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Sample records for metal excited-state electron

  1. Hydrogen Bonding in the Electronic Excited State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-Jiu; Han, Ke-Li; DICP1101 Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Here, I will give a talk on our recent advances in electronic excited-state hydrogen-bonding dynamics and the significant role of excited-state hydrogen bonding on internal conversion (IC), electronic spectral shifts (ESS), photoinduced electron transfer (PET), fluorescence quenching (FQ), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), and metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT). The combination of various spectroscopic experiments with theoretical calculations has led to tremendous progress in excited-state hydrogen-bonding research. We first demonstrated that intermolecular hydrogen bond in excited state can be greatly strengthened or weakened for many chromophores. We have also clarified that intermolecular hydrogen-bond strengthening and weakening correspond to red-shifts and blue-shifts, respectively, in the electronic spectra. Moreover, radiationless deactivations (via IC, PET, ICT, MLCT, and so on) can be dramatically influenced by excited-state hydrogen bonding. GJZ and KLH thank the NSFC (Nos: 20903094 and 20833008) for financial support.

  2. Excited state electron affinity calculations for aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Adnan Yousif

    2017-08-01

    Excited states of negative aluminum ion are reviewed, and calculations of electron affinities of the states (3s^23p^2)^1D and (3s3p^3){^5}{S}° relative to the (3s^23p)^2P° and (3s3p^2)^4P respectively of the neutral aluminum atom are reported in the framework of nonrelativistic configuration interaction (CI) method. A priori selected CI (SCI) with truncation energy error (Bunge in J Chem Phys 125:014107, 2006) and CI by parts (Bunge and Carbó-Dorca in J Chem Phys 125:014108, 2006) are used to approximate the valence nonrelativistic energy. Systematic studies of convergence of electron affinity with respect to the CI excitation level are reported. The calculated value of the electron affinity for ^1D state is 78.675(3) meV. Detailed Calculations on the ^5S°c state reveals that is 1216.8166(3) meV below the ^4P state.

  3. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  4. The Raman effect and its application to electronic spectroscopies in metal-centered species : Techniques and investigations in ground and excited states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, W.R.; J. McGarvey, J.

    In the decades since its discovery and somewhat limited early applications, Raman scattering has become the basis for the development of a variety of methods for probing molecular structure both in ground and electronically excited states. In this review, following a brief look at the underlying

  5. Electronic Excited States of Tungsten(0) Arylisocyanides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvapilová, Hana; Sattler, W.; Sattler, A.; Sazanovich, I.; Clark, I. P.; Towrie, M.; Gray, H. B.; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 17 (2015), s. 8518-8528 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13015 Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TRANSITION-METAL-COMPLEXES * FEMTOSECOND FLUORESCENCE * CHARGE-TRANSFER Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.820, year: 2015

  6. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  7. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measur...

  8. Electronically excited states of carbazole-modified ortho-phenylenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Azusa; Fukabori, Nao

    2018-02-01

    In recent years new materials for phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes were found from complexes of carbazole-modified ortho-phenylene derivatives. We investigate theoretically the photo-induced charge transfer in these complexes. The electronically excited states and absorption spectra of tetramer ortho-phenylene (OP) derivatives were first studied by using time-dependent density functional theory calculations with various functionals. The functional that best reproduced the experimental results was found to be ωB97XD, and the assignment of the experimentally observed ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum was successfully performed in comparison with the theoretically obtained one. We then performed a spectral assignment of carbazole-modified OP derivatives.

  9. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various...... transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics...... in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong....

  10. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could...

  11. Electron delocalization and aromaticity in low-lying excited states of archetypal organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Vandenbussche, Jelle; Bultinck, Patrick; Matito, Eduard; Solà, Miquel

    2011-12-14

    Aromaticity is a property usually linked to the ground state of stable molecules. Although it is well-known that certain excited states are unquestionably aromatic, the aromaticity of excited states remains rather unexplored. To move one step forward in the comprehension of aromaticity in excited states, in this work we analyze the electron delocalization and aromaticity of a series of low-lying excited states of cyclobutadiene, benzene, and cyclooctatetraene with different multiplicities at the CASSCF level by means of electron delocalization measures. While our results are in agreement with Baird's rule for the aromaticity of the lowest-lying triplet excited state in annulenes having 4nπ-electrons, they do not support Soncini and Fowler's generalization of Baird's rule pointing out that the lowest-lying quintet state of benzene and septet state of cyclooctatetraene are not aromatic.

  12. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  13. Creation and evolution of excited states in anthracene crystals bombarded by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, G.

    1978-01-01

    A qualitative description of the kinematics of excited states in anthracene crystals bombarded by electrons is given. It is compared with experimental results concerning scintillation decay curves, and magnetic field effects on the prompt and delayed components of the scintillation

  14. Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Excited-State Aromaticity: Capturing Electronic Structures and Conformations upon Aromaticity Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Juwon; Sung, Young Mo; Hong, Yongseok; Kim, Dongho

    2018-03-06

    Aromaticity, the special energetic stability derived from cyclic [4 n + 2]π-conjugated electronic structures, has been the topic of intense interest in chemistry because it plays a critical role in rationalizing molecular stability, reactivity, and physical/chemical properties. Recently, the pioneering work by Colin Baird on aromaticity reversal, postulating that aromatic (antiaromatic) character in the ground state reverses to antiaromatic (aromatic) character in the lowest excited triplet state, has attracted much scientific attention. The completely reversed aromaticity in the excited state provides direct insight into understanding the photophysical/chemical properties of photoactive materials. In turn, the application of aromatic molecules to photoactive materials has led to numerous studies revealing this aromaticity reversal. However, most studies of excited-state aromaticity have been based on the theoretical point of view. The experimental evaluation of aromaticity in the excited state is still challenging and strenuous because the assessment of (anti)aromaticity with conventional magnetic, energetic, and geometric indices is difficult in the excited state, which practically restricts the extension and application of the concept of excited-state aromaticity. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies can provide a new and alternative avenue to evaluate excited-state aromaticity experimentally while observing changes in the molecular features in the excited states. Time-resolved optical spectroscopies take advantage of ultrafast laser pulses to achieve high time resolution, making them suitable for monitoring ultrafast changes in the excited states of molecular systems. This can provide valuable information for understanding the aromaticity reversal. This Account presents recent breakthroughs in the experimental assessment of excited-state aromaticity and the verification of aromaticity reversal with time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements. To

  15. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  16. An exciton approach to the excited states of two electron atoms. I Formalism and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The exciton model is formally applied to a description of the excited states of two electron atoms with the explicit inclusion of exchange. The model leads to a conceptually simple framework for the discussion of the electronic properties of the archetypical atomic electron pair

  17. Calculation of electron scattering on excited states of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1993-11-01

    The results of electron-sodium scattering for the 3D → 3P transition at the projectile energy of 5 eV calculated using the Convergent Close Coupling method are presented. These include spin-resolved and spin-averaged alignment, orientation, and coherence parameters, as well as differential cross section and spin asymmetry. This calculation simultaneously produces results for the transitions 3P→3P at 6.52 eV and 3S → 3P at 8.62 eV. The three transitions are used to study the nature of the convergence in the close-coupling expansion. The results were found to be in good agreement with the existent experimental data. 15 refs., 9 figs

  18. An MRCI investigation of the electronically excited states of difluorocarbene and its monovalent ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czernek, Jiří; Živný, O.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 14 (2008), s. 1761-1765 ISSN 0026-8976 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA102/06/1337 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : carbenes * excited states * ab initio Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.478, year: 2008

  19. Implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states in pulsed-power discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    1997-01-01

    The author points out the possible implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules in two pulsed power technologies. One involves the pulsed H 2 discharges used for the generation of H ion beams for magnetic fusion energy and particle accelerators. The other is the power modulated plasma discharges used for material processing

  20. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  1. Performance of TD-DFT for Excited States of Open-Shell Transition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Bingbing; Shen, Kaiyuan; Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2017-05-25

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been very successful in accessing low-lying excited states of closed-shell systems. However, it is much less so for excited states of open-shell systems: unrestricted Kohn-Sham based TD-DFT (U-TD-DFT) often produces physically meaningless excited states due to heavy spin contaminations, whereas restricted Kohn-Sham based TD-DFT often misses those states of lower energies. A much better variant is the explicitly spin-adapted TD-DFT (X-TD-DFT) [J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 194106] that can capture all the spin-adapted singly excited states yet without computational overhead over U-TD-DFT. While the superiority of X-TD-DFT over U-TD-DFT has been demonstrated for open-shell systems of main group elements, it remains to be seen if this is also the case for open-shell transition metal compounds. Taking as benchmark the results by MS-CASPT2 (multistate complete active space second-order perturbation theory) and ic-MRCISD (internally contracted multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles), it is shown that X-TD-DFT is indeed superior to U-TD-DFT for the vertical excitation energies of ZnH, CdH, ScH 2 , YH 2 , YO, and NbO 2 . Admittedly, there exist a few cases where U-TD-DFT appears to be better than X-TD-DFT. However, this is due to a wrong reason: the underestimation (due to spin contamination) and the overestimation (due to either the exchange-correlation functional itself or the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation kernel) happen to be compensated in the case of U-TD-DFT. As for [Cu(C 6 H 6 ) 2 ] 2+ , which goes beyond the capability of both MS-CASPT2 and ic-MRCISD, X-TD-DFT revises the U-TD-DFT assignment of the experimental spectrum.

  2. On the importance of excited state dynamic response electron correlation in polarizable embedding methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2012-01-01

    picture leading to the PE-Random-Phase Approximation (PE-RPA) and bridge the expressions to a Second-Order Polarization Propagator Approximation (SOPPA) frame such that dynamic reaction field contributions are included at the RPA level in addition to the static response described at the SOPPA level...... but with HF induced dipole moments. We conduct calculations on para-nitro-aniline and para-nitro-phenolate using said model in addition to dynamic PE-RPA and PE-CAM-B3LYP. We compare the results to recently published PE-CCSD data and demonstrate how the cost effective SOPPA based model successfully recovers...... a great portion of the inherent PE-RPA error when the observable is the solvatochromic shift. We furthermore demonstrate that whenever the change in density resulting from the ground state-excited state electronic transition in the solute is not associated with a significant change in the electric field...

  3. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments via electronic Stark spectroscopy: 5-methoxyindole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Schmitt, Michael, E-mail: mschmitt@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Meerts, W. Leo, E-mail: leo.meerts@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, NL-6525 AS Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-28

    The dipole moments of the ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of 5-methoxyindole have been determined by means of optical Stark spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The resulting spectra arise from a superposition of different field configurations, one with the static electric field almost parallel to the polarization of the exciting laser radiation, the other nearly perpendicular. Each field configuration leads to different intensities in the rovibronic spectrum. With an automated evolutionary algorithm approach, the spectra can be fit and the ratio of both field configurations can be determined. A simultaneous fit of two spectra with both field configurations improved the precision of the dipole moment determination by a factor of two. We find a reduction of the absolute dipole moment from 1.59(3) D to 1.14(6) D upon electronic excitation to the lowest electronically excited singlet state. At the same time, the dipole moment orientation rotates by 54{sup ∘} showing the importance of the determination of the dipole moment components. The dipole moment in the electronic ground state can approximately be obtained from a vector addition of the indole and the methoxy group dipole moments. However, in the electronically excited state, vector addition completely fails to describe the observed dipole moment. Several reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  4. Excited states v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1982-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 6 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper discusses the linear polyene electronic structure and potential surfaces, considering both the theoretical and experimental approaches in such electronic states. This paper also reviews the theory of electronic structure and cites some experimental techniques on polyene excitations, polyene spectroscopic phenomenology, and those involving higher states of polyenes and their triplet states. Examples of these experimental studies of excited states involve the high-resolution one-pho

  5. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  6. Electronically excited states and photochemical reaction mechanisms of β-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Deniz; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-07

    Carbohydrates are important molecular components of living matter. While spectroscopic and computational studies have been performed on carbohydrates in the electronic ground state, the lack of a chromophore complicates the elucidation of the excited-state properties and the photochemistry of this class of compounds. Herein, we report on the first computational investigation of the singlet photochemistry of β-glucose. It is shown that low-lying singlet excited states are of nσ* nature. Our computations of the singlet vertical excitation energies predict absorption from 6.0 eV onward. Owing to a dense manifold of weakly-absorbing states, a sizable and broad absorption in the ultraviolet-C range arises. We have explored two types of photochemical reaction mechanisms: hydrogen-detachment processes for each of the five O-H groups and a C-O ring-opening process. Both types of reactions are driven by repulsive nσ* states that are readily accessible from the Franck-Condon region and lead to conical intersections in a barrierless fashion. We have optimized the geometries of the conical intersections involved in these photochemical processes and found that these intersections are located around 5.0 eV for the O-H hydrogen-detachment reactions and around 4.0 eV for the C-O ring-opening reaction. The energies of all conical intersections are well below the computed absorption edge. The calculations were performed using linear-response methods for the computation of the vertical excitation energies and multiconfigurational methods for the optimization of conical intersections and the computation of energy profiles.

  7. Electronic excited states of Si(100) and organic molecules adsorbed on Si(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Nicholas A; Blundy, Adam J

    2006-02-02

    The electronically excited states of the Si(100) surface and acetylene, benzene, and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone adsorbed on Si(100) are studied with time-dependent density functional theory. The computational cost of these calculations can be reduced through truncation of the single excitation space. This allows larger cluster models of the surface in conjunction with large adsorbates to be studied. On clean Si(100), the low-lying excitations correspond to transitions between the pi orbitals of the silicon-silicon dimers. These excitations are predicted to occur in the range 0.4-2 eV. When organic molecules are adsorbed on the surface, surface --> molecule, molecule --> surface, and electronic excitations localized within the adsorbate are also observed at higher energies. For acetylene and benzene, the remaining pipi* excitations are found to lie at lower energies than in the corresponding gas-phase species. Even though the aromaticity of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone is retained, significant shifts in the pipi* excitations of the aromatic rings are predicted. This is in part due to structural changes that occur upon adsorption.

  8. Triplet excited states and radical intermediates formed in electron pulse radiolysis of amino-substituted fluorenones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samant, Vaishali; Singh, A.K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Palit, D.K. E-mail: dkpalit@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-04-01

    Electron pulse radiolysis of four differently substituted amino derivatives of fluorenone, namely, 1-amino-, 2-amino- 3-amino-, and 4-aminofluorenone, has been carried out to study the effect of structure on the spectroscopic and kinetic characteristics of the triplet excited states as well as the transient free radical intermediates formed under reducing and oxidizing conditions. The triplet states of these compounds have been generated in benzene by pulse radiolysis and in other solvents by flash photolysis technique and their spectral and kinetic properties have been investigated. Hydrated electron (e{sub aq}{sup -}) has been found to react with these fluorenone derivatives to form the anion radical species with a diffusion-controlled rate constant. The spectral and kinetic properties of the transient ketyl and anion radicals have been studied by generating them in aqueous solutions of suitable pH. The pK{sub a} values of ketyl[rlhar2]anion radical equilibria are in the range of 6.8-7.7 for these derivatives. The oxidized species have been generated by reaction with the azide radical. Hydrogen atom adducts as well as the cation radicals of these derivatives have also been generated by pulse radiolysis and characterized.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  10. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  11. Analytical Hessian of electronic excited states in time-dependent density functional theory with Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2011-07-07

    We present the analytical expression and computer implementation for the second-order energy derivatives of the electronic excited state with respect to the nuclear coordinates in the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Gaussian atomic orbital basis sets. Here, the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to the full TDDFT is adopted, and therefore the formulation process of TDDFT excited-state Hessian is similar to that of configuration interaction singles (CIS) Hessian. However, due to the replacement of the Hartree-Fock exchange integrals in CIS with the exchange-correlation kernels in TDDFT, many quantitative changes in the derived equations are arisen. The replacement also causes additional technical difficulties associated with the calculation of a large number of multiple-order functional derivatives with respect to the density variables and the nuclear coordinates. Numerical tests on a set of test molecules are performed. The simulated excited-state vibrational frequencies by the analytical Hessian approach are compared with those computed by CIS and the finite-difference method. It is found that the analytical Hessian method is superior to the finite-difference method in terms of the computational accuracy and efficiency. The numerical differentiation can be difficult due to root flipping for excited states that are close in energy. TDDFT yields more exact excited-state vibrational frequencies than CIS, which usually overestimates the values.

  12. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...... moments are computed using the same geometries (MP2/6-31G*) and basis set (TZVP) as in our previous ab initio benchmark study on electronically excited states. The results from TD-DFT (with the functionals BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP) and from DFT/MRCI are compared against the previous high-level ab initio...

  13. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  14. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  15. Development and implementation of theoretical methods for the description of electronically core-excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Jan

    2016-03-23

    -cc-series, a mean error of -0.23% ±0.12% for core-excitation energies can be identified at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen K-edge excitations, whereas CVS-ADC(3) exhibits errors of 0.61% ± 0.32%. This is due to fortuitous error compensation of basis set truncation, electron correlation, orbital relaxation and neglect of relativistic effects at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level. Transition moments and spectral features, as well as static dipole moments, are excellently described with both CVS-ADC(2)-x and CVS-ADC(3). Especially the 6-311++G** basis set provides an excellent ratio of accuracy to computational time. Another important topic is the description of orbital relaxation effects. In the scope of this thesis, I show, how these effects are included indirectly within the CVS-ADC approaches. For this purpose, two different descriptors are used, i.e. electron promotion numbers and the amount of doubly excited amplitudes. Furthermore, with the help of detachment/attachment (D/A) densities, which can be constructed via the CVS-ISR approach, relaxation effects can be visualized. For this purpose, the (D/A) densities are compared with hole/electron (h/e) densities based on the transition density matrix. With this knowledge, the X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized molecules and radicals from the fields of organic electronics and biology are investigated and analyzed. On the basis of these studies, the restricted and unrestricted versions of CVS-ADC(2)-x in combination with the 6-311++G** basis set exhibit mean errors of core-excitation energies around 0.1%, compared to experimental values. Additionally, core-excited state characters are analyzed with the help of state densities obtained via the CVS-ISR approach or the transition density matrix. To demonstrate the computational savings as a function of the size of the core space, several systems are investigated. CVS-ADC(3) calculations take about 8-10 times longer than CVS-ADC(2)-x calculations and since the

  16. Excited state interactions in graphene oxide-semiconductor/metal nanoparticle architectures for sensing and energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightcap, Ian V.

    The recent emergence of graphene, along with its unique and impressive set of properties, has resulted in a concerted effort to incorporate the material into electronic devices and composite materials. Graphene oxide, a chemically modified form of graphene which can be produced economically and in large scale, is one of the most common starting materials for making graphene composite materials with improved conductivity, photovoltaic performance, and photocatalytic activity, to name a few examples. This dissertation describes progress made in understanding and quantifying the electronic properties of graphene oxide as they relate to electron storage and shuttling in composite materials. A more complete understanding of the nature of electronic interactions in graphene composites was achieved through two processes: 1) A dual electron-titration showing storage and shuttling of electrons in reduced graphene oxide. 2) A method developed to isolate the energy and electron transfer pathways involved in the deactivation of excited CdSe quantum dots by RGO. The results obtained from these two processes provide insight into the electronic interactions between graphene, semiconductors, and metals. Additionally, composite films were constructed to demonstrate the electron transfer properties of reduced graphene oxide. TiO2-reduced graphene oxide films were made via a simple drop-cast technique. The films show enhanced photovoltaic and photocatalytic characteristics when compared to TiO2-only films. A stacked architecture incorporating single-layer reduced graphene oxide on thin TiO2 nanoparticle films was developed as a method for illumination-controlled deposition of metal nanoparticles. Films of metal nanoparticles made using this technique were employed as Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman (SERRS) sensors and show nano-molar sensitivity. Finally, quantum dot-reduced graphene oxide composites were made via an electrophoretic deposition process. The resulting films were used

  17. Excited states 4

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the excited states of molecular activity. One paper investigates the resonance Raman spectroscopy as the key to vibrational-electronic coupling. This paper reviews the basic theory of Raman scattering; it also explains the derivation of the Raman spectra, excitation profiles, and depolarization ratios for simple resonance systems. Another paper reviews the magnetic properties of triplet states, including the zero-field resonance techniques, the high-field experiments, and the spin Hamiltonian. This paper focuses on the magnetic

  18. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  19. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  20. Simulations of the dissociation of small helium clusters with ab initio molecular dynamics in electronically excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closser, Kristina D.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics resulting from electronic excitations of helium clusters were explored using ab initio molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed with configuration interaction singles and adiabatic classical dynamics coupled to a state-following algorithm. 100 different configurations of He 7 were excited into the 2s and 2p manifold for a total of 2800 trajectories. While the most common outcome (90%) was complete fragmentation to 6 ground state atoms and 1 excited state atom, 3% of trajectories yielded bound, He 2 * , and <0.5% yielded an excited helium trimer. The nature of the dynamics, kinetic energy release, and connections to experiments are discussed

  1. Participation of electronic excited states in the positronium formation mechanism in the Gd(III) pentakis (picrate) complexes with imidazolium countercations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulgêncio, F., E-mail: fefulgencio@gmail.com [Departam ento de Química – ICEx Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Borges, A.S. [Coordenadoria de Química e Biologia – Instituto Federal do Espírito Santos – IFES, Campus Vitória, ES (Brazil); Araújo, M.H. [Departam ento de Química – ICEx Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Brito, H.F. [Instituto de Química, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, F.C. [Departamento de Metalurgia e Química, Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais – CEFET-MG, Campus Timóteo, MG (Brazil); Ribeiro, T.; Windmöller, D. [Departam ento de Química – ICEx Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhães, W.F., E-mail: welmag@ufmg.br [Departam ento de Química – ICEx Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and optical spectroscopies measurements were performed on [Gd(pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](pic)·6H{sub 2}O and on complexes of general formula C{sub 2}[Gd(pic){sub 5}], where pic corresponds to picrate ligands and C to the countercations butyl-methyl, hexyl-methyl, butyl-ethyl and butyl-butyl imidazoles. Since all of these complexes have high energy ligand-to-metal charge transfer states (LMCTS) but form low amounts of Positronium (Ps), the LMCTS do not act here as a mechanism that suppress luminescence nor prevents Ps formation. This result suggests that, besides LMCTS, other effects should also contribute to prevent Ps formation. The results indicate that the electron withdrawing –NO{sub 2} groups in the picrate ligand are responsible by the effect that prevents Ps formation. Also, a rough correlation between the ligands' triplet states lifetimes and Ps formation was observed. The insertion of electron donor groups (the imidazolium countercations) increased the ligands' first triplet excited states ({sup 3}π{sup ⁎}) lifetimes and Ps formation, indicating that these two spectroscopic parameters are correlated. Also, it is demonstrated that there is no clear correlation between Ps formation probability and the excitation energy of the ligands' first triplet excited states. The results were discussed in terms of the recently proposed Ps formation mechanism, named cybotactic correlated system kinetic mechanism (CCSKM), showing that the Ps formation process involves molecular excited states and is kinetically controlled. - Highlights: • PALS and optical spectroscopies measurements performed on Gd{sup 3+} complexes. • A correlation was obtained between the ligands' {sup 3}π{sup ⁎} lifetimes and Ps formation. • Electronegative groups increased the ligands' {sup 3}π{sup ⁎} lifetimes and Ps formation. • Results discussed in terms of a new Ps formation mechanism (ccskm).

  2. Excited State Dynamics and Semiconductor-to-Metallic Phase Transition of VO2 Thin Film

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Huimin

    2004-01-01

    .... Vanadium dioxide shows an ultrafast, passive phase transition (PT) from a monoclinic semiconductor phase to a metallic tetragonal rutile structure when the sample temperature is above 68 degrees C...

  3. Inelastic scattering of high transfer moment electrons to the first excited state (Jsup(π)=3-) of 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Dominique.

    1979-10-01

    A determination was made of an angular distribution of the inelastic scattering cross-sections of electrons by the first excited state (Jsup(π)=3 - , E*=2.615 MeV) of 208 Pb. The statistical accuracy of previous data was improved between 2 and 2.7 fm -1 and the area of transfer of moment was extended up to qsub(max)=3.4 fm -1 . Cross-sections up to 10 -37 cm 2 /sr were determined whereas the limit reached before was 7x10 -35 cm 2 /sr. In order to determine the transition charge density, it was put into parametric form by a Fourier-Bessel development using 12 coefficients and an 11 fm cut-off radius. The model error inherent in this method is reduced to an insignificant contribution by the sufficiently high transfer of moment. The experimental transition charge density was compared with the theoretical predictions [fr

  4. Ab initio structural and electronic properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters in the ground and excited state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoli, Elena; Bisi, O.; Ossicini, Stefano; Cantele, G.; Ninno, D.; Luppi, Eleonora; Magri, Rita

    2004-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of small hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters as a function of dimension are calculated from ab initio technique. The effects induced by the creation of an electron-hole pair are discussed in detail, showing the strong interplay between the structural and optical properties of the system. The distortion induced on the structure after an electronic excitation of the cluster is analyzed together with the role of the symmetry constraint during the relaxation. We point out how the overall effect is that of significantly changing the electronic spectrum if no symmetry constraint is imposed to the system. Such distortion can account for the Stokes shift and provides a possible structural model to be linked to the four-level scheme invoked in the literature to explain recent results for the optical gain in silicon nanoclusters. Finally, formation energies for clusters with increasing dimension are calculated and their relative stability discussed

  5. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Ground State versus Excited State: Discrepancy in Electronic Communication in a Series of meso-meso Two-Atom-Bridged Diporphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieleniewska, Anna; Harper, Shannon R; Arnold, Dennis P; Guldi, Dirk M

    2018-02-26

    The focal point of this work is the photophysical characterization of three meso-meso two-atom-bridged diporphyrins. Detailed investigations by means of cyclic voltammetry, absorption, fluorescence, and femto-/nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed the discrepancy in electronic communication in a series of meso-meso two-atom-bridged porphyrins in the ground state and in the excited state. In the ground state, the azo bridge facilitates the strongest electronic communication between the two porphyrins. In the excited state, however, the ethene bridge induces the strongest coupling, followed by the imine and azo bridges. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cluster expansion of the wavefunction. Calculation of electron correlations in ground and excited states by SAC and SAC CI theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuji, H.

    1979-01-01

    The SAC and SAC CI theories are formulated for actual calculations of singlet ground states and their excited states of arbitrary spin multiplicity. Approximations are considered for the variational methods since time-consuming terms are involved. The results of test calculations for singlet states have shown, with much smaller numbers of variables (sizes of the matrices involved), excellent agreement with the full CI and close-to-full CI results. This shows the utility of the SAC theory for ground states and especially of the SAC CI theory for excited states, since the slow convergence of the CI theory is much more critical for excited states than for ground states. (Auth.)

  8. Photoisomerization Mechanism of Ruthenium Sulfoxide Complexes: Role of the Metal-Centered Excited State in the Bond Rupture and Bond Construction Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Zheng, Lvyin; Li, Xun; Fan, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    Phototriggered intramolecular isomerization in a series of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, [Ru(L)(tpy)(DMSO)](n+) (where tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide; L=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), n=2; N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) n=2; picolinate (pic), n=1; acetylacetonate (acac), n=1; oxalate (ox), n=0; malonate (mal), n=0), was investigated theoretically. It is observed that the metal-centered ligand field ((3) MC) state plays an important role in the excited state S→O isomerization of the coordinated DMSO ligand. If the population of (3) MCS state is thermally accessible and no (3) MCO can be populated from this state, photoisomerization will be turned off because the (3) MCS excited state is expected to lead to fast radiationless decay back to the original (1) GSS ground state or photodecomposition along the Ru(2+) -S stretching coordinate. On the contrary, if the population of (3) MCS (or (3) MCO ) state is inaccessible, photoinduced S→O isomerization can proceed adiabatically on the potential energy surface of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited states ((3) MLCTS →(3) MLCTO ). It is hoped that these results can provide valuable information for the excited state isomerization in photochromic d(6) transition-metal complexes, which is both experimentally and intellectually challenging as a field of study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori [Department of Physics Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-Machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Freeman, Arthur J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ∼2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  10. Cluster expansion of the wavefunction. Electron correlations in ground and excited states by SAC (symmetry-adapted-cluster) and SAC CI theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuji, H.

    1979-01-01

    The solutions of the SAC (symmetry-adapated-cluster) and SAC CI theories for the study of electron correlations in ground and excited states, respectively have been summarized. Variational and non-variational solutions are considered for both theories and their features are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Excited state and ground state proton transfer rates of 3-hydroxyflavone and its derivatives studied by shpol'skii spectroscopy: The influence of redistribution of electron density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Pivovarenko, V.; Demchenko, A.P.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the mechanisms of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and ground-state back proton transfer (BPT) in 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) at cryogenic temperatures. The focus was on substituents that change the distribution of electronic density on the chromophore and their influence

  12. Electronic structure, spectra, and nature of electronically excited states of the bifluorophores stilbene-CH2-coumarine and phenyl-CH2-coumarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'Eva, N. Yu.; Vylegzhanina, Ya. O.; Maier, G. V.

    1993-09-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of trans-stilbene and benzene molecules as well as molecules of bifluorophores based on them — trans-stilbene-CH2-coumarine 120 and phenyl-CH2-coumarine — were performed by the INDO/S method. The form of the molecular orbitals, the distribution of the electron density in the ground and excited states, the spectra and nature of the electronically states of bifluorophore molecules were established in relation to the energy donor and acceptor molecules. Three conformations of the bifluorophore molecules were studied (planar, “edge,” “wing”). It was discovered that the energy and type of the molecular orbitals of the bifluorophores are independent of the relative orientation of the donor and acceptor subsystems. It is shown that the mixed character of the three lowest electronically excited states, participating in the formation of the spectrum, of the bifluorophores gives rise to quite appreciable overlapping of their electronic wave functions and, therefore, ensures that the internal-conversion processes are efficient.

  13. Photo-driven electron transfer from the highly reducing excited state of naphthalene diimide radical anion to a CO 2 reduction catalyst within a molecular triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose F. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; La Porte, Nathan T. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Mauck, Catherine M. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Wasielewski, Michael R. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA

    2017-01-01

    The naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide) radical anion (NDI-˙), which is easily produced by mild chemical or electrochemical reduction (-0.5 Vvs.SCE), can be photoexcited at wavelengths as long as 785 nm, and has an excited state (NDI-˙*) oxidation potential of -2.1 Vvs.SCE, making it a very attractive choice for artificial photosynthetic systems that require powerful photoreductants, such as CO2 reduction catalysts. However, once an electron is transferred from NDI-˙* to an acceptor directly bound to it, a combination of strong electronic coupling and favorable free energy change frequently make the back electron transfer rapid. To mitigate this effect, we have designed a molecular triad system comprising an NDI-˙ chromophoric donor, a 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA) intermediate acceptor, and a Re(dmb)(CO)3carbon dioxide reduction catalyst, where dmb is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, as the terminal acceptor. Photoexcitation of NDI-˙ to NDI-˙* is followed by ultrafast reduction of DPA to DPA-˙, which then rapidly reduces the metal complex. The overall time constant for the forward electron transfer to reduce the metal complex is τ = 20.8 ps, while the time constant for back-electron transfer is six orders of magnitude longer, τ = 43.4 μs. Achieving long-lived, highly reduced states of these metal complexes is a necessary condition for their use as catalysts. The extremely long lifetime of the reduced metal complex is attributed to careful tuning of the redox potentials of the chromophore and intermediate acceptor. The NDI-˙–DPA fragment presents many attractive features for incorporation into other photoinduced electron transfer assemblies directed at the long-lived photosensitization of difficult-to-reduce catalytic centers.

  14. Excited states in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilento, G.; Zinner, K.; Bechara, E.J.H.; Duran, N.; Baptista, R.C. de; Shimizu, Y.; Augusto, O.; Faljoni-Alario, A.; Vidigal, C.C.C.; Oliveira, O.M.M.F.; Haun, M.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of bioluminescence related to bioenergetics are discussed: 1. chemical generation of excited species, by means of two general processes: electron transference and cyclic - and linear peroxide cleavage; 2. biological systems capable of generating excited states and 3. biological functions of these states, specially the non-emissive ones (tripletes). The production and the role of non-emissive excited states in biological systems are analysed, the main purpose of the study being the search for non-emissive states. Experiences carried out in biological systems are described; results and conclusions are given. (M.A.) [pt

  15. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  16. Modeling of charge-transfer transitions and excited states in d6 transition metal complexes by DFT techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Antonín; Záliš, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 251, 3-4 (2007), s. 258-287 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC068; GA MŠk OC 139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : charge-transfer transition * DFT technique * excited states * spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 8.568, year: 2007

  17. The "Rust" Challenge: On the Correlations between Electronic Structure, Excited State Dynamics, and Photoelectrochemical Performance of Hematite Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Daniel A; Yatom, Natav; Ellis, David S; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Rothschild, Avner

    2018-03-05

    In recent years, hematite's potential as a photoanode material for solar hydrogen production has ignited a renewed interest in its physical and interfacial properties, which continues to be an active field of research. Research on hematite photoanodes provides new insights on the correlations between electronic structure, transport properties, excited state dynamics, and charge transfer phenomena, and expands our knowledge on solar cell materials into correlated electron systems. This research news article presents a snapshot of selected theoretical and experimental developments linking the electronic structure to the photoelectrochemical performance, with particular focus on optoelectronic properties and charge carrier dynamics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. General active space commutator-based coupled cluster theory of general excitation rank for electronically excited states: implementation and application to ScH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Olsen, Jeppe; Loras, Jessica; Fleig, Timo

    2013-11-21

    We present a new implementation of general excitation rank coupled cluster theory for electronically excited states based on the single-reference multi-reference formalism. The method may include active-space selected and/or general higher excitations by means of the general active space concept. It may employ molecular integrals over the four-component Lévy-Leblond Hamiltonian or the relativistic spin-orbit-free four-component Hamiltonian of Dyall. In an initial application to ground- and excited states of the scandium monohydride molecule we report spectroscopic constants using basis sets of up to quadruple-zeta quality and up to full iterative triple excitations in the cluster operators. Effects due to spin-orbit interaction are evaluated using two-component multi-reference configuration interaction for assessing the accuracy of the coupled cluster results.

  19. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  20. Organic electronic materials: Recent advances in the dft description of the ground and excited states using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals

    KAUST Repository

    Körzdörfer, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Density functional theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TD-DFT) are powerful tools enabling the theoretical prediction of the ground- and excited-state properties of organic electronic materials with reasonable accuracy at affordable computational costs. Due to their excellent accuracy-to-numerical-costs ratio, semilocal and global hybrid functionals such as B3LYP have become the workhorse for geometry optimizations and the prediction of vibrational spectra in modern theoretical organic chemistry. Despite the overwhelming success of these out-of-the-box functionals for such applications, the computational treatment of electronic and structural properties that are of particular interest in organic electronic materials sometimes reveals severe and qualitative failures of such functionals. Important examples include the overestimation of conjugation, torsional barriers, and electronic coupling as well as the underestimation of bond-length alternations or excited-state energies in low-band-gap polymers.In this Account, we highlight how these failures can be traced back to the delocalization error inherent to semilocal and global hybrid functionals, which leads to the spurious delocalization of electron densities and an overestimation of conjugation. The delocalization error for systems and functionals of interest can be quantified by allowing for fractional occupation of the highest occupied molecular orbital. It can be minimized by using long-range corrected hybrid functionals and a nonempirical tuning procedure for the range-separation parameter.We then review the benefits and drawbacks of using tuned long-range corrected hybrid functionals for the description of the ground and excited states of π-conjugated systems. In particular, we show that this approach provides for robust and efficient means of characterizing the electronic couplings in organic mixed-valence systems, for the calculation of accurate torsional barriers at the polymer limit, and for the

  1. Electronic Structure and Excited-State Dynamics of an Arduengo-Type Carbene and its Imidazolone Oxidation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Hans-Christian; Flock, Marco; Welz, Eileen; Engels, Bernd; Schneider, Heidi; Radius, Udo; Fischer, Ingo

    2017-03-02

    We describe an investigation of the excited-state dynamics of isolated 1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazoline-2-ylidene (tBu 2 Im, C 11 H 20 N 2 , m/z=180), an Arduengo-type carbene, by time- and frequency-resolved photoionization using a picosecond laser system. The energies of several singlet and triplet excited states were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The S 1 state of the carbene deactivates on a 100 ps time scale possibly by intersystem crossing. In the experiments we observed an additional signal at m/z=196, that was assigned to the oxidation product 1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazolone, tBu 2 ImO. It shows a well-resolved resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectrum with an origin located at 36951 cm -1 . Several low-lying vibrational bands could be assigned, with a lifetime that depends strongly on the excitation energy. At the origin the lifetime is longer than 3 ns, but drops to 49 ps at higher excess energies. To confirm formation of the imidazolone we also performed experiments on benzimidazolone (BzImO) for comparison. Apart from a redshift for BzImO the spectra of the two compounds are very similar. The TD-DFT values display a very good agreement with the experimental data. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. On the triplet nature of excited states of group IVB metallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukova, G.V.; Smirnov, V.A.; Starodubova, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Direct photophysical approach is presented to estimation of energy and orbital nature of electron-excited states of metalorganic compounds of transition metals (Ti, Zr, Hf) by nonradiating triplet-triplet energy transfer from metalorganic complexes to unsaturated hydrocarbons having strong S-T-splitting energy. It is proved for the first time that emission excites states of metallocenes Cp 2 M IV Cl 2 are triplet and their emission is accordingly phosphorescence [ru

  3. Quantum analysis in the transition process to excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions; Denshi shototsu ni tomonau sanso bunshi ni okeru reiki jotai sen`i no ryoshironteki kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimaru, K. [Gifu National College of Technology, Gifu (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    For understanding of fundamental chemical reactions under a highly non equilibrium condition which is quite often used in plasma processing, the relevant atomic and molecular processes must be clarified. In this study, an analysis of the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions in the oxygen plasma has been carried out. First, the electron density distribution in an oxygen molecule has been calculated using the extended Huckel molecular orbital method. Then, the electron potential energy distribution in the transition process to the excited state has been estimated. The electron behavior has been calculated using the estimated unidimensional electron potential energy distribution and unsteady quantum mechanics. As a result, the transition process to the excited state of an oxygen molecule induced by electron collisions and its conditions have been clarified qualitatively. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Electronic properties of excited states in single InAs quantum dots; Elektronische Struktur angeregter Zustaende einzelner InAs-Quantenpunkte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warming, Till

    2009-02-20

    The application of quantum-mechanical effects in semiconductor nanostructures enables the realization of novel opto-electronic devices. Examples are given by single-photon emitters and emitters of entangled photon pairs, both being essential for quantum cryptography, or for qubit systems as needed for quantum computing. InAs/GaAs quantum dots are one of the most promising candidates for such applications. A detailed knowledge of the electronic properties of quantum dots is a prerequisite for this development. The aim of this work is an experimental access to the detailed electronic structure of the excited states in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots including few-particle effects and in particular exchange interaction. The experimental approach is micro photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy ({mu}PLE). One of the main difficulties using {mu}PLE to probe single QDs is the unambiguous assignment of the observed resonances in the spectrum to specific transitions. By comparing micro photoluminescence ({mu}PL) and {mu}PLE spectra, the identification of the main resonances becomes possible. The key is given by the fine structure of the hot trion. Excitation spectroscopy on single charged QDs enables for the first time the complete observation of a non-trivial fine structure of an excitonic complex in a QD, the hot trion. Modelling based on eight-band k.p theory in combination with a configuration interaction scheme is in excellent agreement. Therewith the simulation also enables realistic predictions on the fine structure of the ground-state exciton which is of large importance for single quantum dot devices. Theory concludes from the observed transitions that the structural symmetry of the QDs is broken. Micro photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy combined with resonantly excited micro photoluminescence enables an optical access to the single particle states of the hole without the influence of few-particle coulomb interactions. Based on this knowledge the exciton

  5. Application of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TRNIR) to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state(s) of Os(phen)32+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Kober, Edward M.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Application of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TRNIR) to Os(phen) 3 2+ in CD 3 CN, following visible (450nm) laser flash excitation, reveals an absorption feature at ν-bar max =5460cm -1 (ε max >=5000M -1 cm -1 , Δν-bar 1/2 =1840cm -1 ) for the MLCT excited state Os(phen) 3 2+ *. Based on an electronic structure model, including spin-orbit coupling, the absorption is tentatively assigned to three overlapping ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (LLCT) bands two of which have dπ->dπ interconfigurational character. This assignment is consistent with the results of a solvent dependence study and an analysis of predicted band energies

  6. DFT study of anthocyanidin and anthocyanin pigments for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Electron injecting from the excited states and adsorption onto TiO2 (anatase) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, Emildo

    2017-06-01

    We explored, the absorption spectra, excited states and electronic injection parameters of anthocyanidin and anthocyanin pigments using the level of theory (TD)CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p). For the most isolated dyes, the distribution pattern of HOMO and LUMO spreads over the whole molecules, which lead an efficient electronic delocalization. The calculated light harvesting efficiencies (LHEs) are all near unity. Methoxy group in peonidin molecule lead the largest oscillator strength and LHE. The presence of water lead a higher spontaneous electronic inject process, with ΔGinject average of -1.14 eV. The ΔGinject order is peonidin anthocyanin-(TiO2)30 complex was calculated to be from 17 to 24 eV, indicating both, the strong interactions between the dyes and the anatase (TiO2) surface and stronger electronic coupling strengths of the anthocyanin-(TiO2)30 complex, which corresponded to higher observed η. The HOMO and LUMO shape showed the electrons delocalized predominantly on the anthocyanin structure while the LUMO + 1 shape is localized into the (TiO2)30 surface. Therefore, we expected a electronic injection from HOMO to LUMO + 1 in the anthocyanin-(TiO2)30 adsorption complex, after the light absorption.

