platinum group, aluminum, titanium, and others. Focus is on the extraction of ferrous and platinum group metals from the stony-iron asteroids, and the iron asteroids. Extraction of the metal fraction can be accomplished through the use of tunnel-boring-machines (TBM) in the case of the stony-irons. The metals within the story-iron asteroids occur as dispersed granules, which can be separated from the stony fraction through magnetic and gaseous digestion separation techniques. The metal asteroids are processes by drilling and gaseous digestion or by gaseous digestion alone. Manufacturing of structures, housings, framing networks, pressure vessels, mirrors, and other products is accomplished through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal coating on advanced composites and on the inside of contour-defining inflatables (CDI). Metal coatings on advanced composites provide: resistance to degradation in the hostile environments of space; superior optical properties; superior heat dissipation; service as wear coatings; and service as evidential coatings. Metal coatings on the inside of CDI produce metal load-bearing products. Fibers such as graphite, kevlar, glass, ceramic, metal, etc., can be incorporated in the metal coatings on the inside of CDI producing metal matrix products which exhibit high strength

  16. Metals separation using solvent extractants on magnetic microparticles

    Nunez, L.; Pourfarzaneh, M.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation program was initially funded by DOE EM-50 to develop processes for the efficient separation of radionuclides and other hazardous metals. This process has simulated the partnership between industry and ANL for many applications related to hazardous metal problems in industry. In-tank or near-tank hazardous metals separation using magnetic particles promises simple, compact processing at very low costs and employs mature chemical separations technologies to remove and recover hazardous metals from aqueous solutions. The selective chemical extractants are attached to inexpensive magnetic carrier particles. Surfaces of small particles composed of rare earths or ferromagnetic materials are treated to retain chemical extractants (e.g., TBP, CMPO, quaternary amines, carboxylic acid). After selective partitioning of contaminants to the surface layer, magnets are used to collect the loaded particles from the tank. The particles can be regenerated by stripping the contaminants and the selective metals can be recovered and recycled from the strip solution. This process and its related equipment are simple enough to be used for recovery/recycling and waste minimization activities at many industrial sites. Both the development of the process for hazardous and radioactive waste and the transfer of the technology will be discussed

  17. Criticality safety of solvent extraction process

    Tachimori, Shoichi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    1987-01-01

    The article presents some comments on criticality safety of solvent extraction processes. When used as an extracting medium, tributyl phosphate extracts nitric acid and water, in addition to nitrates of U and Pu, into the organic phase. The amount of these chemical species extracted into the organic phase is dependent on and restricted by the concentrations of tributyl phosphate and other components. For criticality control, measures are taken to decrease the concentration of tributyl phosphate in the organic phase, in addition to control of the U and Pu concentrations in the feed water phase. It should be remembered that complexes of tributyl phosphate with nitrates of such metals as Pu(IV), Pu(VI), U(IV) and Th(IV) do not dissolve uniformly in the organic phase. In criticality calculation for solution-handling systems, U and Pu are generally assumed to have a valence of 6 and 4, respectively. In the reprocessing extraction process, however, U and Pu can have a valence of 4, and 3 and 6, respectively. The organic phase and aqueous phase contact in a counter-current flow. U and Pu will be accumulated if they are not brought out of the extraction system by this flow. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Proceedings of the 6. international symposium on waste processing and recycling in the mineral and metallurgical industries : WALSIM : water, air and land sustainability issues in mineral and metal extraction

    Jia, C.Q.; Pickles, C.A.; Brienne, S.; Rao, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings of the 2008 conference of metallurgists of CIM includes a collection 7 separate symposia, namely (1) aerospace materials and manufacturing, (2) water, air and land sustainability issues in mineral and metal extraction (WALSIM), (3) current status and future trends of functional nanometers, (4) recent developments in advanced high strength steels processing, (5) corrosion and wear of materials, (6) advanced characterization techniques applied to mineral, metals and materials, and (7) management in metallurgy. The WALSIM symposium dealt with environmental issues, with particular reference to the three topics of water, air and land sustainability associated with mineral and metal extraction, processing and fabrication. It provided an opportunity for scientists, engineers and plant operators to report on work aimed at achieving more efficient, environmentally sound and sustainable performance of the mineral and metals industry by enabling related organizations to exchange information on the latest developments in this field of activity with considerations of both industry and society. The sessions were entitled: resource recovery from waste material; by-products processing of slag, fly ash and electric arc furnace dust; metal recycling; wastewater and effluent treatment; gaseous pollutants treatment; and, sustainability and basic research. The symposium featured 43 presentations, of which 17 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  19. Proceedings of the 6. international symposium on waste processing and recycling in the mineral and metallurgical industries : WALSIM : water, air and land sustainability issues in mineral and metal extraction

    Jia, C.Q. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry; Pickles, C.A. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Brienne, S. [Teck Cominco Metals Ltd., Trail, BC (Canada). Applied Research and Engineering; Rao, S.R. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Materials Engineering] (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    The proceedings of the 2008 conference of metallurgists of CIM includes a collection 7 separate symposia, namely (1) aerospace materials and manufacturing, (2) water, air and land sustainability issues in mineral and metal extraction (WALSIM), (3) current status and future trends of functional nanometers, (4) recent developments in advanced high strength steels processing, (5) corrosion and wear of materials, (6) advanced characterization techniques applied to mineral, metals and materials, and (7) management in metallurgy. The WALSIM symposium dealt with environmental issues, with particular reference to the three topics of water, air and land sustainability associated with mineral and metal extraction, processing and fabrication. It provided an opportunity for scientists, engineers and plant operators to report on work aimed at achieving more efficient, environmentally sound and sustainable performance of the mineral and metals industry by enabling related organizations to exchange information on the latest developments in this field of activity with considerations of both industry and society. The sessions were entitled: resource recovery from waste material; by-products processing of slag, fly ash and electric arc furnace dust; metal recycling; wastewater and effluent treatment; gaseous pollutants treatment; and, sustainability and basic research. The symposium featured 43 presentations, of which 17 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Ionic liquids used in extraction and separation of metal ions

    Shen Xinghai; Xu Chao; Liu Xinqi; Chu Taiwei

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids as green solvents now have become a research hotspot in the field of separation of metal ions by solvent extraction. Experimental results of extraction of various metal ions with ionic liquids as solvents, including that of alkali metals, alkaline earths, transition metals rare earths and actinides are introduced. The extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products that are involved in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is also reviewed. The possible extraction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the prospect of replacement of volatile and/or toxic organic solvents with environmentally benign ionic liquids for solvent extraction and the potency of applications of ionic liquids in solvent extraction are also commented. (authors)

  1. Compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal removal.

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsiao, Shin-Tien

    2008-03-01

    A novel process, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX), was developed to generate micro-sized solvent-coated air bubbles (MSAB) for metal extraction. Through pressurization of solvent with compressed air followed by releasing air-oversaturated solvent into metal-containing wastewater, MSAB were generated instantaneously. The enormous surface area of MSAB makes extraction process extremely fast and achieves very high aqueous/solvent weight ratio (A/S ratio). CASX process completely removed Cr(VI) from acidic electroplating wastewater under A/S ratio of 115 and extraction time of less than 10s. When synthetic wastewater containing Cd(II) of 50mgl(-1) was treated, A/S ratios of higher than 714 and 1190 could be achieved using solvent with extractant/diluent weight ratio of 1:1 and 5:1, respectively. Also, MSAB have very different physical properties, such as size and density, compared to the emulsified solvent droplets, making separation and recovery of solvent from treated effluent very easy.

  2. The linear rule of metal extraction

    Han Li; Yushuang Wang; Zhichun Chen; Shulan Meng

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of experimental results a linear rule for the solvent extraction of rare earths and yttrium over a definite range of acidity and metal ion concentration is found. Relations between the coefficients of the linear rule and initial acidity are presented for the extraction systems: HEH(EHP)-kerosene-HNO 3 -R(NO 3 ) 3 , HEH(EHP)-kerosene-HCl-RCl 3 , D2EHPA-n-heptane-HCl-RCl 3 , HEH(EHP)-n-heptane-HCl-RCl 3 , where R=La-Nd, Sm-Lu, Y; HEH(EHP)=momo(2-ethyl-hexyl)2-ethyl-hexyl phosphonate; D2EHPA=di(2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphoric acid. 3 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Ionic Liquids as Extraction Media for Metal Ions

    Hirayama, Naoki

    In solvent extraction separation of metal ions, recently, many researchers have investigated possible use of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media instead of organic solvents. Ionic liquids are salts of liquid state around room temperature and can act not only as solvents but also as ion-exchangers. Therefore, the extraction mechanism of metal ions into ionic liquids is complicated. This review presents current overview and perspective on evaluation of nature of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media for metal ions.

  4. Liquid-solid extraction of metallic cations by cationic amphiphiles

    Mueller, Wolfram; Sievers, Torsten K.; Zemb, Thomas; Diat, Olivier; Sievers, Torsten K.; Dejugnat, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In the field of selective metal ion separation, liquid-liquid extraction is usually conducted through an emulsion mixing of hydrophobic complexants dispersed in an organic phase and acidic water containing the ionic species. Recently, it has been shown that amphiphilic complexants could influence strongly extraction efficiency by enhancing the interfacial interaction between the metal ion in the aqueous and the complexant in the organic phase. Moreover, these amphiphiles can also substitute the organic phase if an appropriate aliphatic chain is chosen. The dispersion of such amphiphilic complexants in an aqueous solution of salt mixtures is not only attractive for studying specific interactions but also to better the understanding of complex formation in aqueous solution of multivalent metal ions, such as lanthanides and actinides. This understanding is of potential interest for a broad range of industries including purification of rare earth metals and pollute treatment e.g. of fission byproducts. This principle can also be applied to liquid-solid extraction, where the final state of the separation is a solid phase containing the selectively extracted ions. Indeed, a novel solid-liquid extraction method exploits the selective precipitation of metal ions from an aqueous salt mixture using a cationic surfactant, below its Krafft point (temperature below which the long aliphatic chains of surfactant crystallize). This technique has been proven to be highly efficient for the separation of actinides and heavy metal using long chain ammonium or pyridinium amphiphiles. The most important point in this process is the recognition of cationic metal ions by cationic surfactants. By computing the free energy of the polar head group per micelle as a function of the different counter-anions, we have demonstrated for the first time that different interactions exist between the micellar surface and the ions. These interactions depend on the nature of the cation but also on

  5. Semisolid Metal Processing Consortium

    Apelian,Diran

    2002-01-10

    Mathematical modeling and simulations of semisolid filling processes remains a critical issue in understanding and optimizing the process. Semisolid slurries are non-Newtonian materials that exhibit complex rheological behavior. There the way these slurries flow in cavities is very different from the way liquid in classical casting fills cavities. Actually filling in semisolid processing is often counter intuitive

  6. Recycling of Metal Containing Waste by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    Reinhardt, H.

    1999-01-01

    Through the years, a large number of liquid-liquid extraction have been proposed for metal waste recovery and recycling(1,2). However, few of them have achieved commercial application. In fact, relatively little information is available on practical operation and economic feasibility. This presentation will give complementary information by describing and comparing three processes, based on the Am MAR hydrometallurgical concept and representing three different modes of operation

  7. Treatment of wastewater containing dissolved metals by extraction-flotation

    Puget, Flavia Pereira

    2002-02-01

    In this work an alternative process for treating a wastewater containing dissolved metals (uranium and zirconium) is considered. In order to develop this work, a continuous separation unit, characterized by the association of solvent extraction and liquid-liquid flotation is used. Alamina 336 (a mixture of tri-octyl and tri-decyl amines) is used as extractant in the the extraction process, carried out inward the ejector. The splitting of the amine-water emulsion formed is carried out in a continuously operated flotation column (of approximately 2.5 L volume). The solvent extraction results showed that it is possible to reach an efficiency of about 95% for the uranium and zirconium extraction, for a metal in the feed concentration of 10 ppm and for a Q fa /Q fo ratio around 200. An efficiency of about 80% is reached in the flotation column when the liquid flowrate is equal 0.05 Lmin -1 and the air flowrate is equal 3.3 Lmin -1 . (author)

  8. METAL PLATING PROCESS

    Walker, D.E.; Noland, R.A.

    1958-08-12

    A process ts described for obtaining a closely bonded coating of steel or iron on uranium. The process consists of providing, between the steel and uramium. a layer of silver. amd then pressure rolling tbe assembly at about 600 deg C until a reduction of from l0 to 50% has been obtained.

  9. An Overview on Metal Cations Extraction by Azocalixarenes

    Hasalettin Deligöz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this overview, our main aim is to present the design, preparation, characterization, and extraction/sorption properties of chromogenic azocalix[4]arenes (substituted with different groups toward metal cations. Azocalixarenes, which contain a conjugated chromophore, i.e. azo (-N=N- group are synthesized in “one-pot” procedures in satisfactory yields. A wide variety of applications is expected by the functionalization of the side arms. Some of them are used to complex with metal ions. These macrocycles due to their bowl-shaped geometry are indeed used as hosts allowing ionic or organic guests to coordinate onto their cavity. The azocalixarene based ionophores are generally applied in various fields such as catalyst recovery, power plant, agriculture, metals finishing, microelectonics, biotechnology processes, rare earths speciation, and potable water purification. Besides these, they find applications in the area of selective ion extractions, receptors, optical devices, chemical sensor devices, the stationary phase for capillary chromatography, ion transport membranes, and luminescence probes etc. This survey is focused to provide overview an of the versatile nature of azocalix[n]arenes as highly efficient extractants for metal ions treated as pollutants.

  10. Task-specific thioglycolate ionic liquids for heavy metal extraction: Synthesis, extraction efficacies and recycling properties

    Platzer, Sonja [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kar, Mega [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Leyma, Raphlin; Chib, Sonia; Roller, Alexander [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Zoology, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006 Johannesburg (South Africa); Krachler, Regina [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MacFarlane, Douglas R. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kandioller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kandioller@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Thioglycolate-based ionic liquids have been synthesized and their physicochemical properties have been examined. • The developed ionic liquids can efficiently remove Cu(II) and Cd(II). • Loaded ionic liquids can be recycled by application of different stripping protocols. - Abstract: Eight novel task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) based on the thioglycolate anion designed for heavy metal extraction have been prepared and characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, UV-Vis, infrared, ESI-MS, conductivity, viscosity, density and thermal properties. Evaluation of their time-resolved extraction abilities towards cadmium(II) and copper(II) in aqueous solutions have been investigated where distribution ratios up to 1200 were observed. For elucidation of the IL extraction mode, crystals were grown where Cd(II) was converted with an excess of S-butyl thioglycolate. It was found by X-ray diffraction analysis that cadmium is coordinated by five oxygen and one sulfur donor atoms provided by two thioglycolate molecules and one water molecule. Leaching behavior of the hydrophobic ionic liquids into aqueous systems was studied by TOC (total dissolved organic carbon) measurements. Additionally, the immobilization on polypropylene was elucidated and revealed slower metal extraction rates and similar leaching behavior. Finally, recovery processes for cadmium and copper after extraction were performed and recyclability was successfully proven for both metals.

  11. Solvent extraction of gold using ionic liquid based process

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, Megawati; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    In decades, many research and mineral processing industries are using solvent extraction technology for metal ions separation. Solvent extraction technique has been used for the purification of precious metals such as Au and Pd, and base metals such as Cu, Zn and Cd. This process uses organic compounds as solvent. Organic solvents have some undesired properties i.e. toxic, volatile, excessive used, flammable, difficult to recycle, low reusability, low Au recovery, together with the problems related to the disposal of spent extractants and diluents, even the costs associated with these processes are relatively expensive. Therefore, a lot of research have boosted into the development of safe and environmentally friendly process for Au separation. Ionic liquids (ILs) are the potential alternative for gold extraction because they possess several desirable properties, such as a the ability to expanse temperature process up to 300°C, good solvent properties for a wide range of metal ions, high selectivity, low vapor pressures, stability up to 200°C, easy preparation, environmentally friendly (commonly called as "green solvent"), and relatively low cost. This review paper is focused in investigate of some ILs that have the potentials as solvent in extraction of Au from mineral/metal alloy at various conditions (pH, temperature, and pressure). Performances of ILs extraction of Au are studied in depth, i.e. structural relationship of ILs with capability to separate Au from metal ions aggregate. Optimal extraction conditon in order to gain high percent of Au in mineral processing is also investigated.

  12. Metal ion extractant in microemulsions: where solvent extraction and surfactant science meet

    Bauer, C.

    2011-01-01

    The presented work describes the supramolecular structure of mixtures of a hydrophilic surfactant n-octyl-beta-glucoside (C8G1), and the hydrophobic metal ion extractant tributylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane/water as well as in the presence of salts. In the first part, basic solvent extraction system, composed of water, oil and extractant, will be introduced. The focus, however, lies on the extraction of multivalent metal ions from the aqueous phase. During this extraction process and in the following thermodynamic equilibrium, aggregation and phase transition in supramolecular assemblies occur, which are already described in literature. Notably, these reports rest on individual studies and specific conclusions, while a general concept is still missing. We therefore suggest the use of generalized phase diagrams to present the physico-chemical behaviour of (amphiphilic) extractant systems. These phase diagrams facilitated the development of a thermodynamic model based on molecular geometry and packing of the extractant molecules in the oil phase. As a result, we are now in the position to predict size and water content of extractant aggregates and, thus, verify the experimental results by calculation.Consequently, the second part presents a systematic study of the aqueous and organic phase of water/C8G1 and water/oil/TBP mixtures. The focus lies on understanding the interaction between metal ions and both amphiphilic molecules by means of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. We confirmed the assumption that extraction of metal ions is driven by TBP, while C8G1 remains passive. In the third and last part, microemulsions of C8G1, TBP, water (and salt) and n-dodecane are characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and chemical analytics (Karl Fischer, total organic carbon, ICP-OES,...). The co-surfactant behaviour of TBP was highlighted by comparison to the classical n-alcohol (4≤n≤8) co

  13. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would

  14. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    Mallett, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  15. Separation of rare earth metal using micro solvent extraction system

    Nishihama, S.; Tajiri, Y.; Yoshizuka, K.

    2005-01-01

    A micro solvent extraction system for the separation of rare earth metals has been investigated. The micro flow channel was fabricated on a PMMA plate. Extraction equilibrium was quickly achieved, without any mechanical mixing. The solvent extraction results obtained for the Pr/Sm binary solutions revealed that both rare earth metals are firstly extracted together. Following, the Pr is extracted in the organic solution and Sm remains in the aqueous phase. The phase separation can be successively achieved by contriving the cross section of the flow channel

  16. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  17. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  18. On solvent extraction of metals by macrocyclic polyethers

    Ionov, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The Ksub(γ) parameter characterizing effective ion charges in ionic associates of metal salts is suggested; these charges parallel with other factors determine the metals extraction by macrocyclic polyethers (crown-ethers). The dependence of metal extraction constant on the Ksub(γ) parameter is discussed. It is shown that the less effective cation charge of alkali metal ionic associates, the more probable its entering the crown-ether cavity. The synergetic crown-ethers extraction is bound as well with Ksub(γ) of metal salts. The differences in the cation extraction constants having the same ionic radius are explained with account of different values of Ksub(γ) parameters of these salts

  19. The process chemistry of the extraction and electrowinning of silver

    Hoffmann, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Conventional processing of Ag-bearing materials containing Au and Pt group metals involves smelting the material to bullion and purification of the Ag by electrorefining (ER). Au and Pt-group metals are recovered from the slimes generated by the Ag ER process. An alternative process that allows extraction of Ag from such feed materials using a combination of sulfate and nitrate chemistry is presented. The AgNO 3 solution produced is purified hydrolytically, and Ag is recovered as high purity crystals by electrowinning (EW). Advantages of the process include: production of high purity Ag, separation of precious metals from Ag at the head of the process, and elimination of the classical pyrometallurgical treatment processes with their attendant generation of recycle slags and challenging emission problems. This paper discusses the process chemistry and engineering of the process and provides information on its commercial application. (author)

  20. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  1. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30

    Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol

  2. Estimating the extractability of potentially toxic metals in urban soils: A comparison of several extracting solutions

    Madrid, F.; Reinoso, R.; Florido, M.C.; Diaz Barrientos, E.; Ajmone-Marsan, F.; Davidson, C.M.; Madrid, L.

    2007-01-01

    Metals released by the extraction with aqua regia, EDTA, dilute HCl and sequential extraction (SE) by the BCR protocol were studied in urban soils of Sevilla, Torino, and Glasgow. By multivariate analysis, the amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn liberated by any method were statistically associated with one another, whereas other metals were not. The mean amounts of all metals extracted by HCl and by SE were well correlated, but SE was clearly underestimated by HCl. Individual data for Cu, Pb and Zn by both methods were correlated only if each city was considered separately. Other metals gave poorer relationships. Similar conclusions were reached comparing EDTA and HCl, with much lower values for EDTA. Dilute HCl extraction cannot thus be recommended for general use as alternative to BCR SE in urban soils. - Dilute HCl extraction is tested as an alternative to the BCR sequential extraction in urban soils

  3. Possible applications of crown-ethers to metal extraction using liquid membrane technology - a literature survey

    Dozol, M.

    1990-01-01

    Ether-crowns, discovered in 1967 by J.C. PEDERSEN, exhibit attractive complexive and extractive properties, enhanced in various fields, such as analytical chemistry, chemical synthesis, field of biology, or extractive chemistry. The investigations carried out on these macrocyclic compounds are continually increasing, as show in international literature. Among the focus of interest, the applications to metal extraction are extensively studied with crown compounds present in liquid phase or impregnated on supports (membranes or resins). The goal of this paper is to describe the application of crown-ethers to metal extraction, using liquid membrane processes. 69 refs

  4. Extraction of uranium with emulsion membrane process use tributylphosphate extractant

    Basuki, K.T.; Sudibyo, R.; Bambang EHB; Muhadi, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    To increase the effectiveness of extraction process with so for to occur, it was tried the extraction with a couple of extraction and stripping process. This couple process was called liquid membrane emulsion. As membrane was used mix surfactant (Span-80), tributylphosphate in kerosene, natrium carbonate, while as a feeder was uranium solution with 500 concentration ppm in 0.5 - 3 M nitrate acid. In this experiment the variable investigated were % surfactant (1 - 5 %), rotary speed for membrane making (2,500 - 10.000 rpm). The optimal condition result of experiment were 5 % surfactant, 3 M nitrate acid, rotary speed 10.000 rpm and (Kd eksU ) 57 %, and (Kd strippU ) 87 %, Kd eksU at liquid-liquid extraction is 44 %. (author)

  5. Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1987-10-01

    Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses

  6. Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1987-10-01

    Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses.

  7. Separation of platinum metals by theirs extraction as sulfides

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Ryabushko, O.P.; Ty Van Mak

    1978-01-01

    Separation of platinum metals by means of their sediment in the form of sulfides with subsequent extraction is studied. The optimum conditions of metal sulfide extraction are determined, the metal output dependence from acidness and aqueous phase composition and also the organic solvent nature are investigated. Ruthenium concentration was determined photometrically. Ruthenium sulfide is extracted by butyl spirit from 1-4 normal hydrochloric acid. The maximum extraction grade of 63% is reached in 3.2-normal acid. When the mixture of acetic and hydrochloric acids (2:1) is used for decomposition of ruthenium tiosalts, the grade of ruthenium extraction by amyl spirit or the mixture of anyl and butyl spirits (1:1) constitutes 100%

  8. Extraction of metal ions by neutral β-diphosphoramides

    Madic, C.

    1990-01-01

    The extracting ability of β-diphosphoramides of the type R-N[P(O)(NMe 2 ) 2 ] 2 with R=-CH 3 (NIPA), -C 12 H 25 (ODIPA), or -C 16 H 33 (OHDIPA) for metal ions such as lanthanides, uranyl, and the transuranium elements Am(III) and Pu(IV) has been studied. Extraction yields depend on the nature of the ligand, the organic diluent (nitromethane, kerosene, tert-butylbenzene), the concentration of nitric acid in the aqueous phase, and the ligand-to-metal ratio, Q. The results show that the bidentate phosphoramides are very efficient extractants for all of the metals studied, even at low ratios Q. The presence of nitric acid generally enhances the extraction yields. On the other hand, selectivity is rather poor with these ligands. A particular effort has been made to determine the nature of extracted species by NMR spectroscopy

  9. Metal extraction from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen using low pH solutions

    ANA A. CUCULOVIC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of metals (K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Ba, Zn, Mn and Sr from dry Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. lichen was performed using solutions similar to acid rain (solution A – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4 and solution B – H2SO4–HNO3–(NH42SO4–NH4NO3. The pH values of these solutions were 2.00, 2.58, 2.87, 3.28, and 3.75. Five consecutive extractions were performed with each solution. In all solutions, the extracted metal content, except Cu and Ca, was the highest in the first extract. The highest percentage of the metals desorbed in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with low pH values, 2.00, 2.58, and 2.87. The lowest percentage in the first extraction was obtained using solutions with pH 3.28 and 3.75, indicating influence of the H+ ion on the extraction. According to the results obtained, the investigated metals form two groups. The first group includes K, Al, Ca, Mg, and Fe. They were extracted in each of the five extractions at each of the pH values. The second group includes Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Sr, which were not all extracted at each pH value. The first group yielded three types of extraction curves when the logarithms of extracted metal amounts were plotted as a function of the number of successive extractions. These effects indicate that three different positions (centres of metal ion accumulation exist in the lichen (due to sorption, complex formation, or other processes present in the tissues.

  10. Catalysed electrolytic metal oxide dissolution processes

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical processes designed for recovering valuable metals from mineral ores as well as industrial wastes usually require preliminary dissolution of inorganic compounds in aqueous media before extraction and purification steps. Unfortunately, most of the minerals concerned hardly or slowly dissolve in acidic or basic solutions. Metallic oxides, sulfides and silicates are among the materials most difficult to dissolve in aqueous solutions. They are also among the main minerals containing valuable metals. The redox properties of such materials sometimes permit to improve their dissolution by adding oxidizing or reducing species to the leaching solution, which leads to an increase in the dissolution rate. Moreover, limited amounts of redox promoters are required if the redox agent is regenerated continuously thanks to an electrochemical device. Nuclear applications of such concepts have been suggested since the dissolution of many actinide compounds (e.g., UO 2 , AmO 2 , PuC, PuN,...) is mainly based on redox reactions. In the 1980s, improvements of the plutonium dioxide dissolution process have been proposed on the basis of oxidation-reduction principles, which led a few years later to the design of industrial facilities (e.g., at Marcoule or at the french reprocessing plant of La Hague). General concepts and well-established results obtained in France at the Atomic Energy Commission (''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'') will be presented and will illustrate applications to industrial as well as analytical problems. (author)

  11. Pyrometallurgical process of actinide metal

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Ho; Woo, Mun Sik; Hwang, Sung Chan

    1999-06-01

    Major subject on pyrometallurgical partitioning technology is to separate transmutation elements (TRU) from rare earth elements(RE). Distribution coefficients of TRU and RE between molten chloride and liquid cadmium were measured for reductive extraction, and TRU were separated from RE in simplified molten chloride system by electrorefining. And separation efficiency between TRU and RE were estimated by using thermodynamics data. The results indicate that uranium, neptunium and plutonium are easy to separate from RE but some amount of RE accompany americium, and that processes have to be optimized to attain good separation efficiency of TRU. (author)

  12. Method of processing radioactive metallic sodium with recycling alcohols

    Sakai, Takuhiko; Mitsuzuka, Norimasa.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To employ high safety alcohol procession and decrease the amount of wastes in the procession of radioactive metallic sodium discharged from LMFBR type reactors. Method: Radioactive metallic sodium containing long half-decay period nuclides such as cesium, strontium, barium, cerium, lanthanum or zirconium is dissolved in an alcohol at about 70% purity. After extracting the sodium alcoholate thus formed, gaseous hydrochloride is blown-in to separate the sodium alcoholate into alcohol and sodium chloride, and regenerated alcohol is used again for dissolving sodium metal. The sodium chloride thus separated is processed into solid wastes. (Furukawa, Y.)

  13. Extraction of certain heavy metals from sewage sludge using ...

    The removal of heavy metal from sludge before disposal or application to farmland is a necessary step to achieve a more safe sludge usage or disposal. Chemical extraction using inorganic acids (nitric, hydrochloric) and organic acids (citric, oxalic) were tested for extraction of chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc from ...

  14. Short communication Increase in metal extractability after liming of ...

    ... decreased in extractability (Statistically significant differences could not be determined for the trial due to the trial not having been designed for the results that were obtained). Similar results were reported in the literature for EDTA metal extraction but the phenomenon was not elaborated upon, except for Cr. The increased ...

  15. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  16. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    Pal, Uday B.; Gazula, Gopala K. M.; Hasham, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements.

  17. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    Martoyan, G A; Karamyan, G G; Vardan, G A

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given. (paper)

  18. Use of sequential extraction to assess metal partitioning in soils

    Kaasalainen, Marika; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2003-01-01

    The state of heavy metal pollution and the mobility of Cd, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Zn were studied in three texturally different agricultural soil profiles near a Cu-Ni smelter in Harjavalta, Finland. The pseudo-total concentrations were determined by an aqua regia procedure. Metals were also determined after division into four fractions by sequential extraction with (1) acetic acid (exchangeable and specifically adsorbed metals), (2) a reducing agent (bound to Fe/Mn hydroxides), (3) an oxidizing agent (bound to soil organic matter) and (4) aqua regia (bound to mineral structures). Fallout from the smelter has increased the concentrations of Cd, Cu and Ni in the topsoil, where 75-90% of Cd, 49-72% of Cu and 22-52% of Ni occurred in the first two fractions. Slight Pb and Zn pollution was evident as well. High proportions of mobile Cd, Cu and Ni also deeper in the sandy soil, closest to the smelter, indicated some downward movement of metals. The hydroxide-bound fraction of Pb dominated in almost all soils and horizons, while Ni, Cr and Zn mostly occurred in mineral structures. Aqua regia extraction is usefully supplemented with sequential extraction, particularly in less polluted soils and in soils that exhibit substantial textural differences within the profiles. - Sequential extraction is most useful with soils with low metal pollutant levels

  19. Using geoelectrochemical technique to extract uranium and other metals

    Gao Yulong

    1990-10-01

    The geoelectrochemical extraction technique, which is a direct deep exploring method, is one of the geoelectrochemical exploring methods. It is developed recently to explore basic metals, precious metals, rare metals and some nonmetal mineral products. It is also a combination of electrical surveying and geochemical surveying. This method is more useful in the seeking of gold ore deposit. The principle and technique of this method and the results in seeking gold, uranium, lead, nickel and tin ore deposits are introduced. The equipment and instruments used in this method are also given

  20. Chelant extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils

    Peters, R.W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    1999-04-23

    The current state of the art regarding the use of chelating agents to extract heavy metal contaminants has been addressed. Results are presented for treatability studies conducted as worst-case and representative soils from Aberdeen Proving Ground's J-Field for extraction of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The particle size distribution characteristics of the soils determined from hydrometer tests are approximately 60% sand, 30% silt, and 10% clay. Sequential extractions were performed on the 'as-received' soils (worst case and representative) to determine the speciation of the metal forms. The technique speciates the heavy metal distribution into an easily extractable (exchangeable) form, carbonates, reducible oxides, organically-bound, and residual forms. The results indicated that most of the metals are in forms that are amenable to soil washing (i.e. exchangeable+carbonate+reducible oxides). The metals Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr have greater than 70% of their distribution in forms amenable to soil washing techniques, while Cd, Mn, and Fe are somewhat less amenable to soil washing using chelant extraction. However, the concentrations of Cd and Mn are low in the contaminated soil. From the batch chelant extraction studies, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were all effective in removing copper, lead, and zinc from the J-Field soils. Due to NTA being a Class II carcinogen, it is not recommended for use in remediating contaminated soils. EDTA and citric acid appear to offer the greatest potential as chelating agents to use in soil washing the Aberdeen Proving Ground soils. The other chelating agents studied (gluconate, oxalate, Citranox, ammonium acetate, and phosphoric acid, along with pH-adjusted water) were generally ineffective in mobilizing the heavy metals from the soils. The chelant solution removes the heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cr, As, and Hg) simultaneously. Using a multiple

  1. Chelant extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils

    Peters, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The current state of the art regarding the use of chelating agents to extract heavy metal contaminants has been addressed. Results are presented for treatability studies conducted as worst-case and representative soils from Aberdeen Proving Ground's J-Field for extraction of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The particle size distribution characteristics of the soils determined from hydrometer tests are approximately 60% sand, 30% silt, and 10% clay. Sequential extractions were performed on the 'as-received' soils (worst case and representative) to determine the speciation of the metal forms. The technique speciates the heavy metal distribution into an easily extractable (exchangeable) form, carbonates, reducible oxides, organically-bound, and residual forms. The results indicated that most of the metals are in forms that are amenable to soil washing (i.e. exchangeable+carbonate+reducible oxides). The metals Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr have greater than 70% of their distribution in forms amenable to soil washing techniques, while Cd, Mn, and Fe are somewhat less amenable to soil washing using chelant extraction. However, the concentrations of Cd and Mn are low in the contaminated soil. From the batch chelant extraction studies, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were all effective in removing copper, lead, and zinc from the J-Field soils. Due to NTA being a Class II carcinogen, it is not recommended for use in remediating contaminated soils. EDTA and citric acid appear to offer the greatest potential as chelating agents to use in soil washing the Aberdeen Proving Ground soils. The other chelating agents studied (gluconate, oxalate, Citranox, ammonium acetate, and phosphoric acid, along with pH-adjusted water) were generally ineffective in mobilizing the heavy metals from the soils. The chelant solution removes the heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cr, As, and Hg) simultaneously. Using a multiple-stage batch extraction

  2. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Microbiological Leaching; an Environmentally Friendly and Cost Effective Method for Extraction of Metals

    Ghobeiti-Hasab Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Finding a cleaner, environmentally friendly and cost-effective way of metal and mineral extraction has a great importance in today’s world. Using microorganisms in bio-leaching and bio-oxidation process is of great value. From Archaea to bacteria and fungi, microorganisms can play an important role in extraction of metals from mine drainage and un-accessible sources, both in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Optimization of environmental factors such as the temperature, pH and substrate concentration is crucially important to access the optimum extraction of selected metals from an ore or mine drainage. The present paper will review the bio-leaching and bio-oxidation process of minerals with emphasis on the most well-known species of bacterial communities of such ability, through the literature.

  4. Frequency response of slow beam extraction process

    Toyama, Takeshi; Sato, Hikaru; Marutsuka, Katsumi; Shirakata, Masashi.

    1994-01-01

    A servo control system has been incorporated into the practical slow extraction system in order to stabilize the spill structure less than a few kHz. Frequency responses of the components of the servo-spill control system and the open-loop frequency response were measured. The beam transfer function of the slow extraction process was derived from the measured data and approximated using a simple function. This is utilized to improve the performance of the servo-loop. (author)

  5. Process for making rare earth metal chlorides

    Kruesi, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    An uncombined metal or a metal compound such as a sulfide, oxide, carbonate or sulfate is converted in a liquid salt bath to the corresponding metal chloride by reacting it with chlorine gas or a chlorine donor. The process applies to metals of groups 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4a, 5a and 8 of the periodic table and to the rare earth metals. The chlorine donor may be ferric or sulfur chloride. The liquid fused salt bath is made up of chlorides of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, ammonia, zinc and ferric iron. Because the formed metal chlorides are soluble in the liquid fused salt bath, they can be recovered by various conventional means

  6. Selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction of metal ions from waste materials

    Wai, C.N.; Laintz, K.E.; Yonker, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The removal of toxic organics, metals, and radioisotopes from solids or liquids is a major concern in the treatment of industrial and nuclear wastes. For this reason, developing methods for selective separation of toxic metals and radioactive materials from solutions of complex matrix is an important problem in environmental research. Recent developments indicate supercritical fluids are good solvents for organic compounds. Many gases become supercritical fluids under moderate temperatures and pressures. For example, the critical temperature and pressure of carbon dioxide are 31 degrees C and 73 atm, respectively. The high diffusivity, low viscosity, and T-P dependence of solvent strength are some attractive properties of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Since CO 2 offers the additional benefits of stability and non-toxicity, the SFE technique avoids generation of organic liquid waste and exposure of personnel to toxic solvents. While direct extraction of metal ions by supercritical fluids is highly inefficient, these ions when complexed with organic ligands become quite soluble in supercritical fluids. Specific ligands can be used to achieve selective extraction of metal ions in this process. After SFE, the fluid phase can be depressurized for precipitation of the metal chelates and recycled. The ligand can also be regenerated for repeated use. The success of this selective chelation-supercritical fluid extraction (SC-SFE) process depends on a number of factors including the efficiencies of the selective chelating agents, solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical fluids, rate of extraction, ease of regeneration of the ligands, etc. In this report, the authors present recent results on the studies of the solubilities of metal chelates in supercritical CO 2 , experimental ions from aqueous solution, and the development of selective chelating agents (ionizable crown ethers) for the extraction of lanthanides and actinides

  7. Comparison of sequential and single extraction in order to estimate environmental impact of metals from fly ash

    Tasić Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to simulate leaching of metals from fly ash in different environmental conditions using ultrasound and microwave-assisted extraction techniques. Single-agent extraction and sequential extraction procedures were used to determine the levels of different metals leaching. The concentration of metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, As, Be in fly ash extracts were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry. Single-agent extractions of metals were conducted during sonication times of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 min. Single-agent extraction with deionized water was also undertaken by exposing samples to microwave radiation at the temperature of 50°C. The sequential extraction was undertaken according to the BCR procedure which was modified and applied to study the partitioning of metals in coal fly ash. The microwave-assisted sequential extraction was performed at different extraction temperatures: 50, 100 and 150°C. The partitioning of metals between the individual fractions was investigated and discussed. The efficiency of the extraction process for each step was examined. In addition, the results of the microwave-assisted sequential extraction are compared to the results obtained by standard ASTM method. The mobility of most elements contained in fly ash is markedly pH sensitive. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030, br. 176006 i br. III43009

  8. Method and apparatus for dissociating metals from metal compounds extracted into supercritical fluids

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred H.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    2000-01-01

    A method for dissociating metal-ligand complexes in a supercritical fluid by treating the metal-ligand complex with heat and/or reducing or oxidizing agents is described. Once the metal-ligand complex is dissociated, the resulting metal and/or metal oxide form fine particles of substantially uniform size. In preferred embodiments, the solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the ligand is a .beta.-diketone such as hexafluoroacetylacetone or dibutyldiacetate. In other preferred embodiments, the metals in the metal-ligand complex are copper, silver, gold, tungsten, titanium, tantalum, tin, or mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the reducing agent is hydrogen. The method provides an efficient process for dissociating metal-ligand complexes and produces easily-collected metal particles free from hydrocarbon solvent impurities. The ligand and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated to provide an economic, efficient process.

  9. Depleted uranium processing and fluorine extraction

    Laflin, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear era, there has never been a commercial solution for the large quantities of depleted uranium hexafluoride generated from uranium enrichment. In the United States alone, there is already in excess of 1.6 billion pounds (730 million kilograms) of DUF_6 currently stored. INIS is constructing a commercial uranium processing and fluorine extraction facility. The INIS facility will convert depleted uranium hexafluoride and use it as feed material for the patented Fluorine Extraction Process to produce high purity fluoride gases and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The project will provide an environmentally friendly and commercially viable solution for DUF_6 tails management. (author)

  10. Processes for extracting radium from uranium mill tailings

    Nirdosh, I.; Baird, M.H.; Muthuswami, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the extraction of radium from uranium mill tailings solids including the steps of contacting the tailings with a liquid leaching agent, leaching the tailings therewith and subsequently separating the leachate liquid and the leached solids. The improvement described here is wherein the leaching agent comprises: (a) a complexing agent in an amount of from 2 to 10 times the stoichiometric amount needed to complex the metal ions to be removed thereby from the tailings; and (b) a reducing agent reducing the hydrolysable ions of the metal ions to be removed to their lower oxidation states, the reduction agent being present in an amount from 2 to 10 times the stoichiometric amount needed for reducing the hydrolysable metals present in the tailings

  11. Process for cleaning radioactively contaminated metal surfaces

    Mihram, R.G.; Snyder, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for removing radioactive scale from a ferrous metal surface, including the steps of initially preconditioning the surface by contacting it with an oxidizing solution (such as an aqueous solution of an alkali metal permanganate or hydrogen peroxide), then, after removal or decomposition of the oxidizing solution, the metallic surface is contacted with a cleaning solution which is a mixture of a mineral acid and a complexing agent (such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid), and which preferably contains a corrosion inhibitor. A final step in the process is the treatment of the spent cleaning solution containing radioactive waste materials in solution by adding a reagent selected from the group consisting of calcium hydroxide or potassium permanganate and an alkali metal hydroxide to thereby form easily recovered metallic compounds containing substantially all of the dissolved metals and radioactivity. (auth)

  12. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Recycling of rare earth metals from fluorescent lamps was conducted by ionic liquid-mediated extraction. • Acid leaching from a waste phosphor powder was carried out using sulfuric and nitric acids. • An ionic liquid was used as extracting solvent for the rare earth metals. • Selective extraction of rare earth metals from leach solutions was attained. •The extracting ionic liquid phase was recyclable in the recovery process. -- Abstract: The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid–liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system

  13. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamiya, Noriho [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Goto, Masahiro, E-mail: m-goto@mail.cstm.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Recycling of rare earth metals from fluorescent lamps was conducted by ionic liquid-mediated extraction. • Acid leaching from a waste phosphor powder was carried out using sulfuric and nitric acids. • An ionic liquid was used as extracting solvent for the rare earth metals. • Selective extraction of rare earth metals from leach solutions was attained. •The extracting ionic liquid phase was recyclable in the recovery process. -- Abstract: The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid–liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system.

  14. Process for the gas extraction of coal

    Urquhart, D B

    1976-05-20

    The object of the invention is a process for the hydroextraction of coal is treated with water and carbon monoxide at a temperature in the region of 300 - 380/sup 0/C. After treatment is completed, the gases are separated from the treated gas; the treated coal is then extracted with an extraction medium during the gas phase at a temperature of at least 400/sup 0/C, the remainder is separated from the gas phase and the coal extract is obtained from the extraction medium. Hydrogenation is preferably carried out at a temperature in the region of 320 - 370/sup 0/C and at a pressure of 200 - 400 at. The time required for treatment with carbon monoxide and water is 1/4 - 2 hours, and in special cases 3/4 - 1 1/2 hours. The coal material itself is nutty slack, of which more than 95% of the coal particles pass through a 1.5 mm mesh sieve. After the hydrogenation the extraction is carried out at a temperature in the region of 400 - 450/sup 0/C. The patent claims relate to the types of extraction media used.

