WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal detector measurements

  1. Metal detector technology data base

    Porter, L.K.; Gallo, L.R.; Murray, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    The tests described in this report were conducted to obtain information on the effects target characteristics have on portal type metal detector response. A second purpose of the tests was to determine the effect of detector type and settings on the detection of the targets. Although in some cases comparison performance of different types and makes of metal detectors is found herein, that is not the primary purpose of the report. Further, because of the many variables that affect metal detector performance, the information presented can be used only in a general way. The results of these tests can show general trends in metal detection, but do little for making accurate predictions as to metal detector response to a target with a complex shape such as a handgun. The shape of an object and its specific metal content (both type and treatment) can have a significant influence on detection. Thus it should not be surprising that levels of detection for a small 100g stainless steel handgun are considerably different than for detection of the 100g stainless steel right circular cylinder that was used in these tests. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved

  3. Methodology for testing metal detectors using variables test data

    Spencer, D.D.; Murray, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    By extracting and analyzing measurement (variables) data from portal metal detectors whenever possible instead of the more typical ``alarm``/``no-alarm`` (attributes or binomial) data, we can be more informed about metal detector health with fewer tests. This testing methodology discussed in this report is an alternative to the typical binomial testing and in many ways is far superior.

  4. A new kind of metal detector based on chaotic oscillator

    Hu, Wenjing

    2017-12-01

    The sensitivity of a metal detector greatly depends on the identification ability to weak signals from the probe. In order to improve the sensitivity of metal detectors, this paper applies the Duffing chaotic oscillator to metal detectors based on its characteristic which is very sensitive to weak periodic signals. To make a suitable Duffing system for detectors, this paper computes two Lyapunov characteristics exponents of the Duffing oscillator, which help to obtain the threshold of the Duffing system in the critical state accurately and give quantitative criteria for chaos. Meanwhile, a corresponding simulation model of the chaotic oscillator is made by the Simulink tool box of Matlab. Simulation results shows that Duffing oscillator is very sensitive to sinusoidal signals in high frequency cases. And experimental results show that the measurable diameter of metal particles is about 1.5mm. It indicates that this new method can feasibly and effectively improve the metal detector sensitivity.

  5. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    Orvis, W.J.; Yee, J.H.; Fuess, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high- efficiency gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, we have modeled parts of the detector and have nearly completed a prototype device. 2 refs

  6. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    Orvis, W.J.; Yee, J.H.; Fuess, D.

    1992-12-01

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with the good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high-efficiency, room temperature gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, the authors have procured and tested a commercial device with operating characteristics similar to those of a single layer of the composite device. They have modeled the radiation transport in a multi-layered device, to verify the initial calculations of layer thickness and composition. They have modeled the electrostatic field in different device designs to locate and remove high-field regions that can cause device breakdown. They have fabricated 14 single layer prototypes

  7. Moving Belt Metal Detector (MBMD)

    Nelson, Carl V; Mendat, Deborah P; Huynh, Toan B

    2006-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has developed a prototype metal detection survey system that will increase the search speed of conventional technology while maintaining high sensitivity...

  8. Radiation detector device for measuring ionizing radiation

    Brake, D. von der.

    1983-01-01

    The device contains a compensating filter circuit, which guarantees measurement of the radiation dose independent of the energy or independent of the energy and direction. The compensating filter circuit contains a carrier tube of a slightly absorbing metal with an order number not higher than 35, which surrounds a tubular detector and which carries several annular filter parts on its surface. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Detector calibration measurements in CRESST

    Westphal, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: westphal@ph.tum.de; Coppi, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Isaila, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jagemann, T. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut I, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Jochum, J. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut I, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Koenig, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lachenmaier, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lanfranchi, J.-C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Potzel, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rau, W. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Stark, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wernicke, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E15, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); VeriCold Technologies GmbH, Bahnhofstrasse 21, D-85737 Ismaning (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    The CRESST dark matter experiment uses the simultaneous measurement of the scintillation light and the heat signal of a CaWO{sub 4} crystal to discriminate between background electron recoil and nuclear recoil events. At the Technical University of Munich calibration measurements have been performed to characterize the detectors. These measurements include the determination of the light output and scintillation time constants of CaWO{sub 4} at temperatures below 50 mK. The setup used in these measurements consist of a CaWO{sub 4} crystal, which is mounted in a reflective housing together with a silicon light detector carrying an Ir/Au transition edge sensor (TES) evaporated directly onto it.

  10. Ion detectors for isotopic measurements

    McCormick, A.

    1978-12-15

    Detector development over the past two decades has been such that this is now the least likely part of the mass spectrometry equipment to give rise to the sort of measurement errors to cause concern. It is now possible to choose from a number of different types of device which can provide more or less 100% efficiency in ion beam detection under all conceivable experimental conditions required for isotopic analysis, from measurement of large samples using the traditional Faraday cage to measurement of exceedingly small ion currents by ion counting techniques. There are even methods of distinguishing one type of ionic species from another in the detector, thus improving the accuracy when unwanted isobaric species might otherwise grossly distort the measurement. Notable contributions to detector development for nuclear measurements have been made by Dietz at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, by Barnett at Oak Ridge and by Daly at Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE), Aldermaston. This paper describes the detection methods which are currently in use at AWRE for isotopic analysis of solid samples for routine applications as well as non-routine applications. Other methods are merely mentioned as a stimulus for discussion.

  11. Measurements of Silicon Detector Thermal Runaway

    Heusch, C A; Moser, H G

    1999-01-01

    We measured thermal runaway properties of previously irradiated silicon detectors cooled by TPG bars. We simulated their expected behaviour to measure the energy gap in the detector material and to test the validity of various underlying assumptions.

  12. Metal Detector By Using PIC Microcontroller Interfacing With PC

    Yin Min Theint; Myo Maung Maung; Hla Myo Tun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This system proposes metal detector by using PIC microcontroller interfacing with PC. The system uses PIC microcontroller as the main controller whether the detected metal is ferrous metal or non-ferrous metal. Among various types of metal sensors and various types of metal detecting technologies concentric type induction coil sensor and VLF very low frequency metal detecting technology are used in this system. This system consists of two configurations Hardware configuration and Sof...

  13. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  14. Using contraband simulators for portal metal detector testing

    Murray, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    Because contraband materials or items are either too dangerous or too expensive, contraband simulators have been widely used to test contraband detection equipment. Very realistic bomb simulators have been used to test x-ray scanners, and common radioactive sources have been used successfully to test the operation of special nuclear material (SNM) radiation detectors. The simulators used to test early metal detectors were also reasonably successful; however, these simulators were rapidly outdated by the introduction of modern active field metal detectors. This paper describes some of the earlier attempts to develop metal detector test simulators. A successful highly enriched uranium (HEU) simulator for metal detector testing is described that has duplicated all the characteristics modern equipment is capable of detecting. The paper also describes the development needed to produce handgun simulators that could be used effectively for metal detector performance testing.

  15. measurements with a total absorption detector

    Shibata, Michihiro; Kawade, Kiyoshi; Shindou, Terumasa; Kojima, Yasuaki; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Kawase, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi

    2003-01-01

    For Q β determination, we have developed a newly total absorption detector that can detect almost all radiation from the radioactive nuclei. The detector is composed of large volume and low background twin BGO scintillation detectors. The estimated efficiency is more than two orders of magnitude larger than those of Ge or Si detectors. The Q β s of some fission products of 235 U were successfully measured using an on-line mass separator for the first time (KUR-ISOL). We have proposed the possibility of determination Q β up to about 10 MeV using the detector without the knowledge of the decay scheme. (author)

  16. Measurements on a prototype segmented Clover detector

    Shepherd, S L; Cullen, D M; Appelbe, D E; Simpson, J; Gerl, J; Kaspar, M; Kleinböhl, A; Peter, I; Rejmund, M; Schaffner, H; Schlegel, C; France, G D

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a segmented Clover germanium detector has been measured. The segmented Clover detector is a composite germanium detector, consisting of four individual germanium crystals in the configuration of a four-leaf Clover, housed in a single cryostat. Each crystal is electrically segmented on its outer surface into four quadrants, with separate energy read-outs from nine crystal zones. Signals are also taken from the inner contact of each crystal. This effectively produces a detector with 16 active elements. One of the purposes of this segmentation is to improve the overall spectral resolution when detecting gamma radiation emitted following a nuclear reaction, by minimising Doppler broadening caused by the opening angle subtended by each detector element. Results of the tests with sources and in beam will be presented. The improved granularity of the detector also leads to an improved isolated hit probability compared with an unsegmented Clover detector. (author)

  17. Cherenkov Detector for Beam Quality Measurement

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078842

    2016-01-01

    A new detector to measure the machine induced background at larger radiihas been developed and installed in the CMS experiment at LHC. Itconsists of 40 modules, each comprising a quartz bar read out by aphotomultiplier. Since Cerenkov radiation is emitted in a forward conearound the charged particle trajectory, these detectors can distinguishthe directions of the machine induced background.The back-end consists of a microTCA readout with excellent time resolution.The performance of the detector modules measured in several test-beamcampaigns will be reported. The installation in CMS will be described, andfirst results about operating the detector during data taking will begiven.

  18. Liquid metal level measurement

    Hale, J.C.; Leyland, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid metal level indicator is described which can be used to measure, in a stainless steel tank, the level of a nuclear reactor coolant such as sodium. The instrument, which is based on the eddy current induction effect, gives readings over substantially the full depth of the tank and indicates the sense of change of level. (U.K.)

  19. Neutron energy response measurement of scintillation detectors

    Yang Hongqiong; Peng Taiping; Yang Jianlun; Tang Zhengyuan; Yang Gaozhao; Li Linbo; Hu Mengchun; Wang Zhentong; Zhang Jianhua; Li Zhongbao; Wang Lizong

    2004-01-01

    Neutron sensitivities of detectors composed of plastic scintillator ST401, ST1422, ST1423 and phyotomultiplier tube in primary energy range of fission neutron are calibrated by direct current. The energy response curve of the detectors is obtained in this experiment. The experimental result has been compared with the theoretical calculation and they are in agreement within measuring uncertainty. (authors)

  20. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  1. Luminosity Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    Maettig, Stefan; Pauly, T

    For almost all measurements performed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) one crucial ingredient is the precise knowledge about the integrated luminosity. The determination and precision on the integrated luminosity has direct implications on any cross-section measurement, and its instantaneous measurement gives important feedback on the conditions at the experimental insertions and on the accelerator performance. ATLAS is one of the main experiments at the LHC. In order to provide an accurate and reliable luminosity determination, ATLAS uses a variety of different sub-detectors and algorithms that measure the luminosity simultaneously. One of these sub-detectors are the Beam Condition Monitors (BCM) that were designed to protect the ATLAS detector from potentially dangerous beam losses. Due to its fast readout and very clean signals this diamond detector is providing in addition since May 2011 the official ATLAS luminosity. This thesis describes the calibration and performance of the BCM as a luminosity detec...

  2. Double Chooz Improved Multi-Detector Measurements

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment (DC) is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment running at Chooz nuclear power plant (2 reactors) in France. In 2011, DC first reported indication of non-zero θ13 with the far detector (FD) located at the maximum of oscillation effects (i.e. disappearance), thus challenging the CHOOZ non-observation limit. A robust observation of θ13 followed in 2012 by the Daya Bay experiments with multiple detector configurations. Since 2015 DC runs in a multi-detector configuration making thus the impact of several otherwise dominating systematics reduce strongly. DC’s unique almost "iso-flux" site, allows the near detector (ND) to become a direct accurate non-oscillation reference to the FD. Our first multi-detector results at MORIOND-2016 showed an intriguing deviation of θ13 with respect to the world average. We will address this issue in this seminar. The combined "reactor-θ13" measurement is expected to ...

  3. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  4. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Kadilin, V V; Kaplun, A A; Taraskin, A A

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6 LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results. (paper)

  5. Passive detectors for neutron fluence measurement

    Holt, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of neutron activation detectors (slow neutron detectors and threshold detectors) and fission track detectors for radiological protection purposes, principally in criticality dosimetry, dosimetry of pulsed accelerators and calibration of neutron fluxes is discussed. References are given to compilations of cross sections. For the determination of the activity induced, either beta ray or gamma ray counting may be used. For beta-ray counting, thin foils are usually necessary which result in low neutron sensitivity. When fission track detectors are used, it is necessary to know the efficiency of track registration. Alternatively, a detector-counter system may be calibrated by exposure to a known flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Usually, the sensitivity of activation detectors is low because small foils are used. For criticality dosimetry, calibration work and shielding studies on accelerators, low sensitivity is acceptable. However, there are some instances where, by the use of long integration times, or very large quantities of detector material with gamma ray detection, neutron fluences in operational areas have been measured. (author)

  6. Time response measurements of LASL diagnostic detectors

    Hocker, L.P.

    1970-07-01

    The measurement and data analysis techniques developed under the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's detector improvement program were used to characterize the time and frequency response of selected LASL Compton, fluor-photodiode (NPD), and fluor-photomultiplier (NPM) diagnostic detectors. Data acquisition procedures and analysis methods presently in use are summarized, and detector time and frequency data obtained using the EG and G/AEC electron linear accelerator fast pulse (approximately 50 psec FWHM) as the incident radiation driving function are presented. (U.S.)

  7. Multilayer detector for skin absorbed dose measuring

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method for skin dosimetry based on utilization of multilayer detectors and permitting to estimate distribution of absorbed dose by skin depth is described. The detector represents a set of thin sensitive elements separated by tissue-equivalent absorbers. Quantitative evaluation and forecasting the degree of radiation injury of skin are determined by the formula based on determination of the probability of the fact that cells are not destroyed and they can divide further on. The given method ensures a possibility of quantitative evaluation of radiobiological effect and forecasting clinical consequences of skin irradiation by results of corresponding measurements of dose by means of the miultilayer detector

  8. Heavy ion measurement by chemical detectors

    Huebner, K.; Erzgraeber, G.; Eichhorn, K.

    1979-02-01

    In testing the applicability of the threshold system polyvinyl alcohol/methyl orange/chloral hydrate/sodium tetraborate to the quantitative detection of single particles, the chemical detector was irradiated with 4 He, 12 C, 18 O, 22 He ions of different LET. Detectors with 4 different borax concentrations (chloral hydrate concentration kept constant) have been irradiated. The dose causing the colour change increased linearly with the borax concentration. For equal borax concentrations this dose increases with increasing LET due to the decreasing G value of the HCl. The fluence ranges measurable with the various detector compositions are given. 4 He and 18 O ion ranges have been determined. The measured depth dose curves have been corrected because the dose is LET-dependent. The experimentally determined ranges are in good agreement with values calculated for the detector material

  9. Neutron flux measurement by mobile detectors

    Verchain, M.

    1987-01-01

    Various incore instrumentation systems and their technological evolution are first reviewed. Then, for 1300 MWe PWR nuclear power plant, temperature and neutron flux measurement are described. Mobile fission chambers, with their large measuring range and accurate location allow a good knowledge of the core. Other incore measures are possible because of flux detector thimble tubes inserted in the reactor core [fr

  10. Plasma measurements with surface barrier detectors

    Futch, A.H. Jr.; Bradley, A.E.

    1969-01-01

    A surface barrier detector system for measuring the loss rate of protons from a hydrogen plasma and their energy spectrum is described. A full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution of 1.4 keV for 15-keV hydrogen atoms was obtained using a selected detector having a sensitive area of 3 mm 2 and a depletion depth of 700 microns

  11. Metal Detector By Using PIC Microcontroller Interfacing With PC

    Yin Min Theint

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This system proposes metal detector by using PIC microcontroller interfacing with PC. The system uses PIC microcontroller as the main controller whether the detected metal is ferrous metal or non-ferrous metal. Among various types of metal sensors and various types of metal detecting technologies concentric type induction coil sensor and VLF very low frequency metal detecting technology are used in this system. This system consists of two configurations Hardware configuration and Software configuration. The hardware components include induction coil sensors which senses the frequency changes of metal a PIC microcontroller personal computer PC buzzer light emitting diode LED and webcam. The software configuration includes a program controller interface. PIC MikroCprogramming language is used to implement the control system. This control system is based on the PIC 16F887 microcontroller.This system is mainly used in mining and high security places such as airport plaza shopping mall and governmental buildings.

  12. Standard guide for installation of Walk-Through metal detectors

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 Some facilities require that personnel entering designated areas be screened for concealed weapons and other metallic materials. Also, personnel exiting designated areas are often screened for metallic shielding material and other types of metallic contraband. Walk-through metal detectors are widely used to implement these requirements. This guide describes various elements to be considered when planning to install walk-through metal detectors. 1.2 This guide is not intended to set performance levels, nor is it intended to limit or constrain operational technologies. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    Fricke, V.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available

  14. Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector -First Run 2 measurements of electroweak processes -Run 1 measurements of SM parameters, i.e. W mass and weak mixing angle -Recent Run 1 measurements of di- and multi-boson production cross-sections as well as vector boson fusion and scattering processes at 8 TeV -Recent Run 1 measurements of exclusive di-lepton and WW production

  15. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca Morelos (Mexico); Leal, B. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Rangel, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D. F (Mexico); Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario 100, Col. Centro, 50000, Toluca Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / {mu}Sv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ {mu}Sv, 0093 b/{mu}Sv, 0.14 b/{mu}Sv, 0.17 b/{mu}Sv, 0051 b/{mu}Sv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90 Degree-Sign this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in {mu}Sv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression R{sub i}= B{sub i} / S{sub i} where B{sub i} is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (S{sub i}) is given for each detector in (b / {mu}Sv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm{sup -2}), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 {mu}Sv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion

  16. Standard Model measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Hassani Samira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various Standard Model measurements have been performed in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 and 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A review of a selection of the latest results of electroweak measurements, W/Z production in association with jets, jet physics and soft QCD is given. Measurements are in general found to be well described by the Standard Model predictions.

  17. NEUTRON SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS USING MULTIPLE THRESHOLD DETECTORS

    Gerken, William W.; Duffey, Dick

    1963-11-15

    From American Nuclear Society Meeting, New York, Nov. 1963. The use of threshold detectors, which simultaneously undergo reactions with thermal neutrons and two or more fast neutron threshold reactions, was applied to measurements of the neutron spectrum in a reactor. A number of different materials were irradiated to determine the most practical ones for use as multiple threshold detectors. These results, as well as counting techniques and corrections, are presented. Some materials used include aluminum, alloys of Al -Ni, aluminum-- nickel oxides, and magesium orthophosphates. (auth)

  18. Detection of boron in metal alloys with solid state nuclear track detector by neutron induced autoradiography

    Ali Nabipour; Hosseini, A.; Afarideh, H.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron induced autoradiography is very useful technique for detection as well as measurement of Boron densities in metal alloys. The method is relatively simple and quite sensitive in comparison with other techniques with resolution in the range of PPM. Using this technique with it is also possible to investigate microscopic scattering of Boron in metal alloys. In comparison with most techniques neutron induced autoradiography has its own difficulties and limitations. In this research measurement of Boron densities and investigation of that diffusion in metal alloys has been carried out. A flat nicely polished Boron doped metal samples is covered with a track detecting plastic (CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector) and exposed to thermal neutron dose. After irradiation the plastic detector have been removed and put in an etching solution. Since the diffusion rate of corrosive solution in those area, which heavy ions have been, produces as the result of nuclear reaction with thermal neutron are more than the other areas, some cavities are formed. The diameter of cavities or tracks cross section are increased with increasing the etching time, to some extent that it is possible to observe the cavities with optical microscopes. The density of tracks on the detector surface is directly related to the Boron concentration in the sample and thermal neutron dose. So by measuring the number of tracks on surface of the detector it would possible to calculate the concentration of Boron in metal samples. (Author)

  19. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    Linck, Rebecca Anne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    As part of its ongoing exploration into the nature of the particles produced in high energy proton-proton collisions, the ATLAS detector has been used to perform a number of new precision electroweak measurements. In this talk the recent measurements of the W-boson mass, the Drell-Yan triple-differential cross-section and the polarisation of tau leptons in Z/γ* → ττ decays will be discussed.

  20. Calibration of SSNDT detectors for radon measurements

    Takahashi, Laura C.; Santos, Talita O.; Pinheiro, Rose Mary M.; Rocha, Zildete

    2017-01-01

    The methods and instrumentation used to measure the concentration of radon need to be calibrated to obtain accurate results. The Nuclear Track Detector is considered the main method of analysis of radon research. Thus, the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG, Brazil) uses the detector CR-39 (Landauer) to measure the concentration of radon in homes, workplaces, underground mines, soils and in environment. Epidemiological studies reveal the strong relationship between lung cancer and radon exposure. Therefore, it is important to monitor this gas and its progeny in order to assess the radiological risk. The alpha particles emitted by radon and its progeny leave traces on CR-39 due to Coulombian interactions with the atoms of the material. The liquid density of traces is converted to radon concentration by means of a calibration factor obtained in calibrated systems. This work aims to determine the LRN / CDTN calibration factor. To do so, the CR-39 detectors were placed inside the calibration chambers, along with two AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) detectors and Ra-266 sources with activities of 3,379 kBq or 0.483 kBq, referenced by NIST. From this, six levels of exposure were obtained, which were: 44 kBq.d.m 3 , 4 kBq.d.m 3 , 3 kBq.d.m 3 , 15 kBq.d.m 3 , 30 kBq.d.m 3 , 26 kBq.d.m 3 . The conversion factor between the liquid density of traces and the total exposure time obtained was K = 52.028 ± 0.752 [(trace density.cm -2 ) / (kBq.d.m -3 )]. After the determination of the conversion factor, it was used to measure the concentration of radon in underground mines, obtaining concentration results between 122 ± 24 and 7384 ± 517 kBq.m -3

  1. Photon detector composed of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles

    Takahashi, Atsuo; Minoura, Norihiko; Karube, Isao

    2005-01-01

    Applying the function of the single electron transistor, a novel photon detector consisting of a self-assembled structure of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles and an organic insulating layer was developed. It showed coulomb blockade behavior under dark conditions and remarkable increase in current corresponding to light intensity under light irradiation. Ultraweak photon emission of about 600 counts per second in the ultraviolet region could be detected at room temperature by this photon counter

  2. Differential Detector for Measuring Radiation Fields

    Broide, A.; Marcus, E.; Brandys, I.; Schwartz, A.; Wengrowicz, U.; Levinson, S.; Seif, R.; Sattinger, D.; Kadmon, Y.; Tal, N.

    2004-01-01

    In case of a nuclear accident, it is essential to determine the source of radioactive contamination in order to analyze the risk to the environment and to the population. The radiation source may be a radioactive plume on the air or an area on the ground contaminated with radionuclides. Most commercial radiation detectors measure only the radiation field intensity but are unable to differentiate between the radiation sources. Consequently, this limitation causes a real problem in analyzing the potential risk to the near-by environment, since there is no data concerning the contamination ratios in the air and on the ground and this prevents us from taking the required steps to deal with the radiation event. This work presents a GM-tube-based Differential Detector, which enables to determine the source of contamination

  3. Controlled Metal Detector Mounted on Mine Detection Robot

    Seiji Masunaga

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Landmine detection capability of metal detectors is very sensitive to the gap between buried landmines and the sensor heads. Therefore, human deminers manually scan ground surface with the metal detectors in such a manner that the sensor heads follow the ground surface. In case of robots assisted landmine detection, this function can be performed accurately and safely by controlling the gap and attitude of the sensor heads. In this investigation, the effectiveness of the gap and attitude control of the sensor head by some mechanical manipulator on the landmine detection performance has been addressed quantitatively. To this end, the paper describes the development of a Controlled Metal Detector (CMD for controlling the gap and attitude of the sensor head. The CMD generates trajectories of the sensor head from the depth information of the ground surface acquired with 3-D stereovision camera in order to avoid any obstacles and possible impact with the ground, and then tracks the trajectories with a trajectory-tracking controller. The effectiveness and the impact related to the gap and attitude control on the landmine detection performance of the CMD have been demonstrated by experimental studies.

  4. Automatic measurement for solid state track detectors

    Ogura, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Since in solid state track detectors, their tracks are measured with a microscope, observers are forced to do hard works that consume time and labour. This causes to obtain poor statistic accuracy or to produce personal error. Therefore, many researches have been done to aim at simplifying and automating track measurement. There are two categories in automating the measurement: simple counting of the number of tracks and the requirements to know geometrical elements such as the size of tracks or their coordinates as well as the number of tracks. The former is called automatic counting and the latter automatic analysis. The method to generally evaluate the number of tracks in automatic counting is the estimation of the total number of tracks in the total detector area or in a field of view of a microscope. It is suitable for counting when the track density is higher. The method to count tracks one by one includes the spark counting and the scanning microdensitometer. Automatic analysis includes video image analysis in which the high quality images obtained with a high resolution video camera are processed with a micro-computer, and the tracks are automatically recognized and measured by feature extraction. This method is described in detail. In many kinds of automatic measurements reported so far, frequently used ones are ''spark counting'' and ''video image analysis''. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. ENSTAR detector: fabrication and test measurement

    Shukla, P.; Jha, V.; Roy, B.J.; Chatterjee, A.; Machner, H.; Biswas, P.K.; Guha, S.; Jawale, S.B.; Panse, H.B.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2003-07-01

    A large acceptance plastic scintillator detector ENSTAR has been designed and built at BARC, Mumbai. The detector will be used for studies of a new type of nuclear matter- the η-mesic nucleus, at the multi-GeV hadron facility COSY (COoler SYnchrotron), Juelich, Germany. The ENSTAR design has been optimized for detecting decay products of eta-nucleus bound state (η-mesic nucleus), namely protons and pions. However, it can also be used in other experiments whereever missing mass determination in a reaction has to be done in coincidence with decay products. The detector is made of plastic scintillators arranged in three concentric cylindrical layers. These layers will be used to generate ΔE - E spectra for particle identification and total energy information for the stopped particles. Each layer is sub-divided into a number of pieces to obtain θ and φ information. The scintillator read-out is made through state-of-the-art fiber optic technique. The present report describes fabrication details such as machining the scintillators, polishing the scintillators and the fibers and coupling the fibers with scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. Test measurements have been performed with proton beam from the COSY accelerator at Juelich, the results of which are reported. (author)

  6. Seminar on Detectors and measurements techniques

    Holm, E.

    2002-01-01

    A Nordic Seminar on detectors and radionuclide measurement techniques was held in Lund, Sweden, May 3-4, 2001. The objective was to highlight recent progress and problems for techniques to study environmental radioactivity. It covered the aspect of detector sample geometry's and methods for evaluation of gamma gamma pulse height distributions. Within the field of alpha-spectrometric techniques gridded ionisation chambers, semiconductor detectors and a general description for analysis of alpha-particle-spectra were presented. Recent development in mass spectrometric techniques, AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and ICPMS (Inductively Coupled Plasma mass Spectrometry) for long-lived radionuclides was described. Principles for analysis of beta particle emitters, especially by liquid scintillation were presented. The seminar also covered radiochemistry such advantages and disadvantages between ion exchange, solvent extraction and extraction chromatography. The use of controlled laboratory conditions for discerning the dynamics of accumulation in organisms was demonstrated. Other techniques such as neutron activation were also shown to be useful analytical tool for certain long-lived radionuclides. The results of the intercalibration exercises within the Nordic countries showed the importance of such analytical quality control. (au)

  7. Seminar on Detectors and measurements techniques

    Holm, E. (ed.) [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    A Nordic Seminar on detectors and radionuclide measurement techniques was held in Lund, Sweden, May 3-4, 2001. The objective was to highlight recent progress and problems for techniques to study environmental radioactivity. It covered the aspect of detector sample geometry's and methods for evaluation of gamma gamma pulse height distributions. Within the field of alpha-spectrometric techniques gridded ionisation chambers, semiconductor detectors and a general description for analysis of alpha-particle-spectra were presented. Recent development in mass spectrometric techniques, AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and ICPMS (Inductively Coupled Plasma mass Spectrometry) for long-lived radionuclides was described. Principles for analysis of beta particle emitters, especially by liquid scintillation were presented. The seminar also covered radiochemistry such advantages and disadvantages between ion exchange, solvent extraction and extraction chromatography. The use of controlled laboratory conditions for discerning the dynamics of accumulation in organisms was demonstrated. Other techniques such as neutron activation were also shown to be useful analytical tool for certain long-lived radionuclides. The results of the intercalibration exercises within the Nordic countries showed the importance of such analytical quality control. (au)

  8. Measurements for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors

    Drozdowicz, K.; Hoek, M.; Aronsson, D.

    1990-05-01

    The report describes measurements performed for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors (two arrays of 16 detectors each one). The calibration procedure determines four calibration parameters for each detector. Results of the calibration measurements are given and test measurements are presented. A relation of the neutron detector calibration parameters to producer's data for the photomulipliers is analysed. Also the tests necessary during normal operation of the TANSY neutron spectrometer are elaborated (passive and active tests). A method how to quickly get the calibration parameters for a spare detector in an array of the neutron detectors is included

  9. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    Zhang, Zhiqing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the high integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the very good understanding of the ATLAS detector, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. In this talk, we present the tau polarisation, measured in $Z\\to \\tau\\tau$ using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton proton collision data collected at a centre of mass energy of 8 TeV. The talk also reviews the measurement of forward-background asymmetry based on the triple differential Drell-Yan cross-section obtained with the same data sample, which can be used to extract the weak mixing angle. We conclude with a presentation of the measurement of the $W$-boson mass using 4.6 fb$^{-1}$ data, collected at 7 TeV.

  10. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    Zhang, Zhiqing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the high integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the very good understanding of the ATLAS detector, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. In this talk, we review the measurement of the W boson mass using data, collected at 7 TeV. Special focus is drawn on a discussion of the modeling uncertainties and the physics potential of the latest low-mu runs, recorded at a center of mass energy of 5 and 13 TeV at the end of 2017. The talk will also review the measurement of the triple differential Drell-Yan cross-section at 8 TeV, which can be used to extract the weak mixing angle. We conclude with a presentation of the tau polarization, measured in Z->tautau using 20.3/fb of proton proton collision data collected at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV.

  11. Comparative analysis for the measured and the predicted relative sensitivity of rhodium In core detector

    Moon, Sang Rae; Cha, Kyoon Ho; Bae, Seong Man

    2012-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is widely used as in-core flux monitoring in nuclear power plants. OPR1000 has applied a rhodium (Rh) as the emitter of the SPND. The SPND contains a neutron-sensitive metallic emitter surrounded by a ceramic insulator. When capturing a neutron, the Rh will be decayed by emitting some electrons which is crossing the sheath and produce current. This current can be measured externally using pico-ammeter. The sensitivity of detectors is closely related with the geometry and material of the detectors. The lifetime of in-core detector is determined by calculating the relative sensitivity of Rh detector. It is required that the Rh detector should be replaced before the burn-up of Rh detector has reached 66% of its original compositions. To predict Rh detector's relative sensitivity ANC code, advanced nodal code capable of two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, is used. It is determined that the Rh detectors should be replaced on the basis of the predicted sensitivity value calculated by ANC code. When evaluating the life of Rh detectors using ANC code, it is assumed that the uncertainty of the sensitivity calculation include the measurement error of 5%. As a result of the analysis of measured and predicted data for the Rh detector's relative sensitivity, it is possible to reduce the assumed uncertainty

  12. Comparative analysis for the measured and the predicted relative sensitivity of rhodium In core detector

    Moon, Sang Rae; Cha, Kyoon Ho; Bae, Seong Man [Nuclear Reactor Safety Lab., KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is widely used as in-core flux monitoring in nuclear power plants. OPR1000 has applied a rhodium (Rh) as the emitter of the SPND. The SPND contains a neutron-sensitive metallic emitter surrounded by a ceramic insulator. When capturing a neutron, the Rh will be decayed by emitting some electrons which is crossing the sheath and produce current. This current can be measured externally using pico-ammeter. The sensitivity of detectors is closely related with the geometry and material of the detectors. The lifetime of in-core detector is determined by calculating the relative sensitivity of Rh detector. It is required that the Rh detector should be replaced before the burn-up of Rh detector has reached 66% of its original compositions. To predict Rh detector's relative sensitivity ANC code, advanced nodal code capable of two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, is used. It is determined that the Rh detectors should be replaced on the basis of the predicted sensitivity value calculated by ANC code. When evaluating the life of Rh detectors using ANC code, it is assumed that the uncertainty of the sensitivity calculation include the measurement error of 5%. As a result of the analysis of measured and predicted data for the Rh detector's relative sensitivity, it is possible to reduce the assumed uncertainty.