  7. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  8. Symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster studies of electronically excited states of copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide dianions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Piecuch, Piotr; Lutz, Jesse J.; Gour, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electronically excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are determined using the scalar relativistic symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster calculations. The results are compared with experimental spectra. Highlights: ► Electronic spectra of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- are examined by SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. ► Relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC results are compared with experimental spectra. ► An assignment of bands in the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- absorption spectra is obtained. ► Relativistic effects affect excitation energies and ground-state geometries. ► The effect of relativity on the oscillator strengths is generally small. - Abstract: The valence excitation spectra of the copper tetrachloride and copper tetrabromide open-shell dianions, CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- , respectively, are investigated by a variety of symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction (SAC-CI) and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods. The valence excited states of the CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- species that correspond to transitions from doubly occupied molecular orbitals (MOs) to a singly occupied MO (SOMO), for which experimental spectra are available, are examined with the ionized (IP) variants of the SAC-CI and EOMCC methods. The higher-energy excited states of CuCl 4 2- and CuBr 4 2- that correspond to transitions from SOMO to unoccupied MOs, which have not been characterized experimentally, are determined using the electron-attached (EA) SAC-CI and EOMCC approaches. An emphasis is placed on the scalar relativistic SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations based on the spin-free part of the second-order Douglass–Kroll–Hess Hamiltonian (DKH2) and on a comparison of the results of the IP and EA SAC-CI and EOMCC calculations with up to 2-hole-1-particle (2h-1p) and 2-particle-1-hole (2p-1h) excitations, referred to as the IP-SAC-CI SD-R and IP-EOMCCSD(2h-1p) methods in the IP case and EA-SAC-CI SD-R and EA

  9. Photophysical properties of 1,8-naphthalic anhydride in aprotic solvents: An electron acceptor in excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Sujay; Biswas, Subhanip; Mondal, Mousumi; Basu, Samita, E-mail: samita.basu@saha.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    1,8-Naphthalic anhydride (NAN) has long been known as an intermediate for the synthesis of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives with diverse applications. Uses of NAN for other purposes are restricted because it hydrolyzes in water and other protic solvents. In the current work we have investigated the absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of NAN in eight different aprotic solvents of varying polarity. The compound is found to have different quantum yields in all the solvents. Astoundingly, NAN shows minimal fluorescence yield in dimethyl sulphoxide and N,N-dimethylformamide which is found to originate from pure collisional quenching owing to proton affinity of the solvent. In aprotic solvents acetonitrile and ethyl acetate, fluorescence emission and lifetime of NAN are quenched on addition of aliphatic amines namely triethylamine (TEA), tri-N-butylamine (TBA) and diisopropylethylamine (DIEA). Laser flash photolysis experiments in acetonitrile solvent have been used to find out the transient intermediates, which depict the involvement of photo-induced electron transfer from the amines to NAN. Hence, NAN has the potential to act as an efficient photo-induced electron acceptor in aprotic medium. -- Highlights: • In aprotic solvents NAN absorbs with maximum around 330–340 nm. • NAN fluoresce in aprotic solvents with maximum around 345–395 nm. • NAN has negligibly poor fluorescence in DMSO and DMF. • Fluorescence of NAN in aprotic solvents is quenched by TEA, TBA and DIEA. • Photo-induced electron transfer from the amines to NAN is the reason for such interaction.

  10. Electron correlation effect on radiative decay processes of the core-excited states of Be-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Cuicui, E-mail: sangcc@126.com [Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810001 (China); Li, Kaikai [College of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing 100038 (China); Sun, Yan; Hu, Feng [School of Mathematic and Physical Science, Xuzhou Institute of Technology, Xuzhou 221400, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiative rates of the states 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} with Z = 8–54 are studied. • Electron correlation effect on the radiative transition rates is studied. • Forbidden transitions are explored. - Abstract: Energy levels and the radiative decay processes of the core-excited configurations 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} of Be-like ions with Z = 8–54 are studied. Electron correlation effect on the energy levels and the radiative transition rates are studied in detail. Except for E1 radiative transition rates, the E2, M1 and M2 forbidden transitions are also explored. Further relativistic corrections from the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics and the finite nuclear size are included in the calculations to make the results more precise. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  11. Optical studies of multiply excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannervik, S.

    1989-01-01

    Optical studies of multiply-excited states are reviewed with emphasis on emission spectroscopy. From optical measurements, properties such as excitation energies, lifetimes and autoionization widths can be determined with high accuracy, which constitutes a challenge for modern computational methods. This article mainly covers work on two-, three- and four-electron systems, but also sodium-like quartet systems. Furthermore, some comments are given on bound multiply-excited states in negative ions. Fine structure effects on transition wavelengths and lifetimes (autoionization) are discussed. In particular, the most recent experimental and theoretical studies of multiply-excited states are covered. Some remaining problems, which require further attention, are discussed in more detail. (orig.) With 228 refs

  12. Probes of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states in ruthenium-Am(m)ine-bipyridine complexes: the effects of NH/ND and CH/CD isotopic substitution on the 77 K luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jang; Xie, Puhui; Endicott, John F; Odongo, Onduru S

    2006-06-29

    The effects of ligand perdeuteration on the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited-state emission properties at 77 K are described for several [Ru(L)(4)bpy](2+) complexes in which the emission process is nominally [uIII,bpy-] --> [RuII,bpy]. The perdeuteration of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligand is found to increase the zero-point energy differences between the ground states and MLCT excited states by amounts that vary from 0 +/- 10 to 70 +/- 10 cm(-1) depending on the ligands L. This indicates that there are some vibrational modes with smaller force constants in the excited states than in the ground states for most of these complexes. These blue shifts increase approximately as the energy difference between the excited and ground states decreases, but they are otherwise not strongly correlated with the number of bipyridine ligands in the complex. Careful comparisons of the [Ru(L)(4)(d(8)-bpy)](2+) and [Ru(L)(4)(h(8)-bpy](2+) emission spectra are used to resolve the very weak vibronic contributions of the C-H stretching modes as the composite contributions of the corresponding vibrational reorganizational energies. The largest of these, 25 +/- 10 cm(-1), is found for the complexes with L = py or bpy/2 and smaller when L = NH(3). Perdeuteration of the am(m)ine ligands (NH(3), en, or [14]aneN(4)) has no significant effect on the zero-point energy difference, and the contributions of the NH stretching vibrational modes to the emission band shape are too weak to resolve. Ligand perdeuteration does increase the excited-state lifetimes by a factor that is roughly proportional to the excited-state-ground-state energy difference, even though the CH and NH vibrational reorganizational energies are too small for nuclear tunneling involving these modes to dominate the relaxation process. It is proposed that metal-ligand skeletal vibrational modes and configurational mixing between metal-centered, bpy-ligand-centered, and MLCT excited states are important in

  13. Sub-500 fs electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics of energetic molecules from the S1 excited state: Ab initio multiple spawning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Gajapathy, Harshad; Konar, Arindam; Narasimhaiah, Gowrav M; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2017-11-28

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy. Different ignition processes, including laser ignition and shock or compression wave, initiate the energy release process by first promoting energetic molecules to the electronically excited states. This is why a full understanding of initial steps of the chemical dynamics of energetic molecules from the excited electronic states is highly desirable. In general, conical intersection (CI), which is the crossing point of multidimensional electronic potential energy surfaces, is well established as a controlling factor in the initial steps of chemical dynamics of energetic molecules following their electronic excitations. In this article, we have presented different aspects of the ultrafast unimolecular relaxation dynamics of energetic molecules through CIs. For this task, we have employed ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulation using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) electronic wavefunction and frozen Gaussian-based nuclear wavefunction. The AIMS simulation results collectively reveal that the ultrafast relaxation step of the best energetic molecules (which are known to exhibit very good detonation properties) is completed in less than 500 fs. Many, however, exhibit sub-50 fs dynamics. For example, nitro-containing molecules (including C-NO 2 , N-NO 2 , and O-NO 2 active moieties) relax back to the ground state in approximately 40 fs through similar (S 1 /S 0 ) CI conical intersections. The N 3 -based energetic molecule undergoes the N 2 elimination process in 40 fs through the (S 1 /S 0 ) CI conical intersection. Nitramine-Fe complexes exhibit sub-50 fs Fe-O and N-O bond dissociation through the respective (S 1 /S 0 ) CI conical intersection. On the other hand, tetrazine-N-oxides, which are known to exhibit better detonation properties than tetrazines, undergo internal conversion in a 400-fs time scale, while the relaxation time of tetrazine is very long (about 100 ns). Many

  14. Sub-500 fs electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics of energetic molecules from the S1 excited state: Ab initio multiple spawning study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Gajapathy, Harshad; Konar, Arindam; Narasimhaiah, Gowrav M.; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2017-11-01

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy. Different ignition processes, including laser ignition and shock or compression wave, initiate the energy release process by first promoting energetic molecules to the electronically excited states. This is why a full understanding of initial steps of the chemical dynamics of energetic molecules from the excited electronic states is highly desirable. In general, conical intersection (CI), which is the crossing point of multidimensional electronic potential energy surfaces, is well established as a controlling factor in the initial steps of chemical dynamics of energetic molecules following their electronic excitations. In this article, we have presented different aspects of the ultrafast unimolecular relaxation dynamics of energetic molecules through CIs. For this task, we have employed ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulation using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) electronic wavefunction and frozen Gaussian-based nuclear wavefunction. The AIMS simulation results collectively reveal that the ultrafast relaxation step of the best energetic molecules (which are known to exhibit very good detonation properties) is completed in less than 500 fs. Many, however, exhibit sub-50 fs dynamics. For example, nitro-containing molecules (including C-NO2, N-NO2, and O-NO2 active moieties) relax back to the ground state in approximately 40 fs through similar (S1/S0)CI conical intersections. The N3-based energetic molecule undergoes the N2 elimination process in 40 fs through the (S1/S0)CI conical intersection. Nitramine-Fe complexes exhibit sub-50 fs Fe-O and N-O bond dissociation through the respective (S1/S0)CI conical intersection. On the other hand, tetrazine-N-oxides, which are known to exhibit better detonation properties than tetrazines, undergo internal conversion in a 400-fs time scale, while the relaxation time of tetrazine is very long (about 100 ns). Many other characteristics of

  15. Vibronic coupling in the excited-states of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Takeshi [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Buckup, Tiago [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Krause, Marie S. [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany; Southall, June [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [College of Medical; Veterinary, and Life Science; University of Glasgow; G12 8QQ Glasgow, UK; Motzkus, Marcus [Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut; Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast femtochemistry of carotenoids is governed by the interaction between electronic excited states, which has been explained by the relaxation dynamics within a few hundred femtoseconds from the lowest optically allowed excited state S2to the optically dark state S1.

  16. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 2 covers essays on the theoretical approach of rearrangements; the rearrangements involving boron; and the molecular rearrangements of organosilicon compounds. The book also includes essays on the polytopal rearrangement at phosphorus; the rearrangement in coordination complexes; and the reversible thermal intramolecular rearrangements of metal carbonyls. Chemists and people involved in the study of rearrangements will find the book invaluable.

  17. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J; Jackson, Nicholas E; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W; Stickrath, Andrew B; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M; Li, Xiaosong; Chen, Lin X

    2016-07-20

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the ∼100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance.

  18. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  19. Doubly and triply excited states for different plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.; Safronova, U.I.

    2000-01-01

    Autoionizing rates of doubly excited states as nln'l' configurations with n=2-9 and n'=2-9 are calculated. Analytical expressions of decay amplitude for two-electron system are derived. Expressions for autoionizing rates with averaging over LS are obtained for many-electron systems. The n and l dependence of doubly excited states as nln'l' configurations are investigated. (author)

  20. Excited state dependent electron transfer of a rhenium-dipyridophenazine complex intercalated between the base pairs of DNA: a time-resolved UV-visible and IR absorption investigation into the photophysics of fac-[Re(CO)3(F2dppz)(py)]+ bound to either [poly(dA-dT)]2 or [poly(dG-dC)]2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Creely, Caitriona M; Davies, E Stephen; Dyer, Joanne; Easun, Timothy L; Grills, David C; McGovern, David A; McMaster, Jonathan; Pitchford, Jonathan; Smith, Jayden A; Sun, Xue-Zhong; Kelly, John M; George, Michael W

    2011-08-01

    The transient species formed following excitation of fac-[Re(CO)(3)(F(2)dppz)(py)](+) (F(2)dppz = 11,12-difluorodipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) bound to double-stranded polynucleotides [poly(dA-dT)](2) or [poly(dG-dC)](2) have been studied by transient visible and infra-red spectroscopy in both the picosecond and nanosecond time domains. The latter technique has been used to monitor both the metal complex and the DNA by monitoring the regions 1900-2100 and 1500-1750 cm(-1) respectively. These data provide direct evidence for electron transfer from guanine to the excited state of the metal complex, which proceeds both on a sub-picosecond time scale and with a lifetime of 35 ps, possibly due to the involvement of two excited states. No electron transfer is found for the [poly(dA-dT)](2) complex, although characteristic changes are seen in the DNA-region TRIR consistent with changes in the binding of the bases in the intercalation site upon excitation of the dppz-complex. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2011

  1. Ligand manipulation of charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in [Fe(2,2′-bipyridine2(CN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper S. Kjær

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have used femtosecond resolution UV-visible and Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy2(CN2], where bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT excitation. The excited-state absorption in the transient UV-visible spectra, associated with the 2,2′-bipyridine radical anion, provides a robust marker for the MLCT excited state, while the transient Kβ x-ray emission spectra provide a clear measure of intermediate and high spin metal-centered excited states. From these measurements, we conclude that the MLCT state of [Fe(bpy2(CN2] undergoes ultrafast spin crossover to a metal-centered quintet excited state through a short lived metal-centered triplet transient species. These measurements of [Fe(bpy2(CN2] complement prior measurement performed on [Fe(bpy3]2+ and [Fe(bpy(CN4]2− in dimethylsulfoxide solution and help complete the chemical series [Fe(bpyN(CN6–2N]2N-4, where N = 1–3. The measurements confirm that simple ligand modifications can significantly change the relaxation pathways and excited state lifetimes and support the further investigation of light harvesting and photocatalytic applications of 3d transition metal complexes.

  2. Modeling Molecular Systems at Extreme Pressure by an Extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) Based on the Symmetry-Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) Method: Confined Electronic Excited States of Furan as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2015-05-12

    Novel molecular photochemistry can be developed by combining high pressure and laser irradiation. For studying such high-pressure effects on the confined electronic ground and excited states, we extend the PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (SAC-configuration interaction) methods to the PCM-XP (extreme pressure) framework. By using the PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method, molecular systems in various electronic states can be confined by polarizable media in a smooth and flexible way. The PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method is applied to a furan (C4H4O) molecule in cyclohexane at high pressure (1-60 GPa). The relationship between the calculated free-energy and cavity volume can be approximately represented with the Murnaghan equation of state. The excitation energies of furan in cyclohexane show blueshifts with increasing pressure, and the extents of the blueshifts significantly depend on the character of the excitations. Particularly large confinement effects are found in the Rydberg states. The energy ordering of the lowest Rydberg and valence states alters under high-pressure. The pressure effects on the electronic structure may be classified into two contributions: a confinement of the molecular orbital and a suppression of the mixing between the valence and Rydberg configurations. The valence or Rydberg character in an excited state is, therefore, enhanced under high pressure.

  3. Tracking excited-state charge and spin dynamics in iron coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    to spin state, can elucidate the spin crossover dynamics of [Fe(2,2'-bipyridine)(3)](2+) on photoinduced metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation. We are able to track the charge and spin dynamics, and establish the critical role of intermediate spin states in the crossover mechanism. We anticipate......Crucial to many light-driven processes in transition metal complexes is the absorption and dissipation of energy by 3d electrons(1-4). But a detailed understanding of such non-equilibrium excited-state dynamics and their interplay with structural changes is challenging: a multitude of excited...... states and possible transitions result in phenomena too complex to unravel when faced with the indirect sensitivity of optical spectroscopy to spin dynamics(5) and the flux limitations of ultrafast X-ray sources(6,7). Such a situation exists for archetypal poly-pyridyl iron complexes, such as [Fe(2...

  4. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-29

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH 3 synthesis from N 2 and H 2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N 2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N 2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N 2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N 2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N 2 , with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  5. Electron energies in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-07-10

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33m{sub e}. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/m{sub e} = 1.01 {plus minus} 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  6. A time-dependent density functional theory study on the effect of electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding on luminescent MOFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min; Hao, Ce; Wang, Dandan; Li, Hongjiang; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-03-14

    We have investigated a new silver-based luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory methods. We theoretically demonstrated that the H...O hydrogen bond is strengthened and the Ag-O coordination bond is shortened significantly due to strengthening of the hydrogen bond in the S(1) state. When the hydrogen bond is formed, the mechanism of luminescence changes from a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) coupled with intraligand charge transfer (LLCT) to LMCT, and the luminescence is found to be enhanced.

  7. Correlated formation of the excited states of recoil and scattered ions in multiple electron capture collision of Ar8+ with CO2 and OCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, H.; Takahashi, K.; Matsumoto, J.; Karimi, R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Shiromaru, H.

    2018-02-01

    Multiple ionization events induced by low energy collisions between Ar8+ projectiles and linear triatomic molecular targets, CO2 and OCS, were studied in order to shed light on the correlation between the electronic states of the scattered ion and the ionic fragmentation processes. Position-sensitive time-of-flight measurements of all the recoil fragments, triggered by detection of a charge-selected scattered ion, allowed us to distinguish between ionic fragmentation processes in which different numbers of Auger electrons were emitted by the projectile, just after multiple electron capture. A strong correlation is found for triple capture collisions, between fragmentation with high kinetic energy and events when only single Auger electron emission takes place.

  8. THE ELECTRONIC-STRUCTURE OF THE PTH MOLECULE - FULLY RELATIVISTIC CONFIGURATION-INTERACTION CALCULATIONS OF THE GROUND AND EXCITED-STATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, L; SAUE, T; NIEUWPOORT, WC; FAEGRI, K; GROPEN, O

    1993-01-01

    Fully relativistic all-electron self-consistent field calculations based on the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian have been performed on the three lowest lying states of the PtH molecule. The resulting four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) molecular spinors are subsequently used in relativistic

  9. Faster photoinduced electron transfer in a diluted mixture than in a neat donor solvent: effect of excited-state H-bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nabajeet; Singha, Debabrata; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2014-04-07

    In a neat electron-donating solvent (in this case aniline), photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the solvent to an excited acceptor (e.g. a coumarin fluorophore) may be anticipated to be the most efficient because of the close contact of the acceptor with many donors. Addition of an inert component would most likely retard the PET process by replacing some donors from the neighbourhood of the acceptors. Surprisingly, we found dramatic acceleration of PET (6-10 fold enhancement compared to neat aniline), for coumarin 102 (C102) dissolved in a binary mixture of aniline and an inert solvent (cyclohexane or toluene). The PET induced fluorescence follows an anomalous trend against the mole fraction of aniline (XAN); first quenches up to certain XAN (0.075 for cyclohexane; 0.13 for toluene), thereafter, enhances with increase in XAN. Although the non-interacting component cannot directly participate in the PET process, it may modulate C102-aniline H-bonding association by changing the polarity of the medium or by disrupting the aniline-aniline H-bond. The study clearly illustrates the dominant role of hydrogen bonding in activating the electron transfer rate where standard thermodynamics predicts very weak donor-acceptor interaction.

  10. Ligand manipulation of charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in [Fe(2,2′-bipyridine)2(CN)2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    -visible spectra, associated with the 2,2′-bipyridine radical anion, provides a robust marker for the MLCT excited state, while the transient Kβ x-ray emission spectra provide a clear measure of intermediate and high spin metal-centered excited states. From these measurements, we conclude that the MLCT state...... of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2] undergoes ultrafast spin crossover to a metal-centered quintet excited state through a short lived metal-centered triplet transient species. These measurements of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2] complement prior measurement performed on [Fe(bpy)3]2+ and [Fe(bpy)(CN)4]2− in dimethylsulfoxide solution......We have used femtosecond resolution UV-visible and Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2], where bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitation. The excited-state absorption in the transient UV...

  11. Generation of Triplet Excited States via Photoinduced Electron Transfer in meso-anthra-BODIPY: Fluorogenic Response toward Singlet Oxygen in Solution and in Vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2017-04-14

    Heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads (BADs) generate locally excited triplet states by way of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT), followed by recombination of the resulting charge-separated states (CSS). Subsequent quenching of the triplet states by molecular oxygen produces singlet oxygen (1O2), which reacts with the anthracene moiety yielding highly fluorescent species. The steric demand of the alkyl substituents in the BODIPY subunit defines the site of 1O2 addition. Novel bis- and tetraepoxides and bicyclic acetal products, arising from rearrangements of anthracene endoperoxides were isolated and characterized. 1O2 generation by BADs in living cells enables visualization of the dyads distribution, promising new imaging applications.

  12. Investigation of the Electronic Excited States of Small Gold Clusters in Rare Gas Matrices: Spin-Orbit Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Zahra; Kaveei, Elham; Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh

    2015-08-13

    The effects of the weak interactions of rare gas atoms on the UV-visible absorption spectra of gold dimer and tetramer clusters are investigated. The time-dependent density functional theory based on the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation that considered spin-orbit coupling is performed to estimate the absorption spectra of Au2,4-Rgn (Rg = Ne-Xe, and n = 1-6) complexes. Using spin-orbit, including the appropriate functional, shows a close correlation between experiment and our calculations. It is also demonstrated that the weak interactions between rare gas atoms and gold clusters affect the UV-vis spectra of Au2,4 clusters by shifting the electronic transition toward the blue. Moreover, we find that the order of change in peak position, Δν̃, is proportional to the strength of interactions: Δν̃Au2,4-Xe > Δν̃Au2,4-Kr > Δν̃Au2,4-Ar > Δν̃Au2,4-Ne. In addition, comparing the UV-visible spectra of Au2,4-Rgn complexes with those of isolated Au2 and Au4 clusters shows that for Au2,4-Rg2,4,6 complexes in which Rg atoms interacted symmetrically with gold clusters no additional peaks are observed compared to isolated clusters; however, for Au2,4-Rg1,3,5 complexes, extra peaks appear because of the decrease in symmetry.

  13. Excited state dynamics and isomerization in ruthenium sulfoxide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Albert W; Wang, Lei; Rack, Jeffrey J

    2015-04-21

    Molecular photochromic compounds are those that interconvert between two isomeric forms with light. The two isomeric forms display distinct electronic and molecular structures and must not be in equilibrium with one another. These light-activated molecular switch compounds have found wide application in areas of study ranging from chemical biology to materials science, where conversion from one isomeric form to another by light prompts a response in the environment (e.g., protein or polymeric material). Certain ruthenium and osmium polypyridine sulfoxide complexes are photochromic. The mode of action is a phototriggered isomerization of the sulfoxide from S- to O-bonded. The change in ligation drastically alters both the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of the metal complex. Our laboratory has pioneered the preparation and study of these complexes. In particular, we have applied femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal excited state details of the isomerization mechanism. The data from numerous complexes allowed us to predict that the isomerization was nonadiabatic in nature, defined as occurring from a S-bonded triplet excited state (primarily metal-to-ligand charge transfer in character) to an O-bonded singlet ground state potential energy surface. This prediction was corroborated by high-level density functional theory calculations. An intriguing aspect of this reactivity is the coupling of nuclear motion to the electronic wave function and how this coupling affects motions productive for isomerization. In an effort to learn more about this coupling, we designed a project to examine phototriggered isomerization in bis-sulfoxide complexes. The goal of these studies was to determine whether certain complexes could be designed in which a single photon excitation event would prompt two sulfoxide isomerizations. We employed chelating sulfoxides in this study and found that both the nature of the chelate ring and the R group on the sulfoxide affect

  14. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  15. Interference through the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states. The presence of multiple core-excited states sets off interference into the common final continuum, and we show that the degree of interference depends on the various parameters such as the intensity of the employed x-ray pulse and the lifetimes of the core-excited states. For the specific examples we employ the double (1 s-13 p and 1 s-14 p ) core-excited states of Ne atom and numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to demonstrate that the energy-resolved electron spectra clearly exhibit the signature of interference.

  16. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  17. Competitive Energy and Electron Transfer in β-Functionalized Free-Base Porphyrin-Zinc Porphyrin Dimer Axially Coordinated to C60: Synthesis, Supramolecular Formation and Excited-State Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Thomas, Michael B; Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Wang, Hong; D'Souza, Francis

    2017-09-18

    Simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer events involving different acceptor sites in a newly assembled supramolecular triad comprised of covalently linked free-base porphyrin-zinc porphyrin dyad, H 2 P-ZnP axially coordinated to electron acceptor fullerene, has been successfully demonstrated. The dyad was connected through the β-pyrrole positions of the porphyrin macrocycle instead of the traditionally used meso-positions for better electronic communication. Interestingly, the β-pyrrole functionalization modulated the optical properties to such an extent that it was possible to almost exclusively excite the zinc porphyrin entity in the supramolecular triad. The measured binding constant for the complex with 1:1 molecular stoichiometry was in the order of 10 4  m -1 revealing moderately stable complex formation. An energy level diagram constructed using optical, electrochemical and computational results suggested that both the anticipated energy and electron events are thermodynamically feasible in the triad. Consequently, it was possible to demonstrate occurrence of excited state energy transfer to the covalently linked H 2 P, and electron transfer to the coordinated ImC 60 from studies involving steady-state and time-resolved emission, and femto- and nanosecond transient absorption studies. The estimated energy transfer was around 67 % in the dyad with a rate constant of 1.1×10 9  s -1 . In the supramolecular triad, the charge separated state was rather long-lived although it was difficult to arrive the exact lifetime of charge separated state from nanosecond transient spectral studies due to overlap of strong triplet excited signals of porphyrin in the monitoring wavelength window. Nevertheless, simultaneous occurrence of energy and electron transfer in the appropriately positioned energy and electron acceptor entities in a supramolecular triad was possible to demonstrate in the present study, a step forward to unraveling the complex

  18. Electronic and photophysical properties of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its derivatives enhancing in the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer processes: A TD-DFT study on substitution effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee, E-mail: naweekung@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    The effect of electron donating and withdrawing substituents on the enol absorption and keto emission spectra of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its derivatives has been systematically investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The enol absorption spectra of HBO were simulated by using five different DFTs with various exchange-correlation functions to validate a suitable functional prior to being further used as a method of choice to study the effect of substituents on the spectral characteristics of HBO derivatives. The popular B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) exchange-correlation functional is found to provide the best desirable result in predicting the absorption spectrum close to experimental data. In the ground state, enol forms of HBO and its derivatives are more stable than those of keto forms, while in the first lowest excited state, keto forms are found to be more stable than their enol forms. Overall, simulated absorption and emission spectra of HBO and its derivatives from TD-B3LYP calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. For enol, absorption maxima of HBO derivatives having electron-withdrawing groups are red-shift corresponding to their lower HOMO–LUMO energy gaps compared to that of HBO. For keto emission, HBO having electron donating groups (m-MeHBO and MHBO) and withdrawing group (CNHBO) at 4′-position on the phenol fragment as well as electron donating groups (HBOMe and HBOM) at 6-position on the benzoxazole fragment make the position of keto emission peak shift to shorter wavelength (blue-shift). However, HBO derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (HBOF, HBOCl, HBOA and HBOE) at 6-position give redshifted emission compared to the parent compound (HBO). The type of substituent on both 4′- and 6-positions certainly has a pronounced effect on the absorption and emission spectra of HBO derivatives. - Highlights: • Simulated spectra

  19. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas.

  20. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Ma, Jianyi; Peng, Daoling; Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-02-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO4-, is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3T1 and 3T2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted.

  1. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhua; Ma Jianyi; Peng Daoling; Zou Wenli; Liu Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO 4 - , is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3 T 1 and 3 T 2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted

  2. Evaluating excited state atomic polarizabilities of chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Esther; Hunt, Patricia A; Schröder, Christian

    2018-03-28

    Ground and excited state dipoles and polarizabilities of the chromophores N-methyl-6-oxyquinolinium betaine (MQ) and coumarin 153 (C153) in solution have been evaluated using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). A method for determining the atomic polarizabilities has been developed; the molecular dipole has been decomposed into atomic charge transfer and polarizability terms, and variation in the presence of an electric field has been used to evaluate atomic polarizabilities. On excitation, MQ undergoes very site-specific changes in polarizability while C153 shows significantly less variation. We also conclude that MQ cannot be adequately described by standard atomic polarizabilities based on atomic number and hybridization state. Changes in the molecular polarizability of MQ (on excitation) are not representative of the local site-specific changes in atomic polarizability, thus the overall molecular polarizability ratio does not provide a good approximation for local atom-specific polarizability changes on excitation. Accurate excited state force fields are needed for computer simulation of solvation dynamics. The chromophores considered in this study are often used as molecular probes. The methods and data reported here can be used for the construction of polarizable ground and excited state force fields. Atomic and molecular polarizabilities (ground and excited states) have been evaluated over a range of functionals and basis sets. Different mechanisms for including solvation effects have been examined; using a polarizable continuum model, explicit solvation and via sampling of clusters extracted from a MD simulation. A range of different solvents have also been considered.

  3. Excited state properties of aryl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fuciman, M.; Chábera, P.; Župčanová, Anita; Hříbek, P.; Arellano, J.B.; Vácha, František; Pšenčík, J.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 13 (2010), s. 3112-3120 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited-states * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2010

  4. Dissociation of core-valence doubly excited states in NO followed by atomic Auger decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Y; Kaneyasu, T; Matsushita, T; Tamenori, Y; Shigemasa, E

    2010-10-21

    The decay processes of core-valence doubly excited states near the N K edge of NO have been studied using electron spectroscopy. Electron yields measured as a function of photon energy and kinetic energy enable the clear identification of atomic Auger lines associated with the dissociation of doubly excited states. The atomic Auger lines exhibit Doppler profiles, allowing the entire reaction scheme of such dissociation processes to be determined.

  5. Test of the intercombination rules on the two excited states ({sup 3}0 and {sup 3}1) potential parameters of the second group metal atoms perturbed by inert gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roston, G.D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)]. E-mail: gamal_daniel@yahoo.com; Ghatass, Z.F. [Institute of Graduate Studies and Research, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2006-09-15

    A set of intercombination rules has been used to calculate the two excited ({sup 3}0 and {sup 3}1) state potential parameters {epsilon}{sub 12} and R {sub 12} of Hg, Cd and Zn interacting with inert gases (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne). The results obtained with these rules are compared with various experimental and theoretical results for these molecules. The rules can be very well used for determination of the position of the potential minimum for the two states of all molecules. Concerning the well depths of the two states ({sup 3}0 and {sup 3}1) of these molecules, it is observed that for the more bounded excited state {sup 3}0 some of these rules give results that are in close agreement with experimental data especially for molecules consisting of heavy atoms but for the shallow excited state {sup 3}1 these rules cannot be used.

  6. Method of producing excited states of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, M.; Morita, R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is claimed of producing excited states of atomic nuclei which comprises bombarding atoms with x rays or electrons, characterized in that (1) in the atoms selected to be produced in the excited state of their nuclei, (a) the difference between the nuclear excitation energy and the difference between the binding energies of adequately selected two electron orbits is small enough to introduce the nuclear excitation by electron transition, and (b) the system of the nucleus and the electrons in the case of ionizing an orbital electron in said atoms should satisfy the spin and parity conservation laws; and (2) the energy of the bombarding x rays or electrons should be larger than the binding energy of one of the said two electron orbits which is located at shorter distance from the atomic nucleus. According to the present invention, atomic nuclei can be excited in a relatively simple manner without requiring the use of large scale apparatus, equipment and production facilities, e.g., factories. It is also possible to produce radioactive substances or separate a particular isotope with an extremely high purity from a mixture of isotopes by utilizing nuclear excitation

  7. A Multireference Density Functional Approach to the Calculation of the Excited States of Uranium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    oxidation of uranium oxides in molten salts and in the solid state to forum alkali metal uranates, and their composition and properties,” Journal of...AFIT/DS/ENP/07-01 A MULTIREFERENCE DENSITY FUNCTIONAL APPROACH TO THE CALCULATION OF THE EXCITED STATES OF URANIUM IONS DISSERTATION Eric V. Beck...FUNCTIONAL APPROACH TO THE CALCULATION OF THE EXCITED STATES OF URANIUM IONS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering

  8. Electronic relaxation dynamics of a metal atom deposited on argon cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awali, Slim

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a study on the interaction between electronically excited atomic states and a non-reactive environment. We have theoretically and experimentally studied situations where a metal atom (Ba or K) is placed in a finite size environment (argon cluster). The presence of the medium affects the electronic levels of the atom. On the other side, the excitation of the atom induces a relaxation dynamics of the electronic energy through the deformation of the cluster. The experimental part of this work focuses on two aspects: the spectroscopy and the dynamics. In both cases a first laser electronically excites the metal atom and the second ionizes the excited system. The observable is the photoelectron spectrum recorded after photoionization and possibly information on the photoion which are also produced. This pump/probe technique, with also two lasers, provide the ultrafast dynamic when the lasers pulses used are of ultrashort (60 fs). The use of nanosecond lasers leads to resonance spectroscopic measurement, unresolved temporally, which give information on the position of the energy levels of the studied system. From a theoretical point-of-view, the excited states of M-Ar n were calculated at the ab initio level, using large core pseudo-potential to limit the active electrons of the metal to valence electrons. The study of alkali metals (potassium) is especially well adapted to this method since only one electron is active. The ab-initio calculation and a Monte-Carlo simulation where coupled to optimize the geometry of the KAr n (n = 1-10) cluster when K is in the ground state of the neutral and the ion, or excited in the 4p or 5s state. Calculations were also conducted in collaboration with B. Gervais (CIMAP, Caen) on KAr n clusters having several tens of argon atoms. Absorption spectra were also calculated. From an experimental point-of-view, we were able to characterize the excited states of potassium and barium perturbed by the clusters. In both cases a

  9. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  10. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    The burgeoning class of metal halide perovskites constitutes a paradigm shift in the study and application of solution-processed semiconductors. Advancements in thin film processing and our understanding of the underlying structural, photophysical, and electronic properties of these materials over the past five years have led to development of perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiencies that rival much more mature first and second-generation commercial technologies. It seems only a matter of time before the real-world impact of these compounds is put to the test. Like oxide perovskites, metal halide perovskites have ABX3 stoichiometry, where typically A is a monovalent cation, B a bivalent post-transition metal, and X a halide anion. Characterizing the behavior of photogenerated charges in metal halide perovskites is integral for understanding the operating principles and fundamental limitations of perovskite optoelectronics. The majority of studies outlined in this dissertation involve fundamental study of the prototypical organic-inorganic compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI 3). Time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy serves as a principle tool in these investigations. Excitation of a semiconductor can lead to formation of a number different excited state species and electronic complexes. Through analysis of excited state decay kinetics and optical nonlinearities in perovskite thin films, we identify spontaneous formation of a large fraction of free electrons and holes, whose presence is requisite for efficient photovoltaic operation. Following photogeneration of charge carriers in a semiconductor absorber, these species must travel large distances across the thickness of the material to realize large external quantum efficiencies and efficient carrier extraction. Using a powerful technique known as transient absorption microscopy, we directly image long-range carrier diffusion in a CH3NH3PbI 3 thin film. Charges are unambiguously shown to

  11. Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics: On-the-fly limiting of essential excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Naumov, Artem [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow 143026 (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pea 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Tretiak, Sergei, E-mail: serg@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems involving hundreds of atoms and large densities of states is particularly challenging. Nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) represent a significant numerical bottleneck in surface hopping approaches. Rather than using unreliable NACT cutting schemes, here we develop “on-the-fly” state limiting methods to eliminate states that are no longer essential for the non-radiative relaxation dynamics as a trajectory proceeds. We propose a state number criteria and an energy-based state limit. The latter is more physically relevant by requiring a user-imposed energy threshold. For this purpose, we introduce a local kinetic energy gauge by summing contributions from atoms within the spatial localization of the electronic wavefunction to define the energy available for upward hops. The proposed state limiting schemes are implemented within the nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics framework to simulate photoinduced relaxation in poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) and branched poly-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) oligomers for benchmark evaluation.

  12. Excited state populations and charge-exchange of fast ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.D.; Sofield, C.J.; Woods, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Excited state populations and charge state fractions of 445 MeV Cl ions have been measured for a range of thicknesses of solid C targets. Cross sections for electron capture, loss, excitation and excited state quenching have been determined and these data are found to predict a quantitative difference between equilibrium charge state distributions from gases and solids for a special case of the Bohr-Lindhard density effect model. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  13. Splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, C.D.; Sharma, P.; Tanner, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of some uranyl compounds has been studied. It has been proposed that the splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion is due to a descent in symmetry experienced by the uranyl ion when it is placed in a crystal field. In recent years there has been developed a highly successful model of the electronic structure of the uranyl ion. In this paper the authors use this model to interpret the luminescence spectra of a variety of uranyl compounds

  14. Probing the Locality of Excited States with Linear Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Thibaud

    2015-04-14

    This article reports a novel theoretical approach related to the analysis of molecular excited states. The strategy introduced here involves gathering two pieces of physical information, coming from Hilbert and direct space operations, into a general, unique quantum mechanical descriptor of electronic transitions' locality. Moreover, the projection of Hilbert and direct space-derived indices in an Argand plane delivers a straightforward way to visually probe the ability of a dye to undergo a long- or short-range charge-transfer. This information can be applied, for instance, to the analysis of the electronic response of families of dyes to light absorption by unveiling the trend of a given push-pull chromophore to increase the electronic cloud polarization magnitude of its main transition with respect to the size extension of its conjugated spacer. We finally demonstrate that all the quantities reported in this article can be reliably approximated by a linear algebraic derivation, based on the contraction of detachment/attachment density matrices from canonical to atomic space. This alternative derivation has the remarkable advantage of a very low computational cost with respect to the previously used numerical integrations, making fast and accurate characterization of large molecular systems' excited states easily affordable.

  15. Excited States of the Diatomic Molecule CrHe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Ratschek, Martin; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2013-06-01

    Chromium (Cr) atoms embedded in superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) have been investigated by laser induced fluorescence, beam depletion and resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy in current experiments at our institute. Cr is found to reside inside the He_N in the a^7S ground state. Two electronically excited states, z^7P and y^7P, are involved in a photoinduced ejection process which allowed us to study Fano resonances in the photoionisation spectra The need for a better understanding of the experimental observations triggered a theoretical approach towards the computation of electronically excited states via high-level methods of computational chemistry. Two well-established, wave function-based methods, CASSCF and MRCI, are combined to calculate the potential energy curves for the three states involved. The character of the two excited states z^7P and y^7P turns out to be significantly different. Theory predicts the ejection of the Cr atom in the case of an y^7P excitation as was observed experimentally. The quasi-inert helium environment is expected to weaken spin selection rules, allowing a coupling between different spin states especially during the ejection process. We therefore extend our theoretical analysis to the lowest state in the triplet- and quintet- manifold. Most of these alternative states show very weak bonding of only a few wn. A. Kautsch, M. Hasewend, M. Koch and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. A 86, 033428 (2012). A. Kautsch, M. Koch and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, accepted, doi:10.1021/jp312336m}.

  16. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342 ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA(US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  17. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results...... in an unusually large fluorescence Stokes shift of 10500 cm−1. The emission appears as a broad band with a maximum at 17500 cm−1 and is characterized by a low and nearly temperature-independent quantum yield. The results are interpreted as an indication of a large equilibrium geometry change upon excitation...

  18. Observation of excited state in 41Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohler, D.; Dombradi, Zs.; Grevy, S.; Sorlin, O.; Azaiez, F.; Baiborodin, D.; Borcea, R.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Recently, the collapse of the Z=14 and N=28 shell closures has been revealed in very neutron-rich Si and P nuclei [1]. In order to further explore the behaviour of these shell gaps, we studied the excited states of 41 Si by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy from fragmentation of radioactive beams. The experiment was carried out at the GANIL facility, France. First a stabil 4μA 48 Ca beam at 60 MeV/u was fragmented on a 12 C target in the SISSI device. The primary reaction products were selected by measuring their energy loss and time-of-flight at the ALPHA spectrometer. The cocktail beam impinged onto a secondary 9 Be target placed in the dispersive focal plane of the SPEG spectrometer which was tuned to maximise the transmission of 42 Si. The secondary reaction products were unambiguously identified by their ΔE and positions determined by ionisation and drift chambers, furthermore by their TOF and residual energies measured by a plastic scintillator at the focal plane of SPEG. To detect γ rays, the secondary target was surrounded by an 4π array of 74 BaF 2 scintillators. The γ-ray spectra were obtained by selecting event-by-event the incoming nuclei and the ejectiles after the secondary target. The γ rays were corrected for Doppler shifts due to the in-flight emission by the fragments. As it can be seen in figure 1, a clear peak on a low background at 659±14 keV energy appears in the γ-ray spectrum of 41 Si. This finding is in accordance with the 770 keV energy of the first 2 + excited state in 42 Si with N=28 and Z=14. Along the N=28 isobaric line the next double magic nucleus is 48 Ca. In the neighbouring odd-N nucleus 47 Ca the energy of the first excited state was measured to be 2014 keV. Comparing with that of 47 Ca the low energy value of the first excited state obtained in 41 Si can be interpreted as a further indication of the disappearance of the N=28 spherical shell closure at Z=14

  19. Excited States in Solution through Polarizable Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus; Aidas, Kestutis; Kongsted, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    We present theory and implementation of an advanced quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach using a fully self-consistent polarizable embedding (PE) scheme. It is a polarizable layered model designed for effective yet accurate inclusion of an anisotropic medium in a quantum...... a nonequilibrium formulation of the environmental response. In our formulation of polarizable embedding we explicitly take into account the full self-consistent many-body environmental response from both ground and excited states. The PE-DFT method can be applied to any molecular system, e.g., proteins...

  20. Excited state kinetics of anthracene-bridge-aniline intramolecular exciplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Hammershøj, Peter; Kjær, Kasper Skov

    2014-01-01

    of the excited state dynamics, the presence of this state required the development of a numerical three-excited-state kinetic model to replace the commonly used two-excited-state model. The experimental results shows that the reaction rates are strongly influenced both by substituents and solvent, illustrating...