  15. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  16. Evaluation of extractant-coated magnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution

    Kaminski, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanexreg-sign 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanexreg-sign 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible

  17. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    Hart, Alister J; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D; Skinner, John A; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  18. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    Hart, Alister J [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Sandison, Ann [Department of Histopathology, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Frederick W [Science Division, Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sampson, Barry [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Imperial College and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital Campus, Fulham Palace Rd, London W6 8RF (United Kingdom); Atkinson, Kirk D [8 Nuclear Department Defence Academy College of Management and Technology HMS Sultan Military Road Gosport PO12 3BY (United Kingdom); Skinner, John A [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Goode, Angela [Dept of Materials, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Powell, Jonathan J, E-mail: Paul.Quinn@diamond.ac.u [Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research Centre, Cambridge CB1 9NL (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  19. Catalog solvent extraction: anticipate process adjustments

    Campbell, S.G.; Brass, E.A.; Brown, S.J.; Geeting, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) utilizes commercially available centrifugal contactors to facilitate removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline salt solutions. During the fabrication of the contactor assembly, demonstrations revealed a higher propensity for foaming than was initially expected. A task team performed a series of single-phase experiments that revealed that the shape of the bottom vanes and the outer diameter of those vanes are key to the successful deployment of commercial contactors in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process. (authors)

  20. Novel thiosalicylate-based ionic liquids for heavy metal extractions

    Leyma, Raphlin; Platzer, Sonja [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Zoology, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kandioller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.kandioller@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Krachler, Regina; Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Six thiosalicylate-based ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids (ILs) were newly synthesized. • ILs showed good extraction of cadmium, copper, and zinc. • Phosphonium ILs showed better extraction efficiencies than their ammonium counterparts. - Abstract: This study aims to develop novel ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids (ILs) with thiosalicylate (TS) derivatives as anions and evaluate their extracting efficiencies towards heavy metals in aqueous solutions. Six ILs were synthesized, characterized, and investigated for their extracting efficacies for cadmium, copper, and zinc. Liquid-liquid extractions of Cu, Zn, or Cd with ILs after 1–24 h using model solutions (pH 7; 0.1 M CaCl{sub 2}) were assessed using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (F-AAS). Phosphonium-based ILs trihexyltetradecylphosphonium 2-(propylthio)benzoate [P{sub 66614}][PTB] and 2-(benzylthio)benzoate [P{sub 66614}][BTB] showed best extraction efficiency for copper and cadmium, respectively and zinc was extracted to a high degree by [P{sub 66614}][BTB] exclusively.

  1. Phytotoxicity of trace metals in spiked and field-contaminated soils: Linking soil-extractable metals with toxicity.

    Hamels, Fanny; Malevé, Jasmina; Sonnet, Philippe; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Smolders, Erik

    2014-11-01

    Soil tests have been widely developed to predict trace metal uptake by plants. The prediction of metal toxicity, however, has rarely been tested. The present study was set up to compare 8 established soil tests for diagnosing phytotoxicity in contaminated soils. Nine soils contaminated with Zn or Cu by metal mining, smelting, or processing were collected. Uncontaminated reference soils with similar soil properties were sampled, and series of increasing contamination were created by mixing each with the corresponding soil. In addition, each reference soil was spiked with either ZnCl2 or CuCl2 at several concentrations. Total metal toxicity to barley seedling growth in the field-contaminated soils was up to 30 times lower than that in corresponding spiked soils. Total metal (aqua regia-soluble) toxicity thresholds of 50% effective concentrations (EC50) varied by factors up to 260 (Zn) or 6 (Cu) among soils. For Zn, variations in EC50 thresholds decreased as aqua regia > 0.43 M HNO3  > 0.05 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) > 1 M NH4 NO3  > cobaltihexamine > diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) > 0.001 M CaCl2 , suggesting that the last extraction is the most robust phytotoxicity index for Zn. The EDTA extraction was the most robust for Cu-contaminated soils. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of the total soil metal in the field-contaminated soils markedly explained the lower toxicity compared with spiked soils. The isotope exchange method can be used to translate soil metal limits derived from soils spiked with metal salts to site-specific soil metal limits. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide electron extraction layers for organic solar cells.

    Trost, S; Becker, T; Zilberberg, K; Behrendt, A; Polywka, A; Heiderhoff, R; Görrn, P; Riedl, T

    2015-01-16

    ZnO and TiOx are commonly used as electron extraction layers (EELs) in organic solar cells (OSCs). A general phenomenon of OSCs incorporating these metal-oxides is the requirement to illuminate the devices with UV light in order to improve device characteristics. This may cause severe problems if UV to VIS down-conversion is applied or if the UV spectral range (λ work, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used to plasmonically sensitize metal-oxide based EELs in the vicinity (1-20 nm) of the metal-oxide/organic interface. We evidence that plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide layers facilitate electron extraction and afford well-behaved highly efficient OSCs, even without the typical requirement of UV exposure. It is shown that in the plasmonically sensitized metal-oxides the illumination with visible light lowers the WF due to desorption of previously ionosorbed oxygen, in analogy to the process found in neat metal oxides upon UV exposure, only. As underlying mechanism the transfer of hot holes from the metal to the oxide upon illumination with hν < Eg is verified. The general applicability of this concept to most common metal-oxides (e.g. TiOx and ZnO) in combination with different photoactive organic materials is demonstrated.

  3. Poisoning of liquid membrane carriers in extraction of metal ions

    Wang, Yuchun; Wang, Dexian

    1992-01-01

    As means of effective separation and preconcentration, emulsion liquid membranes (ELMs) have found application in many fields including biochemical separation, wastewater treatment, hydrometallurgy, and preconcentration in analytical chemistry. In the extraction of desired metal (scandium, mixed rare earths) ions using chelating extractants (TTA, HDEHP) as liquid membrane carriers, the carriers will become poisoned owing to the presence of even minute quantity of certain high ionic potential ions in the feed solution. The reason for the poisoning of carriers is that those ions have so much greater affinity than the desired ions for the membrane carrier that the ion-carrier coordination compound cannot be stripped at the interior interface of the membrane and gradually no more free carrier transports any metal ions across the membrane. The calculated results are in agreement with the experiments, and methods to avoid the poisoning are given in the paper

  4. Supercritical Extraction Process of Allspice Essential Oil

    Yasvet Y. Andrade-Avila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allspice essential oil was extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 in a static process at three different temperatures (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K and four levels of pressure (100, 200, 300, and 360 bar. The amount of oil extracted was measured at intervals of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h; the most extraction yield reached was of 68.47% at 318.15 K, 360 bar, and 6 h of contact time. In this supercritical extraction process, the distribution coefficient (KD, the mean effective diffusion coefficient (Def, the energy of activation (Ea, the thermodynamic properties (ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0, and the apparent solubility (S expressed as mass fraction (w/w were evaluated for the first time. At the equilibrium the experimental apparent solubility data were successfully correlated with the modified Chrastil equation.

  5. Optimization and control of metal forming processes

    Havinga, Gosse Tjipke

    2016-01-01

    Inevitable variations in process and material properties limit the accuracy of metal forming processes. Robust optimization methods or control systems can be used to improve the production accuracy. Robust optimization methods are used to design production processes with low sensitivity to the

  6. Extraction of lithium from sea water with metallic aluminum

    Takeuchi, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Extraction of lithium from sea water was investigated. It was found that a corrosion product of metallic aluminum immersed in sea water extracts lithium from it selectively. Effects of the temperature and the pH of sea water, and of the initial concentration of lithium in it were examined. On the basis of the analysis of the surface deposit on aluminum, which is a corrosion product of aluminum, the selectivity coefficients were calculated. For the extraction of lithium from natural sea water, the values of K sub(Na)sup(Li), K sub(Mg)sup(Li), K sub(Ca)sup(Li) and K sub(K)sup(Li) were 9.9 x 10 2 , 1.1 x 10, 4.5 x 10 and 4.4 x 10 2 , respectively. (author)

  7. Processing Relative Clause Extractions in Swedish

    Damon Tutunjian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Relative clauses are considered strong islands for extraction across languages. Swedish comprises a well-known exception, allegedly allowing extraction from relative clauses (RCE, raising the possibility that island constraints may be subject to “deep variation” between languages. One alternative is that such exceptions are only illusory and represent “surface variation” attributable to independently motivated syntactic properties. Yet, to date, no surface account has proven tenable for Swedish RCEs. The present study uses eyetracking while reading to test whether the apparent acceptability of Swedish RCEs has any processing correlates at the point of filler integration compared to uncontroversial strong island violations. Experiment 1 tests RCE against licit that-clause extraction (TCE, illicit extraction from a non-restrictive relative clause (NRCE, and an intransitive control. For this, RCE was found to pattern similarly to TCE at the point of integration in early measures, but between TCE and NRCE in total durations. Experiment 2 uses RCE and extraction from a subject NP island (SRCE to test the hypothesis that only non-islands will show effects of implausible filler-verb dependencies. RCE showed sensitivity to the plausibility manipulation across measures at the first potential point of filler integration, whereas such effects were limited to late measures for SRCE. In addition, structural facilitation was seen across measures for RCE relative to SRCE. We propose that our results are compatible with RCEs being licit weak island extractions in Swedish, and that the overall picture speaks in favor of a surface rather than a deep variation approach to the lack of island effects in Swedish RCEs.

  8. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-05-18

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration.

  9. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration

  10. Process for the extraction of fission products

    Anav, M.; Chesne, A.; Leseur, A.; Miquel, P.; Pascard, R.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the extraction of fission products contained in irradiated nuclear fuel elements which have been subject to a temperature of at least 1200 0 C during their irradiation prior to dissolving the fuel by the wet process. After mechanically treating the elements in order to decan and/or cut them they are brought into contact with water in order to pass the fission products into aqueous solution. The treated elements are then separated from the thus obtained aqueous solution. At least one of the fission products is then recovered from the aqueous solution. The fission products are iodine, cesium, rubidium and tritium

  11. The extraction of alkali metal picrates with dibenzo-18-crown-6

    Sadakane, Akira; Toei, Kyoji; Iwachido, Tadashi.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of alkali metal picrate complexes of macrocyclic polyether (dibenzo-18-crown-6) between water and benzene was investigated. The polyether-cation complexes were found to be of a 1:1 stoichiometry. The formation of 2:1 complexes was recognized for Rb and Cs in a large excess of the polyether. The extractability of complex cation-picrate ion-pairs decreases in this sequence: K>Rb>Cs>Na>Li. The values of the extraction constants (log Ksub(ex)) were determined to be 4.65, 3.75, and 3.07 for K, Rb, and Cs compounds respectively. The thermodynamic quantities for the extraction process were calculated from the change in the extraction constants with the temperature. The extraction reactions are all exothermic, accompanied by an entropy decrease. (auth.)

  12. Extraction of metals from ores by bacterial leaching: present status and future prospects

    Kelly, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The principal organism effecting bacterial leaching of ferrous and sulfide ores is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, though other thiobacilli and other bacteria may be involved. The process depends on (a) direct solubilization of metal sulfides by bacterial oxidation; (b) dissolution of metal sulfides or oxides by ferric iron produced by bacterial pyrite oxidation. Mining spoil dumps and low grade ores can be leached for copper or uranium by cheap low-level technology. Dump leaching enables maximum recovery of valuable metal from any ore, but makes possible exploitation of very low grade Cu and U ores. Continuous extraction processes are possible where a continuously growing bacterial culture is fed with pyritic ores (or FeSO 4 or other sulfide) and continuous metal solubilization proceeds. Intimate contact between the bacteria and the ore to be leached (especially with uranium oxide ores) is not always necessary: leaching of UO 2 ores probably depends only on ferric iron reaction with the ore. Degradation of pyrite-containing rocks may also be developed as part of future recovery processes for petroleum from oil shales. Two-stage leaching systems present the best prospect for developing a higher-level technology for metal extraction. State 1: bacterial generation of Fe 3+ from pyrite or a Fe 2+ source; Stage 2: chemical leaching of ore by Fe 3+ in acid solution. Two-stage processes can be surface processes using crushed or milled ores or can be applied to underground solution mining, when an ore (e.g. uranium) can be leached by pumping Fe 3+ solutions through shattered underground deposits, metal recovered (e.g. solvent extraction) and Fe 3+ regenerated by bacterial oxidation at the surface. The use of controlled continuous microbial cultures to generate either bacteria or ferric iron is outlined

  13. Separation and Extraction of Some Heavy and Toxic Metal Ions from Their Wastes by Ionic Membranes

    El-Sayed Hegazy, A.; Kamal, H.; Mahmoud, Gh. A.; Khalifa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation and characterisation of a series of ion-exchange membranes for the purpose of separation and extraction of some heavy and toxic metal ions from their wastes have been studied. Such ion exchange membranes prepared by γ-radiation grafting of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinyl acetate (VAc) in a binary monomers mixture onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) using direct technique of grafting. The reaction conditions at which grafting process proceeds successfully have been determined. Many modification treatments have been attempted for the prepared membranes to improve their ion-exchange properties. The possibility of their practical use in waste water treatment from some heavy and toxic metal ions such as Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ ,Cu 2+ ,Fe 3+ ,Sr 2+ and Li + have been investigated. These grafted membranes showed great promise for its use in the field of extraction and removal of some heavy and toxic metals from their wastes

  14. History of 232-F, tritium extraction processing

    Blackburn, G.W.

    1994-08-01

    In 1950 the Atomic Energy Commission authorized the Savannah River Project principally for the production of tritium and plutonium-239 for use in thermonuclear weapons. 232-F was built as an interim facility in 1953--1954, at a cost of $3.9M. Tritium extraction operations began in October, 1955, after the reactor and separations startups. In July, 1957 a larger tritium facility began operation in 232-H. In 1958 the capacity of 232-H was doubled. Also, in 1957 a new task was assigned to Savannah River, the loading of tritium into reservoirs that would be actual components of thermonuclear weapons. This report describes the history of 232-F, the process for tritium extraction, and the lessons learned over the years that were eventually incorporated into the new Replacement Tritium Facility

  15. Separation and Recovery of Precious Metals from Leach Liquors of Spent Electronic Wastes by Solvent Extraction

    Nguyen, Thi Hong; Wang, Lingyun; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Solvent extraction was employed to recover precious metals (Au (III), Pd (II) and Pt (IV)) from the leach solution of spent electronic wastes containing Cu (II), Cr (III) and Fe (III). First, pure Fe (III) and Au (III) were recovered by simultaneous extraction with Cyanex 923 followed by selective stripping with HCl and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Second, Pt (IV), Pd (II) and Cu (II) were extracted by Alamine 336 from the raffinate. After the removal of Cu (II) by stripping with weak HCl, Pd (II) and Pt (IV) were separately stripped by controlling the concentration of thiourea in the mixture with HCl. A process flow sheet for the separation of precious metals was proposed.

  16. Recovery of Ni Metal from Spent Catalyst with Emulsion Liquid Membrane Using Cyanex 272 as Extractant

    Yuliusman; Huda, M.; Ramadhan, I. T.; Farry, A. R.; Wulandari, P. T.; Alfia, R.

    2018-03-01

    In this study was conducted to recover nickel metal from spent nickel catalyst resulting from hydrotreating process in petroleum industry. The nickel extraction study with the emulsion liquid membrane using Cyanex 272 as an extractant to extract and separate nickel from the feed phase solution. Feed phase solution was preapred from spent catalyst using sulphuric acid. Liquid membrane consists of a kerosene as diluent, a Span 80 as surfactant, a Cyanex 272 as carrier and sulphuric acid solutions have been used as the stripping solution. The important parameters governing the permeation of nickel and their effect on the separation process have been studied. These parameters are surfactant concentration, extractant concentration feed phase pH. The optimum conditions of the emulsion membrane making process is using 0.06 M Cyanex 272, 8% w/v SPAN 80, 0.05 M H2SO4, internal phase extractant / phase volume ratio: 1/1, and stirring speed 1150 rpm for 60 Minute that can produce emulsion membrane with stability level above 90% after 4 hours. In the extraction process with optimum condition pH 6 for feed phase, ratio of phase emulsion/phase of feed: 1/2, and stirring speed 175 rpm for 15 minutes with result 81.51% nickel was extracted.

  17. Availability of heavy metals in contaminated soil evidenced by chemical extractants

    Maria Ligia de Souza Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals have been accumulating in Brazilian soils, due to natural processes, such as atmospheric deposition, or human industrial activities. For certain heavy metals, when in high concentrations in the soil, there is no specific extractant to determine the availability of these elements in the soil. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the availability of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn for rice and soybeans, using different chemical extractants. In this study we used seven soil samples with different levels of contamination, in completely randomized experimental design with four replications. We determined the available concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn extracted by Mehlich-1, HCl 0.1 mol L-1, DTPA, and organic acid extractants and the contents in rice and soybeans, which extracts were analyzed by ICP-OES. It was observed that Mehlich-1, HCl 0.1 mol L-1 and DTPA extractants were effective to assess the availability of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for rice and soybeans. However, the same was not observed for the organic acid extractant.

  18. Design and Development of a Continuous-Flow Countercurrent Metal Extraction System to Remove Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soils

    Neale, Christopher M. U

    1997-01-01

    .... The research focused on eight contaminated soils from Army installations and the metal extraction capabilities of eight extracting agents including HNO3, HCI, fluorosilicic acid, citric acid, EDTA, DTPA, NTA, and NaOH...

  19. Mass fractionation processes of transition metal isotopes

    Zhu, X. K.; Guo, Y.; Williams, R. J. P.; O'Nions, R. K.; Matthews, A.; Belshaw, N. S.; Canters, G. W.; de Waal, E. C.; Weser, U.; Burgess, B. K.; Salvato, B.

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry make it possible to utilise isotope variations of transition metals to address some important issues in solar system and biological sciences. Realisation of the potential offered by these new isotope systems however requires an adequate understanding of the factors controlling their isotope fractionation. Here we show the results of a broadly based study on copper and iron isotope fractionation during various inorganic and biological processes. These results demonstrate that: (1) naturally occurring inorganic processes can fractionate Fe isotope to a detectable level even at temperature ˜1000°C, which challenges the previous view that Fe isotope variations in natural system are unique biosignatures; (2) multiple-step equilibrium processes at low temperatures may cause large mass fractionation of transition metal isotopes even when the fractionation per single step is small; (3) oxidation-reduction is an importation controlling factor of isotope fractionation of transition metal elements with multiple valences, which opens a wide range of applications of these new isotope systems, ranging from metal-silicate fractionation in the solar system to uptake pathways of these elements in biological systems; (4) organisms incorporate lighter isotopes of transition metals preferentially, and transition metal isotope fractionation occurs stepwise along their pathways within biological systems during their uptake.

  20. Chemical engineering aspect of solvent extraction in mineral processing

    Dara, S.S.; Jakkikar, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Solvent extraction process, types of solvents used, types of extraction, distribution isotherm and McCabe-Thiele diagram for process design, equipment for the process, operating parameters and applications are described. (M.G.B.)

  1. Processing facility for metal waste

    Awano, Toshihiko; Kataoka, Yoshitsune.

    1998-01-01

    Each steps of temporarily storing materials to be reduced in the volume to a storage vessel, transferring them to a weighing machine by a conveyor, weighing them by a weighing machine, drying them by a drying means, packing them in containing canisters, sealing and welding them, carrying out the containing canisters after sealing are conducted independently respectively or optionally simultaneously in parallel. Accordingly, isolation from peripheral circumstances is ensured, and improvement of working efficiency, ensuring of safety and simplification of structure of processing devices can be attained. (T.M.)

  2. Atomization process for metal powder

    Lagutkin, Stanislav; Achelis, Lydia; Sheikhaliev, Sheikhali; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Srivastava, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    A new atomization process has been developed, which combines pressure and gas atomization. The melt leaves the pressure nozzle as a hollow thin film cone. After the pre-filming step, the melt is atomized by a gas stream delivered by a ring nozzle. The objectives of this investigation are to achieve a narrow size distribution and low specific gas consumption compared to conventional gas atomization techniques. Both lead to a higher efficiency and low costs. Tin and some alloys have been atomized successfully with this technique. The mass median diameters from different experiments are between 20 and 100 μm. Sieving analysis of the tin powder shows close particle size distributions

  3. Novel extractants with high selectivity for valuable metals in seawater. Calixarene derivatives

    Kakoi, Takahiko; Goto, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    Seawater contains various valuable metals such as uranium and lithium. Therefore, attempts are being made to develop highly selective extractants which recognize target metal ions in reclaimed seawater. In this review, we have focused our study on the application of novel cyclic compound calixarene based extractants. A novel host compound calixarene, which is a cyclic compound connecting some phenol rings, is capable of forming several different extractant ring sizes and introducing various kinds of functional groups towards targeting of metal ions in seawater. Therefore, calixarene derivatives are capable of extracting valuable metals such as uranium, alkaline metals, heavy metals, rare earth metals and noble metals selectively by varying structural ring size and functional groups. The novel host compound calixarene has given promising results which line it up as a potential extractant for the separation of valuable metal ions in seawater. (author)

  4. Review of Biohydrometallurgical Metals Extraction from Polymetallic Mineral Resources

    Helen R. Watling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review has as its underlying premise the need to become proficient in delivering a suite of element or metal products from polymetallic ores to avoid the predicted exhaustion of key metals in demand in technological societies. Many technologies, proven or still to be developed, will assist in meeting the demands of the next generation for trace and rare metals, potentially including the broader application of biohydrometallurgy for the extraction of multiple metals from low-grade and complex ores. Developed biotechnologies that could be applied are briefly reviewed and some of the difficulties to be overcome highlighted. Examples of the bioleaching of polymetallic mineral resources using different combinations of those technologies are described for polymetallic sulfide concentrates, low-grade sulfide and oxidised ores. Three areas for further research are: (i the development of sophisticated continuous vat bioreactors with additional controls; (ii in situ and in stope bioleaching and the need to solve problems associated with microbial activity in that scenario; and (iii the exploitation of sulfur-oxidising microorganisms that, under specific anaerobic leaching conditions, reduce and solubilise refractory iron(III or manganese(IV compounds containing multiple elements. Finally, with the successful applications of stirred tank bioleaching to a polymetallic tailings dump and heap bioleaching to a polymetallic black schist ore, there is no reason why those proven technologies should not be more widely applied.

  5. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  6. Phase associations and potential selective extraction methods for selected high-tech metals from ferromanganese nodules and crusts with siderophores

    Mohwinkel, Dennis; Kleint, Charlotte; Koschinsky, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Phase associations of metals in marine Fe–Mn nodules and crusts were determined. • Selective leaching experiments with siderophore desferrioxamine B were conducted. • Siderophores selectively mobilize high-tech metals associated with Fe carrier phases. • Base metal liberation including Fe and Mn is limited. • Siderophores have promising potential for application in ore processing industries. - Abstract: Deep-sea ferromanganese deposits contain a wide range of economically important metals. Ferromanganese crusts and nodules represent an important future resource, since they not only contain base metals such as Mn, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn, but are also enriched in critical or rare high-technology elements such as Li, Mo, Nb, W, the rare earth elements and yttrium (REY). These metals could be extracted from nodules and crusts as a by-product to the base metal production. However, there are no proper separation techniques available that selectively extract certain metals out of the carrier phases. By sequential leaching, we demonstrated that, except for Li, which is present in an easily soluble form, all other high-tech metals enriched in ferromanganese nodules and crusts are largely associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxide phases and only to subordinate extents with Mn-oxide phases. Based on this fact, we conducted selective leaching experiments with the Fe-specific organic ligand desferrioxamine-B, a naturally occurring and ubiquitous siderophore. We showed by leaching of ferromanganese nodules and crusts with desferrioxamine-B that a significant and selective extraction of high-tech metals such as Li, Mo, Zr, Hf and Ta is possible, while other elements like Fe and the base metals Mn, Ni, Cu, Co and Zn are not extracted to large extents. The set of selectively extracted elements can be extended to Nb and W if Mn and carbonate phases are stripped from the bulk nodule or crust prior to the siderophore leach by e.g. a sequential leaching technique. This

  7. Feature extraction & image processing for computer vision

    Nixon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This book is an essential guide to the implementation of image processing and computer vision techniques, with tutorial introductions and sample code in Matlab. Algorithms are presented and fully explained to enable complete understanding of the methods and techniques demonstrated. As one reviewer noted, ""The main strength of the proposed book is the exemplar code of the algorithms."" Fully updated with the latest developments in feature extraction, including expanded tutorials and new techniques, this new edition contains extensive new material on Haar wavelets, Viola-Jones, bilateral filt

  8. Separation of alkali metals by extraction chromatography using polyethers

    Smulek, W.; Lada, W.

    1977-01-01

    Separation of alkali metals by means of acyclic polyether 1,13 bis(8-chinolinyl)1, 4, 7, 10, 13 pentaoxatridecane (CPOD) and cyclic polyether dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) using extraction chromatography is described. Solutions of NaSCN were used as eluting agents. The separation ability of the polyether columns strongly depends on pH and temperature. The following radioisotopes were used in the experiments: Na-22, K-42, Rb-86 and Cs-137. The radionuclide purity of the tracers was examined by γ-ray spectrometry using a Ge(Li) detector and a multichannel γ-ray spectrometer. (T.I.)

  9. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  10. Process for etching zirconium metallic objects

    Panson, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a process for etching of zirconium metallic articles formed from zirconium or a zirconium alloy, wherein the zirconium metallic article is contacted with an aqueous hydrofluoric acid-nitric acid etching bath having an initial ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid and an initial concentration of hydrofluoric and nitric acids, the improvement, is described comprising: after etching of zirconium metallic articles in the bath for a period of time such that the etching rate has diminished from an initial rate to a lesser rate, adding hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid to the exhausted bath to adjust the concentration and ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid therein to a value substantially that of the initial concentration and ratio and thereby regenerate the etching solution without removal of dissolved zirconium therefrom; and etching further zirconium metallic articles in the regenerated etching bath

  11. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs

  12. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  13. Processing method of radioactive metal wastes

    Uetake, Naoto; Urata, Megumu; Sato, Masao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume and increase the density of radioactive metal wastes easily while preventing scattering of radioactivity and process them into suitable form to storage and treatment. Method: Metal wastes mainly composed of zirconium are discharged from nuclear power plants or fuel re-processing plants, and these metals such as zirconium and titanium vigorously react with hydrogen and rapidly diffuse as hydrides. Since the hydrides are extremely brittle and can be pulverized easily, they can be volume-reduced. However, since metal hydrides have no ductility, dehydrogenation is applied for the molding fabrication in view of the subsequent storage and processing. The dehydrogenation is easy like the hydrogenation and fine metal pieces can be molded in a small compression device. For the dehydrogenation, a temperature is slightly increased as compared with that in the hydrogenation, pressure is reduced through the vacuum evacuation system and the removed hydrogen is purified for reuse. The upper limit for the temperature of the hydrogenation is 680 0 C in order to prevent the scttering of radioactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Otostegia persica extraction on healing process of burn wounds

    Amin Ganjali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate if the methanolic extract of the Otostegia persica can accelerating healing process of burn wound because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. METHODS:Forty eight male Wistar rats were randomized into three study groups of 16 rats each. Burn wounds were created on dorsal part of shaved rats using a metal rod. In group I the burn wound was left without any treatment. Group was treated with topical silver sulfadiazine pomade. In group III, ointment containing the OP extract was administered. Skin biopsies were harvested from burn area on the 3rd, 5th, 14th and 21st days after burn and examined histologically. RESULTS: Re-epithelialization in the control group and in group II was lower than in group III. Re-epithelialization in groups II and III was significantly different from that in the control group. On the 5th day of the experiment, we assessed lower inflammation in the burn area compared to control group. This means that the inflammation was suppressed by methanolic extract of OP. From day 5 to 14; the fibroblast proliferation peaked and was associated with increased collagen accumulation. It was obvious that angiogenesis improved more in the groups II and III, which facilitated re-epithelialisation. CONCLUSION:Methanolic extract of Otostegia persica exhibited significant healing activity when topically applied on rats. OP is an effective treatment for saving the burn site.

  15. Laser Processing Technology using Metal Powders

    Jang, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Young-Hoon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to review the state of laser processing technology using metal powders. In recent years, a series of research and development efforts have been undertaken worldwide to develop laser processing technologies to fabricate metal-based parts. Layered manufacturing by the laser melting process is gaining ground for use in manufacturing rapid prototypes (RP), tools (RT) and functional end products. Selective laser sintering / melting (SLS/SLM) is one of the most rapidly growing rapid prototyping techniques. This is mainly due to the processes's suitability for almost any materials, including polymers, metals, ceramics and many types of composites. The interaction between the laser beam and the powder material used in the laser melting process is one of the dominant phenomena defining feasibility and quality. In the case of SLS, the powder is not fully melted during laser scanning, therefore the SLS-processed parts are not fully dense and have relatively low strength. To overcome this disadvantage, SLM and laser cladding (LC) processes have been used to enable full melting of the powder. Further studies on the laser processing technology will be continued due to the many potential applications that the technology offers.

  16. Process for production of a metal hydride

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  17. Selective extraction of metals from products of mine acidic water treatment

    Andreeva, N.N.; Romanchuk, S.A.; Voronin, N.N.; Demidov, V.D.; Pasynkova, T.A.; Manuilova, O.A.; Ivanova, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made on possibility of processing of foam products prepared during flotation purification of mine acidic waters for the purpose of selective extraction of non-ferrous (Co, Ni) and rare earth elements (REE) and their separation from the basic macrocomponent of waters-iron. Optimal conditions of selective metal extraction from foam flotation products are the following: T=333 K, pH=3.0-3.5, ratio of solid and liquid phase - 1:4-1:7, duration of sulfuric acid leaching - 30 min. Rare earth extraction under such conditions equals 87.6-93.0%. The degree of valuable component concentration equals ∼ 10. Rare earths are separated from iron by extraction methods

  18. The removal of metals from edible oil by a membrane extraction procedure 355

    Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Bosklopper, T.G.J.; Dorp, van L.J.; Riet, van 't K.

    1990-01-01

    Edible oils may contain traces of metals. In oil refining procedures these metals have to be removed to guarantee oxidatively stable products. In this study we present a hollow fiber membrane extraction system for the removal of metals from an oil. Several extraction liquids were tested, of which an

  19. INVESTIGATION OF THE METAL MELTING PROCESS

    V. I. Timoshpolskij

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model of calculation of temperature fields in the process of metal melting is formulated and solved using the method of equivalent source taking into account nonlinearity of thermophysical properties of material and variable terms of heat exchange.

  20. Process technology - rare and refractory metals

    Gupta, C.K.; Bose, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    India has fairly rich resreves of rare and refractory metals. Abundant sources of ilmenite, rutile, zircon and rare earths are found in the placer deposits of the southern and eastern coasts of the country. Columbite-tantalite occur in mica and the mining belts of Bihar and cassiterite deposits are found in Bastar (Madhya Pradesh). Vanadium as a minor associate occurs in bauxites and in the vast deposits of titaniferrous magnetites. Over the years, research and development and pilot plant works in many research organisations in India have built up a sound technological base in the country for process metallurgy of many refractory and rare earth metals starting from their indigenous sources. The present paper provides a comprehensive view of the developments that have taken place till now on the processing of various refractory and rare earth metals with particular reference to the extensive work carried out at the Department of Atomic Energy. The coverage includes mineral benification separation of individual elements, preparation of pure intermediates, techniques of reduction to metal and final purification. The paper also reviews some of the recent developments that have been taken place in these fields and the potential application of these metals in the foreseeable future. (author). 22 refs., 18 fi g., 7 tabs

  1. Distribution of six heavy metals in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning

    Tuin, B.J.W.; Tels, M.

    1990-01-01

    A sequential extraction procedure according to Tessier et al. is carried out to compare the distribution of six metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in contaminated clay soils before and after extractive cleaning. Extraction of metals from the ‘soil fractions’ with 0.1 N HC1 or 0.1 M EDTA becomes more

  2. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  3. Bio-extraction of precious metals from urban solid waste

    Das, Subhabrata; Natarajan, Gayathri; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Reduced product lifecycle and increasing demand for electronic devices have resulted in the generation of huge volumes of electronic waste (e-waste). E-wastes contain high concentrations of toxic heavy metals, which have detrimental effects on health and the environment. However, e-wastes also contain significant concentrations of precious metals such as gold, silver and palladium, which can be a major driving force for recycling of urban waste. Cyanogenic bacteria such as Chromobacterium violaceum generate cyanide as a secondary metabolite which mobilizes gold into solution via a soluble gold-cyanide complex. However, compared to conventional technology for metal recovery, this approach is not effective, owing largely to the low concentration of lixiviants produced by the bacteria. To overcome the challenges of bioleaching of gold from e-waste, several strategies were adopted to enhance gold recovery rates. These included (i) pretreatment of e-waste to remove competing metal ions, (ii) mutation to adapt the bacteria to high pH environment, (iii) metabolic engineering to produce higher cyanide lixiviant, and (iv) spent medium leaching with adjusted initial pH. Compared to 7.1 % recovery by the wild type bacteria, these strategies achieved gold recoveries of 11.3%, 22.5%, 30% and 30% respectively at 0.5% w/v pulp density respectively. Bioleached gold was finally mineralized and precipitated as gold nanoparticles using the bacterium Delftia acidovorans. This study demonstrates the potential for enhancement of biocyanide production and gold recovery from electronic waste through different strategies, and extraction of solid gold from bioleached leachate.

  4. Relaxation processes during amorphous metal alloys heating

    Malinochka, E.Ya.; Durachenko, A.M.; Borisov, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    Behaviour of Te+15 at.%Ge and Fe+13 at.%P+7 at.%C amorphous metal alloys during heating has been studied using the method of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the most convenient one for determination of the value of heat effects, activation energies, temperature ranges of relaxation processes. Thermal effects corresponding to high-temperature relaxation processes taking place during amorphous metal alloys (AMA) heating are detected. The change of ratio of relaxation peaks values on DSC curves as a result of AMA heat treatment can be explained by the presence of a number of levels of inner energy in amorphous system, separated with potential barriers, the heights of which correspond to certain activation energies of relaxation processes

  5. Process for producing metal oxide kernels and kernels so obtained

    Lelievre, Bernard; Feugier, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    The process desbribed is for producing fissile or fertile metal oxide kernels used in the fabrication of fuels for high temperature nuclear reactors. This process consists in adding to an aqueous solution of at least one metallic salt, particularly actinide nitrates, at least one chemical compound capable of releasing ammonia, in dispersing drop by drop the solution thus obtained into a hot organic phase to gel the drops and transform them into solid particles. These particles are then washed, dried and treated to turn them into oxide kernels. The organic phase used for the gel reaction is formed of a mixture composed of two organic liquids, one acting as solvent and the other being a product capable of extracting the anions from the metallic salt of the drop at the time of gelling. Preferably an amine is used as product capable of extracting the anions. Additionally, an alcohol that causes a part dehydration of the drops can be employed as solvent, thus helping to increase the resistance of the particles [fr

  6. Sequential Extraction Versus Comprehensive Characterization of Heavy Metal Species in Brownfield Soils

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Williamson, Connie A.; Collins, W. Keith; Dahlin, David C.

    2002-06-01

    The applicability of sequential extraction as a means to determine species of heavy-metals was examined by a study on soil samples from two Superfund sites: the National Lead Company site in Pedricktown, NJ, and the Roebling Steel, Inc., site in Florence, NJ. Data from a standard sequential extraction procedure were compared to those from a comprehensive study that combined optical- and scanning-electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. The study shows that larger particles of contaminants, encapsulated contaminants, and/or man-made materials such as slags, coke, metals, and plastics are subject to incasement, non-selectivity, and redistribution in the sequential extraction process. The results indicate that standard sequential extraction procedures that were developed for characterizing species of contaminants in river sediments may be unsuitable for stand-alone determinative evaluations of contaminant species in industrial-site materials. However, if employed as part of a comprehensive, site-specific characterization study, sequential extraction could be a very useful tool.

  7. A New Direction for Biomining: Extraction of Metals by Reductive Dissolution of Oxidized Ores

    Kevin B. Hallberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomining, the biotechnology that uses microorganisms to extract metals from ores and concentrates, is currently used exclusively for processing reduced ores and mine wastes. Metals of economic value also occur extensively in oxidized ores, such as nickel laterites. While these are not amenable to oxidative dissolution, the ferric iron minerals they contain can, in theory, be disrupted by iron reduction, causing associated metals to be released. We have harnessed the ability of the facultatively anaerobic, acidophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferroooxidans to couple the oxidation of elemental sulphur to the reduction of ferric iron in the goethite fraction of a limonitic nickel ore at 30 °C. Nickel and other metals (Co, Cr and Mn were effectively solubilised and maintained in solution due to the low pH (1.8 of the leach liquor. The results highlight the potential for the bioprocessing of oxidized, iron-rich ores using an approach that is energy-saving and environmentally-benign compared with metallurgical processes currently applied to the extraction of Ni from lateritic ores.

  8. Comparative exergy analyses of Jatropha curcas oil extraction methods: Solvent and mechanical extraction processes

    Ofori-Boateng, Cynthia; Keat Teong, Lee; JitKang, Lim

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Exergy analysis detects locations of resource degradation within a process. ► Solvent extraction is six times exergetically destructive than mechanical extraction. ► Mechanical extraction of jatropha oil is 95.93% exergetically efficient. ► Solvent extraction of jatropha oil is 79.35% exergetically efficient. ► Exergy analysis of oil extraction processes allow room for improvements. - Abstract: Vegetable oil extraction processes are found to be energy intensive. Thermodynamically, any energy intensive process is considered to degrade the most useful part of energy that is available to produce work. This study uses literature values to compare the efficiencies and degradation of the useful energy within Jatropha curcas oil during oil extraction taking into account solvent and mechanical extraction methods. According to this study, J. curcas seeds on processing into J. curcas oil is upgraded with mechanical extraction but degraded with solvent extraction processes. For mechanical extraction, the total internal exergy destroyed is 3006 MJ which is about six times less than that for solvent extraction (18,072 MJ) for 1 ton J. curcas oil produced. The pretreatment processes of the J. curcas seeds recorded a total internal exergy destructions of 5768 MJ accounting for 24% of the total internal exergy destroyed for solvent extraction processes and 66% for mechanical extraction. The exergetic efficiencies recorded are 79.35% and 95.93% for solvent and mechanical extraction processes of J. curcas oil respectively. Hence, mechanical oil extraction processes are exergetically efficient than solvent extraction processes. Possible improvement methods are also elaborated in this study.

  9. Improved leaching process for metal ores

    Kar-Kwan Yung, K.; Barlow, C.B.; Glass, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The general overall sequence of process steps in the technique of the invention in set forth. In sequence, the ore is crushed, and solubilizing reagents and moisture are added to the crushed ore in preselected controlled portions. The mixture of ore, reagent, and moisture is then cured followed in the preferred process by conditioning for filtration. The slurry that is produced from conditioning is then subjected to multiple stage washing on a belt filter. The filtrate is further processed for metal value recovery and the solids are transported to tailings disposal

  10. Description of Latvian Metal Production and Processing Enterprises' Air Emissions

    Pubule, J; Zahare, D; Blumberga, D

    2010-01-01

    The metal production and processing sector in Latvia has acquired a stable position in the national economy. Smelting of ferrous and nonferrous metals, production of metalware, galvanisation, etc. are developed in Latvia. The metal production and processing sector has an impact on air quality due to polluting substances which are released in the air from metal treatment processes. Therefore it is necessary to determine the total volume of emissions produced by the metal production and process...

  11. Tannins in Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy

    Jordan Rutledge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an up to date review of tannins, specifically quebracho, in mineral processing and metallurgical processes. Quebracho is a highly useful reagent in many flotation applications, acting as both a depressant and a dispersant. Three different types of quebracho are mentioned in this study; quebracho “S” or Tupasol ATO, quebracho “O” or Tupafin ATO, and quebracho “A” or Silvafloc. It should be noted that literature often refers simply to “quebracho” without distinguishing a specific type. Quebracho is most commonly used in industry as a method to separate fluorite from calcite, which is traditionally quite challenging as both minerals share a common ion—calcium. Other applications for quebracho in flotation with calcite minerals as the main gangue source include barite and scheelite. In sulfide systems, quebracho is a key reagent in differential flotation of copper, lead, zinc circuits. The use of quebracho in the precipitation of germanium from zinc ores and for the recovery of ultrafine gold is also detailed in this work. This analysis explores the wide range of uses and methodology of quebracho in the extractive metallurgy field and expands on previous research by Iskra and Kitchener at Imperial College entitled, “Quebracho in Mineral Processing”.

  12. Laser processing of metals and alloys

    Goswami, G.L.; Kumar, Dilip; Roy, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser, due to its high degree of coherence can produce powder density in the range of 10 3 -10 11 W/mm 2 . This high power density of the laser beam enables it to be utilized for many industrial applications, e.g. welding, cutting, drilling, surface treatment, etc. Laser processing of materials has many advantages, e.g. good quality product at high processing speed, least heat affected zone, minimum distortion, etc. In addition, the same laser system can be utilized for different applications, a very cost effective factor for any industry. Therefore laser has been adopted for processing of different materials for a wide range of applications and is now replacing conventional materials processing techniques on commercial merits with several economic and metallurgical advantages. Applications of laser to process materials of different thicknesses varying from 0.1 mm to 100 mm have demonstrat ed its capability as an important manufacturing tool for engineering industries. While lasers have most widely been utilized in welding, cutting and drilling they have also found applications in surface treatment of metals and alloys, e.g. transfor mation hardening and annealing. More recently, there has been significant amount of research being undertaken in laser glazing, laser surface alloying and laser cladding for obtaining improved surface properties. This report reviews the stat us of laser processing of metals and alloys emphasising its metallurgical aspects a nd deals with the different laser processes like welding, cutting, drilling and surface treatment highlighting the types and choice of laser and its interaction with metals and alloys and the applications of these processes. (author). 93 refs., 32 figs., 7 tables

  13. Contribution to the modelization of liquid-liquid extraction systems. Application to metallic nitrate extraction by TBP in nitric medium

    Ly, J.

    1984-10-01

    The validity of theoretical expression for activity coefficients, in concentrated aqueous solution, proposed by Mikulin-Stokes-Robinson and Ryazanov-Vdovenko is confirmed by numerous tests. This allows a better control of the reactivity of chemicals in the extraction system: nitric aqueous solution-TBP organic solution used in nuclear hydrometallurgy. A reliable methodology is proposed for the study of metal extraction mechanism. Application to palladium (II) evidences extracted species in the organic phase. Influence of degradation product from extractant radiolysis on the behavior of this metallic element is effected. 187 refs [fr

  14. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  15. Application of monocarboxylic acids for the extraction of metal ions-literature survey

    Brzozka, Z.; Rozycki, C.