  13. Two-Channel Metal Detector Using Two Perpendicular Antennas

    Kyoo Nam Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-channel metal detector, having two sets of perpendicularly oriented sensor antennas, is proposed to expand detectable size, ranging from mm through cm scale, of metal sensor, while conventional metal sensor is dedicated for detection only in mm or cm scale. The characteristics of the two metal detection sensor channels were investigated, respectively, and the interference effect, while in simultaneous operation, between two sensor channels was discussed. Metal detection channel, having sensitivity in mm scale, showed detectable sensitivity to moving ferrous sphere, with diameter down to 0.7 mm, at 50 kHz exciting frequency and enhanced sensitivity distribution. And metal detection channel having sensitivity in cm scale showed more uniform sensitivity distribution with the flexibility for future modular construction. The effect of interference, while in simultaneous operation of two sensors, resulted in reduced output response, but still within usable detection range. Thus it was feasible to operate two sensors, having different sensitivity range, simultaneously and to extend detection range from mm to cm scale, within practically acceptable interference.

  14. NWIS Measurements for uranium metal annular castings

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes measurements performed with annular uranium metal castings of different enrichments to investigate the use of 252 Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements as a means to quantify the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in the casting. This work in FY 97 was sponsored by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the DOE Office of Technology Development Programs. Previous measurements and calculational studies have shown that many of the signatures obtained from the source-driven measurement are very sensitive to fissile mass. Measurements were performed to assess the applicability of this method to standard annular uranium metal castings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant under verification by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) using the Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor. Before the measurements with different enrichments, a limited study of source-detector-casting moderator configurations was performed to enhance the correlated information. These configurations consisted of a casting with no reflector and with various thicknesses of polyethylene reflectors up to 10.16 cm in 2.54 cm steps. The polyethylene moderator thickness of 7.62 cm was used for measurements with castings of different enrichments reported here. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to fissile mass was investigated using four castings each with a different enrichment. The high sensitivity of this measurement method to fissile mass and to other material and configurations provides some advantages over existing safeguards methods

  15. Express method and radon gas measurement detector

    Khajdarov, R.A.; Khajdarov, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the activated charcoal adsorption method. The detector consisted of an electronic unit (200 mm x 180 mm x 80 mm) and a scintillation cell (a tube 200 mm long, 60 mm diam.). The electronic unit contained a power supply, amplifier, discriminator, timer, counter and indicator. The scintillation cell contained a zinc sulfide scintillator, photomultiplier, preamplifier, high voltage power supply and a 200 ml chamber above the scintillator. This chamber was intended to situate activated carbon fibrous absorber and air compressor. In this method, air is drawn through a filter to remove radon decay products and then through the activated carbon cloth by using a compressor. Sampling takes between 5 and 15 minutes. After the sampling, the cloth is heated for 5-10 sec up to 200-250 deg C by electric current passing through the fiber. Radon gas evaporates from the cloth and the device detects scintillation pulses. Owing to a high radon preconcentration factor (by adsorption of radon on the activated carbon cloth from 50-150 L of air of and evaporation into the small volume of the chamber), the detection limit of the method is 2-4 Bq/m 3 . Since the distance between the filter, cloth and scintillator is over 80 mm, the detector only measures radiation from radon without interference from the radon decay products, remaining in the filter and cloth

  16. Fast neutron activating detectors for pulsed flow measurements

    Dyatlov, V.D.; Kunaev, G.T.; Popytaev, A.N.; Cheremukhov, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements to the activation detectors of the pulsed flows of the fast neutrons are considered; the criteria of optimum measurement time, geometrical moderator sizes and radioactive detector element properties have been obtained. On their analysis parameter selection has been carried out. The neutron detector to register the short pulses has been designed and calibrated. The ways of further increase of sensitivity and efficiency of such detectors are discussed

  17. Detector characterization for efficiency calibration in different measurement geometries

    Toma, M.; Dinescu, L.; Sima, O.

    2005-01-01

    In order to perform an accurate efficiency calibration for different measurement geometries a good knowledge of the detector characteristics is required. The Monte Carlo simulation program GESPECOR is applied. The detector characterization required for Monte Carlo simulation is achieved using the efficiency values obtained from measuring a point source. The point source was measured in two significant geometries: the source placed in a vertical plane containing the vertical symmetry axis of the detector and in a horizontal plane containing the centre of the active volume of the detector. The measurements were made using gamma spectrometry technique. (authors)

  18. 47 CFR 15.35 - Measurement detector functions and bandwidths.

    2010-10-01

    ... are based on the use of measurement instrumentation employing an average detector function. Unless... in terms of the average value of the emission, and pulsed operation is employed, the measurement... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement detector functions and bandwidths...

  19. A novel forward projection-based metal artifact reduction method for flat-detector computed tomography

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Beister, Marcel; Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: daniel.prell@imp.uni-erlangen.de

    2009-11-07

    Metallic implants generate streak-like artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) reconstructed volumetric images. This study presents a novel method for reducing these disturbing artifacts by inserting discarded information into the original rawdata using a three-step correction procedure and working directly with each detector element. Computation times are minimized by completely implementing the correction process on graphics processing units (GPUs). First, the original volume is corrected using a three-dimensional interpolation scheme in the rawdata domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This metal artifact-reduced volume is then segmented into three materials, i.e. air, soft-tissue and bone, using a threshold-based algorithm. Subsequently, a forward projection of the obtained tissue-class model substitutes the missing or corrupted attenuation values directly for each flat detector element that contains attenuation values corresponding to metal parts, followed by a final reconstruction. Experiments using tissue-equivalent phantoms showed a significant reduction of metal artifacts (deviations of CT values after correction compared to measurements without metallic inserts reduced typically to below 20 HU, differences in image noise to below 5 HU) caused by the implants and no significant resolution losses even in areas close to the inserts. To cover a variety of different cases, cadaver measurements and clinical images in the knee, head and spine region were used to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of our method. A comparison to a three-dimensional interpolation correction showed that the new approach outperformed interpolation schemes. Correction times are minimized, and initial and corrected images are made available at almost the same time (12.7 s for the initial reconstruction, 46.2 s for the final corrected image compared to 114.1 s and 355.1 s on central processing units (CPUs))

  20. A novel forward projection-based metal artifact reduction method for flat-detector computed tomography

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Beister, Marcel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-01-01

    Metallic implants generate streak-like artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) reconstructed volumetric images. This study presents a novel method for reducing these disturbing artifacts by inserting discarded information into the original rawdata using a three-step correction procedure and working directly with each detector element. Computation times are minimized by completely implementing the correction process on graphics processing units (GPUs). First, the original volume is corrected using a three-dimensional interpolation scheme in the rawdata domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This metal artifact-reduced volume is then segmented into three materials, i.e. air, soft-tissue and bone, using a threshold-based algorithm. Subsequently, a forward projection of the obtained tissue-class model substitutes the missing or corrupted attenuation values directly for each flat detector element that contains attenuation values corresponding to metal parts, followed by a final reconstruction. Experiments using tissue-equivalent phantoms showed a significant reduction of metal artifacts (deviations of CT values after correction compared to measurements without metallic inserts reduced typically to below 20 HU, differences in image noise to below 5 HU) caused by the implants and no significant resolution losses even in areas close to the inserts. To cover a variety of different cases, cadaver measurements and clinical images in the knee, head and spine region were used to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of our method. A comparison to a three-dimensional interpolation correction showed that the new approach outperformed interpolation schemes. Correction times are minimized, and initial and corrected images are made available at almost the same time (12.7 s for the initial reconstruction, 46.2 s for the final corrected image compared to 114.1 s and 355.1 s on central processing units (CPUs)).

  1. Spectral Irradiance Measurements Based on Detector

    Lima, M S; Menegotto, T; Duarte, I; Da Silva, T Ferreira; Alves, L C; Alvarenga, A D; Almeida, G B; Couceiro, I B; Teixeira, R N

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of the realization of absolute spectral irradiance scale at INMETRO in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions using filter radiometers as secondary standards. In the construction of these instruments are used, at least, apertures, interference filters and a trap detector. In the assembly of the trap detectors it was necessary to characterize several photocells in spatial uniformity and shunt resistance. All components were calibrated and these results were analyzed to mount the filter radiometer

  2. Development of a Metal Detector for Smartphones and Its Use in the Teaching Laboratory

    Sobral, Geraldo A.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we describe how to develop an inductive metal detector that can be integrated to any Android or iOS smartphone with a standard audio port at low cost. The results indicate the metal detector can be used in the physics teaching laboratory as a practical application of principles of electromagnetism. It allows one to differentiate…

  3. Disproportionality in Daily Metal Detector Student Searches in U.S. Public Schools

    Gastic, Billie; Johnson, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    While the effectiveness of metal detectors to improve school safety remains debated, many public schools continue to rely on this technology to control school violence. Among them is the 1% of public schools where students are searched on a daily basis by metal detector. This study examines the school-level risk factors associated with daily…

  4. Field demonstration of a portable, X-ray, K-edge heavy-metal detector

    Jensen, T.; Aljundi, T.; Whitmore, C.; Zhong, H.; Gray, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    Under the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program, the authors have designed and built a K-edge heavy metal detector that measures the level of heavy metal contamination inside closed containers in a nondestructive, non-invasive way. The device employs a volumetric technique that takes advantage of the X-ray absorption characteristics of heavy elements, and is most suitable for characterization of contamination inside pipes, processing equipment, closed containers, and soil samples. The K-edge detector is a fast, efficient, and cost-effective in situ characterization tool. More importantly, this device will enhance personnel safety while characterizing radioactive and toxic waste. The prototype K-edge system was operated at the Materials and Chemistry Laboratory User Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site during February 1997. Uranium contaminated pipes and valves from a UF 6 feed facility were inspected using the K-edge technique as well as a baseline nondestructive assay method. Operation of the K-edge detector was demonstrated for uranium contamination ranging from 10 to 6,000 mg/cm 2 and results from the K-edge measurements were found to agree very well with nondestructive assay measurements

  5. A new metallic oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detector for use of in vivo dosimetry

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Kang Dehua; Anatoly Rosenfeld

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of a recently developed metallic oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector for use in vivo dosimetry. Methods: The MOSFET detector was calibrated for X-ray beams of 8 MV and 15 MV, as well as electron beams with energy of 6,8,12 and 18 MeV. The dose linearity of the MOSFET detector was investigated for the doses ranging from 0 up to 50 Gy using 8 MV X-ray beams. Angular effect was evaluated as well in a cylindrical PMMA phantom by changing the beam entrance angle every 15 degree clockwise. The MOSFET detector was then used for a breast cancer patient in vivo dose measurement, after the treatment plan was verified in a water phantom using a NE-2571 ion chamber, in vivo measurements were performed in the first and last treatment, and once per week during the whole treatment. The measured doses were then compared with planning dose to evaluate the accuracy of each treatment. Results: The MOSFET detector represented a good energy response for X-ray beams of 8 MV and 15 MV, and for electron beams with energy of 6 MeV up to 18 MeV. With the 6 V bias, Dose linearity error of the MOSFET detector was within 3.0% up to approximately 50 Gy, which can be significantly reduced to 1% when the detector was calibrated before and after each measurement. The MOSFET response varied within 1.5% for angles from 270 degree to 90 degree. However, maximum error of 10.0% was recorded comparing MOSFET response between forward and backward direction. In vivo measurement for a breast cancer patient using 3DCRT showed that, the average dose deviation between measurement and calculation was 2.8%, and the maximum error was less then 5.0%. Conclusions: The new MOSFET detector, with its advantages of being in size, easy use, good energy response and dose linearity, can be used for in vivo dose measurement. (authors)

  6. Development of Optical Fiber Detector for Measurement of Fast Neutron

    YAGI, Takahiro; KAWAGUCHI, Shinichi; MISAWA, Tsuyoshi; PYEON, Cheol Ho; UNESAKI, Hironobu; SHIROYA, Seiji; OKAJIMA, Shigeaki; TANI, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of fast neutron flux is important for investigation of characteristic of fast reactors. In order to insert a neutron detector in a narrow space such as a gap of between fuel plates and measure the fast neutrons in real time, a neutron detector with an optical fiber has been developed. This detector consists of an optical fiber whose tip is covered with mixture of neutron converter material and scintillator such as ZnS(Ag). The detector for fast neutrons uses ThO 2 as converter material because 232 Th makes fission reaction with fast neutrons. The place where 232 Th can be used is limited by regulations because 232 Th is nuclear fuel material. The purpose of this research is to develop a new optical fiber detector to measure fast neutrons without 232 Th and to investigate the characteristic of the detector. These detectors were used to measure a D-T neutron generator and fast neutron flux distribution at Fast Critical Assembly. The results showed that the fast neutron flux distribution of the new optical fiber detector with ZnS(Ag) was the same as it of the activation method, and the detector are effective for measurement of fast neutrons. (authors)

  7. Measurement with self-powered cobalt and cadmium detectors

    Azzoni, A.

    The principle of function is described and the characteristics are given of self-powered cobalt and cadmium neutron detectors. Requirements are summed up for the material used for these detectors, and the specific properties of used detectors are given. The calibration of developed self-powered detectors was carried out using the L 54 CESNEF reactor channels with a maximum output of 40 kW and a neutron flux of 10 10 to 10 12 n.cm -2 s -1 . The absolute measurement of neutron flux and gamma radiation doses in the channel were carried out at an output of 10 kW. The objective of calibration measurements with cadmium and cobalt detectors was to ascertain the promptness of detector response, to determine their sensitivity to neutrons and to gamma radiation, the effects of radiation on the material of the detectors and the contribution thereof on the resulting signal. Inside the CART irradiation channel of the ESSOR reactor three such detectors were used for the measurement of neutron flux and its fluctuations effected by coolant density fluctuations. The behaviour of the detectors was studied in a high neutron flux (10 14 n.cm -2 s -1 ) and at long-term irradiation. It was found that cobalt detectors may be used to advantage for measuring the neutron flux if prompt response is required. The high sensitivity to gamma radiation does, however, limit their uses. Cadmium detectors are sensitive to the neutron flux (currents of several mA with a neutron flux of approximately 10 14 n.cm -2 s -1 ) while response to gamma radiation is considerably limited. These detectors are advantageous for short-term use, such as neutron flux mapping and measuring fluctuations. (B.S.)

  8. Ionization detector for aerosol air pollution detection and ventilation control in the metal processing industry

    Kovacs, Istvan

    1989-01-01

    An indicator and measuring instrument was developed for the continuous monitoring, recording and indicating aerosol mass concentrations in mechanical workshops, like in metal cutting, welding or forming industries, for air pollution control and ventilation of the atmosphere in the workshops. An ionization chamber containing alpha radiation source was modified for this purpose, and a suitable electronic circuit was built for the measurement of ionization current. The calibration of the ionization aerosol detectors was performed for welding smoke and oil mist. They were suitable for continuous monitoring of workshop atmospheres and controlling ventilation equipment, or as portable instruments, for the rapid inspection of air pollution. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 3 figs

  9. Angular detector of defects in a metallic tube by eddy currents

    Broudeur, R.

    1990-01-01

    The angular detector of defects in a metallic tube has two centering pieces for the clad positioning on both sides of a backing ring of the measuring coil. The inner diameter of the backing ring and the diameter of the centering pieces are in the ratio 4/3±0.6/3 and their axis are eccentric. This setting over associated at the guiding piece of the sheath in rotation gives at the measuring coil a functioning as a ponctual probe [fr

  10. Artifact reduction of different metallic implants in flat detector C-arm CT.

    Hung, S-C; Wu, C-C; Lin, C-J; Guo, W-Y; Luo, C-B; Chang, F-C; Chang, C-Y

    2014-07-01

    Flat detector CT has been increasingly used as a follow-up examination after endovascular intervention. Metal artifact reduction has been successfully demonstrated in coil mass cases, but only in a small series. We attempted to objectively and subjectively evaluate the feasibility of metal artifact reduction with various metallic objects and coil lengths. We retrospectively reprocessed the flat detector CT data of 28 patients (15 men, 13 women; mean age, 55.6 years) after they underwent endovascular treatment (20 coiling ± stent placement, 6 liquid embolizers) or shunt drainage (n = 2) between January 2009 and November 2011 by using a metal artifact reduction correction algorithm. We measured CT value ranges and noise by using region-of-interest methods, and 2 experienced neuroradiologists rated the degrees of improved imaging quality and artifact reduction by comparing uncorrected and corrected images. After we applied the metal artifact reduction algorithm, the CT value ranges and the noise were substantially reduced (1815.3 ± 793.7 versus 231.7 ± 95.9 and 319.9 ± 136.6 versus 45.9 ± 14.0; both P metallic objects and various sizes of coil masses. The rater study achieved an overall improvement of imaging quality and artifact reduction (85.7% and 78.6% of cases by 2 raters, respectively), with the greatest improvement in the coiling group, moderate improvement in the liquid embolizers, and the smallest improvement in ventricular shunting (overall agreement, 0.857). The metal artifact reduction algorithm substantially reduced artifacts and improved the objective image quality in every studied case. It also allowed improved diagnostic confidence in most cases. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. The Siegen automatic measuring system for track detectors: new developments

    Rusch, G.; Winkel, E.; Noll, A.; Heinrich, W.

    1991-01-01

    Starting twelve years ago we have developed completely automatic scanning and measuring systems for nuclear track detectors. The hardware and software of these systems have continuously been improved. They were used in different heavy ion and cosmic ray experiments. In this paper we describe methods for high resolution REL measurements in plastic nuclear track detectors and methods to scan and measure nuclear disintegration stars in AgCl detectors using an automatic measuring technique. The system uses a stepping motor driven microscope stage, a video camera and an image analysis computer based on a MC68020 microprocessor. (author)

  12. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  13. Reference detectors for low flux optical radiation measurements

    Bellouati-Ghazi, Amal

    2003-01-01

    The parametric down conversion of photons generated in a non-linear crystal gives rise to two correlated photons. Associated to a System of counting of coincidences, this phenomenon makes possible the quantum efficiency measurements of detectors working on photon counting levels, without using neither sources nor detectors of references. This new method was developed at BNMINM with the aim to realize new standards detectors in the field of weak flows. It allows the determination of quantum efficiency with a relative uncertainty of 1,1%. A comparison with the IENGF (Italy) bearing on the quantum determination of efficiency of one of BNM-FNM detectors made possible to confront the exactitude of the measuring equipment. This detector was also made the object of a comparison with the French reference of radiometry, the cryogenic radiometer, the results were in agreement with uncertainties of measurements. (author) [fr

  14. Design criteria for a hemispherical detector for LET measurements

    Schell, M.C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    A detector for the direct measurement of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) in cylindrical geometry was developed by Brandan and DeLuca. The detector successfully measured the LET of protons and a fraction of the heavy charged particles generated in cylindrical A150 plastic and graphite walls by 14.8 MeV neutrons. In this report, we present design tests for the hemispherical LET detector which will measure the LET of charged particles in spherical geometry and allow comparison with calculated LET spectra. The hemispherical LET detector will also provide a data base for radiobiological predictions with the Track Structure Model by Katz. A comparison of predictions of radiobiological effects by the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and the Track Structure Model by Edwards and the authors indicate that the Track Structure Model predicts cell survival as a function of dose more accurately and hence an additional motivation for the present construction of the hemispherical LET detector

  15. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  16. Multicomponent activation detector measurements of reactor neutron spectra

    Sandberg, J.; Aarnio, P. A.; Routti, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Information on the neutron flux is required in many applications of research reactors, such as activation analysis or radiation damage measurements. Flux spectrum measurements are commonly carried out with activation foils. The reaction types used are threshold reactions in the fast energy region, resonance reactions in the intermediate region and neutron capture reactions with l/v-cross section in the thermal region. It has been shown that it is possible to combine several detector elements into homogeneous multicomponent detectors. The activities of all detector reaction products can be determined with a single gamma spectrum measurement. The multicomponent principle sets some restrictions on the choice of detector reactions, for example, each product nuclide may be produced in one reaction only. Separate multicomponent threshold and resonance detectors were designed for the fast and intermediate regions, respectively. The detectors were fabricated in polyethylene irradiation capsules or quartz glass ampoules, and they were irradiated in a cadmium cover. The detectors were succesfully used in the irradiation ring and in the core of a Triga reactor. The intermediate and fast neutron spectrum was unfolded with the least-squares unfolding program LOUHI. According to the preliminary results multicomponent activation detectors might constitute a convenient means for carrying out routine neutron spectrum measurements in research reactors. (orig.)

  17. Three types of photon detectors for in situ measurements

    Helmer, R. G.; Gehrke, R. J.; Carpenter, M. V.

    1999-02-01

    The authors have been involved in the calibration and use of three types of γ- and X-ray detectors for in situ measurements of soil contamination. These three detectors are an N-type, thin-window Ge semiconductor detector (5.0 cm diam.× 2.0 cm deep), a plastic scintillator (30.5 cm × 30.5 cm × 3.8 cm thick), and an array of six CaF 2 detectors (each 7.6 cm × 7.6 cm × 0.15 cm thick). The latter two detectors have been used with scanning systems that allow significant areas (say, >100 m 2) to be surveyed completely with the aid of either laser-based triangulation or a global positioning system (GPS) to record the precise position for each measurement. Typically, these systems scan at a rate of 15-30 cm/s which allows an area of 100 m 2 to covered with the plastic scintillator in about 15 min. The data are telemetered or transferred via RS232 protocol to a computer, providing operators with real-time mapping of the area surveyed and of the measured detector count rate. The "efficiencies" of these detectors have been determined by a combination of measurements of calibrated planar sources and Monte Carlo transport calculations for a variety of source sizes and depths in soil, as well as by comparing these field measurements with independent laboratory sample analysis.

  18. Passive Time Coincidence Measurements with HEU and DU Metal Castings

    McConchie, Seth M.; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T.; Wright, Michael C.; Archer, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A Department of Energy sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Y-12 National Security Complex program of passive time coincidence measurements has been initiated at Y-12 to evaluate the ability to determine the presence of high enriched uranium (HEU) and distinguish it from depleted uranium (DU). This program uses the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) without an active interrogation source. Previous passive NMIS measurements with Pu metal and Pu oxide have been successful in determining the Pu mass, assuming a known 240Pu content. The spontaneous fission of uranium metal is considerably lower than Pu and measurements of this type have been performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work presents results of measurements of HEU and DU metal castings using moderated 3He detectors.

  19. Vertex measurement at a hadron collider. The ATLAS pixel detector

    Grosse-Knetter, J.

    2008-03-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system and will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the Pixel Detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, fast read-out, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability, all combined with a low material budget. The new design concepts used to meet the challenging requirements are discussed with their realisation in the Pixel Detector, followed by a description of a refined and extensive set of measurements to assess the detector performance during and after its construction. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of indoor radon concentration by CR-39 track detector

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Yoneda, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    A convenient and cheap method for measuring indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration with a CR-39 track detector is described. The detector consisted of two sheets of CR-39 enclosed separately in two plastic pots : one covered by a filter (cup method) and another no covering (bare method). The bare method was used here to supplement the cup method. To compare with the result of the CR-39 detector, alpha-ray spectrometry was carried out with a Si(Au) detector in a controlled radon exposure chamber. Indoor radon concentration measured in 133 houses in several districts of Ishikawa Prefecture have been found to range from 6 Bq/m 3 to as high as 113 Bq/m 3 with a median value of 24 Bq/m 3 . The problems to measure indoor radon concentration using the CR-39 detector are also discussed with emphasis on the position of setting the detector in the room and the possible thoron contribution to the detector. (author)

  1. Measuring the Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos with the MINOS Detector

    Radovic, Alexander [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It measures the flux from the predominately muon neutrino NuMI beam first 1 km from beam start and then again 735 km later using a pair of steel scintillator tracking calorimeters. The comparison of measured neutrino energy spectra at our Far Detector with the prediction based on our Near Detector measurement allows for a measurement of the parameters which define neutrino oscillations. This thesis will describe the most recent measurement of muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI muon neutrino beam using the MINOS experiment.

  2. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm 3 NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR 192 Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility ( 2 =1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for 192 Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2±0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0±0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments

  3. Quality control measurements for digital x-ray detectors

    Marshall, N W [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, 49 Herenstraat, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Mackenzie, A [National Co-ordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Medical Physics, Level B, St Luke' s Wing, The Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Trust, Egerton Road, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Honey, I D, E-mail: nicholas.marshall@uz.kuleuven.ac.be [Department of Medical Physics, Floor 3, Henriette Raphael House, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a digital radiography (DR) quality control protocol for DR detectors from the forthcoming report from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The protocol was applied to a group of six identical caesium iodide (CsI) digital x-ray detectors to assess reproducibility of methods, while four further detectors were assessed to examine the wider applicability. Twelve images with minimal spatial frequency processing are required, from which the detector response, lag, modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and threshold contrast-detail (c-d) detectability are calculated. The x-ray spectrum used was 70 kV and 1 mm added copper filtration, with a target detector air kerma of 2.5 {mu}Gy for the NNPS and c-d results. In order to compare detector performance with previous imaging technology, c-d data from four screen/film systems were also acquired, at a target optical density of 1.5 and an average detector air kerma of 2.56 {mu}Gy. The DR detector images were typically acquired in 20 min, with a further 45 min required for image transfer and analysis. The average spatial frequency for the 50% point of the MTF for six identical detectors was 1.29 mm{sup -1} {+-} 0.05 (3.9% coefficient of variation (cov)). The air kerma set for the six systems was 2.57 {mu}Gy {+-} 0.13 (5.0% cov) and the NNPS at this air kerma was 1.42 x 10{sup -5} mm{sup 2} (6.5% cov). The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measured for the six identical detectors was 0.60 at 0.5 mm{sup -1}, with a maximum cov of 10% at 2.9 mm{sup -1}, while the average DQE was 0.56 at 0.5 mm{sup -1} for three CsI detectors from three different manufacturers. Comparable c-d performance was found for these detectors (5.9% cov) with an average threshold contrast of 0.46% for 11 mm circular discs. The average threshold contrast for the S/F systems was 0.70% at 11 mm, indicating superior imaging performance for the digital systems. The protocol was found

  4. Development of electron temperature measuring system by silicon drift detector

    Song Xianying; Yang Jinwei; Liao Min

    2007-12-01

    Soft X-ray spectroscopy with two channels Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) are adopted for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak in 2005. The working principle, design and first operation of the SDD soft X-ray spectroscopy are introduced. The measuring results of electron temperature are also presented. The results show that the SDD is very good detector for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak. These will become a solid basic work to establish SDD array for electron temperature profiling. (authors)

  5. The antiproton depth–dose curve measured with alanine detectors

    Bassler, Niels; Palmans, Hugo; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Kovacevic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    n this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth–dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen and Olsen for conversion of calculated dose into response. A good agreement is observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although an underestimation of the measured values beyond the Bragg-peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields.

  6. Superheated superconducting granule detector tested with nuclear recoil measurements

    Berger, C.; Czapek, G.; Diggelmann, U.; Flammer, I.; Frei, D.; Furlan, M.; Gabutti, A.; Janos, S.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schmiemann, K.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Brandt, B. van den; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.

    1993-01-01

    The presented results are part of a superheated superconducting granule (SSG) detector development for neutrino and dark matter. The aim of the experiment was to measure the sensitivity of the detector to nuclear recoil energies when exposed to a 70 MeV neutron beam. The detector consists of a small readout coil (diameter 5 mm, length 10 mm) filled with aluminum granules of average diameter 23 μm embedded in an Al 2 O 3 granulate with a 6% volume filling factor. The neutron scattering angles were determined using a scintillator hodoscope. Coincidences between the SSG and the hodoscope signals have been clearly established. Data were taken at an operating temperature of 120 mK for different SSG intrinsic thresholds. The results prove the sensitivity of the detector to nuclear recoils around 10 keV. (orig.)

  7. Exclusive ρ0 production measured with the HERMES recoil detector

    Perez Benito, Roberto Francisco

    2010-12-01

    The Hermes experiment (HERa MEasurement of Spin) at Desy was designed to study the spin structure of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The internal structure of the nucleon has been investigated in detail and it has been measured that the intrinsic quark spin contribution is only about 30% of the total spin of the nucleon. A formalism to describe the internal structure of the nucleon called Generalised Patron Distributions (GPDs) was developed recently to understand the fundamental structure of the nucleon. These GPDs can be accessed by the measurement of hard exclusive reactions and hard exclusive processes that can be understood in terms of GPDs. The accumulated Hermes data offer access to GPDs in different combinations of beam charge and beam and target helicity asymmetries. To improve exclusivity and to enhance the resolution of kinematic variables to study hard exclusive processes which provide access to the GPDs and hence to the orbital angular momentum of the quarks, in January 2006 a Recoil Detector was installed that surrounded the internal gas target of the Hermes experiment. The Hermes Recoil Detector consisted of three components: a silicon strip detector inside the vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and the photon detector. All three detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnet which provided a 1T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector improves the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the momentum and track position of the recoiling particle as well as by rejecting non-exclusive background. This detector was an ideal novel tool to combine energy and position measurements for charged particles in a momentum range of 0.1 to 1.4 GeV/c. The Recoil Detector was fully commissioned and operating. Data was taken continuously until the final Hera shutdown in July of 2007. In this thesis we report on the performance of the Recoil Detector and more specifically about the scintillating fiber tracker

  8. Inner detector alignment and top-quark mass measurement with the ATLAS detector

    Moles-Valls, Regina

    This thesis is divided in two parts: one related with the alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector tracking system and other with the measurement of the top-quark mass. Both topics are connected by the Globalχ2 fitting method. In order to measure the properties of the particles with high accuracy, the ID detector is composed by devices with high intrinsic resolution. If by any chance the position of the modules in the detector is known with worse precision than their intrinsic resolution this may introduce a distortion in the reconstructed trajectory of the particles or at least degrade the tracking resolution. The alignment is the responsible of determining the location of each module with high precision and avoiding therefore any bias in the physics results. During the commissioning of the detector, different alignment exercises were performed for preparing the Globalχ2 algorithm (the CSC , the FDR, weak modes studies,…). At the same time, the ATLAS detector was collecting million of cosmic rays which were...

  9. Measurement of W/Z production with the ATLAS detector

    Sauvan, JB; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The production of W and Z bosons at the LHC has been measured with the ATLAS detector. These measurements include inclusive and differential cross sections, $W$ polarisation, and the polarisation of tau leptons from W decays. They show sensitivity to the proton structure and are also used to test predictions from perturbative QCD and phenomenological models.

  10. Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The seminar presents an overview of the ATLAS electroweak physics programme. Recent measurements of di-boson and multi-boson production processes involving combinations of W, Z and isolated photons, associated with up to two jets, at 8 TeV proton-proton collisions are discussed. Inclusive, fiducial and differential production cross sections are presented, including vector-boson fusion and vector-boson scattering processes. These measurements allow to derive constraints on anomalous triple and quartic gauge couplings.

  11. Electroweak measurements with the ATLAS detector.

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349845; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of multi-boson production processes involving combinations of W, Z and isolated photons at 8 TeV are summarized. Standard Model cross section are measured with high precision by ATLAS and are compared to world averages. Production processes sensitive to vector-boson fusion and vector-boson scattering are also presented and used for the triple and quartic gauge boson couplings limits setting.

  12. Intelligent nuclear measuring system for multi detectors

    Gujgiczer, A.; Solymosi, J.; Zsille, O.; Illes, Z.; Barnabas, I.; Ranga, T.; Lakatos, T.

    1998-01-01

    The measuring system can be used for recording gamma spectra and/or experimental beta-dispersion. Several environmental samples can be examined simultaneously, and the instrument can be used in the laboratory or in the field. Low cost multichannel analyzers using NaI(Tl) or plastic scintillators are interfaced to an IBM PC/AT, which controls the measurement, data processing, and data transmission and archiving. (M.D.)

  13. Track etch detectors with air gap for measurements of radon in soil

    Turek, K; Bednar, J [Czech Academy of Sciences, 18086 Prague (Czech Republic). Nuclear Research Inst., Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry; Neznal, M [Radon Corp., 28922 Lysa nad Labem (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    The main aim of this study was to develop a method of radon concentration measurements in soil using track etch detectors without cups. Our approach enables to minimize the detector dimensions resulting into smaller diameter of drilled holes, more rigid construction, easier handling and mailing, lower consumption of material and consequently in lower costs. The parallel arrangement of two track etch detectors in the open metallic holder seems to be promising as the complementary method to the commonly used cup-technique for radon measurement. The firmness, simple and compact construction, small size as well as low costs could be successfully utilized mainly in field measurement. The possibility of a variable sensitivity by the distance between the detectors makes the system versatile for many applications, 2 detectors with different h can practically exclude of under- or overexposure. The more precise calibrations including exposures in radon-chamber and study of an eventual influence of humidity are supposed to be done in the nearest future. (J.K) 2 tabs.

  14. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  15. Density and water content measurement with two dual detector probes

    Cariou, J.; Menard, J.