  1. Photodissociation of FONO: an excited state nonadiabatic dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Allaa R; Hilal, Rifaat

    2017-03-01

    The photo dissociation of nitrosyl fluorite, FONO, a potential source of atmospheric fluorine, underlies its active role in ozone depletion and other activities in the troposphere. In the present work, the electronic structure of FONO is revisited at high level of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) theoretical levels. Several different post SCF methods were used to compute excited states, vertical excitation energies and intensities, namely configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS), equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-CCSD), and symmetry adopted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) methods. The potential energy functions along two internal coordinates, namely the F-ONO bond and the FONO dihedral angle, have been computed on the ground state relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the ground, 5A' and 5A″ excited states using the EOM-CCSD method. In the gas phase, the decay of the excited states of FONO was examined closely by calculating the UV photoabsorption cross-section spectrum and by nonadiabatic dynamics simulations. Nonadiabatic dynamics were simulated by sampling 300 trajectories in two spectral windows at 3.0 ± 0.25 and 4.5 ± 0.25 eV using the surface hopping method. Two different photodissociation reaction pathways with two main products, including multifragmentation (FO+NO) and atomic elimination (F) mechanisms were identified. For the cis-isomer, the main photochemical channel is F+NO 2 , representing 67% of all processes. For the trans-isomer, however, the main dissociation pathway is (FO+NO). Graphical Abstract Photodisscociation of nitrosyl fluorite (FONO) seems to underlie its active role in ozone depletion and other activities in the troposphere. The present research revisits the electronic structure of FONO at high level of ab initio and DFT theoretical levels. Cis-trans isomerization and dissociation in the ground and low lying excited states were examined

  2. Unsymmetric Ru(II) complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene and/or terpyridine ligands: synthesis, characterization, ground- and excited-state electronic structures and their application for DSSC sensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jun; Kim, Kyeong Ha; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Lee, Wan In; Kang, Youn K; Chung, Young Keun

    2010-08-16

    Three ruthenium(II) complexes with N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) or NHC/2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (tpy) hybrid ligands, bis[2,6-bis(3-methylimidazol-3-ium-1-yl)pyridine-4-carboxylic acid]ruthenium(II) (BCN), [2,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)pyridine-4-carboxylic acid](2,2';6'2''-terpyridine)ruthenium(II) (TCN), and [2,6-bis(3-methylimidazol-3-ium-1-yl)pyridine](2,2';6'2''-terpyridine-4'-carboxylic acid)ruthenium(II) (CTN), have been synthesized and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. The molecular geometry of the TCN complex was determined by X-ray crystallography. Electronic absorption spectra of these complexes exhibit typical pi-pi* and metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands in the UV and visible regions, respectively. The lowest energy absorption maxima were 430, 448, and 463 nm with molar extinction coefficients of 28,100, 15,400, and 7400 M(-1)cm(-1) for BCN, TCN, and CTN, respectively. Voltammetric data suggest that energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) of the three complexes reside within a 10 meV window despite the varying degrees of electronic effect of the constituent ligands. The electronic structures of these complexes calculated via density functional theory (DFT) indicate that the three HOMOs and the three lowest unoccupied MOs (LUMOs) are metal and ligand centered in character, for the former and the latter, respectively. Time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculation predicts that the lowest energy absorption bands of each complex are comprised of multiple one-electron excitations. TD-DFT calculation also suggests that the background of spectral red shift stems most likely from the stabilization of unoccupied MOs rather than the destabilization of occupied MOs. The overall efficiencies of the dye-sensitized solar cell systems of these complexes were found to be 0.48, 0.14, and 0.10% for BCN, TCN, and CTN, respectively, while that of a commercial bis(4,4'-dicarboxylato-2

  3. Excited states of {sup 4}He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, R.; Navarro, J.; Portesi, M.

    2001-06-01

    We study low-lying excited states of {sup 4}He clusters up to a cluster size of 40 atoms in a variational framework. The ansatz wave function combines two- and three-body correlations, coming from a translationally invariant configuration interaction description, and Jastrow-type short-range correlation. We have previously used this scheme to determine the ground-state energies of {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He clusters. Here we present an extension of this ansatz wave function having a good quantum angular momentum L. The variational procedure is applied independently to the cases with L=0,2,4, and upper bounds for the corresponding energies are thus obtained. Moreover, centroid energies for L excitations are calculated through the use of sum rules. A comparison with previous calculations is also made.

  4. First 3- excited state of 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M.

    2010-01-01

    There is no reliable evidence for the existence of the 3.076 MeV (3 - ) level adopted in the ENSDF evaluation for 56 Fe although it has been reported in a few experiments. Previous reports of the observation of this level appear to be based on an incorrect assignment in early (e,e ' ) work. Recent neutron inelastic scattering measurements by Demidov et al. [Phys. At. Nucl. 67, 1884, (2004)] show that the assigned γ-ray decay of this state does not occur at a level consistent with known properties of inelastic scattering. In the present work the 56 Fe(n,n ' γ) reaction was used to populate excited states in 56 Fe. Neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV were provided by the pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's WNR facility. Deexciting γ rays were detected with the GEANIE spectrometer, a Compton suppressed array of 26 Ge detectors. The γ-γ data obtained with GEANIE were used to establish coincidence relations between transitions. All previously reported levels up to E x =3.6 MeV excitation energy were observed except for the 3.076 MeV (3 - ) level. The 991- and 2229-keV transitions, previously reported to deexcite this level, were not observed in the γ-γ coincidence data obtained in the present experiment. The present work supports the assignment of the 4509.6 keV level as the first 3 - excited state in 56 Fe by observation of two previously known transitions deexciting this state.

  5. Application of spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy: Excited state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Photophysics of inorganic materials and organic molecules in complex systems have been extensively studied with absorption and emission spectroscopy.1-4 Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies are commonly carried out to characterize excited-state properties of fluorophores. Although steady-state fluorescence measurements are widely used for analytical applications, time-resolved fluorescence measurements provide more detailed information about excited-state properties and the environment in the vicinity of the fluorophore. Many photophysical processes, such as photoinduced electron transfer (PET), rotational reorientation, solvent relaxation, and energy transfer, occur on a nanosecond (10-9 s) timescale, thus affecting the lifetime of the fluorophores. Moreover, time-resolved microscopy methods, such as lifetimeimaging, combine the benefits of the microscopic measurement and information-rich, timeresolved data. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy combined with microscopy can be used to quantify these processes and to obtain a deeper understanding of the chemical surroundings of the fluorophore in a small area under investigation. This thesis discusses various photophysical and super-resolution microscopic studies of organic and inorganic materials, which have been outlined below.

  6. Some features of excited states density matrix calculation and their pairing relations in conjugated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Direct PPP-type calculations of self-consistent (SC) density matrices for excited states are described and the corresponding 'thawn' molecular orbitals (MO) are discussed. Special attention is addressed to particular solutions arising in conjugated systems of a certain symmetry, and to their chemical implications. The U(2) and U(3) algebras are applied respectively to the 4-electron and 6-electron cases: a natural separation of excited states in different cases follows. A simple approach to the convergence problem for excited states is given. The complementarity relations, an alternative formulation of the pairing theorem valid for heteromolecules and non-alternant systems, allow some fruitful experimental applications. Together with the extended pairing relations shown here, they may help to rationalize general trends. (Author) [pt

  7. Excited states in 146Sm and 147Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kownacki, J.; Sujkowski, Z.; Hammaren, E.; Liukkonen, E.; Piiparinen, M.; Lindblad, Th.; Ryde, H.

    1979-10-01

    The sup(144,146)Nd(α,xn) and sup(146,148)Nd( 3 He,xn) reactions with Esub(α) = 20 - 43 MeV and E 3 sub(He) = 19 - 27 MeV are used to investigate excited states in the isotopes 146 Sm and 147 Sm. The experiments involve measurements of singles γ-ray spectra and conversion electron spectra, γ-ray angular distributions and three parameter (E sub(γ)E sub(γ) time) coincidences. From these experiments information is obtained for states with spin up to I = 13 + and I = 27/2 - , respectively, These states are interpeted within the framework of the cluster-vibration model (CVM) as well as the shell model. (author)

  8. Cathodoluminescence study of excited states and spatial smearing effects in InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsevich, S.; Madhukar, A.; Rich, D. H.; Kim, Eui-Tae

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:We have examined state-filling and thermal activation of carriers in buried InAs self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) with excitation-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and spectroscopy. The InAs SAQDs were formed during molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs on undoped planar GaAs (001). Emission from the excited states was obtained under high electron beam currents, revealing up to three QD excited states in CL spectroscopy. A suppressed relaxation from the first excited state to the ground state at very low excitation densities was observed, demonstrating the presence of a phonon-bottle neck. The dependence of the CL intensity of the ground and the first excited state transitions on excitation density was shown to be linear at all temperatures at low excitation density. This result can be understood by considering that carriers escape and are recaptured as excitons or correlated electron-hole pairs. At sufficiently high excitations, state filling and spatial smearing elects are observed together with a sublinear dependence of the CL intensity on electron beam current. A successive filling of the ground and excited states in adjacent groups of QDs that possess different size distributions is argued to be the cause of the spatial smearing. The intensities of the ground and excited state transitions were analyzed as a function of temperature and excitation to study the thermal activation and reemission of carriers. Thermal quenching of the CL intensity of the QD ground and first excited state transitions at low excitations in 230 to 300 K temperature range is attributed to dissociation and reemission of excitons from the QD states into the WL. At high excitations, significantly reduced activation energies of the ground and excited states are obtained, suggesting that thermal reemission of single holes from QD states into the GaAs barrier is responsible for the observed temperature dependence of the QD luminescence in 230 to 300 K temperature range

  9. Ponderomotive dressing of doubly-excited states with intensity-controlled laser light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We laser-dress several doubly-excited states in helium. Tuning the coupling-laser intensity from perturbative to the strong-coupling regime, we are able to measure phases imprinted on the two-electron wavefunctions, and observe a new continuum coupling mechanism.

  10. Localised to intraligand charge-transfer states in cyclometalated platinum complexes: an experimental and theoretical study into the influence of electron-rich pendants and modulation of excited states by ion binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rochester, D. L.; Develay, S.; Záliš, Stanislav; Williams, J. A. G.

    -, č. 10 (2009), s. 1728-1741 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Cross-Coupling reactions * metal complexes * luminiscence Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.081, year: 2009

  11. Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2014-01-01

    Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed

  12. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarata, Antonio, E-mail: cammaant@fel.cvut.cz [Department of Control Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 16627 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-05-23

    CaFeO{sub 3} is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO{sub 3}. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  13. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  14. Recovering precious metals from electronic scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, James E.

    1992-07-01

    This article characterizes electronic scrap in terms of origin and composition and describes the steps in preliminary processing: sorting, calcination, combustion, shredding, and sampling. Hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical process technologies for the concentration and recovery of precious-metals values in scrap are reviewed, and some downstream processing options are outlined. The article concludes with some caveats concerning the risky but potentially profitable business of recovery of precious metals from electronic scrap.

  15. Stretchable and Soft Electronics using Liquid Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    The use of liquid metals based on gallium for soft and stretchable electronics is discussed. This emerging class of electronics is motivated, in part, by the new opportunities that arise from devices that have mechanical properties similar to those encountered in the human experience, such as skin, tissue, textiles, and clothing. These types of electronics (e.g., wearable or implantable electronics, sensors for soft robotics, e-skin) must operate during deformation. Liquid metals are compelling materials for these applications because, in principle, they are infinitely deformable while retaining metallic conductivity. Liquid metals have been used for stretchable wires and interconnects, reconfigurable antennas, soft sensors, self-healing circuits, and conformal electrodes. In contrast to Hg, liquid metals based on gallium have low toxicity and essentially no vapor pressure and are therefore considered safe to handle. Whereas most liquids bead up to minimize surface energy, the presence of a surface oxide on these metals makes it possible to pattern them into useful shapes using a variety of techniques, including fluidic injection and 3D printing. In addition to forming excellent conductors, these metals can be used actively to form memory devices, sensors, and diodes that are completely built from soft materials. The properties of these materials, their applications within soft and stretchable electronics, and future opportunities and challenges are considered. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaid, Rana [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria); Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Quds University, Abu Dis, Palestine (Country Unknown); Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus, E-mail: markus.oppel@univie.ac.at; González, Leticia [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  17. The reactivity of the triplet excited state of 1,4-diaza-9-fluorenones towards hydrogen and electron donors; Estudo da reatividade do estado excitado triplete de 1,4-diaza-9-fluorenonas frente a doadores de hidrogenio e de eletron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaizumi, Andreza A.C.; Santos, Frances R. dos; Silva, Monica T. da; Netto-Ferreira, Jose Carlos [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica], e-mail: jcnetto@ufrrj.br

    2009-07-01

    The effect of the introduction of nitrogen atoms upon the triplet excited state reactivity of 1,4-diaza-9-fluorenone (1) and 1,4-diaza-9-benz[b]fluorenone (2), in acetonitrile, was investigated employing the nanosecond laser flash photolysis technique. The intersystem crossing quantum yield ({phi}{sub ces}) for 1 and 2 was determined using 9-fluorenone as a secondary standard ({phi}{sub ces}= 0.48, in acetonitrile) and for both diazafluorenones a value of {phi}{sub ces}= 0.28 was found. Quenching rate constants ranged from 8.17 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} (2-propanol) to 1.02 x 10{sup 10} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} (DABCO) for 1,4-diaza-9-fluorenone and from 6.95 x 10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} (2-propanol) to 5.94 x 10{sup 9} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} (DABCO) for 1,4-diaza-9-benz[b]fluorenone, depending if the quenching process involves energy, hydrogen or electron transfer. A comparison between quenching rate constants for both diazaflurenones and the parent compound, i.e. 9-fluorenone, a ketone with lowest triple state of {pi}{pi}{sup *} configuration, lead to the conclusion that the reactive triplet excited state for 1,4-diaza-9-fluorenone and 1,4-diaza-9-benz[b]fluorenone has {pi}{pi}{sup *} configuration. (author)

  18. Does the excited state of the 3He nucleus exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    The suggestion is made that the excited state of the 3 He nucleus found out recently in the reaction has spin and parity 1/2 + and the same configuration that the ground open of 6 He. It is shown that in an elastic nd-scattering a resonance associated with the excited state may be absent due to destructive interference of potential and resonant scattering phases

  19. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  20. A note on calm excited states of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Shiu, Gary

    2011-01-01

    We identify a two-parameter family of excited states within slow-roll inflation for which either the corrections to the two-point function or the characteristic signatures of excited states in the three-point function — i.e. the enhancement for the flattened momenta configurations– are absent. These excited states may nonetheless violate the adiabaticity condition maximally. We dub these initial states of inflation calm excited states. We show that these two sets do not intersect, i.e., those that leave the power-spectrum invariant can be distinguished from their bispectra, and vice versa. The same set of calm excited states that leave the two-point function invariant for slow-roll inflation, do the same task for DBI inflation. However, at the level of three-point function, the calm excited states whose flattened configuration signature is absent for slow-roll inflation, will lead to an enhancement for DBI inflation generally, although the signature is smaller than what suggested by earlier analysis. This example also illustrates that imposing the Wronskian condition is important for obtaining a correct estimate of the non-Gaussian signatures

  1. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Enrico; Pastore, Mariachiara; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  2. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronca, Enrico; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place

  3. Excited-State Dynamics of Melamine and Its Lysine Derivative Investigated by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyuan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melamine may have been an important prebiotic information carrier, but its excited-state dynamics, which determine its stability under UV radiation, have never been characterized. The ability of melamine to withstand the strong UV radiation present on the surface of the early Earth is likely to have affected its abundance in the primordial soup. Here, we studied the excited-state dynamics of melamine (a proto-nucleobase and its lysine derivative (a proto-nucleoside using the transient absorption technique with a UV pump, and UV and infrared probe pulses. For melamine, the excited-state population decays by internal conversion with a lifetime of 13 ps without coupling significantly to any photochemical channels. The excited-state lifetime of the lysine derivative is slightly longer (18 ps, but the dominant deactivation pathway is otherwise the same as for melamine. In both cases, the vast majority of excited molecules return to the electronic ground state on the aforementioned time scales, but a minor population is trapped in a long-lived triplet state.

  4. Triplet excited state properties in variable gap π-conjugated donor–acceptor–donor chromophores

    KAUST Repository

    Cekli, Seda

    2016-02-12

    A series of variable band-gap donor–acceptor–donor (DAD) chromophores capped with platinum(II) acetylide units has been synthesized and fully characterized by electrochemical and photophysical methods, with particular emphasis placed on probing triplet excited state properties. A counter-intuitive trend of increasing fluorescence quantum efficiency and lifetime with decreasing excited state energy (optical gap) is observed across the series of DAD chromophores. Careful study of the excited state dynamics, including triplet yields (as inferred from singlet oxygen sensitization), reveals that the underlying origin of the unusual trend in the fluorescence parameters is that the singlet–triplet intersystem crossing rate and yield decrease with decreasing optical gap. It is concluded that the rate of intersystem crossing decreases as the LUMO is increasingly localized on the acceptor unit in the DAD chromophore, and this result is interpreted as arising because the extent of spin–orbit coupling induced by the platinum heavy metal centers decreases as the LUMO is more localized on the acceptor. In addition to the trend in intersystem crossing, the results show that the triplet decay rates follow the Energy Gap Law correlation over a 1.8 eV range of triplet energy and 1000-fold range of triplet decay rates. Finally, femtosecond transient absorption studies for the DAD chromophores reveals a strong absorption in the near-infrared region which is attributed to the singlet excited state. This spectral band appears to be general for DAD chromophores, and may be a signature of the charge transfer (CT) singlet excited state.

  5. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  6. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-03-28

    Summary: Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Role of mode-mode coupling in short-time excited state decay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menšík, Miroslav; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2005), s. 579-592 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 558; GA MŠk OC D14.30; GA AV ČR KJB1050301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : excited state decay * electron-vibrational interaction * vibrational coherence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2005

  9. Excited state decay of cyclometalated polypyridine ruthenium complexes: insight from theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitner, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2016-09-21

    Deactivation pathways of the triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) excited state of cyclometalated polypyridine ruthenium complexes with [RuN5C](+) coordination are discussed on the basis of the available experimental data and a series of density functional theory calculations. Three different complex classes are considered, namely with [Ru(N^N)2(N^C)](+), [Ru(N^N^N)(N^C^N)](+) and [Ru(N^N^N)(N^N^C)](+) coordination modes. Excited state deactivation in these complex types proceeds via five distinct decay channels. Vibronic coupling of the (3)MLCT state to high-energy oscillators of the singlet ground state ((1)GS) allows tunneling to the ground state followed by vibrational relaxation (path A). A ligand field excited state ((3)MC) is thermally accessible via a (3)MLCT →(3)MC transition state with the (3)MC state being strongly coupled to the (1)GS surface via a low-energy minimum energy crossing point (path B). Furthermore, a (3)MLCT →(1)GS surface crossing point directly couples the triplet and singlet potential energy surfaces (path C). Charge transfer states either with higher singlet character or with different orbital parentage and intrinsic symmetry restrictions are thermally populated which promote non-radiative decay via tunneling to the (1)GS state (path D). Finally, the excited state can decay via phosphorescence (path E). The dominant deactivation pathways differ for the three individual complex classes. The implications of these findings for isoelectronic iridium(iii) or iron(ii) complexes are discussed. Ultimately, strategies for optimizing the emission efficiencies of cyclometalated polypyridine complexes of d(6)-metal ions, especially Ru(II), are suggested.

  10. Investigation into chromophore excited-state coupling in allophycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiguang; Zhao, Fuli; Wang, He Z.; Gao, Zhaolan; Yu, Zhenxin; Zhu, Jinchang; Xia, Andong; Jiang, Lijin

    1994-08-01

    Both theoretical and experimental studies are presented on chromophore excited-state coupling in linker-free allophycocyanin (APC), one of the antenna phycobiliproteins in algal photosynthesis. A three-site-coupling model has been introduced to describe the exciton interaction mechanism amoung the excited (beta) chromophore in APC, and the exciton energy splitting is estimated. Picosecond polarized fluorescence experiments both on monomeric and trimeric APC isolated from alga Spirulina platensis have been performed. The experimental results show that APC monomer and trimer exhibit remarkedly different spectropic characteristics, and satisfy the suggestion of strong excited- state coupling among chromophores in APC.

  11. Study of magnetic moments of nuclear excited states at TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.; Wolf, A.; Berant, Z.; Gill, R.L.; Kruse, H.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of the static magnetic dipole moments of nuclear excited states are of interest since they reveal information on nuclear structure not available by other means. A system has been constructed at the TRISTAN separator to measure magnetic dipole moments of excited states in neutron-rich nuclei using the method of perturbed angular correlations (PAC). High magnetic fields are not available through the use of a superconducting magnet. The capability of the TRISTAN system is discussed and the PAC measuring apparatus is described. Final results from recent g factor measurements at TRISTAN on 4 + states in the N = 82 isotones are discussed in some detail. Studies in progress are briefly outlined

  12. Calculation for electron correlations in excited states of the lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baiwen; Li Mingsheng

    1986-01-01

    A variational method proposed by Wilets et al. is used to calculate the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the (ls) 2 2p 2 P, (ls) 2 3s 2 S, (ls) 2 3p 2 P, (ls) 2 3d 2 D and (ls) 2 4f 2 F states of the lithium. The results are compared with those obtained from Hartree-Fock method, CI method and l/Z expansion method

  13. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  14. Interplay between singlet and triplet excited states in a conformationally locked donor–acceptor dyad

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2015-10-13

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a palladium(II) porphyrin – anthracene dyad bridged via short and conformationally rigid bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene spacer were achieved. A spectroscopic investigation of the prepared molecule in solution has been undertaken to study electronic energy transfer in excited singlet and triplet states between the anthracene and porphyrin units. By using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy it was shown that excitation of the singlet excited state of the anthracene leads to energy transfer to the lower-lying singlet state of porphyrin. Alternatively, excitation of the porphyrin followed by intersystem crossing to the triplet state leads to very fast energy transfer to the triplet state of anthracene. The rate of this energy transfer has been determined by transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparative studies of the dynamics of triplet excited states of the dyad and reference palladium octaethylporphyrin (PdOEP) have been performed.

  15. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of CII from CIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takako; Safronova, U.; Ohira, Mituhiko.

    1996-02-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates for CII including 1s 2 2l2l'nl'' (n=2-6, l'≤(n-1)) states were calculated by using multi-configurational Hartree-Fock (Cowan code) method. Autoionizing levels above three thresholds: 1s 2 2s 2 ( 1 S), 1s 2 2s2p( 3 P), 1s 2 2s2p( 1 P) were considered. Branching ratios related to the first threshold and the intensity factor were calculated for satellite lines of CII ion. The dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states for n=2-6 are calculated with these atomic data. The rate coefficients are fitted to an analytical formula and the fit parameters are given. The values for higher excited states than n=6 are extrapolated and the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficients are derived. The effective recombination rate coefficient for different electron densities are also derived. (author)

  16. A new methodology for measuring time correlations and excite states of atoms and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring time correlation of physical phenomena events in the range of 10 -7 to 10 5 sec is proposed, and his results presented. This system, is based on a sequential time scale which is controlled by a precision quartz oscillator; the zero time of observation is set by means of a JK Flip-Flop, which is operated by a negative transition of pulse in coincidence with the pulse from a detector which marks the time zero of the event (precedent pulse). This electronic system (named digital chronoanalizer) was used in the measurement of excited states of nuclei as well as for the determination of time fluctuations in physical phenomena, such as the time lag in a halogen Geiger counter and is the measurement of the 60 KeV excited state of N P 237 . (author)

  17. On the nature of highly vibrationally excited states of thiophosgene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work an analysis of the highly vibrationally excited states of thiophosgene (SCCl2) is made in order to gain insights into some of the experimental observations and spectral features. The states analysed here lie in a spectrally complex region where strong mode mixings are expected due to the overlap of ...

  18. Excited State Spectra and Dynamics of Phenyl-Substituted Butadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Møller, Søren

    1994-01-01

    A combination of steady-state and dynamic spectral measurements are used to provide new insights into the nature of the excited-state processes of all-trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene and several analogs: 1,4-diphenyl- 1,3-cyclopentadiene, 1,1,4,4-tetraphenylbutadiene, 1,2,3,4-tetraphenyl-1...

  19. Protonation of the imino nitrogen deactivates the excited state of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... These results point to the existence of a non-radiative pathway involving the imidazole nitrogen in the quenching of excited states in these compounds. Keywords. Imidazolin-5-one; gfp chromophore; fluorescence; crystal structure; theoretical study. 1. Introduction. Green Fluorescent Protein (gfp) is among ...

  20. On satellite lines anomalies in OH excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is argued that different pumps produce similar distributions of populations in the first two excited states of OH. The pattern observed recently in G 219.3 - 07 by Whiteoak and Gardner can be due either to radiative or collisional pump. (author)

  1. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several.

  2. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  3. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    *For correspondence. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye probed by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. JAHUR A MONDAL, SANDEEP VERMA, HIRENDRA N GHOSH and DIPAK K PALIT*. Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085.

  4. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other ...

  5. Photoionization of excited states of neon-like Mg III

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The close coupling R-matrix method is used to calculate cross-sections for photoioniza- tion of Mg III from its first three excited states. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent two target states of Mg III retained in the R-matrix expansion. The positions and effective quantum numbers for the ...

  6. Optimal control of peridinin excited-state dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dietzek, B.; Chábera, P.; Hanf, R.; Tschierlei, S.; Popp, J.; Pascher, T.; Yartsev, A.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 373, 1-2 (2010), s. 129-136 ISSN 0301-0104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : peridin * excited-state dynamics * coherent control Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.017, year: 2010

  7. Dark excited states of carotenoids: Consensus and controversy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Sundström, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 477, 1-3 (2009), s. 1-11 ISSN 0009-2614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited states * relaxation pathways * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.291, year: 2009

  8. The recovery of metals from electronic scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Elaine Y. L.

    1991-04-01

    Most of the published literature on the recycling of scrapped electronic devices is listed in chronological order in Table I. In the 1970s and early to mid-1980s, the predominant method of recycling was blast furnace smelting in conjunction with secondary copper or lead smelters. Since the mid-1980s, the trend has shifted toward the hydrometallurgical processing of scrap. The emphasis has always been on the recovery of precious metals, namely gold, silver, platinum and palladium, from electronic scrap for their obvious economic values. In recent years, greater importance has been placed on the recovery of all metals, including low-concentration metals such as cadmium, because of increasingly strict environmental controls. The electronic scrap recycling program of the 1990s will ha ve to meet many objectives—efficient recovery of all metals, strict effluent and emission controls, the use of nontoxic reagents, maximum recycling of chemical reagents, and minimum energy requirements—in an economical and environmentally safe manner.

  9. Plexciton quenching by resonant electron transfer from quantum emitter to metallic nanoantenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinica, D C; Lourenço-Martins, H; Aizpurua, J; Borisov, A G

    2013-01-01

    Coupling molecular excitons and localized surface plasmons in hybrid nanostructures leads to appealing, tunable optical properties. In this respect, the knowledge about the excitation dynamics of a quantum emitter close to a plasmonic nanoantenna is of importance from fundamental and practical points of view. We address here the effect of the excited electron tunneling from the emitter into a metallic nanoparticle(s) in the optical response. When close to a plasmonic nanoparticle, the excited state localized on a quantum emitter becomes short-lived because of the electronic coupling with metal conduction band states. We show that as a consequence, the characteristic features associated with the quantum emitter disappear from the optical absorption spectrum. Thus, for the hybrid nanostructure studied here and comprising quantum emitter in the narrow gap of a plasmonic dimer nanoantenna, the quantum tunneling might quench the plexcitonic states. Under certain conditions the optical response of the system approaches that of the individual plasmonic dimer. Excitation decay via resonant electron transfer can play an important role in many situations of interest such as in surface-enhanced spectroscopies, photovoltaics, catalysis, or quantum information, among others.

  10. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  11. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  12. Initial excited-state structural dynamics of 9-methyladenine from UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladepo, Sulayman A; Loppnow, Glen R

    2011-05-19

    The photophysics and photochemistry of nucleobases are the factors governing the photostability of DNA and RNA, since they are the UV chromophores in nucleic acids. Because the formation of photoproducts involves structural changes in the excited electronic state, we study here the initial excited-state structural dynamics of 9-methyladenine (9-MeA) by using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UV resonance Raman intensities are sensitive to the initial excited-state structural dynamics of molecules. Therefore, information about the initial structural changes in the excited-state of a given molecule can be obtained from its UVRR intensities. The resonance Raman spectra of 9-MeA at wavelengths throughout its 262 nm absorption band were measured, and a self-consistent analysis of the resulting resonance Raman excitation profiles and absorption spectrum was performed using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. We found that the initial structural dynamics of this molecule primarily lie along the N3C4, C4C5, C5C6, C5N7, N7C8, and C8N9 stretching vibrations and CH(3) deformation vibrations. These results are discussed in the context of photochemistry and other deactivation processes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  14. Low Temperature Studies of the Excited-State Structure of Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalov, A.; Jacques, V.; Kaiser, F.; Siyushev, P.; Neumann, P.; Rogers, L. J.; McMurtrie, R. L.; Manson, N. B.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-05-01

    We report a study of the E3 excited-state structure of single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond, combining resonant excitation at cryogenic temperatures and optically detected magnetic resonance. A theoretical model is developed and shows excellent agreement with experimental observations. In addition, we show that the two orbital branches associated with the E3 excited state are averaged when operating at room temperature. This study leads to an improved physical understanding of the NV defect electronic structure, which is invaluable for the development of diamond-based quantum information processing.

  15. Calculation of neutral beam deposition accounting for excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianakon, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Large-scale neutral-beam auxillary heating of plasmas has led to new plasma operational regimes which are often dominated by fast ions injected via the absorption of an energetic beam of hydrogen neutrals. An accurate simulation of the slowing down and transport of these fast ions requires an intimate knowledge of the hydrogenic neutral deposition on each flux surface of the plasma. As a refinement to the present generation of transport codes, which base their beam deposition on ground-state reaction rates, a new set of routines, based on the excited states of hydrogen, is presented as mechanism for computing the attenuation and deposition of a beam of energetic neutrals. Additionally, the numerical formulations for the underlying atomic physics for hydrogen impacting on the constiuent plasma species is developed and compiled as a numerical database. Sample results based on this excited state model are compared with the ground-state model for simple plasma configurations

  16. Optimal control of peridinin excited-state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Chábera, Pavel; Hanf, Robert; Tschierlei, Stefanie; Popp, Jürgen; Pascher, Torbjörn; Yartsev, Arkady; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-07-01

    Optimal control is applied to study the excited-state relaxation of the carbonyl-carotenoid peridinin in solution. Phase-shaping of the excitation pulses is employed to influence the photoinduced reaction dynamics of peridinin. The outcome of various control experiments using different experimentally imposed fitness parameters is discussed. Furthermore, the effects of pump-wavelength and different solvents on the control efficiency are presented. The data show that excited-state population within either the S 1 or the ICT state can be reduced significantly by applying optimal control, while the efficiency of control decreases upon excitation into the low-energy side of the absorption band. However, we are unable to alter the ratio of S 1 and ICT population or increase the population of either state compared to excitation with a transform-limited pulse. We compare the results to various control mechanisms and argue that characteristic low-wavenumber modes are relevant for the photochemistry of peridinin.

  17. The Exotic Excited State Behavior of 3-PHENYL-2-PROPYNENITRILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Khadija M.; Viquez Rojas, Claudia I.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    3-phenyl-2-propynenitrile (Ph-C≡C-C≡N) is of interest to the study of Titan's atmosphere as it is a likely product of the photochemical reaction between two known species in that environment: benzene and cyanoacetylene. The gas phase jet-cooled resonant two-photon ionization, laser induced fluorescence, and preliminary dispersed fluorescence spectra were previously reported without firm assignments due to the scarcity of totally symmetric vibrations and the prevalence of strong bands of b2 and b1 symmetry vibrations. These had called into question the identity and geometry of the excited state(s) involved in the transitions. We will here present the completed set of dispersed fluorescence data along with an analysis of the potential energy surfaces and vibronic coupling characteristic of the close-lying excited states in this intriguing molecule.

  18. Excited state nucleon spectrum with two flavors of dynamical fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, John M.; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert G.; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Richards, David G.; Engelson, Eric; Wallace, Stephen J.; Lichtl, Adam; Mathur, Nilmani

    2009-01-01

    Highly excited states for isospin (1/2) baryons are calculated for the first time using lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical quarks. Anisotropic lattices are used with two pion masses, m π =416(36) MeV and 578(29) MeV. The lowest four energies are reported in each of the six irreducible representations of the octahedral group at each pion mass. The lattices used have dimensions 24 3 x64, spatial lattice spacing a s ≅0.11 fm, and temporal lattice spacing a t =(1/3)a s . Clear evidence is found for a (5 - /2) state in the pattern of negative-parity excited states. This agrees with the pattern of physical states and spin (5/2) has been realized for the first time on the lattice.

  19. Can $\\beta$-decay probe excited state halos?

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In the first experiment at the newly constructed ISOLDE Facility the first-forbidden $\\beta$-decay of $^{17}$Ne into the first excited state of $^{17}$F has been measured. It is a factor two faster than the corresponding mirror decay and thus gives one of the largest recorded asymmetries for $\\beta$-decays feeding bound final states. Shell-model calculations can only reproduce the asymmetry if the halo structure of the $^{17}$F state is taken into account.

  20. Non-adiabatic Excited State Molecule Dynamics Modeling of Photochemistry and Photophysics of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    Understanding and controlling excited state dynamics lies at the heart of all our efforts to design photoactive materials with desired functionality. This tailor-design approach has become the standard for many technological applications (e.g., solar energy harvesting) including the design of organic conjugated electronic materials with applications in photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Over the years, our team has developed efficient LANL-based codes to model the relevant photophysical processes following photoexcitation (spatial energy transfer, excitation localization/delocalization, and/or charge separation). The developed approach allows the non-radiative relaxation to be followed on up to ~10 ps timescales for large realistic molecules (hundreds of atoms in size) in the realistic solvent dielectric environment. The Collective Electronic Oscillator (CEO) code is used to compute electronic excited states, and the Non-adiabatic Excited State Molecular Dynamics (NA-ESMD) code is used to follow the non-adiabatic dynamics on multiple coupled Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our preliminary NA-ESMD simulations have revealed key photoinduced mechanisms controlling competing interactions and relaxation pathways in complex materials, including organic conjugated polymer materials, and have provided a detailed understanding of photochemical products and intermediates and the internal conversion process during the initiation of energetic materials. This project will be using LANL-based CEO and NA-ESMD codes to model nonradiative relaxation in organic and energetic materials. The NA-ESMD and CEO codes belong to a class of electronic structure/quantum chemistry codes that require large memory, “long-queue-few-core” distribution of resources in order to make useful progress. The NA-ESMD simulations are trivially parallelizable requiring ~300 processors for up to one week runtime to reach a meaningful restart point.

  1. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1 flavor ensemble with lattices of size $32^3 \\times 64$ generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at $a=0.081$~fm and with $M_\\pi=312$~MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a two-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation $t_{\\rm sep}$. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost-effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of $t_{\\rm sep}$ needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the $t_{\\rm sep} \\to \\infty $ estimates is presented.

  2. The Sommerfeld enhancement for dark matter with an excited state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Sommerfeld enhancement to dark matter annihilation in the presence of an excited state, where the interaction inducing the enhancement is purely off-diagonal, such as in models of exciting or inelastic dark matter. We derive a simple and accurate semi-analytic approximation for the s-wave enhancement, which is valid provided the mass splitting between the ground and excited states is not too large, and discuss the cutoff of the enhancement for large mass splittings. We reproduce previously derived results in the appropriate limits, and demonstrate excellent agreement with numerical calculations of the enhancement. We show that the presence of an excited state leads to generically larger values of the Sommerfeld enhancement, larger resonances, and shifting of the resonances to lower mediator masses. Furthermore, in the presence of a mass splitting the enhancement is no longer a monotonic function of velocity: the enhancement where the kinetic energy is close to that required to excite the higher state can be up to twice as large as the enhancement at zero velocity

  3. Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory for doublet excitation energies and excited state geometries: the excited states of CN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie J; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-11-15

    Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) is a post multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with similar performance to complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) but with greater computational efficiency. Cyano radical (CN) is a molecule whose spectrum is well established from experiments and whose excitation energies have been used as a testing ground for theoretical methods to treat excited states of open-shell systems, which are harder and much less studied than excitation energies of closed-shell singlets. In the present work, we studied the adiabatic excitation energies of CN with MC-PDFT. Then we compared this multireference (MR) method to some single-reference (SR) methods, including time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and completely renormalized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory with singles, doubles and noniterative triples [CR-EOM-CCSD(T)]; we also compared to some other MR methods, including configuration interaction singles and doubles (MR-CISD) and multistate CASPT2 (MS-CASPT2). Through a comparison between SR and MR methods, we achieved a better appreciation of the need to use MR methods to accurately describe higher excited states, and we found that among the MR methods, MC-PDFT stands out for its accuracy for the first four states out of the five doublet states studied this paper; this shows its efficiency for calculating doublet excited states.

  4. Relaxed structure of typical nitro explosives in the excited state: Observation, implication and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Genbai; Yang, Zuhua; Xi, Tao; Xin, Jianting; Zhao, Yongqiang; He, Weihua; Shui, Min; Gu, Yuqiu; Xiong, Ying; Xu, Tao

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the structural, geometrical, and chemical changes that occur after an electronic excitation is essential to elucidate the inherent mechanism of nitro explosives. Herein, relaxed structures of typical nitro explosives in the lowest singlet excited state are investigated using time-dependent density functional theory. During the excitation process, the nitro group is activated and relaxes via geometrical change. The five explosives RDX, HMX, CL-20, PETN, and LLM-105 exhibit similar relaxed structures, and the impact sensitivity is related to their excitation energy. High-sensitivity δ-HMX has a lower excitation energy for relaxed structure than β-HMX. This study offers novel insight into energetic materials.

  5. Ionization of highly excited states of a hydrogen atom by a strong low-frequency field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersons, I.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The probability of ionization of highly excited states of a hydrogen atom by a low-frequency field is estimated by using the previously derived quasi-classical wave function of an electron in a Coulomb field and in a radiation field. The expression obtained predicts an ionization threshold at field intensities approximately equal to those observed experimentally, but predicts an increase in ionization probability that is approximately ten times the increase observed experimentally when the field intensity in the threshold region is increased. The approximations underlying the derivation of the equation for the ionization probability are discussed

  6. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-01-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals

  7. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

    2004-07-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  8. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  9. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  10. Study of the first excited state in 5Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.M.; Fou, C.M.; Ward, S.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction 6 Li( 3 He,α) 5 Li(α)p was studied with a 1.8MeV incident 3 He beam. Coincidence spectra (α-α) were measured at theta 1 =25 deg, 35 deg, 40 deg and theta 2 =-150 deg. The purpose was to locate the first excited state of 5 Li. The analysis yields E(x)=3.2+0.2MeV and GAMMA=1.5+-0.5MeV

  11. Excited states by analytic continuation of TBA equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorey, P.; Tateo, R.

    1996-01-01

    We suggest an approach to the problem of finding integral equations for the excited states of an integrable model, starting from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations for its ground state. The idea relies on analytic continuation through complex values of the coupling constant, and an analysis of the monodromies that the equations and their solutions undergo. For the scaling Lee-Yang model, we find equations in this way for the one- and two-particle states in the spin-zero sector, and suggest various generalisations. Numerical results show excellent agreement with the truncated conformal space approach, and we also treat some of the ultraviolet and infrared asymptotics analytically. (orig.)

  12. Formation and role of excited states in radiolysis - a foreword

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that the choice of contributions to the special issue of this Journal has been limited to those which bear on the details of the mechanisms of excited state formation and are likely to be useful to radiation chemists. Since more than half the energy deposited in radiolysis goes into excitation, studies on the fate of the excited species formed are very important. A brief reference is made to the subject matter of each of the fifteen contributions, and its significance to the development of the technique of radiolysis is outlined. (U.K.)

  13. Excited state chemistry of indigoid dyes. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Herrmann, H.; Wyman, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    The triplet-triplet absorption spectra and lifetimes of 6,6'-di-n-hexyloxy thioindigo, 5,5'-diethyl selenoindigo and four 5,5'-dialkyl thioindigo dyes were determined by flash photolysis at 77 K in an EPA-glass matrix. Ring- or N,N'-substituted indigos and a mixed indigo-thioindigo dye gave no evidence for transient formation under these conditions. The excited state behavior of these dyes is discussed from the perspective of parallel oxygen-quenching studies on the photoisomerizable dyes and room-temperature nanosecond laser-flash photolytic measurements on several of these compounds. (orig.) [de

  14. Ligand-to-Diimine / Metal-to-Diimine Charge-Transfer Excited States of [Re(NCS)(CO).sub.3./sub.(.alpha.-diimine)] (.alpha.-diimine = 2,2'-bipyridine, di-.sup. i./sup.Pr-N,N-1,4-diazabutadiene). A Spectroscopic and Computational Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodriguez, A. M. B.; Gabrielsson, A.; Motevalli, M.; Matousek, P.; Towrie, M.; Šebera, Jakub; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 23 (2005), s. 5016-5025 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04OCD14.20; GA MŠk 1P05OC068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : intramolecular electron-transfer * resolved infrared-spectroscopy * resonance Raman-spectroscopy * transition-metal-complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact fac tor: 2.898, year: 2005

  15. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongyuan; Min, Yanjun; Chen, Zhichao; He, Zhigang; Yuan, Kaijun; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Wu, Guorong

    2018-04-17

    The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range of 265.7-216.7 nm is studied using the time-resolved photoelectron imaging method. It is found that excitation at longer wavelengths (265.7-250.2 nm) results in the population of the S1(1πσ*) state, which decays out of the photoionization window in about 90 fs. At shorter pump wavelengths (242.1-216.7 nm), the assignments are less clear-cut. We tentatively assign the initially photoexcited state(s) to the 1π3p Rydberg state(s) which has lifetimes of 159 ± 20, 125 ± 15, 102 ± 10 and 88 ± 10 fs for the pump wavelengths of 242.1, 238.1, 232.6 and 216.7 nm, respectively. Internal conversion to the S1(1πσ*) state represents at most a minor decay channel. The methyl substitution effects on the decay dynamics of the excited states of pyrrole are also discussed. Methyl substitution on the pyrrole ring seems to enhance the direct internal conversion from the 1π3p Rydberg state to the ground state, while methyl substitution on the N atom has less influence and the internal conversion to the S1(πσ*) state represents a main channel.

  16. The Microwave Spectroscopy of Aminoacetonitrile in the Vibrational Excited State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Chiho; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Kaori

    2015-06-01

    Aminoacetonitrile (NH_2CH_2CN) is a potential precursor of the simplest amino acid, glycine and was detected toward SgrB2(N). It is expected that the strongest transitions will be found in the terahertz region so that we have extended measurements up to 1.3 THz. This study gave an accurate prediction of aminoacetonitrile up to 2 THz which is useful for astronomically search. This molecule has a few low-lying vibrational excited states and the pure rotational transitions in these vibrational excited states are expected to found. We found a series of transitions with intensity of about 30%. Eighty-eight spectral lines including both a-type and b-type transitions were recorded in the frequency region of 400 - 450 GHz, and centrifugal distortion constants up to the sextic term were determined. Perturbation was recognized. We will report the current status of the analysis. A. Belloche, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, H. S. P. Müller, P. Schilke, J. Ott, S. Thorwirth, and C. Hieret, 2008, Astronom. & Astrophys. 482, 179 (2008). Y. Motoki, Y. Tsunoda, H. Ozeki, and K. Kobayashi, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 209, 23 (2013). B. Bak, E. L. Hansen, F. M. Nicolaisen, and O. F. Nielsen, Can. J. Phys. 53, 2183 (1975).