    1980-01-01

    In the paper there is presented a literature review concerning the application of monocarboxylic acids for extraction of metal ions. The following problems are discussed: characteristic of monocarboxylic acids and their mixtures, the equilibria between the acid solution in organic solvent and aqueous phase, the mechanism of acid partition, complexes of carboxylic acids and metal ions in aqueous phase, mechanism of extraction by means of carboxylic acids as well as the problems concerning the extraction of individual metal ions. Data about the extraction of metal ions are presented in table. The 138 references are given. (author)

  16. Microemulsions and Aggregation Formation in Extraction Processes for Used Nuclear Fuel: Thermodynamic and Structural Studies

    Nilsson, Mikael [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-04

    Advanced nuclear fuel cycles rely on successful chemical separation of various elements in the used fuel. Numerous solvent extraction (SX) processes have been developed for the recovery and purification of metal ions from this used material. However, the predictability of process operations has been challenged by the lack of a fundamental understanding of the chemical interactions in several of these separation systems. For example, gaps in the thermodynamic description of the mechanism and the complexes formed will make predictions very challenging. Recent studies of certain extraction systems under development and a number of more established SX processes have suggested that aggregate formation in the organic phase results in a transformation of its selectivity and efficiency. Aggregation phenomena have consistently been interfering in SX process development, and have, over the years, become synonymous with an undesirable effect that must be prevented. This multiyear, multicollaborative research effort was carried out to study solvation and self-organization in non-aqueous solutions at conditions promoting aggregation phenomena. Our approach to this challenging topic was to investigate extraction systems comprising more than one extraction reagent where synergy of the metal ion could be observed. These systems were probed for the existence of stable microemulsions in the organic phase, and a number of high-end characterization tools were employed to elucidate the role of the aggregates in metal ion extraction. The ultimate goal was to find connections between synergy of metal ion extraction and reverse micellar formation. Our main accomplishment for this project was the expansion of the understanding of metal ion complexation in the extraction system combining tributyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). We have found that for this system no direct correlation exists for the metal ion extraction and the formation of aggregates, meaning that the

  17. Microemulsions and Aggregation Formation in Extraction Processes for Used Nuclear Fuel: Thermodynamic and Structural Studies

    Nilsson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nuclear fuel cycles rely on successful chemical separation of various elements in the used fuel. Numerous solvent extraction (SX) processes have been developed for the recovery and purification of metal ions from this used material. However, the predictability of process operations has been challenged by the lack of a fundamental understanding of the chemical interactions in several of these separation systems. For example, gaps in the thermodynamic description of the mechanism and the complexes formed will make predictions very challenging. Recent studies of certain extraction systems under development and a number of more established SX processes have suggested that aggregate formation in the organic phase results in a transformation of its selectivity and efficiency. Aggregation phenomena have consistently been interfering in SX process development, and have, over the years, become synonymous with an undesirable effect that must be prevented. This multiyear, multicollaborative research effort was carried out to study solvation and self-organization in non-aqueous solutions at conditions promoting aggregation phenomena. Our approach to this challenging topic was to investigate extraction systems comprising more than one extraction reagent where synergy of the metal ion could be observed. These systems were probed for the existence of stable microemulsions in the organic phase, and a number of high-end characterization tools were employed to elucidate the role of the aggregates in metal ion extraction. The ultimate goal was to find connections between synergy of metal ion extraction and reverse micellar formation. Our main accomplishment for this project was the expansion of the understanding of metal ion complexation in the extraction system combining tributyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). We have found that for this system no direct correlation exists for the metal ion extraction and the formation of aggregates, meaning that the

  18. Solar Convective Furnace for Metals Processing

    Patidar, Deepesh; Tiwari, Sheetanshu; Sharma, Piyush; Pardeshi, Ravindra; Chandra, Laltu; Shekhar, Rajiv

    2015-11-01

    Metals processing operations, primarily soaking, heat treatment, and melting of metals are energy-intensive processes using fossil fuels, either directly or indirectly as electricity, to operate furnaces at high temperatures. Use of concentrated solar energy as a source of heat could be a viable "green" option for industrial heat treatment furnaces. This paper introduces the concept of a solar convective furnace which utilizes hot air generated by an open volumetric air receiver (OVAR)-based solar tower technology. The potential for heating air above 1000°C exists. Air temperatures of 700°C have already been achieved in a 1.5-MWe volumetric air receiver demonstration plant. Efforts to retrofit an industrial aluminium soaking furnace for integration with a solar tower system are briefly described. The design and performance of an OVAR has been discussed. A strategy for designing a 1/15th-scale model of an industrial aluminium soaking furnace has been presented. Preliminary flow and thermal simulation results suggest the presence of recirculating flow in existing furnaces that could possibly result in non-uniform heating of the slabs. The multifarious uses of concentrated solar energy, for example in smelting, metals processing, and even fuel production, should enable it to overcome its cost disadvantage with respect to solar photovoltaics.

  19. Experimental Study On The Optimization Of Extraction Process Of ...

    The objective is to study the extraction process of garlic oil and its antibacterial effects. Materials and Methods: CO2 Supercritical extraction was used to investigate the optimal processing conditions for garlic oil extraction; filter paper test and suspension dilution test were applied to determine the bacteriostatic action of ...

  20. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C.; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart, E-mail: s.t.wagland@cranfield.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Samples from multiple core drills were obtained from 4× landfill sites in the UK. • Each sample analysed for rare earth elements, critical metals and valuable metals. • Two stage microwave digestion method ensuring high yield. • High quantities of copper and aluminium were observed in the soil layers of landfill. • Across 4× landfills aluminium and copper present has a value of around $400 million. - Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58 ± 6 mg kg{sup −1} for REEs comprising 44 ± 8 mg kg{sup −1} for light REEs, 11 ± 2 mg kg{sup −1} for heavy REEs and 3 ± 1 mg kg{sup −1} for Scandium (Sc) and 3 ± 1.0 mg kg{sup −1} of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are

  1. Mesoporous metal oxides and processes for preparation thereof

    Suib, Steven L.; Poyraz, Altug Suleyman

    2018-03-06

    A process for preparing a mesoporous metal oxide, i.e., transition metal oxide. Lanthanide metal oxide, a post-transition metal oxide and metalloid oxide. The process comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to form the mesoporous metal oxide. A mesoporous metal oxide prepared by the above process. A method of controlling nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in mesoporous metal oxides. The method comprises providing an acidic mixture comprising a metal precursor, an interface modifier, a hydrotropic ion precursor, and a surfactant; and heating the acidic mixture at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to control nano-sized wall crystallinity and mesoporosity in the mesoporous metal oxides. Mesoporous metal oxides and a method of tuning structural properties of mesoporous metal oxides.

  2. Modified approaches to the complexometric extraction of metal ions into supercritical carbon dioxide

    Ager, P.; Lopez, C.D.; Marshall, W.D.

    2000-01-01

    A modified nebulizing assembly from a commercial atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) unit served to interface the eluate from a supercritical carbon, dioxide (Sc-CO 2 ) extractor with a flame atomic absorption spectrometer and provided low to sub-ng limits of detection for several elements that were detected only inefficiently with an all-silica T-tube interface. The unit was used to monitor the progress of complexometric extractions of cobalt and nickel (2.5 or 25 μg/ml) from aqueous medium. Modifications to the general process for metal mobilisation included (i) a back-filling procedure during the initial pressurisation of the extractor and (ii) the separation of the derivatization reaction from the subsequent extraction. When coupled with (iii) the addition of ethyl acetate or methylisobutyl Ketone to the mobile phase, residual levels of analyte Co and Ni were reduced to the limit of detection with a single extraction. A heated column of iron granules Fe o efficiently removed metal 2,4-pentanedionate and diethyldithiocarbamate complexes from the SCF extractor eluate but did not liberate any complexing reagent. A sea sand column, heated to the same temperature, was less efficient at removing metals but did liberate modest amounts of 2,4-pentanedione back into the mobile phase. (author)

  3. Discontinuity Detection in the Shield Metal Arc Welding Process.

    Cocota, José Alberto Naves; Garcia, Gabriel Carvalho; da Costa, Adilson Rodrigues; de Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes; Rocha, Filipe Augusto Santos; Freitas, Gustavo Medeiros

    2017-05-10

    This work proposes a new methodology for the detection of discontinuities in the weld bead applied in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The detection system is based on two sensors-a microphone and piezoelectric-that acquire acoustic emissions generated during the welding. The feature vectors extracted from the sensor dataset are used to construct classifier models. The approaches based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers are able to identify with a high accuracy the three proposed weld bead classes: desirable weld bead, shrinkage cavity and burn through discontinuities. Experimental results illustrate the system's high accuracy, greater than 90% for each class. A novel Hierarchical Support Vector Machine (HSVM) structure is proposed to make feasible the use of this system in industrial environments. This approach presented 96.6% overall accuracy. Given the simplicity of the equipment involved, this system can be applied in the metal transformation industries.

  4. The Chemophytostabilisation Process of Heavy Metal Polluted Soil.

    Grobelak, Anna; Napora, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial areas are characterised by soil degradation processes that are related primarily to the deposition of heavy metals. Areas contaminated with metals are a serious source of risk due to secondary pollutant emissions and metal leaching and migration in the soil profile and into the groundwater. Consequently, the optimal solution for these areas is to apply methods of remediation that create conditions for the restoration of plant cover and ensure the protection of groundwater against pollution. Remediation activities that are applied to large-scale areas contaminated with heavy metals should mainly focus on decreasing the degree of metal mobility in the soil profile and metal bioavailability to levels that are not phytotoxic. Chemophytostabilisation is a process in which soil amendments and plants are used to immobilise metals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of different doses of organic amendments (after aerobic sewage sludge digestion in the food industry) and inorganic amendments (lime, superphosphate, and potassium phosphate) on changes in the metals fractions in soils contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn during phytostabilisation. In this study, the contaminated soil was amended with sewage sludge and inorganic amendments and seeded with grass (tall fescue) to increase the degree of immobilisation of the studied metals. The contaminated soil was collected from the area surrounding a zinc smelter in the Silesia region of Poland (pH 5.5, Cd 12 mg kg-1, Pb 1100 mg kg-1, Zn 700 mg kg-1). A plant growth experiment was conducted in a growth chamber for 5 months. Before and after plant growth, soil subsamples were subjected to chemical and physical analyses. To determine the fractions of the elements, a sequential extraction method was used according to Zeien and Brümmer. Research confirmed that the most important impacts on the Zn, Cd and Pb fractions included the combined application of sewage sludge from the food industry and

  5. The Chemophytostabilisation Process of Heavy Metal Polluted Soil.

    Anna Grobelak

    Full Text Available Industrial areas are characterised by soil degradation processes that are related primarily to the deposition of heavy metals. Areas contaminated with metals are a serious source of risk due to secondary pollutant emissions and metal leaching and migration in the soil profile and into the groundwater. Consequently, the optimal solution for these areas is to apply methods of remediation that create conditions for the restoration of plant cover and ensure the protection of groundwater against pollution. Remediation activities that are applied to large-scale areas contaminated with heavy metals should mainly focus on decreasing the degree of metal mobility in the soil profile and metal bioavailability to levels that are not phytotoxic. Chemophytostabilisation is a process in which soil amendments and plants are used to immobilise metals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of different doses of organic amendments (after aerobic sewage sludge digestion in the food industry and inorganic amendments (lime, superphosphate, and potassium phosphate on changes in the metals fractions in soils contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn during phytostabilisation. In this study, the contaminated soil was amended with sewage sludge and inorganic amendments and seeded with grass (tall fescue to increase the degree of immobilisation of the studied metals. The contaminated soil was collected from the area surrounding a zinc smelter in the Silesia region of Poland (pH 5.5, Cd 12 mg kg-1, Pb 1100 mg kg-1, Zn 700 mg kg-1. A plant growth experiment was conducted in a growth chamber for 5 months. Before and after plant growth, soil subsamples were subjected to chemical and physical analyses. To determine the fractions of the elements, a sequential extraction method was used according to Zeien and Brümmer. Research confirmed that the most important impacts on the Zn, Cd and Pb fractions included the combined application of sewage sludge from the

  6. Accumulation of some metals by legumes and their extractability from acid mine spoils

    Taylor, R.W.; Ibeabuchi, I.O.; Sistani, K.R.; Shuford, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to investigate the growth (dry matter yield) of selected legume cover crops; phytoaccumulation of metals such as Zn, Mn, Pb, Cu, Ni, and Al; the extractability of heavy metals from three different Alabama acid mine spoils. The spoils were amended based on soil test recommended levels of N, P, K, Ca and Mg prior to plant growth. Metals were extracted by three extractants (Mehlich 1, DTPA, and 0.1 M HCl) and values correlated with their accumulation by the selected legumes. Among the cover crops, kobe lespedeza Lespedeza striata (Thung.) Hook and Arn, sericea lespedeza Lespedeza cuneata (Dum.) G. Don, and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) did not survive the stressful conditions of the spoils. However, cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) followed by 'Bragg' soybean Glycine max (L.) Merr. generally produced the highest dry matter yield while accumulating the largest quantity of metals, except Al, from spoils. The extractability of most metals from the spoils was generally in the order of: 0.1 MHCl > DTPA. Mehlich 1 did not extract Pb and 0.1 M HCl did not extract Ni, whereas DTPA extracted all the metals in a small amount relative to HCl and Mehlich 1. All the extractants were quite effective in removing plant-available Zn from the spoils. In general, the extractants' ability to predict plant-available metals depended on the crop species, spoil type, and extractant used. 28 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Remediation Performance and Mechanism of Heavy Metals by a Bottom Up Activation and Extraction System Using Multiple Biochemical Materials.

    Xiao, Kemeng; Li, Yunzhen; Sun, Yang; Liu, Ruyue; Li, Junjie; Zhao, Yun; Xu, Heng

    2017-09-13

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has caused serious environmental problems and increased the risks to humans and biota. Herein, we developed an effective bottom up metals removal system based on the synergy between the activation of immobilization metal-resistant bacteria and the extraction of bioaccumulator material (Stropharia rugosoannulata). In this system, the advantages of biochar produced at 400 °C and sodium alginate were integrated to immobilize bacteria. Optimized by response surface methodology, the biochar and bacterial suspension were mixed at a ratio of 1:20 (w:v) for 12 h when 2.5% sodium alginate was added to the mixture. Results demonstrated that the system significantly increased the proportion of acid soluble Cd and Cu and improved the soil microecology (microbial counts, soil respiration, and enzyme activities). The maximum extractions of Cd and Cu were 8.79 and 77.92 mg kg -1 , respectively. Moreover, details of the possible mechanistic insight into the metal removal are discussed, which indicate positive correlation with the acetic acid extractable metals and soil microecology. Meanwhile, the "dilution effect" in S. rugosoannulata probably plays an important role in the metal removal process. Furthermore, the metal-resistant bacteria in this system were successfully colonized, and the soil bacteria community were evaluated to understand the microbial diversity in metal-contaminated soil after remediation.

  8. Reliable processing of graphene using metal etchmasks

    Peltekis Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Graphene exhibits exciting properties which make it an appealing candidate for use in electronic devices. Reliable processes for device fabrication are crucial prerequisites for this. We developed a large area of CVD synthesis and transfer of graphene films. With patterning of these graphene layers using standard photoresist masks, we are able to produce arrays of gated graphene devices with four point contacts. The etching and lift off process poses problems because of delamination and contamination due to polymer residues when using standard resists. We introduce a metal etch mask which minimises these problems. The high quality of graphene is shown by Raman and XPS spectroscopy as well as electrical measurements. The process is of high value for applications, as it improves the processability of graphene using high-throughput lithography and etching techniques.

  9. Synergistic extraction of transition metal cations from aqueous media by two separated organic phases

    Goldberg, I.

    1991-12-01

    We have therefore initiated novel approaches to the study of the mechanism of the synergistic extraction of metal ions by means of two separated organic phases, which are brought in contact with the same aqueous phase. The present work is concerned with the extraction of transition metals and actinides ions from nitric acid by chelating agents e.g., HTTA thenoyltrifluoroacetone in a diluent - the first organic phase, and by natural donor, e.g., TBP, tri-butyl phosphate in a diluent the second organic phase. The adduct formation was studied by means of spectrochemical and radiochemical methods. In the first approach the aqueous phase was attacked with both organic phases simultanously (the static or parallel extraction). In this method organic phase are separated one from the other. It was shown that even in the absence of mixing, synergism is observed under this experimental conditions. The results indicate, that adduct formation occurs in both organic phases. Nevertheless the enhanchment of extraction in the TBP phase is by far greater than that in the HTTA containing phase. This approach has one disadvatage, viz., the experiments are very time consuming, a typical experiment requiring over 10 days. In order to overcome this difficulty, the following experiments were carried out: the aqueous phase were first shaken with diluent containing an anionic ligand and the phases were allowed to separate. Then the aqueous solution were shaken with diluent containing a netural donor and the phase again were allowed to separate. The concentration of the metal ions in all the phases were determined. The experiments were repeated with an other diluent replacing the first diluent in one or both organic phases. In this way eight sequences of experiments were carried out for each concentration set chosen. The results thus point out that this experimental approach open new possibilities to investigate the mechanism and the kinetics of synergistic extraction processes. (author) the

  10. Method of processing radioactive metal wastes

    Inoue, Yoichi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Tsuzura, Katsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable long and safety storage for radioactive metal wastes such as used fuel cans after the procession or used pipe, instruments and the likes polluted with various radioactive substances, by compacting them to solidify. Method: Metal wastes such as used fuel cans, which have been cut shorter and reprocessed, are pressed into generally hexagonal blocks. The block is charged in a capsule of a hexagonal cross section made of non-gas permeable materials such as soft steels, stainless steels and the likes. Then, the capsule is subjected to static hydraulic hot pressing as it is or after deaeration and sealing. While various combinations are possible for temperature, pressure and time as the conditions for the static hydraulic hot pressing, dense block with no residual gas pores can be obtained, for example, under the conditions of 900 0 C, 1000 Kg/cm 2 and one hour where the wastes are composed of zircaloy. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Processing Relative Clause Extractions in Swedish

    Tutunjian, Damon; Heinat, Fredrik; Klingvall, Eva; Wiklund, Anna-Lena

    2017-01-01

    Relative clauses are considered strong islands for extraction across languages. Swedish comprises a well-known exception, allegedly allowing extraction from relative clauses (RCE), raising the possibility that island constraints may be subject to “deep variation” between languages. One alternative is that such exceptions are only illusory and represent “surface variation” attributable to independently motivated syntactic properties. Yet, to date, no surface account has proven tenable for Swed...

  12. METAL CHIP HEATING PROCESS INVESTIGATION (Part I

    O. M. Dyakonov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main calculation methods for heat- and mass transfer in porous heterogeneous medium have been considered. The paper gives an evaluation of the possibility to apply them for calculation of metal chip heating process. It has been shown that a description of transfer processes in a chip has its own specific character that is attributed to difference between thermal and physical properties of chip material and lubricant-coolant components on chip surfaces. It has been determined that the known expressions for effective heat transfer coefficients can be used as basic ones while approaching mutually penetrating continuums. A mathematical description of heat- and mass transfer in chip medium can be considered as a basis of mathematical modeling, numerical solution and parameter optimization of the mentioned processes.

  13. New process for weld metal reliability

    Hebel, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The industry-wide nature of weld cracking alerts one to the possibility that there is a fundamental law being overlooked. And in overlooking this law, industry is unable to counteract it. That law mandates that restraint during welding causes internal stress; internal stress causes weld metal to crack. Component restraint during welding, according to the welding standard, is the major cause of weld metal failures. When the metal working industry accepts this fact and begins to counter the effects of restraint, the number of weld failures experienced fall dramatically. Bonal Technologies, inc., of Detroit, has developed the first consistently effective non-thermal process to relieve stress caused by restraint during welding. Bonal's patented Mets-Lax sub-resonant stress relief acts as a restraint neutralizer when used during welding. Meta-Lax weld conditioning produces a finer more uniform weld grain structure. A finer, more uniform grain structure is a clear metallurgical indication of improved mechanical weld properties. Other benefits like less internal stress, and less warpage are also achieved

  14. Simulation of the metallic powders compaction process

    Prado, J.M.; Riera, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The simulation by means of finite elements of the forming processes of mechanical components is a very useful tool for their design and validation. In this work, the simulation of the compaction of a metal powder is presented. The finite element software ABAQUS is used together with the modified CAM-clay plasticity model in order to represent the elastoplastic behaviour of the material. Density distributions are obtained and therefore the motion of the compaction punches which improve this distribution can be found. Stress distribution in the different parts of the mould can also be determined. (Author) 9 refs

  15. Purification process for aqueous solutions of rare earths by liquid-liquid extraction

    Rollat, A.; Sabot, J.L.; Burgard, M.; Delloye, T.

    1986-01-01

    Alkaline earth metals are removed by liquid-liquid extraction between on aqueous nitric phase of impure rare earth compounds and an organic phase of polyether (crown ether). This process is particularly suited to removal of Ca, Ba and Ra contained in nitric solutions of rare earths [fr

  16. The main mechanisms of flotation extraction of heavy metal ions out of water solutions

    Zubareva, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    Flotation extraction of heavy metal ions out of water solutions using reagent EMKO (sodium soaps of vat residues of C grade) is presented. It is established that it is related to hydration energy and stability of sublates being formed. These two parameters affect contrariwise. A difference of molar ratios [EMKO]:[Me] in the course of extracting metals into froth can be explained by their different aggregative state, and a proportion of ionic form of metals and hydroxides being formed. Metal flotation rate is different for each of metal cations to be floated and is dependant on hydrogen ion concentrations [ru

  17. Modified sequential extraction for biochar and petroleum coke: Metal release potential and its environmental implications.

    von Gunten, Konstantin; Alam, Md Samrat; Hubmann, Magdalena; Ok, Yong Sik; Konhauser, Kurt O; Alessi, Daniel S

    2017-07-01

    A modified Community Bureau of Reference (CBR) sequential extraction method was tested to assess the composition of untreated pyrogenic carbon (biochar) and oil sands petroleum coke. Wood biochar samples were found to contain lower concentrations of metals, but had higher fractions of easily mobilized alkaline earth and transition metals. Sewage sludge biochar was determined to be less recalcitrant and had higher total metal concentrations, with most of the metals found in the more resilient extraction fractions (oxidizable, residual). Petroleum coke was the most stable material, with a similar metal distribution pattern as the sewage sludge biochar. The applied sequential extraction method represents a suitable technique to recover metals from these materials, and is a valuable tool in understanding the metal retaining and leaching capability of various biochar types and carbonaceous petroleum coke samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Integration of ceramic membrane and compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal recovery.

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chiu, Chun-Hao; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lee, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In our previous publications, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction process (CASX) was developed and proved to be kinetically efficient process for metal removal. In the current study, CASX with a ceramic MF membrane integrated for separation of spent solvent was employed to remove and recover metal from wastewater. MF was operated either in crossflow mode or dead-end with intermittent flushing mode. Under crossflow mode, three distinct stages of flux vs. TMP (trans-membrane pressure) relationship were observed. In the first stage, flux increases with increasing TMP which is followed by the stage of stable flux with increasing TMP. After reaching a threshold TMP which is dependent of crossflow velocity, flux increases again with increasing TMP. At the last stage, solvent was pushed through membrane pores as indicated by increasing permeate COD. In dead-end with intermittent flushing mode, an intermittent flushing flow (2 min after a 10-min or a 30-min dead-end filtration) was incorporated to reduce membrane fouling by flush out MSAB accumulated on membrane surface. Effects of solvent concentration and composition were also investigated. Solvent concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1% (w/w) have no adverse effect in terms of membrane fouling. However, solvent composition, i.e. D(2)EHPA/kerosene ratio, shows impact on membrane fouling. The type of metal extractants employed in CASX has significant impact on both membrane fouling and the quality of filtrate due to the differences in their viscosity and water solubility. Separation of MSAB was the limiting process controlling metal removal efficiency, and the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) followed the same trend as that for COD.

  19. Extraction of Glycyrrhizic Acid from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Using Ultrasound and Its Process Extraction Model

    Jiangqing Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on the intensification of extraction process of glycyrrhizic acid (GA from Glycyrrhiza uralensis using ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE method. Various process parameters such as ultrasonic power, ultrasonic frequency, extraction temperature, and extraction time which affect the extraction yield were optimized. The results showed that all process parameters had exhibited significant influences on the GA extraction. The highest GA yield of 217.7 mg/g was obtained at optimized parameters of 125 W, 55 kHz, 25 °C, and 10 min. Furthermore, the extraction kinetics model of this process was also investigated based on Fick’s first law available in the literature. Kinetic parameters such as equilibrium concentration (Ce and integrated influence coefficient (λ for different ultrasonic powers, ultrasonic frequencies, and extraction temperatures were predicted. Model validations were done successfully with the average of relative deviation between 0.96% and 4.36% by plotting experimental and predicted values of concentration of GA in extract. This indicated that the developed extraction model could reflect the effectiveness of the extraction of GA from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and therefore serve as the guide for comprehending other UAE process.

  20. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Ranđelović Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  1. Refining of crude uranium by solvent extraction for production of nuclear pure uranium metal

    Gupta, S.K.; Manna, S.; Singha, M.; Hareendran, K.N.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Kumar, K.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is the primary fuel material for any nuclear fission energy program. Natural uranium contains only 0.712% of 235 U as fissile constituent. This low concentration of fissile isotope in natural uranium calls for a very high level of purity, especially with respect to neutron poisons like B, Cd, Gd etc. before it can be used as nuclear fuel. Solvent extraction is a widely used technique by which crude uranium is purified for reactor use. Uranium metal plant (UMP), BARC, Trombay is engaged in refining of uranium concentrate for production of nuclear pure uranium metal for fabrication of fuel for research reactors. This paper reviews some of the fundamental aspects of this refining process with some special references to UMP, BARC. (author)

  2. A tri-metal centered metal-organic framework for solid-phase microextraction of environmental contaminants with enhanced extraction efficiency

    Liu, Shuqin; Xie, Lijun; Hu, Qingkun; Yang, Huangsheng; Pan, Guanrui; Zhu, Fang; Yang, Shenghong; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the preparation and the characterizations of six tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks (tM-MOFs) as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) adsorbents. Possessing different proportions of Al, Ga and In atoms in their frameworks, the tM-MOF-based SPME coatings exhibited different extraction performance towards the organic pollutants. Extraction results showed that the M4 (Al 0.593 Ga 0.167 In 0.240 (O 2 C 2 H 4 )(h 2 fipbb)) coating exhibited the best enrichment ability among six tM-MOFs. In addition, it showed better extraction efficiency towards the analytes than three single-metal centered MOFs coatings and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating. The adsorption process of the M4 coating was physical adsorption and it was mainly affected by the diffusion process of the compound from the sample to the material, which is the same with the adsorption processes of the single-metal centered MOFs coatings. Under optimal conditions (extraction time, 3 min; NaCl concentration, 25% (w/v); desorption temperature, 270 °C; extraction temperature, 30 °C), the M4 coating achieved low detection limits (0.13–0.88 ng L −1 ) and good linearity (5–2000 and 5–5000 ng L −1 ) for benzene series compounds. The repeatabilities (n = 5) for single fiber were between 4.3 and 8.1%, while the reproducibilities (n = 3) of fiber-to-fiber were in the range of 7.9–12.7%. Finally, a M4 coated SPME fiber was successfully applied to the analysis of environmental water samples with satisfactory recoveries (80.8%–119.5%). - Highlights: • Six tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks were synthesized and characterized. • Novel SPME fibers were fabricated with silicone sealant film and tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks crystals. • The self-made fiber exhibited excellent extraction performance to organic pollutants. • The self-made fiber was used for analysis of benzene series compounds in environmental water samples.

  3. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    Lewis, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The invention describes a method of disposing of alkali metals by forming a solid waste for storage. The method comprises preparing an aqueous disposal solution of at least 55 weight percent alkali metal hydroxide, heating the alkali metal to melting temperature to form a feed solution, and spraying the molten feed solution into the disposal solution. The alkali metal reacts with the water in the disposal solution in a controlled reaction which produces alkali metal hydroxide, hydrogen and heat and thereby forms a solution of alkali metal hydroxides. Water is added to the solution in amounts sufficient to maintain the concentration of alkali metal hydroxides in the solution at 70 to 90 weight percent, and to maintain the temperature of the solution at about the boiling point. Removing and cooling the alkali metal hydroxide solution thereby forms a solid waste for storage. The method is particularly applicable to radioactive alkali metal reactor coolant. (auth)

  4. EXTRACTION, RECOVERY, AND BIOSTABILITY OF EDTA FOR REMEDIATION OF HEAVY METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825549C052)

    Chelation removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil is seen as a viable remediation technique. A useful chelating agent should be strong, reusable, and biostable during metal extraction and recovery operations. This work tested the extraction, recovery, and biostability o...

  5. Metal processing with ultrashort laser pulses

    Banks, Paul S.; Felt, M. D.; Komashko, Aleksey M.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2000-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to produce well-defined cuts and holes in metals with minimal heat effect to the remaining material. Ultrashort laser pulse processing shows promise as an important technique for materials processing. We will discuss the physical effects associated with processing based experimental and modeling results. Intense ultra-short laser pulse (USLP) generates high pressures and temperatures in a subsurface layer during the pulse, which can strongly modify the absorption. We carried out simulations of USLP absorption versus material and pulse parameters. The ablation rate as function of the laser parameters has been estimated. Since every laser pulse removes only a small amount of material, a practical laser processing system must have high repetition rate. We will demonstrate that planar ablation is unstable and the initially smooth crater bottom develops a corrugated pattern after many tens of shots. The corrugation growth rate, angle of incidence and the polarization of laser electric field dependence will be discussed. In the nonlinear stage, the formation of coherent structures with scales much larger than the laser wavelength was observed. Also, there appears to be a threshold fluence above which a narrow, nearly perfectly circular channel forms after a few hundred shots. Subsequent shots deepen this channel without significantly increasing its diameter. The role of light absorption in the hole walls will be discussed.

  6. Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

  7. The solvent extraction of alkali metal ions with β-diketones

    Munakata, Megumu; Niina, Syozo; Shimoji, Noboru

    1974-01-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate effects of solvent and chelating-agent on the solvent extraction of alkali metal ions by seven β-diketones, acetylacetone (Acac), benzoylacetone (BzA), dipivaloylmethane (DPM), dibenzoylmethane (DBM), thenoyltrifluoloacetone (TTA), benzoyltrifluoroacetone (BFA) and hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA), and to separate lithium from alkali metals. The extraction of alkali metals increase with increasing donor power of the solvent: i.e., benzene Na>K>Rb>Cs, which is also the order in which the adduct formation of these β-diketone chelates with donor solvents increase. The adduct formations between β-diketone chelates of alkali metals and donor solvents markedly enhance the solubilities of the chelates in solvents and, consequently, the extractabilities of alkali metals with β-diketones. Lithium was extracted with TTA in ether at such a low base concentration that sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium were hardly extracted, and this enabled to separate lithium from other metals by the use of rubidium hydroxide (0.02 M). An attempt has been made to isolate alkali metal β-diketone chelates and some chelates have been obtained as crystals. The infrared absorption bands arising from C=O and C.=C of TTA shift to lower frequencies in the alkali metal chelates with TTA, and consequently, β-diketones is suggested to coordinate to alkali metal as a bidentate ligand. (JPN)

  8. Surplus Cost Potential as a Life Cycle Impact Indicator for Metal Extraction

    Marisa D.M. Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the evaluation of product life cycles, methods to assess the increase in scarcity of resources are still under development. Indicators that can express the importance of an increase in scarcity of metals extracted include surplus ore produced, surplus energy required, and surplus costs in the mining and the milling stage. Particularly the quantification of surplus costs per unit of metal extracted as an indicator is still in an early stage of development. Here, we developed a method that quantifies the surplus cost potential of mining and milling activities per unit of metal extracted, fully accounting for mine-specific differences in costs. The surplus cost potential indicator is calculated as the average cost increase resulting from all future metal extractions, as quantified via cumulative cost-tonnage relationships. We tested the calculation procedure with 12 metals and platinum-group metals as a separate group. We found that the surplus costs range six orders of magnitude between the metals included, i.e., between $0.01–$0.02 (iron and $13,533–$17,098 (rhodium USD (year 2013 per kilogram of metal extracted. The choice of the reserve estimate (reserves vs. ultimate recoverable resource influenced the surplus costs only to a limited extent, i.e., between a factor of 0.7 and 3.2 for the metals included. Our results provide a good basis to regularly include surplus cost estimates as resource scarcity indicator in life cycle assessment.

  9. Closed vessel miniaturized microwave assisted chelating extraction for determination of trace metals in plant materials

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Duering, Rolf-Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (MAE) for plant samples has shown increasing research interest which will probably substitute conventional procedures in the future due to their general disadvantages including consumption of time and solvents. The objective of this study was to demonstrate an innovative miniaturized closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (µMAE) method under the use of EDTA (µMAE-EDTA) to determine metal contents (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in plant samples (Lolio-Cynosuretum) by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Validation of the method was done by comparison of the results with another miniaturized closed vessel microwave HNO3 method (µMAE-H) and with two other macro scale MAE procedures (MAE-H and MAE-EDTA) which were applied by using a mixture of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (MAE-H) and EDTA (MAE-EDTA), respectively. The already established MAE-H method is taken into consideration as a reference validation MAE method for plant material. A conventional plant extraction (CE) method, based on dry ashing and dissolving of the plant material in HNO3, was used as a confidence comparative method. Certified plant reference materials (CRMs) were used for comparison of recovery rates from different extraction protocols. This allowed the validation of the applicability of the µMAE-EDTA procedure. For 36 real plant samples with triplicates each, µMAE-EDTA showed the same extraction yields as the MAE-H in the determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn contents in plant samples. Analytical parameters in µMAE-EDTA should be further investigated and adapted for other metals of interest. By the reduction and elimination of the use of hazardous chemicals in environmental analysis and thus allowing a better understanding of metal distribution and accumulation process in plants and also the metal transfer from soil to plants and into the food chain, µ

  10. Synergism of thiocyanate ions and microinterfacial surface as driving forces for heavy multi-metals extraction

    Daniela Cadar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study has been carried out to evaluate the extraction of heavy metals mixture (Co2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+ from aqueous media by Winsor II non-ionic microemulsion, containing polyoxyethylene (4 lauryl ether as non-ionic surfactant and butyl acetate as organic phase. The extraction mechanism is based on the formation of thiocyanate complexes of metals and their transfer from aqueous to microemulsion phase, either towards the interfacial film of surfactant (Co2+ or into the core of micelles (Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+. The value of the distribution coefficient for Co2+ was higher than for the other studied metals and its extraction efficiency was not dependent on the working conditions, showing a maximum value (99.99% in all cases. By using successive extractions, chromium, nickel and copper ions that remained in the aqueous phase after first extraction were transported into the microemulsion phase, leading to an increase in the extraction efficiency up to 99.99% for chromium and copper, and 85% for nickel. Based on pH influence, a selective extraction of Co2+ and Cr3+ can be achieved, since the cobalt ions were completely extracted into the microemulsion phase at pH = 1, and the chromium ions still remained in the aqueous phase. Keywords: Nonionic microemulsion, Thiocyanate complexes of heavy metals, Simultaneous heavy metals extraction, Microinterfacial effect, Synergism

  11. Review on calixarene-type macrocycles and metal extraction data

    Ludwig, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current state of solvent extraction studies with derivatized [1.n]-metacyclophanes and related compounds. 122 References from the last ten years are discussed and data on extractability, extraction equilibria, and complex formation are presented in graphical form. (author) 122 refs

  12. Review on calixarene-type macrocycles and metal extraction data

    Ludwig, R [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-12-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current state of solvent extraction studies with derivatized [1.n]-metacyclophanes and related compounds. 122 References from the last ten years are discussed and data on extractability, extraction equilibria, and complex formation are presented in graphical form. (author) 122 refs.

  13. Process for the enhanced capture of heavy metal emissions

    Biswas, Pratim; Wu, Chang-Yu

    2001-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent-metal complex. The process includes oxidizing a sorbent precursor and contacting the sorbent precursor with a metallic species. The process further includes chemically reacting the sorbent precursor and the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. In one particular aspect of the invention, at least a portion of the sorbent precursor is transformed into sorbent particles during the oxidation step. These sorbent particles then are contacted with the metallic species and chemically reacted with the metallic species, thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex. Another aspect of the invention is directed to a process for forming a sorbent metal complex in a combustion system. The process includes introducing a sorbent precursor into a combustion system and subjecting the sorbent precursor to an elevated temperature sufficient to oxidize the sorbent precursor and transform the sorbent precursor into sorbent particles. The process further includes contacting the sorbent particles with a metallic species and exposing the sorbent particles and the metallic species to a complex-forming temperature whereby the metallic species reacts with the sorbent particles thereby forming a sorbent-metal complex under UV irradiation.

  14. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  15. Extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils using EDTA and HCl

    Hatem Asel Gzar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the extraction of lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd and nickel (Ni from a contaminated soil by washing process. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (Na2EDTA and hydrochloric acid (HCl solution were used as extractants. Soil washing is one of the most suitable in-situ/ ex-situ remediation method in removing heavy metals. Soil was artificially contaminated with 500 mg/kg (Pb , Cd and Ni . A set of batch experiments were carried out at different conditions of extractant concentration , contact time, pH and agitation speed. The results showed that the maximum removal efficiencies of (Cd, Pb and Ni were (97, 88 and 24 % respectively using ( 0.1 M Na2EDTA. While the maximum removal efficiencies using (1M HCl were (98, 94 and 55% respectively. The experimental data of batch extraction were applied in four kinetic models; first order, parabolic diffusion, two constant and Elovich model. The parabolic diffusion was the most fitted to the experimental data.

  16. Recovery and Separation of Valuable Metals from Spent Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries using some Organophosphorus Extractants

    Aly, M.I.; Daoud, J.A.; ALy, H.F.

    2012-01-01

    The separation of cobalt, nickel, and rare earth elements from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. A hydrometallurgical process is developed for the recovery of metals from spent batteries and a selective separation of RE by precipitation of sodium RE double sulfate is performed. The methodology used benefits the solubility of the battery electrode materials in sulfuric or hydrochloric acids. The results obtained show that sulfuric acid is slightly less powerful in leaching (NiMH) compared to HCl acid. However, sulfuric acid was used on economic basis. Leaching solution was obtained by using 3 M H 2 SO 4 at 70 +1 degree C + 3% wt. H 2 O 2 for 5 hours. It has been shown that it is possible to recover about 98 % of the RE contained in spent NiMH batteries. The maximum recovery of nickel and cobalt metals was 99.9% and 99.4%, respectively. The effects of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps of nickel (II) and cobalt (II) from the leach solution using HDEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) and CYANEX 272 (di-(2,4,4 trimethyl pentyl) phosphinic acid) in kerosene were investigated aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes. The developed process for the recovery and separation of nickel (II) , cobalt (II), and rare earth from spent NiMH batteries is tested and the obtained sulfate salts CoSO 4 and NiSO 4 have a high purity, suggesting that these recovered products could be used as chemical materials without further purification

  17. Processing of Phosphorus Slag with Recovery of Rare Earth Metals and Obtaining Silicon Containing Cake

    Karshigina, Zaure; Abisheva, Zinesh; Bochevskaya, Yelena; Akcil, Ata; Sharipova, Aynash; Sargelova, Elmira

    2016-10-01

    The present research is devoted to the processing of slag generating during the yellow phosphorus production. In this paper are presented studies on leaching of phosphorus production slag by nitric acid with recovery of rare earth metals (REMs) into solution. REMs recovery into the solution achieved 98 % during the leaching process with using 7.5 mol/L of HNO3, liquid-to-solid ratio is 2.6:1, temperature is 60°C, process duration is 1 hour and stirrer speed is 500 rpm. Behaviour during the leaching of associated components such as calcium, aluminium, and iron was studied. After the leaching cake contains ∼⃒75-85 % of SiO2 and it might be useful for obtaining of precipitated silicon dioxide. With the purpose of separation from the impurities, recovery and concentrating of REMs, the obtained solution after leaching was subjected to extraction processing methods. The influence of ratio of organic and aqueous phases (O: A) on the extraction of rare earth metals by tributyl phosphate (TBP) with concentrations from 20 up to 100 % was studied. The REMs extraction with increasing TBP concentration under changes O:A ratio from 1:20 down to 1:1 into the organic phase from the solutions after nitric acid leaching increased from 22.2 up to 99.3%. The duration effect of REMs extraction process was studied by tributyl phosphate. It is revealed that with increasing of duration of the extraction process from 10 to 30 minutes REMs recovery into the organic phase almost did not changed. The behaviour of iron in the extraction process by TBP was studied. It was found that such accompanying components as calcium and aluminium by tributyl phosphate didn't extracted. To construct isotherm of REMs extraction of by tributyl phosphate was used variable volume method. It was calculated three-step extraction is needed for REMs recovery from the solutions after nitric acid leaching of phosphorus production slag. The process of the three-steps counter current extraction of rare earth

  18. Study on microwave assisted process in chemical extraction

    Amer Ali; Rosli Mohd Yunus; Ramlan Abd Aziz

    2001-01-01

    The microwave assisted process is a revolutionary method of extraction that reduces the extraction time to as little as a few seconds, with up to a ten-fold decrease in the use of solvents. The target material is immersed in solvent that is transparent to microwaves, so only the target material is heated, and because of the microwaves tend to heat the inside of the material quickly, the target chemical are expelled in a few seconds. benefits from this process include significant reductions in the amount of energy required and substantial reductions in the cost and dispose of hazardous solvents. A thorough review has been displayed on: using the microwave in extraction, applications of microwave in industry, process flow diagram, mechanism of the process and comparison between microwave process and other extraction techniques (soxhlet, steam distillation and supercritical fluid). This review attempts to summarize the studies about microwave assisted process as a very promising technique. (Author)

  19. A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Jensen, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100' (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually

  20. Kinetic studies of the solvent extraction of metal complexes

    Mirza, M.Y.; Nwabue, F.I.; Okafo, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of forward extraction of Zr(IV) from 2M sulphuric acid into 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazole-5-one (HPsub (z)) dissolved in chloroform and backward extraction of the tetrakis-chelate, Zr(Pz) 4 have been measured under various conditions. The rate of forward reaction is proportional to [Zr 4+ ], [HPsub(z)] 2 and [H + ] -2 , while that of back extraction to [Zr(Pz) 4 ]sub(org), [HPsub(z)] -2 sub(org) and [H + ] 2 . The rate determining step in the forward extraction is established to be the formation of the second complex between the dissociated form of HPz, Pz - and the Zr(H 2 O) 2 SO 4 Pz + species in the aqueous phase while it is the reverse in the backward extraction. The velocity constants for both rate controlling steps have been determined and the extraction constant agrees with the value obtained from the equilibrium data. (author)

  1. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  2. Glycerol extracting dealcoholization for the biodiesel separation process.

    Ye, Jianchu; Sha, Yong; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Yunlong; Wu, Housheng

    2011-04-01

    By means of utilizing sunflower oil and Jatropha oil as raw oil respectively, the biodiesel transesterification production and the multi-stage extracting separation were carried out experimentally. Results indicate that dealcoholized crude glycerol can be utilized as the extracting agent to achieve effective separation of methanol from the methyl ester phase, and the glycerol content in the dealcoholized methyl esters is as low as 0.02 wt.%. For the biodiesel separation process utilizing glycerol extracting dealcoholization, its technical and equipment information were acquired through the rigorous process simulation in contrast to the traditional biodiesel distillation separation process, and results show that its energy consumption decrease about 35% in contrast to that of the distillation separation process. The glycerol extracting dealcoholization has sufficient feasibility and superiority for the biodiesel separation process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Systematic Synthesis Framework for Extractive Distillation Processes

    Kossack, S.; Kraemer, K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2008-01-01

    An effective extractive distillation process depends on the choice of the extractive agent. in this contribution, heuristic rules for entrainer selection and the design of entrainers through computer-aided molecular design are reviewed. The potential of the generated alternatives is then evaluated...

  4. Feature extraction for classification in the data mining process

    Pechenizkiy, M.; Puuronen, S.; Tsymbal, A.

    2003-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction is a very important step in the data mining process. In this paper, we consider feature extraction for classification tasks as a technique to overcome problems occurring because of "the curse of dimensionality". Three different eigenvector-based feature extraction approaches

  5. Heavy metal concentration in forage grasses and extractability from some acid mine spoils

    Taylor, R.W.; Ibeabuchi, I.O.; Sistani, K.R.; Shuford, J.W. (Alabama A and M University, Normal (United States). Department of Plant and Soil Science)

    1993-06-01

    Laboratory and greenhouse studies were conducted on several forage grasses, bermudagrass ([ital Cynodon dactylon]), creeping red fescue ([ital Festuca rubra]), Kentucky 31-tall fescue ([ital Festuca arundinacea]), oat ([ital Avena sativa]), orchardgrass ([ital Dactylis glomerata]), perennial ryegrass ([ital Lolium perenne]), sorghum ([ital Sorghum bicolor]), triticale (X. [ital triticosecale Wittmack]), and winter wheat ([ital Triticum aestivum]) grown on three Alabama acid mine spoils to study heavy metal accumulation, dry matter yield and spoil metal extractability by three chemical extractants (Mehlich 1, DTPA, and 0.1 M HCl). Heavy metals removed by these extractants were correlated with their accumulation by several forage grasses. Among the forages tested, creeping red fescue did not survive the stressful conditions of any of the spoils, while orchard grass and Kentucky 31-tall fescue did not grow in Mulberry spoil. Sorghum followed by bermudagrass generally produced the highest dry matter yield. However, the high yielding bermudagrass was most effective in accumulating high tissue levels of Mn and Zn from all spoils (compared to the other grasses) but did not remove Ni. On the average, higher levels of metals were extracted from spoils in the order of 0.1 M HCl[gt] Mehlich 1[gt] DTPA. However, DTPA extracted all the metals from spoils while Mehlich 1 did not extract Pb and 0.1 M HCl did not extract detectable levels of Ni. All of the extractants were quite effective in determining plant available Zn from the spoils. For the other metals, the effective determination of plant availability depended on the crop, the extractant, and the metal in concert. 20 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  7. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  8. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...