    1980-01-01

    The ''Laboratoires des Ponts et Chaussees'' have developed an electronic device for geological prospections. This system includes gamma-gamma and neutron-neutron probes for continuous measurement in borehole down to one hundred meters. It is used, as well to measure the density and the water content in the field of soil mechanic engineering. When the diameter is not constant all along the borehole the two probes have to use a dual detector procedure. When constant, a simple detector procedure is sufficient to obtain density and water content. Two examples show the possibilities of this apparatus, particularly to control the borehole diameter and the soil chemical composition [fr

  16. An intercomparison of detectors for measurement of background radiation

    Nielsen, S.P.; Boetter-Jensen, L.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the background radiation were made in 1978 at 14 locations with a high-pressure ionization chamber, thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD's), two NaI(Tl) detectors, and a Ge(Li) spectrometer system. Simultaneous measurements with the ionization chamber and the spectrometer system provide reliable estimates of the total background exposure rate, of the individual contributors to the terrestrial exposure rate, and of the exposure rate from the secondary cosmic radiation. The TLD results agree with those of the ionization chamber. The NaI(Tl) detector results show that accurate estimates of the terrestrial exposure rate can be obtained if empirical corrections are applied. (author)

  17. The Antiproton Depth Dose Curve Measured with Alanine Detectors

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, Johnny Witterseh; Palmans, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report on the measurement of the antiproton depth dose curve, with alanine detectors. The results are compared with simulations using the particle energy spectrum calculated by FLUKA, and using the track structure model of Hansen et Olsen for conversion of calculated dose...... into response. A good agreement was observed between the measured and calculated relative effectiveness although a slight underestimation of the calculated values in the Bragg peak remains unexplained. The model prediction of response of alanine towards heavy charged particles encourages future use...... of the alanine detectors for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields....

  18. Measurement of the Higgs boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    Garay Walls F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the latest results on the combined measurement of the Higgs boson mass in the H → ZZ* → 4l and the H → γγ decay channels with the ATLAS detector is presented. The analysis uses 25 fb−1 of pp collision data recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8 TeV during 2011 and 2012. The combined measured value of the Higgs boson mass is mH = 125.36 ± 0.37 (stat ± 0.18 (syst GeV.

  19. Application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurments

    Abu-Jarad, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    The application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurements is discussed. The ''Can Technique'', used for measuring radon emanation from building materials, walls and soil; the ''Working Level Monitor'', used for measuring short period working levels of radon daughters in houses; and ''Passive Radon Dosimeters'', used to measure radon levels in houses for long term (few months) periods are described. Application of nuclear track detectors for measuring the radon daughters plate-out on the surface of mixing fan blades and walls are discussed. The uranium content of some wall papers was found to be 6 ppm. The variation of radon progeny concentration in the same room was measured and supported by another study through Gas Chromatograph measurements. The independence of radon concentration on room level in high-rise buildings was established. The effect of sub-floor radon emanation on radon concentration in houses is dependent on whether there is sub-floor ventilation or not. (author)

  20. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector

    Obradovic, D.; Bosevski, T.

    1964-01-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable

  1. Energy-loss measurement with the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector

    Bartsch, D.

    2007-05-15

    The measurement of the specific energy loss due to ionisation, dE/dx, in a drift chamber is a very important tool for particle identification in final states of reactions between high energetic particles. Such identification requires a well understood dE/dx measurement including a precise knowledge of its uncertainties. Exploiting for the first time the full set of ZEUS data from the HERA operation between 1996 and 2005 twelve detector-related influences affecting the dE/dx measurement of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector have been identified, separately studied and parameterised. A sophisticated iterative procedure has been developed to correct for these twelve effects, which takes into account the correlations between them. A universal parameterisation of the detector-specific Bethe-Bloch curve valid for all particle species has been extracted. In addition, the various contributions to the measurement uncertainty have been disentangled and determined. This yields the best achievable prediction for the single-track dE/dx resolution. For both the analysis of the measured data and the simulation of detector performance, the detailed understanding of the measurement and resolution of dE/dx gained in this work provides a tool with optimum power for particle identification in a physics studies. (orig.)

  2. Energy-loss measurement with the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector

    Bartsch, D.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of the specific energy loss due to ionisation, dE/dx, in a drift chamber is a very important tool for particle identification in final states of reactions between high energetic particles. Such identification requires a well understood dE/dx measurement including a precise knowledge of its uncertainties. Exploiting for the first time the full set of ZEUS data from the HERA operation between 1996 and 2005 twelve detector-related influences affecting the dE/dx measurement of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector have been identified, separately studied and parameterised. A sophisticated iterative procedure has been developed to correct for these twelve effects, which takes into account the correlations between them. A universal parameterisation of the detector-specific Bethe-Bloch curve valid for all particle species has been extracted. In addition, the various contributions to the measurement uncertainty have been disentangled and determined. This yields the best achievable prediction for the single-track dE/dx resolution. For both the analysis of the measured data and the simulation of detector performance, the detailed understanding of the measurement and resolution of dE/dx gained in this work provides a tool with optimum power for particle identification in a physics studies. (orig.)

  3. Displacement measurement system for linear array detector

    Zhang Pengchong; Chen Ziyu; Shen Ji

    2011-01-01

    It presents a set of linear displacement measurement system based on encoder. The system includes displacement encoders, optical lens and read out circuit. Displacement read out unit includes linear CCD and its drive circuit, two amplifier circuits, second order Butterworth low-pass filter and the binarization circuit. The coding way is introduced, and various parts of the experimental signal waveforms are given, and finally a linear experimental test results are given. The experimental results are satisfactory. (authors)

  4. Radon measurements technique in air using a track plastic detector

    Pereira, J.F.A.; Silva Estrada, J.J. da; Binns, D.A.C.; Urban, M.

    1983-01-01

    A difusion chamber is used to measure the radon concentration in air through alpha particles tracks in Makrofol E, 300μm thick. This system was developed by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, Germany, and is already used by the Occupational Radiological Protection Department of IRD/CNEN, for premilimar measurements in Pocos de Caldas and Rio de Janeiro. In the chamber, the plastic detector is set at the lower end and a filter is placed at the upper end. In this way, a known volume is defined in the detector system. To amplify the tracks produced by the alpha particles due to radon and short-lived dadon-daughter products, an electrochemical system is employed. Some theoretical questions about the treeing produced by the electrochemical etching, the detector characteristics, as well as the adapted statistics model are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  5. Rancang Bangun Deteksi Jalur Pipa Terpendam Menggunakan Mobile Robot dengan Metal Detector

    Dwi Indah Pratiwi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ketika melaksanakan pembangunan atau perbaikan sesuatu di dalam tanah diperlukan secara akurat mengetahui lokasi utilitas bawah tanah, seperti instalasi pipa logam dan kabel listrik. Sedangkan selama ini masih cenderung kurang adanya pemetaan jaringan utilitas bawah tanah yang jelas. Telah banyak kasus dan pihak yang dirugikan karena masalah ini, seperti kebocoran atau bahkan ledakan. Utilitas bawah tanah yang mengandung logam seperti pipa logam, dapat dideteksi dengan metal detector. Dalam penelitian ini, metal detector yang dibuat menggunakan prinsip beat frequency oscillator (BFO dimana prinsipnya memanfaatkan perubahan frekuensi untuk mendeteksi keberadaan logam. Mikrokontroller Arduino Uno digunakan dalam rangkaian metal detector sebagai frequency counter. Metal detector ini kemudian diaplikasikan sebagai sensor ke sebuah mobile robot. Dengan membaca data metal detector dari Arduino Uno, robot kemudian dapat bergerak mengikuti jalur pipa logam. Robot juga dilengkapi dengan sistem navigasi berdasarkan posisi GPS, sehingga posisi dan gerakan robot dapat diketahui. Pengujian dilakukan pada 3 jenis bahan logam, yaitu besi (ferromagnetik, alumunium (paramagnetik, dan seng (diamagnetik. Hasil pendeteksian paling kuat didapatkan pada bahan besi. Jarak deteksi sensor bervariasi tergantung konstruksi kumparan dan jenis benda logam yang diuji. Pada pengujian dengan pipa besi berdiameter 3 cm, sensor dapat mendeteksi maksimal pada jarak 10 cm tanpa halangan. Dalam aplikasi mobile robot, digunakan 3 sensor untuk mempermudah pendeteksian ketika ada jalur yang berkelok tajam.  

  6. QCD measurements with the CMS detector

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In the first year of LHC data taking, CMS pursued a rich program of QCD physics. In the low-pt front, results on momentum-, pseudorapidity- and multiplicity distributions of charged and strange hadrons, underlying event observables, two particle rapidity correlations and Bose-Einstein correlations are presented. In the high-pt front, jet and photon cross-section measurements are reported on inclusive and di-object production, as well as ratios of 3/2 jet cross sections. Finally, the QCD multi-jet dynamics is explored with event-shapes variables, dijet azimuthal decorrelations and dijet angular distributions

  7. A scintillation detector for measuring inert gas beta rays

    Shi Hengchang; Yu Yunchang

    1989-10-01

    The inert gas beta ray scintillation detector, which is made of organic high polymers as the base and coated with compact fluorescence materials, is a lower energy scintillation detector. It can be used in the nuclear power plant and radioactive fields as a lower energy monitor to detect inert gas beta rays. Under the conditions of time constant 10 minutes, confidence level is 99.7% (3σ), the intensity of gamma rays 2.6 x 10 -7 C/kg ( 60 Co), and the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of this detector for 133 Xe 1.2 Bq/L. The measuring range for 133 Xe is 11.1 ∼ 3.7 x 10 4 Bq/L. After a special measure is taken, the device is able to withstand 3 x 10 5 Pa gauge pressure. In the loss-of-cooolant-accident, it can prevent the radioactive gas of the detector from leaking. This detector is easier to be manufactured and decontaminated

  8. An electrostatic detector for dust measurement on HT-7 tokamak

    Ling, B.L.; Zhang, X.D.; Ti, A.; Gao, X.

    2007-01-01

    An electrostatic dust detector has been successfully developed to measure dust event in situ and in real time on the HT-7 tokamak. For measuring dust near the edge plasmas and preventing interference of electrons and ions, the shielding plates were designed and installed around the dust detector. The electric signal of dust has been successfully measured during LHCD discharges on HT-7 tokamak. The measured dust signal was in good agreement with bursts appeared on multi-channel H α radiation and on multi-channel ECE diagnostics. Diagnostics of the spectrum and the measurement of impurity emission during dust bursts were studied in detail. It is interesting that there is a delay between dust bursts and CIII line emission. It is observed that the delay time between dust signal and measured CIII line emission is about 0.3 ms in the HT-7 tokamak

  9. Secondary standard neutron detector for measuring total reaction cross sections

    Sekharan, K.K.; Laumer, H.; Gabbard, F.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron detector has been constructed and calibrated for the accurate measurement of total neutron-production cross sections. The detector consists of a polyethylene sphere of 24'' diameter in which 8- 10 BF 3 counters have been installed radially. The relative efficiency of this detector has been determined for average neutron energies, from 30 keV to 1.5 MeV by counting neutrons from 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be. By adjusting the radial positions of the BF 3 counters in the polyethylene sphere the efficiency for neutron detection was made nearly constant for this energy range. Measurement of absolute efficiency for the same neutron energy range has been done by counting the neutrons from 51 V(p,n) 51 Cr and 57 Fe(p,n) 57 Co reactions and determining the absolute number of residual nuclei produced during the measurement of neutron yield. Details of absolute efficiency measurements and the use of the detector for measurement of total neutron yields from neutron producing reactions such as 23 Na(p,n) 23 Mg are given

  10. Graphite-based detectors of alkali metals for nuclear power plants

    Kalandarishvili, A.G.; Kuchukhidze, V.A.; Sordiya, T.D.; Shartava, Sh.Sh.; Stepennov, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    The coolants most commonly used in today's fast reactors are alkali metals or their alloys. A major problem in nuclear plant design is leakproofing of the liquid-metal cooling system, and many leak detection methods and safety specifications have been developed as a result. Whatever the safety standards adopted for nuclear plants in different countries, they all rely on the basic fact that control of the contamination and radiation hazards involved requires reliable monitoring equipment. Results are presented of trials with some leak detectors for the alkali-metal circuits of nuclear reactors. The principal component affecting the detector performance is the sensing element. In the detectors graphite was employed, whose laminar structure enables it to absorb efficiently alkali-metal vapors at high temperatures (320--500 K). This produces a continuous series of alkali-metal-graphite solid solutions with distinct electrical, thermal, and other physical properties. The principle of operation of the detectors resides in the characteristic reactions of the metal-graphite system. One detector type uses the change of electrical conductivity of the graphite-film sensor when it is exposed to alkali-metal vapor. In order to minimize the effect of temperature on the resistance the authors prepared composite layers of graphite intercalated with a donor impurity (cesium or barium), and a graphite-nickel material. The addition of a small percentage of cesium, barium, or nickel produces a material whose temperature coefficient of resistance is nearly zero. Used as a sensing element, such a material can eliminate the need for thermostatic control of the detector

  11. Analysis and optimal design of Si microstrip detector with overhanging metal electrode

    Ranjan, Kirti; Chatterji, S; Srivastava-Ajay, K; Shivpuri, R K

    2001-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment to be encountered at LHC (large hadron collider) and RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) poses a challenging task for the fabrication of Si microstrip detectors. Due to high luminosities, detectors are required to sustain very high voltage operation well exceeding the bias voltage needed to fully deplete them. The "overhanging" metal contact is now a well established technique for improving the breakdown performance of the Si microstrip detector. Based on computer simulation, the influence of various physical and geometrical parameters on the electrical breakdown of the Si detectors equipped with metal overhangs is extensively analysed. Furthermore, optimization of design parameters is performed to achieve breakdown voltages close to maximum realizable values. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. (17 refs).

  12. Operation of a hemispherical detector for LET measurements

    Schell, M.C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    A hemispherical ΔE/E detector has been constructed and tested for the measurement of linear-energy-transfer distributions of charged particles induced by fast neutrons. The initial performance test results and LET distributions from 14.8-MeV monoenergetic neutron irradiation in free space of carbon, lead, and Al50-plastic are presented

  13. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    -doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios...... measurements, the authors recommend the use of detectors that require relatively little correction, such as unshielded diodes, diamond detectors or microchambers, and solid state detectors such as alanine, TLD, Al2O3:C, or scintillators....

  14. Measurements of quarkonia with the central detectors of ALICE

    Sommer, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The production of quarkonia, the bound state of an heavy quark with its anti-particle, has for a long time been seen as a key process to understand the properties of nuclear matter in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. This thesis presents studies on the production of quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions at the new Large Hadron collider (LHC). The focus is set on the decay of J/Psi and Upsilon-states into their di-electronic decay channel, measured within the central detectors of the ALICE detector. (orig.)

  15. Measurements of quarkonia with the central detectors of ALICE

    Sommer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-26

    The production of quarkonia, the bound state of an heavy quark with its anti-particle, has for a long time been seen as a key process to understand the properties of nuclear matter in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. This thesis presents studies on the production of quarkonia in heavy-ion collisions at the new Large Hadron collider (LHC). The focus is set on the decay of J/Psi and Upsilon-states into their di-electronic decay channel, measured within the central detectors of the ALICE detector. (orig.)

  16. A micromegas detector for {sup 222}Rn emanations measurements

    García, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Irastorza, I. G.; Mirallas, H. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Altas Energías, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-08-08

    The {sup 222}Rn emanation has significant contribution in the overall background for rare event searches experiments. In order to measure this emanations a high sensitivity detector has been designed. The detection method is based on the electrostatic collection of the {sup 222}Rn daughters on a Micromegas detector. Using a chamber with a volume of 21.2 l for the collection of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po progeny of {sup 222}Rn and a 12 × 12cm{sup 2} pixelized Micromegas for the α detection. The advantages of the Micromegas detectors are the low intrinsic radioactivity and the track reconstruction of the α’s, having excellent capabilities for event discrimination.

  17. Heavy ion measurements by use of chemical detectors

    Huebner, K.; Erzgraeber, G.; Eichhorn, K.

    1980-01-01

    In order to test whether the threshold system polyvinyl alcohol/methyl organe/chloral hydrate/sodium tetraborate permits quantitative detection of individual particles, the chemical detector was irradiated at the JINR U-200 cyclotron with 4 He, 12 C, 18 O, 22 Ne ions having different LET. Irradiations were performed with detectors of four different borax concentrations (the chloral hydrate concentration being constant). The colour change dose Dsub(u) increases linearly with increasing borax concentration and at constant borax concentration with increasing LET. Hence it follows that the G value of dehydrochlorination decreases with increasing LET. Fluence ranges measurable with detectors of different composition are given for the heavy ions studied. (author)

  18. Measurement of neutron sensitivity of self powered neutron detectors

    Mahant, A.K.; Yeshuraja, V.; Ghodke, Shobha

    2005-01-01

    Self powered neutron detectors (SPNDs ) will form the part of Reactor Instrumentation in the upcoming 500 MWe power reactors. ECIL has developed Vanadium and Cobalt SPNDs for NPCIL to be used in regulation and protection channels. Experimental determination of neutron sensitivity of the vanadium and cobalt Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) was carried out in A-l location of Apsara reactor at BARC. The measurements involved determination of total detector signal, its various components and the thermal neutron flux at the detector location. The paper describes the experimental techniques used to measure various parameters required to evaluate the neutron sensitivity of the SPNDs and also the parameters required to ascertain the integrity of SPNDs. Neutron flux measurement was done by gold foil irradiation technique. The predominant signal component from the vanadium SPND is Ib the current due to activation of the vanadium emitter, it forms about 85% of the total signal. The other components I n,γ due to the capture gamma rays of 52 V and I externalγ produced by the external reactor gamma rays contribute about 10% and 5% respectively to the total signal. Whereas in the cobalt SPND the main signal component is due to the capture gamma rays of 60 Co and accounts for about the 95% of the total signal. Remaining 5% signal is due to external reactor gamma rays. (author)

  19. Characterization of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements

    Holanda M, L. de; Federico, C. A.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2014-08-01

    Air crews, as pilots and flight attendants, are subjected to cosmic ray doses which can be higher than the average doses on workers from the nuclear industry. The diversity of particles of high energies present in the radiation field on board of air crafts turns the determination of the incident dose difficult, and requires special care regarding dosimetric systems to be used in this kind of radiation field. The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA) in conjunction with the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP) are working on this subject since 2008. A prototype of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements was previously built and tested in flight and laboratory conditions. The detector is able of measuring a quantity known as absorbed dose (using passive dosimeters), which will subsequently be correlated to the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose received by air crews. In this context, a theoretical approach through Monte Carlo simulations with the computational codes MCNP5 and MCNPX was used to model and characterize the detector response at such experimental conditions. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between the absorbed doses measured and simulated, and its relationship with the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose for this detector. (author)

  20. Characterization of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements

    Holanda M, L. de; Federico, C. A.; Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Air crews, as pilots and flight attendants, are subjected to cosmic ray doses which can be higher than the average doses on workers from the nuclear industry. The diversity of particles of high energies present in the radiation field on board of air crafts turns the determination of the incident dose difficult, and requires special care regarding dosimetric systems to be used in this kind of radiation field. The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA) in conjunction with the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP) are working on this subject since 2008. A prototype of a radiation detector for aircraft measurements was previously built and tested in flight and laboratory conditions. The detector is able of measuring a quantity known as absorbed dose (using passive dosimeters), which will subsequently be correlated to the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose received by air crews. In this context, a theoretical approach through Monte Carlo simulations with the computational codes MCNP5 and MCNPX was used to model and characterize the detector response at such experimental conditions. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between the absorbed doses measured and simulated, and its relationship with the ambient dose equivalent and the effective dose for this detector. (author)

  1. Measurement of Detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System

    Yoon, Kang Hwa; Kon, Kang Seo; Kim, Jeongin [KHNP, Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Evaluation method of using CZT have been being attempted in various places such as AEP(American Electronic Power) etc since EDF(Electricite de France) had apply to the project named 'Source Term Reduction'. CZT can measure source terms on various places in nuclear power plants because it is available at room temperature unless a seperate device and portability is good. Consequently, CZT show good result from analysis of source terms in nuclear power plants. This study found out efficiency of CZT detector that is now researched in CZT Monitoring System for measure source terms on RCS system of domestic old and new nuclear power plants and verified measured efficiency values by comparing to reference efficiency we already know. This study was carried out for finding out detector's efficiency depending on necessary energy in order to save quantitative radioactivity value of source terms. Eventually, this study is to develope CZT Monitoring System measuring CRUD in domestic PWRs primary system or piping system by carrying out in-vivo. Considering error ratio ±20% on radioactivity value of CRM used in measuring and verifying efficiency, measurement of detector Efficiency for the CZT Monitoring System is good. But more various tests is needed than now for an accurate measurement.

  2. Measurement of the tau lifetime with the DELPHI detector

    Andreazza, A.

    2005-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e + e → τ + τ - events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong τ decay channels. These are combined with previously published DELPHI results to provide a tau lifetime measurement of τ τ =290.9+/-1.4 stat +/-1.0 sys fs, using the full LEP1 data sample

  3. Use of a superconductive gradiometer in an ultrasensitive electromagnetic metal detector

    Czipott, P.V.; Podney, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a new instrument that we call an electromagnetic gradiometer. It uses a SQUID sensor as the receiver in an active, electromagnetic detector of nonferrous as well as ferrous objects. The gradiometer pickup loops sit in the center of magnet coils that generate a time-varying magnetic field inducing eddy currents in conductive bodies. The gradiometer measures the secondary magnetic field of the eddy currents. The SQUID's sensitivity at frequencies below 1 kHz makes electromagnetic metal detectors practical in the marine environment, where the electrical conductivity of seawater precludes conventional systems. The authors describe a prototype system that attains a detection range of 10 m in seawater for targets 50 cm in diameter. It operates at frequencies from 1 Hz to a few hundred Hz. Uses of the electromagnetic gradiometer include locating naval mines and undersea treasure. The system's response to seawater enables application to airborne electromagnetic bathymetry. On land, its sensitivity to crustal conductivity contrasts suits it to mineral exploration

  4. Low-level radon measurements by nuclear track detectors

    Koksal, E. M.; Goksel, S. A.; Alkan, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the work to be described here we have developed a passive nuclear track dosimeter to measure the integrated value of indoor radon (Rn-222) over a long period of time. Passive radon dosimeter which we have developed in our laboratories makes use of two small pieces of CR-39 plastic (Allyl diglycol carbonate) as detectors for registering tracks of alpha particles emitted by radon. These CR-39 plastic detectors are fixed on the inside bottom of a cup-shaped polystrene enclosure which is closed at the top by a tissue permeable for gases only. CR-39 detectors exposed to radon gas in the indoor air for a period of six months then are removed and chemically etched to make the alpha particle tracks visible under the microscope. The counts of tracks are evaluated to determine the radon concentration in the air in comparison with the number of tracks produced by a known concentration of radon gas. By using the passive dosimeters developed and the chemical etching procedure descriped here, measurements of indoor radon concentrations were carried out in 45 houses in different districts of the city of Istanbul. In this pilot experiment mean radon concentrations between 0.7 and 3.5 pCi/l have been found in these houses. In order to improve the counting of alpha tracks produced on the detectors a prototype electrochemical etching system in addition to chemical etching, is being developed. (author)

  5. Equipment for liquid metal pressure measurement

    Jung, J.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment is proposed for measuring liquid metal pressure in piping or a tank. An auxiliary piping is connected to the piping or tank at the measuring point. The auxiliary piping transports liquid metal to a container by means of an electromagnetic pump. The piping also houses an electromagnetic flow ratemeter connected to an electric comparator. The comparator and the electromagnetic pump are connected to the pump output generator. (Z.M.)

  6. Laser measurement of the LumiCal detector displacement

    Blocki, J.; Daniluk, W.; Gil, M.; Karbowiak, M.; Moszczynski, A.; Oliwa, K.; Pawlik, B.; Wierba, W.; Zawiejski, L.; Slominski, W.; Suszycki, L.

    2006-12-01

    The silicon-tungsten calorimeter LumiCal, located in very forward region of the future detector at the International Linear Collider, is proposed for precisely luminosity measurement. One of the requirements to fulfil this task is available information on the actual position of the calorimeter relative to the beam interaction area which should be known with accuracy of a few micrometers. In this paper we discuss the possible solutions for the positioning of the LumiCal electron detector by optical method. The results of the displacement measurement using a laser beam and a CCD camera are described. The measurements were performed on a proof-of-principle basis and achieved the accuracy of about ± 1 μm in x, y and ± μm in z direction. (author)

  7. Measurements of radon in dwellings with CR-39 track detectors

    Majborn, Benny

    1986-01-01

    A passive integrating dosemeter has been designed for measuring natural radiation in dwellings. The dosemeter contains one or two CR-39 track detectors to measure radon and three thermoluminescence dosemeters to measure external radiation. The dosemeter was investigated in a pilot study in 1983....../84, and it is now used in a nationwide survey of natural radiation in Danish dwellings. The characteristics of the dosemeter with respect to radon measurements are presented, and the radon monitoring results obtained in the pilot study are summarized...

  8. Alpha activity of 190 Pt isotope measured with CR-39 track detector

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Terranova, M.L.

    1996-11-01

    A new method to measure alpha activity of long-lived radioisotopes is reported. The method consists basically in using CR-39 track detectors in close contact with thick samples of the radioelement to be investigated. Accordingly, a long-term exposure experiment has been performed using metallic sheets of natural platinum to measure alpha activity of platinum 190 isotope. The half-life of platinum 190 has been obtained in good agreement with two recent theoretical half-life predictions. (author). 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Identification of Pu isotopes by measurement of Q-value with cryogenic detector

    Jang, Y. S.; Kim, M. S.; Le, J. S.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, H. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic detectors using heat generation below 1 K have become an attractive alternative because of their outstanding energy resolution. Significant improvement in gamma spectroscopy has been achieved with high resolution transition edge sensors (TESs) for nuclear material analysis. In alpha spectroscopy, superior resolution to that of conventional detectors has been also demonstrated. Since all the deposited energy can be converted into thermal energy by surrounding a radioactive source with metal foil, alpha energy can be measured without any correction for selfattenuation. Accompanying electrons, x-rays, and/or γ-rays are also converted into thermal energy. Thus measurement of alpha decay in 4π geometry returns the Q value, the total decay energy, independent of decay branches without loss of energy and count, enabling Q spectroscopy.

  10. Recent X-ray hybrid CMOS detector developments and measurements

    Hull, Samuel V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Wages, Mitchell; Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; McQuaide, Maria; Bray, Evan; Kern, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Penn State X-ray detector lab, in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS), have progressed their efforts to improve soft X-ray Hybrid CMOS detector (HCD) technology on multiple fronts. Having newly acquired a Teledyne cryogenic SIDECARTM ASIC for use with HxRG devices, measurements were performed with an H2RG HCD and the cooled SIDECARTM. We report new energy resolution and read noise measurements, which show a significant improvement over room temperature SIDECARTM operation. Further, in order to meet the demands of future high-throughput and high spatial resolution X-ray observatories, detectors with fast readout and small pixel sizes are being developed. We report on characteristics of new X-ray HCDs with 12.5 micron pitch that include in-pixel CDS circuitry and crosstalk-eliminating CTIA amplifiers. In addition, PSU and TIS are developing a new large-scale array Speedster-EXD device. The original 64 × 64 pixel Speedster-EXD prototype used comparators in each pixel to enable event driven readout with order of magnitude higher effective readout rates, which will now be implemented in a 550 × 550 pixel device. Finally, the detector lab is involved in a sounding rocket mission that is slated to fly in 2018 with an off-plane reflection grating array and an H2RG X-ray HCD. We report on the planned detector configuration for this mission, which will increase the NASA technology readiness level of X-ray HCDs to TRL 9.

  11. Automatic control and detector for three-terminal resistance measurement

    Fasching, George E.

    1976-10-26

    A device is provided for automatic control and detection in a three-terminal resistance measuring instrument. The invention is useful for the rapid measurement of the resistivity of various bulk material with a three-terminal electrode system. The device maintains the current through the sample at a fixed level while measuring the voltage across the sample to detect the sample resistance. The three-electrode system contacts the bulk material and the current through the sample is held constant by means of a control circuit connected to a first of the three electrodes and works in conjunction with a feedback controlled amplifier to null the voltage between the first electrode and a second electrode connected to the controlled amplifier output. An A.C. oscillator provides a source of sinusoidal reference voltage of the frequency at which the measurement is to be executed. Synchronous reference pulses for synchronous detectors in the control circuit and an output detector circuit are provided by a synchronous pulse generator. The output of the controlled amplifier circuit is sampled by an output detector circuit to develop at an output terminal thereof a D.C. voltage which is proportional to the sample resistance R. The sample resistance is that segment of the sample between the area of the first electrode and the third electrode, which is connected to ground potential.

  12. TT detector description and implementation of the survey measurements

    Salzmann, C

    2008-01-01

    The TT geometry in the software has been updated to comply with the latest technical drawings. The main difference is in the description of the beam pipe insulation, where the amount of material has increased from $7.5\\%$ to $15.4\\%$ of $X_0$. Mother volumes are added to decrease the CPU consumption and finally several scans are made to compare the material budget between the DC06 geometry and the new 2008 geometry. In addition, the survey measurements of the TT detector have been analysed. These measurements can be subdivided into surveys of the detector box, photogrammetry of the balconies and metrology of the half-modules. The offsets with the nominal geometry are implemented in the alignment condition database.

  13. Initial Measurements on Pixel Detector Modules for the ATLAS Upgrades

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Delicate conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel Detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming Pixel Detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation for silicon planar and 3D pixel sensors, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies, are presented.

  14. Initial Measurements On Pixel Detector Modules For The ATLAS Upgrades

    Gallrapp, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated conditions in terms of peak and integrated luminosity in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will raise the ATLAS Pixel detector to its performance limits. Silicon planar, silicon 3D and diamond pixel sensors are three possible sensor technologies which could be implemented in the upcoming pixel detector upgrades of the ATLAS experiment. Measurements of the IV-behavior and measurements with radioactive Americium-241 and Strontium-90 are used to characterize the sensor properties and to understand the interaction between the ATLAS FE-I4 front-end chip and the sensor. Comparisons of results from before and after irradiation, which give a first impression on the charge collection properties of the different sensor technologies are presented.

  15. An improved inclusive measurement of Ac using the SLD detector

    1998-01-01

    The authors report a new measurement of A c using data obtained by SLD in 1993--97. This measurement uses a vertex tag technique, where the selection of a c hemisphere is based on the reconstructed mass of the charm hadron decay vertex. The method uses the 3D vertexting capabilities of SLD's CCD vertex detector and the small and stable SLC beams to obtain a high c-event tagging efficiency and purity of 28% and 81%, respectively. Charged kaons identified by the CRID detector and the charge of the reconstructed vertex provide an efficient quark-antiquark tag. They obtain a preliminary result of A c = 0.650 ± 0.041 ± 0.033

  16. Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors for the Beam Profile Monitoring

    Pugatch, V M; Fedorovitch, O A; Mikhailenko, A V; Prystupa, S V; Pylypchenko, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors (MMFD) designed and used for the Beam Profile Monitoring (BPM) are discussed. Fast particles hitting a metal strip initiate Secondary Electron Emission (SEE) which occurs at 10 - 50 nm surface layers of a strip. The SEE yield is measured by a sensitive Charge Integrator with built-in current-to-frequency converter (1 Hz per 1 fA). The MMFD (deposited onto the 20 μm thick Si-wafer) with 32 Al strips (10 μm wide, 32 μm pitch) has been used for the BPM of the 32 MeV alpha-particle beam at the MPIfK (Heidelberg) Tandem generator for Single-Event-Upset studies of the BEETLE micro-chip. Similar MMFD (0.5 μm thick Ni-strips) with totally removed Si-wafer (by plasma-chemistry, at the working area of 8 x 10 mm2) has been applied for the on-line X-ray BPM at the HASYLAB (DESY). The number of photons (11.3 GeV, mean X-ray energy 18 keV) producing out of a strip a single SEE was evaluated as (1.5 ±0.5)* 104. MMFD has demonstrated stable...

  17. X-ray measurement with Pin type semiconductor detectors

    Ramirez J, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    Here are presented the experimental results of the applications of Pin type radiation detectors developed in a National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) project, in the measurement of low energy gamma and X-rays. The applications were oriented mainly toward the Medical Physics area. It is planned other applications which are in process of implementation inside the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. (Author)

  18. Impulse method for temperature measurement of silicon detectors

    Kushpil, V.V.; Kushpil, S.A.; Petracek, V.