  17. Reversible bridge-mediated excited-state symmetry breaking in stilbene-linked DNA dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Frederick D; Daublain, Pierre; Zhang, Ligang; Cohen, Boiko; Vura-Weis, Josh; Wasielewski, Michael R; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Wang, Qiang; Raytchev, Milen; Fiebig, Torsten

    2008-03-27

    The excited-state behavior of synthetic DNA dumbbells possessing stilbenedicarboxamide (Sa) linkers separated by short A-tracts or alternating A-T base-pair sequences has been investigated by means of fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy. Electronic excitation of the Sa chromophores results in conversion of a locally excited state to a charge-separated state in which one Sa is reduced and the other is oxidized. This symmetry-breaking process occurs exclusively via a multistep mechanism-hole injection followed by hole transport and hole trapping-even at short distances. Rate constants for charge separation are strongly distance-dependent at short distances but become less so at longer distances. Disruption of the A-tract by inversion of a single A-T base pair results in a pronounced decrease in both the rate constant and efficiency of charge separation. Hole trapping by Sa is highly reversible, resulting in rapid charge recombination that occurs via the reverse of the charge separation process: hole detrapping, hole transport, and charge return to regenerate the locally excited Sa singlet state. These results differ in several significant respects from those previously reported for guanine or stilbenediether as hole traps. Neither charge separation nor charge recombination occur via a single-step superexchange mechanism, and hole trapping is slower and detrapping faster when Sa serves as the electron donor. Both the occurrence of symmetry breaking and reversible hole trapping by a shallow trap in a DNA-based system are without precedent.

  18. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; Schirò, Giorgio; Adam, Virgile; Aquila, Andrew; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Byrdin, Martin; Carbajo, Sergio; de La Mora, Eugenio; Doak, R. Bruce; Feliks, Mikolaj; Fieschi, Franck; Foucar, Lutz; Guillon, Virginia; Hilpert, Mario; Hunter, Mark S.; Jakobs, Stefan; Koglin, Jason E.; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Lane, Thomas J.; Lévy, Bernard; Liang, Mengning; Nass, Karol; Ridard, Jacqueline; Robinson, Joseph S.; Roome, Christopher M.; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Seaberg, Matthew; Thepaut, Michel; Cammarata, Marco; Demachy, Isabelle; Field, Martin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Schlichting, Ilme; Weik, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecond timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.

  19. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Cytosine Aza-Derivative and Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongneng; Zhou, Xueyao; Wang, Xueli; Jiang, Bin; Li, Yongle; Chen, Jinquan; Xu, Jianhua

    2017-04-13

    Excited state dynamics of 5-azacytosine (5-AC), 2,4-diamino-1,3,5-triazine (2,4-DT), and 2-amino-1,3,5-triazine (2-AT) were comprehensively investigated by steady state absorption, fluorescence, and femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed to help assign the absorption bands and understand the excited state decay mechanisms. The experimental results of excited singlet state dynamics for 5-AC, 2,4-DT, and 2-AT with femtosecond time resolution were reported for the first time. Two distinct decay pathways, with ∼1 ps and tens of picosecond lifetimes, were observed in 5-AC. Only one decay pathway with 17 ps lifetime was observed in 2,4-DT while an emissive state was found in 2-AT. TDDFT calculations suggest that 5-AC has a dark nπ* (S 1 ) state below the first allowed ππ* (S 2 ) state, which leads to the ultrafast decay of the ππ* state. In 2,4-DT, there is no dark nπ* state below the bright ππ* (S 1 ) state and the 17 ps lifetime is assigned to the relaxation from the ππ* (S 1 ) state to ground state. Two dark nπ* states (S 1 and S 2 ) were found in 2-AT, which exhibits much more complex excited state dynamics compared with the other two. Photoluminescence in 2-AT has been confirmed to be fluorescence emission from its bright ππ* (S 3 ) state. Our results strongly suggest that electronic structures are very sensitive to the substitution on the triazine ring and that the photophysical properties of nucleic acid analogues depend highly on their molecular structures.

  20. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  1. Aqueous reactions of triplet excited states with allylic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, R.; Anastasio, C.; Hudson, B. M.; Tantillo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Triplet excited states of dissolved organic matter react with several classes of aromatic organics such as phenols, anilines, sulfonamide antibiotics and phenylurea herbicides. Aqueous triplets appear to be among the most important oxidants for atmospheric phenols in regions with biomass burning, with phenol lifetimes on the order of a few hours to a day. However, little is known of the reactions of triplets with other classes of organic compounds. Recent work from our group shows that triplets react rapidly with several biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), such as methyl jasmonate, cis-3-hexenyl acetate, and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. However, there are only a few rate constants for aqueous reactions between alkenes such as these and triplet excited states. For our work, we refer to these and similar alkenes which have hydrogen(s) attached to a carbon adjacent to the double bond, as allylic compounds. To better assess the importance of triplets as aqueous oxidants, we measured second-order rate constants (kAC+3BP*) for a number of allylic compounds (ACs) with the triplet state of benzophenone; then established a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) between kAC+3BP* and computed oxidation potential of the ACs (R2 =0.65). Using the QSAR, we estimated the rate constants for triplets with some allylic isoprene and limonene oxidation products that have high Henry's law constants (KH>103 M atm-1). Hydroxylated limonene products and the delta-isomers of isoprene hydroxyhydroperoxides (δ4ISOPOOH) and hydroxynitrates (δ4ISONO2) were faster with predicted kAC+3BP* values ranging between (0.5-3.5) x 109 M-1-s-1 whereas the beta-isomers of ISOPOOH and ISONO2 were slower (kAC+3BP* gas and aqueous hydroxyl radical and ozone, triplets in fog could account for up to 20 % of the measured loss of these compounds in the atmosphere. We are currently evaluating the importance of triplets in particulate matter (PM) which can have much higher concentrations of triplet

  2. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, T; Aroulmoji, V; Ravindran, R Samson; Müller, M; Ranjitha, S; Rajarajan, G; Anbarasan, P M

    2015-01-25

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were studied based on density functional theory (DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP. The Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by using a hybrid method which combines the properties and dynamics of many-body in the presence of time-dependent (TD) potentials, i.e. TDSCF-DFT (B3LYP). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the visible and near-UV regions were plotted and assigned based on TD-DFT calculations. Due to the absorption, bands of the metal-organic compound are n→π(*) present. The calculated results suggest that the three lowest energy excited states of the investigated dye sensitizers are due to photoinduced electron transfer processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer is owing to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The role of linking the henna1 dye with a carboxylic acid via a thiophene bridge was analyzed. The results are that using a stronger π-conjugate bridge as well as a strong donator and acceptor group enhances the efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum entanglement of locally excited states in Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Watamura, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    In 4 dimensional Maxwell gauge theory, we study the changes of (Rényi) entanglement entropy which are defined by subtracting the entropy for the ground state from the one for the locally excited states, generated by acting with gauge invariant local operators on the state. The changes for the operators which we consider in this paper reflect the electric-magnetic duality. The late-time value of changes can be interpreted in terms of electromagnetic quasi-particles. When the operator constructed of both electric and magnetic fields acts on the ground state, it shows that the operator acts on the late-time structure of quantum entanglement differently from free scalar fields.

  4. Excited states using semistochastic heat-bath configuration interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Adam A.; Umrigar, C. J.; Sharma, Sandeep

    2017-10-01

    We extend our recently developed heat-bath configuration interaction (HCI) algorithm, and our semistochastic algorithm for performing multireference perturbation theory, to calculate excited-state wavefunctions and energies. We employ time-reversal symmetry, which reduces the memory requirements by more than a factor of two. An extrapolation technique is introduced to reliably extrapolate HCI energies to the full CI limit. The resulting algorithm is used to compute fourteen low-lying potential energy surfaces of the carbon dimer using the cc-pV5Z basis set, with an estimated error in energy of 30-50 μHa compared to full CI. The excitation energies obtained using our algorithm have a mean absolute deviation of 0.02 eV compared to experimental values.

  5. Psoralen phototherapy and the possible involvement of triplet excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoralens are important drugs used in the phototherapy of psoriasis and vitiligo. It has been predicted that the triplet excited state of psoralen is photoactive. The authors have employed pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis to determine the quantum yields of formation of the triplet states of psoralens and related molecules including 4'5' dihydropsoralen, a model for 4'5' psoralenpyrimidine mono-adducts. The triplet spectra were used to follow the reactions of the triplets with thymine and tryptophan. Such reactions may take place via a charge transfer mechanism. For 8-methoxy psoralen, in addition to triplet formation, photoionization was detected using high laser intensities. Although significant yields of psoralen triplets are formed, and some such triplets react with thymine, it is too early yet to say definitely whether or not the therapeutic action of psoralens is mediated via such triplet states. (Auth.)

  6. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  7. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rabi oscillation in few-photon double ionization through doubly excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinbo; Zhou, Yueming; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate few-photon double ionization of helium in intense XUV laser fields by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our results show that the familiar single-ring structure in the joint electron momentum spectra is split into the double-ring and previously unobserved triple-ring structures at some specific photon energies. By tracing the electron population evolution of the corresponding states, we found that the triple-ring structure is induced by the coupled Rabi oscillations among the ground, a singly excited, and a doubly excited states. The intermediate detuning causes the asymmetry of the triple-ring structures, which can be controlled by changing the laser intensity and frequency.

  9. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Izumi; Safronova, Ulyana I.; Kato, Takako

    2001-05-01

    We have calculated energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for Be-like oxygen (O{sup 4+}) including ls{sup 2}2lnl' (n=2 - 8, l {<=} n - 1) and 1s{sup 2}3l'nl (n=3 - 6, l {<=} n - l) states by multi-configurational Hartree-Fock method (Cowan code) and perturbation theory Z-expansion method (MZ code). The state selective dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of Be-like O ions are obtained. Configuration mixing plays an important role for the principal quantum number n distribution of the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients for 2snl (n {<=} 5) levels at low electron temperature. The orbital angular momentum quantum number l distribution of the rate coefficients shows a peak at l = 4. The total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient is derived as a function of electron temperature. (author)

  10. Dependence of resonant effects in excited-state decay on the form of inter-state coupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menšík, Miroslav; Král, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 486, - (2008), s. 79-100 ISSN 1542-1406 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0643 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electron-vibrational interaction * energy transfer * excited state decay Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.537, year: 2008

  11. Ground and excited state properties of high performance anthocyanidin dyes-sensitized solar cells in the basic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prima, Eka Cahya [Advanced Functional Material Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Computational Material Design and Quantum Engineering Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); International Program on Science Education, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia (Indonesia); Yuliarto, Brian; Suyatman, E-mail: yatman@tf.itb.ac.id [Advanced Functional Material Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno [Computational Material Design and Quantum Engineering Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    The aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes were previously reported to form carbinol pseudobase, cis-chalcone, and trans-chalcone due to the basic levels. The further investigations of ground and excited state properties of the dyes were characterized using density functional theory with PCM(UFF)/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level in the basic solutions. However, to the best of our knowledge, the theoretical investigation of their potential photosensitizers has never been reported before. In this paper, the theoretical photovoltaic properties sensitized by dyes have been successfully investigated including the electron injections, the ground and excited state oxidation potentials, the estimated open circuit voltages, and the light harvesting efficiencies. The results prove that the electronic properties represented by dyes’ LUMO-HOMO levels will affect to the photovoltaic performances. Cis-chalcone dye is the best anthocyanidin aglycone dye with the electron injection spontaneity of −1.208 eV, the theoretical open circuit voltage of 1.781 V, and light harvesting efficiency of 56.55% due to the best HOMO-LUMO levels. Moreover, the ethanol solvent slightly contributes to the better cell performance than the water solvent dye because of the better oxidation potential stabilization in the ground state as well as in the excited state. These results are in good agreement with the known experimental report that the aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes in basic solvent are the high potential photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell.

  12. Ground and excited state properties of high performance anthocyanidin dyes-sensitized solar cells in the basic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prima, Eka Cahya; Yuliarto, Brian; Suyatman; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno

    2015-01-01

    The aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes were previously reported to form carbinol pseudobase, cis-chalcone, and trans-chalcone due to the basic levels. The further investigations of ground and excited state properties of the dyes were characterized using density functional theory with PCM(UFF)/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level in the basic solutions. However, to the best of our knowledge, the theoretical investigation of their potential photosensitizers has never been reported before. In this paper, the theoretical photovoltaic properties sensitized by dyes have been successfully investigated including the electron injections, the ground and excited state oxidation potentials, the estimated open circuit voltages, and the light harvesting efficiencies. The results prove that the electronic properties represented by dyes’ LUMO-HOMO levels will affect to the photovoltaic performances. Cis-chalcone dye is the best anthocyanidin aglycone dye with the electron injection spontaneity of −1.208 eV, the theoretical open circuit voltage of 1.781 V, and light harvesting efficiency of 56.55% due to the best HOMO-LUMO levels. Moreover, the ethanol solvent slightly contributes to the better cell performance than the water solvent dye because of the better oxidation potential stabilization in the ground state as well as in the excited state. These results are in good agreement with the known experimental report that the aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes in basic solvent are the high potential photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell

  13. Chromium(0), molybdenum(0), and tungsten(0) isocyanide complexes as luminophores and photosensitizers with long-lived excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueldt, Laura A.; Wenger, Oliver S.

    2017-01-01

    Arylisocyanide complexes based on earth-abundant Group 6 d 6 metals are interesting alternatives to photoactive complexes made from precious metals such as Ru II , Re I , Os II , or Ir III . Some of these complexes have long-lived 3 MLCT excited states that exhibit luminescence with good quantum yields as well as nano- to microsecond lifetimes, and they are very strongly reducing. Recent studies have demonstrated that Cr 0 , Mo 0 , and W 0 arylisocyanide complexes have great potential for applications in luminescent devices, photoredox catalysis, and dye-sensitized solar cells. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, Tedd E; Parkman, Jacob A; Diaz Aldana, Luis A; Clark, Gemma; Dufek, Eric J; Keller, Philip

    2017-10-03

    A method of recovering metals from electronic waste comprises providing a powder comprising electronic waste in at least a first reactor and a second reactor and providing an electrolyte comprising at least ferric ions in an electrochemical cell in fluid communication with the first reactor and the second reactor. The method further includes contacting the powders within the first reactor and the second reactor with the electrolyte to dissolve at least one base metal from each reactor into the electrolyte and reduce at least some of the ferric ions to ferrous ions. The ferrous ions are oxidized at an anode of the electrochemical cell to regenerate the ferric ions. The powder within the second reactor comprises a higher weight percent of the at least one base metal than the powder in the first reactor. Additional methods of recovering metals from electronic waste are also described, as well as an apparatus of recovering metals from electronic waste.

  15. A non-adiabatic quantum-classical dynamics study of the intramolecular excited state hydrogen transfer in ortho-nitrobenzaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Verónica; Corral, Inés; Feixas, Ferran; Migani, Annapaola; Blancafort, Lluís; González-Vázquez, Jesús; González, Leticia

    2011-08-28

    Ab initio surface-hopping dynamics calculations have been performed to simulate the intramolecular excited state hydrogen transfer dynamics of ortho-nitrobenzaldehyde (o-NBA) in the gas phase from the electronic S(1) excited state. Upon UV excitation, the hydrogen is transferred from the aldehyde substituent to the nitro group, generating o-nitrosobenzoic acid through a ketene intermediate. The semiclassical propagations show that the deactivation from the S(1) is ultrafast, in agreement with the experimental measurements, which detect the ketene in less than 400 fs. The trajectories show that the deactivation mechanism involves two different conical intersections. The first one, a planar configuration with the hydrogen partially transferred, is responsible for the branching between the formation of a biradical intermediate and the regeneration of the starting material. The conversion of the biradical to the ketene corresponds to the passage through a second intersection region in which the ketene group is formed.

  16. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and Charge Transfer Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development and implementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probe apparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation of investigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specific attention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highly symmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes the development and construction of the experimental apparatus used throughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss the investigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resulting from a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of its methyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we are able to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provide evidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT) type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1 state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of the carotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidence for the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systems and found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigation of the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsible for the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allows for a more detailed understanding of the importance of structural dynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting

  17. Excited-State Dynamics of Oxyluciferin in Firefly Luciferase

    KAUST Repository

    Snellenburg, Joris J.

    2016-11-23

    The color variations of light emitted by some natural and mutant luciferases are normally attributed to collective factors referred to as microenvironment effects; however, the exact nature of these interactions between the emitting molecule (oxyluciferin) and the active site remains elusive. Although model studies of noncomplexed oxyluciferin and its variants have greatly advanced the understanding of its photochemistry, extrapolation of the conclusions to the real system requires assumptions about the polarity and proticity of the active site. To decipher the intricate excited-state dynamics, global and target analysis is performed here for the first time on the steady-state and time-resolved spectra of firefly oxyluciferin complexed with luciferase from the Japanese firefly (Luciola cruciata). The experimental steady-state and time resolved luminescence spectra of the oxyluciferin/luciferase complex in solution are compared with the broadband time-resolved firefly bioluminescence recorded in vivo. The results demonstrate that de-excitation of the luminophore results in a complex cascade of photoinduced proton transfer processes and can be interpreted by the pH dependence of the emitted light. It is confirmed that proton transfer is the central event in the spectrochemistry of this system for which any assignment of the pH dependent emission to a single chemical species would be an oversimplification.

  18. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in dihydroxyphenyl anthracenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Wan, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The photochemistry of three 9-(dihydroxyphenyl)anthracenes 6-8 was studied in neat CH(3)CN and selected organic solvents, to investigate excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) from the phenol to the anthracene moiety. In D(2)O-CH(3)CN mixtures, the observed deuterium exchange of 6-8 is consistent with water-mediated (formal) ESIPT process from the ortho phenolic OH to the 10'-position of the anthracene ring, giving rise to quinone methide (QM) intermediates 12-14. There is no ESIPT for the corresponding methoxy-substituted compounds. Introduction of an extra hydroxyl group onto the phenol ring at different positions led to a range of deuterium exchange quantum yields (Φ = 0.03 to 0.15). In addition to the anticipated ESIPT process to the 10'-position, in neat CH(3)CN and other organic solvents, 6 (but not 7 or 8) undergoes a clean photocyclization to give bridged product 19 in quantitative yield. The mechanism of this unique photocyclization may involve a direct ESIPT or a 1,4-hydrogen transfer from the ortho phenolic OH to the 9'-position of the anthracene ring, generating a zwitterion (20) or diradical (21) intermediate, respectively, followed by ring closure. Fluorescence studies of 6 in various solvents show the existence of both local excited and intramolecular charge transfer states whereas only the former was present for 7 and 8, offering a possible rationalization for the photocyclization pathway.

  19. Photophysical Model of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Internal Conversion and Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Photophysics of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) has been in controversy, in particular, on the nature of the electronic states before and after the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), even though the dynamics and mechanism of the ESIPT have been well established. We report highly time resolved fluorescence spectra over the full emission frequency regions of the enol and keto isomers and the anisotropy in time domain to determine the accurate rates of the population decay, spectral relaxation and anisotropy decay of the keto isomer. We have shown that the ∼300 fs component observed frequently in ESIPT dynamics arises from the S{sub 2}→S{sub 1} internal conversion in the reaction product keto isomer and that the ESIPT occurs from the enol isomer in S{sub 1} state to the keto isomer in S{sub 2} state.

  20. Tracking the excited-state time evolution of the visual pigment with multiconfigurational quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, Luis Manuel; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Santoro, Fabrizio; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2007-05-08

    The primary event that initiates vision is the photoinduced isomerization of retinal in the visual pigment rhodopsin (Rh). Here, we use a scaled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential that reproduces the isomerization path determined with multiconfigurational perturbation theory to follow the excited-state evolution of bovine Rh. The analysis of a 140-fs trajectory provides a description of the electronic and geometrical changes that prepare the system for decay to the ground state. The data uncover a complex change of the retinal backbone that, at approximately 60-fs delay, initiates a space saving "asynchronous bicycle-pedal or crankshaft" motion, leading to a conical intersection on a 110-fs time scale. It is shown that the twisted structure achieved at decay features a momentum that provides a natural route toward the photoRh structure recently resolved by using femtosecond-stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Phenothiazine Radical Cation Excited States as Super-oxidants for Energy Demanding Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Joseph A; Phelan, Brian T; Chaudhuri, Subhajyoti; Acharya, Atanu; Batista, Victor S; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2018-03-28

    We demonstrate that the 10-phenyl-10H-phenothiazine radical cation (PTZ +• ) has a manifold of excited doublet states accessible using visible and near-infrared light that can serve as super-photooxidants with excited state potentials in excess of +2.1 V vs SCE to power energy demanding oxidation reactions. Photoexcitation of PTZ +• in CH 3 CN with a 517 nm laser pulse populates a D n electronically excited doublet state that decays first to the unrelaxed lowest electronic excited state, D 1 ' (τ < 0.3 ps), followed by relaxation to D 1 (τ = 10.9 ± 0.4 ps), which finally decays to D 0 (τ = 32.3 ± 0.8 ps). D 1 ' can also be populated directly using a lower energy 900 nm laser pulse, which results in a longer D 1 ' → D 1 relaxation time (τ = 19 ± 2 ps). To probe the oxidative power of PTZ +• photoexcited doublet states, PTZ +• was covalently linked to each of three hole acceptors, perylene (Per), 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA), and 10-phenyl-9-anthracenecarbonitrile (ACN), which have oxidation potentials of 1.04, 1.27, and 1.6 V vs. SCE, respectively. In all three cases, photoexcitation wavelength dependent ultrafast hole transfer occurs from D n , D 1 ', or D 1 of PTZ +• to Per, DPA, and ACN. The ability to take advantage of the additional oxidative power provided by the upper excited doublet states of PTZ +• will enable applications using this chromophore as a super-oxidant for energy demanding reactions.

  2. Spectroscopic and excited-state properties of tri-9-anthrylborane I: Solvent polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noboru; Sakuda, Eri

    2005-08-25

    Spectroscopic and excited-state properties of tri-9-anthrylborane (TAB), showing unique absorption and fluorescence characteristics originating from p(boron)-pi(anthryl group) orbital interactions, were studied in 12 solvents. Although the absorption maximum energy (nu(a)) of TAB which appeared at around 21 x 10(3) cm(-1) (band I) was almost independent of the solvent polarity parameter, f(X) (f(X) = (D(s) - 1)/(2D(s) + 1) - (n(2) - 1)/(2n(2) + 1) where D(s) and n represent the static dielectric constant and the refractive index of a solvent, respectively), the fluorescence maximum energy (nu(f)) showed a linear correlation with f(X). The f(X) dependence of the value of nu(a) - nu(f) demonstrated that the change in the dipole moment of TAB upon light excitation was approximately 8.0 D, indicating that absorption band I was ascribed to an intramolecular charge-transfer transition in nature. The excited electron of TAB was thus concluded to localize primarily on the p orbital of the boron atom. Furthermore, it was shown that the fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield of TAB varied from 11.8 to 1.1 ns and from 0.41 to 0.02, respectively, with an increase in f(X). The present results indicated that the nonradiative decay rate constant (k(nr)) of TAB was influenced significantly by f(X). Excited-state decay of TAB was understood by intramolecular back-electron (charge) transfer from the p orbital of the boron atom to the pi orbital of the anthryl group, which was discussed in terms of the energy gap dependence of k(nr). Specific solvent interactions of TAB revealed by the present spectroscopic and photophysical studies are also discussed.

  3. 2D electron systems: Metals in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible for a metal to exist in a strictly two-dimensional system? This may seem trivial, but it is actually a longstanding problem. The electrical characteristics of an array of superconducting islands on a normal metal suggests that the answer could be 'yes'.

  4. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures. G.U. Kulkarni. Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research. Bangalore, India. kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in.

  5. Separating and recycling metals from mixed metallic particles of crushed electronic wastes by vacuum metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2009-09-15

    During the treatment of electronic wastes, a crushing process is usually used to strip metals from various base plates. Several methods have been applied to separate metals from nonmetals. However, mixed metallic particles obtained from these processes are still a mixture of various metals, including some toxic heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. With emphasis on recovering copper and other precious metals, there have hitherto been no satisfactory methods to recover these toxic metals. In this paper, the criterion of separating metals from mixed metallic particles by vacuum metallurgy is built. The results show that the metals with high vapor pressure have been almost recovered completely, leading to a considerable reduction of environmental pollution. In addition, the purity of copper in mixed particles has been improved from about 80 wt % to over 98 wt %.

  6. Excited States and Photodebromination of Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Computational and Quantitative Structure—Property Relationship Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a density functional theory (DFT/time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT study on the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states of 20 selected polybrominateddiphenyl ether (PBDE congeners, with the solvation effect included in the calculations using the polarized continuum model (PCM. The results obtained showed that for most of the brominated diphenyl ether (BDE congeners, the lowest singlet excited state was initiated by the electron transfer from HOMO to LUMO, involving a π–σ* excitation. In triplet excited states, structure of the BDE congeners differed notably from that of the BDE ground states with one of the specific C–Br bonds bending off the aromatic plane. In addition, the partial least squares regression (PLSR, principal component analysis-multiple linear regression analysis (PCA-MLR, and back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN approaches were employed for a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR study. Based on the previously reported kinetic data for the debromination by ultraviolet (UV and sunlight, obtained QSPR models exhibited a reasonable evaluation of the photodebromination reactivity even when the BDE congeners had same degree of bromination, albeit different patterns of bromination.

  7. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  8. Electron and ion induced electron emission from metals and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbatz, M

    2001-01-01

    gradually exposed to oxygen as an experimental probe. The experimental data are fitted with an analytical model, that is able to describe the observed kinetics. The fit parameters give absolute values of sticking probabilities and of surface reaction rates. During oxidation of aluminum and magnesium also spontaneous emission of electrons (exoelectrons) is observed. This effect is quantitatively studied for different oxygen partial pressures. The experimental data also indicate a significant influence of the surface morphology on the exoemission process. An important consequence of atomic collisions in solids is ionization leading to electron ejection from the target atoms with subsequent migration through the solid. A certain fraction of these electrons finally reaches the surface and is ejected into vacuum. A standard measurement of this phenomenon is the observation of the particle (electron, ion) induced electron emission yield g, defined as the average number of ejected electrons per incoming projectile. ...

  9. External Electric Field Effects on Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer in 4'-N,N-Dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone in Poly(methyl methacrylate) Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Hino, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Norifumi; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2015-09-17

    The external electric field effects on the steady-state electronic spectra and excited-state dynamics were investigated for 4'-N,N-(dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone (DMHF) in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film. In the steady-state spectrum, dual emission was observed from the excited states of the normal (N*) and tautomer (T*) forms. Application of an external electric field of 1.0 MV·cm(-1) enhanced the N* emission and reduced the T* emission, indicating that the external electric field suppressed the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The fluorescence decay profiles were measured for the N* and T* forms. The change in the emission intensity ratio N*/T* induced by the external electric field is dominated by ESIPT from the Franck-Condon excited state of the N* form and vibrational cooling in potential wells of the N* and T* forms occurring within tens of picoseconds. Three manifolds of fluorescent states were identified for both the N* and T* forms. The excited-state dynamics of DMHF in PMMA films has been found to be very different from that in solution due to intermolecular interactions in a rigid environment.

  10. How Parallel Are Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces from Time-Independent and Time-Dependent DFT? A BODIPY Dye Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Keenan T; Kowalczyk, Tim

    2016-10-06

    To support the development and characterization of chromophores with targeted photophysical properties, excited-state electronic structure calculations should rapidly and accurately predict how derivatization of a chromophore will affect its excitation and emission energies. This paper examines whether a time-independent excited-state density functional theory (DFT) approach meets this need through a case study of BODIPY chromophore photophysics. A restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS) treatment of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes is contrasted with linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Vertical excitation energies predicted by the two approaches are remarkably different due to overestimation by TDDFT and underestimation by ROKS relative to experiment. Overall, ROKS with a standard hybrid functional provides the more accurate description of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes, but excitation energies computed by the two methods are strongly correlated. The two approaches also make similar predictions of shifts in the excitation energy upon functionalization of the chromophore. TDDFT and ROKS models of the S 1 potential energy surface are then examined in detail for a representative BODIPY dye through molecular dynamics sampling on both model surfaces. We identify the most significant differences in the sampled surfaces and analyze these differences along selected normal modes. Differences between ROKS and TDDFT descriptions of the S 1 potential energy surface for this BODIPY derivative highlight the continuing need for validation of widely used approximations in excited state DFT through experimental benchmarking and comparison to ab initio reference data.

  11. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically b...

  12. Characterization of trans-dioxotechnetium(V) and technetium(II)phosphine excited states and spectroelectrochemical detection of pertechnetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Del Negro, Andy S.; Wang, Zheming; Hubler, Timothy L.; Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Sullivan, Brian P.

    2006-06-01

    We report the first examples of excited-state luminescence from technetium complexes. We have examined a series of trans-dioxo complexes of Tc(V) and a Tc(I/II) phosphine complex and compare their respective photophysical properties with the corresponding rhenium analogues. When excited with a 415 nm laser, the Tc(V) complexes luminesce in the 700-800 nm range and have excited state lifetimes in the range of several microseconds at room temperature. The low-temperature luminescence spectra of the technetium complexes have also been investigated. Distinct vibrational band progressions are resolved in the low-temperature luminescence spectra. Excited state lifetimes at 5 K vary between tens of microseconds to several milliseconds for the dioxo-technetium complexes. In addition, a previously known Tc(I) complex, [Tc(DMPE) 3]+ which has been used as a radiography imaging agent has been demonstrated in our labs to fluoresce in the visible wavelength region upon a one-electron reversible oxidation to form the Tc(II), [Tc(DMPE)3]2+ complex in aqueous solution. The luminescence of [Tc(DMPE)3]2+ was observed by illuminating the solution complex with a 404 nm excitation while performing the reversible electrochemical experiment. In a recent application, we have focused on making thin chemically-selective films for sensing radioactive technetium compounds and in this effort have developed a fluorescence-based spectroelectrochemical sensor. Characterization of the new dioxo-technetium(V) and technetium(II)phosphine excited states as well as application of the respective chromophores for use in a spectroelectrochemical sensor for pertechnetate will be discussed.

  13. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  14. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  15. Synthesis, Acidity Constants and Tautomeric Structure of the Diazonium Coupling Products of 2-(Benzylsulfanyl-7H-purin-6-one in Its Ground and Excited States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam A. Saad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of new 8-arylhydrazono-2-(benzylsulfanyl-7H-purin-6-ones 6 were synthesized, their electronic absorption spectra in different organic solvents of varying polarities were investigated and their acid dissociation constants in both the ground and excited states were determined spectrophotometrically. The tautomeric structures of such products were elucidated by spectral analyses and correlation of their acid dissociation constants with the Hammett equation. The results indicated that the studied compounds 6 exist predominantly in the hydrazone tautomeric form 6A in both the ground and excited states.

  16. Electron pairing in dilute liquid metal-metal halide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selloni, A.; Car, R.; Parrinello, M.; Carnevali, P.

    1987-09-10

    Spin density functional theory is used to describe the interaction between solvated electrons in KCl in the high dilution limit. In agreement with recent calculations based on the path integral method our results for antiparallel spin predict a strong tendency to form localized bielectronic complexes. At variance with numerical path integral, our method can efficiently treat the case of parallel spins. For this case we find that electrons repel each other and localize into separate F-center-like states.

  17. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au{sub 3} was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH{sub 2} could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH{sub 2} back to Au and H{sub 2}. We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}{sup +} etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the

  18. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2009-01-01

    methods with all-electron Douglas-Kroll relativistic methods. We have the capabilities for computing full CI extrapolations including spin-orbit effects and several one-electron properties and electron density maps including spin-orbit effects. We are continuously collaborating with several experimental groups around the country and at National Labs to carry out computational studies on the DOE-BES funded projects. The past work in the last 3 years was primarily motivated and driven by the concurrent or recent experimental studies on these systems. We were thus significantly benefited by coordinating our computational efforts with experimental studies. The interaction between theory and experiment has resulted in some unique and exciting opportunities. For example, for the very first time ever, the upper spin-orbit component of a heavy trimer such as Au 3 was experimentally observed as a result of our accurate computational study on the upper electronic states of gold trimer. Likewise for the first time AuH 2 could be observed and interpreted clearly due to our computed potential energy surfaces that revealed the existence of a large barrier to convert the isolated AuH 2 back to Au and H 2 . We have also worked on yet to be observed systems and have made predictions for future experiments. We have computed the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal carbides transition metal clusters and compared our electronic states to the anion photodetachment spectra of Lai Sheng Wang. Prof Mike Morse and coworkers(funded also by DOE-BES) and Prof Stimle and coworkers(also funded by DOE-BES) are working on the spectroscopic properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides. Our predictions on the excited states of transition metal clusters such as Hf 3 , Nb 2 + etc., have been confirmed experimentally by Prof. Lombardi and coworkers using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have also been studying larger complexes critical to the environmental management of high

  19. The Structure of the Nucleon and its Excited States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1995-01-01

    The past year has been an exciting and productive one for particle physics research at Abilene Christian University. The thrust of our experimental investigations is the study of the nucleon and its excited states. Laboratories where these investigations are presently being conducted are the AGS at Brookhaven, Fermilab and LAMPF. Some analysis of the data for experiments at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Gatchina, Russia) is still in progress. Scheduling of activities at different laboratories inevitably leads to occasional conflicts. This likelihood is increased by the present budget uncertainties at the laboratories that make long-term scheduling difficult. For the most part, the investigators have been able to avoid such conflicts. Only one experiment received beam time in 1994 (E890 at the AGS). The situation for 1995-1996 also appears manageable at this point. E890 and another AGS experiment (E909) will run through May, 1995. El 178 at LAMPF is presently scheduled for August/September 1995. E866 at Fermilab is scheduled to start in Spring/Summer 1996. Undergraduate student involvement has been a key element in this research contract since its inception. Summer students participated at all of the above laboratories in 1994 and the same is planned in 1995. A transition to greater involvement by graduate students will provide cohesiveness to ACU involvement at a given laboratory and full-time on-site involvement in the longer running experiments at FNAL and BNL. Funds to support a full-time graduate student are requested this year. Finally, collaboration by Russian, Croatian and Bosnian scientists has proven to be mutually beneficial to these experimental programs and to the overall programs at the institutions involved. Past support has been augmented by other grants from government agencies and from the Research Council at Abilene Christian University. Additional funds are requested in this renewal to enable more programmatic support for these

  20. Electron field emission from sp 2-induced insulating to metallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of concentration and size of 2 cluster on the transport properties and electron field emissions of amorphous carbon films have been investigated. The observed insulating to metallic behaviour from reduced activation energy derived from transport measurement and threshold field for electron emission of ...

  1. Excited-state dynamics of size-dependent colloidal TiO{sub 2}-Au nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, Tony E.; Khoury, Rami A.; Haber, Louis H., E-mail: lhaber@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of size-dependent TiO{sub 2}-Au nanocomposites synthesized by reducing gold nanoclusters to the surface of colloidal TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are studied using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy with 400 nm excitation pulses. The results show that the relaxation processes of the plasmon depletion band, which are described by electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scattering lifetimes, are independent of the gold nanocluster shell size surrounding the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle core. The dynamics corresponding to interfacial electron transfer between the gold nanoclusters and the TiO{sub 2} bandgap are observed to spectrally overlap with the gold interband transition signal, and the electron transfer lifetimes are shown to significantly decrease as the nanocluster shell size increases. Additionally, size-dependent periodic oscillations are observed and are attributed to acoustic phonons of a porous shell composed of aggregated gold nanoclusters around the TiO{sub 2} core, with frequencies that decrease and damping times that remain constant as the nanocluster shell size increases. These results are important for the development of improved catalytic nanomaterial applications.

  2. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  3. Role of scanning electron microscope )SEM) in metal failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaiful Rizam Shamsudin; Hafizal Yazid; Mohd Harun; Siti Selina Abd Hamid; Nadira Kamarudin; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamad Jalil

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a scientific instrument that uses a beam of highly energetic electrons to examine the surface and phase distribution of specimens on a micro scale through the live imaging of secondary electrons (SE) and back-scattered electrons (BSE) images. One of the main activities of SEM Laboratory at MINT is for failure analysis on metal part and components. The capability of SEM is excellent for determining the root cause of metal failures such as ductility or brittleness, stress corrosion, fatigue and other types of failures. Most of our customers that request for failure analysis are from local petrochemical plants, manufacturers of automotive components, pipeline maintenance personnel and engineers who involved in the development of metal parts and component. This paper intends to discuss some of the technical concepts in failure analysis associated with SEM. (Author)

  4. Secondary-electron cascade in attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    an analytical model based on an approximate solution to Boltzmann's transport equation to account for the amount and energy distribution of these secondary electrons. Our theory is in good agreement with the electron spectrum found in a recent attosecond streaking experiment. To suppress the background and gain......Attosecond spectroscopy is currently restricted to photon energies around 100 eV. We show that under these conditions, electron-electron scatterings, as the photoelectrons leave the metal, give rise to a tail of secondary electrons with lower energies and hence a significant background. We develop...

  5. Scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    A source of spin polarized electrons with remarkable characteristics based on negative electron affinity (NEA) GaAs has recently been developed. It constitutes a unique tool to investigate spin dependent interactions in electron scattering processes. The characteristics and working principles of the source are briefly described. Some theoretical aspects of the scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals are discussed. Finally, the results of the first polarized low-energy electron diffraction experiment using the NEA GaAs source are reviewed; they give information about the surface magnetization of ferromagnetic Ni (110). (Author) [pt

  6. Electron-phonon coupling in the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mertig, I.

    1990-01-01

    We have estimated the strength of the mass enhancement of the conduction electrons due to electron-phonon interaction in the rare metals Sc, Y, and La–Lu. The underlying self-consistent energy bands were obtained by means of the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method, and the electron......-phonon parameters were calculated within the Gaspari-Gyorffy formulation. For the heavier rare earths Gd–Tm spin polarization was included both in the band-structure calculations and in the treatment of the electron-phonon coupling to take into account the spin splitting of the conduction electrons induced by the 4...

  7. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  8. Excited-state kinetics of the carotenoid S//1 state in LHC II and two-photon excitation spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution Efficient Car S//1 yields Chl electronic energy transfer via hot S//1 states?

    CERN Document Server

    Walla, P J; Linden, Patricia A; Ohta, Kaoru

    2002-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids (Car) in light- harvesting complex II (LHC II) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied by transient absorption measurements. The decay of the Car S //1 population ranges from similar to 200 fs to over 7 ps, depending on the excitation and detection wavelengths. In contrast, a 200 fs Car S//1 yields Chlorophyll (Chl) energy transfer component was the dominant time constant for our earlier two-photon fluorescence up- conversion measurements (Walla, P.J. ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 4799-4806). We also present the two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution and compare them with the TPE spectrum of LHC II. The TPE-spectrum of LHC II has an onset much further to the blue and a width that is narrower than expected from comparison to the S//1 fluorescence of lutein and beta-carotene in solution. Different environments may affect the shape of the S//1 spectrum significantly. To explain the blue shift of the TPE spectrum and the d...

  9. Dynamics of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, T.; Kim, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphtalene (laurdan), a derivative of 6-propanoyl- 2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (prodan), has been used as a fluorescent probe in cell imaging, especially in visualizing the lipid rafts by the generalized polarization (GP) images, where GP=(I 440 -I 490 )/(I 440 +I 490 ) with I being the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence spectrum of laurdan is sensitive to its dipolar environment due to the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in S 1 state, which results in a dual emission from the locally excited (LE) and the ICT states. The ICT process and the solvation of the ICT state are very sensitive to the dipolar nature of the environment. In this work, the ICT of laurdan in ethanol has been studied by femtosecond time resolved fluorescence (TRF), especially TRF spectra measurement without the conventional spectral reconstruction method. TRF probes the excited states exclusively, a unique advantage over the pump/probe transient absorption technique, although time resolution of the TRF is generally lower than transient absorption and the TRF spectra measurement was possible only though the spectral reconstruction. Over the years, critical advances in TRF technique have been made in our group to achieve <50 fs time resolution with direct full spectra measurement capability. Detailed ICT and the subsequent solvation processes can be visualized unambiguously from the TRF spectra. Fig. 1 shows the TRF spectra of laurdan in ethanol at several time delays. Surprisingly, two bands at 433 and 476 nm are clearly visible in the TRF spectra of laurdan even at T = 0 fs. As time increases, the band at 476 nm shifts to the red while its intensity increases. The band at 433 nm also shifts slightly to the red, but loses intensity as time increases. The intensity of the 476 nm band reaches maximum at around 5 ps, where it is roughly twice as intense as that at 0 fs, and stays constant until lifetime decay is noticeable. The spectra were fit by

  10. Resonance processes in e - H2 collisions: Dissociative attachment and dissociation from vibrationally and rotationally excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, I.; Xu, Y.; Wadehra, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    We summarize theoretical studies of dissociative electron attachment to rovibrationally excited H2 molecules by comparing results of earlier local calculations with the results of more recent nonlocal complex potential calculations. The extension of the resonance theory to the near-threshold resonant dissociation is discussed and results are shown for dissociation from vibrationally excited states. Contributions from two negative-ion resonances, 2 Σ + u shape resonance and 2 Σ + g Feshbach resonance, are analysed. We also demonstrate the isotope effect by presenting the peak values of the dissociative attachment cross section for all five isotopic substitutes of H 2

  11. Nanoscale electron manipulation in metals with intense THz electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Jun; Yoshioka, Katsumasa; Minami, Yasuo; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2018-03-01

    Improved control over the electromagnetic properties of metals on a nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation nanoelectronics and plasmonic devices. Harnessing the terahertz (THz)-electric-field-induced nonlinearity for the motion of electrons is a promising method of manipulating the local electromagnetic properties of metals, while avoiding undesirable thermal effects and electronic transitions. In this review, we demonstrate the manipulation of electron delocalization in ultrathin gold (Au) films with nanostructures, by intense THz electric-field transients. On increasing the electric-field strength of the THz pulses, the transmittance in the THz-frequency region abruptly decreases around the percolation threshold. The observed THz-electric-field-induced nonlinearity is analysed, based on the Drude-Smith model. The results suggest that ultrafast electron delocalization occurs by electron tunnelling across the narrow insulating bridge between the Au nanostructures, without material breakdown. In order to quantitatively discuss the tunnelling process, we perform scanning tunnelling microscopy with carrier-envelope phase (CEP)-controlled single-cycle THz electric fields. By applying CEP-controlled THz electric fields to the 1 nm nanogap between a metal nanotip and graphite sample, many electrons could be coherently driven through the quantum tunnelling process, either from the nanotip to the sample or vice versa. The presented concept, namely, electron tunnelling mediated by CEP-controlled single-cycle THz electric fields, can facilitate the development of nanoscale electron manipulation, applicable to next-generation ultrafast nanoelectronics and plasmonic devices.