  9. Application of Hydroforming Process in Sheet Metal Formation

    GRIZELJ, Branko; CUMIN, Josip; ERGIĆ, Todor

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with the theory and application of a hydroforming process. Nowadays automobile manufacturers use high strength sheet metal plates. This high strength steel sheet metal plates are strain hardened in the process of metal forming. With the use of high strength steel, cars are made lightweight, which is intended for low fuel consumption because of high energy prices. Some examples of application of a hydroforming process are simulated with FEM.

  10. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  11. The Extraction of Heavy Metals by Means of a New Electrolytic Method

    Guiragossian, Z. G.; Martoyan, G. A.; Injeyan, S. G.; Tonikyan, S. G.; Nalbandyan, G. G.

    2003-01-01

    The extraction of metals in known metallurgical methods is pursued on the basis of separating as much as possible the desired metal's content from the ore concentrate, in the most economical manner. When these principles are also applied to the extraction of heavy metals, the related environmental factors do not readily meet with requirements. Today, an acceptable extraction technology for metals must satisfy the need to produce the deep separation of metals from their source in both economical and environmentally safe manner. This pertains to the direction of our ongoing research and development, among others in the field of environmental remediation. Earlier, we successfully addressed in an environmentally safe manner the selective extraction of radioactive isotopes from liquid radioactive wastes, produced at Armenia's Metzamor Nuclear Power Plant and implemented a functioning LRW station at the NPP. Currently, we extended our new electrodialysis-based electrolytic method in a laboratory scale, for the extraction and deep separation of different metals, including the heavy metals. Our new method, its efficiency, economy and full compliance with environmental issues will be presented

  12. Extraction of selected heavy metals using modified clays.

    Krikorian, Nadine; Martin, Dean F

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, attapulgite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite KSF were modified using azeotropic distillation to condense 2-mercaptoethanol with the clay material. The resulting product was used as a coordinating agent to remove selected metal ions, e.g., copper(II), cadmium(II), silver(I), nickel(II), and lead(II) ions from standard aqueous solutions. Batch systems were used, and samples were shaken for two hours, and following filtration, metal content of the filtrate was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Without adjusting the pH, better than 90% of the metal ions could be removed.

  13. Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction of herbicides in peanuts.

    Li, Na; Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Liyuan; Nian, Li; Lei, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-phase extraction coupled with metal-organic frameworks-based dispersive solid phase extraction was developed and applied to the extraction of pesticides in high fatty matrices. The herbicides were ultrasonically extracted from peanut using ethyl acetate as extraction solvent. The separation of the analytes from a large amount of co-extractive fat was achieved by dispersive solid-phase extraction using MIL-101(Cr) as sorbent. In this step, the analytes were adsorbed on MIL-101(Cr) and the fat remained in bulk. The herbicides were separated and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental parameters, including type and volume of extraction solvent, ultrasonication time, volume of hexane and eluting solvent, amount of MIL-101(Cr) and dispersive solid phase extraction time, were optimized. The limits of detection for herbicides range from 0.98 to 1.9 μg/kg. The recoveries of the herbicides are in the range of 89.5-102.7% and relative standard deviations are equal or lower than 7.0%. The proposed method is simple, effective and suitable for treatment of the samples containing high content of fat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    Lewis, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level. 6 claims

  15. Process modifications of obtaining Tc-99m by solvent extraction

    Leon, A.; Verdera, S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a modification in the process to obtaining Tc-99m by the extraction method of solvent from Mo-99 produced by irradiation. Tc-99m is considered an ideal radionuclide for medical and biological applications

  16. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  17. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  18. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  19. Comparison of three sequential extraction procedures to describe metal fractionation in anaerobic granular sludges

    Hullebusch, van E.D.; Sudarno, S.; Zandvoort, M.H.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2005-01-01

    In the last few decades. several sequential extraction procedures have been developed to quantify the chemical status of metals in the solid phase. In this study. three extraction techniques (modified [A. Tessier, P.G.C. Campbell, M. Bisson, Anal. Chem. 51 (1979) 844]: [R.C. Stover. L.E. Sommers,

  20. Removal of heavy metal contamination from peanut skin extracts by waste biomass adsorption

    Polyphenols are a rapidly increasing portion of the nutraceutical and functional food marketplace. Peanut skins are a waste product which have potential as a low-cost source of polyphenols. Extraction and concentration of peanut skin extracts can cause normally innocuous levels of the heavy metal co...

  1. Investigation of metal ion extraction and aggregate formation combining acidic and neutral organophosphorous reagents

    Braatz, A.D.; Nilsson, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, 916 Engineering Tower, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2575 (United States); Ellis, R.; Antonio, M. [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200 9700 South Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439-4831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate how varying mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphate (HDBP) results in enhanced extraction of lanthanum(III), La{sup 3+}, and dysprosium(III), Dy{sup 3+}. Water and metal ion extraction were carefully monitored as a function of TBP:HDBP mole ratio.In addition to these techniques, EXAFS was used to determine the coordination environment of the metal ion in this system. To produce the necessary signal, a concentration of 1.25*10{sup -3} M La{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} was used. Although previous studies of synergistic extraction of metal cations using combinations of neutral and acidic reagents explain the enhanced extraction by increased dehydration of the metal ion and the formation of mixed extractant complexes, our evidence for the increased water extraction coupled with the aggregate formation suggests a reverse micellar aspect to synergism in the system containing TBP and HDBP. It is quite possible that both of these phenomena contribute to our system behavior. The EXAFS data shows that, based on coordination numbers alone, several possible structures may exist. From this study, we cannot provide a definitive answer as to the nature of extraction in this system or the exact complex formed during extraction.

  2. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  3. Calculations in solvent extraction of rare earth metals

    Sadanandam, R.; Sharma, A.K.; Fonseca, M.F.; Hubli, R.C.; Suri, A.K.; Singh, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with calculation of number of countercurrent stages in solvent extraction of rare earths both under total reflux and partial reflux conditions to achieve a given degree of purification and recovery. The use of Fenske's equation normally used for separation by distillation is proposed to calculate the number of stages required under total reflux, replacing relative volatility by separation factor. Kremser's equations for extraction and scrubbing are used to calculate the number of stages in extraction and scrubbing modules under partial reflux conditions. McCabe-Thiele's approach is also adopted to arrive at the number of scrubbing stages. (author)

  4. Evaluating the Metal Tolerance Capacity of Microbial Communities Isolated from Alberta Oil Sands Process Water.

    Mathew L Frankel

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities have resulted in the intensified use of water resources. For example, open pit bitumen extraction by Canada's oil sands operations uses an estimated volume of three barrels of water for every barrel of oil produced. The waste tailings-oil sands process water (OSPW-are stored in holding ponds, and present an environmental concern as they are comprised of residual hydrocarbons and metals. Following the hypothesis that endogenous OSPW microbial communities have an enhanced tolerance to heavy metals, we tested the capacity of planktonic and biofilm populations from OSPW to withstand metal ion challenges, using Cupriavidus metallidurans, a known metal-resistant organism, for comparison. The toxicity of the metals toward biofilm and planktonic bacterial populations was determined by measuring the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs and planktonic minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using the MBEC ™ assay. We observed that the OSPW community and C. metallidurans had similar tolerances to 22 different metals. While thiophillic elements (Te, Ag, Cd, Ni were found to be most toxic, the OSPW consortia demonstrated higher tolerance to metals reported in tailings ponds (Al, Fe, Mo, Pb. Metal toxicity correlated with a number of physicochemical characteristics of the metals. Parameters reflecting metal-ligand affinities showed fewer and weaker correlations for the community compared to C. metallidurans, suggesting that the OSPW consortia may have developed tolerance mechanisms toward metals present in their environment.

  5. Investigations on extraction separation of noble metals from secondary raw materials by means of tracer technique application

    Urban'ski, T.S.; Migdal, V.; Lada, V.

    1979-01-01

    In laboratory scale equilibrium and kinetics of the liquid extraction of gold, platinum and palladium from chloride and nitrate-chloride solutions were investigated. Experiments were done using model solutions and solutions, obtained in processing of secondary raw materials, for example: solutions in aqua regia of anode slurries after electrical refining of silver and jewelry wastes, as well as solutions after extraction of silver from nitrate mwdia. In investigations for determination of the extraction factor, the radioisotope indicators method have been used. Gold-198, platinum-197, palladium-109, silver-110 m and copper-64 were used. Radioisotope platinum-197 was refined from gold-199 on the ionite Dauex 50VX2 in the medium of hydrobromic acid. Gold was extracted by neutral extraction agents such as tributilphosphate; methylizobutylketone; amylacetate; amil alcohol; 2-ethylhexanol and dibutylcarbitol. In details extraction of palladium and platinum by tri-n-actylamine in different diluents with additions of modifiers, as well as their extraction by aliquat 336 in benzene and by some petroleum products. Influence was determined of the time of phases contact, of application of diluents, influence of extracting agents concentrations on the magnitude of extraction factor and on the separation factor for investigated metals [ru

  6. Processing of mixed waste via quantum-catalytic extraction processing (Q-CEP trademark), a case study

    Evans, L.; Richards, T.; McGowan, B.

    1996-01-01

    Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) as developed by Molten Metal Technology (MMT), Inc. employs the use of a refractory-lined, steel-shell reactor vessel and an inductively-heated metal bath. When molten, the metal bath can process gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes and recycle their constituents into commercially valuable products. Quantum-Catalytic Extraction Processing, or Q-CEP, is the application of CEP technology to radioactive and mixed wastes. The Q-CEP technology can take wastes in various physical forms (gas, liquid, slurry, sludge, or grindable solid) and inject them into the molten metal bath of iron, nickel, or copper. The bath acts as both a catalyst and solvent and breaks the compounds of the waste feed into their original constituent elements. The flexibility and robustness of the Q-CEP process are attributed to the open-quote singular close-quote dissolved elemental intermediate through which reactions proceed. open-quotes Singular close-quote refers to the fact that the catalytic and salvation effects of the liquid metal ensure that the constituents of the feed are only found in the liquid metal as dissolved elements (e.g. dissolved carbon). As a result, Q-CEP feed conversion is independent of the complexity of the molecular structure of the feed molecule. Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs) exceeding 99.9999% (six nines) are typical in CEP regardless of the complexity of feed materials. Q-CEP is not a combustion technology. Unlike incineration where wastes are volume reduced and residuals buried, Q-CEP allows for the formation of commercially valuable products. Chemical reactions are performed in a highly reducing environment which results in extremely low concentrations of free oxygen, preventing the formation of furans, dioxins, or other products of incomplete combustion

  7. Extractive decontamination of heavy metals from CCA contaminated ...

    user

    investigated operating conditions, oxalic acid extracted the lowest amount of As, Cr and Cu from the contaminated soil ... available fraction of the soil treated with the four different organic acid chelants. ...... polluted soils using oxalate. Water ...

  8. Extraction of metal ions through ligand assisted ionic liquids

    Kumar, P.; Vincent, T.; Khanna, A.

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of Strontium by crown ether (DCH18C6) has been investigated in [BMIM][TF2N] Ionic Liquid (IL) giving higher extraction ~98% and distribution ratio as compared to other organic solvents (Dodecane, Hexane, & Isodecyl alcohol + Dodecane). Distribution ratio of Sr in IL at 0.15M DCH18C6 indicates an enhancement of 20000, 2000, 500 times over Dodecane, Hexane and 5% Isodecyl Alcohol + 95 % Dodecane at 0.01M aqueous acidity respectively. In presence of IL Sr extraction decreases with increase in HNO 3 concentration in aqueous phase whereas opposite trend was observed with organic solvents. Extraction of Sr initially increases with increase in DCH18C6 concentration in IL, finally reaching an asymptotic constant. Sr can be stripped from the organic phase by precipitating with K 2 SO 4 . (author)

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-07

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

  10. Chemical Separation of Fission Products in Uranium Metal Ingots from Electrolytic Reduction Process

    Lee, Chang-Heon; Kim, Min-Jae; Choi, Kwang-Soon; Jee, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Chemical characterization of various process materials is required for the optimization of the electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. In the uranium metal ingots of interest in this study, residual process materials and corrosion products as well as fission products are involved to some extent, which further adds difficulties to the determination of trace fission products. Besides it, direct inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) analysis of uranium bearing materials such as the uranium metal ingots is not possible because a severe spectral interference is found in the intensely complex atomic emission spectra of uranium. Thus an adequate separation procedure for the fission products should be employed prior to their determinations. In present study ion exchange and extraction chromatographic methods were adopted for selective separation of the fission products from residual process materials, corrosion products and uranium matrix. The sorption behaviour of anion and tri-nbutylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatographic resins for the metals in acidic solutions simulated for the uranium metal ingot solutions was investigated. Then the validity of the separation procedure for its reliability and applicability was evaluated by measuring recoveries of the metals added

  11. The study of heavy metals leaching from waste foundry sands using a one-step extraction

    Bożym, Marta

    2017-10-01

    There are a number of leaching test which are used to evaluate the effect of foundry waste disposal on the environment (TCLP, SPLP, ASTM at al.). Because the spent foundry sand are usually deposited at the ground level and they have a similar structure to the soil, survey mobility of metals using the same methods seems appropriate. One-step extraction allows for the evaluation of the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. Waste foundry sands have been successfully used as a component in manufactured soils in U.S., but concern over metal contamination must be eliminated before considering this direction of use. The study evaluated the leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni) from deposited waste foundry sands. The overall, as well as heavy metals were extracted by different type of extractants: H2O, CH3COOH, HCl, EDTA, MgCl2 and NaCOOH. These extractants are most commonly used to study the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. In the present study applicable standards and methodology described in the literature in analysis were used. The results allowed to evaluate the bioavailability of metals leached from those wastes.

  12. The study of heavy metals leaching from waste foundry sands using a one-step extraction

    Bożym Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of leaching test which are used to evaluate the effect of foundry waste disposal on the environment (TCLP, SPLP, ASTM at al.. Because the spent foundry sand are usually deposited at the ground level and they have a similar structure to the soil, survey mobility of metals using the same methods seems appropriate. One-step extraction allows for the evaluation of the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. Waste foundry sands have been successfully used as a component in manufactured soils in U.S., but concern over metal contamination must be eliminated before considering this direction of use. The study evaluated the leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni from deposited waste foundry sands. The overall, as well as heavy metals were extracted by different type of extractants: H2O, CH3COOH, HCl, EDTA, MgCl2 and NaCOOH. These extractants are most commonly used to study the mobility and bioavailability of metals in soil and waste. In the present study applicable standards and methodology described in the literature in analysis were used. The results allowed to evaluate the bioavailability of metals leached from those wastes.

  13. Low-level radioactive waste from rare metals processing facilities

    Eng, J.; Hendricks, D.W.; Feldman, J.; Giardina, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the situations at the existing Teledyne Wah Chang Co., Inc. located at Albany, Oregon, and the former Carborundum Corp./Amax Specialty Metals, Inc., facilities located at Parkersburg, West Virginia, and Akron, New York, in order to show the extent of the radioactivity problem at rare metals processing facilities and the need to identify for radiological review other rare metal and rare earth processing sites

  14. Automatic extraction of process categories from process model collections

    Malinova, M.; Dijkman, R.M.; Mendling, J.; Lohmann, N.; Song, M.; Wohed, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations build up their business process management activities in an incremental way. As a result, there is no overarching structure defined at the beginning. However, as business process modeling initiatives often yield hundreds to thousands of process models, there is a growing need for

  15. Solvent extraction

    Coombs, D.M.; Latimer, E.G.

    1988-01-05

    It is an object of this invention to provide for the demetallization and general upgrading of heavy oil via a solvent extracton process, and to improve the efficiency of solvent extraction operations. The yield and demetallization of product oil form heavy high-metal content oil is maximized by solvent extractions which employ either or all of the following techniques: premixing of a minor amount of the solvent with feed and using countercurrent flow for the remaining solvent; use of certain solvent/free ratios; use of segmental baffle tray extraction column internals and the proper extraction column residence time. The solvent premix/countercurrent flow feature of the invention substantially improves extractions where temperatures and pressures above the critical point of the solvent are used. By using this technique, a greater yield of extract oil can be obtained at the same metals content or a lower metals-containing extract oil product can be obtained at the same yield. Furthermore, the premixing of part of the solvent with the feed before countercurrent extraction gives high extract oil yields and high quality demetallization. The solvent/feed ratio features of the invention substanially lower the captial and operating costs for such processes while not suffering a loss in selectivity for metals rejection. The column internals and rsidence time features of the invention further improve the extractor metals rejection at a constant yield or allow for an increase in extract oil yield at a constant extract oil metals content. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Advances in microbial leaching processes for nickel extraction from lateritic minerals - A review

    Behra, Sunil Kumar; Mulaba-Bafubiandi, Antoine Floribert

    2015-01-01

    Lateritic nickel minerals constitute about 80% of nickel reserves in the world, but their contribution for nickel production is about 40%. The obstacles in extraction of nickel from lateritic minerals are attributed to their very complex mineralogy and low nickel content. Hence, the existing metallurgical techniques are not techno-economically feasible and environmentally sustainable for processing of such complex deposits. At this juncture, microbial mineral processing could be a benevolent approach for processing of lateritic minerals in favor of nickel extraction. The microbial mineral processing route offers many advantages over conventional metallurgical methods as the process is operated under ambient conditions and requires low energy input; thus these processes are relatively simple and environment friendly. Microbial processing of the lateritic deposits still needs improvement to make it industrially viable. Microorganisms play the pivotal role in mineral bio-processing as they catalyze the extraction of metals from minerals. So it is inevitable to explore the physiological and bio-molecular mechanisms involved in this microbe-mineral interaction. The present article offers comprehensive information about the advances in microbial processes for extraction of nickel from laterites.

  17. Advances in microbial leaching processes for nickel extraction from lateritic minerals - A review

    Behra, Sunil Kumar; Mulaba-Bafubiandi, Antoine Floribert [Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Johannesburg, (South Africa)

    2015-08-15

    Lateritic nickel minerals constitute about 80% of nickel reserves in the world, but their contribution for nickel production is about 40%. The obstacles in extraction of nickel from lateritic minerals are attributed to their very complex mineralogy and low nickel content. Hence, the existing metallurgical techniques are not techno-economically feasible and environmentally sustainable for processing of such complex deposits. At this juncture, microbial mineral processing could be a benevolent approach for processing of lateritic minerals in favor of nickel extraction. The microbial mineral processing route offers many advantages over conventional metallurgical methods as the process is operated under ambient conditions and requires low energy input; thus these processes are relatively simple and environment friendly. Microbial processing of the lateritic deposits still needs improvement to make it industrially viable. Microorganisms play the pivotal role in mineral bio-processing as they catalyze the extraction of metals from minerals. So it is inevitable to explore the physiological and bio-molecular mechanisms involved in this microbe-mineral interaction. The present article offers comprehensive information about the advances in microbial processes for extraction of nickel from laterites.

  18. Extraction of valuable metals by microwave discharge in crude oil

    Lebedev, Yu A.; Averin, K. A.

    2018-05-01

    Microwave discharges in liquids are a new direction in the physics and chemistry of low temperature plasma. The article describes the results of experiments on the separation of metals from oil when a microwave discharge is created at atmospheric pressure in its volume. It is shown for the first time that the content of metals Al, Co, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn in a tree-like structure deposited on the microwave antenna is up to 10 times higher than their content in the initial substance.

  19. European sites contaminated by residues from the ore extracting and processing industries

    Vandenhove, H.

    2000-01-01

    Activities linked with the ore extraction and processing industries may lead to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (NORs) in products, by-products and waste and at the installations and in the surroundings of the facility. In the framework of the EC-DGXI CARE project (Common Approach for REstoration of contaminated sites) nine important categories of industries were identified and discussions were summarized on the industrial processes and the levels of NORs in parent material, waste and by-products. The most contaminating industries are uranium mining and milling, metal mining and smelting and the phosphate industry. Radionuclide levels in products and/or waste products from the oil and gas extraction industry and of the rare earth, zirconium and ceramics industries may be particularly elevated, but waste streams are limited. The impact on the public from coal mining and power production from coal is commonly considered low. No typical values are available for contaminant levels in materials, buildings and surroundings of radium extraction and luminizing plants, nor for thorium extraction and processing plants. An attempt to give an overview of sites in Europe contaminated with NORs, with emphasis on past practices, was only partly successful since information was often limited or unavailable. The most prominent case of environmental contamination due to mining and processing activities (uranium, metal and coal mining) is in eastern Germany. (author)

  20. Antipollution processing of a used refining catalyst and metal recovery

    Trinh Dinh Chan; Llido, E.

    1992-04-30

    The used catalyst, containing metals such as vanadium, nickel and iron, is unloaded from the plant and is first processed by stripping; it is then calcined in critical conditions, and the catalyst metals are leached with a sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate aqueous solution. The antipollution process can be applied to oil fraction hydroconversion or hydroprocessing catalysts.

  1. Assessment of metals bioavailability to vegetables under field conditions using DGT, single extractions and multivariate statistics

    2012-01-01

    Background The metals bioavailability in soils is commonly assessed by chemical extractions; however a generally accepted method is not yet established. In this study, the effectiveness of Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT) technique and single extractions in the assessment of metals bioaccumulation in vegetables, and the influence of soil parameters on phytoavailability were evaluated using multivariate statistics. Soil and plants grown in vegetable gardens from mining-affected rural areas, NW Romania, were collected and analysed. Results Pseudo-total metal content of Cu, Zn and Cd in soil ranged between 17.3-146 mg kg-1, 141–833 mg kg-1 and 0.15-2.05 mg kg-1, respectively, showing enriched contents of these elements. High degrees of metals extractability in 1M HCl and even in 1M NH4Cl were observed. Despite the relatively high total metal concentrations in soil, those found in vegetables were comparable to values typically reported for agricultural crops, probably due to the low concentrations of metals in soil solution (Csoln) and low effective concentrations (CE), assessed by DGT technique. Among the analysed vegetables, the highest metal concentrations were found in carrots roots. By applying multivariate statistics, it was found that CE, Csoln and extraction in 1M NH4Cl, were better predictors for metals bioavailability than the acid extractions applied in this study. Copper transfer to vegetables was strongly influenced by soil organic carbon (OC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC), while pH had a higher influence on Cd transfer from soil to plants. Conclusions The results showed that DGT can be used for general evaluation of the risks associated to soil contamination with Cu, Zn and Cd in field conditions. Although quantitative information on metals transfer from soil to vegetables was not observed. PMID:23079133

  2. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  3. Mathematical modeling of processes of nuclear fuel extraction reprocessing

    Rozen, A.M.; Zel'venskij, M.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model of extraction process in the mixer-settlers is given which describes both a simple step process and extraction complicated with chemical reactions. The extraction equilibrium is described on the basis of theoretical data on the extraction mechanism using the mass action law and contains one empirical constant. The equations for concentration extraction constants of uranium(6) and uranium(4), plutonium(3, 4, 6), neptunium(4, 6) and zirconium(4) depending on the solution ion strength are given, which are obtained by treatment of numerous experimental data. On the example of the reductive reextraction process it is shown that there is a good coincidence of the calculated results of the suggested model with the experimental ones by Mc-Kay. By the method of matematical modeling the uranium and plutonium separation processes without reducers are investigated. The purification improvement of uranium extract, for example, is followed by the deterioration of the data on the other end of cascade i.e. purification of plutonium reextract from uranium and vice versa. To obtain a high grade of separation is possible only in comparatively long cascades and, besides, the regime parameters should be precisely observed

  4. A low inventory adsorptive process for tritium extraction and purification

    Keefer, B.; Bora, B.; Chew, M.; Rump, M.; Kveton, O.K.

    1990-08-01

    The fuel cycles of future fusion power systems present a diverse spectrum of challenges to gas separation technology, for extraction, concentration, purification and confinement of tritium in fusion fuel cycles. Economic and safety factors motivate process design for minimum tritium inventory, functional simplicity, and overall reliability. A new gas separation process with some features of interest to fusion has been demonstrated under the auspices of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project. This process (Thermally Coupled Pressure Swing Adsorption or 'TCPSA') is potentially applicable to several fusion applications for separation purification of hydrogen, notably for tritium extraction from breeder blanket purge helium. Recent experimental tests have been directed toward fusion applications, primarily extraction and concentration of tritium-rich hydrogen from the blanket purge helium stream, and also considering purification of this and other hydrogen isotope streams such as the plasma exhaust. For example, hydrogen at 0.1% concentration in helium has been extracted in a TCPSA module operating at 195 K, with the process performed in a single working space to achieve simultaneous high extraction and concentration of the hydrogen. With methane or carbon oxides as the impurities, substantially complete separation is achieved by the same apparatus at ambient temperature. Engineering projections for scale-up to ITER blanket purge extraction and purification applications indicate a low working inventory of tritium

  5. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction with Crown Ether

    Park, Jihe; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Previous decontamination methods have shortcomings in that they produce additional waste due to the usage of solutions with chemical toxicity. Hence, demand is strong for new decontamination methods that can guarantee effective decontamination while decreasing the chemical solution. In particular, methods using supercritical CO2 as a means of decontamination are currently in progress. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2. This paper examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2 and crown ether as the ligand. It was confirmed that extraction effectiveness increases following greater usage of ligand and co-ligand, with a drastic increase in extraction effectiveness when using extracts over a certain dose. Moreover, it was shown that if the usage of ligand and additive decreases, the extraction ratio also decreases.

  6. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction with Crown Ether

    Park, Jihe; Park, Kwangheon

    2015-01-01

    Previous decontamination methods have shortcomings in that they produce additional waste due to the usage of solutions with chemical toxicity. Hence, demand is strong for new decontamination methods that can guarantee effective decontamination while decreasing the chemical solution. In particular, methods using supercritical CO2 as a means of decontamination are currently in progress. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2. This paper examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2 and crown ether as the ligand. It was confirmed that extraction effectiveness increases following greater usage of ligand and co-ligand, with a drastic increase in extraction effectiveness when using extracts over a certain dose. Moreover, it was shown that if the usage of ligand and additive decreases, the extraction ratio also decreases

  7. Investigation on microbiology of olive oil extraction process

    B. Zanoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several batches of approx. 200 kg olives from Frantoio and Moraiolo cultivars were processed in an oil mill at two dates of harvesting. Samples were collected in several steps of extraction process for sensory, chemical and microbial analyses.All extracted olive oil from the second olive harvesting date was affected by sensory defects and hence classified as being “non-extra virgin”. A distinction between extra virgin olive oil and nonextra virgin olive oil obtained from both harvesting dates was explained by the volatile compounds content of olive oil samples and by yeast and mould counts collected at different processing steps.

  8. Extractive decontamination of heavy metals from CCA contaminated ...

    In this paper, the mobilization and extraction of As, Cr and Cu from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) contaminated soil obtained from a wood treatment factory site by four organic acids are presented and discussed. The CCA contaminated soil (pH = 5.91, carbon = 0.32, CEC = 47.84 meq/100 g) was found to contain 39.55 ...

  9. Lunar Oxygen Production and Metals Extraction Using Ionic Liquids

    Marone, Matthew; Paley, Mark Steven; Donovan, David N.; Karr, Laurel J.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results indicate that ionic liquids are promising media for the extraction of oxygen from lunar regolith. IL acid systems can solubilize regolith and produce water with high efficiency. IL electrolytes are effective for water electrolysis, and the spent IL acid media are capable of regeneration.

  10. Economic and process optimization of ethanol production by extractive fermentation

    1992-01-01

    This report demonstrates by computer simulation the economic advantages of extractive fermentation on an industrial scale compared to the best alternative technology currently available. The simulations were based on a plant capacity of 100 x 10 6 L/y of azeotropic ethanol. The simulation results were verified with a fully integrated, computer controlled extractive fermentation process demonstration unit based around a 7 L fermentor operated with a synthetic glucose medium and using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system was also operated with natural substrates (blackstrap molasses and grain hydrolyzate). Preliminary tests with the organism Zymomonas mobilis were also carried out under extractive fermentation conditions.

  11. Comparison of three-stage sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching tests to evaluate metal mobility in mining wastes

    Margui, E.; Salvado, V.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abandoned mining sites contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterised by high concentrations of heavy metals. The form in which a metal exists strongly influences its mobility and, thus, the effects on the environment. Operational methods of speciation analysis, such as the use of sequential extraction procedures, are commonly applied. In this work, the modified three-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by the BCR (now the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in mining wastes from old Pb-Zn mining areas located in the Val d'Aran (NE Spain) and Cartagena (SE Spain). Analyses of the extracts were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure was evaluated by using a certified reference material, BCR-701. The results of the partitioning study indicate that more easily mobilised forms (acid exchangeable) were predominant for Cd and Zn, particularly in the sample from Cartagena. In contrast, the largest amount of lead was associated with the iron and manganese oxide fractions. On the other hand, the applicability of lixiviation tests commonly used to evaluate the leaching of toxic species from landfill disposal (US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and DIN 38414-S4) to mining wastes was also investigated and the obtained results compared with the information on metal mobility derivable from the application of the three-stage sequential extraction procedure

  12. Structure-process-yield interrelations in nanocrystalline cellulose extraction

    Hamad, W.Y.; Hu, T.Q. [FPInnovations, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Paprican Div.

    2010-06-15

    An understanding of the effect of hydrolysis conditions on yields of extracted water-insoluble cellulose materials is needed in order to understand the full potential of the extracted materials and the extent of their applications. This study provided a detailed analysis of the extraction of highly crystalline water-insoluble cellulose nanomaterials from commercial bleached kraft pulps using a sulfuric acid hydrolysis process. The process-yield-structure interrelations of the extracted materials were evaluated. The reproducibility of the hydrolysis process was evaluated, and methods of optimizing the yield of the extracted nanomaterials were explored. A Ruland-Rietveld analysis was used to resolve X-ray diffraction patterns and characterize crystallite size, crystalline and amorphous areas, and to determine the crystallinity of the extracted materials. The study showed that sulfation determines the yield of the materials and imparts the unique solid-state characteristics of the nanomaterials. The nanomaterials possessed iridescent patterns typical of chiral nematic materials. 27 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. The extraction of zinc and other minor metals from concentrated ammonium chloride solutions with D2EHPA and Cyanex 272

    Amer, S.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study is made of the extractants D2EHPA and Cyanex 272 for the zinc and minor metal extraction from aqueous concentrated ammonium chloride solutions, as those of the leaching liquors of the CENIM-LNETI process. Extraction equilibrium data for zinc are presented as extraction isotherms at constant pH and at a temperature of 50 °C. Zinc extraction and coextraction of minor metal ions as Cu, Ca, Pb, Mg, Cd, Co, Ni and Hg are studied. Mercury does not extract from concentrated ammonium chloride solutions. Cyanex 272 shows a better selectivity for zinc with regard to the minor metals than D2EHPA, which is especially remarkable for calcium, the most coextracted element by D2EHPA. Nickel and cadmium coextraction is negligible for both extractants. The possible use of the Cyanex 272 as an alternative to D2EHPA is considered.

    Se realiza un estudio comparativo del comportamiento del D2EHPA y del Cyanex 272 durante la extracción del cinc y otros metales minoritarios de soluciones acuosas concentradas de cloruro amónico, como las de las soluciones de lixiviación del proceso CENIM-LNETI. Se presentan los datos de equilibrio de extracción del cinc en forma de isotermas de extracción a una temperatura de 50 °C y pH constante y se estudia la coextracción de los metales minoritarios Cu, Ca, Pb, Mg, Cd, Co, Ni y Hg. El mercurio no se extrae de las soluciones concentradas de cloruro amónico. La selectividad del Cyanex 272 para el cinc respecto de esos metales minoritarios es mejor que la del D2EHPA, siendo verdaderamente notable para el calcio, que es la impureza que más se coextrae con el D2EHPA. La coextracción de níquel y de cadmio es muy pequeña para ambos extractantes. Se considera la posibilidad del uso alternativo del Cyanex 272 en lugar del D2EHPA.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria Macrocarpa) Extract in Subcritical Water Extraction Process

    Hashim, N. A.; Mudalip, S. K. Abdul; Harun, N.; Che Man, R.; Sulaiman, S. Z.; Arshad, Z. I. M.; Shaarani, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria Macrocarpa), a good source of saponin, flavanoid, polyphenol, alkaloid, and mangiferin has an extensive range of medicinal effects. The intermolecular interactions between solute and solvents such as hydrogen bonding considered as an important factor that affect the extraction of bioactive compounds. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to elucidate the hydrogen bonding exists between Mahkota Dewa extracts and water during subcritical extraction process. A bioactive compound in the Mahkota Dewa extract, namely mangiferin was selected as a model compound. The simulation was performed at 373 K and 4.0 MPa using COMPASS force field and Ewald summation method available in Material Studio 7.0 simulation package. The radial distribution functions (RDF) between mangiferin and water signify the presence of hydrogen bonding in the extraction process. The simulation of the binary mixture of mangiferin:water shows that strong hydrogen bonding was formed. It is suggested that, the intermolecular interaction between OH2O••HMR4(OH1) has been identified to be responsible for the mangiferin extraction process.

  15. Printed circuit board recycling: Physical processing and copper extraction by selective leaching.

    Silvas, Flávia P C; Correa, Mónica M Jiménez; Caldas, Marcos P K; de Moraes, Viviane T; Espinosa, Denise C R; Tenório, Jorge A S

    2015-12-01

    Global generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is about 40 million tons per year. Constant increase in WEEE generation added to international legislations has improved the development of processes for materials recovery and sustainability of electrical and electronic industry. This paper describes a new hydrometallurgical route (leaching process) to recycle printed circuit boards (PCBs) from printers to recover copper. Methodology included PCBs characterization and a combined route of physical and hydrometallurgical processing. Magnetic separation, acid digestion and chemical analysis by ICP-OES were performed. On leaching process were used two stages: the first one in a sulfuric media and the second in an oxidant media. The results showed that the PCBs composition was 74.6 wt.% of non-magnetic material and 25.4 wt.% of magnetic one. The metallic fraction corresponded to 44.0 wt.%, the polymeric to 28.5 wt.% and the ceramic to 27.5 wt.%. The main metal was copper and its initial content was 32.5 wt.%. On sulfuric leaching 90 wt.% of Al, 40 wt.% of Zn and 8.6 wt.% of Sn were extracted, whereas on oxidant leaching tests the extraction percentage of Cu was 100 wt.%, of Zn 60 wt.% and of Al 10 wt.%. At the end of the hydrometallurgical processing was obtained 100% of copper extraction and the recovery factor was 98.46%, which corresponds to a 32 kg of Cu in 100 kg of PCB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste by cerium IV redox process

    Shah, J.G.; Dhami, P.S.; Gandhi, P.M.; Wattal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste is an important aspect in the management of waste generated during dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Present work on cerium redox process targets decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste till it qualifies for the non alpha waste category for disposal in near surface disposal facility. Recovery of the alpha radio nuclides and cerium from aqueous secondary waste streams was also studied deploying solvent extraction process and established. The alpha-lean secondary waste stream has been immobilised in cement based matrix for final disposal. (author)

  17. Manufacturing processes of cellular metals. Part I. Liquid route processes

    Fernandez, P.; Cruz, L. J.; Coleto, J.

    2008-01-01

    With its interesting and particular characteristics, cellular metals are taking part of the great family of new materials. They can have open or closed porosity. At the present time, the major challenge for the materials researchers is based in the manufacturing techniques improvement in order to obtain reproducible and reliable cellular metals with quality. In the present paper, the different production methods to manufacture cellular metals by liquid route are reviewed; making a short description about the main parameters involved and the advantages and drawbacks in each of them. (Author) 106 refs

  18. Standard Operation Procedure of Gaharu Oil Extraction Process

    Peng, C.S.; Mohd Fajri Osman; Norella Bahari; Rusli Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Gaharu oil extraction system developed by Nuclear Malaysia is a hydro-distillation system innovated from the tradition method and improvised with science and technology to enhance the process efficiency and safety. The main component of gaharu oil extraction system included the extraction vessel, condenser and collection decanter. Apart from the extraction unit, the gaharu oil extraction process also incorporated two major supporting systems. These systems are the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) system and the water cooling system. The LPG system is solely used for heating the vessel, which contains a mixture of treated and grind gaharu bark and fluid, to produce steam. Meanwhile the water cooling system is used to supply the necessary cool water into the condenser unit and facilitate in the transformation of the mentioned steam into gaharu oil and distilled water. The dissipate water from this process will be channeled back into the water cooling ponds to let excess heat to be removed and allow the cool water to reuse again by the process. (author)

  19. Selective extraction of cesium: from compound to process

    Simon, N.; Eymard, S.; Tournois, B.; Dozol, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Under the French law of 30 December 1991 on nuclear waste management, research is conducted to recover long-lived fission products from high-level radioactive effluents generated by spent fuel reprocessing, in order to destroy them by transmutation or encapsulate them in specific matrices. Cesium extraction with mono and bis-crown calix(4)arenes (Frame 1) is a candidate for process development. These extractants remove cesium from highly acidic or basic pH media even with high salinity. A real raffinate was treated in 1994 in a hot cell to extract cesium with a calix-crown extractant. The success of this one batch experiment confirmed the feasibility of cesium decontamination from high-level liquid waste. It was then decided to develop a process flowchart to extract cesium selectively from high-level raffinate, to be included in the general scheme of long-lived radionuclide partitioning. It was accordingly decided to develop a process based on liquid-liquid extraction and hence optimize a calixarene/diluent solvent according to: - hydraulic properties: density, viscosity, interfacial tension, - chemical criteria: sufficient cesium extraction (depending on the diluent), kinetics, third phase elimination... New mono-crown-calixarenes branched with long aliphatic groups (Frame 2) were designed to be soluble in aliphatic diluents. To prevent third phase formation associated with nitric acid extraction, the addition of modifiers (alcohol, phosphate and amide) in the organic phase was tested (Frame 3). Table 1 shows examples of calixarene/diluent systems suitable for a process flowchart, and Figure 2 provides data on cesium extraction with these new systems. Alongside these improvements, a system based on a modified 1,3-di(n-octyl-oxy)2,4-calix[4]arene crown and a modified diluent was also developed, considering a mixed TPH/NPHE system as the diluent, where TPH (hydrogenated tetra propylene) is a common aliphatic industrial solvent and NPHE is nitrophenyl

  20. Separation of Metals From Spent Catalysts Waste by Bioleaching Process

    Sirin Fairus, Tria Liliandini, M.Febrian, Ronny Kurniawan

    2010-01-01

    A kind of waste that hard to be treated is a metal containing solid waste. Leaching method is one thealternative waste treatment. But there still left an obstacle on this method, it is the difficulty to find theselective solvent for the type of certain metal that will separated. Bioleaching is one of the carry ablealternative waste treatments to overcome that obstacle. Bioleaching is a metal dissolving process orextraction from a sediment become dissolve form using microorganisms. On this met...

  1. Advanced hybrid process with solvent extraction and pyro-chemical process of spent fuel reprocessing for LWR to FBR

    Fujita, Reiko; Mizuguchi, Koji; Fuse, Kouki; Saso, Michitaka; Utsunomiya, Kazuhiro; Arie, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Toshiba has been proposing a new fuel cycle concept of a transition from LWR to FBR. The new fuel cycle concept has better economical process of the LWR spent fuel reprocessing than the present Purex Process and the proliferation resistance for FBR cycle of plutonium with minor actinides after 2040. Toshiba has been developing a new Advanced Hybrid Process with Solvent Extraction and Pyrochemical process of spent fuel reprocessing for LWR to FBR. The Advanced Hybrid Process combines the solvent extraction process of the LWR spent fuel in nitric acid with the recovery of high pure uranium for LWR fuel and the pyro-chemical process in molten salts of impure plutonium recovery with minor actinides for metallic FBR fuel, which is the FBR spent fuel recycle system after FBR age based on the electrorefining process in molten salts since 1988. The new Advanced Hybrid Process enables the decrease of the high-level waste and the secondary waste from the spent fuel reprocessing plants. The R and D costs in the new Advanced Hybrid Process might be reduced because of the mutual Pyro-chemical process in molten salts. This paper describes the new fuel cycle concept of a transition from LWR to FBR and the feasibility of the new Advanced Hybrid Process by fundamental experiments. (author)

  2. Rapid Computer Aided Ligand Design and Screening of Precious Metal Extractants from TRUEX Raffinate with Experimental Validation

    Clark, Aurora Sue; Wall, Nathalie; Benny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium is the most extensively used metal in catalytic applications; it occurs in mixed ores with platinum group metals (PGMs) in the earth's crust in low concentrations (0.4 - 10 ppb). It is resistant to aerial oxidation and insoluble in all acids, including aqua regia, making classical purification methods time-consuming and inefficient. To ensure adequate purity, several precipitation and dissolution steps are necessary during separation. Low abundance, high demand, and extensive processing make rhodium the most expensive of all PGMs. From alternative sources, rhodium is also produced in sufficient quantities (0.47 kg per ton initial heavy metal (tIHM)) during the fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors along with other PGMs (i.e. Ag, Pd, Ru). A typical power water reactor operating with UO 2 fuel after cooling can generate PGMs in quantities greater than found in the earth's crust (0.5-2 kg/tIHM). This currently untapped supply of PGMs has the potential to yield $5,000-30,000/tIHM. It is estimated that by the year 2030, the amount of rhodium generated in reactors could exceed natural reserves. Typical SNF processing removes the heavier lanthanides and actinides and can leave PGMs at ambient temperatures in aqueous acidic (Cl - or NO 3 - ; pH < 1) solutions at various activities. While the retrieval of these precious metals from SNF would minimize waste generation and improve resource utilization, it has been difficult to achieve thus far. Two general strategies have been utilized to extract Rh(III) from chloride media: ion pairing and coordination complexation. Ion pairing mechanisms have been studied primarily with the tertiary and quaternary amines. Additionally, mixed mechanism extractions have been observed in which ion pairing is the initial mechanism, and longer extraction equilibrium time generated coordination complexes. Very few coordination complexation extraction ligands have been studied. This project approached this problem through the

  3. Rapid Computer Aided Ligand Design and Screening of Precious Metal Extractants from TRUEX Raffinate with Experimental Validation

    Clark, Aurora Sue [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Wall, Nathalie [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Benny, Paul [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Rhodium is the most extensively used metal in catalytic applications; it occurs in mixed ores with platinum group metals (PGMs) in the earth’s crust in low concentrations (0.4 - 10 ppb). It is resistant to aerial oxidation and insoluble in all acids, including aqua regia, making classical purification methods time-consuming and inefficient. To ensure adequate purity, several precipitation and dissolution steps are necessary during separation. Low abundance, high demand, and extensive processing make rhodium the most expensive of all PGMs. From alternative sources, rhodium is also produced in sufficient quantities (0.47 kg per ton initial heavy metal (tIHM)) during the fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors along with other PGMs (i.e., Ag, Pd, Ru). A typical power water reactor operating with UO2 fuel after cooling can generate PGMs in quantities greater than found in the earth’s crust (0.5-2 kg/tIHM). This currently untapped supply of PGMs has the potential to yield $5,000-30,000/tIHM. It is estimated that by the year 2030, the amount of rhodium generated in reactors could exceed natural reserves. Typical SNF processing removes the heavier lanthanides and actinides and can leave PGMs at ambient temperatures in aqueous acidic (Cl⁻ or NO3⁻; pH < 1) solutions at various activities. While the retrieval of these precious metals from SNF would minimize waste generation and improve resource utilization, it has been difficult to achieve thus far. Two general strategies have been utilized to extract Rh(III) from chloride media: ion pairing and coordination complexation. Ion pairing mechanisms have been studied primarily with the tertiary and quaternary amines. Additionally, mixed mechanism extractions have been observed in which ion pairing is the initial mechanism, and longer extraction equilibrium time generated coordination complexes. Very few coordination complexation extraction ligands have been studied. This project approached this problem

  4. Ethanol production by extractive fermentation - Process development and technology transfer

    Daugulis, A.J.; Axford, D.B.; Mau, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Extractive Fermentation is an ethanol processing strategy in which the operations of fermentation and product recovery are integrated and undertaken simultaneously in a single step. In this process an inert and biocompatible organic solvent is introduced directly into the fermentation vessel to selectively extract the ethanol product. The ethanol is readily recovered from the solvent at high concentration by means of flash vaporization, and the solvent is recycled in a closed loop back to the fermentor. This process is characterized by a high productivity (since ethanol does not build up to inhibitory levels), continuous operation, significantly reduced water consumption, and lower product recovery costs. The technical advantages of this processing strategy have been extensively demonstrated by means of a continuous, fully integrated and computer-controlled Process Demonstration Unit in the authors' laboratory. Numerous features of this technology have been protected by US patent. A thorough economic comparison of Extractive Fermentation relative to modern ethanol technology (continuous with cell recycle) has been completed for both new plants and retrofitting of existing facilities for a capacity of 100 million liters of ethanol per year. Substantial cost savings are possible with Extractive Fermentation ranging, depending on the process configuration, from 5 cents to 16 cents per liter. Activities are under way to transfer this proprietary technology to the private sector

  5. Pilot plant studies on the extraction of antimony metal from lower grade krinj stibnite ore

    Rehman, W.; Riaz, M.; Ishaq, M.