    1999-01-01

    A new impulse method of temperature measurement based on switching characteristic of the P-N junction is described. Temperature of silicon detector can be determined, due to the strong temperature dependence of minority carrier lifetime, from the charge registered during the switching-off process. The method has been tested in temperature range 25 - 60 deg C. Advantages, drawbacks and precision of this method are discussed

  19. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00408270

    This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector based on the data-set recorded by ATLAS in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and corresponding to 4.6 inverse femtobarn of integrated luminosity. Measurements are performed through template fits to the transverse momentum distributions of charged leptons and to transverse mass distributions of the W boson, in electron and muon decay modes in various kinematic categories. The individual measurements are found to be consistent and their combination leads to a value of \\begin{eqnarray} \

  20. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G.; Sharples, Steve D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  1. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  2. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration

  3. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-06-25

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.).

  4. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.)

  5. Efficiency measurement of the NeuLAND detector

    Toernqvist, Hans; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Holl, Matthias; Horvat, Andrea; Kahlbow, Julian; Miki, Kenjiro; Rossi, Dominic; Scheit, Heiko; Schindler, Fabia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, Konstanze; Caesar, Christoph; Simon, Haik [GSI Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gasparic, Igor [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Collaboration: R3B-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    NeuLAND is the next-generation high-energy and high-efficiency neutron detector currently under construction at GSI/FAIR by the R{sup 3}B collaboration. This detector will be used in a wide variety of experiments, ranging from nuclear-structure measurements of neutron-rich species to the investigation of the equation-of-state of asymmetric nuclear matter. The design goals of the full NeuLAND detector are a >95% detection efficiency for single neutrons, a time resolution of σ{sub t} ≤ 150 ps and a position resolution of σ{sub x,y,z} ≤ 1.5 cm, with a detection volume of 250 x 250 x 300 cm{sup 3}. While still under construction, a set of 4 of the 30 planned NeuLAND double-planes were used for a series of experiments at the SAMURAI setup at RIKEN. In particular, the time resolution and one-neutron efficiency were measured using neutrons from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The test setup at RIKEN are described, and the resolution and efficiency results are discussed.

  6. Accuracy of fuel motion measurements using in-core detectors

    Dupree, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    An initial assessment has been made as to how accurately fuel motion can be measured with in-core detectors. A portion of this assessment has involved the calculation of the response of various detectors to fuel motion and the development of a formalism for correlating uncertainties in a neutron flux measurement to uncertainties in the fuel motion. Initially, four idealized configurations were studied in one dimension. These configurations consisted of (1) a single fuel-pin test using ACPR, (2) a seven fuel-pin test using ACPR, (3) a full subassembly (271 pin) test using a Class I ANL-type SAREF, and (4) a full subassembly plus six partial subassemblies (approximately 1000 pin) test using a Class III GE-type SAREF. It was assumed that melt would occur symmetrically at the center of the test fuel and that fuel would therefore disappear from the center of the geometry. For each case of series of calculations was performed in which detector responses were determined at several radial locations for the unperturbed core and for the core with various fractions of the fuel replaced with Na. This fuel loss was assumed to occur essentially instantaneously such that the power level in the remaining portion of the test fuel remained unchanged from that of the initial unperturbed condition

  7. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  8. Measurement of diffractive and exclusive processes with the ATLAS detector

    Gach Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS Collaboration has carried out a study of diffractive dijet production in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV at the LHC. The data distributions are compared with Monte Carlo models and the rapidity gap survival probability has been estimated in the kinematic region with high diffractive contribution. Prospects for exclusive jet production studies with the forward proton tagging capability of the AFP sub-detector of ATLAS are also discussed. First results based on data taken jointly with the ATLAS and the LHCf detectors in a p+Pb run will also be shown. In addition, the measurement of the cross-section for the exclusive production of di-lepton pairs in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV is discussed.

  9. Measurement of the position resolution of the Gas Pixel Detector

    Soffitta, Paolo; Muleri, Fabio; Fabiani, Sergio; Costa, Enrico; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo; Pinchera, Michele; Spandre, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The Gas Pixel Detector was designed and built as a focal plane instrument for X-ray polarimetry of celestial sources, the last unexplored subtopics of X-ray astronomy. It promises to perform detailed and sensitive measurements resolving extended sources and detecting polarization in faint sources in crowded fields at the focus of telescopes of good angular resolution. Its polarimetric and spectral capability were already studied in earlier works. Here we investigate for the first time, with both laboratory measurements and Monte Carlo simulations, its imaging properties to confirm its unique capability to carry out imaging spectral-polarimetry in future X-ray missions.

  10. Burnup measurements with the Los Alamos fork detector

    Bosler, G.E.; Rinard, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The fork detector system can determine the burnup of spent-fuel assemblies. It is a transportable instrument that can be mounted permanently in a spent-fuel pond near a loading area for shipping casks, or be attached to the storage pond bridge for measurements on partially raised spent-fuel assemblies. The accuracy of the predicted burnup has been demonstrated to be as good as 2% from measurements on assemblies in the United States and other countries. Instruments have also been developed at other facilities throughout the world using the same or different techniques, but with similar accuracies. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Measurement of the tau lifetime with the DELPHI detector

    Andreazza, Attilio

    2005-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the $e^{+}e^{-}$ to tau /sup +/ tau /sup -/ events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. These are combined with previously published DELPHI results to provide a tau lifetime measurement of tau /sub tau /=290.9+or-1.4/sub stat/+or-1.0/sub sys/ fs, using the full LEP1 data sample.

  12. Measurement of CP-violation with the GEM detector

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki

    1993-01-01

    In this note, the feasibility of measuring CP-violation in the B-meson system with the GEM detector at SSC is described, using the decay mode B d → J/ψ + K 0 S → μ + μ - π + π - for the β angle measurement. In Section 2, the signature of the signal is discussed. Section 3 is devoted to a description of the GEM performance, including the estimation of the backgrounds. The rate of the signal is discussed in Section 4, and the summary is given in Section 5

  13. Measurement of the total cross section with ALFA Detector at ATLAS

    Trzebinski, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The main goals of the Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) detector is to provide an absolute luminosity and total cross section measurement. The measurement method used, the detector alignment and the quality of the collected data are discussed.

  14. Towards a Total Cross Section Measurement with the ALFA Detector at ATLAS

    Trzebiński, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The main goals of the Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) detector is to provide an absolute luminosity and total cross section measurement. The measurement method used, the detector alignment and the quality of the collected data are discussed.

  15. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  16. Low-background measurements of neutron emission from Ti metal in pressurized deuterium gas

    Menlove, H.O.; Paciotti, M.A.; Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of neutron detector systems have been used at various research facilities to search for anomalous neutron emission from deuterated metals. Some of these detector systems are summarized here together with possible sources of spurious signals from electronic noise. During the past two years, we have performed experiments to measure neutron emission from pressurized D 2 gas mixed with various forms of titanium metal chips and sponge. Details concerning the neutron detectors, experimental procedures, and results have been reported previously. Our recent experiments have focused on increasing the low-level neutron emission and finding a way to trigger the emission. To improve our detection sensitivity, we have increased the shielding in our counting laboratory, changed to low-background 3 He tubes, and set up additional detector systems in deep underground counting stations. This report is an update on this experimental work. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  18. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose‐weighted correction method for LET effects

    Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth‐dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high‐bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth‐dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth‐output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose‐weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors. PACS number: 87.56.‐v

  19. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ID# 104 Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and ...

  20. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    Kivernyk, Oleh

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector based on the data-set recorded by ATLAS in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and corresponding to 4.6 inverse femto-barn of integrated luminosity. Measurements are performed through template fits to the transverse momentum distributions of charged leptons and to transverse mass distributions of the W boson, in electron and muon decay modes in various kinematic categories. The individual measurements are found to be consistent and their combination leads to a value of m W = 80371.1 ± 18.6 MeV. The measured value of the W boson mass is compatible with the current world average of m W = 80385 ± 15 MeV. The uncertainty is competitive with the current most precise measurements performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations. (author) [fr

  1. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    Balli, Fabrice; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A precise measurement of the mass of the W boson mass represents an important milestone to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC represents an ideal laboratory for such a precise measurement. Large samples of many millions of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6/fb. With these samples the detector and physics modelling has been studied in great detail to enable a systematic uncertainty on the measurement that approaches the statistical power of the data of 7 MeV per decay channel as far as possible.

  2. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    Camarda, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A precise measurement of the mass of the W boson represents an important milestone to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC represents an ideal laboratory for such a precise measurement. Large samples of many millions of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6/fb. With these samples the detector and physics modelling has been studied in great detail to enable a systematic uncertainty on the measurement that approaches the statistical power of the data of 7 MeV per decay channel as far as possible.

  3. Ultra Low Level Environmental Neutron Measurements Using Superheated Droplet Detectors

    Fernandes, A.C. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Felizardo, M.; Girard, T.A.; Kling, A.; Ramos, A.R. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa. Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649- 003 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques, J.G.; Prudencio, M.I.; Marques, R.; Carvalho, F.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10 - km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Through the application of superheated droplet detectors (SDDs), the SIMPLE project for the direct search for dark matter (DM) reached the most restrictive limits on the spin-dependent sector to date. The experiment is based on the detection of recoils following WIMP-nuclei interaction, mimicking those from neutron scattering. The thermodynamic operation conditions yield the SDDs intrinsically insensitive to radiations with linear energy transfer below ∼150 keVμm{sup -1} such as photons, electrons, muons and neutrons with energies below ∼40 keV. Underground facilities are increasingly employed for measurements in a low-level radiation background (DM search, gamma-spectroscopy, intrinsic soft-error rate measurements, etc.), where the rock overburden shields against cosmic radiation. In this environment the SDDs are sensitive only to α-particles and neutrons naturally emitted from the surrounding materials. Recently developed signal analysis techniques allow discrimination between neutron and α-induced signals. SDDs are therefore a promising instrument for low-level neutron and α measurements, namely environmental neutron measurements and α-contamination assays. In this work neutron measurements performed in the challenging conditions of the latest SIMPLE experiment (1500 mwe depth with 50-75 cm water shield) are reported. The results are compared with those obtained by detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron background induced by {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th traces in the facility, shielding and detector materials. Calculations of the neutron energy distribution yield the following neutron fluence rates (in 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}): thermal (<0.5 eV): 2.5; epithermal (0.5 eV-100 keV): 2.2; fast (>1 MeV): 3.9. Signal rates were derived using standard cross sections and codes routinely employed in reactor dosimetry. The measured and calculated neutron count rates per unit of active mass were 0.15 ct/kgd and 0.33 ct/kg-d respectively. As the major

  4. Leakage current measurements on pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    Dirks, B.P.F.; Blondel, C.; Daly, F.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of the R and D of a new generation hard X-ray cameras for space applications we focus on the use of pixelated CdTe or CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. They are covered with 64 (0.9x0.9 mm 2 ) or 256 (0.5x0.5 mm 2 ) pixels, surrounded by a guard ring and operate in the energy ranging from several keV to 1 MeV, at temperatures between -20 and +20 o C. A critical parameter in the characterisation of these detectors is the leakage current per pixel under polarisation (∼50-500 V/mm). In operation mode each pixel will be read-out by an integrated spectroscopy channel of the multi-channel IDeF-X ASIC currently developed in our lab. The design and functionality of the ASIC depends directly on the direction and value of the current. A dedicated and highly insulating electronics circuit is designed to automatically measure the current in each individual pixel, which is in the order of tens of pico-amperes. Leakage current maps of different CdZnTe detectors of 2 and 6 mm thick and at various temperatures are presented and discussed. Defect density diagnostics have been performed by calculation of the activation energy of the material

  5. Alpha- and gamma-detection by the avalanche detectors with metal-resistor-semiconductor structure

    Vetokhin, S.S.; Evtushenko, V.P.; Zalesskij, V.B.; Malyshev, S.A.; Chudakov, V.A.; Shunevich, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Possibility to use silicon avalanche photodetectors with metal-resistor-semiconductor structure with 0.12 cm 2 photosensitive area as detectors of α-particles, as well as, photodetector of γ-quanta scintillation detector is shown. When detection of α-particles the energy resolution reaches 10%. R energy resolution for avalanche photodetector-CsI(Tl) scintillator system cooled up to - 60 deg C at 59 keV ( 241 Am) and 662 keV ( 137 Cs) energy of γ-quanta constitutes 60% and 80%, respectively. R minimal value in the conducted experiments is determined by the degree of irregularity of avalanche amplification along the photodetector area

  6. Tau Polarization Measurement in the L3 Detector

    Garcia, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Polarization asymmetry (A p ) measurement can be obtained from the energy spectra of the tau lepton (tau) decay products. This measurement provides a precise determination of the weak mixing angel (sin''2 tilde char theta w ), one of the Standard Model fundamental parameters. Tau leptons are produced at LEP in e''+e''-yields tilde char f interactions at a center of mass energy of the order of the Z boson mass. In order to get A p we have calculated the analytical formulae of the tau decay products energy spectra, including radiative corrections, for all of the one prong tau decay channels. We have also extended this analytical formalism to the detector level, including the selection criteria effectsand the detector resolution (calibration) in the analytical expressions.Detailed studies have been performed concerning our measurement using this formalism. From the data collected with the L3 detector between 1991 and 1994, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 118.8 pb''1 at a center of mass energy of the order of the Z mass, we have identified and selected the following tau decay channel samples: tau yields e nu tilde char nu, tau yields mu nu tilde char nu, tau yields pi/K nu y tau yields p/K*nu. From the analysis of these samples we get the tau polarization asymmetry measurement: A p =3D0.143+-0.014+-0.010, which corresponds to a value of sin''2 tilde char theta w =3D0.2320+-0.0018+-0.0013. (Author) 24 refs

  7. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurement and Detector Development

    Longo, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Proton radiography offers significant advantages over conventional X-ray radiography, including the capability of looking into thick, dense materials, better contrast for a wide range of materials, sensitivity to different materials of similar density, and better resolution because of the ability to focus beams. In order to achieve this capability it is crucial to understand the background due to neutrons and photons and to develop techniques to reduce it to tolerable levels. The physics goal of this project is to measure forward production of neutrons and photons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. This work is being carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab Experiment 907 (MIPP) collaboration including physicists from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Our group is responsible for the E907 forward neutron/photon calorimeters. These are the only detectors in the experiment that provide information on neutrons and photons. We are taking a leading role in obtaining and analyzing the for-ward production data and in developing an optimal detector for proton radiography. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grant, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. E-907 officially started physics running at Fermilab in January 2005, and data taking continued through February 2006. Data were taken on a range of targets, from liquid hydrogen to uranium, at beam energies from 5 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c. The analysis of the data is challenging because data from many different detector systems must be understood and merged and over 31 million events were accumulated. Our recent efforts have been devoted to the calibration of the neutron and photon detectors, to track and shower reconstruction, identification of forward-going neutrons, and simulation of the calorimeters in a Monte Carlo. Reconstruction of the data with improved tracking is underway

  8. An attenuation measurement technique for rotating planar detector positron tomographs

    McNeil, P.A.; Julyan, P.J.; Parker, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new attenuation measurement technique suitable for rotating planar detector positron tomographs. Transmission measurements are made using two unshielded positron-emitting line sources, one attached to the front face of each detector. Many of the scattered and accidental coincidences are rejected by including only those coincidences that form a vector passing within a predetermined distance of either line source. Some scattered and accidental coincidences are still included, which reduces the measured linear attenuation; in principle their contribution can be accurately estimated and subtracted, but in practice, when limited statistics are available (as is the case with the multi-wire Birmingham positron camera), this background subtraction unacceptably increases the noise. Instead an attenuation image having the correct features can be reconstructed from the measured projections. For objects containing only a few discrete linear attenuation coefficients, segmentation of this attenuation image reduces noise and allows the correct linear attenuation coefficients to be restored by renormalization. Reprojection through the segmented image may then provide quantitatively correct attenuation correction factors of sufficient statistical quality to correct for attenuation in PET emission images. (author)

  9. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Papka, P.; Dobson, R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of 6 Li and 12 C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  10. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino composition with the IMB-3 detector

    Casper, D.; Becker-Szendy, R.; Bratton, C.B.; Cady, D.R.; Claus, R.; Dye, S.T.; Gajewski, W.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T.J.; Halverson, P.G.; Jones, T.W.; Kielczewska, D.; Kropp, W.R.; Learned, J.G.; LoSecco, J.M.; McGrew, C.; Matsuno, S.; Matthews, J.; Mudan, M.S.; Price, L.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sinclair, D.; Sobel, H.W.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Svoboda, R.; Thornton, G.; van der Velde, J.C.; The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 Brookhaven National; Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973; Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; The University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 University College, London, WC1E F6BT, United Kingdom; Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland; Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115; The University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556; Lousiana State University, Baton Rouge, Lousisiana 70803; The University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742)

    1991-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino flux is measured using a 3.4-kt yr exposure of the IMB-3 detector. Single-ring events are classified as showering or nonshowering using the geometry of the Cerenkov pattern. A simulation of neutrino interactions and three models of atmospheric neutrino production are used to predict the composition of the sample. Showering-nonshowering character is strongly correlated with the flavor of the neutrino parent. In the lepton momentum range p<1500 MeV/c, we find that nonshowering events comprise [41±3±2syst]% of the total. The fraction expected is [51±5(syst)]%

  11. Prompt photon measurements with PHENIX's MPC-EX detector

    Campbell, Sarah; PHENIX Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The MPC-EX detector is a Si-W preshower extension to the existing Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC). The MPC-EX consists of eight layers of alternating W absorber and Si mini-pad sensors. Located at forward rapidity, 3.1 80 GeV, a factor of four improvement over current capabilities. Not only will the MPC-EX strengthen PHENIX's existing forward π0 and jet measurements, it will provide sufficient prompt photon and π0 separation to make a prompt photon measurement possible. Prompt photon yields at high pT, pT > 3 GeV/c, can be statistically extracted using the double ratio method. In transversely polarized p+p collisions, the measurement of the prompt photon single spin asymmetry, AN, will resolve the sign discrepancy between the Sivers and twist-3 extractions of AN. In p+Au collisions, the prompt photon RpAu will quantify the level of gluon saturation in the Au nucleus at low-x, x ~ 10-3, with a projected systematic error band a factor of four smaller than EPS09's current allowable range. The MPC-EX detector will expand our understanding of the gluon nuclear parton distribution functions, providing important information about the initial state of heavy ion collisions, and clarify how the valence parton's transverse momentum and spin correlates to the proton spin.

  12. Absolute luminosity measurements with the LHCb detector at the LHC

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Brisbane, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Caicedo Carvajal, J M; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Constantin, F; Conti, G; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Almagne, B; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Deissenroth, M; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Eames, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; d'Enterria, D G; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hofmann, W; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koblitz, S; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kukulak, S; Kumar, R; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Mclean, C; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nardulli, J; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Nies, S; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B; Palacios, J; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilar, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; du Pree, T; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skottowe, H P; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Styles, N; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wacker, K; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer scan'' method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using beam-gas and beam-beam interactions. This beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. The results of the two methods have comparable precision and are in good agreement. Combining the two methods, an overall precision of 3.5\\% in the absolute lumi...

  13. Nanoscale measurements of proton tracks using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Ferreira, Felisberto A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Biophysics Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc., Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a method in which fluorescence nuclear track detectors (FNTDs), novel track detectors with nanoscale spatial resolution, are used to determine the linear energy transfer (LET) of individual proton tracks from proton therapy beams by allowing visualization and 3D reconstruction of such tracks. Methods: FNTDs were exposed to proton therapy beams with nominal energies ranging from 100 to 250 MeV. Proton track images were then recorded by confocal microscopy of the FNTDs. Proton tracks in the FNTD images were fit by using a Gaussian function to extract fluorescence amplitudes. Histograms of fluorescence amplitudes were then compared with LET spectra. Results: The authors successfully used FNTDs to register individual proton tracks from high-energy proton therapy beams, allowing reconstruction of 3D images of proton tracks along with delta rays. The track amplitudes from FNTDs could be used to parameterize LET spectra, allowing the LET of individual proton tracks from therapeutic proton beams to be determined. Conclusions: FNTDs can be used to directly visualize proton tracks and their delta rays at the nanoscale level. Because the track intensities in the FNTDs correlate with LET, they could be used further to measure LET of individual proton tracks. This method may be useful for measuring nanoscale radiation quantities and for measuring the LET of individual proton tracks in radiation biology experiments.

  14. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Stefan L. Danilishin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  15. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  16. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  17. Measurement of nuclear activity with Ge detectors and its uncertainty

    Cortes P, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse the influence magnitudes which affect the activity measurement of gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources. They prepared by means of the gravimetric method, as well as, determining the uncertainty of such measurement when this is carried out with a gamma spectrometer system with a germanium detector. This work is developed in five chapters: In the first one, named Basic principles it is made a brief description about the meaning of the word Measurement and its implications and the necessaries concepts are presented which are used in this work. In the second chapter it is exposed the gravimetric method used for the manufacture of the gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources, it is tackled the problem to determine the main influence magnitudes which affect in the measurement of their activity and the respective correction factors and their uncertainties are deduced. The third chapter describes the gamma spectrometry system which is used in this work for the measurement of the activity of isolated sources and also its performance and experimental arrangement that it is used. In the fourth chapter are applied the three previous items with the object of determining the uncertainty which would be obtained in the measurement of an isolated radioactive source elaborated with the gravimetric method in the experimental conditions less favourable predicted above the obtained results from the chapter two. The conclusions are presented in the fifth chapter and they are applied to establish the optimum conditions for the measurement of the activity of a gamma transmitter isolated radioactive source with a spectrometer with germanium detector. (Author)

  18. Cosmic Ray Measurements by Scintillators with Metal Resistor Semiconductor Avalanche Photo Diodes

    Blanco, Francesco; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Akindinov, Alexandre; Mal'kevich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    An educational set-up for cosmic ray physics experiments is described. The detector is based on scintillator tiles with a readout through metal resistor semiconductor (MRS) avalanche photo diode (APD) arrays. Typical measurements of the cosmic angular distribution at sea level and a study of the East-West asymmetry obtained by such a device are…

  19. Measurements of ttbar+X using the ATLAS detector

    Kawade, Kentaro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The large centre-of-mass energy available at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) allows for the copious production of top quark pairs in association with other final state particles at high transverse momenta. Several final state observables that are sensitive to additional radiation in top anti-top quark final states has been measured by the ATLAS experiment. The production of top quark pair in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons or with a photon are also measured by using the ATLAS detector. Analyses probing the top pair production with additional QCD radiation include the multiplicity of jets for various transverse momentum thresholds in the 13 TeV data. These measurements are compared to modern Monte Carlo generators based on NLO QCD matrix element or LO multi-leg matrix elements, and the results are consistent with the standard model predictions within the experimental uncertainties.

  20. Cerenkov detector for heavy-ion velocity measurements

    Olson, D.L.; Baumgartner, M.; Dufour, J.P.; Girard, J.G.; Greiner, D.E.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Symons, T.J.M.; Crawford, H.J.

    1984-08-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive velocity measuring detector using total-internal-reflection Cerenkov counters of a type mentioned by Jelly in 1958. If the velocity of the particle is above the threshold for total-internal-reflection these counters have a charge resolution of sigma = 0.18e for a 3mm thick glass radiator. For the velocity measurement we use a fused silica radiator so that the velocity of the particles are near the threshold for total-internal reflection. For momentum-analyzed projectile fragments of 1.6 GeV/nucleon 40 Ar, we have measured a mass resolution of sigma = 0.1u for isotope identification

  1. Radiation detectors

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  2. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    Pichotka, Martin; Jakůbek, Jan; Vavřík, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 12 (2015), C12033 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : micro-tomography * photon-counting detectors * metallic-organic composites Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/10/12/C12033/pdf

  3. Implanted cardiac devices are reliably detected by commercially available metal detectors

    Holm, Katja Fiedler; Hjortshøj, Søren Pihlkjær; Pehrson, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Explosions of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) (pacemakers, defibrillators, and loop recorders) are a well-recognized problem during cremation, due to lithium-iodine batteries. In addition, burial of the deceased with a CIED can present a potential risk for environmental...... contamination. Therefore, detection of CIEDs in the deceased would be of value. This study evaluated a commercially available metal detector for detecting CIEDs....

  4. Liquid metal flow measurement by neutron radiography

    Takenaka, N.; Ono, A.; Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1996-01-01

    Visualization of a liquid metal flow and image processing methods to measure the vector field are carried out by real-time neutron radiography. The JRR-3M real-time thermal neutron radiography facility in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was used. Lead-bismuth eutectic was used as a working fluid. Particles made from a gold-cadmium intermetallic compound (AuCd 3 ) were used as the tracer for the visualization. The flow vector field was obtained by image processing methods. It was shown that the liquid metal flow vector field was obtainable by real-time neutron radiography when the attenuation of neutron rays due to the liquid metal was less than l/e and the particle size of the tracer was larger than one image element size digitized for the image processing. (orig.)

  5. Possible overexposure of pregnant women to emissions from a walk through metal detector

    Wu Dagang; Qiang Rui; Chen Ji; Seidman, Seth; Witters, Donald; Kainz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic procedure to evaluate the induced current densities and electric fields due to walk-through metal detector (WTMD) exposure. This procedure is then used to assess the exposure of nine pregnant women models exposed to one WTMD model. First, we measured the magnetic field generated by the WTMD, then we extracted the equivalent current source to represent the WTMD emissions and finally we calculated the induced current densities and electric fields using the impedance method. The WTMD emissions and the induced fields in the pregnant women and fetus models are then compared to the ICNIRP Guidelines and the IEEE C95.6 exposure safety standard. The results prove the consistency between maximum permissible exposure (MPE) levels and basic restrictions for the ICNIRP Guidelines and IEEE C95.6. We also found that this particular WTMD complies with the ICNIRP basic restrictions for month 1-5 models, but leads to both fetus and pregnant women overexposure for month 6-9 models. The IEEE C95.6 restrictions (MPEs and basic restrictions) are not exceeded. The fetus overexposure of this particular WTMD calls for carefully conducted safety evaluations of security systems before they are deployed

  6. Prompt photon measurements with the PHENIX MPC-EX detector

    Campbell, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    The MPC-EX detector is a preshower extension to PHENIX's Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC). It consists of eight layers of alternating W absorber and Si mini-pad sensors. Located at forward rapidity, 3.180 GeV, allowing the measurement of prompt photons using the double ratio method. At forward rapidities, prompt photons are dominated by direct photons produced by quark-gluon Compton scattering. In transversely polarized p+p collisions, the prompt photon single spin asymmetry measurement, AN, will resolve the sign discrepancy between the Sivers and twist-3 extractions of AN. In p+Au collisions, the prompt photon RpAu will quantify the level of gluon saturation in the Au nucleus at low-x, 10-3, with a projected systematic error band a factor of four smaller than EPS09's current allowable range. The MPC-EX detector will expand our understanding of gluon nuclear parton distribution functions, providing information about the initial state of heavy ion collisions, and clarify how valence parton's pT and spin correlate to the proton spin.

  7. Induced Radioactivity Measured in a Germanium Detector After a Long Duration Balloon Flight

    Starr, R.; Evans, L. G.; Floyed, S. R.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Rester, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 13-day long duration balloon flight carrying a germanium detector was flown from Williams Field, Antartica in December 1992. After recovery of the payload the activity induced in the detector was measured.

  8. Measurement of neutron flux by semiconductor detector; Merenje raspodele neutronskog fluksa poluprovodnickim detektorom

    Obradovic, D; Bosevski, T [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-07-01

    Using semiconductor detectors for measuring the neutron flux distribution is considered suitable and faster than using activation foils. Results of radial neutron flux distribution obtained by semiconductor detectors are presented.

  9. MARTA: A high-energy cosmic-ray detector concept with high-accuracy muon measurement

    Abreu, P.; et al.

    2017-12-20

    A new concept for the direct measurement of muons in air showers is presented. The concept is based on resistive plate chambers (RPCs), which can directly measure muons with very good space and time resolution. The muon detector is shielded by placing it under another detector able to absorb and measure the electromagnetic component of the showers such as a water-Cherenkov detector, commonly used in air shower arrays. The combination of the two detectors in a single, compact detector unit provides a unique measurement that opens rich possibilities in the study of air showers.

  10. Effect of uncompensated SPN detector cables on neutron noise signals measured in VVER-440 reactors

    Kiss, S. E-mail: kisss@sunserv.kfki.hu; Lipcsei, S. E-mail: lipcsei@sunserv.kfki.hu; Hazi, G. E-mail: gah@sunserv.kfki.hu

    2003-03-01

    The Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) noise measurements of an operating VVER-440 nuclear reactor are described and characterised. Signal characteristics may be radically influenced by the geometrical properties of the detector and the cable, and by the measuring arrangement. Simulator is used as a means of studying the structure of those phase spectra that show propagating perturbations measured on uncompensated SPN detectors. The paper presents measurements with detectors of very different sizes (i.e. 20 cm length SPNDs and the 200 cm length compensation cables), where the ratios of the global and local component differ significantly for the different detector sizes. This phenomenon is used up for signal compensation.

  11. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI 2 ) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 10 p/cm 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 12 p/cm 2 . CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 x 10 9 p/cm 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 10 n/cm 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 x 10 10 α/cm 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 x 10 9 α/cm 2 . CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 x 10 9 p/cm 2 at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 x 10 10 n/cm 2 . Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10 12 p/cm 2 and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 x 10 8 p/cm 2 . Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10 15 n/cm 2 . No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions

  12. Measurement of Charmonium Polarization with the LHCb Detector

    Zhang, Yanxi

    In particle physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory used to describe the interaction of colored particles. Heavy quarkonium is the bound state of heavy quark and its anti-quark, and its production cross section and polarization can be used to test the theory models in the framework of QCD. The computation of the heavy quarkonium production cross section by color singlet mechanism (CSM) underestimates the experimental measurements, while results from the calculation of non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) can describe experimental data very well. However, the NRQCD predicts that the $S$ wave heavy quarkonium is heavily transversely polarized in the large transverse momentum region, which is contrary to experimental observations. LHCb, dedicated for precision measurement in bottom and charm physics, is one of the experiments located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb detector, which is a forward region spectrometer covering the pseudo rapidity range 2-5, has fine particle reconstruction and identi...

  13. Measurement of 147Pm in-vivo using phoswich detectors

    Johnson, J.R.

    1977-10-01

    Recently an individual was suspected of having inhaled significant amounts of the almost pure beta emitter, 147 Pm. Urine analysis confirmed that contaminations had occurred but these results could not be used to evaluate the amount of material deposited in the lungs because an acceptable model of promethium clearance from the lung to blood and hence to urine has not been developed. Therefore another method of evaluation, that of the measurement, using phoswich detectors, of the soft photons emitted by the deposited 147 Pm was used. This paper describes the calibrations and measurements that were done in order that an upper limit on the deposited activity, and hence limits for committed dose to the various organs, could be assigned. (author)

  14. Measurement of Top Mass and Properties with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary success of the LHC in delivering proton-proton collisions with large integrated luminosity allows the study of top-quark-enriched data samples with unprecedented statistics. This opens new possibilities for the assessment and further refinements of detector performance, and of data analysis tools. At the same time, different aspects of top-quark event modeling, as implemented in Monte Carlo simulations, can be tested and confronted with data with impressive precision. As an example, the description of the extra QCD radiation accompanying the top-anti-top system can be refined based on measurements. In this context, the experimental challenges and recent results on precision top-quark physics measurements within the ATLAS experiment are summarized and reviewed. In particular, the recent ATLAS top-quark mass result, obtained using a three dimensional template method, which allows the simultaneous determination of the top-quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a ...

  15. Di-boson production measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Chevalier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This talk covers the results of the measurements of diboson production cross sections in proton- proton interactions at 7 TeV in 2011 and at 8 TeV in 2012, performed by the ATLAS experiment. The cross sections are measured in phase space regions defined by the decay kinematics, the detector acceptance and then extrapolated to the full phase space. Cross sections for VV (V=W, Z, γ) production in the leptonic or semileptonic channels are compared to (N)NLO predictions of the Standard Model. Kinematic spectra are used to place constraints on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. All cross sections are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. No experimental evidence is found of anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. PACS: 14.70.-e Gauge bosons.

  16. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    Strindehag, O.