  12. Refraction-reflection of electrons at lateral metallic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher-Elden, M. A.; El-Fattah, Z. M. Abd; Yassin, O.; El-Okr, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Electron boundary element method (EBEM) has been employed to simulate electron refraction at the lateral interface between two homogenous metals featuring surface states characterized by isotropic constant energy surfaces. A decent agreement was achieved between the real-space EBEM simulations and the wave-space analysis obtained from electron plane wave expansion (EPWE) method. Calculations were performed for three different electron energies, being -0.05, -0.15, and -0.25 eV, where the reference energy is set to -0.4 eV, i.e., the band minimum of the Cu(111) surface state. For an interface separating two metals with the same effective mass (0.41 me) and a potential difference of 0.2 eV, we demonstrate that electrons with the first two energies exhibit refraction at the interface, following the Snell's law, and total internal reflections occur beyond energy-dependent critical angles, whereas for the third electron energy, a total internal reflection occurs at all incident angles. These findings were used to simulate optical elements such as convex lenses and possible guiding through perfect electron mirrors, in contrast to Bragg-based guiding. Given the varieties of possible means of manipulating the dispersion parameters via surface adsorbates and thin-film growth, the degree of electron refraction-reflection at metallic interfaces could be precisely tuned.

  13. METAL CHELATING AGENTS IV: ELECTRON IONIZATION AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electron ionization (EI) and ammonia chemical ionization [CI (NH3)] mass spectral studies on 2-phenyl acetophenone semicarbazone are reported. The El spectrum shows a clearly identifiable molecular ion peak of weak intensity at m/z 253 and the base peak is observed at m/z 77. The CI (NH3) spectrum is ...

  14. Photoluminescence and excited states dynamics in PbWO4:Pr3+ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E; Shalapska, T; Zazubovich, S

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence and photo-thermally stimulated defects creation processes are studied for a Pr3+-doped PbWO4 crystal at 4.2-400 K under excitation in the band-to-band, exciton, and charge-transfer transitions regions, as well as in the Pr3+-related absorption bands. Emission spectra of Pr3+ centers depend on the excitation energy, indicating the presence of Pr3+ centers of two types. The origin of these centers is discussed. The 2.03-2.06 eV emission, arising from the D-1(2) -> H-3(4) transitions of Pr3+ ions, is found to be effectively excited in a broad intense absorption band peaking at 4.2 K at 3.92 eV. By analogy with some other Pe(3+)-doped compounds, this band is suggested to arise from an electron transfer from an impurity Pr3+ ion to the crystal lattice W6+ or Pb2+ ions. The dynamics of the Pr3+-related excited states is clarified. In the PbWO4:Pr crystal studied, the concentration of single oxygen and lead vacancies as traps for electrons and holes is found to be negligible.

  15. Double-magnetic-lens beta spectrometer for measurements of nucleus excited state lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikov, B.A.; Lizurej, G.I.; Muminov, T.M.; Ormandzhiev, S.I.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Usmanov, R.R.; Kholbaev, I.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a design of an installation made on the basis of a double magnetic-lens beta spectrometer intended for measurement of lifetimes of nucleus excited states by the method of e-e-delayed coincidences. A system of the Hubert conic diaphragms is used in the spectrometer, and plastic scintillation detectors and photomultipliers are used as a registering system. The experimental arrangement is considered, and the main parameters of a stabilized current rectifier, developed for the supply of the spectrometer windings are given. Also presented is the lay-out of the time spectrometer of e-e-delayed coincidences which uses units of fast spectra metric electronics and the system of amplification stabilization. Besides, analytically studied were focusing characteristics of the magnetic-lens spectrometer for the case when the magnetic field shape may be considered triangular. Using the above installation obtained was the time spectrum of delayed coincidences between conversion electrons of K241 and K104 keV in a 136 E/ r nucleus, and determined was the half-life of 104 keV state (Tsub(1/2)=0.53+-0.02 ns) which is in a good agreement with the known value of Tsub(1/2)=0.52+-0.02 ns

  16. Ensemble DFT Approach to Excited States of Strongly Correlated Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) is a novel time-independent formalism for obtaining excitation energies of many-body fermionic systems. A considerable advantage of ensemble DFT over the more common Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT and time-dependent DFT formalisms is that it enables one to account for strong non-dynamic electron correlation in the ground and excited states of molecular systems in a transparent and accurate fashion. Despite its positive aspects, ensemble DFT has not so far found its way into the repertoire of methods of modern computational chemistry, probably because of the perceived lack of practically affordable implementations of the theory. The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method is perhaps the first computationally feasible implementation of the ideas behind ensemble DFT which enables one to describe accurately electronic transitions in a wide class of molecular systems, including strongly correlated molecules (biradicals, molecules undergoing bond breaking/formation), extended π-conjugated systems, donor-acceptor charge transfer adducts, etc.

  17. Excited-State Dynamics of Carotenoids Studied by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ingu; Pang, Yoonsoo; Lee, Sebok

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids, natural antenna pigments in photosynthesis share a symmetric backbone of conjugated polyenes. Contrary to the symmetric and almost planar geometries of carotenoids, excited state structure and dynamics of carotenoids are exceedingly complex. In this paper, recent infrared and visible transient absorption measurements and excitation dependent dynamics of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-β-carotene will be reviewed. The recent visible transient absorption measurements of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al in polar and nonpolar solvents will also be introduced to emphasize the complex excited-state dynamics and unsolved problems in the S 2 and S 1 excited states

  18. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to excited states of He from He+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Kato, T.; Murakami, I.

    1999-04-01

    A Simplified Relativistic Configuration Interaction (SRCI) method is used to calculate the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients to the excited states of He from He + . In this method, the infinite resonant doubly excited states involving high Rydberg states are treated conveniently in a unified manner by interpolation. The dielectronic recombination processes for ΔN = 1 and ΔN = 2 transitions are included in our calculations, and the cross sections are in agreements with the experimental measurements. The rate coefficients to the excited states are fitted to an analytical formula and the n-dependences of the fitting parameters are discussed. (author)

  19. Certain relationships in the luminescence of organophosphors based on metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'tser, L.E.; Talipov, S.T.; Vereshchagina, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of general relationships in the luminescent radiation of organophosphors based on metal complexes and the specific features of chemical and analytical properties of organic analytical reagents in the electronically excited state. Routes have been proposed for activation of emission and for the improvement of metrological characteristics of the luminescence method of analysis

  20. Bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. H.; Xie, S. J.; Mei, L. M.; Yan, YiJing

    2007-07-01

    The authors investigate the bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics devices on the basis of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model [W. P. Su et al., Phys. Rev. B 22, 2099 (1980)] combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The insulator-metal transition is explained with the energy level crossover that eliminates the Peierls phase [R. Peierls, Quantum Theory of Solids (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1955)] and delocalizes the electron states near the threshold voltage. This may account for the experimental observations on the devices that exhibit intrinsic bistable conductance switching with large on-off ratio.

  1. Investigation of metal coatings for the free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.L.; Arendt, P.N.; Springer, R.W.; Cordi, R.C.; McCreary, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    We are investigating the deposition and characteristics of metal coatings for use in environments such as the Free Electron Laser where the radiation resistance of metal coatings could prove to be of great benefit. We have concentrated our initial efforts on silver laminate coatings due to the high reflectance of silver at 1 micron wavelength. Our initial laminate coatings have utilized thin layers of titanium oxide to break up the columnar structure of the silver during electron-beam deposition on fused silica substrates. Our initial results on equal coating thickness samples indicate an improvement in damage threshold that ranges from 1.07 to 1.71 at 351 nm

  2. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of HCP metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.-P.; Le Hazif, Roger

    1976-01-01

    The recent literature on the slip systems of the h.c.p. metals is reviewed and the contribution of transmission electron microscopy assessed. It is now clear that the stress-strain curves and the dislocation configurations in the slip plane are very similar, whether the principal slip system is basal or prismatic. The important problem of the relative ease of slip systems is linked to the ease of splitting of dislocations in the slip planes and to the electronic band structure of the metal [fr

  3. Secondary electron emission from metals and semi-conductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Susumu; Kanaya, Koichi

    1979-01-01

    Attempt was made to present the sufficient solution of the secondary electron yield of metals and semiconductor compounds except insulators, applying the free electron scattering theory to the absorption of secondary electrons generated within a solid target. The paper is divided into the sections describing absorption coefficient and escape depth, quantitative characteristics of secondary yield, angular distribution of secondary electron emission, effect of incident angle to secondary yield, secondary electron yield transmitted, and lateral distribution of secondary electron emission, besides introduction and conclusion. The conclusions are as follows. Based on the exponential power law for screened atomic potential, secondary electron emission due to both primary and backscattered electrons penetrating into metallic elements and semi-conductive compounds is expressed in terms of the ionization loss in the first collision for escaping secondary electrons. The maximum yield and the corresponding primary energy can both consistently be derived as the functions of three parameters: atomic number, first ionization energy and backscattering coefficient. The yield-energy curve as a function of the incident energy and the backscattering coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental results. The energy dependence of the yield in thin films and the lateral distribution of secondary yield are derived as the functions of the backscattering coefficient and the primary energy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Dephasing of excited-state excitons in InGaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E.A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2006-01-01

    We measure the dephasing time of the first optically-active excited-state excitonic transition in strongly confined InGaAs quantum dots using transient four-wave mixing. The optically-driven excited-state polarization shows a bi-exponential decay with a significant fraction of the probed excited states exhibiting a very long dephasing time, in the nanosecond range at 10 K. The full time-dependent four-wave mixing polarization is microscopically calculated by taking into account both virtual and real acoustic phonon-assisted transitions. The bi-exponential decay is qualitatively explained by a model of two-bright excitonic excited states non-degenerate in the absence of in-plane cylindrical symmetry. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. The [18.1], [18.6] and [18.7] Excited States of Ytterbium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy; Wang, Fang; Smallman, Joe

    2014-06-01

    The generation of a fountain of laser-cooled ytterbium fluoride, YbF, has been recently proposed as a method for long coherent observation times, thereby improving the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) measurement. Understanding the properties of the excited electronic states of YbF is essential for the development of such a scheme for laser cooling. Here we report on the measurement of the radiative lifetimes,τ, permanent electric dipole moments, μel, and magnetic g-factors for the [18.6] and [18.7] excited states of YbF. The results are compared with the previously determined values for [18.1] state. The [18.1] state is the Ω=1/2 spin-orbit component of the A 2Π(v=0) electronic state arising from the Yb+(4f146pπ)F-(2p14) configuration. The experimentally determined μel, and g-factors will be used to unravel the nature of the [18.6] and [18.7] states, which are known to be admixtures A 2Π and an additional Ω=1/2 state of unknown electronic configuration. Tarbutt, M R; Sauer, B E; Hudson, J J; Hinds E A, New J. Phys 15, 053034, 2013. Zhuang,X; Le,A.;Steimle, T C; Bulleid, N E; Smallman, I J; Hendricks, R J; Skoff, S M ; M R; Hudson, J J; Sauer, B E; Hinds, Tarbutt, M R, PCCP, 13 19103, 2011 Condylis,P C; Hudson, J J; Tarbutt, M R; Sauer, B E; Hinds E A, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 231101, 2005

  6. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  7. High-lying doubly excited states of H-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Y.K.

    1990-01-01

    We report a calculation for 1 S e resonance parameters in electron-hydrogen scattering converging on the N = 4 to N = 9 hydrogen thresholds. Resonance energy positions and widths are calculated by using a method of complex coordinate rotations, with quantum numbers K, T, N and n given to each resonant state. Results are compared with the recent R-matrix calculations for resonances below the N = 4 and N = 5 hydrogen thresholds, and with the hyperspherical coordinate calculations for resonances associated with the N = 6 - 9 hydrogen thresholds. The present results are also used to interpret the grandparent model for high-lying doubly excited two-electron atomic systems. (author)

  8. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdoerfer, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of moderate intensity near-infrared few cycle laser pulses with nano-scale metal tips. Local field enhancement in a nanometric region around the tip apex triggers coherent electron emission on the nanometer length and femtosecond time scale. The quantum dynamics at the surface are simulated with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and interpreted based on the simple man's model. We investigate the dependence of the emitted electron spe...

  9. Triplet Excited States as a Source of Relevant (Bio)Chemical Information

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Molero, María Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    The properties of triplet excited states are markedly medium-dependent, which turns this species into valuable tools for investigating the microenvironments existing in protein binding pockets. Monitoring of the triplet excited state behavior of drugs within transport proteins (serum albumins and alpha(1)-acid glycoproteins) by laser flash photolysis constitutes a valuable source of information on the strength of interaction, conformational freedom and protection from oxygen or other external...

  10. Locally-excited (LE) versus charge-transfer (CT) excited state competition in a series of para-substituted neutral green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-12

    In this paper, I provide a characterization of the low-energy electronic structure of a series of para-substituted neutral green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore models using a theoretical approach that blends linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with state-averaged complete-active-space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) theory. The substituents are chosen to sample the Hammett σ(p) scale from R = F to NH2, and a model of the neutral GFP chromophore structure (R = OH) is included. I analyze the electronic structure for different members of the series in a common complete-active-space valence-bond (CASVB) representation, exploiting an isolobal analogy between active-space orbitals for different members of the series. I find that the electronic structure of the lowest adiabatic excited state is a strong mixture of weakly coupled states with charge-transfer (CT) or locally excited (LE) character and that the dominant character changes as the series is traversed. Chromophores with strongly electron-donating substituents have a CT-like excited state such as expected for a push-pull polyene or asymmetric cyanine. Chromophores with weakly electron-donating (or electron-withdrawing) substituents have an LE-like excited state with an ionic biradicaloid structure localized to the ground-state bridge π bond.

  11. Maximum Secondary Electron Yield and Parameters of Secondary Electron Yield of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ai-Gen; Uhm, Han-Sup; Chen, Yun-Yun; Choi, Eun-Ha

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the free-electron model, the energy range of internal secondary electrons, the energy band of a metal, the formula for inelastic mean escape depth, the processes and characteristics of secondary electron emission, the probability of internal secondary electrons reaching surface and passing over the surface barrier into vacuum B as a function of original work function Φ and the distance from Fermi energy to the bottom of the conduction band EF was deduced. According to the characteristics of creation of an excited electron, the definition of average energy required to produce an internal secondary electron ɛ, the energy range of excited electrons and internal secondary electrons and the energy band of a metal, the formula for expressing ɛ using the number of valence electron of the atom V, Φ,EF and atomic number Z was obtained. Based on the processes and characteristics of secondary electron emission, several relationships among the parameters of the secondary electron emission and the deduced formulae for B and ɛ, the formula for expressing maximum secondary electron yield of metals δm using Z, V, back-scattering coefficient r, incident energy of primary electron at which secondary electron yield reaches δm, Φ and EF was deduced and demonstrated to be true. According to the deduced formula for δm and the relationships among δm and several parameters of secondary electron emitter, it can be concluded that high δm values are linked to high V, Z and Φ values, and vice versa. Based on the processes and characteristics of secondary electron emission and the deduced formulae for the B, ɛ and δm, the influences of surface properties on δm were discussed.

  12. Chromium(0), molybdenum(0), and tungsten(0) isocyanide complexes as luminophores and photosensitizers with long-lived excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueldt, Laura A. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 18, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenger, Oliver S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, St. Johanns-Ring 19, 4056, Basel (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    Arylisocyanide complexes based on earth-abundant Group 6 d{sup 6} metals are interesting alternatives to photoactive complexes made from precious metals such as Ru{sup II}, Re{sup I}, Os{sup II}, or Ir{sup III}. Some of these complexes have long-lived {sup 3}MLCT excited states that exhibit luminescence with good quantum yields as well as nano- to microsecond lifetimes, and they are very strongly reducing. Recent studies have demonstrated that Cr{sup 0}, Mo{sup 0}, and W{sup 0} arylisocyanide complexes have great potential for applications in luminescent devices, photoredox catalysis, and dye-sensitized solar cells. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeglund, J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of band-structure calculations for studying thermodynamic properties of solids. We discuss 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition metal carbides and nitrides. Through a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results, we draw conclusions on the character of the atomic bonds in these materials. We show how electronic structure calculations can be used to give accurate predictions for bonding energies. Part of the thesis is devoted to the application of the generalized gradient approximation in electronic structure calculations on transition metals. For structures with vibrational disorder, we present a method for calculating averaged phonon frequencies without using empirical information. For magnetic excitations, we show how a combined use of theoretical results and experimental data can yield information on magnetic fluctuations at high temperatures. The main results in the thesis are: Apart for an almost constant shift, theoretically calculated bonding energies for transition metal carbides and nitrides agree with experimental data or with values from analysis of thermochemical information. The electronic spectrum of transition metal carbides and nitrides can be separated into bonding, antibonding and nonbonding electronic states. The lowest enthalpy of formation for substoichiometric vanadium carbide VC 1-X at zero temperature and pressure occurs for a structure containing vacancies (x not equal to 0). The generalized gradient approximation improves theoretical calculated cohesive energies for 3d-transition metals. Magnetic phase transitions are sensitive to the description of exchange-correlation effects in electronic structure calculations. Trends in Debye temperatures can be successfully analysed in electronic structure calculations on disordered lattices. For the elements, there is a clear dependence on the crystal structure (e.g., bcc, fcc or hcp). Chromium has fluctuating local magnetic moments at temperatures well above

  14. Dipole moment of metallocene precatalyst in ground and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukova, G.V.; Vasil'ev, V.P.; Smirnov, V.A.; Milov, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Electric dipole momenta of high-emitting metallocene precatalyst, i.e. π-complex of Zr IV (ras-C 6 H 10 (IndH 4 ) 2 ZrCl 2 ) in basic and triplet states in series of diluents have been estimated by the method of spectral shifts and quantum-chemical calculations using the DFT method. The absorption spectra characteristic of charge transfer from the ligand to metal and of zirconocene luminescence depend on the aprotic diluent nature. It is shown that transition from S 0 state to emitting T 1 state entails essential increase in the electric dipole momentum [ru

  15. Cyanide-Assembled d10Coordination Polymers and Cycles: Excited State Metallophilic Modulation of Solid-State Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey; Eskelinen, Toni; Dau, Thuy Minh; Ershova, Yana Yu; Tunik, Sergey P; Melnikov, Alexei S; Hirva, Pipsa; Koshevoy, Igor O

    2018-01-26

    The series of cyanide-bridged coordination polymers [(P 2 )CuCN] n (1), [(P 2 )Cu{M(CN) 2 }] n (M=Cu 3, Ag 4, Au 5) and molecular tetrametallic clusters [{(P 4 )MM'(CN)} 2 ] 2+ (MM'=Cu 2 6, Ag 2 7, AgCu 8, AuCu 9, AuAg 10) were obtained using the bidentate P 2 and tetradentate P 4 phosphane ligands (P 2 =1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene; P 4 =tris(2-diphenylphosphinophenyl)phosphane). All title complexes were crystallographically characterized to reveal a zig-zag chain arrangement for 1 and 3-5, whereas 6-10 possess metallocyclic frameworks with different degree of metal-metal bonding. The d 10 -d 10 interactions were evaluated by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) computational approach. The photophysical properties of 1-10 were investigated in the solid state and supported by theoretical analysis. The emission of compounds 1 and 3-5, dominated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions located within {CuP 2 } motifs, is compatible with thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) behaviour and a small energy gap between the T 1 and S 1 excited states. The luminescence characteristics of 6-10 are strongly dependent on the composition of the metal core; the emission band maxima vary in the range 484-650 nm with quantum efficiency reaching 0.56 (6). The origin of the emission for 6-8 and 10 at room temperature is assigned to delayed fluorescence. AuCu cluster 9, however, exhibits only phosphorescence that corresponds to theoretically predicted large value ΔE(S 1 -T 1 ). DFT simulation highlights a crucial impact of metallophilic bonding on the nature and energy of the observed emission, the effect being greatly enhanced in the excited state. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Ultrafast studies of electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Nien-Hui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Femtosecond time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study fundamental aspects of excited electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces, including layer-by-layer evolution of electronic structure and two-dimensional electron localization. On bare Ag(111), the lifetimes of image states are dominated by their position with respect to the projected bulk band structure. The n = 2 state has a shorter lifetime than the n = 1 state due to degeneracy with the bulk conduction band. As the parallel momentum of the n = 1 image electron increases, the lifetime decreases. With decreasing temperatures, the n = 1 image electrons, with zero or nonzero parallel momentum, all become longer lived. Adsorption of one to three layers of n-heptane results in an approximately exponential increase in lifetime as a function of layer thickness. This results from the formation of a tunneling barrier through which the interfacial electrons must decay, consistent with the repulsive bulk electron affinity of n-alkanes. The lifetimes of the higher quantum states indicate that the presence of the monolayer significantly reduces coupling of the image states to the bulk band structure. These results are compared with predictions of a dielectric continuum model. The study of electron lateral motion shows that optical excitation creates interfacial electrons in quasifree states for motion parallel to the n-heptane/Ag(111) interface. These initially delocalized electrons decay into a localized state within a few hundred femtoseconds. The localized electrons then decay back to the metal by tunneling through the adlayer potential barrier. The localization time depends strongly on the electron's initial parallel momentum and exhibits a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. The experimental findings are consistent with a 2-D self-trapping process in which electrons become localized by interacting with the topmost plane of the alkane layer. The energy

  17. Investigation of excited states populations density of Hall thruster plasma in three dimensions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, D. D.; Skrylev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with investigation of the excited states populations distribution of a low-temperature xenon plasma in the thruster with closed electron drift at 300 W operating conditions were investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) over the 350–1100 nm range. Seven xenon ions (Xe II) transitions were analyzed, while for neutral atoms (Xe I) just three transitions were explored, since the majority of Xe I emission falls into the ultraviolet or infrared part of the spectrum and are difficult to measure. The necessary spontaneous emission probabilities (Einstein coefficients) were calculated. Measurements of the excited state distribution were made for points (volume of about 12 mm3) all over the plane perpendicular to thruster axis in four positions on it (5, 10, 50 and 100 mm). Measured LIF signal intensity have differences for each location of researched point (due to anisotropy of thruster plume), however the structure of states populations distribution persisted at plume and is violated at the thruster exit plane and cathode area. Measured distributions show that for describing plasma of Hall thruster one needs to use a multilevel kinetic model, classic model can be used just for far plume region or for specific electron transitions.

  18. Optimization method for electron beam melting and refining of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Veliko; Vutova, Katia

    2014-03-01

    Pure metals and special alloys obtained by electron beam melting and refining (EBMR) in vacuum, using electron beams as a heating source, have a lot of applications in nuclear and airspace industries, electronics, medicine, etc. An analytical optimization problem for the EBMR process based on mathematical heat model is proposed. The used criterion is integral functional minimization of a partial derivative of the temperature in the metal sample. The investigated technological parameters are the electron beam power, beam radius, the metal casting velocity, etc. The optimization problem is discretized using a non-stationary heat model and corresponding adapted Pismen-Rekford numerical scheme, developed by us and multidimensional trapezional rule. Thus a discrete optimization problem is built where the criterion is a function of technological process parameters. The discrete optimization problem is heuristically solved by cluster optimization method. Corresponding software for the optimization task is developed. The proposed optimization scheme can be applied for quality improvement of the pure metals (Ta, Ti, Cu, etc.) produced by the modern and ecological-friendly EBMR process.

  19. Electron field emission from sp 2-induced insulating to metallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 3. Electron field emission from 2-induced insulating to metallic behaviour of amorphous carbon (-C) films. Pitamber Mahanandia P N Viswakarma Prasad Vishnu Bhotla S V Subramanyam Karuna Kar Nanda. Thin Films and Nanomatter Volume 33 Issue 3 ...

  20. Observation of Electronic Raman Scattering in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farhat, H.; Berciaud, S.; Kalbáč, Martin; Saito, R.; Heinz, T. F.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kong, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 15 (2011), s. 157401 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : spectroscopy * electronic Raman scattering * metallic carbon nanotubes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  1. Metal-nanoparticle single-electron transistors fabricated using electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, K I; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Pasupathy, A N

    2004-01-01

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors from individual metal nanoparticles using a geometry that provides improved coupling between the particle and the gate electrode. This is accomplished by incorporating a nanoparticle into a gap created between two electrodes using electromigration, all...

  2. Electrons and Spin Waves in Heavy Rare Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackintosh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Although the main principles governing the magnetic interactions and magnetic ordering in rare earth metals have been qualitatively understood for some time, it is only relatively recently that a sufficiently detailed study has been made of their electronic and magnetic excitations to place...

  3. Sensitivity tests on the rates of the excited states of positron decays during the rapid proton capture process of the one-zone X-ray burst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rita

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sensitivities of positron decays on a one-zone model of type-I X-ray bursts. Most existing studies have multiplied or divided entire beta decay rates (electron captures and beta decay rates) by 10. Instead of using the standard Fuller & Fowler (FFNU) rates, we used the most recently developed weak library rates [1], which include rates from Langanke et al.'s table (the LMP table) (2000) [2], Langanke et al.'s table (the LMSH table) (2003) [3], and Oda et al.'s table (1994) [4] (all shell model rates). We then compared these table rates with the old FFNU rates [5] to study differences within the final abundances. Both positron decays and electron capture rates were included in the tables. We also used pn-QRPA rates [6,7] to study the differences within the final abundances. Many of the positron rates from the nuclei's ground states and initial excited energy states along the rapid proton capture (rp) process have been measured in existing studies. However, because temperature affects the rates of excited states, these studies should have also acknowledged the half-lives of the nuclei's excited states. Thus, instead of multiplying or dividing entire rates by 10, we studied how the half-lives of sensitive nuclei in excited states affected the abundances by dividing the half-lives of the ground states by 10, which allowed us to set the half-lives of the excited states. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the final abundance shifted when we modified the rates from the excited states of the 105Sn positron decay rates. Furthermore, the abundance of 80Zr also changed due to usage of pn-QRPA rates instead of weak library rates (the shell model rates).

  4. Kinetics of the reactions of hydrated electrons with metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsse, J.

    1983-01-01

    The reactivity of the hydrated electron towards metal complexes is considered. Experiments are described involving metal EDTA and similar complexes. The metal ions studied are mainly Ni 2+ , Co 2+ and Cu 2+ . Rates of the reactions of the complexes with e - (aq) were measured using the pulse radiolysis technique. It is shown that the reactions of e - (aq) with the copper complexes display unusually small kinetic salt effects. The results suggest long-range electron transfer by tunneling. A tunneling model is presented and the experimental results are discussed in terms of this model. Results of approximate molecular orbital calculations of some redox potentials are given, for EDTA chelates as well as for series of hexacyano and hexaquo complexes. Finally, equilibrium constants for the formation of ternary complexes are reported. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  5. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  6. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  7. Triplet Excited State of BODIPY Accessed by Charge Recombination and Its Application in Triplet-Triplet Annihilation Upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kepeng; Yang, Wenbo; Wang, Zhijia; Iagatti, Alessandro; Bussotti, Laura; Foggi, Paolo; Ji, Wei; Zhao, Jianzhang; Di Donato, Mariangela

    2017-10-12

    The triplet excited state properties of two BODIPY phenothiazine dyads (BDP-1 and BDP-2) with different lengths of linker and orientations of the components were studied. The triplet state formation of BODIPY chromophore was achieved via photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and charge recombination (CR). BDP-1 has a longer linker between the phenothiazine and the BODIPY chromophore than BDP-2. Moreover, the two chromophores in BDP-2 assume a more orthogonal geometry both at the ground and in the first excited state (87°) than that of BDP-1 (34-40°). The fluorescence of the BODIPY moiety was significantly quenched in the dyads. The charge separation (CS) and CR dynamics of the dyads were studied with femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (k CS = 2.2 × 10 11 s -1 and 2 × 10 12 s -1 for BDP-1 and BDP-2, respectively; k CR = 4.5 × 10 10 and 1.5 × 10 11 s -1 for BDP-1 and BDP-2, respectively; in acetonitrile). Formation of the triplet excited state of the BODIPY moiety was observed for both dyads upon photoexcitation, and the triplet state quantum yield depends on both the linker length and the orientation of the chromophores. Triplet state quantum yields are 13.4 and 97.5% and lifetimes are 13 and 116 μs for BDP-1 and BDP-2, respectively. The spin-orbit charge transfer (SO-CT) mechanism is proposed to be responsible for the efficient triplet state formation. The dyads were used for triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion, showing an upconversion quantum yield up to 3.2%.

  8. Electronic behavior of highly correlated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, A.

    1988-10-01

    This thesis addresses the question of the strongly interacting many-body problem: that is, systems where the interparticle correlations are so strong as to defy perturbative approaches. These subtle correlations occur in narrow band materials, such as the lanthanides and actinides, wherein the f-electrons are so localized that a variety of new phenomena, including intermediate-valence and heavy-fermionic behavior, may occur. As well, one has the alloying problem, where local interactions are paramount in determining the overall behavior. The technique employed in dealing with these systems is the Small Cluster method, wherein the full many-body Hamiltonian for a small grouping of atoms, coupled with periodic boundary conditions, is solved exactly. This is tantamount to solving a bulk crystal at the high points of symmetry in the Brillouin Zone. The mathematical overhead is further reduced by employing the full space group and spin symmetries. By its very nature, the Small Cluster method is well able to handle short-range interactions, as well as the combinatorial complexity of the many-body problem, on an equal footing. The nature of long-range order and phase transition behavior cannot be incorporated, but sometimes clues as to their origin can be discerned. The calculations presented include: a two-band Anderson model for an intermediate-valence system, wherein photoemission and fluctuation behavior is examined; a single-band Hubbard model for a ternary alloy system, such as copper-silver-gold; and a Hubbard model for a heavy- fermion system, wherein Fermi surface, transport, magnetic and superconducting properties are discussed. 148 refs., 31 figs., 24 tabs

  9. Effects of lattice fluctuations on electronic transmission in metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.G.; Smith, D.L.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic transmission across metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures in the presence of lattice fluctuations is studied for short oligomer chains. The lattice fluctuations are approximated by static white noise disorder. Resonant transmission occurs when the energy of an incoming electron coincides with a discrete electronic level of the oligomer. The corresponding transmission peak diminishes in intensity with increasing disorder strength. Because of disorder there is an enhancement of the electronic transmission for energies that lie within the electronic gap of the oligomer. If fluctuations are sufficiently strong, a transmission peak within the gap is found at the midgap energy E=0 for degenerate conjugated oligomers (e.g., trans-polyacetylene) and E≠0 for AB-type degenerate oligomers. These results can be interpreted in terms of soliton-antisoliton states created by lattice fluctuations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  11. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Luisa; Münzenrieder, Niko; Vogt, Christian; Faber, Hendrik; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Tröster, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In particular

  12. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Luisa; Vogt, Christian; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Tröster, Gerhard [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Münzenrieder, Niko [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Sensor Technology Research Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Faber, Hendrik; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In

  13. Point charge embedding for ONIOM excited states calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Alessandro; Barnes, Jeremy; Caricato, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanical methods can assist in the interpretation and prediction of the electronic spectra of large molecular structures. In this work, we study the performance of the ONIOM (Our own N-layered Integrated molecular Orbital molecular Mechanics) hybrid method for the calculation of transition energies and oscillator strengths by embedding the core region in a field of fixed point charges. These charges introduce polarization effects from the substituent groups to the core region. We test various charge definitions, with particular attention to the issue of overpolarization near the boundary between layers. To minimize this issue, we fit the charges on the electrostatic potential of the entire structure in the presence of the link atoms used to cap dangling bonds. We propose two constrained fitting strategies: one that produces an average set of charges common to both model system calculations, EE(L1), and one that produces two separate sets of embedding charges, EE(L2). The results from our tests show that indeed electronic embedding with constrained-fitted charges tends to improve the performance of ONIOM compared to non-embedded calculations. However, the EE(L2) charges work best for transition energies, and the EE(L1) charges work best for oscillator strengths. This may be an indication that fixed point charges do not have enough flexibility to adapt to each system, and other effects (e.g., polarization of the embedding field) may be necessary.

  14. Interplay of spin-dependent delocalization and magnetic anisotropy in the ground and excited states of [Gd2@C78]- and [Gd2@C80]-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Popov, Alexey A.; Deng, Qingming; Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structure of the ground and excited states of two recently characterized endohedral metallo-fullerenes, [Gd2@C78]- (1) and [Gd2@C80]- (2), have been studied by theoretical methods. The systems can be considered as [Gd2]5+ dimers encapsulated in a fullerene cage with the fifteen unpaired electrons ferromagnetically coupled into an S = 15/2 high-spin configuration in the ground state. The microscopic mechanisms governing the Gd-Gd interactions leading to the ferromagnetic ground state are examined by a combination of density functional and ab initio calculations and the full energy spectrum of the ground and lowest excited states is constructed by means of ab initio model Hamiltonians. The ground state is characterized by strong electron delocalization bordering on a σ type one-electron covalent bond and minor zero-field splitting (ZFS) that is successfully described as a second order spin-orbit coupling effect. We have shown that the observed ferromagnetic interaction originates from Hund's rule coupling and not from the conventional double exchange mechanism. The calculated ZFS parameters of 1 and 2 in their optimized geometries are in qualitative agreement with experimental EPR results. The higher excited states display less electron delocalization, but at the same time they possess unquenched first-order angular momentum. This leads to strong spin-orbit coupling and highly anisotropic energy spectrum. The analysis of the excited states presented here constitutes the first detailed study of the effects of spin-dependent delocalization in the presence of first order orbital angular momentum and the obtained results can be applied to other mixed valence lanthanide systems.

  15. Recent Progress in GW-based Methods for Excited-State Calculations of Reduced Dimensional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of excited-state phenomena within the GW and GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approaches allow one to accurately study the electronic and optical properties of various materials, including systems with reduced dimensionality. However, several challenges arise when dealing with complicated nanostructures where the electronic screening is strongly spatially and directionally dependent. In this talk, we discuss some recent developments to address these issues. First, we turn to the slow convergence of quasiparticle energies and exciton binding energies with respect to k-point sampling. This is very effectively dealt with using a new hybrid sampling scheme, which results in savings of several orders of magnitude in computation time. A new ab initio method is also developed to incorporate substrate screening into GW and GW-BSE calculations. These two methods have been applied to mono- and few-layer MoSe2, and yielded strong environmental dependent behaviors in good agreement with experiment. Other issues that arise in confined systems and materials with reduced dimensionality, such as the effect of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to GW-BSE, and the calculation of non-radiative exciton lifetime, are also addressed. These developments have been efficiently implemented and successfully applied to real systems in an ab initio framework using the BerkeleyGW package. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with Diana Y. Qiu, Steven G. Louie, Meiyue Shao, Chao Yang, and the experimental groups of M. Crommie and F. Wang. This work was supported by Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR10-1006184.

  16. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have estimated the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Fr and Ra plus the light actinides Ac through Pu. The underlying self-consistent band-structure calculations were performed by the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method including l quantum numbers s through g......-phonon parameter λ is found to attain its maximum value in Ac, and they predict a transition temperature of 9K for this metal. In the light actinides Th through Pu, λ is found to be of order 0.4 and within a factor of 2 of experiments which is also the accuracy found in studies of the transition metals...

  17. Metals: Phonon states, electron states and Fermi surfaces. Subvolume a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, P.H.; Schober, H.; Sellmyer, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of tables and diagrams is the first contribution to a larger programme aiming at a complete and critical tabulation of reliable data relevant to metal physics. No such complete collection exists at present, and these tables should fill a long felt need of both experimentalists and theoreticians. Group III in the New Series of the Landolt-Boernstein tables deals with Crystal and Solid State Physics. Volume III/13 to which this subvolume 13a belongs will cover all data published up to 1980 on phonon and electron states and Fermi surfaces in metals. Both experimental and theoretical results are included. (orig./WL)

  18. MM&T-Ceramic Metal Substrates for Hybrid Electronics: Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Copper EL-P0II-2 Alloy 42 EK5/EK6 303 Stainless Steel Steel- Invar -Steel (a) FERRO-ECA Electronics Company 3130 West 22nd Street, P.O. Box 8305...AND ADDRESS Harry Diamond Laboratories 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783 12. REPORT DATE January 1984 13. NUMBER OF PAGES 14...PLASMA-SPRAYED CERAMIC ON METAL Metal Coating Results of Coating Effect of 850oC Thkr Film Profile Alloy #2 105SF 334F LINDE A Good Good

  19. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar (∼1 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for β-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower (∼0.5 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for β-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number of conjugated double bonds, the longer chain systems having

  20. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  1. Effective targeting of proton transfer at ground and excited states of ortho-(2'-imidazolyl)naphthol constitutional isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Thaís C F; Carmo, Luiz F V; Murta, Bárbara; Duarte, Luís G T A; Nome, Rene A; Rocha, Willian R; Brandão, Tiago A S

    2015-01-28

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy and quantum chemical computational studies were employed to investigate ground and excited state proton transfer of a novel series of ortho-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)naphthol constitutional isomers: 1-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-2-ol (1NI2OH), 2-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-1-ol (2NI1OH) and 3-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)naphthalen-2-ol (3NI2OH). Proper Near Attack Conformations (NACs) involving a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the naphthol moiety and the ortho-imidazole group account for the highest ground state acidity of 2NI1OH compared with 1NI2OH and 3NI2OH. Moreover, ESIPT for 2NI1OH and 3NI2OH is further associated with planar chelate H-ring formation whereas 1NI2OH shows the highest ESIPT barrier and a noncoplanar imidazole group. In addition to energetic and structural requirements, the final state also depends on electronic configuration of the ESIPT product with the neutral 3NI2OH showing an ICT effect that correlates with the excited state pKa of the cationic species.

  2. Effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in plant leaves and isolated LHCII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Zia, Ahmad [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Horton, Peter [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Ruban, Alexander V., E-mail: a.ruban@qmul.ac.uk [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-19

    Xanthophyll excited states have been implicated by transient absorption and two-photon excitation studies in playing a key role in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting via photoprotective energy dissipation. For any proposed quenching mechanism to be effective it must reduce the chlorophyll excited state lifetime from 2 ns to {approx}0.5-0.4 ns. In the presented study the effect of xanthophyll composition on the chlorophyll excited state lifetime in Arabidopsis leaves in the light harvesting (F{sub m}) and photoprotective (NPQ) states was determined. The data was compared to the chlorophyll excited state lifetime of native isolated LHCII and CP26 in detergent micelles with varying xanthophyll composition. It was found that although the differences in xanthophyll composition between LHC complexes from various Arabidopsis mutants were sufficient to explain the varying F{sub m} lifetime (and varying PSII efficiency), they were not of a sufficient scale to fully explain the observed differences in the NPQ lifetimes. Only when the LHC complexes were exposed to a low detergent/low pH media, a condition known to mimic the conformational state of LHCII associated with NPQ in vivo, were variations in excited state lifetime large enough to explain the differences observed in leaves. Furthermore, the data reveal that the replacement of lutein by either zeaxanthin or violaxanthin in the internal xanthophyll binding sites of LHCII and CP26 reduces the efficiency of energy dissipation in the photoprotective state in leaves and isolated complexes.

  3. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  5. Large amplitude femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Daligault, J

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical model that allows us to study linear and non-linear aspects of the femtosecond electron dynamics in metal clusters. The theoretical approach consists in the classical limit of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. The electrons are described by a phase-space distribution function which satisfies a Vlasov-like equation while the ions are treated classically. This allows simulations for clusters containing several hundreds of atoms and extending up to several hundreds of femtoseconds during which the description conserves the fermionic character of the electron distribution. This semi-quantal approach compares very well with the purely quantal treatment. As an application of this approach, we show the prominent role of the electron dynamics during and after the interaction with an intense femtosecond laser pulse.

  6. Electron core ionization in compressed alkali metal cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2018-01-01

    Elements of groups I and II in the periodic table have valence electrons of s-type and are usually considered as simple metals. Crystal structures of these elements at ambient pressure are close-packed and high-symmetry of bcc and fcc-types, defined by electrostatic (Madelung) energy. Diverse structures were found under high pressure with decrease of the coordination number, packing fraction and symmetry. Formation of complex structures can be understood within the model of Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interactions and supported by Hume-Rothery arguments. With the volume decrease there is a gain of band structure energy accompanied by a formation of many-faced Brillouin zone polyhedra. Under compression to less than a half of the initial volume the interatomic distances become close to or smaller than the ionic radius which should lead to the electron core ionization. At strong compression it is necessary to assume that for alkali metals the valence electron band overlaps with the upper core electrons, which increases the valence electron count under compression.

  7. Structure, electronic properties and electron energy loss spectra of transition metal nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsokeras, L.E.; Matenoglou, G.M.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2013-01-01

    We present a thorough and critical study of the electronic properties of the mononitrides of the group IV–V–VI metals (TiN, ZrN, HfN, NbN, TaN, MoN, and WN) grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The microstructure and density of the films have been studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), while their optical properties were investigated by spectral reflectivity at vertical incidence and in-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (R-EELS). We report the R-EELS spectra for all the binary TMN and we identify their features (metal-d plasmon and N-p + metal-d loss) based on previous ab-initio band structure calculations. The spectral positions of p + d loss peak are rationally grouped according to the electron configuration (i.e. of the respective quantum numbers) of the constituent metal. The assigned and reported R-EELS spectra can be used as a reference database for the colloquial in-situ surface analysis performed in most laboratories. - Highlights: ► Identification of the effect of ionization potential to the structure of PLD nitride films. ► Report of low energy electron loss spectra of NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, WN. ► Correlation of the Np+Med loss peak with the metal’s valence electron configuration.

  8. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Nanocrystalline film at liquid-liquid interface · Slide 21 · Slide 22.

  9. Stopping power of degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1985-01-01

    We calculate the stopping power of the degenerate electron liquid at metallic densities in the dielectric formalism. The strong Coulomb-coupling effects beyond the random-phase approximation are taken into account through the static and dynamic local-field corrections. It is shown that those strong-coupling and dynamic effects act to enhance the stopping power substantially in the low-velocity regime, leading to an improved agreement with experimental data. (author)

  10. Study on the 49V excited states in the (p, nγ) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorets, I.D.; Zalyubovskij, I.I.; Nemashkalo, B.A.; Storozhko, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    49 V excited states were investigated by means of the (p, nγ) reaction in the energy range of incident protons from the reaction threshold (1.412 MeV) to 3.34 MeV. Angular distributions of γ-rays related to excited states de-excitation were measured at 2.7 MeV proton energy. Check of statistical theory applicability for analysis of experimental results using the (p, γ) reaction on 49 Ti in the proton energy range from 0.84 to 2.58 MeV precedes the study of 42 V state properties. Cross sections of 49 V state excitation in the (p, nγ) reaction were determined from γ-ray yields. Scheme of 49 V states de-excitation was constructed, measurements of angular γ-ray distribution were analysed within the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach theory 49 V excited state characteristics were discussed

  11. Equilibrium excited state and emission spectra of molecular aggregates from the hierarchical equations of motion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liping; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2013-01-28

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method was applied to calculate the emission spectra of molecular aggregates using the Frenkel exciton model. HEOM equations for the one-exciton excited state were first propagated until equilibration. The reduced density operator and auxiliary density operators (ADOs) were used to characterize the coupled system-bath equilibrium. The dipole-dipole correlation functions were then calculated to obtain the emission spectra of model dimers, and the B850 band of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in purple bacteria. The effect of static disorder on equilibrium excited state and the emission spectra of LH2 was also explicitly considered. Several approximation schemes, including the high temperature approximation (HTA) of the HEOM, a modified version of the HTA, the stochastic Liouville equation approach, the perturbative time-local and time-nonlocal generalized quantum master equations, were assessed in the calculation of the equilibrium excited state and emission spectra.