    2013-01-01

    Antimony is a silvery white, brittle and crystalline solid which is extensively consumed in lead acid batteries, antimonial lead alloys, flame retardants and a variety of metallic products. The antimony content of commercial ores range from 5-60% and determines the method of extraction, either pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical. The present study focuses on pilot plant scale extraction of antimony metal from lower grade stibnite ore of Krinj (Chitral) without the use of iron scrap, thus eliminating the second step of iron removal in conventional direct reduction method. A tilting gas fired furnace with digital temperature control system and a heat recuperator was designed to optimize the operating parameters for extraction of antimony metal. Weight ratios of flux and reductant, operating time and operating temperature were optimized. Highest percentage recovery and purity were achieved using soda ash as a flux, at a temperature of 900 degree C for 2 hours. (author)

  6. Multiple heavy metals extraction and recovery from hazardous electroplating sludge waste via ultrasonically enhanced two-stage acid leaching.

    Li, Chuncheng; Xie, Fengchun; Ma, Yang; Cai, Tingting; Li, Haiying; Huang, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Gaoqing

    2010-06-15

    An ultrasonically enhanced two-stage acid leaching process on extracting and recovering multiple heavy metals from actual electroplating sludge was studied in lab tests. It provided an effective technique for separation of valuable metals (Cu, Ni and Zn) from less valuable metals (Fe and Cr) in electroplating sludge. The efficiency of the process had been measured with the leaching efficiencies and recovery rates of the metals. Enhanced by ultrasonic power, the first-stage acid leaching demonstrated leaching rates of 96.72%, 97.77%, 98.00%, 53.03%, and 0.44% for Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, and Fe respectively, effectively separated half of Cr and almost all of Fe from mixed metals. The subsequent second-stage leaching achieved leaching rates of 75.03%, 81.05%, 81.39%, 1.02%, and 0% for Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, and Fe that further separated Cu, Ni, and Zn from mixed metals. With the stabilized two-stage ultrasonically enhanced leaching, the resulting over all recovery rates of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr and Fe from electroplating sludge could be achieved at 97.42%, 98.46%, 98.63%, 98.32% and 100% respectively, with Cr and Fe in solids and the rest of the metals in an aqueous solution discharged from the leaching system. The process performance parameters studied were pH, ultrasonic power, and contact time. The results were also confirmed in an industrial pilot-scale test, and same high metal recoveries were performed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metal nanoparticles (other than gold or silver) prepared using plant extracts for medical applications

    Pasca, Roxana-Diana; Santa, Szabolcs; Racz, Levente Zsolt; Racz, Csaba Pal

    2016-12-01

    There are many modalities to prepare metal nanoparticles, but the reducing of the metal ions with plant extracts is one of the most promising because it is considerate less toxic for the environment, suitable for the use of those nanoparticles in vivo and not very expensive. Various metal ions have been already studied such as: cobalt, copper, iron, platinum, palladium, zinc, indium, manganese and mercury and the number of plant extracts used is continuously increasing. The prepared systems were characterized afterwards with a great number of methods of investigation: both spectroscopic (especially UV-Vis spectroscopy) and microscopic (in principal, electron microscopy-TEM) methods. The applications of the metal nanoparticles obtained are diverse and not completely known, but the medical applications of such nanoparticles occupy a central place, due to their nontoxic components, but some diverse industrial applications do not have to be forgotten.

  8. Electrokinetic extraction of surfactants and heavy metals from sewage sludge

    Ferri, Violetta; Ferro, Sergio; Martinez-Huitle, Carlos A.; De Battisti, Achille

    2009-01-01

    Waste management represents a quite serious problem involving aspects of remediation technologies and potential re-utilization in different fields of human activities. Of course, wastes generated in industrial activities deserve more attention because of the nature and amount of xenobiotic components, often difficult to be eliminated. However, also ordinary wastes of urban origin are drawing more and more attention, depending on the concentration of noxious substances like surfactants and some heavy metal, which may eventually require expensive disposal. In the present paper, a research has been carried out on the application of electrokinetic treatments for the abatement of the above xenobiotic components from sewage sludge generated in urban wastewater treatment plants. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory scale, in a 250 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm cell, using 250-300 g of sludge for each test and current densities between 2.4 and 5.7 mA cm -2 . As a general result, quite significant abatements of heavy-metal ions and surfactants were achieved, with relatively low energy consumption

  9. A bioseparation process for removing heavy metals from waste ...

    The role of cell structure, cell wall, micropores and macropores is evaluated in terms of the potential of these biosorbents for metal sequestration. Binding mechanisms are discussed, including the key functional groups involved and the ion-exchange process. Quantification of metal-biomass interactions is fundamental to the ...

  10. Study on novel ionic liquids as extracting agent for priority metals from waste waters

    Fischer, L.; Falta, T.; Stingeder, G.; Koellensperger, G.; Hann, S.; Kogelnig, D.; Stojanovic, A.; Krachler, R.; Keppler, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: As the new EU Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) sets high environmental quality standards for priority substances in surface water, effective procedures for wastewater treatment are required. The characteristics of ionic liquids (IL) can be adjusted by modifying their ionic composition for liquid-liquid extraction of metals and metal containing compounds (Cd, Hg, Ni, Pb, tributyltin, cancerostatic platinum compounds) from the water phase. The potential of novel IL for selective removal of the above mentioned substances regarding extraction time, pH and matrix were determined by ICPSFMS, HPLC-ICPMS and GC-ICPMS measurements. (author)

  11. New solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium

    Takahashi, M.; Katoh, Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' company developed a new solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium separation, and started production of zirconium sponge by this new process in September 1979. The process utilizes selective extraction of zirconium oxysulfate using high-molecular alkyl amine, and has the following advantages: 1. This extraction system has a separation factor as high as 10 to 20 for zirconium and hafnium in the range of suitable acid concentration. 2. In the scrubbing section, removal of all the hafnium that coexists with zirconium in the organic solvent can be effectively accomplished by using scrubbing solution containing hafnium-free zirconium sulfate. Consequently, hafnium in the zirconium sponge obtained is reduced to less than 50 ppm. 3. The extractant undergoes no chemical changes but is very stable for a long period. In particular, its solubility in water is small, about 20 ppm maximum, posing no environmental pollution problems such as are often caused by other process raffinates. At the present time, the zirconium and hafnium separation operation is very stable, and zirconium sponge made by this process can be applied satisfactorily to nuclear reactors

  12. Valorization of Tomato Processing Waste for Lycopene Extraction

    Rim Driouich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is one of the most powerful antioxidants and singlet oxygen quenching agents. It has been found to be of great medical importance with various anti cancer effects, cardiovascular diseases effective agent and with its ability to be an important carotenoid in preventive medicine. In Tunisia, we note a real consumption of tomato paste. With 28 production units for double and triple concentrated tomato, noting a significant production of waste (approximately 30000 Tonne/year consisting of skins pulp and seeds, which could be an important source of lycopene. Our study is concerned with three solid-phase extraction process: assisted by ultrasonic, by microwave and by homogenizer heating at moderate temperature. Their efficiency for the extraction of lycopene contained in the tomato waste was elaborated. The effect of the main process variables (including solvent polarity, solid-to-liquid ratio, temperature and time on lycopene recovery have been investigated. The yield of the isolated lycopene was determined using UV-Visible spectrophotometry and UPLC-DAD quantification methods. Lycopene-rich extract was obtained from the dried and milled tomatoes waste using ethanol as a food grade extraction solvent and employing microwave assisted extraction process. The optimum conditions were 30 min total extraction time at 50°C temperature and 1bar pressure. The degradation of extracted lycopene through air oxidation and day light effect were also tested. Lycopene is stable when mixed with olive oil as a natural antioxidant. Up to 80% of lycopene degradated when exposed for one month to day light at 25°C.

  13. A study of liberation and separation process of metals from printed circuit boards (PCBs) scrap

    Noorliyana, H.A.; Zaheruddin, K.; Mohd Fazlul Bari; M. Sri Asliza; Nurhidayah, A.Z.; Kamarudin, H.

    2009-01-01

    Since the metallic elements are covered with or encapsulated by various plastic or ceramic materials on printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment process allowing their liberation and separation is first needed in order to facilitate their efficient extraction with hydrometallurgy route. Even though many studies have been performed on the mechanical pre-treatment processing for the liberation and separation of the metallic components of printed circuit boards scrap, further studies are required to pave the way for efficient recycling of waste printed circuit boards through a combination of mechanical pre-treatment and hydrometallurgical technology. In this work, a fundamental study has been carried out on the mechanical pre-treatment that is necessary to recover metallic concentrates from printed circuit boards scraps. The most important problem is to separate or release particles from the associated gangue minerals at the possible liberation particle size. The distribution of metallic elements has been also investigated in relation to the particle size of the milled printed circuit boards. The samples of printed circuit boards were separated into the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions by Rare-earth Roll Magnetic separator. Thereafter, the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were separated to heavy fraction (metallic elements) and light fraction (plastic) by Mozley Laboratory Table Separator. The recovery ratios and the evaluation of the metallic concentrates recovered by each separation process were also investigated. This study is expected to provide useful data for the efficient mechanical separation of metallic components from printed circuit boards scraps. (author)

  14. Time evolution of absorption process in nonlinear metallic photonic crystals

    Singh, Mahi R.; Hatef, Ali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    The time evolution of the absorption coefficient in metallic photonic crystals has been studied numerically. These crystals are made from metallic spheres which are arranged periodically in air. The refractive index of the metallic spheres depends on the plasma frequency. Probe and pump fields are applied to monitor the absorption process. Ensembles of three-level particles are embedded in the crystal. Nanoparticles are interacting with the metallic crystals via the electron-photon interaction. It is found that when the resonance states lie away from the band edges system goes to transparent state. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Determination of reduction yield of lithium metal reduction process

    Choi, In Kyu; Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Taek Jin; Jee, Kwang Young

    2004-01-01

    Metal reduction of spent oxide fuel is the first step for the effective storage of spent fuel in Korea as well as transmutation purpose of long-lived radio-nuclides. During the reduction of uranium oxide by lithium metal to uranium metal, lithium oxide is stoichiometrically produced. By determining the concentration of lithium oxide in lithium chloride, we can estimate that how much uranium oxide is converted to uranium metal. Previous method to determine the lithium oxide concentration in lithium chloride is tedious and timing consuming. This paper describe the on-line monitoring method of lithium oxide during the reduction process

  16. Particle Formation by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Expansion Process

    Sujuan Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction and expansion (SFEE patented technology combines the advantages of both supercritical fluid extraction (SFE and rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS with on-line coupling, which makes the nanoparticle formation feasible directly from matrix such as Chinese herbal medicine. Supercritical fluid extraction is a green separation technology, which has been developed for decades and widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines or natural active components. In this paper, a SFEE patented instrument was firstly built up and controlled by LABVIEW work stations. Stearic acid was used to verify the SFEE process at optimized condition; via adjusting the preexpansion pressure and temperature one can get different sizes of particles. Furthermore, stearic acid was purified during the SFEE process with HPLC-ELSD detecting device; purity of stearic acid increased by 19%, and the device can purify stearic acid.

  17. PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-10-01

    A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

  18. Optimization of metals extraction using cyanex series and NaDDC reagents in liquid/supercritical CO{sub 2}

    Ko, M. S.; Kim, S. H.; Park, K. H.; Kim, H. D.; Kim, H. W. [Kyunghee Univ., Youngin (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    In this research, extraction of small fraction of radioactive elements from mixed contaminated working dress has been conducted by organic solvent extraction, but use of organic solvents has created secondary wastes. In this study, liquid/supercritical fluid CO{sub 2}, an environmentally friendly solvent, was used to extract five metals(Co, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn). Using five metals selective ligand Cyanex-272 and NaDDC, the most optimized extraction conditions were founded 20 .deg. C, 100atm and complexed ratio(Cyanex-272: 100mg, NaDDC:5mg). The results suggest the possibility of utilizing supercritical fluid technology for extraction of metals from contaminated working dress.

  19. Liquid membrane extraction techniques for trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological matrices

    Ndungu, Kuria

    1999-04-01

    In this thesis, liquid-membrane-based methods for the analysis of trace metal species in samples of environmental and biological origin were developed. By incorporating extracting reagents in the membrane liquid, trace metal ions were selectively separated from humic-rich natural waters and urine samples, prior to their determination using various instrumental techniques. The extractions were performed in closed flow systems thus allowing easy automation of both the sample clean-up and enrichment. An acidic organophosphorus reagent (DEHPA) and a basic tetraalkylammonium reagent (Aliquat-336) were used as extractants in the membrane liquid to selectively extract and enrich cationic and anionic metal species respectively. A speciation method for chromium species was developed that allowed the determination of cationic Cr(III) species and anionic CR(VI) species in natural water samples without the need of a chromatographic separation step prior to their detection. SLM was also coupled on-line to potentiometric stripping analysis providing a fast and sensitive method for analysis of Pb in urine samples. A microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction (MMLLE) method was developed for the determination of organotin compounds in natural waters that reduced the number of manual steps involved in the LLE of organotin compounds prior to their CC separation. Clean extracts obtained after running unfiltered humic-rich river water samples through the MMLLE flow system allowed selective determination of all the organotin compounds in a single run using GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) 171 refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Process of treating surfaces of metals

    Kimura, T.; Murao, A.; Kuwahara, T.

    1975-01-01

    Both higher corrosion resistance and paint adherence are given to films formed on the surfaces of metals by treating the surfaces with aqueous solutions of one or more materials selected from the group consisting of water soluble vinyl monomer or water soluble high polymer and then irradiating with ionizing radioactive rays on the nearly dried surface film. When a water soluble inorganic compound is mixed with the above mentioned aqueous solution, the film properties are greatly improved. The inorganic ionic material should contain a cation from the group consisting of Ca, Mg, Zn, Cr, Al, Fe, and Ni. Electron beams may be used. (U.S.)

  1. Separation of alkali and alkaline earth metals by polyethers using extraction chromatography

    Smulek, W.; Lada, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of alkali and alkaline earth metals by means of an acyclic polyether, 1,13-bis(8-chinolinyl)-1, 4, 7, 10, 13-pentaoxatridecane (CPOD), and cyclic polyethers, benzo-15-crown-5 (BC), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 (DCHC), using extraction chromatography has been studied. The alkali metals can be effectively separated using SCN - as the accompanying ion. For alkaline earth metals, the best results were obtained with ClO 4 - ions. Different elution sequences for these groups were observed using chloroform and/meen=/ sitylene as diluents for the polyethers. (author)

  2. Effects of Extraction Process Parameters on the Quality ...

    Akorede

    for the first time the effects of extraction process parameters on the properties of parinari seed oil. The parinari seeds ... soya oil used in the production of alkyd polymer resin, a main ... relatively lower acid value implies better storage and shell life of the oil. ... Little work has been done on parinari oil, the variation in lipid.

  3. Image Processing and Features Extraction of Fingerprint Images ...

    To demonstrate the importance of the image processing of fingerprint images prior to image enrolment or comparison, the set of fingerprint images in databases (a) and (b) of the FVC (Fingerprint Verification Competition) 2000 database were analyzed using a features extraction algorithm. This paper presents the results of ...

  4. Optimization of aqueous extraction process to enhance the ...

    Kumar Sudhir

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... Aqueous extraction process was optimized to reduce endotoxins from mixed ... management and minimizes the initial capital costs for ... of about 40%, was suggested to be an economic ... industry and as the nutraceutical food for human due to ... economical production of industrial enzymes and as feed.

  5. Process for the extraction of tritium from heavy water

    Dombra, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The object of the invention is achieved by a process for the extraction of tritium from a liquid heavy water stream comprising: contacting the heavy water with a countercurrent gaseous deuterium stream in a column packed with a water-repellent catalyst such that tritium is transferred by isotopic exchange from the liquid heavy water stream to the gaseous deuterium stream

  6. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of chloride induced .... represents the protective barrier moderating the chloride attack which ... inhibitors and their influence on the physical properties of. Portland ...

  7. Hopper design for metallic powders used in additive manufacturing processes

    Visagie, N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hopper geometry on the flow behaviour of typical metallic powders used in additive manufacturing processes is investigated. Bulk hopper theory provides a method of determining critical hopper parameters for bulk amounts...

  8. Sequential separation of transuranic elements and fission products from uranium metal ingots in electrolytic reduction process of spent PWR fuels

    Chang Heon Lee; Kih Soo Joe; Won Ho Kim; Euo Chang Jung; Kwang Yong Jee

    2009-01-01

    A sequential separation procedure has been developed for the determination of transuranic elements and fission products in uranium metal ingot samples from an electrolytic reduction process for a metallization of uranium dioxide to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt at 650 deg C. Pu, Np and U were separated using anion-exchange and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatography. Cs, Sr, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Zr and Mo were separated in several groups from Am and Cm using TBP and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) extraction chromatography. Effect of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg, which were corrosion products formed through the process, on the separation of the analytes was investigated in detail. The validity of the separation procedure was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the stable metals and 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am and 244 Cm added to a synthetic uranium metal ingot dissolved solution. (author)

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-06-08

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Madhavi Nallani-Chakravartula; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-27

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

  11. Determination and partitioning of metals in sediments along the Suez Canal by sequential extraction

    Abd El-Azim, H.; El-Moselhy, Kh. M.

    2005-06-01

    The application of sequential extraction technique was used to determine the chemical association of heavy metals in five different chemical phases (exchangeable F1, bound to carbonate F2, bound to Fe-Mn oxides F3, bound to organic matter F4 and residual F5) for sediment samples collected from the Suez Canal. From the obtained data, it can be seen that the surplus of metal contaminants introduced into the sediment from sources usually exists in relatively unstable chemical forms. A high proportion of the studied metals remained in the residual fraction. Most of remaining portion of metals was bound to ferromanganese oxides fraction. The low concentrations of metals in the exchangeable fraction indicated that the sediments of Suez Canal were relatively unpolluted.

  12. Titanium and zirconium metal powder spheroidization by thermal plasma processes

    Bissett, H.; van der Walt, I.J.; Havenga, J.L.; Nel, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    New technologies used to manufacture high-quality components, such as direct laser sintering, require spherical powders of a narrow particle size distribution as this affects the packing density and sintering mechanism. The powder also has to be chemically pure as impurities such as H, O, C, N, and S causes brittleness, influence metal properties such as tensile strength, hardness, and ductility, and also increase surface tension during processing. Two new metal powder processes have been dev...

  13. Metal Catalyzed Fusion: Nuclear Active Environment vs. Process

    Chubb, Talbot

    2009-03-01

    To achieve radiationless dd fusion and/or other LENR reactions via chemistry: some focus on environment of interior or altered near-surface volume of bulk metal; some on environment inside metal nanocrystals or on their surface; some on the interface between nanometal crystals and ionic crystals; some on a momentum shock-stimulation reaction process. Experiment says there is also a spontaneous reaction process.

  14. Supercritical fluid extraction of peach (Prunus persica) almond oil: process yield and extract composition.

    Mezzomo, Natália; Mileo, Bruna R; Friedrich, Maria T; Martínez, Julian; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2010-07-01

    Peach kernels are industrial residues from the peach processing, contain oil with important therapeutic properties and attractive nutritional aspects because of the high concentration of oleic and linoleic acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw matter is critical for product quality definition. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare peach almond extraction yields obtained by different procedures: soxhlet extractions (Sox) with different solvents; hydrodistillation (HD); ethanolic maceration (Mac) followed by fractionation with various solvents, and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) at 30, 40 and 50 degrees C and at 100, 200 and 300bar, performed with pure CO(2) and with a co-solvent. The extracts were evaluated with respect to fatty acid composition (FAC), fractionated chemical profile (FCP) and total phenolic content (TPC). The Sox total yields were generally higher than those obtained by SFE. The crossover pressure for SFE was between 260 and 280bar. The FAC results show oleic and linoleic acids as main components, especially for Sox and SFE extracts. The FCP for samples obtained by Sox and Mac indicated the presence of benzaldehyde and benzyl alcohol, components responsible for almond flavor and with important industrial uses, whereas the SFE extracts present a high content of a possible flavonoid. The higher TPC values were obtained by Sox and Mac with ethanol. In general, the maximum pressure in SFE produced the highest yield, TPC and oleic acid content. The use of ethanol at 5% as co-solvent in SFE did not result in a significant effect on any evaluated parameter. The production of peach almond oil through all techniques is substantially adequate and SFE presented advantages, with respect to the quality of the extracts due to the high oleic acid content, as presented by some Sox samples. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Release of microspherolites and metals extraction from energetical fly ashes by Bacillus isolates

    Štyriaková Iveta

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The amorphous secondary silicate mineral components formed in the process of coal combustion dominate in the composition of energy fly-ash. Depending on the composition of coal concentrate, this secondary raw material source also contains the industrially interesting components, e.g. titanium (eventually iron and aluminium and can be considered as a non-metallic material suitable for the construction industry.The main secondary mineral components of the energy fly-ash formed during the coal combustion were studied using SEM (scanning electronic microscope. They can be divided into four groups:1. Amorphous spherical alumocilicate particles in allotriomorphic aluminosilicate grains – they represent a main mineral component of fly-ash, which is formed from the accompanying rocks of coal containing silicate minerals,2. Quartz – which formed a substantial component of accompanying rocks of coal or accompanying accessory mineral of coal together with kaolinite and mica, was transformed into tridymite at the temperature exceeding 870°C and into cristobalite at the temperature exceeding 1470°C. The spherical particles are products of reaction between cristobalite and aluminosilicate, which is a frequent phenomenon occurring during the formation of volcanic rocks. These particles form together a main amorphous phase of fly-ash.3. Mullite – represents a secondary component of fly-ash, which is formed from accompanying clay minerals of coal (kaolinite, mica together with cristobalite under the effect of temperature exceeding 1150°C,4. Non-combusted residue – consists of organic substance, represents a non-combusted ratio of coal as a secondary component of fly-ash.Heterotrophic bacteria of Bacillus genus are capable to remove 66 % of titanium and 33 % of iron from non-deposited fly-ash from Opatovice after 35 days of leaching of samples. The content of solid phase in fly-ash influences the extraction of elements, mainly iron and titatnium, because

  16. Evaluation of N,N-dialkylamides as promising process extractants

    Pathak, P N; Prabhu, D R; Kanekar, A S; Manchanda, V K

    2010-01-01

    Studies carried out at BARC, India on the development of new extractants for reprocessing of spent fuel suggested that while straight chain N,N-dihexyloctanamide (DHOA) is promising alternative to TBP for the reprocessing of irradiated uranium based fuels, branched chain N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (D2EHIBA) is suitable for the selective recovery of 233 U from irradiated Th. In advanced fuel cycle scenarios, the coprocessing of U/Pu stream appears attractive particularly with respect to development of proliferation resistant technologies. DHOA extracted Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium/plutonium loading conditions. Uranium extraction behavior of DHOA was however, similar to that of TBP during the extraction cycle. Stripping behavior of U and Pu (without any reductant) was better for DHOA than that of TBP. It was observed during batch studies that whereas 99% Pu is stripped in four stages in case of DHOA, only 89% Pu is stripped in case of TBP under identical experimental conditions. DHOA offered better fission product decontamination than that of TBP. GANEX (Group ActiNide EXtraction) and ARTIST (Amide-based Radio-resources Treatment with Interim Storage of Transuranics) processes proposed for actinide partitioning use branched chain amides for the selective extraction of uranium from spent fuel feed solutions. The branched-alkyl monoamide (BAMA) proposed to be used in ARTIST process is N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)butyramide (D2EHBA). In this context, the extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were compared using D2EHIBA, TBP, and D2EHBA under similar concentration of nitric acid (0.5 - 6M) and of uranium (0-50g/L). These studies suggested that D2EHIBA is a promising extractant for selective extraction of uranium over plutonium in process streams. Similarly, D2EHIBA offered distinctly better decontamination of 233 U over Th and fission products under THOREX feed conditions. The possibility of simultaneous

  17. Evaluation of N,N-dialkylamides as promising process extractants

    Pathak, P. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Kanekar, A. S.; Manchanda, V. K.

    2010-03-01

    Studies carried out at BARC, India on the development of new extractants for reprocessing of spent fuel suggested that while straight chain N,N-dihexyloctanamide (DHOA) is promising alternative to TBP for the reprocessing of irradiated uranium based fuels, branched chain N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (D2EHIBA) is suitable for the selective recovery of 233U from irradiated Th. In advanced fuel cycle scenarios, the coprocessing of U/Pu stream appears attractive particularly with respect to development of proliferation resistant technologies. DHOA extracted Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium/plutonium loading conditions. Uranium extraction behavior of DHOA was however, similar to that of TBP during the extraction cycle. Stripping behavior of U and Pu (without any reductant) was better for DHOA than that of TBP. It was observed during batch studies that whereas 99% Pu is stripped in four stages in case of DHOA, only 89% Pu is stripped in case of TBP under identical experimental conditions. DHOA offered better fission product decontamination than that of TBP. GANEX (Group ActiNide EXtraction) and ARTIST (Amide-based Radio-resources Treatment with Interim Storage of Transuranics) processes proposed for actinide partitioning use branched chain amides for the selective extraction of uranium from spent fuel feed solutions. The branched-alkyl monoamide (BAMA) proposed to be used in ARTIST process is N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)butyramide (D2EHBA). In this context, the extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were compared using D2EHIBA, TBP, and D2EHBA under similar concentration of nitric acid (0.5 — 6M) and of uranium (0-50g/L). These studies suggested that D2EHIBA is a promising extractant for selective extraction of uranium over plutonium in process streams. Similarly, D2EHIBA offered distinctly better decontamination of 233U over Th and fission products under THOREX feed conditions. The possibility of simultaneous

  18. Extraction of certain heavy metals from sewage sludge using ...

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    by a physical separation process, e.g. sedimentation, flotation, or membrane filtration. The precipitation experiments were carried out using hydroxide precipitation with ... matter and nitrogen which may be present in the ammonium, nitrate and.

  19. Sol-gel processing with inorganic metal salt precursors

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2004-10-19

    Methods for sol-gel processing that generally involve mixing together an inorganic metal salt, water, and a water miscible alcohol or other organic solvent, at room temperature with a macromolecular dispersant material, such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) added. The resulting homogenous solution is incubated at a desired temperature and time to result in a desired product. The methods enable production of high quality sols and gels at lower temperatures than standard methods. The methods enable production of nanosize sols from inorganic metal salts. The methods offer sol-gel processing from inorganic metal salts.

  20. Process for the regeneration of metallic catalysts

    Katzer, James R.; Windawi, Hassan

    1981-01-01

    A method for the regeneration of metallic hydrogenation catalysts from the class consisting of Ni, Rh, Pd, Ir, Pt and Ru poisoned with sulfur, with or without accompanying carbon deposition, comprising subjecting the catalyst to exposure to oxygen gas in a concentration of about 1-10 ppm. intermixed with an inert gas of the group consisting of He, A, Xe, Kr, N.sub.2 and air substantially free of oxygen to an extent such that the total oxygen molecule throughout is in the range of about 10 to 20 times that of the hydrogen sulfide molecular exposure producing the catalyst poisoning while maintaining the temperature in the range of about 300.degree. to 500.degree. C.

  1. Trend and Development of Semisolid Metal Joining Processing

    M. N. Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The semisolid metal joining (SSMJ process or thixojoining process has recently been developed based on the principles of SSM processing, which is a technology that involves the formation of metal alloys between solidus and liquidus temperatures. Thixojoining has many potential benefits, which has encouraged researchers to carry out feasibility studies on various materials that could be utilized in this process and which could transform the production of metal components. This paper reviews the findings in the literature to date in this evolving field, specifically, the experimental details, technology considerations for industrialization, and advantages and disadvantages of the various types of SSMJ methods that have been proposed. It also presents details of the range of materials that have been joined by using the SSMJ process. Furthermore, it highlights the huge potential of this process and future directions for further research.

  2. Liquid metal extraction of Nd from NdFeB magnet scrap

    Xu, Yanchen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-12-10

    This research involves using molten magnesium (Mg) to remove neodymium (Nd) from NdFeB magnet scrap by diffusion. The results show that liquid metal extraction of Nd may be a viable and inexpensive method for recovering the expensive rare earth element Nd for use in Mg castings.

  3. Ceramic/metal nanocomposites by lyophilization: Processing and HRTEM study

    Gutierrez-Gonzalez, C.F.; Agouram, S.; Torrecillas, R.; Moya, J.S.; Lopez-Esteban, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cryogenic route has been used to obtain ceramic/metal nanostructured powders. ► The powders present good homogeneity and dispersion of metal. ► The metal nanoparticle size distributions are centred in 17–35 nm. ► Both phases, ceramic and metal, present a high degree of crystallinity. ► Good metal/ceramic interfaces due to epitaxial growth, studied by HRTEM. -- Abstract: This work describes a wet-processing route based on spray-freezing and subsequent lyophilization designed to obtain nanostructured ceramic/metal powders. Starting from the ceramic powder and the corresponding metal salt, a water-based suspension is sprayed on liquid nitrogen. The frozen powders are subsequently freeze-dried, calcined and reduced. The material was analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis at all stages. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies showed a uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles on the ceramic grain surfaces, good interfaces and high crystallinity, with an average metal particle size in the nanometric range.

  4. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  5. Solvent extraction process development for high plutonium fuel cycles

    Anil Kumar, R; Selvaraj, P G; Natarajan, R; Raman, V R [Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1994-06-01

    The purification of high plutonium bearing irradiated fuels using 30% TBP in dodecane diluent requires precise determination of concentration profiles during steady state, transient and process upset conditions. Mathematical models have been developed and a computer code is in use for determining Pu-U concentration profiles in a solvent extraction equipment in a typical reprocessing plant. The process parameters have been optimised for recovery of U and Pu and decontamination from the fission products. This computer code is used to analyse the extraction flow sheets of fuels of two typical Pu-U compositions encountered in Indian fast breeder programme. The analysis include the effect of uncertainty in equilibrium condition prediction by the model and the variation of flows of streams during plant operation. The studies highlight the margin available to avoid second organic phase formation and adjustments required in the process flowsheet. (author). 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Seaweed Extracts as Edible Coatings for Minimally Processed Products

    Ana Augusto

    2014-05-01

    The EC containing Codium tomentosum seaweed extract showed the better performance by minimizing physical and chemical changes in RTE apples, namely: minor changes of moisture, total soluble solids and firmness values. In relation to the browning index, after 20 days of storage, RTE apples coated with EC containing Codium tomentosum seaweed extract showed the lowest values, also the results of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase showed lower activity compared with the EC containing Fucus spirals, Bifurcaria bifurcate and Codium vermilara seaweed extracts, citric acid EC and the control. These results also allowed a pending patent application nº 107369 “Revestimento de origem marinha para aplicação em produtos minimamente processados ou de quarta gama” which is related with an edible coating with the incorporation of bioactive compounds from macroalgae for minimally processed products.

  7. Effect of metal salts on antibacterial activity of zingiber officinale roscoe extract

    Sohail, T.; Yaqeen, Z.; Imran, H.; Rehman, Z.; Fatima, N.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale Roscoe (ginger) and its combination with different salts like CuSO/sub 4/, ZnSO/sub 4/ and MnCl/sub 2/ was investigated. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested by agar diffusion method. The results showed that ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale gave the maximum zone of inhibition at 50 mg/ml concentrations against Escherichia coli among Gram negative bacteria and against Staphylococcus aureus in Gram positive bacteria. However antibacterial activity of the ginger and metal salts combination was greater than activity of ethanol extract. These investigations indicate that though ethanol extract has antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, ginger and metal salts complex has more inhibitory effect on microorganisms. Antibacterial activity was also compared with standard drug ampicillin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ginger extract and metal salts complexes against all test organisms ranged from 0.3125 to 2.5 mg/ml. (author)

  8. Fabrication of subwavelength metallic structures by using a metal direct imprinting process

    Hsieh, C W; Hsiung, H Y; Lu, Y T; Sung, C K; Wang, W H

    2007-01-01

    This work employs a metal direct imprinting process, which possesses the characteristics of simplicity, low-cost and high resolution, for the fabrication of subwavelength structures on a metallic thin film. Herein, the mould featuring periodic line structures is manufactured by using E-beam lithography and followed by a dry etching process; meanwhile, the thin film is fabricated by sputtering Al on a silicon substrate. AFM section analyses are employed to measure imprinting depths of the subwavelength metallic structures and it is found that the uniformity of the imprinting depths is affected by the designed patterns, the material property of thin film and mould deformation. The process temperature and the mould filling that influence the transferred quality are investigated. In addition, TEM is also utilized to examine defects in the subwavelength metallic structures. Finally, good quality subwavelength metallic structures are fabricated under a pressure of 300 MPa for 60 s at room temperature. In this study, we have demonstrated that subwavelength metallic structures with a minimum linewidth of less than 100 nm on the Al thin film are successfully constructed by the metal direct imprinting process

  9. Treatment of tributyl phosphate wastes by extraction cum pyrolysis process

    Deshingkar, D.S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Kartha, P.K.S.; Kutty, P.V.E.; Ramanujam, A.

    1989-01-01

    For the treatment of spent tri n-butyl phospate (TBP) wastes from Purex process, a method involving extraction of TBP with phosphoric acid followed by pyrolysis of TBP - phosphoric acid phase was investigated. The process was examined with respect to simulated waste, process solvent wastes and aged organic waste samples. These studies seem to offer a simple treatment method for the separation of bulk of diluent from spent solvent wastes. The diluent phase needs further purification for reuse in reprocessing plant; otherwise it can be incinerated. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  10. Can standard sequential extraction determinations effectively define heavy metal species in superfund site soils?

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Williamson, Connie A.; Collins, Wesley K.; Dahlin, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Speciation and distribution of heavy metals in soils controls the degree to which metals and their compounds are mobile, extractable, and plant-available. Consequently, speciation impacts the success of remediation efforts both by defining the relationship of the contaminants with their environment and by guiding development and evaluation of workable remediation strategies. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center (Albany, OR), under a two-year interagency project with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), examined the suitability of sequential extraction as a definitive means to determine species of heavy metals in soil samples. Representative soil samples, contaminated with lead, arsenic, and/or chromium, were collected by EPA personnel from two Superfund sites, the National Lead Company site in Pedricktown, NJ, and the Roebling Steel, Inc., site in Florence, NJ. Data derived from Tessier=s standard three-stage sequential-extraction procedure were compared to data from a comprehensive characterization study that combined optical- and scanning-electron microscopy (with energy-dispersive x-ray and wavelength-dispersive x-ray analyses), x-ray diffraction, and chemical analyses. The results show that standard sequential-extraction procedures that were developed for characterizing species of contaminants in river sediments may be unsuitable for sole evaluation of contaminant species in industrial-site materials (particularly those that contain larger particles of the contaminants, encapsulated contaminants, and/or man-made materials such as slags, metals, and plastics). However, each sequential extraction or comprehensive characterization procedure has it=s own strengths and weaknesses. Findings of this study indicate that the use of both approaches, during the early stages of site studies, would be a best practice. The investigation also highlights the fact that an effective speciation study does not simply identify metal contaminants as

  11. Extraction process of U from its ores using solutions of alkaline earth carbonates and bicarbonates in presence of carbon dioxide

    Floreancig, Antoine; Schuffenecker, Robert.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for extracting uranium from its ores, either directly in the ore deposit or after such ore bodies have been taken from the ground, comprising an oxidation-leaching stage followed by a recovery stage. The characteristic of this process is that in the leaching process, carbonate and bicarbonate solutions of an alkaline-earth metal are used under a pressure of carbon dioxide between zero and 60 bars and at a temperature of zero to 100 0 C [fr

  12. Forensic print extraction using 3D technology and its processing

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos S.

    2017-05-01

    Biometric evidence plays a crucial role in criminal scene analysis. Forensic prints can be extracted from any solid surface such as firearms, doorknobs, carpets and mugs. Prints such as fingerprints, palm prints, footprints and lip-prints can be classified into patent, latent, and three-dimensional plastic prints. Traditionally, law enforcement officers capture these forensic traits using an electronic device or extract them manually, and save the data electronically using special scanners. The reliability and accuracy of the method depends on the ability of the officer or the electronic device to extract and analyze the data. Furthermore, the 2-D acquisition and processing system is laborious and cumbersome. This can lead to the increase in false positive and true negative rates in print matching. In this paper, a method and system to extract forensic prints from any surface, irrespective of its shape, is presented. First, a suitable 3-D camera is used to capture images of the forensic print, and then the 3-D image is processed and unwrapped to obtain 2-D equivalent biometric prints. Computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of using 3-D technology for biometric matching of fingerprints, palm prints, and lip-prints. This system can be further extended to other biometric and non-biometric modalities.

  13. A new hydrometallurgical process for extracting rare earths from apatite using solvent extraction with P35

    Li Hongfei; Guo Fuqiang; Zhang Zhifeng; Li Deqian; Wang Zhonghuai

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new process is proposed to recover rare earths from nitric acid leaching of apatite without interfering with the normal route for fertilizer production using solvent extraction with dimethyl heptyl methyl phosphonate CH 3 P(O)(OC 8 H 17 ) 2 (P 35 , B). In the present work, the leaching conditions are studied. In selected condition, apatite was dissolved in 20% (v/v) nitric acid solution at 60-70 deg. C while agitating. The most suitable acidity for extraction is 0.4 M HNO 3 . More than 98% of rare earths in apatite can be recovered using countercurrent extraction process with six stages when phase ratio = 0.5, and defluorination is unnecessary. The influences of phase ratio, stage number, acidity and salting-out agent on extractabilities of P 35 are studied. The results show that rare earths can be separated with P 35 from Ca, P, Fe and other impurities. Mixed rare earth oxides (REO) of which purity is more than 95% with yield over 98% can be obtained

  14. Application of molten salts in pyrochemical processing of reactive metals

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Various mixes of chloride and fluoride salts are used as the media for conducting pyrochemical processes in the production and purification of reactive metals. These processes generate a significant amount of contaminated waste that has to be treated for recycling or disposal. Molten calcium chloride based salt systems have been used in this work to electrolytically regenerate calcium metal from calcium oxide for the in situ reduction of reactive metal oxides. The recovery of calcium is characterized by the process efficiency to overcome back reactions in the electrowinning cell. A thermodynamic analysis, based on fundamental rate theory, has been performed to understand the process parameters controlling the metal deposition, rate, behavior of the ceramic anode-sheath and influence of the back-reactions. It has been observed that the deposition of calcium is dependent on the ionic diffusion through the sheath. It has also been evidenced that the recovered calcium is completely lost through the back-reactions in the absence of a sheath. A practical scenario has also been presented where the electrowon metal can be used in situ as a reductant to reduce another reactive metal oxide

  15. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Process intensification for biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas L. seeds: Supercritical reactive extraction process parameters study

    Lim, Steven; Lee, Keat Teong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Investigation of supercritical reactive extraction process for biodiesel production. ► Focus is given on optimizing methyl esters yield for Jatropha curcas L. seeds. ► Influence of process parameters to the reaction are discussed thoroughly. ► Comparison between the novel reaction with conventional process are studied. ► High methyl esters yield can be obtained without pre-extraction and catalyst. -- Abstract: In a bid to increase the cost competitiveness of biodiesel production against mineral diesel, process intensification has been studied for numerous biodiesel processing technologies. Subsequently, reactive extraction or in situ transesterification is actively being explored in which the solid oil-bearing seeds are used as the reactant directly with short-chain alcohol. This eliminates separate oil extraction process and combines both extraction and transesterification in a single unit. Supercritical reactive extraction takes one step further by substituting the role of catalyst with supercritical conditions to achieve higher yield and shorter processing time. In this work, supercritical reactive extraction with methanol was carried out in a high-pressure batch reactor to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from Jatropha curcas L. seeds. Material and process parameters including space loading, solvent to seed ratio, co-solvent (n-hexane) to seed ratio, reaction temperature, reaction time and mixing intensity were varied one at a time and optimized based on two responses i.e. extraction efficiency, M extract and FAME yield, F y . The optimum responses for supercritical reactive extraction obtained were 104.17% w/w and 99.67% w/w (relative to 100% lipid extraction with n-hexane) for M extract and F y respectively under the following conditions: 54.0 ml/g space loading, 5.0 ml/g methanol to seeds ratio, 300 °C, 9.5 MPa (Mega Pascal), 30 min reaction time and without n-hexane as co-solvent or any agitation source. This proved that

  17. Separation of actinide elements by solvent extraction using centrifugal contactors in the NEXT process

    Nakahara, Masaumi; Sano, Yuichi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Kamiya, Masayoshi; Shibata, Atsuhiro; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Koyama, Tomozo

    2007-01-01

    Using the advanced aqueous reprocessing system named NEXT process, actinides recovery was attempted by both a simplified solvent extraction process using TBP as an extractant for U, Pu and Np co-recovery and the SETFICS process for Am and Cm recovery from the raffinate. In U, Pu and Np co-recovery experiments a single cycle flow sheet was used under high nitric acid concentration in the feed solution or scrubbing solution. High nitric acid concentration in the feed solution aided Np oxidation not only in the feed solution, but also at the extraction section. This oxidation reaction accomplished Np extraction by TBP with U and Pu. Most of Np could be recovered into the product solution. In the SETFICS process, a TRUEX solvent of 0.2 mol/dm 3 CMPO and 1.4 mol/dm 3 TBP in n-dodecane was employed instead of 0.2 mol/dm 3 CMPO and 1.0 mol/dm 3 TBP in n-dodecane in order to increase the loading of metals. Instead of sodium nitrate, hydroxylamine nitrate was applied to this experimental flow sheet in accordance with a 'salt-free' concept. The counter current experiment succeeded with the Am and Cm product. On the high-loading flow sheet, compared with the previous flow sheet, the flow of the aqueous effluents and spent solvent were expected to decrease by about one half. Two solvent extraction experiments for actinides recovery demonstrated the utility of the flow sheet of these processes in the NEXT process. (author)

  18. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Medina, J.; Hernandez, P.; Barrado, E.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) ↔ Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al 3 Sm and Al 2 Sm.