    1971-11-01

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  17. Self-Powered Neutron and Gamma Detectors for In-Core Measurements

    Strindehag, O

    1971-11-15

    The performance of various types of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors intended for control and power distribution measurements in water cooled reactors is discussed. The self-powered detectors are compared with other types of in-core detectors and attention is paid to such properties as neutron and gamma sensitivity, high-temperature performance, burn-up rate and time of response. Also treated are the advantages and disadvantages of using gamma detector data for power distribution calculations instead of data from neutron detectors. With regard to neutron-sensitive detectors, results from several long-term experiments with vanadium and cobalt detectors are presented. The results include reliability and stability data for these two detector types and the Co build-up in cobalt detectors. Experimental results which reveal the fast response of cobalt detectors are presented, and the use of cobalt detectors in reactor safety systems is discussed. Experience of the design and installation of complete flux probes, electronic units and data processing systems for power reactors is reported. The investigation of gamma-sensitive detectors includes detectors with emitters of lead, zirconium, magnesium and Inconel. Measured gamma sensitivities from calibrations both in a reactor and in a gamma cell are given, and the signal levels of self-powered neutron and gamma detectors when applied to power reactors are compared

  18. Radiation damage measurements in room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    Franks, L A; Olsen, R W; Walsh, D S; Vizkelethy, G; Trombka, J I; Doyle, B L; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI sub 2) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 0 p/cm sup 2 and significant bulk leakage after 10 sup 1 sup 2 p/cm sup 2. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5x10 sup 9 p/cm sup 2 in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from a moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 0 n/cm sup 2 , although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particles at fluences up to 1.5x10 sup 1 sup 0 alpha/cm sup 2 produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5x10 sup 9 alpha/cm sup 2. CT detectors show resolution...

  19. Dose measurements with a HPGe detector - a technical manual

    Lidstroem, K.; Nordenfors, C.; Aagren, G

    2000-06-01

    This paper is a technical manual for estimations of dose based on a gamma spectrum. The method used is based on the Monte Carlo code EGS4. Since dose estimations from spectra are specific for each detector, this work is performed on two mobile HPGe detectors at FOA NBC Defence in Umeaa. This technical manual describes the method used in three steps: Part 1 explains how to construct a model of the detector geometry and the specific material for a new detector. Part 2 describes the underlying work of Monte Carlo simulations of a detector given geometry and material. Part 3 describes dose estimations from a gamma spectrum.

  20. Radon measurements using track detector in Wadi Sannur cave

    Shahin, F.; Eissa, M.F.; Mostafa, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    The most important contributors to the committed effective dose received by population due to natural sources are the short-lived decay products of radon ( 222 Rn). In natural voids, such as caves, most radon will enter the system from diffusion across the rock-air interface. It is well known that factors such as air pressure and temperature control the distribution of radon. The radon concentration measurements in the Wadi Sannur cave in Beni-Suef governorate in the period from 14 th of July 2005 to 17 th of October 2005. The average radon concentrations in the right, left and whole first cave are 916.12 ± 179.09, 819.63 ± 54.72 and 873.90± 147.11 Bq m -3 respectively. The measurements were performed using track etch detector of type Cr-39. After exposure, all detectors were etched chemically in 6.25 M NaOH solution at 70 C degrees for 6 h. The tracks were counted with an optical microscope magnifying 400 times. The average temperature inside the first cave during the period of measurements is 25-26 C degrees. The annual effective doses for the workers and visitors in the cave have been calculated. The average radon concentration in the Wadi Sannur cave, was 873.90 ± 147.11 Bq m -3 . The annual effective doses for worker and visitor in the cave were 1.33 ± 0.24 and 0.041 ± 0.007 mSv respectively. The doses are within the international recommended dose of 1.15 mSv. (author)

  1. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI 2 would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI 2 detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI 2 detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig

  2. The Daya Bay antineutrino detector filling system and liquid mass measurement

    Band, H. R.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Draeger, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hinrichs, P.; Lewis, C. A.; Mattison, H.; McFarlane, M. C.; Webber, D. M.; Wenman, D.; Wang, W.; Wise, T.; Xiao, Q.

    2013-09-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment has measured the neutrino mixing angle θ13 to world-leading precision. The experiment uses eight antineutrino detectors filled with 20-tons of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator to detect antineutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear power plant through the inverse beta decay reaction. The precision measurement of sin22θ13 relies on the relative antineutrino interaction rates between detectors at near (400 m) and far (roughly 1.8 km) distances from the nuclear reactors. The measured interaction rate in each detector is directly proportional to the number of protons in the liquid scintillator target. A precision detector filling system was developed to simultaneously fill the three liquid zones of the antineutrino detectors and measure the relative target mass between detectors to < 0.02%. This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of the system and the resulting precision measurement of the detectors' target liquid masses.

  3. Measurements of Charge Sharing Effects in Pixilated CZT/CdTe Detectors

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, charge sharing and charge loss effects in pixilated CZT/CdTe detectors are investigated by measurements. We measured charge sharing effects function of the inter-pixel gap (with same pixel pitch), the photon energy and the detector bias voltage for a large numbers of CZT and Cd......Te pixel detector samples. The results are used for the development of the large area X-ray and Gamma ray detector for the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) planned for the ISS ESA Columbus module. Charge sharing measurements on detector samples with identical size and pixel geometry...

  4. Top quark mass and properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle and unique among the known quarks since it decays before forming hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector are reported using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data of proton-proton collisions from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN laboratory. Measurements of the top quark decay width, top quark spin observables and $W$ boson helicity in events with top quark pairs ($t\\bar{t}$) are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The cross-section measurements of top quark pairs production in association with photons, $Z$ or $W$ bosons is also presented and compared to the most accurate theoretical calculations. These measurements probe the top quark electroweak couplings. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are also reported. In add...

  5. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Dado, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and the Z boson. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pairs is a...

  6. Measurement of radon concentration in water with Lucas cell detector

    Machaj, B.; Pienkos, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the measurement of radon concentration in water is presented based on flushing a water sample with air in a closed loop with the Lucas cell as alpha radiation detector. The main feature of the method is washing radon away from the larger sample of water (0.75 l) to a small volume of air, approximately 0.5 l, thanks to which a high radon concentration in air and a considerable sensitivity of measurement is achieved. Basic relations and results of measurements of a model of a gauge is given. The estimated measuring sensitivity (S) is 8.5 (cpm)/(Bq/l). The random error due to the statistical fluctuations of count rate at radon concentrations 1,10, 100, 1000, 10000 Bq/l is 11, 3.6, 1.1, 0.4, 0.1% correspondingly at a counting (measuring) time of 10 min. The minimum detectable radon concentration in water is 0.11 Bq/l. (author)

  7. Measuring variation of indoor radon concentration using bare nuclear tracks detectors, scintillation counters and surface barrier detectors

    Ishak, I.; Mahat, R.H.; Amin, Y.M.

    1996-01-01

    Bare LRI 15 nuclear track detectors , scintillators counter and surface barrier detectors were used to measured the indoor radon concentration in various location within two rooms. Spatial variation of the radon concentration is caused by positioning of the door, windows, furniture, cracks in the building and also distances from floor, wall and ceiling. It is found that the change in temperature are causing radon concentration to increase at certain time of the day

  8. Design of New Complex Detector Used for Gross Beta Measuring

    Zhang Junmin

    2010-01-01

    The level of gross β for radioactive aerosol in the containment of nuclear plants can indicate how serious the radioactive pollution is in the shell, and it can provide evidence which shows whether there is the phenomenon of leak in the boundaries of confined aquifer of the primary coolant circuit equipment.In the process of measuring, the counting of gross β is influenced by γ. In order to avoid the influence of γ, a new method was introduced and a new detector was designed using plastic scintillator as the major detecting component and BGO as the sub-component. Based on distinctive difference of light attenuation time, signal induced in them can be discriminated. γ background in plastic scintillator was subtracted according to the counting of γ in BGO. The functions of absolute detection efficiency were obtained. The simulation for Monte-Carlo method shows that the influence of γ background is decreased about one order of magnitude. (authors)

  9. Radon measurements by track detectors in Calabrian workplaces

    Nastro, V.; Niceforo, G.; Vuono, D.; Luca, P. de; Nastro, A. [Calabria Univ., Dipt. di Pianificazione Territoriale, Arcavacata di Rende, CS (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Indoor radon studies have been carried out in some workplaces of the South Calabria (Italy) by track detectors CR-39. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of safeguarding the public healthy: since the European population spends, in average, the most greater part of their time in confined environments(residences and offices) the risks of exposure can be elevated. This radon passive measurements are been effectuated according to the recommendations. The exposure time in the workplaces was two different cycle: three months, and six months. The obtained results indicate a radon concentration not only in an average of low level but also in the range of action level (>500 Bq/m{sup 3}). In this last case will be necessary to reduce the radon pollution by adequate land operation works, and a continuous monitoring is also necessary.

  10. Radon measurements by track detectors in Calabrian workplaces

    Nastro, V.; Niceforo, G.; Vuono, D.; Luca, P. de; Nastro, A.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor radon studies have been carried out in some workplaces of the South Calabria (Italy) by track detectors CR-39. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of safeguarding the public healthy: since the European population spends, in average, the most greater part of their time in confined environments(residences and offices) the risks of exposure can be elevated. This radon passive measurements are been effectuated according to the recommendations. The exposure time in the workplaces was two different cycle: three months, and six months. The obtained results indicate a radon concentration not only in an average of low level but also in the range of action level (>500 Bq/m 3 ). In this last case will be necessary to reduce the radon pollution by adequate land operation works, and a continuous monitoring is also necessary

  11. Measurement of the W boson mass with the ATLAS detector

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the W-boson mass is presented based on 4.6 fb^-1 of proton–proton collision data recorded in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The selected data sample consists of 7.8x10^6 candidates in the W -> mu nu channel and 5.9x10^6 candidates in the W -> e nu channel. The W-boson mass is determined using template fits to the charged lepton transverse momentum distributions, and to the charged lepton and E_T^miss transverse mass distribution. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the experimental systematic uncertainties, as well as on the uncertainties due to the modeling of the vector boson production and decay. The final result is compared to the current world average and interpreted in the context of the global electroweak fit.

  12. Measurements of the Vector boson production with the ATLAS Detector

    Kordas, Kostas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The electroweak sector of the Standard Model can be tested by precision measurements of its fundamental parameters, such as the W boson mass or the electroweak mixing angle. In this talk, we present the first measurement of the W boson mass, based on the 7 TeV data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb$^{-1}$. With these samples the detector and physics modelling has been studied in great detail, leading to an overall uncertainty of 19 MeV. The ATLAS collaboration also performed a new precise triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of M(ll), dilepton rapidity and $cos\\theta^{*}$ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the Z forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{FB}$, which is derived and will be presented. The later builds the foundation for a possible future extraction of the weak-mixing angle. The production of jets in association with vector bosons is an important process to study perturbative QCD in a multi-scale environment...

  13. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  14. Lifetime measurements of charmed mesons with high resolution silicon detectors

    Rijk, G.A.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis an experiment is described to measure the lifetimes of pseudoscalar charmed mesons. The experiment uses a negatively charged unseparated hadron beam of 200 GeV. The experiment is carried out with a magnetic spectrometer preceded by a beam telescope, an active target and a vertex telescope, all consisting of Si microstrip detectors. The spectrometer consists of two spectrometer magnets, 48 planes of drift chambers and 3 Cerenkov hodoscopes for the determination and identification of charged secondaries. The lifetimes of the charmed mesons are determined by measuring the length of their flight path, their momentum and their mass. The results, which are described in the thesis, are based on the analysis of part of the collected data. The production rates in the K - beam and in the π - beam are found to be in the same order of magnitude within the x F range covered. Previous experimental data on the lifetimes of charmed particles are reviewed. A theoretical interpretation is presented of the measured decay properties. (Auth.)

  15. Characterization of CdTe and (CdZn)Te detectors with different metal contacts

    Pekárek, J.; Belas, E.; Grill, R.; Uxa, Å.; James, R. B.

    2013-09-01

    In the present work we studied an influence of different types of surface etching and surface passivation of high resistivity CdZnTe-based semiconductor detector material. The aim was to find the optimal conditions to improve the properties of metal-semiconductor contact. The main effort was to reduce the leakage current and thus get better X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum, i.e. to create a detector operating at room temperature based on this semiconductor material with sufficient energy resolution and the maximum charge collection efficiency. Individual surface treatments were characterized by I-V characteristics, spectral analysis and by determination of the profile of the internal electric field.

  16. Personal medical electronic devices and walk-through metal detector security systems: assessing electromagnetic interference effects.

    Guag, Joshua; Addissie, Bisrat; Witters, Donald

    2017-03-20

    There have been concerns that Electromagnetic security systems such as walk-through metal detectors (WTMDs) can potentially cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) in certain active medical devices including implantable cardiac pacemakers and implantable neurostimulators. Incidents of EMI between WTMDs and active medical devices also known as personal medical electronic devices (PMED) continue to be reported. This paper reports on emission measurements of sample WTMDs and testing of 20 PMEDs in a WTMD simulation system. Magnetic fields from sample WTMD systems were characterized for emissions and exposure of certain PMEDs. A WTMD simulator system designed and evaluated by FDA in previous studies was used to mimic the PMED exposures to the waveform from sample WTMDs. The simulation system allows for controlled PMED exposure enabling careful study with adjustable magnetic field strengths and exposure duration, and provides flexibility for PMED exposure at elevated levels in order to study EMI effects on the PMED. The PMED samples consisted of six implantable cardiac pacemakers, six implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), five implantable neurostimulators, and three insulin pumps. Each PMED was exposed in the simulator to the sample WTMD waveforms using methods based on appropriate consensus test standards for each of the device type. Testing the sample PMEDs using the WTMD simulator revealed EMI effects on two implantable pacemakers and one implantable neurostimulator for exposure field strength comparable to actual WTMD field strength. The observed effects were transient and the PMEDs returned to pre-exposure operation within a few seconds after removal from the simulated WTMD exposure fields. No EMI was observed for the sample ICDs or insulin pumps. The findings are consistent with earlier studies where certain sample PMEDs exhibited EMI effects. Clinical implications were not addressed in this study. Additional studies are needed to evaluate potential PMED

  17. Noninvasive Quantum Measurement of Arbitrary Operator Order by Engineered Non-Markovian Detectors

    Bülte, Johannes; Bednorz, Adam; Bruder, Christoph; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2018-04-01

    The development of solid-state quantum technologies requires the understanding of quantum measurements in interacting, nonisolated quantum systems. In general, a permanent coupling of detectors to a quantum system leads to memory effects that have to be taken into account in interpreting the measurement results. We analyze a generic setup of two detectors coupled to a quantum system and derive a compact formula in the weak-measurement limit that interpolates between an instantaneous (text-book type) and almost continuous—detector dynamics-dependent—measurement. A quantum memory effect that we term "system-mediated detector-detector interaction" is crucial to observe noncommuting observables simultaneously. Finally, we propose a mesoscopic double-dot detector setup in which the memory effect is tunable and that can be used to explore the transition to non-Markovian quantum measurements experimentally.

  18. A Detector for (n,gamma) Cross Section Measurements

    Hellstroem, J; Beshai, S

    1971-09-15

    A new detector to be used for determining total (n,gamma) cross sections has been developed in this laboratory. The detector is a large liquid scintillator of approximately 4pi geometry. When used in an experiment the overall time resolution was found to be 10 ns

  19. Measurement of ionising radiation semiconductor detectors: a review

    Aussel, J.P.

    1986-06-01

    Manufacturing techniques for nuclear detectors using semiconductors are constantly advancing, and a large range of models with different specificities and characteristics are available. After a theoretical reminder, this report describes the main types of detectors, their working and their preferential use. A comparative table guides the neophyte reader in his choice [fr

  20. Neutron detector for fusion reaction-rate measurements

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Tietbohl, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a fast, sensitive neutron detector for recording the fusion reaction-rate history of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator (BC-422) and has a response 7 neutrons

  1. Usage of the micropixel detector TimePix for observation of the dynamics of phase transitions in metals

    M. V. Pugach

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results for the test of a TimePix hybrid detector as a tool for measuring and imaging in real time dynamics of phase transitions in metal alloys under heating or cooling are presented. The X-rays ( ~ 10 keV experimental setup explored for the diffraction studies at the Institute for Problems of Material Science NASU (Kyiv is briefly described. An evolution of the diffraction maxima position (~ 20 μm accuracy of the scattered X-rays was ob-served with exposures from a few dozen to a few hundred milliseconds under heating or cooling of the samples of Armco iron at a rate of 100 to 250 C/s. Data for the phase transitions (alpha-, gamma-phases observed during heating/cooling (20 - 1250 °C using the X-ray diffraction were measured.

  2. Measurement of phosphorus in metals by RNAA

    Paul, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    An RNAA procedure has been developed for measurement of low-level phosphorus in metals. Samples are irradiated at a neutron flux of 2.7 x 10 13 n x cm -2 x s -1 then mixed with carrier and dissolved in acid. After chemical separation and purification of the phosphorus and gravimetric determination of carrier yield, 32 P is determined using a beta proportional counter. The detection limit for a 0.1 g sample irradiated for 30 minutes is 5 μg/kg. The method has been used to determine 6.4 ± 0.6 mg/kg phosphorus is SRM 2175 refractory alloy. (author)

  3. Measurements using a silicon detector near the Fukushima nuclear plant

    Ploc, O.; Uchinori, Yu.; Kitamura, H.

    2011-01-01

    The massive tsunami hit the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant after the Tohoku earthquake on March 11 th , 2011. Emergency electric systems of diesel electric machines stopped and during several days later the hydrogen exploded due to over-heated reactors at units 1, 3 and 4. In addition, serious damage was caused in a fuel nuclear storage of unit 2. As a result of these accidents, an extremely large amount of radioisotopes were spread in air, soil, tap water, seawater and food around large areas in East Japan.First, this presentation reports about radiation measurements with the silicon detector Liulin at the J-village, a base of emergency workers, located 20 km from Fukushima Daiichi from March 23 rd , 2011 to August 5 th , 2011. Comparison of measurements with the same device at some other locations (Chiba city, Moscow, board of aircraft) before and after the accident will be presented. Second, the presentation describes our efforts to develop a new portable gamma camera based on Medipix to locate radiation hotspots at Fukushima prefecture. (authors)

  4. Efficiency measurements for 3D silicon strip detectors

    Parzefall, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.d [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN Trento and Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Koehler, Michael; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN Trento and Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Silicon strip detectors are widely used as part of the inner tracking layers in particle physics experiments. For applications at the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the sLHC, silicon detectors with extreme radiation hardness are required. The 3D detector design, where electrodes are processed from underneath the strips into the silicon bulk material, provides a way to enhance the radiation tolerance of standard planar silicon strip detectors. Detectors with several innovative 3D designs that constitute a simpler and more cost-effective processing than the 3D design initially proposed were connected to read-out electronics from LHC experiments and subsequently tested. Results on the amount of charge collected, the noise and the uniformity of charge collection are given.

  5. Prospects of top quark mass measurement with ATLAS detector

    Roy, Pierrick

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the work done to instrument the 'Super-Drawer', supports of the front-end electronics of the Tile Calorimeter, as well as the preparatory analysis of the top quark mass measurement with ATLAS detector. Initially the instrumental part exposes the various stages having led to the instrumentation. This required upstream a phase named integration, where methods were developed to cope with space and ergonomic constraints during the assembly of the Super-Drawers. The experience accumulated in this fast phase allowed the drafting of the protocol of assembly of the Super-Drawers and the installation of the two assembly lines. The first ten Super-Drawers were thus produced for the 2001 test- beam period, and the continuous production of the 260 remaining Super-Drawers must start in June 2002. In the analysis part, this thesis deals with the precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel. It is initially shown that systematic uncertainties will dominate the precision on the measurement, in particular the knowledge of the jet energy scale as well as the final state radiations, leading to a total covariance of approximately 2 GeV. It is then shown that the same events can be used for the energy calibration of the light jets to better than 1%. Finally, the use of a kinematic fit should make it possible to reduce the impact of the effects due to the knowledge of the energy scale of light jets as well as of radiations in the final state. A total uncertainty to the measurement of the top mass less than 1 GeV appears possible in one year of data acquisition at low luminosity, this uncertainty being dominated by that of the b-quark jet energy scale, assumed to be of 1%. (author)

  6. Verification of the first measurement data of the ZEUS detector

    Bender, M.

    1992-12-01

    At the begin of this work an extension of the data-analysis program of ZEUS was performed, which simplifies essentially the operation of this program. By this it is now possible to access the measurement data without requirement on knowledge, on which tape they are. On time of the beginning of the data taking a monitoring program was established, which montors continuously the technical function of all components of the ZEUS detector and the data quality. In the framework of this thesis the routine for the control of the central calorimeter was developed. This routine makes a series of histograms available, which both permit the monitoring of each single channel and present global properties of the calorimeter. For each single channel for instance the mean energy and the mean time and their standard deviations are plotted, for the whhole calorimeter among others the energy distribution and the transverse energy are determined. By means of these data failures can be recognized and localized, which escape the local controls. Beyond the comparison over larger time spans is possible. The suppression of background is an essential problem at storage rings, therefore the different background sources are simulated by means of Monte-Carlo generators and from the so obtained results strategies for the reduction of the background developed. By means of the histograms the simulated data were compared with the first measurement results. Thereby no agreement of the simulated beam-residual gas reactions with the measured data could be found. The simulation yields too few events with low energy deposition (up to several GeV) in the calorimeter, but predicts a high-energetic contribution in the energy distributions, which was not measured. (orig.) [de

  7. Standard practice for detection sensitivity mapping of In-Plant Walk-through metal detectors

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This standard practice covers a procedure for determining the weakest detection path through the portal aperture and the worst-case orthogonal orientation of metallic test objects. It results in detection sensitivity maps, which model the detection zone in terms related to detection sensitivity and identify the weakest detection paths. Detection sensitivity maps support sensitivity adjustment and performance evaluation procedures (see Practices C1269 and C1309). Note 1—Unsymmetrical metal objects possessing a primary longitudinal component, such as handguns and knives, usually have one particular orientation that produces the weakest detection signal. The orientation and the path through the detector aperture where the weakest response is produced may not be the same for all test objects, even those with very similar appearance. Note 2—In the case of multiple specified test objects or for test objects that are orientation sensitive, it may be necessary to map each object several times to determine ...

  8. Soil Electromagnetic Properties and Metal Detector Performance: Theory and Measurement

    2008-11-17

    configuration on 51 a uniform conductive half-space are predicted by the following relation reported by Oldenburg (1978) S(r, z) = s(r1, z)− s(r2, z)− s(r3...where γQ denotes an instrument-specific scaling factor. In complete analogy with sensitivity functions described for quadrapole electrode ar- rays ...www.bartington.com/media/aedd335c/om0408%20MS2%20v46.pdf Billings, S.D., Pasion, L.R. and Oldenburg , D.W., 2003, Characterizing magnetic soils: state of the art and

  9. Measurement of the wire tension and position of the muon detector in the CMS project

    Niu Weiping

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently being constructed at CERN including the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS. It this report, it is have a sample introduction of CMS Muon detector, the drift tube introduction and chamber construction. The scope of this report covers the drift tube design and technical description; measurement of the wire tension of the Muon detector and the quality control; measurement of the wire position of the Muon detector and the quality control and so on. (authors)

  10. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Moller, Soren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhoj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured

  11. Injection quality measurements with diamond based particle detectors

    Stein, Oliver; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    During the re-commissioning phase of the LHC after the long shutdown 1 very high beam losses were observed at the TDI during beam injection. The losses reached up to 90% of the dump threshold. To decrease the through beam losses induced stress on the accelerator components these loss levels need to be reduced. Measurements with diamond based particle detectors (dBLMs), which have nano-second time resolution, revealed that the majority of these losses come from recaptured SPS beam surrounding the nominal bunch train. In this MD the injection loss patterns and loss intensities were investigated in greater detail. Performed calibration shots on the TDI (internal beam absorber for injection) gave a conversion factor from impacting particles intensities to signal in the dBLMs (0.1Vs/109 protons). Using the SPS tune kicker for cleaning the recaptured beam in the SPS and changing the LHC injection kicker settings resulted in a reduction of the injection losses. For 144 bunch injections the loss levels were decreased...

  12. A scintillation detector set measuring the charge particle energy

    Dore, Chantal.

    1979-01-01

    The S143 experiment, at CERN in 1976, needed both the measurement and the identification of light nuclei, and especially the separation between 3 H and 3 He, over a large energy range. In the chosen solution, in addition to semiconductor detectors, some scintillation counters are used. The non-linearity of light versus energy of charged particles was complicated by the fact there was two different linear laws according to the charge of particles. To obtain good analogic signals over a dynamic range nearly equal to 200, the signals from several dynodes were used simultaneously. In the experimental setting up, each scintillator was put directly in contact with the corresponding photocathode. In spite of a special shielding, some perturbations due to the magnet placed close by required to bring important corrections to linear laws. Thanks to complementary informations from semiconductor counters, a full separation between charge 1 and charge 2 particles was possible. A suitable identification as guaranted among charge 1 particles, but only kinematic constraints gave the possibility to extract 4 He corresponding to the elastic scattering [fr

  13. Spectroscopic measurements with a silicon drift detector having a continuous implanted drift cathode-voltage divider

    Bonvicini, V; D'Acunto, L; Franck, D; Gregorio, A; Pihet, P; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) prototype where the drift electrode also plays the role of a high-voltage divider has been realised and characterised for spectroscopic applications at near-room temperatures. Among the advantages of this design, is the absence of metal on the sensitive surface which makes this detector interesting for soft X-rays. The detector prototype has a large sensitive area (2x130 mm sup 2) and the charge is collected by two anodes (butterfly-like detector). The energy resolution of a such a detector has been investigated at near-room temperatures using a commercial, hybrid, low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier. The results obtained for the X-ray lines from sup 5 sup 5 Fe and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am are presented.

  14. Beryllium isotopes in cosmic radiation measured with plastic detectors

    Fukui, K.; Enge, W.; Beaujean, R.

    1976-01-01

    Plastic stacks consisting of Daicel cellulose nitrate and Kodak cellulose nitrate were flown from Fort Churchill, Canada in 1971 for the study of isotopic components of light nuclei, especially beryllium, in primary cosmic rays. Tracks found in these detectors were analysed for charge and mass identification; the ratio between Be 7 and total Be is obtained as 0.64 +- 0.25 at detector level. (orig.) [de

  15. A fast neutron detector with IP by track measurement

    Miao Zhengqiang; Yang Jun; Zhang Qiang; Zhao Xiangfeng; Wang Daohua

    2004-01-01

    Imaging Plate(IP) is very sensitive to electric particles, especially to heavy ions. As we know, the recoiling protons are produced while fast neutrons scattered in light material containing hydrogen. When the recoiling proton enters in the sensitive layer of IP, a track will be recorded by IP. In this paper, a fast neutron detector based on IP and (n, p) reaction is described in detail, the detector's efficiency is studied also. (authors)

  16. Trace radioactive measurement in foodstuffs using high purity germanium detector

    Morco, Ryan P.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.; Castaneda, Soledad S.; Almoneda, Rosalina V.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Trace radioactivity in food has been seriously considered sources of potential harm after the accidental radioactive releases in the last decades which led to contamination of the food chain. Countermeasures are being used to reduce the radiological health risk to the population and to ensure that public safety and international commitments are met. Investigation of radioactive traces in foods was carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry. The radionuclides being measured were fission products 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs and naturally occurring 4 0Κ. Gamma-ray measurements were performed using a hybrid gamma-ray counting system with coaxial p-type Tennelec High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with relative efficiency of 18.4%. Channels were calibrated to energies using a standard check source with 1 37Cs and 6 0Co present. Self-shielding within samples was taken into account by comparing directly with reference standards of similar matrix and geometry. Efficiencies of radionuclides of interests were accounted in calculating the activity concentrations in the samples. Efficiency calibration curve was generated using an in-house validated program called FINDPEAK, a least-square method that fits a polynomial up to sixth-order of equation. Lower Limits of Detection (LLD) obtained for both 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs ranges from 1-6 Bq/Kg depending on the sample matrix. In the last five years, there have been no foodstuffs analyzed exceeded the local and international regulatory limit of 1000Bq/Kg for the summed activities of 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs. (author)

  17. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  18. First measurements with the ALICE detector at LHC

    Elia, D.

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is designed to measure the properties of strongly interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions at LHC. The apparatus has several features, such as low p T acceptance and powerful tracking over a broad momentum range, that make ALICE also an important contributor to the first proton-proton physics. In this respect the ALICE physics program aims both at setting the baseline for the understanding of the heavy-ion data and exploring the new energy domain. The charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity density distributions will be the first measurements that ALICE will perform, both in p-p and in Pb-Pb collisions. As those observables correspond to basic properties of the collisions in the new energy domain at LHC, their knowledge will allow to constrain the hadroproduction models and correctly configure the Monte Carlo generators. Moreover, the measurement of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in the central rapidity region will extend the existing energy dependence pattern and provide an estimate of the energy density attained in the early phase of the collision. Besides these very first measurements, p T spectra of both all charged and identified particles, baryon number transport and strangeness production analyses will also be carried out within the p-p first physics programme. Since it will follow the first p-p run, the early heavy-ion data taking is expected to be carried out with a fully commissioned detector: in particular alignment and calibrations will be available from the previously collected comics and p-p samples. Data quality and statistics should allow, already with this pilot run, to explore quite a rich physics spectrum. The first few 10 4 events (both minimum bias and central collisions) will provide information about global event properties such us multiplicity, pseudorapidity density and elliptical flow. With a statistics of 10 5 to 10 6 events particle spectra, resonances, differential flow and

  19. Comparison of phoswich and ARSA-type detectors for radioxenon measurements

    Ward, R.M.; Biegalski, S.R.F.; Hennig, W.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioxenon to ensure compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) has driven the development of improved detectors for measuring xenon, including the development of a phoswich detector. This detector uses only one PMT to detect β-γ coincidence, thus greatly reducing the bulk and electronics of the detector in comparison to the ARSA-type detector. In this experiment, 135 Xe was produced through neutron activation and a phoswich detector was used to attain spectra from the gas. These results were compared to similar results from an ARSA-type β-γ coincidence spectrum. The spectral characteristics and resolution were compared for the coincidence and beta spectra. Using these metrics, the overall performance of the phoswich detector for β-γ coincidence of radioxenon was evaluated. (author)

  20. 30 CFR 75.320 - Air quality detectors and measurement devices.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air quality detectors and measurement devices... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.320 Air quality detectors and measurement devices. (a) Tests for methane shall be made by a qualified person with...

  1. The measurement of the radioactive aerosol diameter by position sensitive detectors, 3

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Kanamori, Masashi; Seki, Akio.

    1981-10-01

    The measurement of the diameter of radioactive aerosol, in particular plutonium aerosol, is very important for the internal dose estimation. Determination of the diameter of radioactive aerosol is performed by using the position sensitive detectors. Position sensitive semiconductor detectors and Scintillation detectors with IIT tube are used as the position sensitive detector. The filter paper with the radioactive aerosols is contacted to the PSD which is connected to the data processor so that the diameter of the aerosol is calculated from the measured radioactivity. (author)

  2. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    Garrison, Lance [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  3. A Test-Bench for Measurement of Electrical Static Parameters of Strip Silicon Detectors

    Golutvin, I A; Danilevich, V G; Dmitriev, A Yu; Elsha, V V; Zamiatin, Y I; Zubarev, E V; Ziaziulia, F E; Kozus, V I; Lomako, V M; Stepankov, D V; Khomich, A P; Shumeiko, N M; Cheremuhin, A E

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for measurement data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control.

  4. The effect of the nuclear track detectors' position on the radon concentration measurements

    Yilmaz, A.; Kuerkcueoglu, M. E.; Haner, B.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to determine the radon concentration values of the underground mines according to workers' health. For this purpose, to be able to measure radon concentrations by using passive nuclear etched track detectors, CR-39 detectors were placed into 66 points on the way of aeration galleries of Armutcuk, Amasra, Karadon, Kozlu and Uezuelmez bituminous coal mines which are known as the Carboniferous outcrops of the Western Black Sea Area in Turkey. In every measurement point, a pair of detectors, one of them is being perpendicular and the other one is parallel to air flow, were exposed to radon gases over 40 days for four seasons of the year 2008. The relationship between the readings of vertically and horizontally positioned detectors was investigated by evaluating the effect of the detectors' positions on the detected radon concentrations. It can be concluded that, the vertically positioned detectors, in general, recorded higher radon gases concentration values than that of the horizontally positioned ones.