  12. Charge transfer state induced from locally excited state by polar solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengtao

    2005-06-01

    The photophysical properties of the novel perylene imide (Pi) and oligo-pentaphenyl bisfluorene (pPh) containing molecule have been investigated by quantum chemical methods. It is concluded that the first excited singlet state in the gas is the locally excited state; while the lowest excited state in polar solvents is the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, which corresponds to the ICT from pPh to Pi. This excited state in the polar solvent adopts a planar geometry, in marked contrast to the twisted geometry in the gas phase. The planar geometry in the polar solvent significantly delocalized densities of HOMOs, compared to those in the gas phase, but the influence of the planar geometry to densities of LUMO is very small. Overall, the computed results remain in good agreement with the relevant experimental data.

  13. On excited states in real-time AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botta-Cantcheff, Marcelo; Martínez, Pedro J.; Silva, Guillermo A. [Instituto de Física de La Plata - CONICET & Departamento de Física - UNLP,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-02-25

    The Skenderis-van Rees prescription, which allows the calculation of time-ordered correlation functions of local operators in CFT’s using holographic methods is studied and applied for excited states. Calculation of correlators and matrix elements of local CFT operators between generic in/out states are carried out in global Lorentzian AdS. We find the precise form of such states, obtain an holographic formula to compute the inner product between them, and using the consistency with other known prescriptions, we argue that the in/out excited states built according to the Skenderis-Van Rees prescription correspond to coherent states in the (large-N) AdS-Hilbert space. This is confirmed by explicit holographic computations. The outcome of this study has remarkable implications on generalizing the Hartle-Hawking construction for wave functionals of excited states in AdS quantum gravity.

  14. Theoretical direct WIMP detection rates for inelastic scattering to excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergados, J. D.; Ejiri, H.; Savvidy, K. G.

    2013-12-01

    The recent WMAP and Planck data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Many extensions of the standard model provide dark matter candidates, in particular Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Thus the direct dark matter detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Most of the research on this issue has hitherto focused on the detection of the recoiling nucleus. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in some nuclei, which have sufficiently low lying excited states. Good examples are the first excited states of 127I and 129Xe. We find appreciable branching ratios for the inelastic scattering mediated by the spin cross sections. So, in principle, the extra signature of the gamma ray following the de-excitation of these states can, in principle, be exploited experimentally.

  15. Inelastic WIMP-nucleus scattering to the first excited state in 125Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J D; Thomas, A W; III, F T Avignone; Kortelainen, M; Pirinen, P; Suhonen, J; Srivastava, P C

    2016-01-01

    The direct detection of dark matter constituents, in particular the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), is considered central to particle physics and cosmology. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in nuclei which have sufficiently low-lying excited states. Examples considered previously were the first excited states of 127 I, 129 Xe and 83 Kr. Here, we examine 125 Te, which offers some advantages and is currently being considered as a target. In all these cases the extra signature of the gamma rays following the de-excitation of these states has definite advantages over the purely nuclear recoil and in principle such a signature can be exploited experimentally. A brief discussion of the experimental feasibility is given in the context of the CUORE experiment. (paper)

  16. Excited-State Dynamics of Carotenoids Studied by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ingu; Pang, Yoonsoo [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sebok [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Carotenoids, natural antenna pigments in photosynthesis share a symmetric backbone of conjugated polyenes. Contrary to the symmetric and almost planar geometries of carotenoids, excited state structure and dynamics of carotenoids are exceedingly complex. In this paper, recent infrared and visible transient absorption measurements and excitation dependent dynamics of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-β-carotene will be reviewed. The recent visible transient absorption measurements of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al in polar and nonpolar solvents will also be introduced to emphasize the complex excited-state dynamics and unsolved problems in the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} excited states.

  17. Time-averaging within the excited state of the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, L J; McMurtrie, R L; Sellars, M J; Manson, N B [Laser Physics Center, RSPhysSE, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: lachlan.rogers@anu.edu.au

    2009-06-15

    The emission intensity of diamond samples containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres are measured as a function of magnetic field along the (111) direction for various temperatures. At low temperatures the responses are sample and stress dependent and can be modelled in terms of the previous understanding of the {sup 3}E excited state fine structure which is strain dependent. At room temperature the responses are largely sample and stress independent, and modelling involves invoking a strain independent excited state with a single zero field spin-level splitting of 1.42 GHz. The change in behaviour is attributed to a temperature dependent averaging process over the components of the excited state orbital doublet. It decouples orbit and spin and at high temperature the spin levels become independent of any orbit splitting. One significant implication of this averaging is that it simplifies the development of room temperature applications.

  18. Time-averaging within the excited state of the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. J.; McMurtrie, R. L.; Sellars, M. J.; Manson, N. B.

    2009-06-01

    The emission intensity of diamond samples containing negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres are measured as a function of magnetic field along the lang111rang direction for various temperatures. At low temperatures the responses are sample and stress dependent and can be modelled in terms of the previous understanding of the 3E excited state fine structure which is strain dependent. At room temperature the responses are largely sample and stress independent, and modelling involves invoking a strain independent excited state with a single zero field spin-level splitting of 1.42 GHz. The change in behaviour is attributed to a temperature dependent averaging process over the components of the excited state orbital doublet. It decouples orbit and spin and at high temperature the spin levels become independent of any orbit splitting. One significant implication of this averaging is that it simplifies the development of room temperature applications.

  19. Theoretical investigation of the ground and excited state of silylated coumarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Haider; Jain, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    We present ground and excited state properties of silylated coumarin dyes. We have calculated the energies and dipole moments of ground and excited states of silylated coumarins and some coumarin derivatives. Using CIS we find a good agreement with experimental S 0 →S 1 excitation energies. Silylation of dye molecules had minor effect on the transition energies. On the basis of theoretical results, we conclude that silylated dye will have improved long-term photostability compared to its unsilylated counterpart due to its covalent bonding with the host matrix. - Highlights: → Theoretical calculation of silylated coumarins. → Improved photostability. → Dye and sol gel silica interaction.

  20. Excited states of 26Al studied via the reaction 27Al(d,t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 27Al(d,t at 25 MeV was utilized to study the excited states of 26Al. The angular distributions of the observed excited states of 26Al were analyzed with zero range distorted wave Born approximation as well as by incorporating finite range correction parameters to extract spectroscopic factors. The two sets of extracted spectroscopic factors were compared with each other to see the effect of using finite range correction in the transfer form factor.

  1. Nucleon, Delta and Omega excited state spectra at three pion mass values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, John; Edwards, Robert G.; Joo, Balint; Richards, David G.; Engelson, Eric; Lin, Huey-Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, Delta and Omega are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculations are performed at three values of the pion mass: 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a basis of about ten interpolating operators enabling six energies to be distinguished clearly in each irreducible representation of the octahedral group. We compare our calculations of nucleon excited states with the low-lying experimental spectrum. There is reasonable agreement for the pattern of states.

  2. Luminescent materials: probing the excited state of emission centers by spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihóková, E.; Nikl, M.

    2015-01-01

    We review recent methods employed to study the excited state of rare-earth centers in various luminescent and scintillating materials. The focus is on processes that help determine localization of the excited state within the material band gap, namely photoionization and thermally stimulated ionization. Then the tunneling process between the luminescence center and the trapping state is addressed. We describe the experimental implementation of methods recently developed to study these processes. We report theoretical models helping the data interpretation. We also present application to currently investigated materials.

  3. Multireference Density Functional Theory with Generalized Auxiliary Systems for Ground and Excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehua; Zhang, Du; Jin, Ye; Yang, Yang; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao

    2017-09-21

    To describe static correlation, we develop a new approach to density functional theory (DFT), which uses a generalized auxiliary system that is of a different symmetry, such as particle number or spin, from that of the physical system. The total energy of the physical system consists of two parts: the energy of the auxiliary system, which is determined with a chosen density functional approximation (DFA), and the excitation energy from an approximate linear response theory that restores the symmetry to that of the physical system, thus rigorously leading to a multideterminant description of the physical system. The electron density of the physical system is different from that of the auxiliary system and is uniquely determined from the functional derivative of the total energy with respect to the external potential. Our energy functional is thus an implicit functional of the physical system density, but an explicit functional of the auxiliary system density. We show that the total energy minimum and stationary states, describing the ground and excited states of the physical system, can be obtained by a self-consistent optimization with respect to the explicit variable, the generalized Kohn-Sham noninteracting density matrix. We have developed the generalized optimized effective potential method for the self-consistent optimization. Among options of the auxiliary system and the associated linear response theory, reformulated versions of the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (SF-TDDFT) are selected for illustration of principle. Numerical results show that our multireference DFT successfully describes static correlation in bond dissociation and double bond rotation.

  4. Electronic specific heats in metal--hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flotow, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic specific heats of metals and metal--hydrogen systems can in many cases be evaluated from the measured specific heats at constant pressure, C/sub p/, in the temperature range 1 to 10 K. For the simplest case, C/sub p/ = γT + βT 3 , where γT represents the specific heat contribution associated with the conduction electrons, and βT 3 represents lattice specific heat contribution. The electronic specific heat coefficient, γ, is important because it is proportional to electron density of states at the Fermi surface. A short description of a low temperature calorimetric cryostat employing a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigeration is given. Various considerations and complications encountered in the evaluation of γ from specific heat data are discussed. Finally, the experimental values of γ for the V--Cr--H system and for the Lu--H system are summarized and the variations of γ as function of alloy composition are discussed

  5. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  6. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  7. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  8. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hyroxyflavone isolated in solid argon: fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra and tautomer fluorescence rise time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, B.; Ernsting, N.P.

    1987-07-30

    The fluorescence properties of 3-hydroxyflavone isolated in solid argon at 15 K have been investigated. Upon electronic excitation the molecules undergo rapid intramolecular proton transfer. No fluorescence from the excited state of the normal form of the molecule could be detected. Perturbations due to hydrogen-bonding impurities which produce serious experimental problems in hydrocarbon glasses are largely suppressed in argon matrices. The rise of the green fluorescence of the tautomer was studied with excitation pulses of 230-fs duration and streak camera detection. An apparent tautomer fluorescence rise time of 2.7 ps was obtained by deconvolution. A comparative measurement of the dye coumarine 6 yielded an apparent fluorescence rise time of 2.5 ps, which can be entirely attributed to the group velocity dispersion of the streak camera optics. This indicates a rate constant for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone of greater than 10/sup 12/ s/sup -1/.

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal doped graphyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangan, Abhijeet Sadashiv; Yadav, Asha S.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2017-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the interaction of few 3d (V,Mn) and 4d (Y,Zr) transition metals with the γ-graphyne structure using the spin-polarized density functional theory for its potentials application in Hydrogen storage, spintronics and nano-electronics. By doping different TMs we have observed that the system can be either metallic(Y), semi-conducting or half metallic. The system for Y and Zr doped graphyne becomes non-magnetic while V and Mn doped graphyne have a magnetic moments of l μB and 3 μB respectively From bader charge analysis it is seen that there is a charge transfer from the TM atom to the graphyne. Zr and Y have a net charge transfer of 2.15e and 1.73e respectively. Charge density analysis also shows the polarization on the carbon skeleton which becomes larger as the charge transfer for the TM atom increases. Thus we see Y and Zr are better candidates for hydrogen storage devices since they are non-magnetic and have less d electrons which is ideal for kubas-type interactions between hydrogen molecule and TM.

  10. Simulation of the photodynamics of azobenzene on its first excited state: Comparison of full multiple spawning and surface hopping treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toniolo, A.; Ciminelli, C.; Persico, M.; Martinez, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the cis→trans and trans→cis photoisomerization of azobenzene after n→π* excitation using the full multiple spawning (FMS) method for nonadiabatic wave-packet dynamics with potential-energy surfaces and couplings determined 'on the fly' from a reparametrized multiconfigurational semiempirical method. We compare the FMS results with a previous direct dynamics treatment using the same potential-energy surfaces and couplings, but with the nonadiabatic dynamics modeled using a semiclassical surface hopping (SH) method. We concentrate on the dynamical effects that determine the photoisomerization quantum yields, namely, the rate of radiationless electronic relaxation and the character of motion along the reaction coordinate. The quantal and semiclassical results are in good general agreement, confirming our previous analysis of the photodynamics. The SH method slightly overestimates the rate of excited state decay, leading in this case to lower quantum yields

  11. Study of doubly excited states of H- and He in the coupled-channel hypersperical adiabatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrashkevich, A.G.; Abrashkevich, D.G.; Vinitskij, S.I.; Kaschiev, M.S.; Puzynin, I.V.

    1989-01-01

    Doubly excited states (DES) of H - and He are investigated within the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic (HSA) approach. Influence of the angular and radial electron correlations on the rate of convergence of the values of the potential curves and matrix elements of radial coupling is studied numerically. The scheme based on molecular classification of the HSA basis states is used for the classification of DES. The results of the multichannel calculations of 1 S e and 1 P 0 DES of H - and He below the second threshold are presented. The obtained results are compared with other calculations and experiment. The region of applicability of the adiabatic approximation is discussed. 75 refs.; 10 tabs

  12. Symmetry-adapted density matrix renormalization group calculations of the primary excited states of poly(para-phenylene vinylene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursill, Robert J; Barford, William

    2009-06-21

    The Pariser-Parr-Pople model of pi-conjugated electrons is solved by a three-block, symmetry-adapted density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method for the light emitting polymer, poly(para-phenylene vinylene). The energies of the primary excited states are calculated. There is excellent agreement between theory and experiment when solid state screening is incorporated into the model parameters, enabling us to make an identification of the origin of the key spectroscopic features. Appendices describe important technical aspects of the three-block DMRG approach: Local Hilbert space efficiency and its relation to the matrix product formulation of the DMRG; an efficient computational procedure for constructing symmetry-adapted states for DMRG calculations; and correct superblock state targeting to ensure good convergence of the method.

  13. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  14. Electrorecycling of Critical and Value Metals from Mobile Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, Tedd E.; Wang, Peming; Anderko, Andre

    2014-09-01

    Mobile electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are a significant source of valuable metals that should be recycled. Each year over a billion devices are sold world-wide and the average life is only a couple years. Value metals in phones are gold, palladium, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel. Devices now contain increasing amounts of rare earth elements (REE). In recent years the supply chain for REE has moved almost exclusively to China. They are contained in displays, speakers and vibrators within the devices. By US Department of Energy (DOE) classification, specific REEs (Nd, Dy, Eu, Tb and Y) are considered critical while others (Ce, La and Pr) are deemed near critical. Effective recycling schemes should include the recovery of these critical materials. By including more value materials in a recovery scheme, more value can be obtained by product diversification and less waste metals remains to be disposed of. REEs are mined as a group such that when specific elements become critical significantly more ore must be processed to capture the dilute but valuable critical elements. Targeted recycling of items containing the more of the less available critical materials could address their future criticality. This presentation will describe work in developing aqueous electrochemistry-based schemes for recycling metals from scrap mobile electronics. The electrorecycling process generates oxidizing agents at an anode while reducing dissolved metals at the cathode. E vs pH diagrams and metals dissolution experiments are used to assess effectiveness of various solution chemistries. Although several schemes were envisioned, a two stages process has been the focus of work: 1) initial dissolution of Cu, Sn, Ag and magnet materials using Fe+3 generated in acidic sulfate and 2) final dissolution of Pd and Au using Cl2 generated in an HCl solution. Experiments were performed using simulated metal mixtures. Both Cu and Ag were recovered at ~ 97% using Fe+3 while

  15. Contribution to the study of highly excited states of the uranium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blancard, Pierre.

    1979-01-01

    Study of highly excited states and some autoionized states of uranium and particularly Rydberg states and behavior in a continuous electric field. The experimental equipment consists of three dye lasers allowing atom ionization or excitation in several steps. The aim is the study of a uranium enrichment process by lasers [fr

  16. Excited-state properties of the 16 kDa red carotenoid protein from Arthrospira maxima

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Durchan, Milan; Shih, P.M.; Kerfeld, C.A.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1807, č. 1 (2011), s. 30-35 ISSN 0005-2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : cyanobacteria * carotenoid * excited-state Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.843, year: 2011

  17. Symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of meso-linked BODIPY dyads

    KAUST Repository

    Whited, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of symmetric BODIPY dyads where the chromophores are attached at the meso position, using either a phenylene bridge or direct linkage. Both molecules undergo symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state, and the directly linked dyad serves as a visible-light-absorbing analogue of 9,9′-bianthryl.

  18. Elucidation of the relationships between H-bonding patterns and excited state dynamics in cyclovalone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperti, Marco; Maspero, Angelo; Tønnesen, Hanne H; Bondani, Maria; Nardo, Luca

    2014-08-28

    Cyclovalone is a synthetic curcumin derivative in which the keto-enolic system is replaced by a cyclohexanone ring. This modification of the chemical structure might in principle result in an excited state that is more stable than that of curcumin, which in turn should produce an enhanced phototoxicity. Indeed, although curcumin exhibits photosensitized antibacterial activity, this compound is characterized by very fast excited-state dynamics which limit its efficacy as a photosensitizer. In previous works we showed that the main non-radiative decay pathway of keto-enolic curcuminoids is through excited-state transfer of the enolic proton to the keto-oxygen. Another effective deactivation pathway involves an intermolecular charge transfer mechanism occurring at the phenyl rings, made possible by intramolecular H-bonding between the methoxy and the hydroxyl substituent. In this paper we present UV-Vis and IR absorption spectra data with the aim of elucidating the intramolecular charge distribution of this compound and its solvation patterns in different environments, with particular focus on solute-solvent H-bonding features. Moreover, we discuss steady state and time-resolved fluorescence data that aim at characterizing the excited-state dynamics of cyclovalone, and we compare its decay photophysics to that of curcumin. Finally, because during the characterization procedures we found evidence of very fast photodegradation of cyclovalone, its photostability in four organic solvents was studied by HPLC and the corresponding relative degradation rates were calculated.

  19. Elucidation of the Relationships between H-Bonding Patterns and Excited State Dynamics in Cyclovalone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lamperti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyclovalone is a synthetic curcumin derivative in which the keto-enolic system is replaced by a cyclohexanone ring. This modification of the chemical structure might in principle result in an excited state that is more stable than that of curcumin, which in turn should produce an enhanced phototoxicity. Indeed, although curcumin exhibits photosensitized antibacterial activity, this compound is characterized by very fast excited-state dynamics which limit its efficacy as a photosensitizer. In previous works we showed that the main non-radiative decay pathway of keto-enolic curcuminoids is through excited-state transfer of the enolic proton to the keto-oxygen. Another effective deactivation pathway involves an intermolecular charge transfer mechanism occurring at the phenyl rings, made possible by intramolecular H-bonding between the methoxy and the hydroxyl substituent. In this paper we present UV-Vis and IR absorption spectra data with the aim of elucidating the intramolecular charge distribution of this compound and its solvation patterns in different environments, with particular focus on solute-solvent H-bonding features. Moreover, we discuss steady state and time-resolved fluorescence data that aim at characterizing the excited-state dynamics of cyclovalone, and we compare its decay photophysics to that of curcumin. Finally, because during the characterization procedures we found evidence of very fast photodegradation of cyclovalone, its photostability in four organic solvents was studied by HPLC and the corresponding relative degradation rates were calculated.

  20. An evaluation of the methods of determining excited state population distributions from sputtering sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowdon, K.J.; Andresen, B.; Veje, E.

    1978-01-01

    The method of calculating relative initial level populations of excited states of sputtered atoms is developed in principle and compared with those in current use. The reason that the latter, although mathematically different, have generally led to similar population distributions is outlined. (Auth.)

  1. Effect of carotenoid structure on excited-state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Fuciman, M.; Hříbek, P.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2009), s. 8795-8703 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : excited-state dynamics * carbonyl carotenoids * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2009

  2. Electronic excitations and metallization of dense solid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R E; Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2013-08-20

    Theoretical calculations and an assessment of recent experimental results for dense solid hydrogen lead to a unique scenario for the metallization of hydrogen under pressure. The existence of layered structures based on graphene sheets gives rise to an electronic structure related to unique features found in graphene that are well studied in the carbon phase. The honeycombed layered structure for hydrogen at high density, first predicted in molecular calculations, produces a complex optical response. The metallization of hydrogen is very different from that originally proposed via a phase transition to a close-packed monoatomic structure, and different from simple metallization recently used to interpret recent experimental data. These different mechanisms for metallization have very different experimental signatures. We show that the shift of the main visible absorption edge does not constrain the point of band gap closure, in contrast with recent claims. This conclusion is confirmed by measured optical spectra, including spectra obtained to low photon energies in the infrared region for phases III and IV of hydrogen.

  3. Normal modes and the Duschinsky mixing of the ground- and excited-state vibrations of the green fluorescent protein chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran

    2013-11-01

    Ground- and excited-state vibrational frequencies were calculated for the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method and detailed normal-mode analyses were carried out for ground and excited states. The mixing of the vibrational modes between the different states was studied by applying the Duschinsky effect by the expressing excited-state normal modes in terms of the ground-state normal modes. It was found that the low-frequency vibrational modes in the vertical excited state play a significant role in structural adjustment.

  4. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, D.T.A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Netherlands Institute for Metals Research and Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Netherlands Institute for Metals Research and Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2008-05-15

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensile fracture of metallic glasses to be analysed. In situ shear band propagation was found to be jump-like, with the jump sites correlating with the formation of secondary shear bands. The effect of structural relaxation by in situ heating is also discussed. Nanocrystallization near the fracture surface was observed; however, no crystallization was also reported in the same sample and the reasons for this are discussed. Both the TEM and the SEM observations confirmed the presence of a liquid-like layer on or near the fracture surface of the ribbons. The formation of a liquid-like layer was characterized by the vein geometries and vein densities on the fracture surfaces and its dependence on shear displacement, {delta}, is discussed. A simple model is adapted to relate the temperature rise during shear banding to the glass transition and melting temperatures and this is used to explain the variety of fracture surfaces which are developed for macroscopically identical tensile testing of metallic glasses together with features which exhibit local melting.

  5. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.T.A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P.M.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2008-01-01

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensile fracture of metallic glasses to be analysed. In situ shear band propagation was found to be jump-like, with the jump sites correlating with the formation of secondary shear bands. The effect of structural relaxation by in situ heating is also discussed. Nanocrystallization near the fracture surface was observed; however, no crystallization was also reported in the same sample and the reasons for this are discussed. Both the TEM and the SEM observations confirmed the presence of a liquid-like layer on or near the fracture surface of the ribbons. The formation of a liquid-like layer was characterized by the vein geometries and vein densities on the fracture surfaces and its dependence on shear displacement, δ, is discussed. A simple model is adapted to relate the temperature rise during shear banding to the glass transition and melting temperatures and this is used to explain the variety of fracture surfaces which are developed for macroscopically identical tensile testing of metallic glasses together with features which exhibit local melting

  6. Silicon-based metallic micro grid for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehong; Jeon, Seok-Gy; Kim, Jung-Il; Kim, Geun-Ju; Heo, Duchang; Shin, Dong Hoon; Sun, Yuning; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2012-01-01

    A micro-scale metal grid based on a silicon frame for application to electron field emission devices is introduced and experimentally demonstrated. A silicon lattice containing aperture holes with an area of 80 × 80 µm 2 and a thickness of 10 µm is precisely manufactured by dry etching the silicon on one side of a double-polished silicon wafer and by wet etching the opposite side. Because a silicon lattice is more rigid than a pure metal lattice, a thin layer of Au/Ti deposited on the silicon lattice for voltage application can be more resistant to the geometric stress caused by the applied electric field. The micro-fabrication process, the images of the fabricated grid with 88% geometric transparency and the surface profile measurement after thermal feasibility testing up to 700 °C are presented. (paper)

  7. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    The angular correlation of the photons emitted when positrons annihilate with electrons has been studied in single crystals of the rare-earth metals Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, and in a single crystal of an equiatomic alloy of Ho and Er. A comparison of the results for Y with the calculations...... of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood...... qualitatively in terms of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave calculations by Keeton and Loucks. The angular distributions in the c direction in the paramagnetic phases are characterized by a rapid drop at low angles followed by a hump, and these features are associated with rather flat regions of Fermi...

  8. Plasmon Response and Electron Dynamics in Charged Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata Herrera, Mario; Aizpurua, Javier; Kazansky, Andrey K; Borisov, Andrei G

    2016-03-22

    Using the time-dependent density functional theory, we perform quantum calculations of the electron dynamics in small charged metallic nanoparticles (clusters) of spherical geometry. We show that the excess charge is accumulated at the surface of the nanoparticle within a narrow layer given by the typical screening distance of the electronic system. As a consequence, for nanoparticles in vacuum, the dipolar plasmon mode displays only a small frequency shift upon charging. We obtain a blue shift for positively charged clusters and a red shift for negatively charged clusters, consistent with the change of the electron spill-out from the nanoparticle boundaries. For negatively charged clusters, the Fermi level is eventually promoted above the vacuum level leading to the decay of the excess charge via resonant electron transfer into the continuum. We show that, depending on the charge, the process of electron loss can be very fast, on the femtosecond time scale. Our results are of great relevance to correctly interpret the optical response of the nanoparticles obtained in electrochemistry, and demonstrate that the measured shift of the plasmon resonances upon charging of nanoparticles cannot be explained without account for the surface chemistry and the dielectric environment.

  9. The ion-electron correlation function in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Tamaki, S.; Waseda, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The structure factors of liquid Zn at 723 K, Sn at 523 K and Bi at 573 K have been determined by neutron diffraction with sufficient accuracy and compared with those of X-ray diffraction. A remarkable difference in the structural information between the two methods is clearly found around the first peak region as well as in the slightly varied peak positions, and it is apparently larger than the experimental errors. With these facts in mind, a new method evaluating the ion-electron correlation function in liquid metals has been proposed by using the measured structural data of X-rays and neutrons, with the help of theoretical values of the electron-electron correlation function by he Utsumi-Ichimaru scheme. This method has been applied to liquid Zn, Sn and Bi, and the radial distribution function of valence electrons around an ion has been estimated, from which the ionic radius and the schematic diagram of the electron distribution map are obtained. The ionic radii evaluated in this work have been found to agree well with those proposed by Pauling. (author)

  10. Picosecond spectral relaxation of curcumin excited state in toluene–alcohol mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, R.K.; Das, K., E-mail: kaustuv@rrcat.gov.in

    2013-12-15

    Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols (Methanol, Ethanol, 1-Propanol, 1-Butanol and 1-Octanol) are compared with an instrument time resolution of ∼40 ps. As the alcohol mole-fraction is varied from zero to unity, the observed trends in the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixtures changes significantly in going from Methanol to 1-Octanol. This is attributed to the different degree of modulation of the non-radiative rates associated with the excited state intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. Fluorescence decays taken at the red edge of the emission spectrum started to show measurable rise times (200–30 ps) the magnitude of which decreased gradually with increasing alcohol mole-fraction. As a consequence the solvation times in the binary mixture were observed to slow down considerably at certain solvent compositions compared to that in neat alcohol. However, in toluene-1-Octanol mixture, the rise times and corresponding solvation times did not show a dependence on the 1-Octanol mole-fraction. The observed results suggest that viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding property of the alcohol solvent plays an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixture. -- Highlights: • Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols were studied. • The observed trends in the fluorescence properties are attributed to intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. • Except 1-Octanol, the average solvation times of the pigment were observed to depend upon alcohol mole-fraction. • Viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment.

  11. Picosecond spectral relaxation of curcumin excited state in toluene–alcohol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, R.K.; Das, K.

    2013-01-01

    Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols (Methanol, Ethanol, 1-Propanol, 1-Butanol and 1-Octanol) are compared with an instrument time resolution of ∼40 ps. As the alcohol mole-fraction is varied from zero to unity, the observed trends in the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixtures changes significantly in going from Methanol to 1-Octanol. This is attributed to the different degree of modulation of the non-radiative rates associated with the excited state intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. Fluorescence decays taken at the red edge of the emission spectrum started to show measurable rise times (200–30 ps) the magnitude of which decreased gradually with increasing alcohol mole-fraction. As a consequence the solvation times in the binary mixture were observed to slow down considerably at certain solvent compositions compared to that in neat alcohol. However, in toluene-1-Octanol mixture, the rise times and corresponding solvation times did not show a dependence on the 1-Octanol mole-fraction. The observed results suggest that viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding property of the alcohol solvent plays an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment in toluene–alcohol mixture. -- Highlights: • Excited state photophysics of Curcumin in a binary solvent mixture of toluene and five different alcohols were studied. • The observed trends in the fluorescence properties are attributed to intermolecular H bonding between the pigment and the alcohol. • Except 1-Octanol, the average solvation times of the pigment were observed to depend upon alcohol mole-fraction. • Viscosity, polarity and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the excited state processes of the pigment

  12. Thermohydraulic behavior of liquid metal pool submitted to electronic bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Patrice

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with the thermohydraulics of liquid metal molten by an electron beam. We study the relationship between the liquid metal pool and the vapor rate. The aim is to find good conditions increasing the metal vapor rate. In first place, energy losses are identified. Mains are convection (buoyancy and thermo-capillary) strengthen by the deformation of the molten pool. The first action is to reduce the liquid interface deformation with a transient spot realized by scanning the electron beam. I find that in this case, the optimum vapor rate is obtained when the crossing time of the beam is smaller than characteristic time of formation of the cavity, but greater than the heating time of the surface. Secondly, I impose forces to change the morphology of the flow. Two actions are tried: magnetic field application and rotating motion of the crucible. External magnetic field application may reduce convective flow, by the creation of a magnetic brake. But in my experiment, magnetic field deteriorates electron beam before to be effective. Results obtained by the rotating motion of the crucible approve this choice to reduce energy losses and increase vapor rate. This growth of vapor rate is due to an expansion of the emitted vapor source and an increase of the central temperature of the molten pool. Nevertheless with the increase of the rotation velocity and after the optimum vapor rate, I note that the flow is not axisymmetric. My observation give to think about instabilities that are developed by baroclinic waves. The comparison of my works with the Eady's linear theory gives good results. (author) [fr

  13. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  14. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Schenk, Markus; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We report on the first investigation of plateau and cut-off structures in photoelectron spectra from nano-scale metal tips interacting with few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. These hallmarks of electron rescattering, well-known from atom-laser interaction in the strong-field regime, appear at remarkably low laser intensities with nominal Keldysh parameters of the order of $\\gtrsim 10$. Quantum and quasi-classical simulations reveal that a large field enhancement near the tip and the increa...

  15. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-04-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement.

  16. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241 Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement

  17. Metal centre effects on HNO binding in porphyrins and the electronic origin: metal's electronic configuration, position in the periodic table, and oxidation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Weihai; Zhang, Yong

    2012-04-21

    HNO binds to many different metals in organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. To help understand experimentally observed metal centre effects, a quantum chemical investigation was performed, revealing clear general binding trends with respect to metal centre characteristics and the electronic origin for the first time. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  18. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  19. Atomic-level Electron Microscopy of Metal and Alloy Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide

    This thesis presents the application of transmission electron microscopy techniques towards the characterisation of novel metal nanoparticle catalysts. Two main subjects have been covered: first, the sintering-resistance behaviour of monomodal mass-selected Pt cluster catalysts have been studied...... flat surfaces and exposed to different sintering conditions. Ex situ STEM imaging has been used to monitor the variation of the particle dimensions through the analysis of particle area distributions. Clusters with a monomodal size distribution exhibited intrinsic sintering resistance on different...... peroxide H2O2. The active surface is predicted to be formed by reactive Pt or Pd atoms surrounded by more inert Hg atoms. Electrochemical measurements on the two catalysts have shown performance exceeding the current state-of-the-art in both forms of extended surface and nanoparticles. Electron microscopy...

  20. Recycling of metal bearing electronic scrap in a plasma furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Piotr; Małecki, Stanisław; Gargul, Krzysztof

    2011-12-01

    The recycling of electronic waste and the recovery of valuable components are large problems in the modern world economy. This paper presents the effects of melting sorted electronic scrap in a plasma furnace. Printed circuit boards, cables, and windings were processed separately. The characteristics of the obtained products (i.e., alloy metal, slag, dust, and gases) are presented. A method of their further processing in order to obtain commercial products is proposed. Because of the chemical composition and physical properties, the waste slag is environmentally inert and can be used for the production of abrasives. Process dusts containing large amounts of carbon and its compounds have a high calorific value. That makes it possible to use them for energy generation. The gas has a high calorific value, and its afterburning combined with energy recovery is necessary.

  1. Simulated electron affinity tuning in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Kissan; Yavuz, Mustafa; Musselman, Kevin P.

    2017-05-01

    Metal-insulator-metal diodes for rectification applications must exhibit high asymmetry, nonlinearity, and responsivity. Traditional methods of improving these figures of merit have consisted of increasing insulator thickness, adding multiple insulator layers, and utilizing a variety of metal contact combinations. However, these methods have come with the price of increasing the diode resistance and ultimately limiting the operating frequency to well below the terahertz regime. In this work, an Airy Function Transfer Matrix simulation method was used to observe the effect of tuning the electron affinity of the insulator as a technique to decrease the diode resistance. It was shown that a small increase in electron affinity can result in a resistance decrease in upwards of five orders of magnitude, corresponding to an increase in operating frequency on the same order. Electron affinity tuning has a minimal effect on the diode figures of merit, where asymmetry improves or remains unaffected and slight decreases in nonlinearity and responsivity are likely to be greatly outweighed by the improved operating frequency of the diode.

  2. Unrestricted density functional theory based on the fragment molecular orbital method for the ground and excited state calculations of large systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hiroya, E-mail: nakata.h.ab@m.titech.ac.jp [Center for Biological Resources and Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B-62 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fedorov, Dmitri G. [NRI, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yokojima, Satoshi [RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1423-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kitaura, Kazuo [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sakurai, Minoru [Center for Biological Resources and Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B-62 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Shinichiro [RIKEN, Research Cluster for Innovation, Nakamura Lab, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    We extended the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method interfaced with density functional theory (DFT) into spin unrestricted formalism (UDFT) and developed energy gradients for the ground state and single point excited state energies based on time-dependent DFT. The accuracy of FMO is evaluated in comparison to the full calculations without fragmentation. Electronic excitations in solvated organic radicals and in the blue copper protein, plastocyanin (PDB code: 1BXV), are reported. The contributions of solvent molecules to the electronic excitations are analyzed in terms of the fragment polarization and quantum effects such as interfragment charge transfer.

  3. Electron correlations in the k-dependent electronic structure of metallic V2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, O.; Denlinger, J. D.; Kim, B. J.; Allen, J. W.; Metcalf, P.

    2010-03-01

    Both the insulator and metal phases of vanadium sesquioxide serve as paradigms of strongly correlated electron physics. The metallic state displays an incoherent lower Hubbard band and a coherent quasiparticle (QP) peak near the Fermi level. Employing angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we are making the first studies of the behavior of the QP band in energy-momentum space. Here we report on electron mass renormalization near the Fermi level, and higher energy kink and ``waterfall'' features such as have been reported for different families of superconducting cuprates. Owing to a variety of coexisting interactions the precise origin of these features remains controversial and is presently actively discussed in the literature. Observation of these features in a paradigm system broadens the basis for discussing and assessing various suggested scenarios.

  4. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs and electronic hookahs (EHs, examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements.Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium, thick wire (copper coated with silver, brass clamp (copper, zinc, solder joints (tin, lead, and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum. Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs.These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  5. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Monique; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Ghai, Sanjay; Talbot, Prue

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs) and electronic hookahs (EHs), examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements. Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium), thick wire (copper coated with silver), brass clamp (copper, zinc), solder joints (tin, lead), and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum). Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs). These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  6. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Angelucci, M.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  7. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron yield (SEY curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  8. Electronic self-organization in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, Tobias

    2015-10-30

    The interplay between different self-organized electronically ordered states and their relation to unconventional electronic properties like superconductivity constitutes one of the most exciting challenges of modern condensed matter physics. In the present thesis this issue is thoroughly investigated for the prototypical layered material 1T-TaS{sub 2} both experimentally and theoretically. At first the static charge density wave order in 1T-TaS{sub 2} is investigated as a function of pressure and temperature by means of X-ray diffraction. These data indeed reveal that the superconductivity in this material coexists with an inhomogeneous charge density wave on a macroscopic scale in real space. This result is fundamentally different from a previously proposed separation of superconducting and insulating regions in real space. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data uncover the important role of interlayer correlations in 1T-TaS{sub 2}. Based on the detailed insights into the charge density wave structure obtained by the X-ray diffraction experiments, density functional theory models are deduced in order to describe the electronic structure of 1T-TaS{sub 2} in the second part of this thesis. As opposed to most previous studies, these calculations take the three-dimensional character of the charge density wave into account. Indeed the electronic structure calculations uncover complex orbital textures, which are interwoven with the charge density wave order and cause dramatic differences in the electronic structure depending on the alignment of the orbitals between neighboring layers. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that these orbital-mediated effects provide a route to drive semiconductor-to-metal transitions with technologically pertinent gaps and on ultrafast timescales. These results are particularly relevant for the ongoing development of novel, miniaturized and ultrafast devices based on layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The discovery of orbital textures

  9. Sign Changes in the Electric Dipole Moment of Excited States in Rubidium-Alkaline Earth Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Lackner, Florian; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2015-06-01

    In a recent series of combined experimental and theoretical studies we investigated the ground state and several excited states of the Rb-alkaline earth molecules RbSr and RbCa. The group of alkali-alkaline earth (AK-AKE) molecules has drawn attention for applications in ultracold molecular physics and the measurement of fundamental constants due to their large permanent electric and magnetic dipole moments in the ground state. These properties should allow for an easy manipulation of the molecules and simulations of spin models in optical lattices. In our studies we found that the permanent electric dipole moment points in different directions for certain electronically excited states, and changes the sign in some cases as a function of bond length. We summarize our results, give possible causes for the measured trends in terms of molecular orbital theory and extrapolate the tendencies to other combinations of AK and AKE - elements. F. Lackner, G. Krois, T. Buchsteiner, J. V. Pototschnig, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 153001; G. Krois, F. Lackner, J. V. Pototschnig, T. Buchsteiner, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 22373; J. V. Pototschnig, G. Krois, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 234309 J. V. Pototschnig, G. Krois, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in Press (2015), doi:10.1016/j.jms.2015.01.006 M. Kajita, G. Gopakumar, M. Abe, and M. Hada, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2014, 300, 99-107 A. Micheli, G. K. Brennen, and P. Zoller, Nature Physics, 2006, 2, 341-347

  10. Observation of the long-lived triplet excited state of perylenebisimide (PBI) in C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes and application in photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jifu; Zhong, Fangfang; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2013-07-14

    Perylenebisimide (PBI) was used to prepare C^N cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and it is the first time the long-lived triplet excited state of PBI chromophore was observed in a transition metal complex (τT = 22.3 μs). Previously, the lifetime of the triplet state of PBI in transition metal complexes was usually shorter than 1.0 μs. Long-lived triplet excited states are useful for applications in photocatalysis or other photophysical processes concerning triplet-triplet-energy-transfer. PBI and amino-PBI were used for preparation of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir-2 and Ir-3), in which the PBI chromophore was connected to the coordination center via C≡C π-conjugation bond. The new complexes show strong absorption in visible region (ε = 34,200 M(-1) cm(-1) at 541 nm for Ir-2, and ε = 19,000 at 669 nm for Ir-3), compared to the model complex Ir(ppy)(bpy)[PF6] Ir-1 (ε PBI-localized long-lived (3)IL states were populated for Ir-2 and Ir-3 upon photoexcitation. The complexes were used as triplet photosensitizers for (1)O2-mediated photooxidation of 1,5-dihydronaphthalene to produce juglone, an important intermediate for preparation of anti-cancer compounds. (1)O2 quantum yields (Φ(Δ)) up to 91% were observed for the new Ir(III) complexes and the overall photosensitizing ability is much higher than the conventional Ir(III) complex Ir-1, which shows the typical weak visible light absorption in visible region. Our results are useful for preparation of transition metal complexes that show strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet excited state and for the application of these complexes in photocatalysis.

  11. Calculation of the ground and excited states of the Ne2 molecule by the variational cellular method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, A.M.; Rosato, A.

    1981-07-01

    The potential curves for the ground state 1 Σ + sub(g) and for the first singlet excited state 1 Σ + sub (u) of the Ne 2 molecule are determined by the Variational Cellular Method. From these curves some spectroscopical constants are obtained. Ionization energies of the excited state 1 Σ + sub (u) are calculated. (Author) [pt

  12. Calculation of the ground and excited states of the Ne2 molecule by the Variational Cellular Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, A.M.; Rosato, A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential curves for the ground 1 μ + sub(g) and for the first singlet excited state 1 μ + sub(u) of the Ne 2 molecule are determined by the Variational Cellular Method. From these curves some spectroscopical constants are obtained. Ionization energies of the excited state 1 μ + sub(u) are calculated. (Author) [pt

  13. Electroreflectance spectroscopy as a probe of the electronic structure at the metal-electronic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.M.; Liu, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a surface is influenced by the surface electronic structure. In particular, the existence of surface states in band gaps can lead to optical absorption below the bulk interband threshold. However, such effects are usually too small to be observed because while surface states are localized within several atomic layers near the surface, light waves can penetrate at least hundreds of layers into the metal. One way to enhance the surface effect for a metallic surface is to make use of electromodulation techniques. When a metal is placed in an electrolyte, an intense electric field (approx. 10/sup 7/ volts/cm) can be induced at the metal-electrolyte boundary with the application of a bias voltage of less than a volt. Electroreflectance (ER) experiments modulate the bias voltage and measure the resultant modulations in the optical reflectivity. Since the static electric field is highly localized at the interface (the Fermi-Thomas screening length for typical metals is of the order of Angstroms) we expect the ER effect to be highly surface sensitive. Sensitivities in ..delta..R/R up to 10/sup -6/ can be achieved in such experiments. 12 references.

  14. Simulating Ru L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional theory: model complexes and electron localization in mixed-valence metal dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-30

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6](4-) and Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5M(II)-CN-Ru(III)(NH3)5](-) (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  15. Heat capacity for systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejnar, Pavel; Stránský, Pavel, E-mail: stransky@ipnp.troja.mff.cuni.cz

    2017-03-18

    Heat capacities of model systems with finite numbers of effective degrees of freedom are evaluated using canonical and microcanonical thermodynamics. Discrepancies between both approaches, which are observed even in the infinite-size limit, are particularly large in systems that exhibit an excited-state quantum phase transition. The corresponding irregularity of the spectrum generates a singularity in the microcanonical heat capacity and affects smoothly the canonical heat capacity. - Highlights: • Thermodynamics of systems with excited-state quantum phase transitions • ESQPT-generated singularities of the microcanonical heat capacity • Non-monotonous dependences of the canonical heat capacity • Discord between canonical and microcanonical pictures in the infinite-size limit.