  19. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  20. RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS

    Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

    2002-03-31

    This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the

  1. Extraction of zirconium from zircon (A new process)

    Shahid, K.A.; Saeed, D.; Jan, S.; Masood, A.; Akhtar, J.

    1985-10-01

    A new process has been used for the extraction of zirconium from zircon. Caustic fritting was done in the presence of magnesium hydroxide carbonate and magnesium oxide. These additives decrease the amount of nitric acid soluble silica less than 1000 ppm. Caustic fritting without any additions results in some nitric acid soluble silica, which is removed by dehydration with concentrated sulphuric acid. The present process eliminates the sulphuric acid dissolution and subsequent precipitation with ammonia which involves difficulty in washing of sulphate ions from the geletinous hydroxide cake and hence makes the direct nitric acid dissolution an attractive option. The effect of excess magnesium was studied and extraction does not seem to be effected by excess magnesium. How the reaction proceeds is not exactly understood but a probable mechanism has been postulated. (authors)

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction by reversed micelles in biotechnological processes

    Kilikian B. V.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In biotechnology there is a need for new purification and concentration processes for biologically active compounds such as proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, or cells that combine a high selectivity and biocompatibility with an easy scale-up. A liquid-liquid extraction with a reversed micellar phase might serve these purposes owing to its capacity to solubilize specific biomolecules from dilute aqueous solutions such as fermentation and cell culture media. Reversed micelles are aggregates of surfactant molecules containing an inner core of water molecules, dispersed in a continuous organic solvent medium. These reversed micelles are capable of selectively solubilizing polar compounds in an apolar solvent. This review gives an overview of liquid-liquid extraction by reversed micelles for a better understanding of this process.

  3. Overview of friction modelling in metal forming processes

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several research...... groups have studied and modelled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most important...... future work in order to advance further in modelling of real contact area in relation to implementation of frictional conditions existing finite element codes for simulation of metal forming processes. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd....

  4. Synthesis and processing of composites by reactive metal penetration

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic-metal composites are being developed because their high stiffness-to weight ratios, good fracture toughness, and variable electrical and thermal properties give them advantages over more conventional materials. However, because ceramic-metal composite components presently are more expensive than monolithic materials, improvements in processing are required to reduce manufacturing costs. Reactive metal penetration is a promising new method for making ceramic- and metal-matrix composites that has the advantage of being inherently a net-shape process. This technique, once fully developed, will provide another capability for manufacturing the advanced ceramic composites that are needed for many light-weight structural and wear applications. The lower densities of these composites lead directly to energy savings in use. Near-net-shape fabrication of composite parts should lead to additional savings because costly and energy intensive grinding and machining operations are significantly reduced, and the waste generated from such finishing operations is minimized. The goals of this research program are: (1) to identify feasible compositional systems for making composites by reactive metal penetration; (2) to understand the mechanism(s) of composite formation by reactive metal penetration; and (3) to learn how to control and optimize reactive metal penetration for economical production of composites and composite coatings.

  5. Prediction of extraction ability during metal complexing with organic phosphorus extractants

    Rozen, A.M.; Krupnov, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of thermodynamic parameters of complexing of neutral organic phosphorus compounds (phosphates, phosphine oxides and diphosphine dioxides with different substituents) with seven acceptors of different strength have been made. It is shown that in a wide range of the complexes strength change the entropy contribution of the Gibbs energy of complexing depends but slightly both on the ligand basicity and on the acceptor nature. It is ascertained that this reaction series is isoentropic for any Lewis acid. Practicability of the previously used correlation between extractability and complexing enthalpy has been proved. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. Valuable metals - recovery processes, current trends, and recycling strategies

    Froehlich, Peter; Lorenz, Tom; Martin, Gunther; Brett, Beate; Bertau, Martin [Institut fuer Technische Chemie, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Strasse 29, 09599, Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    This Review provides an overview of valuable metals, the supply of which has been classified as critical for Europe. Starting with a description of the current state of the art, novel approaches for their recovery from primary resources are presented as well as recycling processes. The focus lies on developments since 2005. Chemistry strategies which are used in metal recovery are summarized on the basis of the individual types of deposit and mineral. In addition, the economic importance as well as utilization of the metals is outlined. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Extraction of metal ions using chemically modified silica gel: a PIXE analysis.

    Jal, P K; Dutta, R K; Sudarshan, M; Saha, A; Bhattacharyya, S N; Chintalapudi, S N; K Mishra, B

    2001-08-30

    Organic ligand with carboxyhydrazide functional group was immobilised on the surface of silica gel and the metal binding capacity of the ligand-embedded silica was investigated. The functional group was covalently bonded to the silica matrix through a spacer of methylene groups by sequential reactions of silica gel with dibromobutane, malonic ester and hydrazine in different media. Surface area value of the modified silica was determined. The changes in surface area were correlated with the structural change of the silica surface due to chemical modifications. A mixture solution of metal ions [K(I),Cr(III),Co(II),Ni(II),Cu(II),Zn(II),Hg(II) and U(VI)] was treated with the ligand-embedded silica in 10(-3) M aqueous solution. The measurement of metal extraction capacity of the silica based ligand was done by multielemental analysis of the metal complexes thus formed by using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique.

  8. Cation exchange process for molten salt extraction residues

    Proctor, S.G.

    1975-01-01

    A new method, utilizing a cation exchange technique, has been developed for processing molten salt extraction (MSE) chloride salt residues. The developed ion exchange procedure has been used to separate americium and plutonium from gross quantities of magnesium, potassium, and sodium chloride that are present in the residues. The recovered plutonium and americium contained only 20 percent of the original amounts of magnesium, potassium, and sodium and were completely free of any detectable amounts of chloride impurity. (U.S.)

  9. Survey of electrochemical metal winning processes. Final report

    Vaaler, L.E.

    1979-03-01

    The subject program was undertaken to find electrometallurgical technology that could be developed into energy saving commercial metal winning processes. Metals whose current production processes consume significant energy (excepting copper and aluminum) are magnesium, zinc, lead, chromium, manganese, sodium, and titanium. The technology of these metals, with the exception of titanium, was reviewed. Growth of titanium demand has been too small to justify the installation of an electrolyte process that has been developed. This fact and the uncertainty of estimates of future demand dissuaded us from reviewing titanium technology. Opportunities for developing energy saving processes were found for magnesium, zinc, lead, and sodium. Costs for R and D and demonstration plants have been estimated. It appeared that electrolytic methods for chromium and manganese cannot compete energywise or economically with the pyrometallurgical methods of producing the ferroalloys, which are satisfactory for most uses of chromium and manganese.

  10. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  11. Partnew - New solvent extraction processes for minor actinides - final report

    Madic, C.; Testard, F.; Hudson, M.J.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Christiansen, B.; Ferrando, M.; Facchini, A.; Geist, A.; Modolo, G.; Gonzalez-Espartero, A.; Mendoza, J. de

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the European project PARTNEW were to define solvent extraction processes for the partitioning of the minor actinides, Am and Cm, from the aqueous high active raffinate or high active concentrate issuing the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuels by the PUREX process. Eleven laboratories participated to the research: 1/ CEA-DEN (Marcoule), 2/ CEA-DSM (Saclay), 3/ UREAD (U.K.), 4/ CTU (Sweden), 5/ ITU (Germany), 6/ ENEA (Italy), 7/ PoliMi (Italy), 8/ FZK-INE (Germany), 9/ FZJ-ISR (Germany), 10/ CIEMAT (Spain) and 11/ UAM (Spain). The research was organised into eight work packages (WP): Basic and applied DIAMEX studies, using diamide extractants for the co-extraction of actinides(III) (An(III)) and lanthanides(III) (Ln(III)) nitrates (WP1 and WP2), Basic and applied SANEX studies based on the use of polydentate N-ligands for the An(III)/Ln(III) separation (WP3 and WP4), Basic and applied SANEX studies based on the use of synergistic mixtures made of bis-(chloro-phenyl)-di-thio-phosphinic acid + neutral O-bearing ligand, (WP5 and WP6), Basic SANEX studies for the An(III)/Ln(III) separation, based on the use of new S-bearing ligands, Basic and applied studies for the Am(III)/Cm(III) separation. The work done in the fundamental and applied domains was very fruitful. Several processes have been successfully tested with genuine high active raffinates and concentrate. (authors)

  12. Crud in the solvent extraction process for spent fuel reprocessing

    Chen Jing

    2004-01-01

    The crud occurred in Purex process is caused by the degradations of extractant and solvent and the existence of insoluble solid particle in the nuclear fuel reprocessing. The crud seriously affects the operation of the extraction column. The present paper reviews the study status on the crud in the Purex process. It is generally accepted that in the Purex process, particularly in the first cycle, the crud occurrence is related to the capillary chemistry phenomena resulting from the deposits of Zr with TBP degradation products HDBP, H 2 MBP, H 3 PO 4 and the insoluble particle RuO 2 and Pd. The occurrence of deposits and the type of crud are tightly related to the molar ratio of HDBP and Zr, and the aqueous pH. In addition, the effect of degradation products from the diluent, such as kerosene, is an unnegligible factor to cause the crud. The crud can be discharged from the extraction equipment with Na 2 CO 3 or oxalic acid. In the study on simulating the crud, the effects of the deposits of Zr with TBP degradation products HDBP, H 2 MBP and H 2 PO 4 , and the insoluble particle RuO 2 and Pd should be considered at the same time. (authors)

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Extract, Transformation and Loading (ETL) Process

    Runtuwene, J. P. A.; Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Manoppo, C. T. M.; Salaki, R. J.

    2018-02-01

    The current growth of data and information occurs rapidly in varying amount and media. These types of development will eventually produce large number of data better known as the Big Data. Business Intelligence (BI) utilizes large number of data and information for analysis so that one can obtain important information. This type of information can be used to support decision-making process. In practice a process integrating existing data and information into data warehouse is needed. This data integration process is known as Extract, Transformation and Loading (ETL). In practice, many applications have been developed to carry out the ETL process, but selection which applications are more time, cost and power effective and efficient may become a challenge. Therefore, the objective of the study was to provide comparative analysis through comparison between the ETL process using Microsoft SQL Server Integration Service (SSIS) and one using Pentaho Data Integration (PDI).

  14. A kinetic approach to evaluate the association of acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals in aquatic sediments

    Poot, A.; Meerman, E.; Gillissen, F.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (¿SEM) method is widely used for evaluating potential bioavailability of heavy metals in soil and sediment. It is also criticized, because the requirement that AVS and SEM metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) are associated in the

  15. Changes in thermal plasticity of low grade coals during selective extraction of metals

    В. Ю. Бажин

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As the world oil market tends to be highly volatile, the coal becomes a primary source of organic raw materials for chemical and metallurgical industries. Fossil coals can accumulate high amounts of elements and mixtures quite often reaching commercially valuable concentrations. Reserves of scandium and other rare elements in coal deposits in Siberia alone are sufficient to satisfy the expected global demand for several decades. This study is intended to solve complex tasks associated with extraction of metal oxides using the developed enrichment method to ensure the required thermal plasticity determining the quality and properties of metallurgical coke.Laboratory experiments have been conducted for the enrichment of high-ash coals containing the highest concentrations of metals. Thermal plasticity values have been determined with the help of Gieseler plastometer . Using modern technologies and equipment individual deposits can be turned into profitable production of enriched coking coals with concurrent extraction of rare metals. It has been proven that the highest commercial potential lies with the extraction of scandium and some other rare metals in the form of oxides from the coal.

  16. LOADS TRANSMITED TO THE METALLIC TOWERS OF THE EXTRACTING INSTALLATIONS IN THE CASE OF THE APPLICATION OF THE SAFETY BRAKE

    Razvan Itu; Alexandru Ioan Pop

    2016-01-01

    In the paper there are presented certain aspects concerning the determination of loads transmitted through the bearings of the extracting pulleys of the structure of the metallic towers of the extracting installations In the case of the application of the safety brake The exemplification of the determination of the loads transmitted to the metallic tower in the case of the application of the emergency brake has been done by taking into study the extracting installation ,, Auxiliar...

  17. TBP determination in nitric acid solutions from solvent extraction process

    Kuada, T.A.; Carvalho, E.I. de; Araujo, I. da C.; Cohen, V.H.

    1988-07-01

    Heavy organic phases have been observed on some occasions during TBP extraction process. These products, described as red oils, were considered as the main cause for process failures, specially in evaporators and concentrators. In view of safety aspects it is necessary to control organic concentration in product and waste solutions. The proposed method involves the organic removal by chloroform as a first step, followed by purification onto a silica gel column. The results are given from analysing TBP and its degradation product (DBP) by gas chromatography. (author) [pt

  18. Sequential extraction for the speciation of some heavy metals in soils

    Zemberyova, M.; Zwaik, A.A.H.; Farkasovska, I.

    1998-01-01

    The five step sequential extraction for speciation of copper and nickel originally designed for sediments has been applied to soil samples. The extractant solutions were: 1 mol/l ammonium acetate, 1 mol/l hydroxylammonium chloride in 25% acetic acid (1:1), 0.1 mol/l hydrochlorid acid, 0.5 mol/l sodium hydroxide and 8 mol/l nitric acid. The residue was decomposed by HF and HNO 3 . Using this procedure the metal fraction bound to the organic matter can be distinguished. The concentrations of analytes were determined in the soil extracts by FAAS and ETAAS. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the sum of the contents of copper and nickel in soil extracts with the total certified values of CRMs of soils. The overall recovery values for nickel was 84-105% and for copper 105-114%. (author)

  19. Process control for sheet-metal stamping process modeling, controller design and shop-floor implementation

    Lim, Yongseob; Ulsoy, A Galip

    2014-01-01

    Process Control for Sheet-Metal Stamping presents a comprehensive and structured approach to the design and implementation of controllers for the sheet metal stamping process. The use of process control for sheet-metal stamping greatly reduces defects in deep-drawn parts and can also yield large material savings from reduced scrap. Sheet-metal forming is a complex process and most often characterized by partial differential equations that are numerically solved using finite-element techniques. In this book, twenty years of academic research are reviewed and the resulting technology transitioned to the industrial environment. The sheet-metal stamping process is modeled in a manner suitable for multiple-input multiple-output control system design, with commercially available sensors and actuators. These models are then used to design adaptive controllers and real-time controller implementation is discussed. Finally, experimental results from actual shopfloor deployment are presented along with ideas for further...

  20. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM Process

    Kwangho Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE and low density polyethylene (LDPE and polypropylene (PP resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  1. Liquid phase micro-extraction: Towards the green methodology for ultratrace metals determination in aquatic ecosystems

    López-López J. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are normally found, in natural waters, in very low concentrations. Some of them are essential for life in low level; however, in higher level they are toxic. Therefore, analyzing their bio-available fraction is of main interest. Standard methodology is based in the collection of a number of samples from a water body. Collected samples must be stored, pre-treated and then analyzed. Pre-treatment usually involves pre-concentrating the metal, with the corresponding risk of contamination or loss of analyte. This way, punctual information is obtained from every sampling campaign. As an alternative, passive sampling techniques allow the continuous and coupled sampling-pre-treatment for heavy metals analysis, giving a better approach in the characterization of the studied water body. Liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME is a green analytical alternative for liquid-liquid extraction that promotes a reduction of sample volume, solvent needed and waste generation. Using these systems, polypropylene hollow fibers (HF with pores in their walls can be used. A few micro-liters of organic solvent are supported in the pores. The sample is placed in the outer part of the fiber and a receiving phase is placed in its inner part, allowing continuous liquid extraction of the metal from the sample. Several fibers with different physical features have been employed to analyzed total concentration and bio-availability of some heavy metals (Ag, Ni, Cu in natural water samples. Thanks to fibers configuration, devices for passive sampling based in HF-LPME could be designed. Advantages of this methodology over existing ones are supported because the receiving phase is liquid. As a consequence, retained metals do not need to be eluted from the acceptor prior to instrumental analysis.

  2. Extraction of heavy metals from MSWI fly ash using hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solution.

    Weibel, Gisela; Eggenberger, Urs; Kulik, Dmitrii A; Hummel, Wolfgang; Schlumberger, Stefan; Klink, Waldemar; Fisch, Martin; Mäder, Urs K

    2018-03-17

    Fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration contains a large potential for recyclable metals such as Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd. The Swiss Waste Ordinance prescribes the treatment of fly ash and recovery of metals to be implemented by 2021. More than 60% of the fly ash in Switzerland is acid leached according to the FLUWA process, which provides the basis for metal recovery. The investigation and optimization of the FLUWA process is of increasing interest and an industrial solution for direct metal recovery within Switzerland is in development. With this work, a detailed laboratory study on different filter cakes from fly ash leaching using HCl 5% (represents the FLUWA process) and concentrated sodium chloride solution (300 g/L) is described. This two-step leaching of fly ash is an efficient combination for the mobilization of a high percentage of heavy metals from fly ash (Pb, Cd ≥ 90% and Cu, Zn 70-80%). The depletion of these metals is mainly due to a combination of redox reaction and metal-chloride-complex formation. The results indicate a way forward for an improved metal depletion and recovery from fly ash that has potential for application at industrial scale. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  4. Comparative study of resist stabilization techniques for metal etch processing

    Becker, Gerry; Ross, Matthew F.; Wong, Selmer S.; Minter, Jason P.; Marlowe, Trey; Livesay, William R.

    1999-06-01

    This study investigates resist stabilization techniques as they are applied to a metal etch application. The techniques that are compared are conventional deep-UV/thermal stabilization, or UV bake, and electron beam stabilization. The electron beam tool use din this study, an ElectronCure system from AlliedSignal Inc., ELectron Vision Group, utilizes a flood electron source and a non-thermal process. These stabilization techniques are compared with respect to a metal etch process. In this study, two types of resist are considered for stabilization and etch: a g/i-line resist, Shipley SPR-3012, and an advanced i-line, Shipley SPR 955- Cm. For each of these resist the effects of stabilization on resist features are evaluated by post-stabilization SEM analysis. Etch selectivity in all cases is evaluated by using a timed metal etch, and measuring resists remaining relative to total metal thickness etched. Etch selectivity is presented as a function of stabilization condition. Analyses of the effects of the type of stabilization on this method of selectivity measurement are also presented. SEM analysis was also performed on the features after a compete etch process, and is detailed as a function of stabilization condition. Post-etch cleaning is also an important factor impacted by pre-etch resist stabilization. Results of post- etch cleaning are presented for both stabilization methods. SEM inspection is also detailed for the metal features after resist removal processing.

  5. Chemical and plant extractability of metals and plant growth on soils amended with sludge

    Gaynor, J.D.; Halstead, R.L.

    1976-02-01

    The addition of sludge to a Fox sandy loam (sl), Granby sl and Rideau clay (c) soil increased soil pH, total C, NaHCO3 extractable P, cation exchange capacity and exchangeable Ca. Sludge application increased DTPA-extractable Cd 2 to 5 times, Pb 2 to 3 times, Cu 3 to 7 times and Zn 7 to 31 times. Metal extractability in Granby and Fox sl soils was not greatly changed after 11 mo incubation but extractable Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd were reduced in the clay soil following incubation. Cropping to lettuce reduced the quantity of metal extracted from Fox sl soil and to a lesser extent from Rideau c soil but not from Granby sl soil. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) yields were significantly reduced for the first crop grown on sludge + fertilizer-treated Rideau c and Granby sl soils and for all three harvests from similarly treated Fox s 1 soil compared to harvests from soils treated with fertilizer only. Yield reduction for the first crop was attributed to a salt effect, as subsequent yields on Rideau c and Granby sl soils were similar to harvests from fertilized treatments. Saturation extract conductivities for all sludge treatments were higher for incubated than for cropped soils. Generally Zn, Cu and Pb tissue concentrations in lettuce harvested from sludge + fertilizer-treated Fox and Granby sl soils were significantly increased but total uptake was only increased for Zn. Metal uptake and tissue concentrations for lettuce grown on similarly treated Rideau c soil were equal to or less than those found in lettuce harvested from the fertilizer-only treatment. To a lesser extent similar trends were observed with the tomato (Lycospersicon esculentum Mill.) crop. 27 references, 3 tables.

  6. Process development for elemental recovery from PGM tailings by thermochemical treatment: Preliminary major element extraction studies using ammonium sulphate as extracting agent.

    Mohamed, Sameera; van der Merwe, Elizabet M; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Doucet, Frédéric J

    2016-04-01

    Mine tailings can represent untapped secondary resources of non-ferrous, ferrous, precious, rare and trace metals. Continuous research is conducted to identify opportunities for the utilisation of these materials. This preliminary study investigated the possibility of extracting major elements from South African tailings associated with the mining of Platinum Group Metals (PGM) at the Two Rivers mine operations. These PGM tailings typically contain four major elements (11% Al2O3; 12% MgO; 22% Fe2O3; 34% Cr2O3), with lesser amounts of SiO2 (18%) and CaO (2%). Extraction was achieved via thermochemical treatment followed by aqueous dissolution, as an alternative to conventional hydrometallurgical processes. The thermochemical treatment step used ammonium sulphate, a widely available, low-cost, recyclable chemical agent. Quantification of the efficiency of the thermochemical process required the development and optimisation of the dissolution technique. Dissolution in water promoted the formation of secondary iron precipitates, which could be prevented by leaching thermochemically-treated tailings in 0.6M HNO3 solution. The best extraction efficiencies were achieved for aluminium (ca. 60%) and calcium (ca. 80%). 35% iron and 32% silicon were also extracted, alongside chromium (27%) and magnesium (25%). Thermochemical treatment using ammonium sulphate may therefore represent a promising technology for extracting valuable elements from PGM tailings, which could be subsequently converted to value-added products. However, it is not element-selective, and major elements were found to compete with the reagent to form water-soluble sulphate-metal species. Further development of this integrated process, which aims at achieving the full potential of utilisation of PGM tailings, is currently underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Solvent extraction of some metal ions by dithiocarbamate types of chemically modified lipophilic chitosan

    Inoue, K.; Nakagawa, H.; Naganawa, H.; Tachimori, S.

    2001-01-01

    Chitosan is a basic polysaccharide containing primary amino groups with high reactivity. we prepared O,O'-decanoyl chitosan and dithiocarbamate O,O'-decanoyl chitosan; the former was soluble in chloroform and toluene, while latter was soluble not only these diluents but also in some aliphatic diluents such as hexane and kerosene which are employed in commercial scale solvent extraction. Solvent extraction by dithiocarbamate O,O'-decanoyl chitosan in kerosene was tested for some base metal ions from sulfuric acid solution. The sequence of selectivity for these metal ions was found to be as follows: Cu(II) >> Ni(II) > Cd(II) ∼ Fe(III) > Co(II) ∼ Zn(II). Copper(II) was quantitatively extracted at pH > 1 and quantitatively stripped with 2 M sulfuric acid solution. Solvent extraction of silver(I) and gold(III) from hydrochloric acid as well as lanthanides and americium(III) from nitrate solution were also tested. Americium was selectively extracted over trivalent lanthanides, suggesting a high possibility for the final treatment of high level radioactive wastes. (authors)

  8. [Exposure to metal compounds in occupational galvanic processes].

    Surgiewicz, Jolanta; Domański, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    Occupational galvanic processes are provided in more than 600 small and medium enterprises in Poland. Workers who deal with galvanic coating are exposed to heavy metal compounds: tin, silver, copper and zinc. Some of them are carcinogenic, for example, hexavalent chromium compounds, nickel and cadmium compounds. Research covered several tens of workstations involved in chrome, nickel, zinc, tin, silver, copper and cadmium plating. Compounds of metals present in the air were determined: Cr, Ni, Cd, Sn, Ag--by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (ET-AAS) and Zn--by atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization (F-AAS). The biggest metal concentrations--of silver and copper--were found at workstations of copper, brass, cadmium, nickel and chrome plating, conducted at the same time. Significant concentrations of copper were found at workstations of maintenance bathing and neutralizing of sewage. The concentrations of metals did not exceed Polish MAC values. MAC values were not exceeded for carcinogenic chromium(VI), nickel or cadmium, either. In galvanic processes there was no hazard related to single metals or their compounds, even carcinogenic ones. Combined exposure indicators for metals at each workstation did not exceed 1, either. However, if there are even small quantities of carcinogenic agents, health results should always be taken into consideration.

  9. Separation of Process Wastewater with Extractive Heterogeneous-Azeotropic Distillation

    Tóth András József

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of vapour-liquid equilibria-based separation alternatives can be extraordinarily complicated for the treatment of process wastewaters containing heterogeneous-azeotropic. Despite dissimilar successfully tested methods for separation, there is possibility to get better distillation method by enabling the separation of more and more specific process wastewater. Extractive heterogeneous-azeotropic distillation (EHAD is a new advance in treatment of fine chemical wastewater showing special features to cope with the treatment of highly non-ideal mixtures. This method combines the worth of heterogeneous-azeotropic and extractive distillations in one apparatus without addition of any extra materials. The study of the separations of ternary component process wastewater from the fine chemical industry shows both in the modelled and experimental results that EHAD can be successfully applied. The measured and modelled compositions at extreme purities, that is, close to 0% or 100%, can be different because of the inaccuracies of the modelling. This highlights the paramount importance of the experiments if special extra-fine chemicals with almost no impurities, e.g. of pharmacopoeial quality are to be produced by special distillation technique. This study expands the application of EHAD technique, this new field is the separation of process wastewaters.

  10. Effects of extraction methods and factors on leaching of metals from recycled concrete aggregates.

    Bestgen, Janile O; Cetin, Bora; Tanyu, Burak F

    2016-07-01

    Leaching of metals (calcium (Ca), chromium (Cr), copper, (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn)) of recycled concrete aggregates (RCAs) were investigated with four different leachate extraction methods (batch water leach tests (WLTs), toxicity leaching procedure test (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure test (SPLP), and pH-dependent leach tests). WLTs were also used to perform a parametric study to evaluate factors including (i) effects of reaction time, (ii) atmosphere, (iii) liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, and (iv) particle size of RCA. The results from WLTs showed that reaction time and exposure to atmosphere had impact on leaching behavior of metals. An increase in L/S ratio decreased the effluent pH and all metal concentrations. Particle size of the RCA had impact on some metals but not all. Comparison of the leached concentrations of metals from select RCA samples with WLT method to leached concentrations from TCLP and SPLP methods revealed significant differences. For the same RCA samples, the highest metal concentrations were obtained with TCLP method, followed by WLT and SPLP methods. However, in all tests, the concentrations of all four (Cr, Cu, Fe, and Zn) metals were below the regulatory limits determined by EPA MCLs in all tests with few exceptions. pH-dependent batch water leach tests revealed that leaching pattern for Ca is more cationic whereas for other metals showed more amphoteric. The results obtained from the pH-dependent tests were evaluated with geochemical modeling (MINTEQA2) to estimate the governing leaching mechanisms for different metals. The results indicated that the releases of the elements were solubility-controlled except Cr.

  11. A solution-processed binary cathode interfacial layer facilitates electron extraction for inverted polymer solar cells.

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Liu, Chunyu; Guo, Jiaxin; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin

    2018-03-15

    The charge transfer and separation are significantly affected by the electron properties of the interface between the electron-donor layer and the carrier-transporting layer in polymer solar cells (PSCs). In this study, we investigate the electron extraction mechanism of PSCs with a low temperature solution-processed ZnO/PEI as electron transport layer. The incorporation of PEI layer can decrease the work function of ZnO and reduce interfacial barrier, which facilitates electron extraction and suppresses bimolecular recombination, leading to a significant performance enhancement. Furthermore, PEI layer can induce phase separation and passivite inorganic surface trap states as well as shift the interfacial energy offset between metal oxide and organic materials. This work offers a simple and effective way to improve the charge transporting property of organic photovoltaic devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilizing a sequential injection system furnished with an extraction microcolumn as a novel approach for executing sequential extractions of metal species in solid samples

    Chomchoei, R.; Hansen, Elo Harald; Shiowatana, J.

    2007-01-01

    This communication presents a novel approach to perform sequential extraction of elements in solid samples by using a sequential injection (SI) system incorporating a specially designed extraction microcolumn. Based on the operation of the syringe pump, different modes of extraction are potentially...... that the system entails many advantages such as being fully automated, and besides being characterised by rapidity, ease of operation and robustness, it is less prone to risks of contamination and personal errors as encountered in traditional batch systems. Moreover, improvement of the precision and accuracy...... of the chemical fractionation of metal in solids as compared with previous reports are obtained. The system ensures that extraction is performed at designated pH values. Variation of sample weight to column volume ratios do not affect the amounts of extractable metals, nor do extraction flow rates ranging from 50...

  13. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel forward osmosis process to effectively remove heavy metal ions

    Cui, Yue; Ge, Qingchun; Liu, Xiangyang; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel forward osmosis (FO) process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater was demonstrated for the first time. The proposed FO process consists of a thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane made from interfacial polymerization on a macrovoid-free polyimide support and a novel bulky hydroacid complex Na4[Co(C6H4O7)2]·r2H2O (Na-Co-CA) as the draw solute to minimize the reverse solute flux. The removal of six heavy metal solutions, i.e., Na2Cr2O7, Na2HAsO4, Pb(NO3)2, CdCl2, CuSO4, Hg(NO3)2, were successfully demonstrated. Water fluxes around 11L/m2/h (LMH) were harvested with heavy metals rejections of more than 99.5% when employing 1M Na-Co-CA as the draw solution to process 2000ppm(1 ppm=1 mg/L) heavy metal solutions at room temperature. This FO performance outperforms most nanofiltration (NF) processes. In addition, the high rejections were maintained at 99.5% when a more concentrated draw solution (1.5M) or feed solution (5000ppm) was utilized. Furthermore, rejections greater than 99.7% were still achieved with an enhanced water flux of 16.5LMH by operating the FO process at 60°C. The impressive heavy metal rejections and satisfactory water flux under various conditions suggest great potential of the newly developed FO system for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Novel forward osmosis process to effectively remove heavy metal ions

    Cui, Yue

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a novel forward osmosis (FO) process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater was demonstrated for the first time. The proposed FO process consists of a thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane made from interfacial polymerization on a macrovoid-free polyimide support and a novel bulky hydroacid complex Na4[Co(C6H4O7)2]·r2H2O (Na-Co-CA) as the draw solute to minimize the reverse solute flux. The removal of six heavy metal solutions, i.e., Na2Cr2O7, Na2HAsO4, Pb(NO3)2, CdCl2, CuSO4, Hg(NO3)2, were successfully demonstrated. Water fluxes around 11L/m2/h (LMH) were harvested with heavy metals rejections of more than 99.5% when employing 1M Na-Co-CA as the draw solution to process 2000ppm(1 ppm=1 mg/L) heavy metal solutions at room temperature. This FO performance outperforms most nanofiltration (NF) processes. In addition, the high rejections were maintained at 99.5% when a more concentrated draw solution (1.5M) or feed solution (5000ppm) was utilized. Furthermore, rejections greater than 99.7% were still achieved with an enhanced water flux of 16.5LMH by operating the FO process at 60°C. The impressive heavy metal rejections and satisfactory water flux under various conditions suggest great potential of the newly developed FO system for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO{sub 2} Extraction with Catecholamine Ligand

    Park, Jihye; Kim, Hakwon; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The role of fuel cladding and reactor vessels is to help prevent the leakage of radioactive materials, including the fission products. However, if these shielding materials are damaged by a severe disaster such as the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials could leak outside of a power plant site. Indeed, after the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials have been detected in air and water samples. The air and water pollution lead to soil pollution, which is particularly difficult to decontaminate, as soil pollution has several types that vary according to the characteristics of a pollutant or its area. The existing decontamination methods generate a secondary waste owing to use of chemical toxicity solvents. It is also disadvantageous due to the additional cost of handling them. Therefore, new effective decontamination methods that reduce the use of toxicity solvents are necessary. For example, using supercritical CO{sub 2} has been studied as a new decontamination method. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside of the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and a catecholamine compound. This study examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and catecholamine as the ligand. Based on these results, it is evident that when only the extraction agent was used, there was no extraction effect and that only when the ligand, co-ligand, and additive were used together was there an extraction effect. Following this, the optimal extraction-agent ratio was confirmed using varying amounts of extraction agents. The most effective extraction ratio of ligand to co-ligand was 1:2 in E-9 when 0.3 ml of H{sub 2}O were added.

  17. Evaluation of Heavy Metals Concentration and Sequential Extraction in Zahedan Compost

    Safoora Javan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Producing compost out of municipal solid wastes and organic materials is one of the main ways to recycle organic materials which plays an important role in waste management. Compost can also bring some toxic substances such as heavy metals into the soil and food chain and these substances have negative effects on the living things. Methods: This research is a cross-sectional descriptive study which was carried out during two seasons of spring and summer on Zahedan vermicompost factory. There were 100 samples in the research and the rate of mobility of heavy metals of lead, cadmium, and nickel was measured through five-step sequential extraction method. Then the hazard of the metals was assessed too. Results: The results show that the highest rate of mobility is related to chromium and then cadmium and lead. Moreover, the risk assessment of heavy metals estimates the average risk of all three metals for the living things in the environment. Conclusion: Heavy metals of lead and cadmium and nickel in Zahedan compost are less than the standard that is set for Iran. 

  18. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    Tao, Kai; Xu, Sen; Liu, Xiao-yan; Liang, Jiu-long; Qiu, Tao; Tan, Jia-nan; Che, Jian-hua; Wang, Zi-hua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3–6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  19. Electromembrane extraction of heavy metal cations followed by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection

    Kubáň, Pavel; Strieglerová, Lenka; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2011), s. 1025-1032 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA ČR GAP206/10/1219; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * electromembrane extraction * heavy metal cations Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  20. Extraction of metals from liquid effluent using modified inorganic ion exchangers

    Hudson, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Inorganic ion exchangers such as goethite, titanium (IV) oxide; silica and zeolites have been modified to examine the extraction of ruthenium; technetium and cobalt from liquid effluent. In addition, tin (IV) hydrogenphosphate and antimony hydrogenphosphate have been also examined in the modified and unmodified forms. It has been shown that some of the above reagents are able to remove the required metal ions from aqueous solution at the trace and mg L -1 levels. (author)

  1. Polyimide and Metals MEMS Multi-User Processes

    Arevalo, Arpys

    2016-11-01

    The development of a polyimide and metals multi-user surface micro-machining process for Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) is presented. The process was designed to be as general as possible, and designed to be capable to fabricate different designs on a single silicon wafer. The process was not optimized with the purpose of fabricating any one specific device but can be tweaked to satisfy individual needs depending on the application. The fabrication process uses Polyimide as the structural material and three separated metallization layers that can be interconnected depending on the desired application. The technology allows the development of out-of-plane compliant mechanisms, which can be combined with six variations of different physical principles for actuation and sensing on a single processed silicon wafer. These variations are: electrostatic motion, thermal bimorph actuation, capacitive sensing, magnetic sensing, thermocouple-based sensing and radio frequency transmission and reception.

  2. Nature differences of humic acids fractions induced by extracted sequence as explanatory factors for binding characteristics of heavy metals.

    Shi, Wenjing; Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; En, He; Gao, Manshu; Zhao, Boyi; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Haijun; Liu, Hualin; Zhang, Yu

    2018-06-15

    The composition and structure of Humic acid (HA) is so heterogeneous that it brings significant barriers to investigate the interaction between HA and heavy metal ions. The isolation of HA with relatively homogeneity is a key to reveal the binding mechanisms between HA and heavy metals. In this work, ten HA fractions (HAs) were obtained by sequential alkali extraction procedure and nature differences of the extracted HAs were considered as explanatory factors for binding characteristics of Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ . The results indicate that more large molecular weight (MW) HA subunits, less carboxyl and phenolic group contents, weaker aromaticity and polarity were measured with increasing extractions, inducing weaker binding capacity of HAs. Ligand binding and bi-Langmuir models indicated that the sorption capacity and binding affinity of earlier extracted HAs were higher than the latter ones. The peak area changes at 3427, 1599, and 619 cm -1 pre- and post-adsorption in FTIR spectra suggested carboxyl, phenolic and nitrogen-containing groups were involved in the adsorption process. At the same time, the peak area difference between HAs and HAs-metal (ΔS) of phenolic groups were 8.22-20.50, 6.81-21.11 and 10.66-19.80% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively, ΔS of carboxyl groups 6.64-17.03, 8.96-16.82 and 9.45-17.85% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively, ΔS of nitrogen-containing groups 0.33-0.48, 0.20-1.38 and 0.31-0.59% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively. ΔS of phenolic and carboxyl groups were larger than those of nitrogen-containing groups, implying that these two groups were the predominant binding sites suppliers for metal ions, which were also supported by the results of correlation analysis. This work is helpful to insight the environmental impacts of natural organic matter and the fate of heavy metals in natural environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proposal of new convenient extractant for assessing phytoavailability of heavy metals in contaminated sandy soil.

    Korzeniowska, Jolanta; Stanislawska-Glubiak, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the usefulness of 1 M HCl with aqua regia, EDTA, and CaCl 2 for the extraction of phytoavailable forms of Cu, Ni, and Zn on coarse-textured soils contaminated with these metals. Two microplot experiments were used for the studies. Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), maize (Zea mays), willow (Salix viminalis), spartina (Spartina pectinata), and miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) were used as test plants. They were grown on soil artificially spiked with Cu, Ni, and Zn. The experimental design included a control and three increasing doses of metals. Microplots (1 m 2  × 1 m deep) were filled with sandy soil (clay-6%, pH 5.5, Corg-0.8%). Metals in the form of sulfates were dissolved in water and applied to the plot using a hand liquid sprayer. During the harvest, samples were collected from aboveground parts, roots, and the soil and then tested for their Cu, Zn, and Ni contents. The metal content of the soil was determined using four tested extractants. It was found that Cu and Ni were accumulated in roots in bigger amounts than Zn. The usefulness of the extractants was evaluated based on the correlation between the content of metals in the soil and the plant (n = 32). This study demonstrated that 1 M HCl, aqua regia, and EDTA were more efficient or equally useful for the assessment of the phytoavailability of Cu, Ni, and Zn as CaCl 2 . Due to the ease of performing determinations and their low cost, 1 M HCl can be recommended to assess the excess of Cu, Ni, and Zn in the coarse-textured soils.

  4. An image-processing methodology for extracting bloodstain pattern features.

    Arthur, Ravishka M; Humburg, Philomena J; Hoogenboom, Jerry; Baiker, Martin; Taylor, Michael C; de Bruin, Karla G

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing trend in forensic science to develop methods to make forensic pattern comparison tasks more objective. This has generally involved the application of suitable image-processing methods to provide numerical data for identification or comparison. This paper outlines a unique image-processing methodology that can be utilised by analysts to generate reliable pattern data that will assist them in forming objective conclusions about a pattern. A range of features were defined and extracted from a laboratory-generated impact spatter pattern. These features were based in part on bloodstain properties commonly used in the analysis of spatter bloodstain patterns. The values of these features were consistent with properties reported qualitatively for such patterns. The image-processing method developed shows considerable promise as a way to establish measurable discriminating pattern criteria that are lacking in current bloodstain pattern taxonomies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactive liquid/liquid extraction of heavy metals from landfill seepage waters. Its characterisation and application

    Woller, N.

    1994-06-01

    This study demonstrates the applicability of liquid-liquid extraction by means of the commercial complexers LIX26 R and LIX84 R to heavy metal removal from waste waters. The composition of this oil-soluble complex is MeR 2 , where Me denotes Hg 2+ , Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Ni 2+ , and R denotes LIX84 R . This composition makes the complex electrically neutral, and all polar groups are located inside the molecule. The extraction efficiency of the complexer LIX84 R for the various metal ions is evident in the succession Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ >> Zn 2+ > Hg 2+ > Cd 2+ . These heavy metal ions are even readily extractable at chloride concentrations of up to 1 mol/l. As the structure of the complexer is that of an oil-soluble surfactant with complexing properties, it accumulates at the phase boundary between oil and water. Measurement of interfacial tension in various solvent systems showed that the polar solvent chloroform permits only a weak accumulation of the complexer (400 nmol/m 2 ), whereas the unpolar solvent kerosine permits greater accumulation specifically on the water side of the phase boundary (1958 nmol/m 2 ). Organic solvents solvate the complexer so well, that it is even removed from the air side of the phase boundary. The differing accumulation of the complexer at the water/oil phase boundary explains the differing increase of phase separation time for polar and unpolar solvents. (orig.) [de

  6. New applications and novel processing of refractory metal alloys

    Briant, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Refractory metals have often been limited in their application because of their propensity to oxidize and to undergo a loos of yield strength at elevated temperatures. However, recent developments in both processing and alloy composition have opened the possibility that these materials might be used in structural applications that were not considered possible in the past. At the same time, the use of refractory metals in the electronics industry is growing, particularly with the use of tantalum as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. Finally, the application of grain boundary engineering to the problem of intergranular fracture in these materials may allow processes to be developed that will produce alloys with a greater resistance to fracture. (author)

  7. Microfabrication process for patterning metallic lithium encapsulated electrodes

    Oukassi, Sami; Dunoyer, Nicolas; Salot, Raphael; Martin, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This work presents recent achievements concerning thin film encapsulation of metallic lithium negative electrode. In the context of this study, the encapsulation stack includes polymer and dielectric layers combined in such way to optimize barrier performances of the whole structure towards oxygen and water vapor permeation. The first part of this work is dedicated to the description of the barrier stack architecture and properties. A second part presents the application of a microfabrication process to the metallic lithium negative electrode and barrier stack so as to have very small features (100 μm x 100 μm patterns). The microfabrication process includes several steps of photolithography and etching (dry and wet) blocks, which allows us to reach the target critical dimensions. These results show a method of patterning functional metallic lithium. It demonstrates the feasibility of energy sources miniaturization which is an important issue in the field of autonomous and wireless sensor networks.

  8. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qing; Li, Ming-Ming; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of heavy metals by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was investigated. Chemical analysis showed that different EPS compositions had different capacities for the adsorption of heavy metals which was investigated using Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Batch adsorption tests indicated that EPS had a higher combined ability with Zn(2+) than Cu(2+). This was confirmed and explained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy analysis. FTIR analysis showed that both polysaccharides and protein combined with Zn(2+) while only protein combined with Cu(2+). EEM spectra further revealed that tryptophan-like substances were the main compositions reacted with the heavy metals. Moreover, Zn(2+) had a higher fluorescence quenching ability than Cu(2+). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hemimorphite Ores: A Review of Processing Technologies for Zinc Extraction

    Chen, Ailiang; Li, Mengchun; Qian, Zhen; Ma, Yutian; Che, Jianyong; Ma, Yalin

    2016-10-01

    With the gradual depletion of zinc sulfide ores, exploration of zinc oxide ores is becoming more and more important. Hemimorphite is a major zinc oxide ore, attracting much attention in the field of zinc metallurgy although it is not the major zinc mineral. This paper presents a critical review of the treatment for extraction of zinc with emphasis on flotation, pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods based on the properties of hemimorphite. The three-dimensional framework structure of hemimorphite with complex linkage of its structural units lead to difficult desilicification before extracting zinc in the many metallurgical technologies. It is found that the flotation method is generally effective in enriching zinc minerals from hemimorphite ores into a high-grade concentrate for recovery of zinc. Pure zinc can be produced from hemimorphite or/and willemite with a reducing reagent, like methane or carbon. Leaching reagents, such as acid and alkali, can break the complex structure of hemimorphite to release zinc in the leached solution without generation of silica gel in the hydrometallurgical process. For optimal zinc extraction, combing flotation with pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical methods may be required.