  5. Characterisation of a MOSFET-based detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam radiotherapy

    Jong, W. L.; Ung, N. M.; Tiong, A. H. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Wong, J. H. D.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of the MOSkin detector for megavoltage electron beam dosimetry. The reproducibility, linearity, energy dependence, dose rate dependence, depth dose measurement, output factor measurement, and surface dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam were tested. The MOSkin detector showed excellent reproducibility (>98%) and linearity (R2= 1.00) up to 2000 cGy for 4-20 MeV electron beams. The MOSkin detector also showed minimal dose rate dependence (within ±3%) and energy dependence (within ±2%) over the clinical range of electron beams, except for an energy dependence at 4 MeV electron beam. An energy dependence correction factor of 1.075 is needed when the MOSkin detector is used for 4 MeV electron beam. The output factors measured by the MOSkin detector were within ±2% compared to those measured with the EBT3 film and CC13 chamber. The measured depth doses using the MOSkin detector agreed with those measured using the CC13 chamber, except at the build-up region due to the dose volume averaging effect of the CC13 chamber. For surface dose measurements, MOSkin measurements were in agreement within ±3% to those measured using EBT3 film. Measurements using the MOSkin detector were also compared to electron dose calculation algorithms namely the GGPB and eMC algorithms. Both algorithms were in agreement with measurements to within ±2% and ±4% for output factor (except for the 4 × 4 cm2 field size) and surface dose, respectively. With the uncertainties taken into account, the MOSkin detector was found to be a suitable detector for dose measurement under megavoltage electron beam. This has been demonstrated in the in vivo skin dose measurement on patients during electron boost to the breast tumour bed.

  6. Error in measuring radon in soil gas by means of passive detectors

    Tanner, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Passive detection of radon isotopes depends on diffusion of radon atoms from the sites of their generation to the location of the detecting or collecting device. Because some radon decays en route to a passive detector in soil, the radon concentration measured by the detector must be less than the concentration in those soil pores where it is undiminished by diffusion to the detector cavity. The true radon concentration may be significantly underestimated in moist soils. (author)

  7. Measurement of Photomultipier Plateau Curves and Single MIP response in the AD detector at ALICE

    Sanchez Falero, Sebastian De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The Alice Diffractive (AD) detector is a forward detector in the ALICE experiment at CERN. It is aimed to the triggering on diffractive events and extends the pseudorapidity coverage to about 4.9 < /n/ < 6.3. In this work, a PMT's efficiency plateau and single MIP response are measured using a replica of the detector's scintillator modules, electronic and data acquisition system and cosmic rays as particle source.

  8. Laboratory Measurement of the Brighter-fatter Effect in an H2RG Infrared Detector

    Plazas, A. A.; Shapiro, C.; Smith, R.; Huff, E.; Rhodes, J.

    2018-01-01

    The "brighter-fatter" (BF) effect is a phenomenon (originally discovered in charge coupled devices) in which the size of the detector point spread function (PSF) increases with brightness. We present, for the first time, laboratory measurements demonstrating the existence of the effect in a Hawaii-2RG HgCdTe near infrared (NIR) detector. We use the Precision Projector Laboratory, a JPL facility for emulating astronomical observations with UV/VIS/NIR detectors, to project about 17,000 point so...

  9. Measurement of inclusive semileptonic B decays with the ARGUS detector

    Nau, A.

    1993-01-01

    Using data collected with the ARGUS detector at the ε + ε - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, the inclusive semileptonic branching ratio of B mesons, the charm content of the final hadronic state and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke have been measured. Model-dependent inclusive semileptonic branching ratios of B mesons are obtained by fitting theoretical models to measured and corrected lepton spectra. Using the free-quark model gives BR (B → Xl y ) = (9.4±0.1±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke 0.041±0.001±0.002, the model of Altarelli et al. BR(B→Xlν)=(9.7±0.2±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.041±0.001±0.002, the one of Grinstein et al. BR(B→Xlν)=(9.5±0.1±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke 0.042±0.001±0.006, and a modified version of the Grinstein et al. model with free D ** content BR(B→Xlν) =(9.7±0.5±0.6)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.043±0.006±0.002 were l is either an electron or a muon. The first quoted error on the semileptonic branching ratio is statistical and the second systematic, whereas the first error on vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke is experimental and the second theoretical. A 'model-independent' inclusive semileptonic branching ratio for B mesons and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke are obtained by tagging electrons with D 0 and D *+ mesons. The results are: BR(B→Xeν)=(11.2±2.8±1.1)% and vertical stroke V cb vertical stroke =0.045±0.006±0.002. Counting the charm fraction in the final hadronic state in semileptonic B decays with letpon momenta greater than 1.2 GeV/c yields (97±11±8)%. (orig.) [de

  10. Some recent measurements onboard spacecraft with passive detector

    Spurný, František; Jadrníčková, Iva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 116, 1-4 (2005), s. 228-231 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : space research * radiation dosimetry * passive detectors Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.490, year: 2005

  11. Measurement of moderated neutron fluxes using Au-La-Co-Mn sandwich detectors

    Costa, L.

    1967-03-01

    In order to measure the energy spectra of moderated neutrons in reactors or in their protections, it is possible to improve resonating detectors by using three of them together: the difference between the activities of the exterior detectors and that of the central detector is proportional to the neutron flux at the resonance energy. The sensitivity obtained is lower but the energy selectivity is better than with simple detectors. The object of this work has been to develop this technique for four substances: gold, lanthanum, cobalt and manganese which have resonance energies at 4.9 - 73.5 - 132 and 337 eV. (author) [fr

  12. A normalization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a normalization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the C.E.A., of the physical tests for detectors measuring external irradiation. Among the various tests mentionned are treated more in details, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response. As far as calibration is concerned, the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. Finally, a chapter is consecrated to the high flux detectors and to those for pulsed electromagnetic radiations [fr

  13. The solid state track detectors for α-particles angular distribution measurements

    Bakr, M.H.S.

    1978-01-01

    The solid state track detectors technique is described in details from the point of view of applying them in nuclear reactions research. Using an optimum developing solution, the etching rate of polycarbonate detector was found to be 10.5 μ/hour. The energy resolution of this detector was estimated using 241 Am α-source at α-energies between 1 and 3 Mev. The scattering chamber designed for angular distribution measurements using solid state track detectors is described. A special schematic normograph for range-energy-degrading foils relation is given

  14. Energy deposition measurements in fast reactor safety experiments with fission thermocouple detectors

    Wright, S.A.; Scott, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of phenomena occurring in in-pile fast reactor safety experiments requires an accurate measurement of the time dependent energy depositions within the fissile material. At Sandia Laboratories thin-film fission thermocouples are being developed for this purpose. These detectors have high temperature capabilities (400 to 500 0 C), are sodium compatible, and have milli-second time response. A significant advantage of these detectors for use as energy deposition monitors is that they produce an output voltage which is directly dependent on the temperature of a small chip of fissile material within the detectors. However, heat losses within the detector make it necessary to correct the response of the detector to determine the energy deposition. A method of correcting the detector response which uses an inverse convolution procedure has been developed and successfully tested with experimental data obtained in the Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) and in the Annular Core Research Reactor

  15. A test-bench for measurement of electrical static parameters of strip silicon detectors

    Golutvin, I.A.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Elsha, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control. (author)

  16. MTF measurement and analysis of linear array HgCdTe infrared detectors

    Zhang, Tong; Lin, Chun; Chen, Honglei; Sun, Changhong; Lin, Jiamu; Wang, Xi

    2018-01-01

    The slanted-edge technique is the main method for measurement detectors MTF, however this method is commonly used on planar array detectors. In this paper the authors present a modified slanted-edge method to measure the MTF of linear array HgCdTe detectors. Crosstalk is one of the major factors that degrade the MTF value of such an infrared detector. This paper presents an ion implantation guard-ring structure which was designed to effectively absorb photo-carriers that may laterally defuse between adjacent pixels thereby suppressing crosstalk. Measurement and analysis of the MTF of the linear array detectors with and without a guard-ring were carried out. The experimental results indicated that the ion implantation guard-ring structure effectively suppresses crosstalk and increases MTF value.

  17. A position-sensitive start detector for time-of-flight measurement

    Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Shikazono, Naomoto; Isoyama, Goro.

    1978-08-01

    A position-sensitive start detector for a time-of-flight measurement is described. In this detector microchannel plates were used to obtain time and position signals simultaneously. A time resolution of 121 psec FWHM and a position resolution of 0.28 mm FWHM were obtained for α-particles from an 241 Am source. (auth.)

  18. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    Thiesen, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a vessel for handling molten metal having an interior refractory lining, apparatus for continuous high temperature measurement of the molten metal. It comprises a thermowell; the thermowell containing a multiplicity of thermocouples; leads being coupled to a means for continuously indicating the temperature of the molten metal in the vessel

  19. Photon detector for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer (Fermilab experiment E781)

    Goncharenko, Yu.M.; Grachov, O.A.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Nurushev, S.B.; Vasil'ev, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A possibility to use one- or two-photon lead glass detectors for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer with E γ up to 500 GeV is studied. It is shown that a single photon detector equipped with radiation-resistant lead glass counters is applicable for the experiment discussed. It is concluded that for the best energy resolution in the case of Primakoff effect like π - = γ * → π - + γ the combined method would be used with weighted combination of direct E γ measurement in the Photon-3 detector and the π - beam energy precise measurement. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs

  20. Measurement of jet production with the ATLAS detector and extraction of the strong coupling constant

    Marceca, Gino; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The inclusive-jet cross-section at 8 TeV and the inclusive-jet and dijet cross-sections at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector are presented. NLO QCD calculations, and NNLO for the inclusive-jet measurement at 13 TeV, are compared to the measurements. The extraction of $\\alpha_{s}$ from the measurement of the transverse energy-energy correlation at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is also presented.

  1. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H., E-mail: ngkh@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia and University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jong, W. L. [Clinical Oncology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  2. X-ray measurement with Pin type semiconductor detectors; Medicion de rayos X con detectores de semiconductor tipo PIN

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Electronica, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Here are presented the experimental results of the applications of Pin type radiation detectors developed in a National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) project, in the measurement of low energy gamma and X-rays. The applications were oriented mainly toward the Medical Physics area. It is planned other applications which are in process of implementation inside the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. (Author)

  3. Comparison of radiation detector performance for different metal contacts on CdZnTe deposited by electroless deposition method

    Zheng, Q.; Dierre, F.; Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Dieguez, E. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, Department of Materials Physics, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ayoub, M. [Durham Scientific Crystals Laboratory, Netpark, Thomas Wright Way, Sedgefield, TS21, 3FD (United Kingdom); Corregidor, V.; Alves, E. [Unidade de Fisica e Aceleradores, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953, Sacavem (Portugal); Fernandez-Ruiz, R. [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion. Laboratorio de TXRF/Laue-XRD. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Perez, J.M. [CIEMAT, Edificio 22, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    A comparative study of four different metals gold (Au), platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and rhodium (Rh) deposited on CdZnTe(CZT) by the electroless deposition method has been carried out. Two of these materials, Ru and Rh, have been deposited for the first time by this method. In contrast to the Pt deposition, the deposition of Ru and Rh were not carried out under the optimal conditions. The metals deposited on the samples were identified by Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF). Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) analyses show that Au forms the thickest layer ({proportional_to}160 nm) for the experimental conditions of this work. Current-voltage measurements show that Pt forms a more linear ohmic contact with the lowest leakage current. A {sup 57}Co gamma ray spectrum gave a better detector performance with a FWHM 11 keV at 122 keV. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Radiation damage measurements on CZT drift strip detectors

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    from 2 x 10(8) to 60 x 10(8) p(+)/cm(2). Even for the highest fluences, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as a function of depth inside the detector material...... with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (mutau(e)(-1))(rad) = (2.5+/-0.2) x 10(-7) x Phi (V/cm)(2) with the proton fluence, Phi in p(+)/cm(2). The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well with the damage profile calculated...

  5. In-core neutron flux measurements at PARR using self powered neutron detector

    Hussain, A.; Ansari, S.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report describes experimental reactor physics measure ments at PARR using the in-core neutron detectors. Rhodium self powered neutron detectors (SPND) were used in the PARR core and several measurements were made aimed at detector calibration, response time determination and neutron flux measurements. The detectors were calibrated at low power using gold foils and full power by the thermal channel. Based on this calibration it was observed that the detector response remains almost linear throughout the power range. The self powered detectors were used for on-line determination of absolute neutron flux in the core as well as the spatial distribution of neutron flux or reactor power. The experimental, axial and horizontal flux mapping results at certain locations in the core are presented. The total response time of rhodium detector was experimentally determined to be about 5 minutes, which agree well with the theoretical results. Because of longer response time of SPND of the detectors it is not possible to use them in the reactor protection system. (author). 10 figs

  6. Technical Note: Response measurement for select radiation detectors in magnetic fields

    Reynolds, M., E-mail: michaelreynolds@ualberta.net [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division,University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose response to applied magnetic fields for ion chambers and solid state detectors has been investigated previously for the anticipated use in linear accelerator–magnetic resonance devices. In this investigation, the authors present the measured response of selected radiation detectors when the magnetic field is applied in the same direction as the radiation beam, i.e., a longitudinal magnetic field, to verify previous simulation only data. Methods: The dose response of a PR06C ion chamber, PTW60003 diamond detector, and IBA PFD diode detector is measured in a longitudinal magnetic field. The detectors are irradiated with buildup caps and their long axes either parallel or perpendicular to the incident photon beam. In each case, the magnetic field dose response is reported as the ratio of detector signals with to that without an applied longitudinal magnetic field. The magnetic field dose response for each unique orientation as a function of magnetic field strength was then compared to the previous simulation only studies. Results: The measured dose response of each detector in longitudinal magnetic fields shows no discernable response up to near 0.21 T. This result was expected and matches the previously published simulation only results, showing no appreciable dose response with magnetic field. Conclusions: Low field longitudinal magnetic fields have been shown to have little or no effect on the dose response of the detectors investigated and further lend credibility to previous simulation only studies.

  7. Leakage current measurements on pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    Dirks, B.; Blondel, C.; Daly, F.; Gevin, O.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.

    2006-01-01

    In the field of the R&D of a new generation hard X-ray cameras for space applications we focus on the use of pixelated CdTe or CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. They are covered with 64 (0.9×0.9 mm2) or 256 (0.5×0.5 mm2) pixels, surrounded by a guard ring and operate in the energy ranging from several

  8. A measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and NuMI beam

    Ospanov, Rustem [Texas U.

    2008-08-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. The neutrino beam is produced by the NuMI facility at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, and is observed at near and far detectors placed 734 km apart. The neutrino interactions in the near detector are used to measure the initial muon neutrino fl The vast majority of neutrinos travel through the near detector and Earth matter without interactions. A fraction of muon neutrinos oscillate into other fl vors resulting in the disappearance of muon neutrinos at the far detector. This thesis presents a measurement of the muon neutrino oscillation parameters in the framework of the two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis.

  9. Measurements of streaming neutrons on nuclear ship 'Mutsu' by a two-detector-method

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Ryufuku, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Streaming neutrons escaping through an air gap located between the pressure vessel and the primary shield of the Nuclear Ship ''Mutsu'' were measured by applying the two-detector-method. The two detectors consisted of a single BF 3 counter provided alternatively with different covering arrangements - (a) 3mm thick steel tube + layers of polyethylene sheeting with total thickness of 30mm + 1mm thick Cd plate and (b) same covering as (a) + polyethylene boxing 20mm thick. In order to derive from the count rates obtained with the detectors described above the absolute values of neutron flux and dose equivalent rate, the detectors were calibrated in laboratory by comparison with a reference detector system in neutron field created around a 252 Cf source and TCA, a light-water moderated critical assembly. The conversion from measured counts to neutron flux and neutron dose equivalent rate was estimated to incur errors of +-15 and +-40%, respectively. (auth.)

  10. Thermo-dynamical measurements for ATLAS Inner Detector (evaporative cooling system)

    Bitadze, Alexander; Buttar, Craig

    During the construction, installation and initial operation of the Evaporative Cooling System for the ATLAS Inner Detector SCT Barrel Sub-detector, some performance characteristics were observed to be inconsistent with the original design specifications, therefore the assumptions made in the ATLAS Inner Detector TDR were revisited. The main concern arose because of unexpected pressure drops in the piping system from the end of the detector structure to the distribution racks. The author of this theses made a series of measurements of these pressure drops and the thermal behavior of SCT-Barrel cooling Stave. Tests were performed on the installed detector in the pit, and using a specially assembled full scale replica in the SR1 laboratory at CERN. This test setup has been used to perform extensive tests of the cooling performance of the system including measurements of pressure drops in different parts of system, studies of the thermal profile along the stave pipe for different running conditions / parameters a...

  11. Decision for counting condition of radioactive waste activities measuring by Ludlum detector

    Bambang-Purwanto

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive waste must measured for activities before be throw out to environment. Measuring will be important in ordered to know activities can be given management direction. For activities radioactive waste on limit threshold value must processed, but for under limit threshold value activities can be throw out to environment. Activities measuring for solid radioactive waste and liquid by (Total, β, γ) Ludlum detector connected Mode-1000 Scaler Counting. Before measuring for solid waste activities was decisioned optimally counting condition, and be obtained are : sample weight 3.5 gram, heating temperature of 125 o C and heating time at 60 minutes. Activities measuring result by total detector ranges from (0.68-0.71) 10 -1 μCi/gram, β detector ranges from (0.24-0.25) 10 -1 μCi/gram and γ detector ranges from (0.35-0.37) μCi/gram

  12. First examination of CASCADE-X-ray-detector and measurement of neutron-mirrorneutron-oscillation

    Boehm, B.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of X-radiation is of utmost importance for both fundamental physics and medical diagnostics. This work investigates whether or not the CASCADE detector working principle, first developed for the detection of neutrons, can be adapted for the detection of X-rays. This modular detector concept combines the use of a solid neutron or X-ray converter with the advantages of a counting gas detector. Thus, it gives the possibility to optimize efficiency, dynamics and spatial resolution independently. Firstly, it is necessary to find a suitable converter material that allows for the best possible detector efficiency. In order to do so, a mathematical model of the complete detector system was developed that yields the total efficiency for any given material. Respecting technical constraints, gold and gadolinium showed to be favorable choices. Based on these theoretical considerations a prototype of a CASCADE X-ray detector was built, and measurements for the determination of this detector's efficiency were conducted. In the second part of this work a CASCADE neutron detector was used to conduct the first measurement the neutron-mirrorneutron oscillation time. Mirrormatter was proposed in 1956 by Lee and Yang to allow for symmetry in the description of the universe despite the existence of parity violation. By using neutrons it was possible to determine a lower limit for the oscillation time in this work. (orig.)

  13. Prototype of the stacked CdZnTe semiconductor detector for 16N measurement

    Nishizawa, Hiroshi; Inujima, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2001-01-01

    Prototype of the Stacked CdZnTe Semiconductor Detector for Measurement The prototype model of the stacked CdZnTe semiconductor detector, which is able to measure the 6.13 MeV γ-ray from 16 N, was fabricated. The prototype's response calculation was carried out by Monte-Carlo method. The result of the response calculation agreed with the experiment data of check sources of 137 Cs and 60 Co, and 16 N which was measured at vicinity of the primary cooling water pipe of the nuclear reactor. The source spectra were unfolded with detector's response function obtained by simulation, and it is indicated that the incident γ-ray energy and its intensity ratio was identified and that the energy of 6 MeV γ-ray could be measured by the prototype of the stacked detector. (author)

  14. Optimisation of elevated radon concentration measurement by using electro-chemical etching of nuclear track detectors

    Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P.; Fujimoto, K.; Tommasino, L.; Demajo, A.; Zunic, Z.; Celikovic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, two methods for adjusting of passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeters (UFO detector) for enhanced radon concentration measurement are presented. Achieved upper limit of detection is 5.94 MBq m-3 d [sr

  15. Measurement of high-energy electrons by means of a Cherenkov detector in ISTTOK tokamak

    Jakubowski, L., E-mail: lech.Jjakubowski@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Zebrowski, J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 - 001 Lisboa (Portugal); Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Rabinski, M. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 - 001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-10-15

    The paper concerns detectors of the Cherenkov radiation which can be used to measure high-energy electrons escaping from short-living plasma. Such detectors have high temporal (about 1 ns) and spatial (about 1 mm) resolution. The paper describes a Cherenkov-type detector which was designed, manufactured and installed in the ISTTOK tokamak in order to measure fast runaway electrons. The radiator of that detector was made of an aluminium nitride (AlN) tablet with a light-tight filter on its front surface. Cherenkov signals from the radiator were transmitted through an optical cable to a fast photomultiplier. It made possible to perform direct measurements of the runaway electrons of energy above 80 keV. The measured energy values and spatial characteristics of the recorded electrons appeared to be consistent with results of numerical modelling of the runaway electron generation process in the ISTTOK tokamak.

  16. Validation of Am-241 measurement in ion chamber type smoke detector by using gamma spectrometry system

    Yii Mei Wo; Khairul Nizam Razali

    2005-01-01

    Smoke detectors are useful devices in modern days that able to save many lives. Even though, the use of ion chamber type smoke detector (usually contain Americium-241) was exempted in Malaysia, but the trading of this device was controlled by regulation, under the Atomic Energy Licensing Act (Act 304). The activity of the Am-241 can be measured by using the Gamma Spectrometry System since it was much easier, compared to Alpha Spectrometry System. To do so, the system was first need to be calibrated using the standard reference source to find the efficiency of the germanium detector. The method used for the measurement was first validated for several relevant parameters, which include specificity, precision (repeatability), bias (accuracy), linearity, working range, detection limit, robustness and ruggedness to ensure it was fit for the purpose. The measured Am-241 activity inside the smoke detector will be reported together with a reasonable expanded uncertainty arise from the measurement. (Author)

  17. Role of electrode metallization in the performance of bulk semi-insulating InP radiation detectors

    Zatko, B.; Dubecky, F.; Prochazkova, O.; Necas, V.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the study of three different electrode metallizations with the aim to form a Schottky barrier contact. Electrode geometry corresponds to the requirements of digital radiography systems. As substrates bulk Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) SI InP wafers doped with Fe and Fe+Zn are used. Results of this study show that no one of the used metallization performs as a blocking contact. However, detectors with Ti/Pt/Au metallization attained a relatively good energy resolution of 7.0 keV in full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the charge collection efficiency (CCE) higher than 83% for 122 keV γ-photons at 255 K. The development of SI InP radiation detectors and in particular their electrode technology is discussed in the light of observed results

  18. On the electron density localization in elemental cubic ceramic and FCC transition metals by means of a localized electrons detector.

    Aray, Yosslen; Paredes, Ricardo; Álvarez, Luis Javier; Martiz, Alejandro

    2017-06-14

    The electron density localization in insulator and semiconductor elemental cubic materials with diamond structure, carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin, and good metallic conductors with face centered cubic structure such as α-Co, Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au, was studied using a localized electrons detector defined in the local moment representation. Our results clearly show an opposite pattern of the electron density localization for the cubic ceramic and transition metal materials. It was found that, for the elemental ceramic materials, the zone of low electron localization is very small and is mainly localized on the atomic basin edges. On the contrary, for the transition metals, there are low-valued localized electrons detector isocontours defining a zone of highly delocalized electrons that extends throughout the material. We have found that the best conductors are those in which the electron density at this low-value zone is the lowest.

  19. Beam profile measurement with CR-39 track detector for low-energy ions

    Sato, F; Tanaka, T; Iida, T; Yamauchi, T; Oda, K

    1999-01-01

    A CR-39 track detector was successfully used to measure the outline of thin low-energy ion beams. After the etching, the surface of the detector was examined with an observation system composed of a Normarski microscope, a CCD camera and a digital image processing computer. Beam images obtained with the system were in good agreement on the outline of the beam formed with a beam aperture. Also, the resolving power in the beam outline measurement was roughly explained from the consideration of the ion range and the etch-pit growth in the chemical etching for the CR-39 detector.

  20. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    Heijne, E.H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The neutrino beam installations at the CERN SPS accelerator are described, with emphasis on the beam monitoring systems. Especially the muon flux measurement system is considered in detail, and the calibration procedure and systematic aspects of the measurements are discussed. An introduction is given to the use of silicon semiconductor detectors and their related electronics. Other special chapters concern non-linear phenomena in the silicon detectors, radiation damage in silicon detectors, energy loss and energy deposition in silicon and a review of energy loss phenomena for high energy muons in matter. (orig.)

  1. The γ rays sensitivity measurement of CeF3 scintillator detector

    Hu Mengchun; Zhou Dianzhong; Li Rurong; Wang Zhentong; Yang Hongqiong; Zhang Jianhua; Hu Qingyuan; Peng Taiping

    2003-01-01

    The CeF 3 is an abio-scintillator developed in recent years, which are insensitive to neutron and sensitive to gamma rays and respond quickness. The relationship of CeF 3 scintillation detector gamma rays sensitivity with the change of crystal thickness was measured. The CeF 3 scintillation detector is composed by high liner current photomultiplier tube of CHφT3, CHφT5 and CeF 3 scintillator. The detector gamma rays sensitivity of purple photocell and common photocell with CeF 3 scintillator were measured too

  2. Measurement of depth-dose distributions by means of the LiF-fluoroplastic thermoluminescent detectors

    Shaks, A.I.; Uryaev, I.A.; Trifonov, V.A.; Reshetnikova, L.V.

    1977-01-01

    Depth-dose distributions have been studied by means of thin-layer thermoluminescent detectors LiF-fluoroplast (8 mg/cm 2 ). Dosimetric characteristics of the detectors are described. They are: tissue-equivalence, dependence of sensitivity on the dose, dose rate and angle of incidence of radiation, and time-dependent storage, of the total light absorbed. Comparison of the results obtained with the measurements taken with an extrapolation chamber has demonstrated the possibility of measuring the depth-dose distributions by means of LiF-fluoroplast detectors

  3. Measurement of β-decay end point energy with planar HPGe detector

    Bhattacharjee, T.; Pandit, Deepak; Das, S. K.; Chowdhury, A.; Das, P.; Banerjee, D.; Saha, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, S.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The β - γ coincidence measurement has been performed with a segmented planar Hyper-Pure Germanium (HPGe) detector and a single coaxial HPGe detector to determine the end point energies of nuclear β-decays. The experimental end point energies have been determined for some of the known β-decays in 106Rh →106Pd. The end point energies corresponding to three weak branches in 106Rh →106Pd decay have been measured for the first time. The γ ray and β particle responses for the planar HPGe detector were simulated using the Monte Carlo based code GEANT3. The experimentally obtained β spectra were successfully reproduced with the simulation.

  4. Measurement of Radon concentration in groundwater by technique of nuclear track detector

    Trinh Van Giap; Nguyen Manh Hung; Dang Duc Nhan

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring radon concentration in groundwater using nuclear track detector LR-115 stripping is reported. The radon-monitoring device in groundwater is a small box with two pieces of nuclear track detector and all these materials is placed in a plastic bag made by polyethylene. It is very suitable to measure radon concentration in groundwater well in long term. Alpha tracks produced by radon and it daughter on nuclear track detector is counted automatically by spark counting method. The paper also presents some results of radon concentration in some groundwater well and mineral water sources. (author)

  5. Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section with the ATLAS detector

    Zenis, Tibor [Comenius University Bratislava (Slovakia); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    A measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross-section at centre-of-mass energy of Central diffraction in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. Events are selected by requiring hits in scintillator counters mounted in the forward region of the ATLAS detector and the dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20{mu}b{sup -1}. In addition, the total cross-section is studied as a function of the rapidity gap size measured with the inner detector and calorimetry.

  6. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Lou, Kai [Rice University (United States)

    2015-05-18

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  7. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai

    2015-01-01

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  8. Cylinder gauge measurement using a position sensitive detector

    St John, W. Doyle

    2007-01-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) has been used to determine the diameter of cylindrical pins based on the shift in a laser beam's centroid. The centroid of the light beam is defined here as the weighted average of position by the local intensity. A shift can be observed in the centroid of an otherwise axially symmetric light beam, which is partially obstructed. Additionally, the maximum shift in the centroid is a unique function of the obstructing cylinder diameter. Thus to determine the cylinder diameter, one only needs to detect this maximum shift as the cylinder is swept across the beam

  9. A prototype silicon detector system for space cosmic-ray charge measurement

    Zhang, Fei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Peng, Wen-Xi; Dong, Yi-Fa; Gong, Ke; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    A readout electronics system used for space cosmic-ray charge measurement for multi-channel silicon detectors is introduced in this paper, including performance measurements. A 64-channel charge sensitive ASIC (VA140) from the IDEAS company is used. With its features of low power consumption, low noise, large dynamic range, and high integration, it can be used in future particle detecting experiments based on silicon detectors.

  10. Measurement of the decoherence function with the MACRO detector at Gran Sasso

    Ahlen, S.; Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G.C.; Barish, B.C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Campana, P.; Carboni, M.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiera, C.; Cobis, A.; Cormack, R.; Corona, A.; Coutu, S.; DeCataldo, G.; Dekhussi, H.; DeMarzo, C.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Diehl, E.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Ficenec, D.; Forti, C.; Foti, L.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Giubellino, P.; Grassi, M.; Green, P.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Heinz, R.; Hong, J.T.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Klein, S.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Lee, C.; Levin, D.S.; Lipari, P.; Liu, G.; Liu, R.; Longo, M.J.; Ludlam, G.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Marin, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Matteuzzi, P.; Michael, D.G.; Miller, L.; Monacelli, P.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nutter, S.; Okada, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Parlati, S.; Patera, V.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C.W.; Petrakis, J.; Petrera, S.; Pignatano, N.D.; Pistilli, P.; Predieri, F.; Ramello, L.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Rosa, G.; Satriano, C.; Satta, L.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sciubba, A.; Serra Lugaresi, P.; Severi, M.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steele, J.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Surdo, A.; Tarle, G.; Togo, V.; Valente, V.; Walter, C.W.; Webb, R.; Worstell, W.

    1992-01-01

    A measurement of the underground muon decoherence function has been performed using the multiple muon events collected by the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. A detector-independent analysis is presented for different zenith regions and rock depths; this allows direct comparison with any model of hadronic interactions. The measured decoherence function is compared with the predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation based on data taken by recent collider experiments

  11. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  12. Aging measurements on triple-GEM detectors operated with $CF_{4}$-based gas mixtures

    Alfonsi, M; De Simone, P; Murtas, F; Poli Lener, M P; Bonivento, W; Cardini, A; Raspino, D; Saitta, B; Pinci, D; Baccaro, S; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2005.03.054

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a global irradiation test of full size triple-GEM detectors operated with CF/sub 4/-based gas mixtures. This study has been performed in the framework of an R&D activity on detectors for the innermost region of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. The prototypes have been irradiated at the Calliope facility of the ENEA-Casaccia with a high intensity 1.25 MeV detectors performances have been measured with X-rays and with a 3 Ge V pion beam at CERN. A SEM analysis on several samples of the detectors has been performed to complete the understanding of the physical processes occurring in a GEM detector during a strong irradiation.

  13. Aging measurements on triple-GEM detectors operated with $CF_{4}$- based gas mixtures

    Alfonsi, M; Bencivenni, G; Bonivento, W; Cardini, A; Lener, M P; Murtas, F; Pinci, D; Raspino, D; Saitta, B; De Simone, P

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a global irradiation test of full size triple-GEM detectors operated with CF/sub 4/-based gas mixtures. This study has been performed in the framework of an R&D activity on detectors for the innermost region of the first muon station of the LHCb experiment. The prototypes have been irradiated at the Calliope facility of the ENEA-Casaccia with a high intensity 1.25 MeV gamma from a /sup 60/Co source. After the irradiation test the detectors performances have been measured with X-rays and with a 3 GeV pion beam at CERN. A SEM analysis on several samples of the detectors has been performed to complete the understanding of the physical processes occurring in the GEM detector during the strong irradiation.

  14. Luminosity Measurement at ATLAS Development, Construction and Test of Scintillating Fibre Prototype Detectors

    Ask, S; Braem, André; Cheiklali, C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fournier, D; de La Taille, C; Di Girolamo, B; Grafström, P; Joram, C; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hedberg, V; Lavigne, B; Maio, A; Mapelli, A; Mjörnmark, U; Puzo, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Stenzel, H; Thioye, M; Valladolid, E; Vorobel, V

    2006-01-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fibre tracking detector which is proposed for the precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under $\\mu$rad angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibres read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of a beam test experiment at DESY. The excellent detector performance established in this test validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement.

  15. A timing detector with pulsed high-voltage power supply for mass measurements at CSRe

    Zhang, W.; Tu, X.L.; Wang, M.; Zhang, Y.H.; Xu, H.S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Blaum, K.