  16. Note on entanglement temperature for low thermal excited states in higher derivative gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wu-zhong; He, Song; Tao, Jun

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the entanglement temperature of a small scale subsystem in low excited states by using holographic method. Especially, we study the entanglement entropy and entanglement temperature in higher derivative gravities which are considered as low thermal excitation of pure AdS gravity. We find that the entanglement entropy are related to the central charges of CFT living on the boundary. The relation between the variance of entanglement entropy and energy of a small scale subsystem has been also obtained. Furthermore, the relation is consistent with the first law-like relation that is proposed by Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 (2013)091602. Finally, we derive the formula of the variance of entanglement entropy in general excited states in gravity background with the Fefferman-Graham coordinates and the entanglement temperature can be figured out in special case.

  17. Highly selective population of two excited states in nonresonant two-photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Zhang Shi-An; Sun Zhen-Rong

    2011-01-01

    A nonresonant two-photon absorption process can be manipulated by tailoring the ultra-short laser pulse. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate a highly selective population of two excited states in the nonresonant two-photon absorption process by rationally designing a spectral phase distribution. Our results show that one excited state is maximally populated while the other state population is widely tunable from zero to the maximum value. We believe that the theoretical results may play an important role in the selective population of a more complex nonlinear process comprising nonresonant two-photon absorption, such as resonance-mediated (2+1)-three-photon absorption and (2+1)-resonant multiphoton ionization. (atomic and molecular physics)

  18. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, Z. E., E-mail: zjguevaram@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  19. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy of HNC and DNC in the vibrationally excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsutoshi

    1993-09-01

    The rotational transitions of hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) and deuterium isocyanide (DNC) in the vibrationally excited states as well as in the ground states were observed in the millimeter and submillimeter wave region. These compounds were generated in a dc glow discharge plasma containing hydrogen (or deuterium), nitrogen, and carbon atoms. The stretching vibrational modes, nu1 and nu3 states, were selectively excited in the discharge plasma; on the other hand, the bending mode nu2 state was thermally populated at the cell temperature. The precise rotational, centrifugal distortion and l-type doubling constants were obtained for all of the first vibrationally excited states as well as the ground states. The experimental equilibrium rotational constants Be are 45 496.7769(45) and 38 207.7217(105) MHz for HNC and DNC, respectively, where uncertainties correspond to one standard deviation. The equilibrium internuclear distances are also determined.

  20. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanath, M. [Tata Institute; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Mathur, Nilmani [Tata Institute; Peardon, Michael [Trinity College

    2014-07-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)ⓍO(3) symmetry.

  1. Dynamics of excited state proton transfer in nitro substituted 10-hydroxybenzo[h] quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marciniak, H.; Hristova, S.; Deneva, V.

    2017-01-01

    The ground state tautomerism and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) and its nitro derivatives, 7-nitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (2) and 7,9-dinitrobenzo[h]quinolin-10-ol (3), have been studied in acetonitrile using steady state as well as time...... occurs with a time constant of 0.89 ps and 0.68 ps, respectively. In both cases a mixture of the enol and proton transfer forms is optically excited. The enol form exhibits then the ESIPT and subsequently both fractions take the same relaxation path. We propose that in 2 and 3 the ESIPT path exhibits...... a potential energy barrier resulting in an incoherent rate governed process while in HBQ the ESIPT proceeds as a ballistic wavepacket motion along a path without significant barriers. The theoretical calculations (M06-2X/TZVP) confirm the existence of a barrier in the ground and excited states as result...

  2. Excited State Evolution towards ligand loss and ligand chelation at group 6 metal carbonyl centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manton, J.C.; Amirjalayer, S.; Coleman, A.C.; McMahon, S.; Harvey, E.C.; Greetham, G.M.; Clark, I.P.; Buma, W.J.; Woutersen, S.; Pryce, M.T.; Long, C.

    2014-01-01

    The photochem. and photophysics of three model "half-​sandwich" complexes (η6-​benzophenone)​Cr(CO)​3, (η6-​styrene)​Cr(CO)​3, and (η6-​allylbenzene)​Cr(CO)​3 were investigated using pico-​second time-​resolved IR spectroscopy and time-​dependent d. functional theory methods. The

  3. Optical methods for the evaluation of lanthanide excited state thermal ionization barrier in luminescent materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasoli, M.; Vedda, A.; Mihóková, Eva; Nikl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 8 (2012), "085127-1"-"085127-8" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100802; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Lu 2 Si 2 O 7 * Pr-doped * luminescence * scintillator * excited state ionization Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  4. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  5. Influence of excited states on the energy loss of fast ions in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE)); Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Stopping power calculations of fast ions penetrating a hydrogen plasma target in local thermodynamic equilibrium at arbitrary temperatures are performed. Excited state contributions to the energy loss are included in the framework of the Bethe formalism. Average ionization potentials for the excited ions are given in a quasiclassical approximation. It is shown that the net effect is an enhancement of the stopping power compared to the energy loss when assuming all atoms to be in their ground state.

  6. A DETERMINATION OF RADIATIVE TRANSITIONS WIDTHS OF EXCITED STATES IN C(12),

    Science.gov (United States)

    the -2 power to 3.14 F to the -2 power. A new method of analysis has been employed to obtain the radiative widths for the first three excited states...in C(12) from the measured inelastic cross sections. This method of analysis does not depend on a model for the transition charge distribution and is useful in determining the multipolarity of the transition. (Author)

  7. Excited states in 22Mg via the 12C(12C,2n)22Mg reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewett, Cybele; Baktash, Cyrus; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeff C.; Chipps, K.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Greife, U.; Gross, Carl J.; Jones, K. L.; Liang, Junjien; Livesay, Jake; Kozub, R. L.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Radford, David C.; Sarazin, F.; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2007-01-01

    The 12C(12C, 2n)22Mg reaction was measured with the CLARION array and the RMS separator at the Holifield Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This experiment was performed to gather more information on the excited states in 22Mg, which might be of relevance to recent radioactive ion beam measurements of the astrophysically important 21Na(p,γ)22Mg reaction. The results are compared to direct measurements, transfer experiments and a competing experiment performed with Gammasphere

  8. Formation of H-atom in 2s excited state of proton-lithium and proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The differential and total cross-sections have been investigated in the forma- tion of H-atom in the 2s excited state of proton-lithium and proton-sodium scattering by using the Coulomb projected Born (CPB) approximation in the energy range from 50 to. 10,000 keV. The results thus obtained are compared with the ...

  9. Theory of g-shift and linewidth in CeP excited state EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.; Cooper, B.R.; Huang, C.Y.; Sugawara, K.

    1979-01-01

    The Mori-Zwanzig memory function formalism was used to analyze the observed excited state EPR mode in CeP. The mixing of the Zeeman-split crystal-field excitation by the exchange, particularly among those with degenerate frequencies, yields a normal mode determining the observed low-frequency spectrum. This is illustrated by calculation with Heisenberg exchange which yields a single peak in qualitative agreement with the experiment

  10. Triplet excited States as a source of relevant (bio)chemical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The properties of triplet excited states are markedly medium-dependent, which turns this species into valuable tools for investigating the microenvironments existing in protein binding pockets. Monitoring of the triplet excited state behavior of drugs within transport proteins (serum albumins and α1-acid glycoproteins) by laser flash photolysis constitutes a valuable source of information on the strength of interaction, conformational freedom and protection from oxygen or other external quenchers. With proteins, formation of spatially confined triplet excited states is favored over competitive processes affording ionic species. Remarkably, under aerobic atmosphere, the triplet decay of drug@protein complexes is dramatically longer than in bulk solution. This offers a convenient dynamic range for assignment of different triplet populations or for stereochemical discrimination. In this review, selected examples of the application of the laser flash photolysis technique are described, including drug distribution between the bulk solution and the protein cavities, or between two types of proteins, detection of drug-drug interactions inside proteins, and enzyme-like activity processes mediated by proteins. Finally, protein encapsulation can also modify the photoreactivity of the guest. This is illustrated by presenting an example of retarded photooxidation.

  11. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  12. Approximate singly excited states from a two-component Hartree-Fock reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua J; Ding, Feizhi; Davidson, Ernest R; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-10-14

    For many molecules, relaxing the spin symmetry constraint on the wave function results in the lowest energy mean-field solution. The two-component Hartree-Fock (2cHF) method relaxes all spin symmetry constraints, and the wave function is no longer an eigenfunction of the total spin, spin projection, or time-reversal symmetry operators. For ground state energies, 2cHF is a superior mean-field method for describing spin-frustrated molecules. For excited states, the utility of 2cHF is uncertain. Here, we implement the 2cHF extensions of two single-reference excited state methods, the two-component configuration interaction singles and time-dependent Hartree-Fock. We compare the results to the analogous methods based off of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation, as well as the full configuration interaction for three small molecules with distinct 2cHF solutions, and discuss the nature of the 2cHF excited state solutions.

  13. Creation and evolution of excited states in α particle tracks in anthracene crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, G.

    1977-01-01

    The kinematics of excited states in anthracene crystals bombarded by 5MeV α particles is studied. The elementary processes which account for the transitions from the primary excited states to the lowest singlet S 1 and triplet T 1 excited states is described. The equation governing the evolution of the S 1 and T 1 excitons in the α particle track are then solved, and the scintillation decay curve is calculated. This calculated result is in good agreement with all available experimental results. The experimental part of this work are scintillation decay curves measurements. The scintillation decay was measured between 0.5nsec and 40μsec. The influence of the initial very fast singlet excitons quenching by triplet excitons can be seen in the beginning of scintillation. The delayed component is described by the triplet excitons kinematics. The magnetic field effect on the scintillation was investigated. This effect is attributed to an effect on the T 1 -T 1 annihilation and an effect on the triplet excitons quenching by radicals which are formed in the α particle track

  14. Ab initio excited states from the in-medium similarity renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzuchowski, N. M.; Morris, T. D.; Bogner, S. K.

    2017-04-01

    We present two new methods for performing ab initio calculations of excited states for closed-shell systems within the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IMSRG) framework. Both are based on combining the IMSRG with simple many-body methods commonly used to target excited states, such as the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and equations-of-motion (EOM) techniques. In the first approach, a two-step sequential IMSRG transformation is used to drive the Hamiltonian to a form where a simple TDA calculation (i.e., diagonalization in the space of 1 p 1 h excitations) becomes exact for a subset of eigenvalues. In the second approach, EOM techniques are applied to the IMSRG ground-state-decoupled Hamiltonian to access excited states. We perform proof-of-principle calculations for parabolic quantum dots in two dimensions and the closed-shell nuclei 16O and 22O. We find that the TDA-IMSRG approach gives better accuracy than the EOM-IMSRG when calculations converge, but it is otherwise lacking the versatility and numerical stability of the latter. Our calculated spectra are in reasonable agreement with analogous EOM-coupled-cluster calculations. This work paves the way for more interesting applications of the EOM-IMSRG approach to calculations of consistently evolved observables such as electromagnetic strength functions and nuclear matrix elements, and extensions to nuclei within one or two nucleons of a closed shell by generalizing the EOM ladder operator to include particle-number nonconserving terms.

  15. The Microwave Spectroscopy of Aminoacetonitrile in the Vibrational Excited States 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Chiho; Higurashi, Haruka; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Kaori

    2016-06-01

    Aminoacetonitrile (NH_2CH_2CN) is a potential precursor of the simplest amino acid, glycine in the interstellar space and was detected toward SgrB2(N). We have extended measurements up to 1.3 THz so that the strongest transitions that may be found in the terahertz region should be covered. Aminoacetonitrile has a few low-lying vibrational excited states and indeed the pure rotational transitions in these vibrational excited states were found. The pure rotational transitions in six vibrational excited states in the 80-180 GHz range have been assigned and centrifugal distortion constants up to the sextic terms were determined. Based on spectral intensities and the vibrational information from Bak et al., They were assigned to the 3 low-lying fundamentals, 1 overtone and 2 combination bands. In the submillimeter wavelength region, perturbations were recognized and some of the lines were off by more than a few MHz. At this moment, these perturbed transitions are not included in our analysis. A. Belloche, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, H. S. P. Müller, P. Schilke, J. Ott, S. Thorwirth, and C. Hieret, 2008, Astronom. & Astrophys. 482, 179 (2008). Y. Motoki, Y. Tsunoda, H. Ozeki, and K. Kobayashi, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 209, 23 (2013). B. Bak, E. L. Hansen, F. M. Nicolaisen, and O. F. Nielsen, Can. J. Phys. 53, 2183 (1975) C. Fujita, H. Ozeki, and K. Kobayashi, 70th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy (2015), MH14.

  16. Exact finite volume expectation values of local operators in excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozsgay, B. [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Szécsényi, I.M. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Eötvös Loránd University,Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Takács, G. [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-04-07

    We present a conjecture for the exact expression of finite volume expectation values in excited states in integrable quantum field theories, which is an extension of an earlier conjecture to the case of general diagonal factorized scattering with bound states and a nontrivial bootstrap structure. The conjectured expression is a spectral expansion which uses the exact form factors and the excited state thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz as building blocks. The conjecture is proven for the case of the trace of the energy-moment tensor. Concerning its validity for more general operators, we provide numerical evidence using the truncated conformal space approach. It is found that the expansion fails to be well-defined for small values of the volume in cases when the singularity structure of the TBA equations undergoes a non-trivial rearrangement under some critical value of the volume. Despite these shortcomings, the conjectured expression is expected to be valid for all volumes for most of the excited states, and as an expansion above the critical volume for the rest.

  17. EPR studies of excited state exchange and crystal-field effects in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.Y.; Sugawara, K.; Cooper, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    EPR in excited crystal-field states of Tm 3+ , Pr 3+ , and Tb 3+ in singlet-ground-state systems and in the excited state of Ce 3+ in CeP are reviewed. Because one is looking at a crystal-field excited state resonance, the exchange, even if isotropic, does not act as a secular perturbation. This means that one obtains different effects and has access to more information about the dynamic effects of exchange than in conventional paramagnetic resonance experiments. The Tm and Pr monopnictides studied are paramagnetic at all temperatures. The most striking feature of the behavior of the GAMMA 5 /sup (2)/ EPR in the Tm compounds is the presence of an anomalous maximum in the temperature dependence of the g-factor. The relationship of this effect to anisotropic exchange is discussed. The results of the EPR of the excited GAMMA 5 /sup (2)/ level of Tb 3 + (g-factor becomes very large at T/sub N/ in antiferromagnetic TbX (X = P, As, Sb) and that of the excited GAMMA 8 level of Ce 3+ in antiferromagnetic CeP will also be reported. For sufficient dilution of the Tb 3+ in the terbium monopnictides, the systems become paramagnetic (Van Vleck paramagnets) down to 0 0 K. The Tb 3+ excited state resonance EPR in Tb/sub 0.1/ La/sub 0.9/P was studied as an example of behavior in such systems. 10 fig

  18. Hot excited state management for long-lived blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesang; Jeong, Changyeong; Batagoda, Thilini; Coburn, Caleb; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2017-05-01

    Since their introduction over 15 years ago, the operational lifetime of blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) has remained insufficient for their practical use in displays and lighting. Their short lifetime results from annihilation between high-energy excited states, producing energetically hot states (>6.0 eV) that lead to molecular dissociation. Here we introduce a strategy to avoid dissociative reactions by including a molecular hot excited state manager within the device emission layer. Hot excited states transfer to the manager and rapidly thermalize before damage is induced on the dopant or host. As a consequence, the managed blue PHOLED attains T80=334+/-5 h (time to 80% of the 1,000 cd m-2 initial luminance) with a chromaticity coordinate of (0.16, 0.31), corresponding to 3.6+/-0.1 times improvement in a lifetime compared to conventional, unmanaged devices. To our knowledge, this significant improvement results in the longest lifetime for such a blue PHOLED.

  19. Ab initio calculation on the low-lying excited states of Si2+ cation including spin–orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanlei; Zhai, Hongsheng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Liu, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • 24 Λ–S states are correlated to the dissociation limit of Si( 3 P g ) + Si + ( 2 P u ) are first reported. • The dissociation energies of the calculated electronic states are predicted in our work. • It is first time that the entire 54 Ω states generated from the 24 Λ–S states have been studied. • PECs of Λ–S and Ω states are depicted with the aid of avoided crossing rule between the same symmetry. - Abstract: Ab initio all-electron relativistic calculations of the low-lying excited states of Si 2 + have been performed at MRCI+Q/AVQZ level. The calculated electronic states, including 12 doublet and 12 quartet Λ–S states, are correlated to the dissociation limit of Si( 3 P g ) + Si + ( 2 P u ). Spin–orbit interaction is taken into account via the state interaction approach with the full Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian, which causes the entire 24 Λ–S states to split into 54 Ω states. This is the first time that spin–orbit coupling (SOC) calculation has been performed on Si 2 + . The obtained potential energy curves (PECs) of Λ–S and Ω states are respectively depicted with the aid of the avoided crossing rule between the same symmetry. The spectroscopic constants of the bound Λ–S and Ω states are determined, and excellent agreements with the latest theoretical results are achieved

  20. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D; Bruckner, B; Moro, M V; Gruber, S; Goebl, D; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M; Steinberger, R; Duchoslav, J; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P

    2017-03-10

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  1. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  2. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  3. Evaporation of uranium metal by electron beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa; Ogura, Koichi; Nishimura, Akihiko

    1999-06-01

    Using tungsten particles, a tungsten cylinder, or a porous tungsten rod, evaporations of uranium metal by electron beam heating were attempted to improve the evaporation efficiency. In comparison with the evaporation from liquid uranium without the tungsten, it was confirmed that the evaporation efficiency is improved even in either case. The cross-sectional observation of the evaporation samples shows that the tungsten had great deformation from the as-received shape or dispersed into the liquid uranium by the liquid uranium corrosion, and there were the precipitates and tungsten grains incorporated in the liquid uranium. These tungsten grains or particles from dissolved tungsten seem to suppress convective heat conduction of the liquid uranium and improve the evaporation efficiency. (author)

  4. Excited state electron spin coherence (ESESC) studies of triplet states in molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrasch, M.E.

    1978-02-01

    The field of coherent spectroscopy of two-level systems is applied to the lowest triplet state of organic molecules. By neglecting the triplet sublevel not coupled by the field, it is possible to describe the remaining two levels with Feynman-Vernon-Hellwarth geometrical representation of a general two-level system. The equations of motion of the pseudomagnetization are derived after transformation to the rotating frame, as are Bloch-type equations which include phenomenological relaxation times. The loss of coherence due to exchange between triplet states with different Larmor frequencies but identical zero-field dipolar tensor axes is then discussed. By writing two sets of coupled Bloch equations, expressions for the effective decay rate and frequency shift of the experimentally monitored triplet system are derived and discussed in the limits of slow and rapid exchange. This analysis is applied to intramolecular tunneling between different configurations of cyclopentanone. It is shown by both spin locking and CW spectra that the tunneling rate is considerably slower than the phosphorescence decay rate of the lowest triplet state. Rotary echoes are considered, both on- and off-resonance, with Average Hamiltonian theory. It is shown that relaxation fields perpendicular to the driving field are averaged while those parallel to it are not. The inhomogeneity in the broadening mechanism is completely removed by on-resonance rotary echoes but only partially eliminated by off-resonance rotary echoes. Calculations for off-resonance rotary echo intensities are presented and extended to include triplet sublevel population kinetics and inhomogeneous broadening. Finally, experimental observation of rotary echoes in several 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene systems is reported and compared with the theoretical predictions made.

  5. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin's resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  6. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Eric Scott [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin`s resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  7. The Role of Electronically Excited States and Free Radicals in Ultraviolet-Induced Lens Opacification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    Project Scientist Supervisor ROY L. DEHART Colonel, USAF, MC Commander J& - -" 1 UNCLASS IFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Wh~ en 0.ta...of a noncrystallin protein. It has a molecular weight of 14,400 ± 100 and is found in tears, nasal mucus, milk, saliva , and blood serum and is known...mix- ture of hydrogen atom, hydroxy, and carbon-centered radical adducts to MPO . (The number of hyperfine splitting lines, intensity ratio, and

  8. The contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsky, S.

    1990-01-01

    The photocurrent from anthracene in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2.2- dimethylbutane, cyclohexane, cyclopentane, and tetramethylsilane has been studied as a function of excitation energy from the ionization threshold to the onset of strong solvent absorption. The fluroescence from solutions of hexafluorobenzene in cyclopentane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane and tetramethylsilane irradiated with β-particles has been studied as a function of the hexafluorobenzene concentration from c = 10 -3 -10 -1 M. The data are analyzed to permit extraction of the geminate ion-pair scavenging probability. The absorption of 160 nm light by cyclohexane in mixtures of cyclohexane, benzene and tetraphenylmethylenediamine results in an emission spectrum consisting of the simultaneous fluorescence from all three components. A mechanism for the development of this spectrum and its dependence on benzene concentration is constructed and shown to be quantitatively consistent with the results of independent measurements on the separate components. 55 refs

  9. Excited State Assignment and Laser Action in π-Conjugated Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Z. V.

    1998-03-01

    We have applied a variety of ps transient and cw spectroscopies to elucidate the ground and excited electronic states of luminescent and nonluminescent thin films and solutions of π-conjugated polymers. These techniques include photoinduced absorption (PA), photoluminescence (PL), resonant Raman scattering (RRS), electro-absorption (EA), two photon absorption (TPA), and PA detected magnetic resonance. We found that the luminescence efficiency, the resonant and subgap third-order nonlinear optical properties and the RRS dispersion in these polymers are determined by the energies and symmetries of a subset of the excited states, including a series of singlet excitons with odd (B_u) and even (A_g) parity lying below a continuum band. Among them, the lowest Bu exciton (1B_u) and two other dominant Ag excitons (mAg and kA_g) are particularly important in determining the EA, TPA, and excitonic ps PA spectra.(S.V. Frolov, M. Liess, P.A. Lane, W. Gellermann, Z.V. Vardeny, M. Ozaki, and K. Yoshino, Phys. Rev. Lett). 78, 4285 (1997). We also found(M. Ozaki, E. Ehrenfreund, R.E. Benner, T.J. Baron, K. Yoshino, and Z.V. Vardeny, Phys. Rev. Lett). 79, 1762 (1997). that the RRS phonon dispersion with the laser excitation energy is governed by the dependence of lowest Ag exciton (2A_g) on the chain length distribution in the polymer. This leads to stronger RRS dispersion in nonluminescent polymers. Moreover the relative energies of the 1Bu and 2Ag excitons determine the PL quantum efficiency η, regardless of the ground state degeneracy. If E(2A_g) < E(1B_u) then η is small because of the dipole forbidden character of the lowest singlet. We will give examples of nonluminescent polymers which belong to this class with both degenerate and nondegenerate ground state, respectively. On the other hand, if E(1B_u) < E(2A_g) then η is large and the polymer might be considered as active material for display applications. Again we give examples of highly luminescent polymers with

  10. Direct Observation of Cr3+ 3d States in Ruby: Toward Experimental Mechanistic Evidence of Metal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunault, Myrtille O J Y; Harada, Yoshihisa; Miyawaki, Jun; Wang, Jian; Meijerink, Andries; de Groot, Frank M F; van Schooneveld, Matti M

    2018-04-26

    The role of transition metals in chemical reactions is often derived from probing the metal 3d states. However, the relation between metal site geometry and 3d electronic states, arising from multielectronic effects, makes the spectral data interpretation and modeling of these optical excited states a challenge. Here we show, using the well-known case of red ruby, that unique insights into the density of transition metal 3d excited states can be gained with 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). We compare the experimental determination of the 3d excited states of Cr 3+ impurities in Al 2 O 3 with 190 meV resolution 2p3d RIXS to optical absorption spectroscopy and to simulations. Using the crystal field multiplet theory, we calculate jointly for the first time the Cr 3+ multielectronic states, RIXS, and optical spectra based on a unique set of parameters. We demonstrate that (i) anisotropic 3d multielectronic interactions causes different scaling of Slater integrals, and (ii) a previously not observed doublet excited state exists around 3.35 eV. These results allow to discuss the influence of interferences in the RIXS intermediate state, of core-hole lifetime broadenings, and of selection rules on the RIXS intensities. Finally, our results demonstrate that using an intermediate excitation energy between L 3 and L 2 edges allows measurement of the density of 3d excited states as a fingerprint of the metal local structure. This opens up a new direction to pump-before-destroy investigations of transition metal complex structures and reaction mechanisms.

  11. Electronic properties of antiferromagnetic UBi2 metal by exact exchange for correlated electrons method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ghasemikhah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the electronic properties of antiferromagnetic UBi2 metal by using ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT, employing the augmented plane waves plus local orbital method. We used the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE method to calculate the exchange-correlation energy under a variety of hybrid functionals. Electric field gradients (EFGs at the uranium site in UBi2 compound were calculated and compared with the experiment. The EFGs were predicted experimentally at the U site to be very small in this compound. The EFG calculated by the EECE functional are in agreement with the experiment. The densities of states (DOSs show that 5f U orbital is hybrided with the other orbitals. The plotted Fermi surfaces show that there are two kinds of charges on Fermi surface of this compound.

  12. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    In the field of electron transport in metal films and wires, the 'size effect' refers to the increase in the resistivity of the films and wires as their critical dimensions (thickness of film, width and height of wires) approach or become less than the electron mean free path lambda, which is, for example, 39 nm for bulk copper at room temperature. This size-effect is currently of great concern to the semiconductor industry because the continued downscaling of feature sizes has already lead to Cu interconnect wires in this size effect regime, with a reported 2.5 times higher resistivity for 40 nm wide Cu wires than for bulk Cu. Silver is a possible alternate material for interconnect wires and titanium nitride is proposed as a gate metal in novel field-effect-transistors. Therefore, it is important to develop an understanding of how the growth, the surface morphology, and the microstructure of ultrathin (few nanometers) Cu, Ag and TiN layers affect their electrical properties. This dissertation aims to advance the scientific knowledge of electron scattering at surfaces (external surfaces and grain boundaries), that are, the primary reasons for the size-effect in metal conductors. The effect of surface and grain boundary scattering on the resistivity of Cu thin films and nanowires is separately quantified using (i) in situ transport measurements on single-crystal, atomically smooth Cu(001) layers, (ii) textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers and patterned wires with independently varying grain size, thickness and line width, and (iii) in situ grown interfaces including Cu-Ta, Cu-MgO, Cu-vacuum and Cu-oxygen. In addition, the electron surface scattering is also measured in situ for single-crystal Ag(001), (111) twinned epitaxial Ag(001), and single-crystal TiN(001) layers. Cu(001), Ag(001), and TiN(001) layers with a minimum continuous thickness of 4, 3.5 and 1.8 nm, respectively, are grown by ultra-high vacuum magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates with

  13. Degrees of validity of models for the description of doubly excited states of H{sup -} and He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens (Greece); Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece); Themelis, Spyros I.; Komninos, Yannis [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens (Greece)

    2002-04-28

    There are models for the description of doubly excited states (DES) of H{sup -} and He whose degrees of validity can be tested by comparing their results to those from theory based on the solution of the Schroedinger equation with the full Hamiltonian. Such comparisons are meaningful and definitive when a reasonably wide range of data are available. We present results for the energies and the nature of the wavefunctions of the four lowest {sup 1}P{sup o} DES of H{sup -} and of He for each hydrogenic manifold from N=6 up to 25. These are used to establish the degree and range of validity of the quantum number n{sub 2} introduced by Herrick and Kellman (Herrick D R and Kellman M E 1980 Phys. Rev. A 21 418) in their triatomic model for qualitative description of the spectra of DES, as well as of two classification schemes, as a function of level of excitation and of type of state. According to the model, the number n{sub 2} is equal to the number of nodes of the density {rho}({theta}{sub 12}) of the corresponding DES. We present results of calculations of {rho}({theta}{sub 12}) using correlated wavefunctions for the four lowest states in the N=10 and 25 manifolds. These show for the first time for such highly excited states how the angle opens as excitation increases. Furthermore, they indicate that n{sub 2} provides a valid picture even up to N=25. The first of the two classification schemes examined here is the (K,T) scheme, introduced by Herrick and Sinanoglu (Herrick D R and Sinanoglu O 1975 Phys. Rev. A 11 97). It is shown quantitatively that it deteriorates as N increases and Z decreases. The second scheme is the (F,T) scheme, introduced by Komninos et al (Komninos Y, Themelis S, Chrysos M and Nicolaides C A 1993 Int. J. Quantum Chem. Suppl. 27 399), where F=N-K-1 and N,K are not good numbers anymore. It is shown that it constitutes a consistently better representation, especially as the relative significance of electron correlation increases, as in the high

  14. Radiative decay of 4d94f/sup n+1/ excited states in LaB6 and CeB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.; Nisawa, A.; Tsutsumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    The N/sub 4,5/ emission spectra of LaB 6 and CeB 6 were measured to investigate the radiative decay of the 4d 9 4f/sup n+1/ excited states, where n is the number of 4f electrons in the ground state. These spectra show an intense and broad emission peak above the N/sub 4,5/ threshold in addition to sharp peaks below the threshold. The energy positions of these emission peaks are compared with those of the peaks in the absorption spectra and the existing results of resonant photoemission. The comparison shows that the fine structure below the threshold coincides in energy with the multiplet structures in the absorption spectrum, and that the intense emission peak is located in the energy region where the electron-emission peak due to the direct recombination of the 4f electron with the 4d hole has been observed in resonant photoemission. The peaks observed in the energy region below and above the N/sub 4,5/ threshold are attributed to the radiative decay of the 4d 9 4f/sup n+1/ excited states

  15. Energy level alignment and electron transport through metal/organic contacts. From interfaces to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    A new calculational approach to describing metal/organic interfaces. A valuable step towards a better understanding of molecular electronics. Nominated as an outstanding contribution by the Autonomous University of Madrid. In recent years, ever more electronic devices have started to exploit the advantages of organic semiconductors. The work reported in this thesis focuses on analyzing theoretically the energy level alignment of different metal/organic interfaces, necessary to tailor devices with good performance. Traditional methods based on density functional theory (DFT), are not appropriate for analyzing them because they underestimate the organic energy gap and fail to correctly describe the van der Waals forces. Since the size of these systems prohibits the use of more accurate methods, corrections to those DFT drawbacks are desirable. In this work a combination of a standard DFT calculation with the inclusion of the charging energy (U) of the molecule, calculated from first principles, is presented. Regarding the dispersion forces, incorrect long range interaction is substituted by a van der Waals potential. With these corrections, the C60, benzene, pentacene, TTF and TCNQ/Au(111) interfaces are analyzed, both for single molecules and for a monolayer. The results validate the induced density of interface states model.

  16. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  17. Metal Cluster Models for Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Matrix-Isolation Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Olaf; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2018-02-19

    Metal cluster models are of high relevance for establishing new mechanistic concepts for heterogeneous catalysis. The high reactivity and particular selectivity of metal clusters is caused by the wealth of low-lying electronically excited states that are often thermally populated. Thereby the metal clusters are flexible with regard to their electronic structure and can adjust their states to be appropriate for the reaction with a particular substrate. The matrix isolation technique is ideally suited for studying excited state reactivity. The low matrix temperatures (generally 4-40 K) of the noble gas matrix host guarantee that all clusters are in their electronic ground-state (with only a very few exceptions). Electronically excited states can then be selectively populated and their reactivity probed. Unfortunately, a systematic research in this direction has not been made up to date. The purpose of this review is to provide the grounds for a directed approach to understand cluster reactivity through matrix-isolation studies combined with quantum chemical calculations. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited-state

  19. Static quadrupole moment of the first excited state of 24Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewell, M.P.; Hinds, S.; Kean, D.C.; Zabel, T.H.

    1979-01-01

    The static quadrupole moment Qsub(2+) and the B(E2;0 + → 2 + ) value for the first excited state of 24 Mg have been determined using the reorientation effect in Coulomb excitation. Surface barrier detectors at 90 0 and 172 0 were used to detect 24 Mg ions scattered from 208 Pb. It is found that Qsub(2+) = -18.1 +- 1.3 e.fm 2 , suggesting that, contrary to most previous experimental evidence, the quadrupole moment is in agreement with theoretical predictions. For B(E2;0 + → 2 + ) the value 443 +- 24 e 2 . fm 4 was obtained

  20. Excited-state relaxation of Ag8 clusters embedded in helium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliffe, Paul; Przystawik, Andreas; Diederich, Thomas; Doeppner, Tilo; Tiggesbaeumker, Josef; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz

    2004-01-01

    Neutral silver clusters Ag N are grown in ultracold helium nanodroplets. By exploiting a strong absorption resonance recently found for Ag 8 , first photoelectron spectra of this neutral species are recorded. Variation of the laser photon energy reveals that direct vertical two-photon ionization is hindered by rapid relaxation into the lower edge of a long-living excited state manifold. The analysis of the dynamics gives a precise value of (6.89±0.09) eV for the vertical ionization potential of Ag 8 . The influence of the helium matrix on photoemission is discussed

  1. Excited State Contributions to the Heavy Baryon Fragmentation Functions in a Quark-Diquark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adamov, A D; Goldstein, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Spin dependent fragmentation functions for heavy flavor quarks to fragment into heavy baryons are calculated in a quark-diquark model. The production of intermediate spin 1/2 and 3/2 excited states is explicity included. The resulting $\\Lambda_b$ production rate and polarization at LEP energies are in agreement with experiment. The $\\Lambda_c$ and $\\Xi_c$ functions are also obtained. The spin independent $f_1(z)$ is compared to data. The integrated values for production rates agree with the data.

  2. Excited states in the doubly closed shell nucleus $^{132}_{50}Sn_{82}$

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørnstad, T; Ewan, G T; Jonson, B; Kawade, K; Kérek, A; Mattsson, S; Sistemich, K

    1982-01-01

    New excited states in the nucleus /sup 1/ /sup 32/Sn have been identified from gamma gamma coincidence measurements. Strong beta feeding to a state at 7.210 keV was established. This level is interpreted as a 6^{-} state formed after a\\pig/sup -1//sub 9/2/ to nu g/sup -1//sub 7/2/GT beta ^{-} transition from the 7^{-} ground state of /sup 132/In. The deexcitation of the 7210 keV state passes through a 4351 keV state, providing support for a 3^{-} assignment of this level.

  3. g-Factor measurements on excited states in the N=82 isotones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    A program for the measurement of g-factors for excited states of neutron-rich nuclei at the TRISTAN separator facility is described. Results are given for the 4 1 + states in the N=82 isotones 136 Xe and 138 Ba. Systematics for g-factors for 4 1 + and 6 1 + states in the N=82 isotones are presented and the results are compared with those of a shell-model calculation. The results are well described using effective proton spin and orbital g-factors. 21 references

  4. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstrom, Eric J., E-mail: eric.jon.sundstrom@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing 〈S{sup 2}〉 for the ground and excited states.

  5. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited-state

  6. On the applicability of nearly free electron model for resistivity calculations in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Popielawski, J.

    1982-09-01

    The calculations of resistivity based on the nearly free electron model are presented for many noble and transition liquid metals. The triple ion correlation is included in resistivity formula according to SCQCA approximation. Two different methods for describing the conduction band are used. The problem of applicability of the nearly free electron model for different metals is discussed. (author)

  7. Effects of excited state mixing on transient absorption spectra in dimers Application to photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, L; Trinkunas, G; Müller, M G; Holzwarth, A R

    1999-01-01

    The excited state mixing effect is taken into account considering the difference spectra of dimers. Both the degenerate (homo) dimer as well as the nondegenerate (hetero) dimer are considered. Due to the higher excited state mixing with the two-exciton states in the homodimer, the excited state absorption (or the difference spectrum) can be strongly affected in comparison with the results obtained in the Heitler-London approximation. The difference spectrum of the heterodimer is influenced by two resonance effects (i) mixing of the ground state optical transitions of both monomers in the dimer and (ii) mixing of the excited state absorption of the excited monomer with the ground state optical transition in the nonexcited monomer. These effects have been tested by simulating the difference absorption spectra of the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC II) experimentally obtained with the 60 fs excitation pulses at zero delay times and various excitation wavelengths. The pairs of coupled chlorophylls...

  8. Efficient enhancement of below-threshold harmonic generation by laser-driven excited states of Cs atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiao-Ling; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an efficient method for the enhancement of below-threshold harmonic generation (BTHG) by mid-infrared laser-driven excited states of a Cs atom. The BTHG is calculated by solving three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation accurately and efficiently using the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method. We adopt an excited state as the initial state of a Cs atom. As a result, the BTHG is significantly enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared with the case of the initial ground state. Furthermore, we find that a single vacuum-ultraviolet pulse can be generated by mid-infrared laser-driven excited states by superposing several below-threshold harmonics of a Cs atom. Our finding suggests that the generation of below-threshold harmonics by laser-driven excited states of an atom can provide a powerful methodology for the production of intense vacuum-ultraviolet pulses.

  9. Metal-dielectric interfaces in gigascale electronics thermal and electrical stability

    CERN Document Server

    He, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Metal-dielectric interfaces are ubiquitous in modern electronics. As advanced gigascale electronic devices continue to shrink, the stability of these interfaces is becoming an increasingly important issue that has a profound impact on the operational reliability of these devices. In this book, the authors present the basic science underlying  the thermal and electrical stability of metal-dielectric interfaces and its relationship to the operation of advanced interconnect systems in gigascale electronics. Interface phenomena, including chemical reactions between metals and dielectrics, metallic-atom diffusion, and ion drift, are discussed based on fundamental physical and chemical principles. Schematic diagrams are provided throughout the book to illustrate  interface phenomena and the principles that govern them. Metal-Dielectric Interfaces in Gigascale Electronics  provides a unifying approach to the diverse and sometimes contradictory test results that are reported in the literature on metal-dielectric i...

  10. Excited-State Dynamics of the Thiopurine Prodrug 6-Thioguanine: Can N9-Glycosylation Affect Its Phototoxic Activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan Ashwood; Steffen Jockusch; Carlos E. Crespo-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    6-Thioguanine, an immunosuppressant and anticancer prodrug, has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell death following exposure to UVA radiation. Its metabolite, 6-thioguanosine, plays a major role in the prodrug’s overall photoreactivity. However, 6-thioguanine itself has proven to be cytotoxic following UVA irradiation, warranting further investigation into its excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, the excited-state dynamics and photochemical properties of 6-thioguanine are studie...

  11. The role of substrate electrons in the wetting of a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, Klas Jerker

    2010-01-01

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution...... of charge that enables surface wetting. On open d-shell Pt(111), the ligand field of water alters the distribution of metal d-electrons to reduce the repulsion. The closed-shell Cu d(10) configuration of isostructural Cu(111), however, does not afford this mechanism, resulting in a hydrophobic surface...

  12. Relationship between the electronic structure and the glide in the hexagonal close packed metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, B.; Le Hazif, R.

    1983-06-01

    In all hexagonal close-packed metals (HCP), deformation is performed by slip on a mean glide system (MGS) and on several secondary systems. There are no reliable predictions of the MGS choice. In this paper is shown the role played by the electronic structure on the choice of glide system in HCP metals. MGS is basal for all normal metals and is a function of the electron number in HCP transition metals. The different SFE's were calculated using appropriate total energy models, for different metals. Thus pseudopotentials were used (or empirical pair potentials) for normal metals, and a tight-binding model for transition metals. The most important results are the following: prismatic SFE (PSFE) is smaller than basal SFE (BSFE) for Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, Ru and Os; BSFE is smaller than PSFE for Co and all normal metals; BSFE and PSFe and about the same for RE and Tc

  13. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  14. Excited state proton transfer in 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in water and in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Charles A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-26

    The 9-aminoacridine molecule is important in several different fields of chemistry. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this compound are pH sensitive and it is this property that allowed it to be used as a pH probe in different chemical environments. The compound exhibits proton transfer reactions which are among the most fundamental of chemical reactions. The planarity of 9-aminoacridine allows it to intercalate into DNA. Intercalation is a process in which the aromatic flat surface of the intercalator inserts between adjacent base pairs of DNA. The large surface area of 9-aminoacridine`s fused tricyclic ring system allows strong intercalative binding through van der Waals attractions. 9-aminoacridine and many of its derivatives have been tried as possible antitumor drugs. The cytotoxicity of an antitumor agent can be dramatically increased through the addition of one or two cationic side chains. This increase in cytotoxicity using the 9-aminoacridine compound as a parent molecule has been investigated through various derivatives with cationic side chains consisting of different number of carbon atoms between the proximal and distal N atoms. Similar derivatives varied the position of the carboxamide side chain on the aromatic ring system. The objective of this work is to first create a baseline study of the excited state kinetics of the 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in the absence of DNA. The baseline study will allow the excited state kinetics of these antitumor drugs when placed in DNA to be more fully understood.

  15. A MCSCF method for ground and excited states based on full optimizations of successive Jacobi rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2003-07-30

    A new multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method based on successive optimizations of Jacobi rotation angles is presented. For given one- and two-particle density matrices and an initial set of corresponding integrals, a technique is developed for the determination of a Jacobi angle for the mixing of two orbitals, such that the exact energy, written as a function of the angle, is fully minimized. Determination of the energy-minimizing orbitals for given density matrices is accomplished by successive optimization and updating of Jacobi angles and integrals. The total MCSCF energy is minimized by alternating between CI and orbital optimization steps. Efficiency is realized by optimizing CI and orbital vectors quasi-simultaneously by not fully optimizing each in each improvement step. On the basis of the Jacobi-rotation based approach, a novel MCSCF procedure is formulated for excited states, which avoids certain shortcomings of traditional excited-state MCSCF methods. Applications to specific systems show the practicability of the developed methods.

  16. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles

  17. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  18. Pulsed laser study of excited states of aromatic molecules absorbed in globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.; Thomas, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Pyrene and several derivatives of pyrene such as pyrene sulfonic acid, and pyrene butyric acid were incorporated into bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. The pyrene chromophore was subsequently excited by a pulse of uv light (lambda = 3471 A) from a Q switched frequency doubled ruby laser. The lifetime of the pyrene excited singlet and triplet states were monitored by time resolved spectrophotometry. Various molecules, such as O 2 and I - , dissolved in the aqueous phase, diffused into the protein and quenched pyrene excited states. The rates of these reactions were followed under a variety of conditions such as pH and temperature and in the presence of inert additives. The rates of pyrene excited-state quenching were often considerably smaller than the rates observed in simple solutions. A comparison of the rates in the protein and homogeneous solutions gives information on the factors such as temperature, charge, and pH that control the movement of small molecules in and into BSA

  19. High-precision measurements and theoretical calculations of indium excited-state polarizabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, N. B.; Wang, B.-Y.; Rupasinghe, P. M.; Maser, D. L.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Majumder, P. K.