  10. A Mining Algorithm for Extracting Decision Process Data Models

    Cristina-Claudia DOLEAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces an algorithm that mines logs of user interaction with simulation software. It outputs a model that explicitly shows the data perspective of the decision process, namely the Decision Data Model (DDM. In the first part of the paper we focus on how the DDM is extracted by our mining algorithm. We introduce it as pseudo-code and, then, provide explanations and examples of how it actually works. In the second part of the paper, we use a series of small case studies to prove the robustness of the mining algorithm and how it deals with the most common patterns we found in real logs.

  11. Contour extraction of echocardiographic images based on pre-processing

    Hussein, Zinah Rajab; Rahmat, Rahmita Wirza; Abdullah, Lili Nurliyana [Department of Multimedia, Faculty of Computer Science and Information Technology, Department of Computer and Communication Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering University Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zamrin, D M [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Malaysia, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saripan, M Iqbal

    2011-02-15

    In this work we present a technique to extract the heart contours from noisy echocardiograph images. Our technique is based on improving the image before applying contours detection to reduce heavy noise and get better image quality. To perform that, we combine many pre-processing techniques (filtering, morphological operations, and contrast adjustment) to avoid unclear edges and enhance low contrast of echocardiograph images, after implementing these techniques we can get legible detection for heart boundaries and valves movement by traditional edge detection methods.

  12. Contour extraction of echocardiographic images based on pre-processing

    Hussein, Zinah Rajab; Rahmat, Rahmita Wirza; Abdullah, Lili Nurliyana; Zamrin, D M; Saripan, M Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a technique to extract the heart contours from noisy echocardiograph images. Our technique is based on improving the image before applying contours detection to reduce heavy noise and get better image quality. To perform that, we combine many pre-processing techniques (filtering, morphological operations, and contrast adjustment) to avoid unclear edges and enhance low contrast of echocardiograph images, after implementing these techniques we can get legible detection for heart boundaries and valves movement by traditional edge detection methods.

  13. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  14. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Palomares, R.I.; Dayman, K.J.; Landsberger, S.; Biegalski, S.R.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Casella, A.J.; Brady Raap, M.C.; Schwantes, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO 2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO 2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. - Highlights: • The noble metal phase was chemically extracted from spent nuclear fuel and analyzed non-destructively. • Noble metal phase nuclides and long-lived iodine were identified and quantified using neutron activation analysis. • Activation to shorter-lived radionuclides allowed rapid analysis of long-lived fission products in spent fuel using gamma spectrometry

  15. Depuration Study of Heavy Metal Lead (Pb) and Copper (Cu) in Green Mussels Perna viridis through Continues-discontinues and Acid Extraction Methods

    Budiawan; Bakri, Ridla; Cahaya Dani, Intan; Handayani, Sri; Ade Kurnia Putri, Rizki; Tamala, Riska

    2018-01-01

    Green mussel or Perna viridis is filter feeder, which is very susceptible to heavy metals. It takes an effort to release heavy metal contents on the green shell, one of method that can be used to release heavy metal from green shell is depuration proccess. In this research, the depuration process was conducted by continues method of depuration, discontinues method by using various kind of water and acid extraction. The optimum time of continues depuration method is 1.5 hours, with circulation speed 250 L/h and result of Pb metal content decreased is equal to 30.048% and 29.748% for Cu. In the discontinues method, the optimum result was reached at 100oC by using PAM water as the media at 3 h immersion period with decrease of Pb metal content 35.001% and Cu metal content 39.015%. In the acid extraction method, the optimum condition was achieved by 11% acetic acid solvent with decreasing of Pb and Cu levels are 88.224% and 76.298%. For the determination of protein content, the decrease of protein content obtained by treatment with 11% acetic acid extract showed decrease of protein content 36.656% with Kjeldahl method.

  16. Application and improvement of reciprocating-sieve plate extraction column in natural uranium extraction and purification process

    Wang Xuejun; Li Linyan; Liu Jing; Liu Xin; Yang Lifeng; Xiao Shaohua; Liu Hao

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocating-sieve plate extraction column is commonly used in the extraction process. Optimization and application were conducted successfully via production practice in some chemical and pharmaceutical plants, and good results are obtained while it is applied in the natural uranium extraction and purification process. The key component of reciprocating-sieve plate extraction column is gear-drive equipment in which drive motor serves as its core. Hence, it is important to select appropriate mode of speed regulation. In this paper, the principle and performance of several mode of speed regulation are compared. Both electromagnetic slip and frequency speed-regulation can be applied in general industrial process, but frequency speed-regulation with low energy cost can be used in wider operating range. The application of frequency speed-regulation mode used in reciprocating-sieve plate extraction column will increase the convenience and stability of natural uranium extraction and purification process. (authors)

  17. Application of laser assisted cold spraying process for metal deposition

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser assisted cold spraying (LACS) process is a hybrid technique that uses laser and cold spray to deposit solid powders on metal substrates. For bonding to occur, the particle velocities must be supersonic which are achieved by entraining...

  18. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Congdon, James W [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  19. Trace Metal Levels in Raw and Heat Processed Nigerian Staple ...

    The levels of some trace metals (Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd) were quantitatively determined in raw and heat processed staple food cultivars (yam, cassava, cocoyam and maize) from oil producing areas of part of the Niger Delta and compared with a non-oil producing area of Ebonyi State as control. The survey was conducted to ...

  20. Coagulation / flocculation process in the removal of trace metals ...

    Attempts were made in this study to examine the effectiveness of polymer addition to coagulation process during treatment of a beverage industrial wastewater to remove some of its trace metals content such as lead, cadmium, total iron, total chromium, nickel and zinc. Experiments were conducted using the standard Jar ...

  1. Gas discharge processes in the standard and metal channel PMTs

    Morozov, V.A.; Morozova, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the potential difference at the focusing chamber electrodes of the XP2020, FEU-85, FEU-87, and FEU-93 photomultipliers on the intensity of afterpulses resulting from gas discharge processes is investigated. The time distribution of the afterpulses in the metal channel PMTs - H6780 and R7600U-200 - is studied as well

  2. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Unknown

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of chloride induced .... decrease of pH value by MeOx, a synergism of acidic and chloride ... inhibitors and their influence on the physical properties of. Portland ...

  3. Extraction of pertechnetate anion as a ligand in metal complexes with tributylphosphate

    Macasek, F.; Kadrabova, J.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of the pertechnetate anion has been investigated in the systems tributylphosphate (TBP)-solvent (carbon tetrachloride, n-heptane, chloroform) - metal salt (uranyl nitrate and chloride, thorium nitrate) -ammonium salt. In the absence of a metal, the solvates HTcO 4 xiTBP (i=4) are extracted, while in the presence of uranium and thorium, the distribution of technetium corresponds, to the formation of the mixed complexes: UO 2 (NO 3 )(TcO 4 )x2TBP, UO 2 Cl(TcO 4 )x2TBP and Th(NO 3 ) 3 (TcO 4 )x2TBP. The effective constants of the reactions H + + TcO 4 - + i(TBP)sub(org) reversible (HTcO 4 xiTBP)sub(org), and (MLsub(n)x2TBP)sub(org) + TcO 4 - reversible (MLsub(n-1)TcO 4 x2TBPsub(org) + L were established in the above systems. The extraction of pertechnetate ion is more effective when it is coordinated to a cation solvated by TBP than the extraction in the form of pertechnetate acid solvated by TBP. (author)

  4. Preliminary study of extraction of heavy metals in sediments under pH-controlled conditions

    Kao, M.

    2012-12-01

    The arsenic ingestion not only increases the risk of developing cancer of the skin, internal organs and lungs but also causes a peripheral vascular gangrene disease known as black-foot disease. It is crucial to determine the arsenic source for managing groundwater resources properly. The study area, Tsengwen Creek watershed, is in the middle of Chianan Plain, which has been identified with problems of high arsenic content in groundwater. According to the results of BCR extraction procedure conducting on core sediments, it is interesting that arsenic content extracted by deionized water is significantly higher than that extracted with the first step of BCR, which is 0.11 mol/L acetic acid. It is believed that deionized water can only extract metals adsorbing on mineral surface without strong chemical bonding and acetic acid can extract those in the forms both of adsorption and carbonate. Even though arsenic is scarcely associated with carbonates, the deionized water can obviously extract much more arsenic than acid solution. Therefore, desorption of arsenic is possible to be controlled by a strong pH-dependent reaction. For the preliminary analysis, a laboratory experiment was performed to evaluated desorption of metals with pH control in this study. The solutions with different values of pH are simply adjusted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Ten sediment samples were collected from aquifers in Tsengwen Creek watershed. To simulate an isolated system like groundwater in aquifer, these sediments were extracted with solutions of pH=7, 8, 9 and 10 in a container purged by nitrogen gas. The results demonstrate that arsenic does show significant enrichment in solution of pH=10 and vanadium shares the similar property with arsenic. On the contrary, the other selected metals of cadmium, copper, nickel and cobalt have no similar enrichment in high-pH extraction solution; especially, nickel and cobalt are highly enriched in deionized water. These are possibly caused by the

  5. Impact of heavy metals on the oil products biodegradation process.

    Zukauskaite, Audrone; Jakubauskaite, Viktorija; Belous, Olga; Ambrazaitiene, Dalia; Stasiskiene, Zaneta

    2008-12-01

    Oil products continue to be used as a principal source of energy. Wide-scale production, transport, global use and disposal of petroleum have made them major contaminants in prevalence and quantity in the environment. In accidental spills, actions are taken to remove or remediate or recover the contaminants immediately, especially if they occur in environmentally sensitive areas, for example, in coastal zones. Traditional methods to cope with oil spills are confined to physical containment. Biological methods can have an advantage over the physical-chemical treatment regimes in removing spills in situ as they offer biodegradation of oil fractions by the micro-organisms. Recently, biological methods have been known to play a significant role in bioremediation of oil-polluted coastal areas. Such systems are likely to be of significance in the effective management of sensitive coastal ecosystems chronically subjected to oil spillage. For this reason the aim of this paper is to present an impact of Mn, Cu, Co and Mo quantities on oil biodegradation effectiveness in coastal soil and to determine the relationship between metal concentrations and degradation of two oil products (black oil and diesel fuel). Soil was collected in the Baltic Sea coastal zone oil products degradation area (Klaipeda, Lithuania). The experiment consisted of two parts: study on the influence of micro-elements on the oil product biodegradation process; and analysis of the influence of metal concentration on the number of HDMs. The analysis performed and results obtained address the following areas: impact of metal on a population of hydrocarbon degrading micro-organisms, impact of metals on residual concentrations of oil products, influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, inter-relation of metal concentrations with degradation rates. Statistical analysis was made using ;Statgraphics plus' software. The influence of metals on the growth of micro-organisms, the biodegradation process

  6. Process Modeling and Validation for Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Nycz, Andrzej [ORNL; Noakes, Mark W. [ORNL; Chin, Charlie [Dassault Systemes; Oancea, Victor [Dassault Systemes

    2017-05-01

    Metal Big Area Additive Manufacturing (mBAAM) is a new additive manufacturing (AM) technology based on the metal arc welding. A continuously fed metal wire is melted by an electric arc that forms between the wire and the substrate, and deposited in the form of a bead of molten metal along the predetermined path. Objects are manufactured one layer at a time starting from the base plate. The final properties of the manufactured object are dependent on its geometry and the metal deposition path, in addition to depending on the basic welding process parameters. Computational modeling can be used to accelerate the development of the mBAAM technology as well as a design and optimization tool for the actual manufacturing process. We have developed a finite element method simulation framework for mBAAM using the new features of software ABAQUS. The computational simulation of material deposition with heat transfer is performed first, followed by the structural analysis based on the temperature history for predicting the final deformation and stress state. In this formulation, we assume that two physics phenomena are coupled in only one direction, i.e. the temperatures are driving the deformation and internal stresses, but their feedback on the temperatures is negligible. The experiment instrumentation (measurement types, sensor types, sensor locations, sensor placements, measurement intervals) and the measurements are presented. The temperatures and distortions from the simulations show good correlation with experimental measurements. Ongoing modeling work is also briefly discussed.

  7. The obtained of concentrates containing precious metals for pyrometallurgical processing

    B. Oleksiak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the presented study the flotation process has been proposed as a method of enrichment of silver-bearing jewellery waste. This method, traditionally used for the enrichment of non-ferrous metal ores, is based on differences in wettability between individual minerals. Flotation concentrate, enriched with Ag, was subjected to further processing by the pyrometallurgical method in order to produce silver from these wastes.

  8. The obtained of concentrates containing precious metals for pyrometallurgical processing

    Oleksiak, B.; Siwiec, G.; Blacha-Grzechnik, A.; Wieczorek, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the presented study the flotation process has been proposed as a method of enrichment of silver-bearing jewellery waste. This method, traditionally used for the enrichment of non-ferrous metal ores, is based on differences in wettability between individual minerals. Flotation concentrate, enriched with Ag, was subjected to further processing by the pyrometallurgical method in order to produce silver from these wastes.

  9. EXTRACT

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/......., organism, tissue and disease terms. The evaluators in the BioCreative V Interactive Annotation Task found the system to be intuitive, useful, well documented and sufficiently accurate to be helpful in spotting relevant text passages and extracting organism and environment terms. Comparison of fully manual...

  10. Synthesis and processing of composites by reactive metal penetration

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Achieving better performance in commercial products and processes often is dependent on availability of new and improved materials. Ceramic-metal composites have advantages over more conventional materials because of their high stiffness-to-weight ratios, good fracture toughness, and because their electrical and thermal properties can be varied through control of their compositions and microstructures. However, ceramic composites will be more widely used only when their costs are competitive with other materials and when designers have more confidence in their reliability. Over the past four years reactive metal penetration has been shown to be a promising technique for making ceramic and metal-matrix composites to near-net-shape with control of both composition and microstructure. It appears that, with sufficient development, reactive metal penetration could be an economical process for manufacturing many of the advanced ceramic composites that are needed for light-weight structural and wear applications for transportation and energy conversion devices. Near-net-shape fabrication of parts is a significant advantage because costly and energy intensive grinding and machining operations are substantially reduced, and the waste generated from such finishing operations is minimized. The most promising compositions to date consist of Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; thus, these composites should be of particular interest to the aluminum industry. The goals of this ceramic-metal composite research and development program are: (1) to identify compositions favorable for making composites by reactive metal penetration; (2) to understand the mechanism(s) by which these composites are formed; (3) to control and optimize the process so that composites and composite coatings can be made economically; and (4) to apply R&D results to problems of interest to the aluminum industry.

  11. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  12. Enhancement in extraction rates by addition of organic acids to aqueous phase in solvent extraction of rare earth metals in presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Azis, A.; Fujita, Mamoru; Teramoto, Masaaki.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the selectivity of rare earth metals by solvent extraction is increased by the addition of a chelating agent such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in the aqueous phase. One of the disadvantages of this method is the decrease in extraction rates due to complexation in the aqueous phase. In this paper, further addition of organic acids to the aqueous phase was examined for the purpose of enhancing the extraction rates in solvent extraction with DTPA. The addition of several kind of organic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid, lactic acid and citric acid was investigated for a Er/Y separation system. A remarkable enhancement in extraction rates was observed with a slight decrease in the selectivity by the addition of citric acid or lactic acid. Extraction rates in the presence of both DTPA and citric acid increased with the increase in citric acid concentration and with the increase in proton concentration. A 150 times enhancement in extraction rates was found in the low proton concentration condition. In order to analyze the extraction rates and selectivities obtained, mass transfer equations were presented by considering both the dissociation reaction of rare earth metal-DTPA complexes and the complex formation between rare earth metal and organic acid in the aqueous phase. The experimental data were analyzed by these equations. (author)

  13. Nuclear processes in deuterium/natural hydrogen-metal systems

    Zelensky, V.F.

    2013-01-01

    The survey presents the analysis of the phenomena taking place in deuterium - metal and natural hydrogen - metal systems under cold fusion experimental conditions. The cold fusion experiments have shown that the generation of heat and helium in the deuterium-metal system without emission of energetic gamma-quanta is the result of occurrence of a chain of chemical, physical and nuclear processes observed in the system, culminating in both the fusion of deuterium nuclei and the formation of a virtual, electron-modified excited 4He nucleus. The excitation energy of the helium nucleus is transferred to the matrix through emission of conversion electrons, and that, under appropriate conditions, provides a persistent synthesis of deuterium. The processes occurring in the deuterium/natural hydrogen - metal systems have come to be known as chemonuclear DD- and HD-fusion. The mechanism of stimulation of weak interaction reactions under chemonuclear deuterium fusion conditions by means of strong interaction reactions has been proposed. The results of numerous experiments discussed in the survey bear witness to the validity of chemonuclear fusion. From the facts discussed it is concluded that the chemonuclear deuterium fusion scenario as presented in this paper may serve as a basis for expansion of deeper research and development of this ecologically clean energy source. It is shown that the natural hydrogen-based system, containing 0.015% of deuterium, also has good prospects as an energy source. The chemonuclear fusion processes do not require going beyond the scope of traditional physics for their explanation

  14. Bilayer lift-off process for aluminum metallization

    Wilson, Thomas E.; Korolev, Konstantin A.; Crow, Nathaniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently published reports in the literature for bilayer lift-off processes have described recipes for the patterning of metals that have recommended metal-ion-free developers, which do etch aluminum. We report the first measurement of the dissolution rate of a commercial lift-off resist (LOR) in a sodium-based buffered commercial developer that does not etch aluminum. We describe a reliable lift-off recipe that is safe for multiple process steps in patterning thin (recipe consists of an acid cleaning of the substrate, the bilayer (positive photoresist/LOR) deposition and development, the sputtering of the aluminum film along with a palladium capping layer and finally, the lift-off of the metal film by immersion in the LOR solvent. The insertion into the recipe of postexposure and sequential develop-bake-develop process steps are necessary for an acceptable undercut. Our recipe also eliminates any need for accompanying sonication during lift-off that could lead to delamination of the metal pattern from the substrate. Fine patterns were achieved for both 100-nm-thick granular aluminum/palladium bilayer bolometers and 500-nm-thick aluminum gratings with 6-μm lines and 4-μm spaces.

  15. Spectral BRDF measurements of metallic samples for laser processing applications

    Vitali, L; Fustinoni, D; Gramazio, P; Niro, A

    2015-01-01

    The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of metals plays an important role in industrial processing involving laser-surface interaction. In particular, in laser metal machining, absorbance is strongly dependent on the radiation incidence angle as well as on finishing and contamination grade of the surface, and in turn it can considerably affect processing results. Very recently, laser radiation is also used to structure metallic surfaces, in order to produce many particular optical effects, ranging from a high level polishing to angular color shifting. Of course, full knowledge of the spectral BRDF of these structured layers makes it possible to infer reflectance or color for any irradiation and viewing angles. In this paper, we present Vis-NIR spectral BRDF measurements of laser-polished metallic, opaque, flat samples commonly employed in such applications. The resulting optical properties seem to be dependent on the atmospheric composition during the polishing process in addition to the roughness. The measurements are carried out with a Perkin Elmer Lambda 950 double-beam spectrophotometer, equipped with the Absolute Reflectance/Transmittance Analyzer (ARTA) motorized goniometer. (paper)

  16. Recovery of palladium, cesium, and selenium from heavy metal alkali borosilicate glass by combination of heat treatment and leaching processes

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • A separation technique of both noble and less noble metal from glass is studied. • Via reductive heat treatment, 80% of palladium is extracted in liquid bismuth. • Sodium–potassium-rich materials with cesium and selenium are phase separated. • From the materials, over 80% of cesium and selenium are extracted in water. - Abstract: Reductive heat-treatment and leaching process were applied to a simulated lead or bismuth soda-potash-borosilicate glass with palladium, cesium, and selenium to separate these elements. In the reductive heat treatment, palladium is extracted in liquid heavy metal phase generated by the reduction of the heavy metal oxides, whereas cesium and selenium are concentrated in phase separated Na–K-rich materials on the glass surface. From the materials, cesium and selenium can be extracted in water, and the selenium extraction was higher in the treatment of the bismuth containing glass. The chemical forms of palladium in the glass affected the extraction efficiencies of cesium and selenium. Among the examined conditions, in the bismuth glass treatment, the cesium and selenium extraction efficiencies in water were over 80%, and that of palladium in liquid bismuth was over 80%.

  17. Review of friction modeling in metal forming processes

    Nielsen, C.V.; Bay, N.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several...... research groups have studied and modeled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most...... conditions, normal pressure, sliding length and speed, temperature changes, friction on the flattened plateaus and deformation of the underlying material. The review illustrates the development in the understanding of asperity flattening and the methods of analysis....

  18. Flameless atomic absorption determination of noble metals after extraction by mixture of di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid and n-octylaniline

    Yukhin, Yu.M.; Udalova, T.A.; Tsimbalist, V.G.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Geologii i Geofiziki)

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of using the mixture of di-2-ethylhexyl dithiophosphoric acid (D2EHDTPA) and p-octylaniline (OA) (extractants of acid and basic character) for extraction atomic absorption determination of noble metals is studied. The mixture of D2EHDTPA with OA is shown to extract noble metals from hydrochloric acid solutions with distribution factors > 10 3 . An extraction atomic absorption method for determination of noble metals in copperbearing materials is suggested. The minimum determined contents of noble metals at the initial sample equal to 100 for gold, silver, platinum, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium make up (g/t) 0.0005, 0.0001, 0.015, 0.005, 0.002 and 0.015 respectively. Relative standard deviation constitutes Ssub(r)<0.2

  19. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be

  20. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process

    Senda, Yasuhide; Mori, Yukihide

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the plant concept of metal fuel fabrication system (38tHM/y) using casting process in electrolytic recycle, which based on recent studies of its equipment design and quality control system. And we estimate the cost of its construction and operation, including costs of maintenance, consumed hardware and management of waste. The content of this work is as follows. (1) Designing of fuel fabrication equipment: We make material flow diagrams of the fuel fabrication plant and rough designs of the injection casting furnace, demolder and inspection equipment. (2) Designing of resolution system of liquid waste, which comes from analytical process facility. Increased analytical items, we rearrange analytical process facility, estimate its chemicals and amount of waste. (3) Arrangement of equipments: We made a arrangement diagram of the metal fuel fabrication equipments in cells. (4) Estimation of cost data: We estimated cost to construct the facility and to operate it. (author)

  1. Advanced Wear Simulation for Bulk Metal Forming Processes

    Behrens Bernd-Arno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades the finite element method has become an essential tool for the cost-efficient virtual process design in the metal forming sector in order to counter the constantly increasing quality standards, particularly from the automotive industry as well as intensified international competition in the forging industry. An optimized process design taking precise tool wear prediction into account is a way to increase the cost-efficiency of the bulk metal forming processes. The main objective of the work presented in this paper is a modelling algorithm, which allows predicting die wear with respect to a geometry update during the forming simulation. Changes in the contact area caused by geometry update lead to the different die wear distribution. It primarily concerns the die areas, which undergo high thermal and mechanical loads.

  2. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  3. Relaxation processes and physical aging in metallic glasses

    Ruta, B.; Pineda, E.; Evenson, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Since their discovery in the 1960s, metallic glasses have continuously attracted much interest across the physics and materials science communities. In the forefront are their unique properties, which hold the alluring promise of broad application in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental science and engineering. However, a major obstacle to their wide-spread commercial use is their inherent temporal instability arising from underlying relaxation processes that can dramatically alter their physical properties. The result is a physical aging process which can bring about degradation of mechanical properties, namely through embrittlement and catastrophic mechanical failure. Understanding and controlling the effects of aging will play a decisive role in our on-going endeavor to advance the use of metallic glasses as structural materials, as well as in the more general comprehension of out-of-equilibrium dynamics in complex systems. This review presents an overview of the current state of the art in the experimental advances probing physical aging and relaxation processes in metallic glasses. Similarities and differences between other hard and soft matter glasses are highlighted. The topic is discussed in a multiscale approach, first presenting the key features obtained in macroscopic studies, then connecting them to recent novel microscopic investigations. Particular emphasis is put on the occurrence of distinct relaxation processes beyond the main structural process in viscous metallic melts and their fate upon entering the glassy state, trying to disentangle results and formalisms employed by the different groups of the glass-science community. A microscopic viewpoint is presented, in which physical aging manifests itself in irreversible atomic-scale processes such as avalanches and intermittent dynamics, ascribed to the existence of a plethora of metastable glassy states across a complex energy landscape. Future experimental challenges and the comparison with

  4. Development of solvent extraction process for erbium purification

    Singh, D.K.; Anitha, M.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    Erbium an important heavy rare earth (HRE) finds valuable application in space and nuclear energy technology. High purity erbium oxide is used as coating material for test blanket module of fusion reactor to prevent the tritium permeation. The total concentration of HRE (including Er) in only proven resource of rare earths in Indian monazite mineral is < 0.05%. Its separation from such a low concentration and also from host of other chemically similar elements like Y, Dy, Ho, Yb, Tm etc is quite difficult and challenging. A solvent extraction process employing PC88A and Aliquat336 has been developed for the purification of erbium oxide from two types of HRE fractions having % composition; (i) Y 2 O 3 : 0.18, Tb 4 O 7 : 0.28, Dy 2 CO 2 : 47.07, Er 2 O 3 : 35.03, HO 2 O 3 : 10.11, Yb 2 O 3 : 5.88, Tm 2 O 3 : 1.43 and (ii) Dy 2 O 3 : 6.39, Er 2 O 3 : 49.43, HO 2 O 3 : 10.43, Tm 2 O 3 : 2.7, Y 2 O 3 : 24.08, Yb 2 O 3 : 6.96. PC88A was used to process low Y content concentrate from chloride medium whereas Aliquat336 was found to be suitable in thiocynate medium to treat the concentrate with high Y content. Effects of process variables such as acidity, extractant concentration, total oxide concentration in feed, number of stages, phase ratio, scrubbing agent were investigated for both the systems

  5. Vanadium extraction by combined process of lixiviation and toasting

    Coral, Aldo

    1992-01-01

    Combinated toasting and leaching processes were applied at laboratory level to vanadiferous ore from Puyango deposit in order to evaluate different rates. Before leaching, a pretreatment consisting in toasting at open atmosphere was given to the ore. Both raw and toasted ore were later washed in organic solvents. In reason of mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of the ore, only alcaline leaching was tested under different pressure temperature and pH conditions of leaching solution (pH=9.8) in order to optimize time and efficiency of each individual process. Four different unitary alcaline leaching processes were studied: MECHANICAL STIRRING, PNEUMATIC STIRRING, LEACHING IN AUTOCLAVE AND LEACHING IN COLUMNS. For these four processes were obtained recovery rates (in percentage) of 18.63 and 87.82; 17.03 and 82.57; 60.42 and 99.55; 2.5 and 30.10; respectively from raw and pre-toasted ore. After filtration, vanadium was extracted from enriched solutions by using liquid resin ALAMINE 336, selective for vanadium at pH=2.8. Vanadium was later discharged with a Sodium Carbonate solution (10 per cent) and finally precipitated as the commercial compound Ammonium Vanadate, NH4VO3. Nuclear techniques as X-ray fluorescence and Atomic Absorption spectroscopy were used for analysis all over the investigation

  6. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  7. “High-Throughput” Evaluation of Polymer-Supported Triazolic Appendages for Metallic Cations Extraction

    Riadh Slimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to find and use a low-cost high-throughput method for a quick primary evaluation of several metal extraction by substituted piperazines appendages as chelatants grafted onto Merrifield polymer using click-chemistry by the copper (I-catalyzed Huisgen’s reaction (CuAAC The polymers were tested for their efficiency to remove various metal ions from neutral aqueous solutions (13 cations studied: Li+, Na+, K+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Ce3+, Hg+ and Pb2+ using the simple conductimetric measurement method. The polymers were found to extract all metals with low efficiencies ≤40%, except for Fe3+ and Hg+, and sometimes Pb2+. Some polymers exhibited a selectively for K+, Cd2+ and Ba2+, with good efficiencies. The values obtained here using less polymer, and a faster method, are in fair correspondence (average difference ±16% with another published evaluation by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS.

  8. Process, structure, property and applications of metallic glasses

    B. Geetha Priyadarshini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic glasses (MGs are gaining immense technological significance due to their unique structure-property relationship with renewed interest in diverse field of applications including biomedical implants, commercial products, machinery parts, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. Various processing routes have been adopted to fabricate MGs with short-range ordering which is believed to be the genesis of unique structure. Understanding the structure of these unique materials is a long-standing unsolved mystery. Unlike crystalline counterpart, the outstanding properties of metallic glasses owing to the absence of grain boundaries is reported to exhibit high hardness, excellent strength, high elastic strain, and anti-corrosion properties. The combination of these remarkable properties would significantly contribute to improvement of performance and reliability of these materials when incorporated as bio-implants. The nucleation and growth of metallic glasses is driven by thermodynamics and kinetics in non-equilibrium conditions. This comprehensive review article discusses the various attributes of metallic glasses with an aim to understand the fundamentals of relationship process-structure-property existing in such unique class of material.

  9. Different strategies for recovering metals from CARON process residue

    Cabrera, G.; Gomez, J.M.; Hernandez, I.; Coto, O.; Cantero, D.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans DMS 11478 to recover the heavy metals contained in the residue obtained from the CARON process has been evaluated. Different bioreactor configurations were studied: a two-stage batch system and two semi-continuous systems (stirred-tank reactor leaching and column leaching). In the two-stage system, 46.8% Co, 36.0% Mg, 26.3% Mn and 22.3% Ni were solubilised after 6 h of contact between the residue and the bacteria-free bioacid. The results obtained with the stirred-tank reactor and the column were similar: 50% of the Mg and Co and 40% of the Mn and Ni were solubilised after thirty one days. The operation in the column reactor allowed the solid-liquid ratio to be increased and the pH to be kept at low values (<1.0). Recirculation of the leachate in the column had a positive effect on metal removal; at sixty five days (optimum time) the solubilisation levels were as follows: 86% Co, 83% Mg, 72% Mn and Ni, 62% Fe and 23% Cr. The results corroborate the feasibility of the systems studied for the leaching of metals from CARON process residue and these methodologies can be considered viable for the recovery of valuable metals.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Elliot B. Kennel; R. Michael Bergen; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; W. Morgan Summers; John W. Zondlo

    2006-05-12

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, coking and composite fabrication continued using coal-derived samples. These samples were tested in direct carbon fuel cells. Methodology was refined for determining the aromatic character of hydro treated liquid, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Tests at GrafTech International showed that binder pitches produced using the WVU solvent extraction protocol can result in acceptable graphite electrodes for use in arc furnaces. These tests were made at the pilot scale.

  11. Remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil using chelant extraction: Feasibility studies

    Peters, R.W.; Miller, G.; Taylor, J.D.; Schneider, J.F.; Zellmer, S.; Edgar, D.E.; Johnson, D.O.

    1993-08-01

    Results are presented of a laboratory investigation conducted to determine the efficacy of using chelating agents to extract heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ba, Cu, and Zn) from soil, the primary focus being on the extraction of lead from the soil. Results from the batch-shaker studies and emphasizes the columnar extraction studies are described. The chelating agents studied included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid, in addition to water. Concentrations of the chelants ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 M; the suspension pH was varied between 3 and 8. Results showed that the removal of lead using citric acid and water was somewhat pH-dependent. For the batch-shaker studies, the results indicated that EDTA was more effective at removing Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn than was citric acid (both present at 0.01 M). EDTA and citric acid were equally effective in mobilizing Cr and Ba from the soil. Heavy metals removal was slightly more effective in the more acidic region (pH {le} 5).

  12. Semi solid metal processing: The fraction solid dilemma

    Nafisi, S.; Emadi, D.; Ghomashchi, R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects in semi solid metal (SSM) processing is to determine the actual volume fraction of the solid at the processing temperature. The fraction has great impact on the SSM slurry viscosity and the subsequent filling of the mold in the casting stage. Three methods, namely quantitative metallography, thermodynamic calculation, and thermal analysis are employed to investigate and clarify the contradictory open literature reports about the real value of the volume fraction of primary particles. It is reported that the discrepancies between the results obtained by different methods are caused mainly by variations in cooling rates and by coarsening of the primaries during the quenching process

  13. Semi solid metal processing: The fraction solid dilemma

    Nafisi, S. [EVRAZ Inc. NA 100 Armour Road, Regina, SK, S4P 3C7 (Canada)], E-mail: Shahrooz.Nafisi@evrazincna.com; Emadi, D. [CEPG, CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1M1 (Canada); Ghomashchi, R. [Advanced Materials and Processing Research Institute, Suite 122, A7-1390 Major MacKenzie, ON, L4S 0A1 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    One of the most challenging aspects in semi solid metal (SSM) processing is to determine the actual volume fraction of the solid at the processing temperature. The fraction has great impact on the SSM slurry viscosity and the subsequent filling of the mold in the casting stage. Three methods, namely quantitative metallography, thermodynamic calculation, and thermal analysis are employed to investigate and clarify the contradictory open literature reports about the real value of the volume fraction of primary particles. It is reported that the discrepancies between the results obtained by different methods are caused mainly by variations in cooling rates and by coarsening of the primaries during the quenching process.

  14. Phytochemicals and heavy metals analysis of methanolic extract of edible mushrooms collected from Karak District, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Farhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To qualitatively evaluate the phytochemicals and quantitatively determine the heavy metals of three species of edible mushrooms collected from the Karak area of Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa, Pakistan. Methods: The plant sample was subjected to methanolic extraction. The extraction was then concentrated by using rotary evaporator. The methanolic extract was screened for the qualitative study of various phytochemicals and quantitative measurement of heavy metals. Results: A maximum of phytochemicals were confirmed by carring out different tests. Among the different phytochemicals, alkaloids, flavonoids, proteins and carbohydrates were found to be present in the extracts, while saponins and glycosides were not detected. Similarly quantitative study of heavy metals was also conducted on the same extracts of the edible mushrooms. The results suggested that iron was present in maximum concentration than all other metals and nickel was found to be present in little amount when compared with other metals. All the metals were found present. Conclusions: The concentrations of heavy metals were investigated in the samples which were different in all samples. The presence of different phytochemicals in the mushroom is the key for its active biological profile.

  15. The CHPM2030 H2020 Project: Combined Heat, Power and Metal extraction from ultra-deep ore bodies

    Miklovicz, Tamas; Bodo, Balazs; Cseko, Adrienn; Hartai, Eva; Madarasz, Tamas

    2017-04-01

    The CHPM2030 project consortium is working on a novel technology solution that can provide both geothermal energy and minerals, in a single interlinked process. The CHPM technology involves an integrated approach to cross fertilize between two yet separated research areas: unconventional geothermal energy and mineral extraction. This places the project's research agenda onto the frontiers of geothermal resources development, mineral extraction and electro-metallurgy with the objectives of converting ultra-deep metallic mineral formations into an "orebody-enhanced geothermal system". In the envisioned facility, an EGS is established on a 3-4 km deep ore mineralisation. Metal content from the ore body is mobilised using mild leaching and/or nanoparticles, then metals are recovered by high-temperature, high-pressure geothermal fluid electrolysis and gas-diffusion electroprecipitation and electrocrystallisation. Salinity gradient power from pre-treated geothermal fluids will also be used. In the project, all these will be carried out at laboratory scale (technology readiness level of 4-5), providing data for the conceptual framework, process optimisation and simulations. Integrated sustainability assessment will also be carried out on the economic feasibility, social impact, policy considerations, environmental impact and ethics concerns. During the last stage of the research agenda, the work will focus on mapping converging technological areas, setting a background for pilot implementation and developing research roadmaps for 2030 and 2050. Pilot study areas include South West England, the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Portugal, the Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenic Belt in Romania, and three mining districts in Sweden. The project started in January 2016 and lasts for 42 months. In the first phase, the metallogenesis of Europe was investigated and the potential ore formations have been identified. The rock-mechanical characteristics of orebodies have also been examined

  16. SOLVEX: a computer program for simulation of solvent extraction processes

    Scotten, W.C.

    1975-09-01

    SOLVEX is a FORTRAN IV computer program that simulates the dynamic behavior of solvent extraction processes conducted in mixer-settlers and centrifugal contactors. Two options permit terminating dynamic phases by time or by achieving steady state, and a third option permits artificial rapid close to steady state. Thus the program is well suited to multiple phases of dynamic problems and multiple input of steady state problems. Changes from the previous problem are the only inputs required for each succeeding problem. Distribution data can be supplied by two-variable third-power polynomial equations or by three-variable tables in any one of 16 different combinations involving phase concentrations or distribution coefficients (ratio of phase concentrations) or their logarithms

  17. Molten salt extractive distillation process for zirconium-hafnium separation

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for zirconium-hafnium separation. It utilizes an extractive distillation column with a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides introduced into a distillation column having a top and bottom with hafnium enriched overheads taken from the top of the column and a molten salt solvent circulated through the column to provide a liquid phase, and with molten salt solvent containing zirconium chloride being taken from the bottom of the distillation column. The improvements comprising: utilizing a molten salt solvent consisting principally of lithium chloride and at least one of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides; stripping of the zirconium chloride taken from the bottom of the distillation column by electrochemically reducing zirconium from the molten salt solvent; and utilizing a pressurized reflux condenser on the top of the column to add the hafnium chloride enriched overheads to the molten salt solvent previously stripped of zirconium chloride

  18. Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of ∼1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment

  19. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.280 Solvent extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid from...

  20. A metallic buried interconnect process for through-wafer interconnection

    Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Herrault, Florian; Allen, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication process and experimental results of electroplated metal interconnects buried at the bottom of deep silicon trenches with vertical sidewalls. A manual spray-coating process along with a unique trench-formation process has been developed for the electroplating of a metal interconnection structure at the bottom surface of the deep trenches. The silicon etch process combines the isotropic dry etch process and conventional Bosch process to fabricate a deep trench with angled top-side edges and vertical sidewalls. The resulting trench structure, in contrast to the trenches fabricated by wet anisotropic etching, enables spray-coated photoresist patterning with good sidewall and top-side edge coverage while maintaining the ability to form a high-density array of deep trenches without excessive widening of the trench opening. A photoresist spray-coating process was developed and optimized for the formation of electroplating mold at the bottom of 300 µm deep trenches having vertical sidewalls. A diluted positive tone photoresist with relatively high solid content and multiple coating with baking between coating steps has been experimentally proven to provide high quality sidewall and edge coverage. To validate the buried interconnect approach, a three-dimensional daisy chain structure having a buried interconnect as the bottom connector and traces on the wafer surface as the top conductor has been designed and fabricated

  1. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  2. Biological removal of metal ions from aqueous process streams

    Shumate, S.E. II; Strandberg, G.W.; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Aqueous waste streams from nuclear fuel processing operations may contain trace quantities of heavy metals such as uranium. Conventional chemical and physical treatment may be ineffective or very expensive when uranium concentrations in the range of 10 to 100 g/m 3 must be reduced to 1 g/m 3 or less. The ability of some microorganisms to adsorb or complex dissolved heavy metals offers an alternative treatment method. Uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-2574 and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined to identify factors which might affect a process for the removal of uranium from wastewater streams. At uranium concentrations in the range of 10 to 500 g/m 3 , where the binding capacity of the biomass was not exceeded, temperature, pH, and initial uranium concentration were found to influence the rate of uranium uptake, but not the soluble uranium concentration at equilibrium. 6 figs

  3. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  4. Extraction of alginate biopolymer present in marine alga sargassum filipendula and bioadsorption of metallic ions

    Sirlei Jaiana Kleinübing

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the bioadsorption of Pb2+, Cu2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ ions by marine alga Sargassum filipendula and by the alginate biopolymer extracted from this alga. The objective is to evaluate the importance of this biopolymer in removing different metallic ions by the marine alga S. filipendula. In the equilibrium study, the same affinity order was observed for both bioadsorbents: Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Cd2+. For Pb2+ and Cu2+ ions when the alginate is isolated and acting as bioadsorbents, adsorption capacities greater than those found for the alga were observed, indicating that it is the main component responsible for the removal of metallic ions. For Zn2+ and Cd2+ ions, greater bioadsorption capacities were observed for the alga, indicating that other functional groups of the alga, such as sulfates and amino, are also important in the bioadsorption of these ions.

  5. Recovery of gallium from coal fly ash by a dual reactive extraction process

    Gutierrez, B.; Pazos, C.; Coca, J. [University of Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the extraction of gallium from coal fly ash by leaching and extraction with commercial extractants Amerlite LA-2 and LIX-54N dissolved in kerosene. Leaching of gallium and other metals from the fly ash was carried out with 6 M hydrochloric acid. The leaching liquor is first contacted with Amerlite LA-2 which extracts the gallium and iron. The iron is then precipitated with sodium hydroxide, while gallium remains in solution. Gallium is extracted selectively from the base solution with LIX 54; the resulting stripped solution contains 83% of the gallium present in the leaching liquor.

  6. Chelant extraction and REDOX manipulation for mobilization of heavy metals from contaminated soils

    Brewster, M.D.; Peters, R.W.; Miller, G.A.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Was the result of open burning and open detonation of chemical agents and munitions in the Toxic Burning Pits area at J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland, soils have been contaminated with heavy metals. Simultaneous extraction is complicated because of the multitude of contaminant forms that exist. This paper uses data from a treatability study performed at Argonne National Laboratory to discuss and compare several treatment methods that were evaluated for remediating metals-contaminated soils. J-Field soils were subjected to a series of treatability experiments designed to determine the feasibility of using soil washing/soil flushing, enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing, solidification/stabilization, and electrokinetics for remediating soils contaminated with metals. Chelating and mobilizing agents evaluated included ammonium acetate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid, Citranox, gluconic acid, phosphoric acid, oxalic acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid, in addition to pH-adjusted water. REDOX manipulation can maximize solubilities, increase desorption, and promote removal of heavy metal contaminants. Reducing agents that were studied included sodium borohydride, sodium metabisulfite, and thiourea dioxide. The oxidants studied included hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate, sodium hypochlorite, and potassium permanganate. This paper summaries the results from the physical/chemical characterization, soil washing/soil flushing, and enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing portions of the study

  7. Assessing pollution in a Mediterranean lagoon using acid volatile sulfides and estimations of simultaneously extracted metals.

    Zaaboub, Noureddine; Helali, Mohamed Amine; Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Ennouri, Rym; Béjaoui, Béchir; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; El Bour, Monia; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-11-01

    Bizerte Lagoon is a southern Mediterranean semi-enclosed lagoon with a maximum depth of 12 m. After assessing sediment quality, the authors report on the physicochemical characteristics of the lagoon's surface sediment using SEM (simultaneously extracted metals) and AVS (acid volatile sulfides) as proxies. Biogeochemical tools are used to investigate the environmental disturbance at the water-sediment interface by means of SEM and AVS to seek conclusions concerning the study area's pollution status. Results confirm accumulation of trace elements in sediment. The use of the SEM-AVS model with organic matter in sediment (ƒOC) confirms possible bioavailability of accumulated trace elements, especially Zn, in the southern part of the lagoon, with organic matter playing an important role in SEM excess correction to affirm a nontoxic total metal sediment state. Individual trace element toxicity is dependent on the bioavailable fraction of SEM Metal on sediment, as is the influence of lagoon inflow from southern water sources on element bioavailability. Appropriate management strategies are highly recommended to mitigate any potential harmful effects on health from this heavy-metal-based pollution.