    2014-01-01

    Accuracy of nuclear mass measurements in storage rings depends critically on the accuracy with which the revolution times of stored ions can be obtained. In such experiments, micro-channel plates (MCP) are used as timing detectors. Due to large phase space of injected secondary beams, a large number of ions cannot be stored in the ring and is lost within the first few revolutions. However, these ions interact with the detector and can saturate the MCP and thus deteriorate its performance. In order to eliminate such effects, a fast, pulsed high-voltage power supply (PHVPS) has been employed which keeps the detector switched-off during the first few revolutions. The new detector setup was taken into operation at the Experimental Cooler-Storage-Ring CSRe in Lanzhou and resulted in a significant improvement of the detector amplitude and efficiency characteristics

  16. Design for measurement system of Doppler broadening profiles with the coincidence technique using a NaI detector in colinear geometry with the Ge detector

    Mori, Kazuteru; Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Nakai, Katsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The measurement system for Doppler broadening profiles with the coincidence technique using a NaI detector in colinear geometry with a Ge detector was developed. The principle of measurement system with the coincidence technique between the NaI detector and the Ge detector was described. Application of the system for the detection of vacancy-type defects introduced by electron irradiation in Czochralski-(Cz) grown Si was shown. Detail in the difference between the Doppler broadening profiles for Cz-Si and Si grown by the floating-zone method was also obtained. (author)

  17. Design for measurement system of Doppler broadening profiles with the coincidence technique using a NaI detector in colinear geometry with the Ge detector

    Mori, Kazuteru; Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Nakai, Katsuhiko

    1998-08-01

    The measurement system for Doppler broadening profiles with the coincidence technique using a NaI detector in colinear geometry with a Ge detector was developed. The principle of measurement system with the coincidence technique between the NaI detector and the Ge detector was described. Application of the system for the detection of vacancy-type defects introduced by electron irradiation in Czochralski-(Cz) grown Si was shown. Detail in the difference between the Doppler broadening profiles for Cz-Si and Si grown by the floating-zone method was also obtained. (author)

  18. Precise measurement of muon momenta at LEP using the L3 detector

    Gonzalez Romero, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this PhD report the author presents the studies and methods developed to achieve the optimization of the resolution in the momentum measurement of the L3 moun detector. Chapters 1 and 2 show the motivations to build a precision muon detector for the LEP e + e - collider. Special emphasis is applied to the study of the Higgs scalar boson search and identification and the guiding principles used to design the L3 muon detector are outlined. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the drift chambers. They are located in three concentric octagonal cylinders inside one solenoidal magnet, around the interaction point and coaxial with the beams. These chambers are the measuring elements of the detector. The chapter includes the description or the different tests applied to the chambers to obtain their resolution and calibration. In chapter 4 the alignment system of this chambers is described. This system is a key element to the precision of the detector, that being 12 meters long and of 12 meters of diameter has to measure the particles trajectories with precisions of just a few micrometers. Chapter 5 describes the third key piece for the detector precision, the monitoring and control system. It allows to know continually the precise values of the critical parameters of the detector. Finally in chapter 6 the author presents the results of the many test applied to the detector using cosmic rays, UV lasers and even the actual muons produced in the e + e - interactions. These tests prove that the L3 muon detector is the most precise measuring system for muon momenta installed at present in one e + e - collider ring. (Author)

  19. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    Marini, P., E-mail: marini@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Mathieu, L. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Acosta, L. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, México D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I. [CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3-Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium B.P. 120, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  20. Developments in Silicon Detectors and their impact on LHCb Physics Measurements

    Gouldwell-Bates, A

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a high energy physics detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will probe the current understanding of the Standard Model through precise measurements of CP violation and rare decays. The LHCb detector heavily depends on the silicon vertexing (VELO) sub-detector for excellent vertex and proper decay time resolutions. The VELO detector sits at a position of only 7 mm from the LHC proton beams. However, the proximity of the silicon sensors to the proton beams results in the detectors suffering radiation damage. Radiation damage results in three changes in the macroscopic properties of the silicon detector: an increase of the leakage current, a decrease in the charge collection efficiency, and changes in the operation voltage required to fully deplete the silicon detector of the free charge carriers. Due to this radiation damage, it is expected that a replacement or upgrade of the LHCb vertex detector will be required by 2010, only 3 years after the turn-on of the LHC. This thesis...

  1. Single track coincidence measurements of fluorescent and plastic nuclear track detectors in therapeutic carbon beams

    Osinga, J-M; Jäkel, O; Ambrožová, I; Brabcová, K Pachnerová; Davídková, M; Akselrod, M S; Greilich, S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for single track coincidence measurements using two different track detector materials. We employed plastic and fluorescent nuclear track detectors (PNTDs and FNTDs) in the entrance channel of a monoenergetic carbon ion beam covering the therapeutic energy range from 80 to 425 MeV/u. About 99% of all primary particle tracks detected by both detectors were successfully matched, while 1% of the particles were only detected by the FNTDs because of their superior spatial resolution. We conclude that both PNTDs and FNTDs are suitable for clinical carbon beam dosimetry with a detection efficiency of at least 98.82% and 99.83% respectively, if irradiations are performed with low fluence in the entrance channel of the ion beam. The investigated method can be adapted to other nuclear track detectors and offers the possibility to characterize new track detector materials against well-known detectors. Further, by combining two detectors with a restricted working range in the presented way a hybrid-detector system can be created with an extended and optimized working range

  2. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  3. Development of a novel diamond based detector for machine induced background and luminosity measurements

    Hempel, Maria

    2017-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest particle accelerator and storage ring in the world, used to investigate fundamentals of particle physics and to develop at the same time the technology of accelerators and detectors. Four main experiments, located around the LHC ring, provide insight into the nature of particles and search for answers to as yet unexplained phenomena in the universe. These four experiments are ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus), ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment), CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (LHC beauty). Two proton or heavy ion beams circulate in the LHC and are brought into collision in the four experiments. The physics potential of each experiment is determined by the luminosity, which is a ratio of the number of the events during a certain time period to the cross section of a physics process. A measurement of the luminosity is therefore essential to determine the cross section of interesting physics processes. In addition, safe and high-quality data-taking requires stable beam conditions with almost no beam losses. So-called beam loss monitors are installed in the LHC rings to monitor beam losses around the LHC. Each experiment has in addition its own detectors to measure beam losses, hereafter called machine induced background. One such detector is installed in CMS, the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F). Based on diamond sensors it was designed and built to measure both, the luminosity and the machine induced background. BCM1F ran smoothly during the first LHC running period from 2009-2012 and delivered valuable beam loss and luminosity information to the control rooms of CMS and LHC. At the end of 2012 the LHC was shut down for an upgrade to improve the performance by increasing the proton energy from 4 TeV to 7 TeV and decreasing the proton bunch spacing from 50 ns to 25 ns. Due to the success of BCM1F an upgrade of its sensors and readout components was planned in order to fulfil the new requirements. The upgrade

  4. Tau Polarization Measurement in the L3 Detector; Medida de la polarizacion del Tau en el detector L3

    Garcia, P

    1996-06-01

    The Polarization asymmetry (A{sub p}) measurement can be obtained from the energy spectra of the tau lepton (tau) decay products. This measurement provides a precise determination of the weak mixing angel (sin``2 tilde char theta{sub w}), one of the Standard Model fundamental parameters. Tau leptons are produced at LEP in e``+e``-yields tilde char f interactions at a center of mass energy of the order of the Z boson mass. In order to get A{sub p} we have calculated the analytical formulae of the tau decay products energy spectra, including radiative corrections, for all of the one prong tau decay channels. We have also extended this analytical formalism to the detector level, including the selection criteria effects and the detector resolution (calibration) in the analytical expressions. Detailed studies have been performed concerning our measurement using this formalism. From the data collected with the L3 detector between 1991 and 1994, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 118.8 pb``1 at a center of mass energy of the order of the Z mass, we have identified and selected the following tau decay channel samples: tau yields e nu tilde char nu, tau yields mu nu tilde char nu, tau yields pi/K nu y tau yields p/K*nu. From the analysis of these samples we get the tau polarization asymmetry measurement: A{sub p}=0.143+-0.014+-0.010, which corresponds to a value of sin``2 tilde char theta{sub w}=0.2320+-0.0018+-0.0013. (Author) 24 refs

  5. Measurement uncertainties of long-term 222Rn averages at environmental levels using alpha track detectors

    Nelson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    More than 250 replicate measurements of outdoor Rn concentration integrated over quarterly periods were made to estimate the random component of the measurement uncertainty of Track Etch detectors (type F) under outdoor conditions. The measurements were performed around three U mill tailings piles to provide a range of environmental concentrations. The measurement uncertainty was typically greater than could be accounted for by Poisson counting statistics. Average coefficients of variation of the order of 20% for all measured concentrations were found. It is concluded that alpha track detectors can be successfully used to determine annual average outdoor Rn concentrations through the use of careful quality control procedures. These include rapid deployment and collection of detectors to minimize unintended Rn exposure, careful packaging and shipping to and from the manufacturer, use of direct sunlight shields for all detectors and careful and secure mounting of all detectors in as similar a manner as possible. The use of multiple (at least duplicate) detectors at each monitoring location and an exposure period of no less than one quarter are suggested

  6. Light higgsinos at the ILC. Precision measurements and detector requirements

    Sert, Hale

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is based on a study of Natural Supersymmetry (SUSY) scenarios at the International Linear Collider (ILC). These scenarios are motivated by naturalness, which requires the mu parameter to be at the electroweak scale. The considered Natural SUSY scenario contains three light higgsino-like charginos and neutralinos, χ 1 ± , χ 1 0 and χ 2 0 with a mass splitting of a few GeV or even sub-GeV, while all other supersymmetric particles are heavy in the multi-TeV scale. Due to the small mass difference of a few GeV, the final state consists of a large missing energy and a few very soft visible particles. Therefore, the analysis of such scenarios is extremely challenging for the LHC as well as the ILC. In order to investigate the feasibility of observing light higgsinos at the ILC, an analysis has been performed using both fast detector simulation and full detector simulation for International Large Detector (ILD). The fast simulation results have indicated that the key observables of the higgsinos can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of a few percent. It has been shown that the results enable determining the lower limits and allowed regions for the mass parameters of the bino M 1 and the wino M 2 , as well as determining the higgsino mass parameter μ to the accuracy of a few percent. The full simulation analysis has provided information about detector requirements, such as the identification of low momentum electrons and muons. The electron identification can be studied by using the ionisation energy loss of the particles per length, dE/dx, which can be obtained from the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of ILD. The identification of low momentum muons has been studied in the context of the thesis by using the calorimeter cluster shape differences between muons and pions. As a result, a method has been developed for particles with momentum lower than 2 GeV, and its impact on the higgsino analysis has been investigated. It has been found that assuming the

  7. VORP, an improved detector system for remote measurements

    Smale, R.F.; Backsen, M.H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Voltage Output Radiation Probe (VORP) is used as the detector to monitor radiological data on underground nuclear tests at the Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site. The VORP was designed to convert the current output of a Neher-White ionization chamber to a voltage output. There are several advantages in having a voltage output device rather than a low current probe in the field. The VORP makes it easier to protect against transients induced in the field wires. It also allows the use of redundant (parallel) data acquisition equipment without having to duplicate each field probe. The electronics was designed to operate off of a self-contained 1.35-volt battery and was fabricated using thick film hybrid circuit technology

  8. An assesment of the characteristics of the GM detectors and iodine remote detectors of the Paks environmental monitoring system based on the data measured from 1982 to 1985

    Nagy, Gy.; Lang, Edit; Deme, S.; Feher, I.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements performed at the GM detectors and iodine remote detectors of the continuous environmental monitoring system of the Paks NPP can be used for estimating the effect of atmospheric releases. Based on the investigations carried out from Sep. 1982 to July 1985, a good correlation between the signals and the background radioactivity levels could be established. It was further stated that radon fallout during raining was responsible for significant signal changes of both types of detectors. (V.N.)

  9. Test results of a new detector system for gamma ray isotopic measurements

    Malcom, J.E.; Bonner, C.A.; Hurd, J.R.; Fleissner,

    1993-01-01

    A new type of gamma-ray detector system for isotopic measurements has been developed. This new system, a ''Duo detector'' array, consists of two intrinsic germanium detectors, a planar followed by a coaxial mounted on the same axis within a single cryostat assembly. This configuration allows the isotopic analysis system to take advantage of spectral data results that are collected simultaneously from different gamma-ray energy regimes. Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) produced several prototypes of this Duo detector array which were then tested by Rocky Flats personnel until the design was optimized. An application for this detector design is in automated, roboticized NDA systems such as those being developed at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The Duo detector design reduces the space necessary for the isotopic instrument by a factor of two (only one liquid nitrogen dewar is needed), and also reduces the complexity of the mechanical systems and controlling software. Data will be presented on measurements of nuclear material with a Duo detector for a wide variety of matrices. Results indicate that the maximum count rate can be increased up to 100,000 counts per second yet maintaining excellent resolution and energy rate product

  10. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Fernandes Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li having high (α, n neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of ~10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by ~2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  11. Measurements of the top quark mass with the ATLAS detector

    Brandt, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The top quark mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Model. The latest ATLAS measurements of the top quark mass are presented. A measurement using lepton+jets events is presented, where a multidimensional template fit is used to constrain the uncertainties on the energy measurements of jets. The measurement is combined with a measurement using dilepton events. In addition, novel measurements aiming to measure the mass in a welldefined scheme are presented. These measurements use precision theoretical QCD calculations for both inclusive ttbar production and ttbar production with an additional jet to extract the top quark mass in the polemass scheme.

  12. Neutron measurements on the JET tokamak by means of bubble detectors

    Gherendi, M.; Craciunescu, T.; Pantea, A.; Zoita, V.; Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Murari, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The bubble detectors (superheated fluid detectors - SHFDs) are based on suspensions of superheated fluid droplets which vaporise into bubbles when nucleated by radiation interactions. The active detecting medium is in the form of microscopic (20-50 μm) droplets suspended within an elastic polymer. The bubble detectors are of interest for neutron detection in nuclear fusion devices due to some particular characteristics: - High neutron detection efficiency (counts/unit fluence) that ranges from about 4x10 -2 to 4x10 -5 ; - Almost flat, threshold-type energy response over a broad energy range (10's keV to 10's MeV); - The possibility of having any energy threshold within the above-mentioned energy range; - Practically zero sensitivity to gamma-radiation; - Good spatial resolution (sub-centimetre resolution in the image plane). A series of the neutron measurements have been carried out by means of bubble detectors on the JET tokamak, at Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, UK, during the experimental campaigns C17-C26 (2007-2009). The neutron field parameters (yield, fluence, energy distribution) at a specific location outside the JET Torus Hall have been measured using three types of bubble detectors (BD-PND, DEFENDER, and BDS). The bubble detector measurement location is situated at the end of a vertical collimated line of sight, behind the TOFOR neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The field-of-view is defined by a variable pre-collimator located on top of the JET tokamak. This paper reports only on the neutron fluence measurements. Spatial (radial and toroidal) distributions of the neutron fluence have been obtained with a two-dimensional array having up to 30 bubble detectors. The operation of the bubble detector array as a neutron pinhole camera having a radial resolution at the JET vacuum chamber mid-plane of about 55 mm was demonstrated in measurements using various openings of the pre-collimator. (authors)

  13. Measurement of gross alpha - activity in some thermal water sources in Yugoslavia by SSNTDs. [Solid state nuclear track detectors

    Benderac, R.; Ristic, D. (Inst. of Security, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Antanasijevic, R.; Vukovic, J. (Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia))

    1991-01-01

    The possible application of the CN-BDH (type 1) nitrocellulose detector synthesized in laboratory conditions, and also the CR-39 detector, to the measurement of the gross alpha-activity of geothermal and mineral water has been investigated. (author).

  14. A standardization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a standardization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the A.E.C., of the physical tests for dectors measuring external irradiations. Among the various tests mentionned, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response are treated in details. As far as calibration is concerned, the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. High flux detectors and those for pulse electromagnetic radiations are also dealt with [fr

  15. Impact of shelf life on measured prompt fraction of spare Inconel in-core flux detectors

    Mohindra, VK; Sadeghi, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Crouse, B. [Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Prompt fraction measurements associated with spare self-powered Inconel In-Core Flux Detectors (ICFDs) carried out a few years after installation on Shut Down System number 1 (SDS1) and Reactor Regulating System (RRS) at Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS), were found to be lower than those of the original detectors. These detectors, spares and originals, were manufactured in the late 80s, however, the former were kept at manufacturer's warehouse and latter were installed in the reactor core within a few years after manufacturing. Although the prompt fractions of the spare detectors were relatively low, the electronic/electrical behavior of the spare detectors was intact. The first batch of the original detectors performed as per the design requirements. Therefore, it is suspected that during shelf life, spare Inconel in-core flux detectors underwent changes that lowered their measured values of prompt fraction, which were taken within a few years after installation in the reactor. Detailed study of detectors' material composition and impurity concentrations revealed no association with the lower prompt fraction measurements. The evaluation of the limited data of the original and spare Inconel ICFDs installed at Darlington showed: 1. The reduction in prompt fraction was roughly proportional to the shelf life of the detectors; and 2. The rate of reduction in prompt fraction during storage was about double the rate of reduction during operation in the reactor. Above observations were based on the data provided by DNGS for a few detectors. The purpose of this paper is two fold, firstly to present the results of the complete study carried out to investigate the cause of relatively low prompt fractions measured on spare SDS1 and RRS Inconel ICFDs at DNGS, and secondly to generate interest/awareness within other CANDU utilities to add to the database of prompt fractions of spare Inconel ICFDs measured after installation. The data will help to improve

  16. Plastic deformation, residual stress, and crystalline texture measurements for in-process characterization of FCC metal alloys

    Ruud, C.O.; Jacobs, M.E.; Weedman, S.D.; Snoha, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the results of several on-going investigations on the measurement of plastic deformation, residual stress, and crystalline texture in nickel, copper, and aluminum base alloys by x-ray diffraction techniques. X-ray diffraction techniques have been shown to be effective in the measurement of plastic deformation, residual stress, and crystalline texture in FCC metals, from the breadth, position, and intensity of the x-ray diffraction peaks. The Ruud-Barrett position-sensitive scintillation detector has been demonstrated to be fast, non-contacting, and tolerant of detector to component distance variation -- necessary requirements for cost-effective in-process inspection of materials

  17. Development of a scintillator detector set with counter and data acquisition for flow measurements

    Costa, F E D

    2002-01-01

    A portable counter with data acquisition system for flow measurements was developed, using the pulse velocity technique. This consists in determining the tracer transit time mixed homogeneously to the liquid or gas pipelines. The counter comprises: (a) two CsI(Tl) crystals solid state detectors, associated with Si PIN photodiodes, with compatible sensitivity to the injected radiotracers activities; (b) amplification units; (c) analogue-to-digital interface, which processes and displays the detectors counting separately and in real time, but in a same temporal axis, via a computer screen and (d) 30-m coaxial cables for signals transmission from each detector to the processing unit. Experiments were carried out for the detector and associated electronic characterizations. The equipment showed to be suitable for flow measurements in an industrial plant, in the real situation.

  18. First evaluation of low frequency noise measurements of in core detector signals in the measuring assembly Rheinsberg

    Collatz, S.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise spectra of in core neutron detectors are measured in the low frequency range (0.03 Hz to 1 Hz) and evaluated. The increase of the effective noise signal value is due to pressure oscillations or oscillations of special steam volume portions. Thus boiling monitoring of reactor cores in PWR type reactors may be possible, if the low frequency noise of the whole set of in core detectors is taken into account

  19. Response of a BGO detector to photon and neutron sources simulations and measurements

    Vincke, H H; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Otto, T

    2002-01-01

    In this paper Monte Carlo simulations (FLUKA) and measurements of the response of a BGO detector are reported. %For the measurements different radioactive sources were used to irradiate the BGO crystal. For the measurements three low-energy photon emitters $\\left({}^{60}\\rm{Co},\\right.$ ${}^{54}\\rm{Mn},$ $\\left. {}^{137}\\rm{Cs}\\right)$ were used to irradiate the BGO from various distances and angles. The neutron response was measured with an Am--Be neutron source. Simulations of the experimental irradiations were carried out. Our study can also be considered as a benchmark for FLUKA in terms of its reliability to predict the detector response of a BGO scintillator.

  20. The calibration of the solid state nuclear track detector LR 115 for radon measurements

    Gericke, C; Jönsson, G; Freyer, K; Treutler, H C; Enge, W

    1999-01-01

    An experimental calibration of indoor room and outdoor soil detector devices which are based on LR 115 as sensitive element has taken place at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in Stockholm (Sweden) in 1994 and 1996, at the Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (Germany) in 1997 and at the Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany) in 1997. Special properties of the used solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) material LR 115 have been measured to define the application of the experimental calibration.

  1. Development of criticality accident detector measuring neutrons and gamma-rays

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Ishii, Masato

    2005-01-01

    The authors developed a new criticality accident detector measuring neutrons and gamma-rays. The detector is a cylindrical plastic scintillator coupled to a current-mode operated photomultiplier, and is covered by an inner cadmium shell, acting as a neutron to gamma-ray converter, and a 5cm thick outer polyethylene moderator in order to respond to the same threshold triggering dose regardless of whether it was exposed to neutrons, gamma-rays or a mixture of the two radiations. (author)

  2. Test of tissue-equivalent scintillation detector for dose measurement of megavoltage beams

    Geso, M.; Ackerly, T.; Clift, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The measurement of depth doses and profiles for a stereotactic radiotherapy beam presents special problems associated with the small beam size compared to the dosimeter's active detection area. In this work a locally fabricated organic plastic scintillator detector has been used to measure the depth dose and profile of a stereotactic radiotherapy beam. The 6MV beam is 1.25 cm diameter at isocentre, typical of small field stereotactic radiosurgery. The detector is a water/tissue equivalent plastic scintillator that is accompanied by Cerenkov subtraction detector. In this particular application, a negligible amount of Cerenkov light was detected. A photodiode and an electronic circuit is used instead of a photomultiplier for signal amplification. Comparison with data using a diode detector and a small size ionization chamber, indicate that the organic plastic scintillator detector is a valid detector for stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry. The tissue equivalence of the organic scintillator also holds the promise of accurate dosimetry in the build up region. Depth doses measured using our plastic scintillator agree to within about 1% with those obtained using commercially available silicon diodes. Beam profiles obtained using plastic scintillator presents correct field width to within 0.35 mm, however some artifacts are visible in the profiles. These artifacts are about 5% discrepancy which has been shown not to be a significant factor in stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  3. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents

    Miljanic, S.; Zorko, B.; Gregori, B.; Knezevic, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron + gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Boskovic Inst. (RBI), Croatia, Jozef Stefan Inst. (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7 LiF (TLD-700), CaF 2 :Mn and Al2 O3 :Mg,Y - all from RBI; CaF 2 :Mn from JSI and 7 LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed. (authors)

  4. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  5. Neutron CT with a multi-detector system leading to drastical reduction of the measuring time

    Hehn, G.; Pfister, G.; Schatz, A.; Goebel, J.; Kofler, R.

    1993-09-01

    By means of numerical simulation methods and their verification with measurements it could be shown that such a detector system can be realized for a line beam and 1-2 detectors per cm. With the maximum available beam width of the fast neutron field at the FRM approximately 20 detectors can be used leading to a reduction of the measuring time to 0,5 - 1 hour. A multi detector system for a line beam of thermal neutrons was constructed, tested and used for CT-measurements. This detector system for the measurement of thinner layers with better spatial resolution could be realized. The electronic discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays has been improved. This discrimination was used in all CT-measurements to get transmission values of both kinds of radiation and to reconstruct to complementary CT-images. The use of a polyenergetic radiation causes spectral shifts in the transmission spectrum leading to artifacts in the reconstructed CT-image. The transmission values must be spectral corrected before image reconstruction, because the image artifacts complicate the image evaluation or make it impossible. A new energy selective procedure for the online spectral correction was developed. This method is based on the concept to measure additionally to the integral transmission value his pulse height spectrum and to do the correction depending on the changes in this pulse height spectrum. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Experimental testing facilities for ultrasonic measurements in heavy liquid metal

    Cojocaru, V.; Ionescu, V.; Nicolescu, D.; Nitu, A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-physical properties of Heavy Liquid Metals (HLM), like lead or its alloy, Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE), makes them attractive as coolant candidates in advanced nuclear systems. The opaqueness, that is common to all liquid metals, disables all optical methods. For this reason ultrasound waves are used in different applications in heavy liquid metal technology, for example for flow and velocity measurements and for inspection techniques. The practical use of ultrasound in heavy liquid metals still needs to be demonstrated by experiments. This goal requires heavy liquid metal technology facility especially adapted to this task. In this paper is presented an experimental testing facility for investigations of Heavy Liquid Metals acoustic properties, designed and constructed in RATEN ICN. (authors)

  7. Study of sample-detector assemblies for application to in-situ measurement of radioactivity in liquid effluents

    Pendharkar, K.A.; Narayanan Kutty, K.; Krishnamony, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigations carried out on four different types of sample-detector assemblies with a view to determining their detection limits and relative merits for application to in-situ measurement of radioactivity in liquid effluents. The four systems studied were: (1) gamma detection using 11 cm x 8 cm NaI (Tl) scintillation detector inserted in the cavity of a specially designed stainless steel chamber of capacity 15 liters, (2) gamma detection using a metal-walled G.M. counter in a similar manner, (3) beta detection using twin thin-walled G.M. counters immersed in liquid, and (4) end window G.M. counter positioned above the liquid surface in a shallow tray. The design features of an in-line monitor employing a 11 cm x 8 cm NaI (Tl) detector used for the routine monitoring of beta gamma activity concentrations in the low level effluents of the Tarapur Fuel Processing Plant are described. (author). 1 tab

  8. Experimental response function of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for gamma photons and tomographic measurements for defect detection

    Sharma, Amandeep; Singh, Karamjit; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    The response function of gamma detector is an important factor for spectrum analysis because some photons and secondary electrons may escape the detector volume before fully depositing their energy, of course destroys the ideal delta function response. An inverse matrix approach, for unfolding of observed pulse-height distribution to a true photon spectrum, is used for construction of experimental response function by formulating a 40 x 40 matrix with bin mesh (E 1/2 ) of 0.025 (MeV) 1/2 for the present measurements. A tomographic scanner system, operating in a non-destructive and non-invasive way, is also presented for inspection of density variation in any object. The incoherent scattered intensity of 662 keV gamma photons, obtained by unfolding (deconvolution) the experimental pulse-height distribution of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, provides the desired information. The method is quite sensitive, for showing inclusion of medium Z (atomic number) material (iron) in low Z material (aluminium) and detecting a void of ∼2 mm in size for iron block, to investigate the inhomogeneities in the object. Also, the grey scale images (using 'MATLAB') are shown to visualise the presence of defects/inclusion in metal samples.

  9. Car-borne survey measurements with a 3x3` NaI detector

    Larsen, E.; Ugletveit, F.; Floe, L.; Mikkelborg, O. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) took part in the international survey measurement exercise RESUME95 that was arranged in Finland in August 1995. NRPA performed measurements with a simple car-borne measuring system based on standard equipment, a 3x3` NaI detector, an MCA and a GPS connected to a portable PC. The results show substantial variations in dose rate inside areas of a few square kilometres. Spectrum analysis shows that a major part of these differences are caused by variations in deposition of {sup 137}Cs. Our results show that even standard 3x3` NaI detectors can be used for car based survey measurements in fall out situations and search for sources. The detection limits are higher than for larger detectors, but the main limiting factor seem to be the timing capabilities of the acquisition system. (au).

  10. Car-borne survey measurements with a 3x3' NaI detector

    Larsen, E.; Ugletveit, F.; Floe, L.; Mikkelborg, O.

    1997-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) took part in the international survey measurement exercise RESUME95 that was arranged in Finland in August 1995. NRPA performed measurements with a simple car-borne measuring system based on standard equipment, a 3x3' NaI detector, an MCA and a GPS connected to a portable PC. The results show substantial variations in dose rate inside areas of a few square kilometres. Spectrum analysis shows that a major part of these differences are caused by variations in deposition of 137 Cs. Our results show that even standard 3x3' NaI detectors can be used for car based survey measurements in fall out situations and search for sources. The detection limits are higher than for larger detectors, but the main limiting factor seem to be the timing capabilities of the acquisition system. (au)

  11. Car-borne survey measurements with a 3x3` NaI detector

    Larsen, E; Ugletveit, F; Floe, L; Mikkelborg, O [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) took part in the international survey measurement exercise RESUME95 that was arranged in Finland in August 1995. NRPA performed measurements with a simple car-borne measuring system based on standard equipment, a 3x3` NaI detector, an MCA and a GPS connected to a portable PC. The results show substantial variations in dose rate inside areas of a few square kilometres. Spectrum analysis shows that a major part of these differences are caused by variations in deposition of {sup 137}Cs. Our results show that even standard 3x3` NaI detectors can be used for car based survey measurements in fall out situations and search for sources. The detection limits are higher than for larger detectors, but the main limiting factor seem to be the timing capabilities of the acquisition system. (au).

  12. Performance of New and Upgraded Detectors for Luminosity and Beam Condition Measurement at CMS

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The beam monitoring and luminosity systems of the CMS experiment are enhanced by several new and upgraded sub-detectors to match the challenges of the LHC operation and physics program at increased energy and higher luminosity. A dedicated pixelated luminosity telescope is installed for a fast and precise luminosity measurement. This detector measures coincidences between several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. An upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using single crystalline diamond sensors. It is equipped with a dedicated front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background, thus serving as online luminosity measurement. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light from fused silica to provide direction sensitivity and excellent time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles....

  13. Development of Optics and Detectors for Advanced CMB Polarization Measurements

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been essential to the development of modern cosmology. Future observations will provide cosmological...

  14. Verification of traceability and backscattering in surface entrance air kerma measurements with detector type ionizing chamber

    Teixeira, G.J.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of doses in radiology services by ionizing chambers are easier than those made by TLD, however the protocols for measurements differ regarding the calibration. The objectives were to verify the traceability in the measures of ESAK corrected by the inverse square law, due to the difference in position between the source and IC and the influence of the backscattered radiation in bringing the detector to the table. Was defined a procedure practiced by the radiological services and designed experimental arrangements for the same technique. Was noted that the approximation of the detector to the table generated a significant backscattered. (author)

  15. Measurement of detector neutron energy response using time-of-flight techniques

    Janee, H.S.

    1973-09-01

    The feasibility of using time-of-flight techniques at the EG and G/AEC linear accelerator for measuring the neutron response of relatively sensitive detectors over the energy range 0.5 to 14 MeV has been demonstrated. The measurement technique is described in detail as are the results of neutron spectrum measurements from beryllium and uranium photoneutron targets. The sensitivity of a fluor photomultiplier LASL detector with a 2- by 1-inch NE-111 scintillator was determined with the two targets, and agreement in the region of overlap was very good. (U.S.)

  16. Measuring delayed part of the current of a self powered neutron detector and comparison with calculations

    Kophazi, J.; Czifrus, Sz.; Feher, S.; Por, G.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the measurement of the delayed signal of a Rh emitter Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) separately from other signal components originating from (n-gamma-e), (background gamma-e) and other effects. In order to separate the delayed signal, the detector was removed from the reactor core and placed to an adequately distant location during the measurement, where the radiation from the core was negligible. The experiment was carried out on the 100kW light water tank-type reactor of Technical University of Budapest and the results of the measurement were compared with the results of Monte Carlo calculations.(author)

  17. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    Heijne, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The present work mainly describes the 'Neutrino Flux Monitoring' system (NFM), which has been built for the 400-GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) neutrino beams. A treatment is given of some general subjects related to the utilization of silicon detectors and the properties of high-energy muons. Energy loss of minimal-ionizing particles, which has to be distinguished from energy deposition in the detector, is considered. Secondary radiation, also called 'spray', consisting of 'delta rays' and other cascade products, is shown to play an important role in the muon flux measurement inside a shield, especially for muons of high energy (> 100 GeV). Radiation induced damage in the detectors, which determines the long term performance, is discussed. The relation between the detector response and the real muon flux is determined. The use of NFM system for on-line beam monitoring is described. (Auth.)

  18. Quality assurance for environmental radon measurements by LR115 nuclear track detectors

    Gomaa, M A [National Network of Radiation Physics, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Hafez, A F [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria Univercity, Alexandria (Egypt); Hussein, A S [Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-06-15

    Passive radon dosimeters based on LR115 nuclear track detectors are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. For developing countries wishing to undertake national radon survey the most appropriate techniques are those making use of LR115 detectors. These detectors are small, cheap, simple, and non-hazardous and provide an entirely adequate tool for large scale use in assessing levels of radon over several months because of the short - term fluctuations in radon concentrations. In this paper, the principles and philosophy in order to improve the quality and reliability of radon exposure under a quality assurance (QA) program are presented . Also examples of how a QA program of radon measurements by LR115 detectors using the can-techniques are well defined and applied.