    2018-02-01

    We report measurements of the scalar and tensor static polarizabilities of the 115In7 p1 /2 and 7 p3 /2 excited states using two-step diode laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. These scalar polarizabilities are one to two orders of magnitude larger than for lower-lying indium states due to the close proximity of the 7 p and 6 d states. For the scalar polarizabilities, we find values (in atomic units) of 1.811 (4 ) ×105a03 and 2.876 (6 ) ×105a03 for the 7 p1 /2 and 7 p3 /2 states, respectively. We determine the tensor polarizability component of the 7 p3 /2 state to be -1.43 (18 ) ×104a03 . These measurements set high-precision benchmarks of the transition properties for highly excited states in trivalent atomic systems. We also present ab initio calculations of these quantities and other In polarizabilities using two high-precision relativistic methods to make a global comparison of the accuracies of the two approaches. The precision of the experiment is sufficient to differentiate between the two theoretical methods as well as to allow precise determination of the indium 7 p -6 d matrix elements. The results obtained in this paper are applicable to other heavier and more complicated systems, and provide much needed guidance for the development of even more precise theoretical approaches.

  20. Ground- and excited-state structural orientation of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzazoles in cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, E.L.; Dey, J.; Warner, I.M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-12-12

    The effects of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}-, and 2,6-di-O-methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrins (CDs) on the ground- and excited-state properties of 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole, 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, and 2-(2`-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole in aqueous media are investigated. Steady-state fluorescence measurements are used to characterize the interaction of CDs with these azoles. Absorbance measurements indicate increased solubility of the azoles in aqueous solutions of CDs. Measurements of acidity constants (pK{sub a}) and data from induced circular dichroism indicate increased ground- and excited-state acidities of the phenolic protons of the molecules in the presence of CDs and axial orientation of the molecules within the CD cavity, respectively. The data further suggest a planar structure for HBO and a twisted confirmation for both HBT and HBI. The association constants of the inclusion complexes have also been estimated. These studies are further supplemented by comparative spectroscopic studies of 2-(2`-methoxyphenyl)benzothiazole in aqueous solutions of CDs. On the basis of the spectral data acquired, it is believed that the HBA molecules exist as zwitterionic tautomers in the presence of CDs. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Debarati; Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Maity, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ max depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  2. Excited-State Dynamics in Folic Acid and 6-CARBOXYPTERIN upon Uva Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huijuan; Vogt, R. Aaron; Crespo-Hernandez, Carlos E.

    2013-06-01

    The excited-state dynamics of folic acid (FA) and 6-carboxypterin (6CP) are poorly understood and work is needed to uncover the relaxation pathways that ultimately lead to their oxidative damage of DNA. In our approach, broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the evolution of the excited states in FA and 6CP in basic aqueous solution upon excitation at 350 nm. In addition, quantum-chemical calculations were performed to assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and in the postulation of kinetic mechanisms. The combined experimental and computational results support a kinetic model where excitation of FA results in ultrafast charge separation (τ = 0.6 ps), which decays back to the ground state primarily by charge recombination with a lifetime of 2.2 ps. A small fraction of the charge transfer state undergoes intersystem crossing to populate the lowest-energy triplet state with a lifetime of 200 ps. On the other hand, a large fraction of the initially excited singlet state in 6CP decays by fluorescence emission with a lifetime of 100 ps, while intersystem crossing to the triplet state occurs with a lifetime of 4.4 ns. The potential implications of these results to the oxidative damage of DNA by FA and 6CP will be discussed. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged (CHE-1255084).

  3. Cotunneling spectroscopy and the properties of excited-state spin manifolds of Mn12 single molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamzadeh Renani, Fatemeh; Kirczenow, George

    2014-10-01

    We study charge transport through single molecule magnet (SMM) junctions in the cotunneling regime as a tool for investigating the properties of the excited-state manifolds of neutral Mn12 SMs. This study is motivated by a recent transport experiment [S. Kahle et al., Nano Lett. 12, 518 (2012), 10.1021/nl204141z] that probed the details of the magnetic and electronic structure of Mn12 SMMs beyond the ground-state spin manifold. A giant spin Hamiltonian and master equation approach is used to explore theoretically the cotunneling transport through Mn12-Ac SMM junctions. We identify SMM transitions that can account for both the strong and weak features of the experimental differential conductance spectra. We find the experimental results to imply that the excited spin-state manifolds of the neutral SMM have either different anisotropy constants or different g factors in comparison with its ground-state manifold. However, the latter scenario accounts best for the experimental data.

  4. Electronic computer prediction of properties of binary refractory transition metal compounds on the base of their simplificated electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutolin, S.A.; Kotyukov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain calculation equations of macroscopic physico-chemical properties of transition metal refractory compounds (density, melting temperature, Debye characteristic temperature, microhardness, standard formation enthalpy, thermo-emf) using the method of the regression analysis. Apart from the compound composition the argument of the regression equation is the distribution of electron bands of d-transition metals, created by the energy electron distribution in the simplified zone structure of transition metals and approximated by Chebishev polynoms, by the position of Fermi energy on the map of distribution of electron band energy depending upon the value of quasi-impulse, multiple to the first, second and third Brillouin zone for transition metals. The maximum relative error of the regressions obtained as compared with the literary data is 15-20 rel.%

  5. Lowest excited states and optical absorption spectra of donor–acceptor copolymers for organic photovoltaics: a new picture emerging from tuned long-range corrected density functionals

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman

    2012-01-01

    Polymers with low optical gaps are of importance to the organic photovoltaics community due to their potential for harnessing a large portion of the solar energy spectrum. The combination along their backbones of electron-rich and electron-deficient fragments contributes to the presence of low-lying excited states that are expected to display significant charge-transfer character. While conventional hybrid functionals are known to provide unsatisfactory results for charge-transfer excitations at the time-dependent DFT level, long-range corrected (LRC) functionals have been reported to give improved descriptions in a number of systems. Here, we use such LRC functionals, considering both tuned and default range-separation parameters, to characterize the absorption spectra of low-optical-gap systems of interest. Our results indicate that tuned LRC functionals lead to simulated optical-absorption properties in good agreement with experimental data. Importantly, the lowest-lying excited states (excitons) are shown to present a much more localized nature than initially anticipated. © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  6. Dynamic screening and electron dynamics in low-dimensional metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkin, V.M.; Quijada, M.; Vergniory, M.G.; Alducin, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Chulkov, E.V.; Echenique, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical description of dynamic screening and electron dynamics in metallic media are reviewed. The time-dependent building-up of screening in different situations is addressed. Perturbative and non-perturbative theories are used to study electron dynamics in low-dimensional systems, such as metal clusters, image states, surface states and quantum wells. Modification of the electronic lifetimes due to confinement effects is analyzed as well

  7. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  8. Possible electronic entropy-driven mechanism for non-thermal ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuta; Tsuneyuki, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    The physical mechanism of metal ablation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation was investigated in this study. Calculations based on finite-temperature density functional theory indicate that condensed copper becomes unstable at high electron temperatures due to an electronic entropy effect. Based on these results, an electronic entropy-driven mechanism is proposed to explain the metal ablation. Furthermore, a mathematical model is developed to simulate the ablation depth, where the effect of the electronic entropy is included. This mathematical model can quantitatively describe the experimental data in the low-laser-fluence region, where the electronic entropy effect is determined to be especially important.

  9. Electronic structure of disordered transition metals within scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakyibchuk, P.M.; Volkov, O.V.; Vakarchuk, S.O.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a new approach to the calculation of density of states of disordered transition metals based on the T-matrix framework presented by Lloyd within generalized Ziman's theory of transport properties and energy structure of disordered metals. This approach makes it possible to avoid such difficulties of familiar calculations as renormalized perturbation theory. We have achieved double hill energy resonance for transition metals at Fe and Co groups caused by hybridization potential. So the results are in good correlation with model presentation of energy structure of these metals conduction band for explaining magnetic and transport properties

  10. Electron microscopic X-ray microanalysis of metals deposited in oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, T; Eto, H; Miyazawa, S

    1992-08-01

    A 35-year-old woman exhibited bluish-brown discoloration of her buccal mucosa suggesting malignant melanoma. Histopathological examination revealed that the pigment was not melanin but caused by metal deposits. Electron microscopically, metallic particles were located on the lamina densa of basal laminae at mucosal epithelium, nerve fibers, and blood vessels and on the microfilaments of elastic fibers as well as in macrophages and fibroblasts. Electron microscopic point X-ray microanalysis revealed that these metallic particles were composed of Ag, Se, Fe, Co, Cu, and S. Analysis suggests that these metals were derived from dental amalgam and that the discoloration was caused by amalgam tattoo.

  11. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems.

  12. Accelerated electron exchange between U4+ and UO22+ by foreign metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obanawa, Heiichiro; Onitsuka, Hatsuki; Takeda, Kunihiko

    1990-01-01

    The rate constant of U 4+ -UO 2 2+ electron exchange (k et ) was increased by more than 100 times in the presence of various metal ions. The larger rate constant was observed for the smaller difference of the standard reduction potential strength between metal ion and UO 2 2+ ion (Δμ θ e ). Detailed investigation of the electron exchange reaction in the presence of Mo 5+ suggested that the mechanism of the electron transfer reaction catalyzed by metal ions is the outer-sphere type independent of U-Clcomplex ions. (author)

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2011-01-04

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO(2), TiO(2), and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO(2)) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO(2)). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency.

  14. Pseudoclassical approach to electron and ion density correlations in simple liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vericat, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Pastore, G.

    1986-04-01

    Electron-electron and electron-ion structural correlations in simple liquid metals are treated by using effective pair potentials to incorporate quantal effects into a pseudoclassical description of the electron fluid. An effective pair potential between simultaneous electron density fluctuations is first constructed from known properties of the degenerate jellium model, which are the plasmon sum rule, the Kimball-Niklasson relation and Yasuhara's values of the electron pair distribution function at contact. An analytic expression is thereby obtained in the Debye-Hueckel approximation for the electronic structure factor in jellium over a range of density appropriate to metals, with results which compare favourably with those of fully quantal evaluations. A simple pseudoclassical model is then set up for a liquid metal: this involves a model of charged hard spheres for the ion-ion potential and an empty core model for the electron-ion potential, the Coulombic tails being scaled as required by the relation between the long-wavelength partial structure factors and the isothermal compressibility of the metal. The model is solved analytically by a pseudoclassical linear response treatment of the electron-ion coupling and numerical results are reported for partial structure factors in liquid sodium and liquid beryllium. Contact is made for the latter system with data on the electron-electron structure factor in the crystal from inelastic X-ray scattering experiments of Eisenberger, Marra and Brown. (author)

  15. Properties of α -decay to ground and excited states of heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Z.; Gu, J. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.

    2010-05-01

    Branching ratios and half-lives of α -decay to the ground-state rotational bands as well as the high-lying excited states of even-even nuclei have been calculated in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and Royer’s formula that we improved very recently. The calculation covers the isotopic chains from Ra to No in the mass regions 222 ≤ A ≤ 252 and 88 ≤ Z ≤ 102 . The agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data indicates the reliability of investigating the properties of the unfavored α -decay with our method, especially the improved Royer’s formula, which is very valuable for the analysis of experimental data. In addition, the dependence of half-lives on excitation energies of daughter nuclei has been investigated. It is shown that the influence on half-lives becomes stronger and stronger with the increase of the excitation energies.

  16. Calculating Derivative Couplings between Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock Excited States with Pseudo-Wavefunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguire, Ethan C; Ou, Qi; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-06-18

    A pseudo-wavefunction description of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) states is proposed and used to develop an analytic expression for derivative couplings between TDHF excited states based on the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The resulting expression includes Pulay terms associated with using an atom-centered basis as well as a correction to ensure translational invariance. We demonstrate that our formalism recovers the well-known Chernyak-Mukamel expression near a crossing and in the limit of a complete basis, and thus our approach is consistent with time-dependent response theory. In a companion paper (DOI 10.1021/jp5057682 ), we investigate these derivative couplings near conical intersections and show that they behave correctly.

  17. Photostability of a fluorescent marker under pulsed excited-state depletion through stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W

    2003-09-01

    Saturated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) of a fluorescent marker has been shown to break the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy and to facilitate spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. Here we investigate the photostability of a fluorophore that, in this concept, is repeatedly excited and depleted by synchronized laser pulses. Our study of bacteria labeled with RH-414, a membrane marker, reveals that increasing the duration of the STED pulse from approximately 10 to 160 ps fundamentally improves the photostability of the dye. At the same time the STED efficiency is maintained. The observed photobleaching of RH-414 is due primarily to multiphoton absorption from its ground state. One can counteract photobleaching by employing STED pulses that range from 150 ps to approximately half of the lifetime of the excited state. The results also have implications for multiphoton excitation microscopy.

  18. Nucleon, Δ and Ω excited state spectra in Nf=2+1 lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulava, J.; Edwards, R.G.; Joo, B.; Richards, D.G.; Engelson, E.; Wallace, S.J.; Lin, H.W.; Morningstar, C.

    2010-04-01

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, Δ and Ω and are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses m π =392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we nd reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. The need to include operators that couple to the expected multi-hadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified. (orig.)

  19. Contribution to the experimental study of excited states of 58,60,62,64Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzit, Pierre

    1971-01-01

    In its experimental part, this research thesis addresses the use of nuclear spectrometry to study electromagnetic properties of excited states of 58,60,62,64 Ni by using coincidence measurements of particles scattered by the nucleus, and of γ lines emitted by the nucleus in reaction. The author also computed energies, wave functions and transition probabilities of levels related to the quasi-particle model according the RPA (random phase approximation) approximation. After a description of the experimental device and a presentation of data reduction methods, the author reports the experimental results. Then, after a recall of theoretical models and calculation approximations, the author discusses the calculated results obtained within the framework of the layer model, and presents those obtained by using the quasi-particle model with the RPA approximation. By using experimental results, a level classification is proposed. The importance of the core configuration and of the proton-neutron interaction is highlighted

  20. Spectroscopy at the two-proton drip line: Excited states in 158W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Joss

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Excited states have been identified in the heaviest known even-Z N=84 isotone 158W, which lies in a region of one-proton emitters and the two-proton drip line. The observation of γ-ray transitions feeding the ground state establishes the excitation energy of the yrast 6+ state confirming the spin-gap nature of the α-decaying 8+ isomer. The 8+ isomer is also expected to be unbound to two-proton emission but no evidence for this decay mode was observed. An upper limit for the two-proton decay branch has been deduced as b2p≤ 0.17% at the 90% confidence level. The possibility of observing two-proton emission from multiparticle isomers in nearby nuclides is considered.

  1. Study of mass=28 isobaric nuclei. 28Si and 28P excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, Christiane.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the electromagnetic decay of the excited states of 28 Si and 28 P was done using the reactions 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si, 24 Mg(α,γ) 28 Si, 25 Mg(α,nγ) 28 Si, 26 Mg(tau,nγ) 28 Si, 27 Al(d,nγ) 28 Si and 28 Si(p,n) 28 P. Special interest was devoted to negative parity level structure and the T=1 states of 28 Si. The location and γ-decay of 28 P levels led to several isospin triplets identification and yields a measurement of Coulomb deplacement energy in the nuclei A=28 [fr

  2. Spectroscopy at the two-proton drip line: Excited states in 158W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joss, D. T.; Page, R. D.; Herzán, A.; Donosa, L.; Uusitalo, J.; Carroll, R. J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hadinia, B.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppanen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.

    2017-09-01

    Excited states have been identified in the heaviest known even-Z N = 84 isotone 158W, which lies in a region of one-proton emitters and the two-proton drip line. The observation of γ-ray transitions feeding the ground state establishes the excitation energy of the yrast 6+ state confirming the spin-gap nature of the α-decaying 8+ isomer. The 8+ isomer is also expected to be unbound to two-proton emission but no evidence for this decay mode was observed. An upper limit for the two-proton decay branch has been deduced as b2p ≤ 0.17% at the 90% confidence level. The possibility of observing two-proton emission from multiparticle isomers in nearby nuclides is considered.

  3. Evidence from n=2 fine structure transitions for the production of fast excited state positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, R.; Niebling, K.D.; Schwarz, R.; Werth, G.

    1990-01-01

    Fine structure transitions in the first excited state of positronium (Ps) have been measured using 'Backscatter Ps' production on a Mo surface by observation of a change in the emitted Lyman-α intensity under resonant microwave irradiation. Production, fine structure transitions and Lyman-α decay of the Ps atoms took place inside a waveguide designed to transmit the microwave frequencies of 8.6, 13.0 and 18.5 GHz for the transitions from the 2 3 S 1 state to the 2 3 P J , J=2, 1, 0, states, respectively. In the presence of a magnetic field, all transitions observed show a shift to higher frequencies, compared with earlier calculations and measurements in zero magnetic field. The deviations exceed the expected Zeeman shift significantly but may be explained by assuming a motional Stark effect for Ps with kinetic energies of several eV. (author)

  4. Temporal mapping of photochemical reactions and molecular excited states with carbon specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Murahari, P; Yokoyama, K; Lord, J S; Pratt, F L; He, J; Schulz, L; Willis, M; Anthony, J E; Morley, N A; Nuccio, L; Misquitta, A; Dunstan, D J; Shimomura, K; Watanabe, I; Zhang, S; Heathcote, P; Drew, A J

    2017-04-01

    Photochemical reactions are essential to a large number of important industrial and biological processes. A method for monitoring photochemical reaction kinetics and the dynamics of molecular excitations with spatial resolution within the active molecule would allow a rigorous exploration of the pathway and mechanism of photophysical and photochemical processes. Here we demonstrate that laser-excited muon pump-probe spin spectroscopy (photo-μSR) can temporally and spatially map these processes with a spatial resolution at the single-carbon level in a molecule with a pentacene backbone. The observed time-dependent light-induced changes of an avoided level crossing resonance demonstrate that the photochemical reactivity of a specific carbon atom is modified as a result of the presence of the excited state wavefunction. This demonstrates the sensitivity and potential of this technique in probing molecular excitations and photochemistry.

  5. Probing ground and low-lying excited states for HIO{sub 2} isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Gabriel L. C. de [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, Mato Grosso 78060-900 (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Itacoatiara, Amazonas 69100-000 (Brazil); Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Brown, Alex, E-mail: alex.brown@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2014-12-21

    We present a computational study on HIO{sub 2} molecules. Ground state properties such as equilibrium structures, relative energetics, vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were obtained for all the isomers at the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVTZ-PP basis set and ECP-28-PP effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The HOIO structure is confirmed as the lowest energy isomer. The relative energies are shown to be HOIO < HOOI < HI(O)O. The HO(O)I isomer is only stable at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory. The transition states determined show interconversion of the isomers is possible. In order to facilitate future experimental identification, vibrational frequencies are also determined for all corresponding deuterated species. Vertical excitation energies for the three lowest-lying singlet and triplet excited states were determined using the configuration interaction singles, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)/B3LYP, TD-DFT/G96PW91, and equation of motion-CCSD approaches with the LANL2DZ basis set plus effective core potential for iodine and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set for hydrogen and oxygen atoms. It is shown that HOIO and HOOI isomers have excited states accessible at solar wavelengths (<4.0 eV) but these states have very small oscillator strengths (<2 × 10{sup −3})

  6. Prototropic studies in vitreous and in solid phases: Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fátima Aparecida das Chagas [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rezende, Eduardo Triboni [Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Filho, Décio Briotto [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brito Rezende, Daisy de [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gome, Ligia Ferreira [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Mauro Francisco Pinheiro da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); and others

    2014-02-15

    Excited state proton transfer processes in vitreous glasses and in solid mixtures are investigated by steady state fluorimetry and laser flash photolysis kinetic studies with the photoacids pyranine and 2-naphthol. Glasses were derived from TEOS by the sol–gel condensation process and hydrated solid mixtures from NaCl or KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} crystals. The extent of the water content necessary for the reaction is determined. Shrinkage of TEOS derived monoliths from water loss leads to an increase in proton transfer extent due to the increase in local concentrations of accepting and donor buffer species, but the concomitant increase in the ionic strength actuates in an opposite direction. Furthermore, water losses by aging of air-exposed gel goes to a critical 20% weight fraction, beyond it proton transfer reactions are hindered. Similar studies with solid NaCl or solid phosphate buffer mixtures demonstrated the same critical water level indicating that free water molecules are crucial for the proton to escape from the original cage where the geminate ion pair [–||RO{sup −⁎}H{sup +}||–] is formed and can undergo coupled proton transfer reactions. -- Highlights: • Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer in SiO{sub 2} gel, solid phosphate buffer and NaCl. • Sol–gel formation leads to contraction and concentration of donor and accepting species. • 20% weight fraction water is required for the ESPT to go forward.

  7. Excited-state annihilation reduces power dependence of single-molecule FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettels, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Maillot, Sacha; Gueye, Moussa; Barth, Anders; Hirschfeld, Verena; Hübner, Christian G; Léonard, Jérémie; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-12-28

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are an important method for probing biomolecular structure and dynamics. The results from such experiments appear to be surprisingly independent of the excitation power used, in contradiction to the simple photophysical mechanism usually invoked for FRET. Here we show that excited-state annihilation processes are an essential cause of this behavior. Singlet-singlet annihilation (SSA) is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching induced by Förster-type energy transfer between two fluorophores while they are both in their first excited singlet states (S1S1), which is usually neglected in the interpretation of FRET experiments. However, this approximation is only justified in the limit of low excitation rates. We demonstrate that SSA is evident in fluorescence correlation measurements for the commonly used FRET pair Alexa 488/Alexa 594, with a rate comparable to the rate of energy transfer between the donor excited state and the acceptor ground state (S1S0) that is exploited in FRET experiments. Transient absorption spectroscopy shows that SSA occurs exclusively via energy transfer from Alexa 488 to Alexa 594. Excitation-power dependent microsecond correlation experiments support the conclusion based on previously reported absorption spectra of triplet states that singlet-triplet annihilation (STA) analogously mediates energy transfer if the acceptor is in the triplet state. The results indicate that both SSA and STA have a pronounced effect on the overall FRET process and reduce the power dependence of the observed FRET efficiencies. The existence of annihilation processes thus seems to be essential for using FRET as a reliable spectroscopic ruler at the high excitation rates commonly employed in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  8. Recent Advancements in Liquid Metal Flexible Printed Electronics: Properties, Technologies, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview on typical properties, technologies, and applications of liquid metal based flexible printed electronics. The core manufacturing material—room-temperature liquid metal, currently mainly represented by gallium and its alloys with the properties of excellent resistivity, enormous bendability, low adhesion, and large surface tension, was focused on in particular. In addition, a series of recently developed printing technologies spanning from personal electronic circuit printing (direct painting or writing, mechanical system printing, mask layer based printing, high-resolution nanoimprinting, etc. to 3D room temperature liquid metal printing is comprehensively reviewed. Applications of these planar or three-dimensional printing technologies and the related liquid metal alloy inks in making flexible electronics, such as electronical components, health care sensors, and other functional devices were discussed. The significantly different adhesions of liquid metal inks on various substrates under different oxidation degrees, weakness of circuits, difficulty of fabricating high-accuracy devices, and low rate of good product—all of which are challenges faced by current liquid metal flexible printed electronics—are discussed. Prospects for liquid metal flexible printed electronics to develop ending user electronics and more extensive applications in the future are given.

  9. Excited States of Xanthene Analogues: Photofragmentation and Calculations by CC2 and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Alexander Jan; Titov, Evgenii; Daly, Steven; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Megow, Jörg; Saalfrank, Peter; Choi, Chang Min; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-10-05

    Action spectroscopy has emerged as an analytical tool to probe excited states in the gas phase. Although comparison of gas-phase absorption properties with quantum-chemical calculations is, in principle, straightforward, popular methods often fail to describe many molecules of interest-such as xanthene analogues. We, therefore, face their nano- and picosecond laser-induced photofragmentation with excited-state computations by using the CC2 method and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Whereas the extracted absorption maxima agree with CC2 predictions, the TDDFT excitation energies are blueshifted. Lowering the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange in the DFT functional can reduce this shift but at the cost of changing the nature of the excited state. Additional bandwidth observed in the photofragmentation spectra is rationalized in terms of multiphoton processes. Observed fragmentation from higher-lying excited states conforms to intense excited-to-excited state transitions calculated with CC2. The CC2 method is thus suitable for the comparison with photofragmentation in xanthene analogues. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Paddle-Wheel BODIPY-Triphenylene Conjugates - Participation of Redox- Active Hexaoxatriphenylene in Excited State Charge Separation to Yield High-Energy Charge Separated States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Robert; Seetharaman, Sairaman; Babin, Eric M; Karr, Paul A; D'Souza, Francis

    2018-03-27

    Hexaoxatriphenylene, a scaffold linker often utilized in building covalent organic frameworks, is shown to be electroactive and a useful entity to build light energy harvesting donor-acceptor systems. To demonstrate this, new donor-acceptor conjugates have been synthesized by employ-ing BODIPY as a sensitizer. Excited state electron transfer leading to high energy charge sepa-rated states, useful to drive energy demanding photocatalytic reactions, from the electron rich hexa oxa triphenylene to 1BODIPY*, in the synthesized tri BODIPY-triphenylene 'paddle-wheel' conjugates, has been successfully demonstrated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The measured rate of charge separation was in the range of ~3-10 x 1011 s-1 reveal-ing ultrafast charge separation.

  11. Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons in an optical near field on a metal microslit

    OpenAIRE

    R., Ishikawa; Jongsuck, Bae; K., Mizuno

    2001-01-01

    Energy modulation of nonrelativistic electrons with a laser beam using a metal microslit as an interaction circuit has been investigated. An optical near field is induced in the proximity of the microslit by illumination of the laser beam. The electrons passing close to the slit are accelerated or decelerated by an evanescent wave contained in the near field whose phase velocity is equal to the velocity of the electrons. The electron-evanescent wave interaction in the microslit has been analy...

  12. Metal-tolerant thermophiles: metals as electron donors and acceptors, toxicity, tolerance and industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranawat, Preeti; Rawat, Seema

    2018-02-01

    Metal-tolerant thermophiles are inhabitants of a wide range of extreme habitats like solfatara fields, hot springs, mud holes, hydrothermal vents oozing out from metal-rich ores, hypersaline pools and soil crusts enriched with metals and other elements. The ability to withstand adverse environmental conditions, like high temperature, high metal concentration and sometimes high pH in their niche, makes them an interesting subject for understanding mechanisms behind their ability to deal with multiple duress simultaneously. Metals are essential for biological systems, as they participate in biochemistries that cannot be achieved only by organic molecules. However, the excess concentration of metals can disrupt natural biogeochemical processes and can impose toxicity. Thermophiles counteract metal toxicity via their unique cell wall, metabolic factors and enzymes that carry out metal-based redox transformations, metal sequestration by metallothioneins and metallochaperones as well as metal efflux. Thermophilic metal resistance is heterogeneous at both genetic and physiology levels and may be chromosomally, plasmid or transposon encoded with one or more genes being involved. These effective response mechanisms either individually or synergistically make proliferation of thermophiles in metal-rich habitats possibly. This article presents the state of the art and future perspectives of responses of thermophiles to metals at genetic as well as physiological levels.

  13. Manipulating Light with Transition Metal Clusters, Organic Dyes, and Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogut, Serdar [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The primary goals of our research program is to develop and apply state-of-the-art first-principles methods to predict electronic and optical properties of three systems of significant scientific and technological interest: transition metal clusters, organic dyes, and metal-organic frameworks. These systems offer great opportunities to manipulate light for a wide ranging list of energy-related scientific problems and applications. During this grant period, we focused our investigations on the development, implementation, and benchmarking of many-body Green’s function methods (GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation) to examine excited-state properties of transition metal/transition-metal-oxide clusters and organic molecules that comprise the building blocks of dyes and metal-organic frameworks.

  14. Electronic excitations in metallic systems: from defect annihilation to track formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets irradiated with GeV heavy ions. The main result of these investigations is that high electronic excitations lead to various and sometimes conflicting effects according to the nature of the target: - partial annealing of the defects induced by elastic collisions, - creation of additional disorder, - phase transformation (tracks formation and amorphization), - anisotropic growth. These different effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets are probably manifestations at various degrees of the same basic energy transfer process between the excited electrons and the target atoms. Up to now no theoretical model explains these effects. 24 refs

  15. Electronic structure of the 3d metals. An investigation by L-shell-photoionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, T.S.

    2007-12-03

    The 3d transition metal elements from Sc to Cu have been investigated by both photo electron emission and photo absorption. Experimental spectra in the 2p energy range are discussed based on atomic multiplet models and Hartree- Fock calculations. The samples have been evaporated from an electron bombardment crucible and excited/ionized by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Fundamental effects and the main interactions which govern the electronic structure of the 3d metal atoms are covered. Common spectral features and trends in the series are discussed as well as the importance of many body electron correlation effects. (orig.)

  16. SEM evaluation of metallization on semiconductors. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh, D. L.; Adolphsen, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test method for the evaluation of metallization on semiconductors is presented and discussed. The method has been prepared in MIL-STD format for submittal as a proposed addition to MIL-STD-883. It is applicable to discrete devices and to integrated circuits and specifically addresses batch-process oriented defects. Quantitative accept/reject criteria are given for contact windows, other oxide steps, and general interconnecting metallization. Figures are provided that illustrate typical types of defects. Apparatus specifications, sampling plans, and specimen preparation and examination requirements are described. Procedures for glassivated devices and for multi-metal interconnection systems are included.

  17. Reconfigurable electronics using conducting metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Talin, Albert Alec; Leonard, Francois; Stavila, Vitalie

    2017-07-18

    A device including a porous metal organic framework (MOF) disposed between two terminals, the device including a first state wherein the MOF is infiltrated by a guest species to form an electrical path between the terminals and a second state wherein the electrical conductivity of the MOF is less than the electrical conductivity in the first state. A method including switching a porous metal organic framework (MOF) between two terminals from a first state wherein a metal site in the MOF is infiltrated by a guest species that is capable of charge transfer to a second state wherein the MOF is less electrically conductive than in the first state.

  18. Development of high current electron source using photoemission from metals with ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Fischer, J.

    1990-10-01

    We summarize the studies of photoemission from metal photocathodes using picosecond pulses in the UV (4.66 eV) wavelength and femtosecond laser pulses in the visible (2 eV) wavelengths. To achieve high current density yield from metal photocathodes, multiphoton photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses are suggested. Electron yield improvement incorporating surface photoemission and surface plasmon resonance in metals and metal films are demonstrated. We examine the possibility of the nonlinear photoemission process overtaking the linear process, and identity some possible complexity. To extract the large amount of electrons free of space charge, a pulsed high voltage is designed; the results of the preliminary test are presented. Finally, for the first time, the width of the electron temporal profiles are measured, utilizing the nonlinear photoelectric effect, to below 100 fsec time regime. The results indicated that the electron pulse duration follows the laser pulses and are not limited by the material. 8 refs., 15 figs

  19. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  20. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  1. Hot-electron-based solar energy conversion with metal-semiconductor nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Changhwan; Hwang, Euyheon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Energy dissipation at metal surfaces or interfaces between a metal and a dielectric generally results from elementary excitations, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface/interface during exothermic chemical processes or an electromagnetic wave incident. In this paper, we outline recent research activities to develop energy conversion devices based on hot electrons. We found that photon energy can be directly converted to hot electrons and that hot electrons flow through the interface of metal-semiconductor nanodiodes where a Schottky barrier is formed and the energy barrier is much lower than the work function of the metal. The detection of hot electron flow can be successfully measured using the photocurrent; we measured the photoyield of photoemission with incident photons-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE). We also show that surface plasmons (i.e. the collective oscillation of conduction band electrons induced by interaction with an electromagnetic field) are excited on a rough metal surface and subsequently decay into secondary electrons, which gives rise to enhancement of the IPCE. Furthermore, the unique optical behavior of surface plasmons can be coupled with dye molecules, suggesting the possibility for producing additional channels for hot electron generation.

  2. Anomalous electron transport in metal/carbon multijunction devices by engineering of the carbon thickness and selecting metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Dhand, Chetna; Rawal, Ishpal; Kumar, Sushil; Malik, Hitendra K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2017-06-01

    A longstanding concern in the research of amorphous carbon films is their poor electrical conductivity at room temperature which constitutes a major barrier for the development of cost effective electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we propose metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices as a promising facile way to overcome room temperature electron transport issues in amorphous carbon films. By the tuning of carbon thickness and swapping metal layers, we observe giant (upto ˜7 orders) reduction of electrical resistance in metal/carbon multijunction devices with respect to monolithic amorphous carbon device. We engineer the maximum current (electrical resistance) from about 10-7 to 10-3 A (˜107 to 103 Ω) in metal (Cu or Ti)/carbon hybrid multijunction devices with a total number of 10 junctions. The introduction of thin metal layers breaks the continuity of relatively higher resistance carbon layer as well as promotes the nanostructuring of carbon. These contribute to low electrical resistance of metal/carbon hybrid multijunction devices, with respect to monolithic carbon device, which is further reduced by decreasing the thickness of carbon layers. We also propose and discuss equivalent circuit model to explain electrical resistance in monolithic carbon and metal/carbon multijunction devices. Cu/carbon multijunction devices display relatively better electrical transport than Ti/carbon devices owing to low affinity of Cu with carbon that restricts carbide formation. We also observe that in metal/carbon multijunction devices, the transport mechanism changes from Poole-Frenkel/Schottky model to the hopping model with a decrease in carbon thickness. Our approach opens a new route to develop carbon-based inexpensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Ground and excited state dipole moments of some flavones using solvatochromic methods: An experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Kapoor, Vinita; Bansal, Ritu; Tandon, H. C.

    2018-03-01

    The absorption and fluorescence characteristics of biologically active flavone derivatives 6-Hydroxy-7,3‧,4‧,5‧-tetramethoxyflavone (6HTMF) and 7-Hydroxy-6,3‧,4‧,5‧-tetramethoxyflavone (7HTMF) are studied at room temperature (298 K) in solvents of different polarities. Excited state dipole moments of these compounds have been determined using the solvatochromic shift method based on the microscopic solvent polarity parameter ETN . Dipole moments in excited state were found to be higher than those in the ground state in both the molecules. A reasonable agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretically calculated dipole moments (using AM1 method). Slightly large value of ground and excited state dipole moments of 7HTMF than 6HTMF are in conformity with predicted electrostatic potential maps. Our results would be helpful in understanding use of these compounds as tunable dye lasers, optical brighteners and biosensors.

  4. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  5. High pressure metallization of Mott Insulators: Magnetic, structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, M.P.; Hearne, G.; Sterer, E.; Taylor, R.D.; Jeanloz, R.

    1993-01-01

    High pressure studies of the insulator-metal transition in the (TM)I 2 (TM = V, Fe, Co and Ni) compounds are described. Those divalent transition-metal iodides are structurally isomorphous and classified as Mott Insulators. Resistivity, X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy were employed to investigate the electronic, structural, and magnetic properties as a function of pressure both on the highly correlated and on the metallic regimes

  6. Electronic states of semiconductor-metal-semiconductor quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, M. L.; Maserjian, J.

    1988-01-01

    Quantum-size effects are calculated in thin layered semiconductor-metal-semiconductor structures using an ideal free-electron model for the metal layer. The results suggest new quantum-well structures having device applications. Structures with sufficiently high-quality interfaces should exhibit effects such as negative differential resistance due to tunneling between allowed states. Similarly, optical detection by intersubband absorption may be possible. Ultrathin metal layers are predicted to behave as high-density dopant sheets.

  7. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Vasenko, Andrey S.; Ozaeta, Asier; Bergeret, Sebastian F.; Hekking, Frank W.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits

  8. Impact of informal electronic waste recycling on metal concentrations in soils and dusts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohajinwa, Chimere May; van Bodegom, Peter M; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2018-01-01

    Electronic and electrical equipment contains over 1000 different substances, including metals. During informal e-waste recycling some of these substances such as metals, are released into the environment causing environmental pollution. This study assessed the impact of different informal e-waste

  9. Spectra of explosive glowing of heavy metal azides at initiation by high-current electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Lysyk, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Glowing spectra of products resulted by heavy metal azides explosive decomposition initiated by high-current electron beam were measured and identified. Intensive emission lines related to atoms of alkali metals were observed in spectra of samples under study. These atoms enter explosives during their preparation. Emission lines of elements being part of a sample holder were also presented in spectra of explosion.

  10. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jikun; Sandison, George A; Hsi, W-C; Ringor, Michael; Lu Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity

  11. On the estimation of emissivity of metals within the framework of electron classical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvarev, K.M.; Baum, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    The well-known Hagen-Rubens and Ashkinass-Foot equations used for calculating the spectral and integral emissive powers of metals usually yield enhanced values of optical characteristics. Improved formulas for estimating emissive characteristics of metals from their electric conductivity are obtained with an allowance for the relaxation time and in the free-electron model approximation

  12. Molecular electrostatic potential on the proton-donating atom as a theoretical descriptor of excited state acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2018-02-07

    Organic photoacids with enhanced acidities in the excited states have received much attention both experimentally and theoretically because of their applications in nanotechnology and chemistry. In this study, we investigate the excited-state acidities of 14 hydroxyl-substituted aromatic photoacids, with a focus on using theoretical molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) as an effective descriptor for photoacidity. For these model photoacids, we applied time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) at the ωB97X-D/6-31G(d) level to calculate the molecular electrostatic potentials of S 1 excited states and show that the molecular electrostatic potential on the proton-donating atom exhibits a linear relationship with the observed excited-state logarithmic acid dissociation constant (pK a *). As a result, the molecular electrostatic potential on the proton-donating atom can be used to estimate the pK a * values based on simple TDDFT calculations for a broad range of hydroxyl-substituted aromatic compounds. Furthermore, we explore the molecular electrostatic potential as a quantum descriptor for the photoacidities of cationic photoacids, and show a universal behavior of the pK a *-MEP dependence. We also investigate the solvent effects on the photoacidity using TDDFT calculations with implicit solvent models. Finally, we discuss the physical insights implicated by the molecular electrostatic potential as a successful measure for photoacidity on the mechanism of proton transfer in the molecular excited states. This pK a * descriptor provides an effective means to quantify the tendency of excited-state proton transfer with a relatively small computational cost, which is expected to be useful in the design of functional photoacids.

  13. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  14. Magnetic collimation and metal foil filtering for electron range and fluence modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaisangittisakul, N.; D'Souza, W.D.; Ma Lijun

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the use of magnetically collimated electron beams together with metal filters for electron fluence and range modulation. A longitudinal magnetic field collimation method was developed to reduce skin dose and to improve the electron beam penumbra. Thin metal foils were used to adjust the energies of magnetically collimated electrons. The effects for different types of foils such as Al, Be, Cu, Pb, and Ti were studied using Monte Carlo calculations. An empirical pencil beam dose calculation model was developed to calculate electron dose distributions under magnetic collimation and foil modulation. An optimization method was developed to produce conformal dose distributions for simulated targets such as a horseshoe-shaped target. Our results show that it is possible to produce an electron depth dose enhancement peak using similar techniques of producing a spread-out Bragg peak. In conclusion, our study demonstrates new aspects of using magnetic collimation and foil filtration for producing fluence and range modulated electron dose distributions

  15. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS2 and Metal/WSe2 Heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds, therefore make more `ideal' Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce recombination centers at the interface with metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10X enhancement in the indirect band gap PL of TMDCs deposited on various metals, while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2, and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier of the Σ-point band makes electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wavefunctions in the metal. This enhancement only occurs for thick flakes, and is absent in monolayer and few-layer flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures. Reference: DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b00885

  16. Distance dependence of intrahelix Ru(II)* to Os(II) polypyridyl excited-state energy transfer in oligoproline assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennaman, M Kyle; Fleming, Cavan N; Slate, Cheryl A; Serron, Scafford A; Bettis, Stephanie E; Erickson, Bruce W; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-05-30

    Energy transfer between the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of [Pra [M(II)(bpy)2(4-Me-4'(-N(H)CO)bpy)](PF6)2 units ([Pra(M(II)bpy2(mbpy)](2+): M(II) = Ru(II) or Os(II), bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, mbpy = 4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxamido, Pra = 4-M(II)-L-proline) linked covalently to oligoproline assemblies in room temperature acetonitrile occurs on the picosecond-nanosecond time scale and has been time-resolved by transient emission measurements. Three derivatized oligoprolines, [CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro2-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro2-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro6-Glu-NH2](6+) (ORR-2, Pro = L-proline and Glu = glutamic acid); [CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro3-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro3-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro6-Glu-NH2](6+) (ORR-3); and CH3-CO-Pro6-Pra[Os(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro5-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-Pro5-Pra[Ru(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)Pro6-Glu2-NH2](6+) (ORR-5), were prepared by using solid-phase peptide synthesis. Given the helical nature of the resulting assemblies and the nature of the synthesis, composition, length, and loading pattern are precisely controlled in the assemblies. In acetonitrile, they adopt a proline I helical secondary structure, confirmed by circular dichroism, in which the appended chromophores are ordered in well-defined orientations and internuclear separation distances although helix formation for ORR-2 is incomplete. Quantitative comparison of oligoproline ground-state absorption and steady-state emission spectra to those for the constituents, [Boc-Pra[M(II)(bpy)2(mbpy)](2+)-OH](PF6)2 (Boc = N(α)-(1,1-dimethylethoxycarbonyl), shows that following Ru(II) light absorption, Ru(II)* undergoes facile energy transfer resulting in sensitization of Os(II). Sensitization efficiencies are 93% for ORR-2, 77% for ORR-3, and 73% for ORR-5. Picosecond-resolved emission measurements reveal complex, coupled dynamics that arise from excited-state decay and kinetically

  17. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Guo [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, Medical Drive, Singapore S117456 (Singapore); Kam, Fong-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Chua, Lay-Lay [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore)

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  18. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have estimated the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Fr and Ra plus the light actinides Ac through Pu. The underlying self-consistent band-structure calculations were performed by the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method including l quantum numbers s through g......, and the electron-phonon parameters were obtained within the rigid-atomic-sphere approximation. The electron-phonon coupling in Fr through Th is found to be dominated by pd and df scattering and in Pa through Pu by pd and fg scattering. At the equilibrium volumes and as a function of atomic number, the electron...... be related to the changeover from an s-to- d to an s-to-f electronic transition and a related change in the topology of the Fermi surface...

  19. Exchange corrections to the bulk plasmon cross section of slow electrons in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, S.; Goodman, B.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    We present a calculation of the simplest exchange correction to the low-energy electron cross section for plasmon creation in a free-electron-like metal with the density of Al. The resulting cancellation effect is found to be much too small to account for the anomalous delayed onset of plasmon losses, found in core level photo emission for Al. (author)

  20. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigations of electromigration in metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozlova, T.

    2015-01-01

    Electromigration is a process in which a metallic contact line is thinned by passing a current through it; which occurs due to a gradual displacement of atoms, ultimately leading to destruction of the wire. Despite the active investigations on electromigration for over fifty years, until now there