  8. The space charge effects on the slow extraction process

    Ohmori, Chihiro.

    1992-06-01

    The calculation of the slow extraction which includes the space charge effects has been performed for the Compressor/Stretcher Ring (CSR) of the proposed Japanese Hadron Project. We have investigated the slow extraction of 1 GeV proton beam with an average current of 100μA. Calculation shows not only the emittance growth of the extracted beam but also decrease of the extraction efficiency and discontinuity of beam spill. (author)

  9. Role of reducing agent in extraction of arsenic and heavy metals from soils by use of EDTA.

    Kim, Eun Jung; Jeon, Eun-Ki; Baek, Kitae

    2016-06-01

    Although many metal-contaminated sites contain both anionic arsenic and cationic heavy metals, the current remediation technologies are not effective for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic elements from the contaminated sites due to their different characteristics. In this study, the role of reducing agent in simultaneous extraction of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn from contaminated soils was investigated using EDTA. The addition of reducing agents, which includes sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4), ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4), greatly enhanced the EDTA extraction of both As and heavy metals from the contaminated soils due to the increased mobility of the metals under the reduced conditions. The extent of the enhancement of the EDTA extraction was greatly affected by the reducing conditions. Strong reducing conditions (0.1 M of dithionite) were required for the extraction of metals strongly bound to the soil, while weak reducing conditions (0.01 M of dithionite or 0.1 M of oxalate/ascorbic acid) were sufficient for extraction of metals that were relatively weakly bound to the soil. An almost 90% extraction efficiency of total metals (As, Cu, Zn, and Pb) was obtained from the contaminated soils using the combination of dithionite and EDTA. Our results clearly showed that the combination of dithionite and EDTA can effectively extract As and heavy metals simultaneously from soils under a wide range of pH conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. LOADS TRANSMITED TO THE METALLIC TOWERS OF THE EXTRACTING INSTALLATIONS IN THE CASE OF THE APPLICATION OF THE SAFETY BRAKE

    Razvan Itu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper there are presented certain aspects concerning the determination of loads transmitted through the bearings of the extracting pulleys of the structure of the metallic towers of the extracting installations In the case of the application of the safety brake The exemplification of the determination of the loads transmitted to the metallic tower in the case of the application of the emergency brake has been done by taking into study the extracting installation ,, Auxiliary well No.12”, from Lupeni Mining Plant. The extracting installation is unbalanced. The wrapping organ of the installation machine is a double wheel with the wrapping of the extracting cable in one layer. The extracting vessels are untipping cages with two levels, with two trolleys per level. The drive of the installation‟s machine is asynchronous, the machine‟ s reducer having two drives.

  11. Extraction of organic materials from red water by metal-impregnated lignite activated carbon

    Wei, Fangfang [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Lv, Fengzhu [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ye, Zhengfang, E-mail: zhengfangye@163.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal-impregnated lignite activated carbon was investigated as adsorbent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorbent for the extraction of organic materials from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) red water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of different metals on the extraction were investigated and discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many loading factors of Cu{sup 2+} were found having great influences on the extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extraction performances and mechanism of TNT red water on Cu/LAC were investigated. - Abstract: Extraction of organic materials from 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) red water by lignite activated carbon (LAC) impregnated with Cu{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Ag{sup +} was investigated. The affinity to organic materials in red water was found to follow the order: Cu/LAC > Sn/LAC > Ag/LAC > Ba/LAC > Fe/LAC > Ca/LAC, which was explained by the hard and soft acid base (HSAB) theory. Cu{sup 2+} showed the best performance and several parameters were further studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified effective loading of Cu{sup 2+} on the LAC surface. The water quality before and after treated by Cu/LAC was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatograph, Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS), UV-vis spectroscopy and other analyses. The extraction performances and mechanism of organic materials on Cu/LAC were investigated through static methods. The experimental results showed that Cu/LAC possessed stronger extraction ability for the sulfonated nitrotoluenes than the non-sulfonated nitrotoluenes, the kinetic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. In addition, the leaching out of Cu{sup 2+} from Cu/LAC was found much lower in the 100 times diluted red water (0.074%) than in the raw water (10.201%). Column adsorptions with more concentrated red water were also studied. Finally, Cu/LAC was observed to possess excellent

  12. Application of Electrochemical Process in Removal of Heavy Metals from Landfill Leachate

    Mostafaii Gh.1 PhD,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims Municipal landfill leachate contains high concentrations of heavy metals, organics, ammonia. The efficeincy of electrochemically removal of heavy metals from landfill leachate was studied. Materials & Methods The leachate was obtained from Kahrizak landfill in south of Tehran. The experiments were carried out by batch process. The 2liter batch reactor was made of glass. There were eight anodes and cathodes electrodes. The electrodes were placed vertically parallel to each other and they were connected to a digital DC power supply. The pH and conductivity were adjusted to a desirable value using NaOH or H2SO4, and NaCl. All the runs were performed at constant temperature of 25°C. In each run, 1.5liter of the leachate was placed into the electrolytic cell. Samples were extracted every 10min and then filtered through a mixed cellulose acetate membrane (0.42μm. The amount of Lead, Zinc and Nickel removal was measured at pH=7 and in current density of 0.5, 0.75, and 1A. Findings When current density and time reaction increased, removal efficiency of heavy metals such as Lead, Zinc and Nickel increased. At initial pH=7, density 1A and reaction time= 60min, Lead, Nickel and Zinc were removed up to 86, 93 and 95%, respectively. Conclusion Electrochemical process can be proposed as a suitable technique to remove heavy metal from landfill leachate.

  13. Extraction of rare earth metals (3) from aqueous solutions containing thorium and uranyl nitrates

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Berinskij, A.E.; Keskinov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    Isotherms of extraction of rare earth metals (3) from aqueous solutions containing thorium and uranyl nitrates by solutions of tributylphosphate (TBP) and diisooctylmethylphosphonate (DIOMP) in kerosene at 298.15 Deg C and pH 1 are presented. Equations for description of interphase distribution of components of the systems considered are suggested. These equations describe distribution of components adequately in the systems of thorium nitrate (uranyl nitrate) - rare earth nitrates - (TBP, DIOMP) in the case of wide variation of phase compositions. Dependences of separation factors on composition of aqueous phase are considered [ru

  14. Evaluation of metal ions in rice samples: extraction and direct determination by ICP OES

    Oliveira, Andrea; Cadore, Solange; Baccan, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    A method for extraction of metal ions present in rice samples using ammoniacal EDTA solution, pH = 10, as extractor agent is proposed under the following optimized conditions: 0.20 g of rice sample and 5.00 mL of ammoniacal EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) solution, with 5 min of ultrasound exposure time. Using robust ICP OES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry) conditions, direct analysis of the extraction solution was allowed, and the recovery values obtained were above 90% for most of the studied elements (P, K, Mg, Ca, Zn, Mn, Cu and Mo) with RSD -1 (Mn) - 48.68 mg kg -1 (K), showing adequate detectability for the determination of the analytes. The analysis of different samples indicated that Brazilian 'integral' rice contains higher contents of the constituents studied, followed by 'parboiled' rice, and the 'agulhinha' rice a long and thin grain type. (author)

  15. Preparation of stable alginate microcapsules coated with chitosan or polyethyleneimine for extraction of heavy metal ions.

    Outokesh, Mohammad; Mimura, Hitoshi; Niibori, Yuichi; Tanaka, Kouichi

    2006-05-01

    Stable alginate microcapsules in dried form containing bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) monothiophosphinic acid (HA) were prepared by coating of fresh alginate microcapsules with chitosan or polyethyleneimine (PEI). The thickness of coatings was estimated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), along with electron microscopy (SEM), as well as comparison of uptake percentage of coated and uncoated hollow capsules. Characterization of microcapsules was carried out by Ag(+) uptake experiments, destructive chemical analyses and thermogravimetric methods (TG and DTA). Chemical stability tests in HNO(3) and NaNO(3) media indicated that the coating with 4-double layer chitosan or mono-layer PEI led to an appreciable enhancement of impermeability in the range of pH > 1 or [Na(+)] microcapsules nearly completely hold their extractant content. Stable extractive microcapsules have an appreciable potential for the selective removal of heavy metal ions.

  16. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY, TOTAL PHENOLIC AND FLAVONOID CONTENT OF MORINDA CITRIFOLIA FRUIT EXTRACTS FROM VARIOUS EXTRACTION PROCESSES

    PRAVEEN K. RAMAMOORTHY

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Soxhlet, Ultrasonic extract of Morinda citrifolia L. fruit and four extracts from high pressure extraction at 10 MPa using ethanol, ethyl acetate as solvent and dried by vacuum oven and spray dryer were analyzed for their antioxidant activity by peroxide value method and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging method. The five extracts along with the reference samples, butylated hydroxyl toluene and tannic acid were further analyzed to determine their total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteau method and total flavonoid content by Dowd method. The M. citrifolia extract by high pressure extraction with ethyl acetate as solvent and spray dried was found to exhibit highest antioxidant activity and total flavonoid content. High total phenolic content was determined in the high pressure extract using ethyl acetate as solvent and vacuum dried. It was interesting to note that ultrasonic extract exhibited significant antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid content. High pressure extracted M. citrifolia in ethanol was found to express lesser values comparatively. The significant difference in activity among the high pressure extracts was found to be due to the polarity of the solvents used for extraction as M. citrifolia fruit contains relatively larger quantity of non-polar antioxidant compounds. It was also found that the drying methods had significant impact on the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid content of the extracts.

  17. Highly efficient extraction and selective separation of uranium (VI) from transition metals using new class of undiluted ionic liquids based on H-phosphonate anions.

    Zarrougui, Ramzi; Mdimagh, Raouf; Raouafi, Nourreddine

    2018-01-15

    In this paper, we report the development of an environmental friendly process to decontaminate uranium-containing ores and nuclear wastes by using non-fluorinated ionic liquids (ILs). The main advantages of this extraction process are the absence of any organic diluent and extra extraction agents added to the organic phase. Moreover, the process is cost-effective and maybe applied as a sustainable hydrometallurgical method to recover uranium. The distribution ratio (D U ) and the extraction efficiency (%E) of uranium(VI) (UO 2 2+ ) were found to be dependent on the acidity of the aqueous phase, the extraction time, the alkyl chain length in the ILs, the concentration of the aqueous feed and molar quantity of ILs. The D U value is higher than 600 and the %E is equal to 98.6% when [HNO 3 ]=7M. The extraction reactions follows a neutral partition or ionic exchange mechanism depending on nitric acid concentration. The nature of bonding in the extracted complexes was investigated by spectroscopic techniques. The potential use of Mor 1-8 -OP for the separation of UO 2 2+ from a mixture containing transition metal ions M n+ was also examined. The UO 2 2+ ions were separated and extracted efficiently. These ILs are promising candidates for the recovery and separation of uranium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biosynthesis of Multicomponent Nanoparticles with Extract of Mortiño (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth Berry: Application on Heavy Metals Removal from Water and Immobilization in Soils

    Mayra Abril

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Through preparation of multicomponent nanoparticles (MCNPs using ferric chloride (FeCl3, sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, and the extract of mortiño fruit (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth, we dramatically improved the removal/immobilization of heavy metals from water and in soils. As-prepared nanoparticles were spherical measuring approximately 12 nm in diameter and contained iron oxides and iron sulfides in the crystal structure. Removal of copper and zinc from water using MCNPs showed high efficiencies (>99% at pH above 6 and a ratio of 0.5 mL of the extract:10 mL 0.5 M FeCl3·6H2O : 10 mL 0.035 M Na2SO4. The physisorption process followed by chemisorption was regarded as the removal mechanism of Cu and Zn from water. While, when MCNPs were used to treat soils contaminated with heavy metals, more than 95% of immobilization was accomplished for all metals. Nevertheless, the distribution of the metallic elements changed in the soil fractions after treatment. Results indicate that immobilization of metals after the injection of nanoparticles into soils was effective. Metals did not leach out when soils were drained with rain, drinking, and deionized water but fairly leached out under acidic water drainage.

  19. [INVITED] Evaluation of process observation features for laser metal welding

    Tenner, Felix; Klämpfl, Florian; Nagulin, Konstantin Yu.; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we show how fast the fluid dynamics change when changing the laser power for different feed rates during laser metal welding. By the use of two high-speed cameras and a data acquisition system we conclude how fast we have to image the process to measure the fluid dynamics with a very high certainty. Our experiments show that not all process features which can be measured during laser welding do represent the process behavior similarly well. Despite the good visibility of the vapor plume the monitoring of its movement is less suitable as an input signal for a closed-loop control. The features measured inside the keyhole show a good correlation with changes of process parameters. Due to its low noise, the area of the keyhole opening is well suited as an input signal for a closed-loop control of the process.

  20. Comparative analyses of diffusion coefficients for different extraction processes from thyme

    Petrovic Slobodan S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed to analyze kinetics and mass transfer phenomena for different extraction processes from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. leaves. Different extraction processes with ethanol were studied: Soxhlet extraction and ultrasound-assisted batch extraction on the laboratory scale as well as pilot plant batch extraction with mixing. The extraction processes with ethanol were compared to the process of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction performed at 10 MPa and 40°C. Experimental data were analyzed by mathematical model derived from the Fick’s second law to determine and compare diffusion coefficients in the periods of constant and decreasing extraction rate. In the fast extraction period, values of diffusion coefficients were one to three orders of magnitude higher compared to those determined for the period of slow extraction. The highest diffusion coefficient was reported for the fast extraction period of supercritical fluid extraction. In the case of extraction processes with ethanol, ultrasound, stirring and extraction temperature increase enhanced mass transfer rate in the washing phase. On the other hand, ultrasound contributed the most to the increase of mass transfer rate in the period of slow extraction.

  1. Architectural design of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals--principles and processes.

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Yao, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Heterogeneous metal nanocrystals (HMNCs) are a natural extension of simple metal nanocrystals (NCs), but as a research topic, they have been much less explored until recently. HMNCs are formed by integrating metal NCs of different compositions into a common entity, similar to the way atoms are bonded to form molecules. HMNCs can be built to exhibit an unprecedented architectural diversity and complexity by programming the arrangement of the NC building blocks ("unit NCs"). The architectural engineering of HMNCs involves the design and fabrication of the architecture-determining elements (ADEs), i.e., unit NCs with precise control of shape and size, and their relative positions in the design. Similar to molecular engineering, where structural diversity is used to create more property variations for application explorations, the architectural engineering of HMNCs can similarly increase the utility of metal NCs by offering a suite of properties to support multifunctionality in applications. The architectural engineering of HMNCs calls for processes and operations that can execute the design. Some enabling technologies already exist in the form of classical micro- and macroscale fabrication techniques, such as masking and etching. These processes, when used singly or in combination, are fully capable of fabricating nanoscopic objects. What is needed is a detailed understanding of the engineering control of ADEs and the translation of these principles into actual processes. For simplicity of execution, these processes should be integrated into a common reaction system and yet retain independence of control. The key to architectural diversity is therefore the independent controllability of each ADE in the design blueprint. The right chemical tools must be applied under the right circumstances in order to achieve the desired outcome. In this Account, after a short illustration of the infinite possibility of combining different ADEs to create HMNC design

  2. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  3. Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

    1997-02-01

    The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  4. Process of technology management in SMEs of the metal processing industry – the case study investigation

    Krawczyk-Dembicka Elżbieta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to identify the factors that influence the process of technology management in the sector of small- and medium-sized enterprises of the metal processing industry, considering the shape and course required to achieve modern operation conditions by enterprises in the market.

  5. Sustainability assessment of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process

    Alkahla, Ibrahim; Pervaiz, Salman

    2017-09-01

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process is one of the most commonly employed material joining processes utilized in the various industrial sectors such as marine, ship-building, automotive, aerospace, construction and petrochemicals etc. The increasing pressure on manufacturing sector wants the welding process to be sustainable in nature. The SMAW process incorporates several types of inputs and output streams. The sustainability concerns associated with SMAW process are linked with the various input and output streams such as electrical energy requirement, input material consumptions, slag formation, fumes emission and hazardous working conditions associated with the human health and occupational safety. To enhance the environmental performance of the SMAW welding process, there is a need to characterize the sustainability for the SMAW process under the broad framework of sustainability. Most of the available literature focuses on the technical and economic aspects of the welding process, however the environmental and social aspects are rarely addressed. The study reviews SMAW process with respect to the triple bottom line (economic, environmental and social) sustainability approach. Finally, the study concluded recommendations towards achieving economical and sustainable SMAW welding process.

  6. Full-fledged temporal processing: bridging the gap between deep linguistic processing and temporal extraction

    Francisco Costa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The full-fledged processing of temporal information presents specific challenges. These difficulties largely stem from the fact that the temporal meaning conveyed by grammatical means interacts with many extra-linguistic factors (world knowledge, causality, calendar systems, reasoning. This article proposes a novel approach to this problem, based on a hybrid strategy that explores the complementarity of the symbolic and probabilistic methods. A specialized temporal extraction system is combined with a deep linguistic processing grammar. The temporal extraction system extracts eventualities, times and dates mentioned in text, and also temporal relations between them, in line with the tasks of the recent TempEval challenges; and uses machine learning techniques to draw from different sources of information (grammatical and extra-grammatical even if it is not explicitly known how these combine to produce the final temporal meaning being expressed. In turn, the deep computational grammar delivers richer truth-conditional meaning representations of input sentences, which include a principled representation of temporal information, on which higher level tasks, including reasoning, can be based. These deep semantic representations are extended and improved according to the output of the aforementioned temporal extraction module. The prototype implemented shows performance results that increase the quality of the temporal meaning representations and are better than the performance of each of the two components in isolation.

  7. Asparagus cochinchinensis Extract Alleviates Metal Ion-Induced Gut Injury in Drosophila: An In Silico Analysis of Potential Active Constituents

    Weiyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions and sulfate are components of atmospheric pollutants that have diverse ways of entering the human body. We used Drosophila as a model to investigate the effect of Asparagus cochinchinensis (A. cochinchinensis extracts on the gut and characterized gut homeostasis following the ingestion of metal ions (copper, zinc, and aluminum. In this study, we found that the aqueous A. cochinchinensis extract increased the survival rate, decreased epithelial cell death, and attenuated metal ion-induced gut morphological changes in flies following chronic exposure to metal ions. In addition, we screened out, by network pharmacology, six natural products (NPs that could serve as putative active components of A. cochinchinensis that prevented gut injury. Altogether, the results of our study provide evidence that A. cochinchinensis might be an effective phytomedicine for the treatment of metal ion-induced gut injury.

  8. Peculiarities of metal welding process modelling for the Arctic

    Lagunov, Alexey; Fofanov, Andrey; Losunov, Anton

    2017-09-01

    M etal being rather tough has been used in the Arctic for a long time. In severe weather conditions metal construction is subject to strong corrosion and erosion. These processes affect the welds particular strongly. Violation of weld integrity leads to the different industrial accidents. Therefore, the welding quality is given such a strong focus. M ost high-quality welding is obtained if welding zone is provided with gas what eliminates the influence of oxygen on the process. But in this case it is very difficult to find the right concentration, gas pressure, direction of the jet. Study of the welding process using video and photography is expensive, in terms of money and time. Mathematical modelling of welding process using the program FlowVision enables to solve this issue at less cost. It's essential that obtained results qualitatively conform to the experimental ones and can be used in real application.

  9. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    Chang, S.G.T.

    1994-12-06

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

  10. Improvements mineral dressing and extraction processes of gold-silver ores from San Pedro Frio Mining District, Colombia

    Yanez Traslavina, J. J.; Vargas Avila, M. A.; Garcia Paez, I. H.; Pedraza Rosas, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    The San Pedro Frio district mining, Colombia, is a rich region production gold-silver ores. Nowadays, the extraction processes used are amalgamation, percolation cyanidation and precipitation with zinc wood. Due to the ignorance of the ore characteristics, gold and silver treatment processes are inadequate and not efficient. In addition the inappropriate use of mercury and cyanide cause environmental contamination. In this research the ore characterization was carried out obtained fundamental parameters for the technical selection of more efficient gold and silver extraction processes. Experimental work was addressed to the study of both processes the agitation cyanidation and the adsorption on activated carbon in pulp. As a final result proposed a flowsheet to improve the precious metals recovery and reduce the environment contamination. (Author)

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Dady B. Dadyburjor; Mark E. Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; J. Joshua Maybury; Alfred H. Stiller; Joseph M. Stoffa; John W. Zondlo

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, and porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, hydrotreatment of solvent was completed in preparation for pitch fabrication for graphite electrodes. Coal digestion has lagged but is expected to be complete by next quarter. Studies are reported on coal dissolution, pitch production, foam synthesis using physical blowing agents, and alternate coking techniques.

  12. Novel 3-Hydroxy-2-Naphthoate-Based Task-Specific Ionic Liquids for an Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals

    Philip Pirkwieser

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs are per definition salts with melting points below 100°C and might be green alternatives for the extraction of heavy metals from aqueous solutions due to their favorable environmental and physico-chemical properties. Partial solution during extraction, so-called leaching, however, limits their applicability. The present study synthesizes three novel ammonium and phosphonium ILs based on 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid—trihexyltetradecylphosphonium—([P66614], methyltrioctylphosphonium—([P1888], and methyltrioctylammonium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate ([N1888][HNA]—by a deprotonation-metathesis route. The aims were to improve stability during extraction while still achieving high selectivity toward heavy metal ions, as well as to study the impact of different alkyl chains and the central atom of the cation on physico-chemical properties, extraction efficacy, and leaching. Extraction capabilities for the seven heavy metals Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Pb were studied in pure water at pH 8.0. Further experiments were conducted in water containing 30 g L−1 NaCl to simulate a seawater matrix and/or 30 mg L−1 humic acids, as well as metal-spiked natural water samples. All three ILs showed extraction efficacies ≥90% for Cu and Pb after 24 h. Overall, extraction efficacies for Ag, Cd, Cu, and Pb were highest for drinking water samples. Ag and Cd extraction was increased by up to 41% in (hyper- saline samples using IL [P66614][HNA] compared with pure water samples. Leaching values were reduced down to 0.07% loss of the applied IL, which can be attributed to the hydrophobic character of 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate. Our results represent a positive development toward a greener extraction of heavy metals from natural waters.

  13. Parameters in selective laser melting for processing metallic powders

    Kurzynowski, Tomasz; Chlebus, Edward; Kuźnicka, Bogumiła; Reiner, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents results of studies on Selective Laser Melting. SLM is an additive manufacturing technology which may be used to process almost all metallic materials in the form of powder. Types of energy emission sources, mainly fiber lasers and/or Nd:YAG laser with similar characteristics and the wavelength of 1,06 - 1,08 microns, are provided primarily for processing metallic powder materials with high absorption of laser radiation. The paper presents results of selected variable parameters (laser power, scanning time, scanning strategy) and fixed parameters such as the protective atmosphere (argon, nitrogen, helium), temperature, type and shape of the powder material. The thematic scope is very broad, so the work was focused on optimizing the process of selective laser micrometallurgy for producing fully dense parts. The density is closely linked with other two conditions: discontinuity of the microstructure (microcracks) and stability (repeatability) of the process. Materials used for the research were stainless steel 316L (AISI), tool steel H13 (AISI), and titanium alloy Ti6Al7Nb (ISO 5832-11). Studies were performed with a scanning electron microscope, a light microscopes, a confocal microscope and a μCT scanner.

  14. THE DISTRIBUTION OF COMMERCIAL CROWN ETHER DC18C6 AND THE EXTRACTION STUDY OF ALKALI AND EARTH ALKALI METALS

    Bambang Rusdiarso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of A and B isomers of crown-ether DC18C6 on their organic and water phases (chloride, nitrate and sulphocyanide salts and extraction of alkali and earth alkali metals has been studied. In LiCl 0.1 M environment, lithium extraction could be ignored. The presence of extracted potassium metal may affect the crown ether DC18C6 distribution albeit only a little. In KNO3 0.1 M environment, the distribution coefficient values (d were 6.1 and 10.3 for A and B isomers, respectively ; while in KCl  0.1 M environment the values were 4.9 and 11.8, respectively. In KSCN 0.1 M, d values for A and B isomers were 40.4 and 36.6, respectively, which were higher than the value obtained from both KNO3 and KCl  0.1 M environments. Caesium metal extraction using DC18C6 occurred weakly, up to only 5%. Strontium extraction using DC18C6 achieved better yield than the caesium extraction. The percentage of extraction increased under organic solvent according to the following: toluene (4% < chloroform (28% < TBP (35%.   Keywords: distribution, crown-ether DC18C6, extraction.

  15. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Reddy, N. Narayana, E-mail: nagireddynarayana@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Healthcare, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia@CRIB, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ravindra, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Reddy, N. Madhava [Department of Environmental Science, Gates Institute of Technology, NH-7, Gooty, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rajinikanth, V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Raju, K. Mohana [Synthetic Polymer Laboratory, Department of Polymer Science & Technology, S.K. University, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel.

  16. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Reddy, N. Narayana; Ravindra, S.; Reddy, N. Madhava; Rajinikanth, V.; Raju, K. Mohana; Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel

  17. Cleanex process: a versatile solvent extraction process for recovery and purification of lanthanides, americium, and curium

    Bigelow, J.E.; Collins, E.D.; King, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    At a concentration of 1 M in straight-chain hydrocarbon diluent, HDEHP will extract americium, curium, and other trivalent actinide and lanthanide elements from dilute acid or salt solutions. The solute is back-extracted with more concentrated acid, either nitric or hydrochloric. The process has been used in the continuous, countercurrent mode, but its greatest advantage arises in batch extractions where the excess acid can be titrated with NaOH to produce a final acidity of about 0.03 M. Under these conditions, 99% recovery can be achieved, usually in one stage. Cleanex was used on the 50-liter scale at the Transuranium Processing Plant at Oak Ridge for 12 years to provide a broad spectrum cleanup to transuranium elements before applying more sophisticated techniques for separating individual products. The process is also used routinely to recover excessive losses of curium and/or californium from plant waste streams. The solvent system is relatively resistant to radiation damage, being usable up to 200 W-h/liter

  18. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  19. Combined Extraction Processes of Lipid from Chlorella vulgaris Microalgae: Microwave Prior to Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Dejoye, Céline; Vian, Maryline Abert; Lumia, Guy; Bouscarle, Christian; Charton, Frederic; Chemat, Farid

    2011-01-01

    Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO2) extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO2). Work performed with pressure range of 20–28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40–70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight) at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO2 allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73%) compared to SCCO2 extraction alone (1.81%). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid were the most abundant identified fatty acids. Oils obtained by MW-SCCO2 extraction had the highest concentrations of fatty acids compared to SCCO2 extraction without pretreatment. Native form, and microwave pretreated and untreated microalgae were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs of pretreated microalgae present tearing wall agglomerates. After SCCO2, microwave pretreated microalgae presented several micro cracks; while native form microalgae wall was slightly damaged. PMID:22272135

  20. Combined Extraction Processes of Lipid from Chlorella vulgaris Microalgae: Microwave Prior to Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Farid Chemat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO2 extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO2. Work performed with pressure range of 20–28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40–70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO2 allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73% compared to SCCO2 extraction alone (1.81%. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid were the most abundant identified fatty acids. Oils obtained by MW-SCCO2 extraction had the highest concentrations of fatty acids compared to SCCO2 extraction without pretreatment. Native form, and microwave pretreated and untreated microalgae were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. SEM micrographs of pretreated microalgae present tearing wall agglomerates. After SCCO2, microwave pretreated microalgae presented several micro cracks; while native form microalgae wall was slightly damaged.

  1. Demonstration of pyrometallurgical processing for metal fuel and HLW

    Tadafumi, Koyama; Kensuke, Kinoshita; Takatoshi, Hizikata; Tadashi, Inoue; Ougier, M.; Rikard, Malmbeck; Glatz, J.P.; Lothar, Koch

    2001-01-01

    CRIEPI and JRC-ITU have started a joint study on pyrometallurgical processing to demonstrate the capability of this type of process for separating actinide elements from spent fuel and HLW. The equipment dedicated for this experiments has been developed and installed in JRC-ITU. The stainless steel box equipped with tele-manipulators is operated under pure Ar atmosphere, and prepared for later installation in a hot cell. Experiments on pyro-processing of un-irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal alloy fuel by molten salt electrorefining has been carried out. Recovery of U and Pu from this type alloy fuel was first demonstrated with using solid iron cathode and liquid Cd cathode, respectively. (author)

  2. Process Optimization for Valuable Metal Recovery from Dental Amalgam Residues

    C.M. Parra–Mesa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the methodology used for optimizing leaching in a semi pilot plant is presented. This leaching process was applied to recover value metals from dental amalgam residues. 23 factorial design was used to characterize the process during the first stage and in the second one, a central compound rotational design was used for modeling copper percentage dissolved, a function of the nitric acid concentration, leaching time and temperature. This model explained the 81% of the response variability, which is considered satisfactory given the complexity of the process kinetics and, furthermore, it allowed the definition of the operation conditions for better copper recovery, which this was of 99.15%, at a temperature of 55°C, a concentration of 30% by weight and a time of 26 hours.

  3. Monitoring of Soil Remediation Process in the Metal Mining Area

    Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Ko, Myoung-Soo; Han, Hyeop-jo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Na, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    Stabilization using proper additives is an effective soil remediation technique to reduce As mobility in soil. Several researches have reported that Fe-containing materials such as amorphous Fe-oxides, goethite and hematite were effective in As immobilization and therefore acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) may be potential material for As immobilization. The AMDS is the by-product from electrochemical treatment of acid mine drainage and mainly contains Fe-oxide. The Chungyang area in Korea is located in the vicinity of the huge abandoned Au-Ag Gubong mine which was closed in the 1970s. Large amounts of mine tailings have been remained without proper treatment and the mobilization of mine tailings can be manly occurred during the summer heavy rainfall season. Soil contamination from this mobilization may become an urgent issue because it can cause the contamination of groundwater and crop plants in sequence. In order to reduce the mobilization of the mine tailings, the pilot scale study of in-situ stabilization using AMDS was applied after the batch and column experiments in the lab. For the monitoring of stabilization process, we used to determine the As concentration in crop plants grown on the field site but it is not easily applicable because of time and cost. Therefore, we may need simple monitoring technique to measure the mobility or leachability which can be comparable with As concentration in crop plants. We compared several extraction methods to suggest the representative single extraction method for the monitoring of soil stabilization efficiency. Several selected extraction methods were examined and Mehlich 3 extraction method using the mixture of NH4F, EDTA, NH4NO3, CH3COOH and HNO3 was selected as the best predictor of the leachability or mobility of As in the soil remediation process.

  4. Superior metallic alloys through rapid solidification processing (RSP) by design

    Flinn, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Rapid solidification processing using powder atomization methods and the control of minor elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon can provide metallic alloys with superior properties and performance compared to conventionally processing alloys. Previous studies on nickel- and iron-base superalloys have provided the baseline information to properly couple RSP with alloy composition, and, therefore, enable alloys to be designed for performance improvements. The RSP approach produces powders, which need to be consolidated into suitable monolithic forms. This normally involves canning, consolidation, and decanning of the powders. Canning/decanning is expensive and raises the fabrication cost significantly above that of conventional, ingot metallurgy production methods. The cost differential can be offset by the superior performance of the RSP metallic alloys. However, without the performance database, it is difficult to convince potential users to adopt the RSP approach. Spray casting of the atomized molten droplets into suitable preforms for subsequent fabrication can be cost competitive with conventional processing. If the fine and stable microstructural features observed for the RSP approach are preserved during spray casing, a cost competitive product can be obtained that has superior properties and performance that cannot be obtained by conventional methods.

  5. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang

  6. Regulable process for sawage electrochemical treatment from heavy metals

    Covaliov, V.; Covaliova, O.

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for sewage treatment and may be used in the protection for metal working, in particular, for electroplating. The disperse magnetic particle are obtaining in the comminution of the sintered spheric particle into a magnetilique faction block at the electrolyser at the outlet from the electrolyzer it is determined the suspension magnetization value concentration of the solid phase and the redox potential of the values it is automatically regulated the feed of magnetic particles and the current intensity correspondingly

  7. PM - processing for manufacturing of metals with cellular structures

    Strobl, S.; Danninger, H.

    2001-01-01

    In this review the major Processes about manufacturing of metals with cellular structure are described - based on powder metallurgy, chemical deposition and some other methods (without melting techniques). It can be shown that during the last decade many interesting innovations led to new production methods to design cellular materials. Some of them are used nowadays in industry. Also characterization and properties become more important and have therefore been carried out carefully, because of their strong influence on the functions and applications of such materials. (author)

  8. Metal matrix composite fabrication processes for high performance aerospace structures

    Ponzi, C.

    A survey is conducted of extant methods of metal matrix composite (MMC) production in order to serve as a basis for prospective MMC users' selection of a matrix/reinforcement combination, cost-effective primary fabrication methods, and secondary fabrication techniques for the achievement of desired performance levels. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of structural fittings, control-surface connecting rods, hypersonic aircraft air inlet ramps, helicopter swash plates, and turbine rotor disks. Methods for technical and cost analysis modeling useful in process optimization are noted.

  9. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  10. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F.; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-01-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO 4 , EDTA, CaCl 2 , NH 4 NO 3 , NaNO 3 , free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r² adj = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r² adj = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: ► New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability to snails. ► Bioavailability of cadmium, lead and zinc to snails was determined by

  11. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F., E-mail: frederic.gimbert@univ-fcomte.fr; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-08-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO{sub 4}, EDTA, CaCl{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability

  12. Solubility of Heavy Metals/Metalloid on Multi-Metal Contaminated Soil Samples from a Gold Ore Processing Area: Effects of Humic Substances

    Cácio Luiz Boechat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioavailability of heavy metals at contaminated sites is largely controlled by the physicochemical properties of the environmental media such as dissolved organic matter, hydroxides and clay colloids, pH, soil cation exchange capacity and oxidation-reduction potential. The aim of this study was to investigate soil pH and heavy metal solubility effect by levels of humic and fulvic acids applied in soil samples with different levels of contamination by heavy metals. The soil samples used in this study were collected in a known metal-contaminated site. Humic acid (HA and fulvic acid (FA were purchased as a commercially available liquid material extracted from Leonardite. The experiment was carried out in a factorial scheme of 4 × (4 + 1, with four contaminated soil samples and four treatments, comprised of two levels of HA, two levels of FA and a control. The HA treatments increased the solubility of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, As and Ba from soils, while FA treatments decreased, thus raising or not their availability and mobility in soil. Humic acid concentration did not influence soil pH and FA decreased soil pH until 0.7 units. The initial heavy metal concentration in soil affects the magnitude of the processes involving humic substances. The lower releases of heavy metals by FA verified the importance of the complexation properties of organic compounds. These results appear to encourage the use of HA for increased plant-availability of heavy metals in remediation projects and the use of FA for decreased plant-availability of heavy metals at contaminated sites with a risk of introducing metals into the food chain.

  13. Novel Chemical Process for Producing Chrome Coated Metal

    Christopher Pelar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates that a version of the Reduction Expansion Synthesis (RES process, Cr-RES, can create a micron scale Cr coating on an iron wire. The process involves three steps. I. A paste consisting of a physical mix of urea, chrome nitrate or chrome oxide, and water is prepared. II. An iron wire is coated by dipping. III. The coated, and dried, wire is heated to ~800 °C for 10 min in a tube furnace under a slow flow of nitrogen gas. The processed wires were then polished and characterized, primarily with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. SEM indicates the chrome layer is uneven, but only on the scale of a fraction of a micron. The evidence of porosity is ambiguous. Elemental mapping using SEM electron microprobe that confirmed the process led to the formation of a chrome metal layer, with no evidence of alloy formation. Additionally, it was found that thickness of the final Cr layer correlated with the thickness of the precursor layer that was applied prior to the heating step. Potentially, this technique could replace electrolytic processing, a process that generates carcinogenic hexavalent chrome, but further study and development is needed.

  14. Novel Chemical Process for Producing Chrome Coated Metal.

    Pelar, Christopher; Greenaway, Karima; Zea, Hugo; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Luhrs, Claudia C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2018-01-05

    This work demonstrates that a version of the Reduction Expansion Synthesis (RES) process, Cr-RES, can create a micron scale Cr coating on an iron wire. The process involves three steps. I. A paste consisting of a physical mix of urea, chrome nitrate or chrome oxide, and water is prepared. II. An iron wire is coated by dipping. III. The coated, and dried, wire is heated to ~800 °C for 10 min in a tube furnace under a slow flow of nitrogen gas. The processed wires were then polished and characterized, primarily with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM indicates the chrome layer is uneven, but only on the scale of a fraction of a micron. The evidence of porosity is ambiguous. Elemental mapping using SEM electron microprobe that confirmed the process led to the formation of a chrome metal layer, with no evidence of alloy formation. Additionally, it was found that thickness of the final Cr layer correlated with the thickness of the precursor layer that was applied prior to the heating step. Potentially, this technique could replace electrolytic processing, a process that generates carcinogenic hexavalent chrome, but further study and development is needed.

  15. Turning the volume down on heavy metals using tuned diatomite. A review of diatomite and modified diatomite for the extraction of heavy metals from water

    Danil de Namor, Angela F., E-mail: A.Danil-De-Namor@surrey.ac.uk [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, Parque Tecnologico Industrial Miguelete, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of Chemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); El Gamouz, Abdelaziz [Department of Chemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Frangie, Sofia; Martinez, Vanina; Valiente, Liliana [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, Parque Tecnologico Industrial Miguelete, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Webb, Oliver A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of published work on raw and modified diatomites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Counter-ion effect on the extraction of heavy metal speciation by diatomite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selection of the counter-ion by the use of existing thermodynamic data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enrichment of diatomites by attaching heavy metal selective functionalities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Supramolecular chemistry for conferring selectivity to diatomites. - Abstract: Contamination of water by heavy metals is a global problem, to which an inexpensive and simple solution is required. Within this context the unique properties of diatomite and its abundance in many regions of the world have led to the current widespread interest in this material for water purification purposes. Defined sections on articles published on the use of raw and modified diatomite for the removal of heavy metal pollutants from water are critically reviewed. The capability of the materials as extracting agents for individual species and mixtures of heavy metals are considered in terms of the kinetics, the thermodynamics and the recyclability for both, the pollutant and the extracting material. The concept of 'selectivity' for the enrichment of naturally occurring materials such as diatomite through the introduction of suitable functionalities in their structure to target a given pollutant is emphasised. Suggestions for further research in this area are given.

  16. Turning the volume down on heavy metals using tuned diatomite. A review of diatomite and modified diatomite for the extraction of heavy metals from water

    Danil de Namor, Angela F.; El Gamouz, Abdelaziz; Frangie, Sofia; Martinez, Vanina; Valiente, Liliana; Webb, Oliver A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Critical assessment of published work on raw and modified diatomites. ► Counter-ion effect on the extraction of heavy metal speciation by diatomite. ► Selection of the counter-ion by the use of existing thermodynamic data. ► Enrichment of diatomites by attaching heavy metal selective functionalities. ► Supramolecular chemistry for conferring selectivity to diatomites. - Abstract: Contamination of water by heavy metals is a global problem, to which an inexpensive and simple solution is required. Within this context the unique properties of diatomite and its abundance in many regions of the world have led to the current widespread interest in this material for water purification purposes. Defined sections on articles published on the use of raw and modified diatomite for the removal of heavy metal pollutants from water are critically reviewed. The capability of the materials as extracting agents for individual species and mixtures of heavy metals are considered in terms of the kinetics, the thermodynamics and the recyclability for both, the pollutant and the extracting material. The concept of ‘selectivity’ for the enrichment of naturally occurring materials such as diatomite through the introduction of suitable functionalities in their structure to target a given pollutant is emphasised. Suggestions for further research in this area are given.

  17. Process model for carbothermic production of silicon metal

    Andresen, B.

    1995-09-12

    This thesis discusses an advanced dynamical two-dimensional cylinder symmetric model for the high temperature part of the carbothermic silicon metal process, and its computer encoding. The situation close to that which is believed to exist around one of three electrodes in full-scale industrial furnaces is modelled. This area comprises a gas filled cavity surrounding the lower tip of the electrode, the metal pool underneath and the lower parts of the materials above. The most important phenomena included are: Heterogeneous chemical reactions taking place in the high-temperature zone (above 1860 {sup o}C), Evaporation and condensation of silicon, Transport of materials by dripping, Turbulent or laminar fluid flow, DC electric arcs, Heat transport by convection, conduction and radiation. The results from the calculations, such as production rates, gas- and temperature distributions, furnace- and particle geometries, fluid flow fields etc, are presented graphically. In its present state the model is a prototype. The process is very complex, and the calculations are time consuming. The governing equations are coded into a Fortran 77 computer code applying the commercial 3D code FLUENT as a basis. 64 refs., 110 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Sequential extraction of heavy metals in river sediments of an abandoned pyrite mining area: pollution detection and affinity series

    Pagnanelli, F.; Moscardini, E.; Giuliano, V.; Toro, L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper heavy metal pollution at an abandoned Italian pyrite mine has been investigated by comparing total concentrations and speciation of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb and As) in a red mud sample and a river sediment. Acid digestions show that all the investigated heavy metals present larger concentrations in the sediment than in the tailing. A modified Tessier's procedure has been used to discriminate heavy metal bound to organic fraction from those originally present in the mineral sulphide matrix and to detect a possible trend of metal mobilisation from red mud to river sediment. Sequential extractions on bulk and size fractionated samples denote that sediment samples present larger percent concentrations of the investigated heavy metals in the first extractive steps (I-IV) especially in lower dimension size fractionated samples suggesting that heavy metals in the sediment are significantly bound by superficial adsorption mechanisms. - Capsule: A modified Tessier's procedure, discriminating organic and sulphide bound metals, was used to detect pollutant mobilisation from red mud to river sediment in an abandoned pyrite mine

  19. Desulfurization of fuels with ionic liquids by extraction and oxidative extraction processes

    Rodríguez Cabo, Borja

    2014-01-01

    The excessive emission of pollutants to the atmosphere has been a problem during the last few decades due to, among other reasons, the massive use of transports. In order to avoid this problem, many methods are being investigated as an alternative to the classical hydrodesulfurization technique, such as adsorption, biodesulfurization, extraction and oxidation. The extractive desulfurization is one of the most promising alternatives. Moreover, its enhancement with selective oxidation of sulfur...

  20. Effects of process parameters on peanut skins extract and CO2 diffusivity by supercritical fluid extraction

    Putra, N. R.; Yian, L. N.; Nasir, H. M.; Idham, Z. Binti; Yunus, M. A. C.

    2018-03-01

    Peanut skins (Arachis hypogea) are an agricultural waste product which has received much attention because they contain high nutritional values and can be potentially utilized in difference industries. At present, only a few studies have been conducted to study the effects of parameters on the peanut skins oil extraction. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the best extraction condition in order to obtain the highest extract yield using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) with co-solvent Ethanol as compared to Soxhlet extraction method. Diffusivity of carbon dioxide in supercritical fluid extraction was determined using Crank model. The mean particle size used in this study was 425 µm. The supercritical carbon dioxide was performed at temperature (40 – 70 °C), flow rate of co-solvent ethanol (0 - 7.5% Vethanol/Vtotal), and extraction pressure (10 – 30 MPa) were used in this studies. The results showed that the percentage of oil yields and effective diffusivity increase as the pressure, rate of co-solvent, and temperature increased.