  19. Quality assurance for environmental radon measurements by LR115 nuclear track detectors

    Gomaa, M.A.; Hafez, A.F.; Hussein, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Passive radon dosimeters based on LR115 nuclear track detectors are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. For developing countries wishing to undertake national radon survey the most appropriate techniques are those making use of LR115 detectors. These detectors are small, cheap, simple, and non-hazardous and provide an entirely adequate tool for large scale use in assessing levels of radon over several months because of the short - term fluctuations in radon concentrations. In this paper, the principles and philosophy in order to improve the quality and reliability of radon exposure under a quality assurance (QA) program are presented . Also examples of how a QA program of radon measurements by LR115 detectors using the can-techniques are well defined and applied

  20. Measuring fast neutrons with large liquid scintillation detector for ultra-low background experiments

    Zhang, C. [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); College of Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Mei, D.-M., E-mail: dongming.mei@usd.edu [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Davis, P.; Woltman, B. [Department of Physics, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Gray, F. [Department of Physics and Computational Science, Regis University, Denver, CO 80221 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron–gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  1. Iterative optimisation of Monte Carlo detector models using measurements and simulations

    Marzocchi, O., E-mail: olaf@marzocchi.net [European Patent Office, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Leone, D., E-mail: debora.leone@kit.edu [Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-04-11

    This work proposes a new technique to optimise the Monte Carlo models of radiation detectors, offering the advantage of a significantly lower user effort and therefore an improved work efficiency compared to the prior techniques. The method consists of four steps, two of which are iterative and suitable for automation using scripting languages. The four steps consist in the acquisition in the laboratory of measurement data to be used as reference; the modification of a previously available detector model; the simulation of a tentative model of the detector to obtain the coefficients of a set of linear equations; the solution of the system of equations and the update of the detector model. Steps three and four can be repeated for more accurate results. This method avoids the “try and fail” approach typical of the prior techniques.

  2. Development of CANDLES low background HPGe detector and half-life measurement of 180Tam

    Chan, W. M.; Kishimoto, T.; Umehara, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Yoshida, S.; Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Fushimi, K.; Nomachi, M.; Ogawa, I.; Tamagawa, Y.; Hazama, R.; Takemoto, Y.; Nakatani, N.; Takihira, Y.; Tozawa, M.; Kakubata, H.; Trang, V. T. T.; Ohata, T.; Tetsuno, K.; Maeda, T.; Khai, B. T.; Li, X. L.; Batpurev, T.

    2018-01-01

    A low background HPGe detector system was developed at CANDLES Experimental Hall for multipurpose use. Various low background techniques were employed, including hermatic shield design, radon gas suppression, and background reduction analysis. A new pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method was specially created for coaxial Ge detector. Using this PSD method, microphonics noise and background event at low energy region less than 200 keV can be rejected effectively. Monte Carlo simulation by GEANT4 was performed to acquire the detection efficiency and study the interaction of gamma-rays with detector system. For rare decay measurement, the detector was utilized to detect the nature's most stable isomer tantalum-180m (180Tam) decay. Two phases of tantalum physics run were completed with total livetime of 358.2 days, which Phase II has upgraded shield configuration. The world most stringent half-life limit of 180Tam has been successfully achieved.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements for efficiency determination of lead shielded plastic scintillator detectors

    Yasin, Zafar; Negoita, Florin; Tabbassum, Sana; Borcea, Ruxandra; Kisyov, Stanimir

    2017-12-01

    The plastic scintillators are used in different areas of science and technology. One of the use of these scintillator detectors is as beam loss monitors (BLM) for new generation of high intensity heavy ion in superconducting linear accelerators. Operated in pulse counting mode with rather high thresholds and shielded by few centimeters of lead in order to cope with radiofrequency noise and X-ray background emitted by accelerator cavities, they preserve high efficiency for high energy gamma ray and neutrons produced in the nuclear reactions of lost beam particles with accelerator components. Efficiency calculation and calibration of detectors is very important before their practical usage. In the present work, the efficiency of plastic scintillator detectors is simulated using FLUKA for different gamma and neutron sources like, 60Co, 137Cs and 238Pu-Be. The sources are placed at different positions around the detector. Calculated values are compared with the measured values and a reasonable agreement is observed.

  4. High-pitch metal-on-glass technology for pad pitch adaptation between detectors and readout electronics

    Ullán, Miguel; Campabadal, Francesca; Fleta, Celeste; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Francisco; Bernabeu, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Modern high-energy physics and astrophysics strip detectors have increased channel density to levels at which their connection with readout electronics has become very complex due to high pad pitch. Also, direct wire bonding is prevented by the fact that typically detector's pad pitch and electronics' pad pitch do not match. A high- pitch metal-on-glass technology is presented, that allows pad pitch adaptation between detectors and readout electronics. It consists of high-density metal lines on top of an insulating glass substrate. A photoresist layer is deposited covering the metal tracks for passivation and protection The technology is tested for conductivity, bondability, bonding pull force, peel off, and radiation hardness, and it is an established technology in the clean room of the CNM Institute in Barcelona. This technology has been chosen by the ATLAS Collaboration for the pad pitch adapters (PPA) of the SCT Endcap Modules, by a Compton camera project, and by other HEP groups for interconnection betwe...

  5. Laboratory Measurement of the Brighter-fatter Effect in an H2RG Infrared Detector

    Plazas, A. A.; Shapiro, C.; Smith, R.; Huff, E.; Rhodes, J.

    2018-06-01

    The “brighter-fatter” (BF) effect is a phenomenon—originally discovered in charge coupled devices—in which the size of the detector point-spread function (PSF) increases with brightness. We present, for the first time, laboratory measurements demonstrating the existence of the effect in a Hawaii-2RG HgCdTe near-infrared (NIR) detector. We use JPL’s Precision Projector Laboratory, a facility for emulating astronomical observations with UV/VIS/NIR detectors, to project about 17,000 point sources onto the detector to stimulate the effect. After calibrating the detector for nonlinearity with flat-fields, we find evidence that charge is nonlinearly shifted from bright pixels to neighboring pixels during exposures of point sources, consistent with the existence of a BF-type effect. NASAs Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will use similar detectors to measure weak gravitational lensing from the shapes of hundreds of million of galaxies in the NIR. The WFIRST PSF size must be calibrated to ≈0.1% to avoid biased inferences of dark matter and dark energy parameters; therefore further study and calibration of the BF effect in realistic images will be crucial.

  6. A new detector for the measurement of neutron flux in nuclear reactors

    Koch, L.; Labeyrie, J.; Tarassenko, S.

    1958-01-01

    The detector described is designed for the instantaneous measurement of thermal neutron fluxes, in the presence of high γ ray activity; this detector can withstand temperatures as high as 500 deg. C. It is based on the following principle: radioactive atoms resulting from heavy-nucleus fission are carried by a gas flow to a detector recording their β and γ disintegration. Thermal neutron fluxes as low as few neutrons per cm 2 per second can be measured. This detector may be used to control a nuclear reactor, to plot the thermal flux distribution with an excellent definition (1 mm 2 ) for fluxes higher than 10 8 n/cm 2 /s. The time response of the system to a sharp variation of flux is limited, in case of large fluxes, to the transit time of the gas flow between the fission product emitter and the detector; of the order of one tenth of a sec per meter of piping. The detector may also be applied for spectroscopy of fission products eider than 0,1 s. (author) [fr

  7. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production measured with the HERMES recoil detector

    Perez Benito, Roberto Francisco

    2010-12-15

    The Hermes experiment (HERa MEasurement of Spin) at Desy was designed to study the spin structure of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The internal structure of the nucleon has been investigated in detail and it has been measured that the intrinsic quark spin contribution is only about 30% of the total spin of the nucleon. A formalism to describe the internal structure of the nucleon called Generalised Patron Distributions (GPDs) was developed recently to understand the fundamental structure of the nucleon. These GPDs can be accessed by the measurement of hard exclusive reactions and hard exclusive processes that can be understood in terms of GPDs. The accumulated Hermes data offer access to GPDs in different combinations of beam charge and beam and target helicity asymmetries. To improve exclusivity and to enhance the resolution of kinematic variables to study hard exclusive processes which provide access to the GPDs and hence to the orbital angular momentum of the quarks, in January 2006 a Recoil Detector was installed that surrounded the internal gas target of the Hermes experiment. The Hermes Recoil Detector consisted of three components: a silicon strip detector inside the vacuum, a scintillating fiber tracker and the photon detector. All three detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnet which provided a 1T longitudinal magnetic field. The Recoil Detector improves the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the momentum and track position of the recoiling particle as well as by rejecting non-exclusive background. This detector was an ideal novel tool to combine energy and position measurements for charged particles in a momentum range of 0.1 to 1.4 GeV/c. The Recoil Detector was fully commissioned and operating. Data was taken continuously until the final Hera shutdown in July of 2007. In this thesis we report on the performance of the Recoil Detector and more specifically about the scintillating fiber tracker

  8. Fracture toughness measurements of WC-based hard metals

    Prakash, L.; Albert, B.

    1983-01-01

    The fracture toughness of WC-based cemented carbides was determined by different methods. The values obtained are dependent on the procedure of measurement. Each method thoughness of hard metals mutually. (orig.) [de

  9. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Span\\`o, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the $t\\overline{t}$ production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top quarks. In the SM the top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into W boson and a $b$-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in $t\\overline{t}$ production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  10. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Spano, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the ttbar production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top-quarks. In the SM the top-quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W boson and a b-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in ttbar production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  11. FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations

    Andrews, Madison Theresa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Tyler Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-14

    FY17 work focused on automation, both of the measurement analysis and comparison of simulations. The experimental apparatus was relocated and weeks of continuous measurements of the spontaneous fission source 252Cf was performed. Programs were developed to automate the conversion of measurements into ROOT data framework files with a simple terminal input. The complete analysis of the measurement (which includes energy calibration and the identification of correlated counts) can now be completed with a documented process which involves one simple execution line as well. Finally, the hurdles of slow MCNP simulations resulting in low simulation statistics have been overcome with the generation of multi-run suites which make use of the highperformance computing resources at LANL. Preliminary comparisons of measurements and simulations have been performed and will be the focus of FY18 work.

  12. On the achievable field sensitivity of a segmented annular detector for differential phase contrast measurements

    Schwarzhuber, Felix, E-mail: felix.schwarzhuber@ur.de; Melzl, Peter; Zweck, Josef

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Practical guide to calibrate a DPC setup considering geometrical parameters. • Optimizing the field sensitivity of a segmented annular DPC detector. • Determination of maximum electric and magnetic field sensitivity of a DPC setup. - Abstract: Differential phase contrast microscopy measures minute deflections of the electron probe due to electric and/or magnetic fields, using a position sensitive device. Although recently, pixelated detectors have become available which also serve as a position sensitive device, the most frequently used detector is a four-segmented annular semiconducting detector ring (or variations thereof), where the difference signals of opposing detector elements represent the components of the deflection vector. This deflection vector can be used directly to quantitatively determine the deflecting field, provided the specimen’s thickness is known. While there exist many measurements of both electric and magnetic fields, even at an atomic level, until now the question of the smallest clearly resolvable field value for this detector has not yet been answered. This paper treats the problem theoretically first, leading to a calibration factor κ which depends solely on simple, experimentally accessible parameters and relates the deflecting field to the measured deflection vector. In a second step, the calibration factor for our combination of microscope and detector is determined experimentally for various combinations of camera length, condenser aperture and spot size to determine the optimum setup. From this optimized condition we determine the minimum change in field which leads to a clearly measurable signal change for both HMSTEM and LMSTEM operation. A strategy is described which allows the experimenter to choose the setup giving the highest field sensitivity. Quantification problems due to scattering processes in the specimen are addressed and ways are shown to choose a setup which is less sensitive to these artefacts.

  13. On the achievable field sensitivity of a segmented annular detector for differential phase contrast measurements

    Schwarzhuber, Felix; Melzl, Peter; Zweck, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Practical guide to calibrate a DPC setup considering geometrical parameters. • Optimizing the field sensitivity of a segmented annular DPC detector. • Determination of maximum electric and magnetic field sensitivity of a DPC setup. - Abstract: Differential phase contrast microscopy measures minute deflections of the electron probe due to electric and/or magnetic fields, using a position sensitive device. Although recently, pixelated detectors have become available which also serve as a position sensitive device, the most frequently used detector is a four-segmented annular semiconducting detector ring (or variations thereof), where the difference signals of opposing detector elements represent the components of the deflection vector. This deflection vector can be used directly to quantitatively determine the deflecting field, provided the specimen’s thickness is known. While there exist many measurements of both electric and magnetic fields, even at an atomic level, until now the question of the smallest clearly resolvable field value for this detector has not yet been answered. This paper treats the problem theoretically first, leading to a calibration factor κ which depends solely on simple, experimentally accessible parameters and relates the deflecting field to the measured deflection vector. In a second step, the calibration factor for our combination of microscope and detector is determined experimentally for various combinations of camera length, condenser aperture and spot size to determine the optimum setup. From this optimized condition we determine the minimum change in field which leads to a clearly measurable signal change for both HMSTEM and LMSTEM operation. A strategy is described which allows the experimenter to choose the setup giving the highest field sensitivity. Quantification problems due to scattering processes in the specimen are addressed and ways are shown to choose a setup which is less sensitive to these artefacts.

  14. Measurement of emittance of metal interface in molten salt

    Araki, N.; Makino, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for measuring the total normal emittance of a metal in a semi-transparent liquid has been proposed and this technique has been applied to measure the emittance of stainless steel (SUS304), nickel, and gold in molten potassium nitrate KNO 3 . These emittance data are indispensable to analyzing the radiative heat transfer between a metal and a semitransparent liquid, such as a molten salt

  15. Dosimetry Measurements around the Angiography Units Using Thermoluminescence Detectors (TLD)

    Salah El-den, T.; Shahein, A.Y.; Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are widely used not only in the field of personnel monitoring (dosimetry) service for ionizing radiation to medical, and research communities, but also for measurements of X-rays emitted from different angiography's unit. Measurements ionizing radiation around the bed area during cardiac catheterization procedures using X-rays was measured. TLD Badges used to determine the annual effective doses, the safe distance for the staff to minimize radiation exposure and the effectiveness of shield and used leaded apron. The results indicated that annual effective dose for by angiography cardiac Catheterization room may exceed the limits

  16. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    Dorman, Mark Edward [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  17. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    Dorman, Mark Edward

    2008-01-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented

  18. Measurement of the τ lifetime with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    Gross, E.

    1993-01-01

    The τ lepton lifetime is measured using four different methods with the DELPHI detector. In addition to the classical three prong vertex reconstruction and one prong impact parameter methods, the two impact parameters in an one vs one prong events are summed and substracted providing two weakly correlated methods to measure the lifetime. 4 refs

  19. Use of FET in automatic scanning of measurements using thermocouples and self-powered neutron detectors

    Plaige, Yves.

    1977-01-01

    Advantages lying in using FET switches in the relays of multiplexing systems are shown with two examples of application. Their performance as regard fast reliable operation are used in temperature measurement scanning inside nuclear reactors. As for current measurements using self-powered neutron detectors, the weak leakage currents of said switches ( [fr

  20. Metal artifact reduction for flat panel detector intravenous CT angiography in patients with intracranial metallic implants after endovascular and surgical treatment.

    Pjontek, Rastislav; Önenköprülü, Belgin; Scholz, Bernhard; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Schubert, Gerrit A; Nikoubashman, Omid; Othman, Ahmed; Wiesmann, Martin; Brockmann, Marc A

    2016-08-01

    Flat panel detector CT angiography with intravenous contrast agent injection (IV CTA) allows high-resolution imaging of cerebrovascular structures. Artifacts caused by metallic implants like platinum coils or clips lead to degradation of image quality and are a significant problem. To evaluate the influence of a prototype metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm on image quality in patients with intracranial metallic implants. Flat panel detector CT after intravenous application of 80 mL contrast agent was performed with an angiography system (Artis zee; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a 20 s rotation protocol (200° rotation angle, 20 s acquisition time, 496 projections). The data before and after MAR of 26 patients with a total of 34 implants (coils, clips, stents) were independently evaluated by two blinded neuroradiologists. MAR improved the assessability of the brain parenchyma and small vessels (diameter metallic implants and at a distance of 6 cm (p<0.001 each, Wilcoxon test). Furthermore, MAR significantly improved the assessability of parent vessel patency and potential aneurysm remnants (p<0.005 each, McNemar test). MAR, however, did not improve assessability of stented vessels. When an intravenous contrast protocol is used, MAR significantly ameliorates the assessability of brain parenchyma, vessels, and treated aneurysms in patients with intracranial coils or clips. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Technological advances in cosmogenic neutron detectors for measuring soil water content

    Zreda, M. G.; Schrön, M.; Köhli, M.

    2017-12-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron probe is used for measuring area-average soil water content at the hectometer scale. Early work showed a simple exponential decrease with distance of the instrument's sensitivity and a footprint 300 m in radius. Recent research suggested a much higher sensitivity to local neutrons and reduced footprint. We show results confirming the high sensitivity to local neutrons, describe two ways to reduce local and increase far-field effects, and propose ways of measuring neutrons at different spatial scales. Measurements with moderated detectors across a 10-m-wide creek and a 2-m-wide water tank show a decrease by 30% and 20%, respectively, of neutron intensity over water compared to that over land nearby. These results mean that the detector is sensitive to meter-scale heterogeneities of water content. This sensitivity can be reduced by rising the detector or by shielding it from local neutrons. The effect of local water distributions on the measured neutron intensity decreases with height. In the water tank experiment it disappeared almost completely at the height of 2 m, leading to the conjecture that the height roughly equal to the horizontal scale of heterogeneity would eliminate the sensitivity. This may or may not be practical. Shielding the detector below by a hydrogenous material removes a substantial fraction of the local neutrons. The shielded detector has a reduced count rate, reduced sensitivity to local neutrons and increased sensitivity to neutrons farther afield, and a larger footprint. Such a detector could be preferable to the current cosmogenic-neutron probe under heterogeneous soil water conditions. The shielding experiments also inspired the development of a local-area neutron detector. It has hydrogenous neutron shields on all sides except the bottom, substantially blocking the neutrons coming from afar, while allowing the neutrons coming directly from below. Its footprint is equal to its physical dimension when the detector is

  2. Overview of the Standard Model Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    Liu, Yanwen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration is engaged in precision measurement of fundamental Standard Model parameters, such as the W boson mass, the weak-mixing angle or the strong coupling constant. In addition, the production cross-sections of a large variety of final states involving high energetic jets, photons as well as single and multi vector bosons are measured multi differentially at several center of mass energies. This allows to test perturbative QCD calculations to highest precision. In addition, these measurements allow also to test models beyond the SM, e.g. those leading to anomalous gauge couplings. In this talk, we give a broad overview of the Standard Model measurement campaign of the ATLAS collaboration, where selected topics will be discussed in more detail.

  3. Measurements of the Higgs boson properties with the ATLAS detector

    Tomoto, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Slide draft for the Crimea 2013 workshop. The subject of the talk will be measurements of the Higgs boson properties, including the spin, mass, signal strength, and couplings of a new boson discovered in 2012 at the ATLAS experiment.

  4. Measurements of the vector boson production with the ATLAS detector

    Lapertosa, A.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution Functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z boson cross sections are also measured at center-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of systematic effects and allows for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions. The production of jets in association with vector bosons is a further important process to study perturbative QCD in a multi-scale environment. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new measurements of Z boson plus jets cross sections, differential in several kinematic variables, in proton-proton collision data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements are compared to state-of-the art theory predictions. They are sensitive to higher-order pQCD effects, probe flavour and mass schemes and can be used to constrain the proton structure. In addition, a new measurement of the splitting scales of the kt jet-clustering algorithm for final states containing a Z boson candidate at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented.

  5. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Negrini, Matteo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Highlights on recent measurements of top quark properties in ATLAS, using pp collision data at \\sqrt{s}= 8 TeV and 13 TeV, are presented. The measurements of the top quark polarization and spin correlation coefficients, the W boson helicity fractions, the structure of the Wtb vertex, the associated production of a t anti-t pair with a vector boson or a photon, and the top quark mass are all in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  6. Measurements of b-hadron lifetimes with the Delphi detector

    Demaria, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Delphi collaboration has measured the lifetime of b-hadrons using several different methods. In this talk those exploited only by Delphi and that employ original ideas are presented: for the b-baryons lifetime the p-μ correlation; for the B 0 s the φ-μ, D s -h correlations and D s inclusive analysis. The measurement of the average lifetime of b- hadrons using the impact parameters and the vertices of hadronic final states is also presented. (orig.)

  7. Precision measurements of electroweak observables with the ATLAS Detector

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration measured the di-lepton mass range up to the TeV scale as well as the triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of Mll, dilepton rapidity and cosθ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the weak mixing angle. The latest results of the ATLAS collaboration will be presented. A second important observable in the electroweak sector is the W boson mass in order to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. Large samples of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set correspo...

  8. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    Schell, W R; Yoon, S R; Tobin, M J

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min . This paper presents the design features, opera...

  9. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    Gomaa, M A [National Network of Radiation Physics. Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Hussein, A S [Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Power Plants Authority, (Egypt); El-Arabi, A M [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Qena, (Egypt)

    2005-04-01

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water.

  10. Analysis for In-situ Fission Rate Measurements using 4He Gas Scintillation Detectors

    Lewis, Jason M.; Raetz, Dominik; Jordan, Kelly A.; Murer, David

    2013-06-01

    Active neutron interrogation is a powerful NDA technique that relies on detecting and analyzing fission neutrons produced in a fuel sample by an interrogating high neutron flux. 4 He scintillation gas fast neutron detectors are investigated in this paper for use in a novel fission rate measurement technique The He-4 detectors have excellent gamma rejection, a fast response time, and give significant information on incident neutron energy allowing for energy cuts to be applied to the detected signal. These features are shown in this work to allow for the detection of prompt fission neutrons in-situ during active neutron interrogation of a 238 U sample. The energy spectrum from three different neutrons sources ( 252 Cf, AmBe, AmLi) is measured using the 4 He detection system and analyzed. An initial response matrix for the detector is determined using these measurements and the kinematic interaction properties of the elastic scattering with the 4 He. (authors)

  11. Prospects for measuring the gravitational free-fall of antihydrogen with emulsion detectors

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A.S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R.S.; Cabaret, L.; Canali, C.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Derking, J.H.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.N.; Haider, S.; Harasimovicz, J.; Hogan, S.D.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Jørgensen, L.V.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Knecht, A.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Magnani, A.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.A.; Moia, F.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Oberthaler, M.K.; Pacifico, N.; Petráček, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Regenfus, C.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Scampoli, P.; Sosa, A.; Storey, J.; Subieta Vasquez, M.A.; Špaček, M.; Testera, G.; Trezzi, D.; Vaccarone, R.; Welsch, C.P.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the AEgIS experiment at CERN is to test the weak equivalence principle for antimatter. AEgIS will measure the free-fall of an antihydrogen beam traversing a moir\\'e deflectometer. The goal is to determine the gravitational acceleration g for antihydrogen with an initial relative accuracy of 1% by using an emulsion detector combined with a silicon micro-strip detector to measure the time of flight. Nuclear emulsions can measure the annihilation vertex of antihydrogen atoms with a precision of about 1 - 2 microns r.m.s. We present here results for emulsion detectors operated in vacuum using low energy antiprotons from the CERN antiproton decelerator. We compare with Monte Carlo simulations, and discuss the impact on the AEgIS project.

  12. The Siegen automatic measuring system for nuclear track detectors: new developments

    Noll, A.; Rusch, G.; Roecher, H.; Dreute, J.; Heinrich, W.

    1988-01-01

    Starting ten years ago we developed completely automatic scanning and measuring systems for nuclear track detectors. In this paper we describe some new developments. Our autofocus systems based on the contrast of the video picture and on a laser autofocus have been improved in speed and in reliability. Based on new algorithms, faster programs have been developed to scan for nuclear tracks in plastic detectors. Methods for separation of overlapping tracks have been improved. Interactive programs for track measurements have been developed which are very helpful for space bio-physics experiments. Finally new methods for track measurements in nuclear emulsions irradiated with a beam perpendicular to the detector surface are described in this paper. (author)

  13. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    Gomaa, M.A.; Hussein, A.S.; El-Arabi, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water

  14. Adsorption smoke detector made of thin-film metal-oxide semiconductor sensor

    Adamian, A.Z.; Adamian, Z.N.; Aroutiounian, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    Based on results of investigations of the thin-film smoke sensors made of Bi 2 O 3 , irresponsive to a change in relative humidity of the environment, an absorption smoke detector processing circuit, where investigated sensor is used as a sensitive element, is proposed. It is shown that such smoke detector is able to function reliably under conditions of high relative humidity of the environment (up to 100%) and it considerably exceeds the known smoke detectors by the sensitivity threshold

  15. Adsorption smoke detector made of thin-film metal-oxide semiconductor sensor

    Adamian, A Z; Aroutiounian, V M

    2001-01-01

    Based on results of investigations of the thin-film smoke sensors made of Bi sub 2 O sub 3 , irresponsive to a change in relative humidity of the environment, an absorption smoke detector processing circuit, where investigated sensor is used as a sensitive element, is proposed. It is shown that such smoke detector is able to function reliably under conditions of high relative humidity of the environment (up to 100%) and it considerably exceeds the known smoke detectors by the sensitivity threshold.

  16. Measurements of the Vector boson production with the ATLAS Detector

    Lapertosa, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/γ bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed for W+, W− and Z/γ bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/γ∗ mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z cross sections are also measured at a center-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of systematic effects and allows for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions. The production of jets in association with vector bosons is a further important process to study perturbative QCD in a multi-scale environment. The ATLAS ...

  17. Measurements of the vector boson production with the ATLAS detector

    Lapertosa, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed for $W^+$, $W^{-}$ and $Z$ bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the $Z$ mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution Functions, in particular the strange density are found. $Z$ boson cross sections are also measured at a center-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of systematic effects and allows for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions. The production of jets in association with vector bosons is a further important process to study perturbative QCD in a multi-scale environment. ...

  18. Viscosity measurements of molten refractory metals using an electrostatic levitator

    Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-François; Okada, Junpei T; Watanabe, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Viscosities of several refractory metals (titanium, nickel, zirconium, niobium, ruthenium, rhodium, hafnium, iridium and platinum) and terbium have been measured by the oscillation drop method with an improved procedure. The measured data were less scattered than our previous measurements. Viscosities at their melting temperatures showed good agreement with literature values and some predicted values. (paper)

  19. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  20. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    Loiacono, Laura Jean [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  1. Measurements of the Vector boson production with the ATLAS Detector

    Weber, Stephen Albert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z bosons at the LHC are an essential part of the ATLAS standard model physics program. These processes are a probe to understand perturbative QCD and the structure of the proton. Differential measurements of the Z boson cross section produced in association with jets can be compared to different LO and NLO MC generators to test the accuracy of these predictions. A selection of recent results are presented on varying studies of W and Z boson production.

  2. Di-boson production measurements with the ATLAS detector

    Chevalier, Laurent; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements diboson production cross sections in proton-proton interactions at 7 and 8 TeV are reported from the ATLAS experiment. The cross section results are measured in phase space regions defined by the decay kinematics and then extrapolated to the full phase spaces. Cross sections for WV (V=W or Z) production in the leptonic or semileptonic channels are compared to (N)NLO predictions of the Standard Model and are used to place constraints on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. First LHC Run-2 results will be included if available.

  3. Diagnostic x-ray spectra measurements using a silicon surface barrier detector

    Pani, R.; Laitano, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    A silicon surface barrier detector having a low efficiency for x-ray is used to analyse diagnostic x-ray spectra. This characteristic is advantageous in overcoming experimental problems caused by high fluence rates typical of diagnostic x-ray beams. The pulse height distribution obtained with silicon surface barrier detectors is very different from the true photon spectra because of the presence of escaped Compton photons and the fact that detection efficiency falls abruptly when photon energy increases. A detailed analysis of the spurious effects involved in detection is made by a Monte Carlo method. A stripping procedure is described for implementation on a personal computer. The validity of this method is tested by comparison with experimental results obtained with a Ge detector. The spectra obtained with the Si detector are in fairly good agreement with the analogous spectra measured with a Ge detector. The advantages of using Si as opposed to Ge detectors in x-ray spectrometry are: its simplicity of use, its greater economy for use in routine diagnostic x-ray spectroscopy and the possibility that the stripping procedure can be implemented on a personal computer. (author)

  4. A novel silicon drift detector with two dimensional drift time measurement

    Hijzen, E.A.; Schooneveld, E.M.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W.; Sarro, P.M.; Van den Bogaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    Until now silicon drift detectors with two dimensional position resolution made use of drift time measurement in one dimension only. The resolution in the other dimension was obtained by dividing the collecting anode into small pixels. In this paper we present a new type of drift detector that uses drift time measurements for both dimensions. The design consists of concentric quadrilateral closed strips with a small collecting anode in the centre. At first electrons will travel perpendicular to the strips until they reach a diagonal. Then they will proceed along this diagonal until they are collected at the centre. Position resolution in two dimensions can be obtained when both the time the electrons need to reach the diagonal and the time they need to reach the centre are measured. The latter is obtained from the collecting anode, the former from a diagonal strip present at the back side of the detector. Compared to common 2D drift detectors this detector offers the advantage of a small amount of readout electronics. It also has the advantage of having just one small collecting anode with a very low capacitance, resulting in low noise and therefore in a good energy resolution. ((orig.))

  5. The CENNS-10 liquid argon detector to measure CEvNS at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Tayloe, R.

    2018-04-01

    The COHERENT collaboration is deploying a suite of low-energy detectors in a low-background corridor of the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to measure coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) on an array of nuclear targets employing different detector technologies. A measurement of CEvNS on different nuclei will test the N2-dependence of the CEvNS cross section and further the physics reach of the COHERENT effort. The first step of this program has been realized recently with the observation of CEvNS in a 14.6 kg CsI detector. Operation and deployment of Ge and NaI detectors are also underway. A 22 kg, single-phase, liquid argon detector (CENNS-10) started data-taking in Dec. 2016 and will provide results on CEvNS from a lighter nucleus. Initial results indicate that light output, pulse-shape discrimination, and background suppression are sufficient for a measurement of CEvNS on argon.

  6. Correlated background and impact on the measurement of θ13 with the Double Chooz detector

    Remoto, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment uses antineutrinos emitted from the Chooz nuclear power plant (France) to measure the oscillation mixing parameter θ 13 . By using two detectors at different baselines, a precise measurement of antineutrinos disappearance is anticipated. The Far detector has been taking physics data since April 2011, while the Near detector is under construction. Data from April 13, 2011 to March 30, 2012 taken with the Far detector only have been analyzed and an indication for antineutrino disappearance, consistent with the current neutrino oscillation hypothesis, has been found. The best fit value for the neutrino mixing parameter sin 2 (2θ 13 ) is 0.109 ± 0.030(stat.) ± 0.025(syst.). This thesis present an accurate description of the Double Chooz experiment, with particular emphasis on the Far detector and its acquisition system. The main focus of the thesis is the accurate study of the correlated background affecting the Double Chooz antineutrinos sample and its impact on the measurement of the mixing parameter θ 13 . A general overview of the current experimental scenario which aim to the characterization of the neutrino oscillation is also provided, focusing on the recent results obtained in this field. (author) [fr

  7. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    Parno, D.S., E-mail: dparno@uw.edu [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Friend, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Mamyan, V.; Benmokhtar, F. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Camsonne, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Franklin, G.B. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Paschke, K. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Quinn, B. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured spectra well.

  8. Comparison of modeled and measured performance of a GSO crystal as gamma detector

    Parno, D.S.; Friend, M.; Mamyan, V.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Franklin, G.B.; Paschke, K.; Quinn, B.

    2013-01-01

    We have modeled, tested, and installed a large, cerium-activated Gd 2 SiO 5 crystal scintillator for use as a detector of gamma rays. We present the measured detector response to two types of incident photons: nearly monochromatic photons up to 40 MeV, and photons from a continuous Compton backscattering spectrum up to 200 MeV. Our GEANT4 simulations, developed to determine the analyzing power of the Compton polarimeter in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, reproduce the measured spectra well

  9. Heavy flavour and quarkonia measurement with ATLAS detector

    Gallus, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Charm and bottom quarks provide a powerful tool to study the properties of the hot, dense medium created in heavy ion collisions, and in particular may help differentiate between initial and final state effects in large collision systems. Measurements of open heavy flavour particle and quarkonia production, including their prompt and non-prompt components, and their correlations with light hadrons, build a path to understanding how heavy quarks propagate through the quark-gluon plasma. Additionally, an important component in these studies is the comparison between large and small collision systems. In this talk, ATLAS presents results on measurements of quarkonia production in PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV, including separated prompt and non-prompt particle yields and a new measurement of the anisotropic flow of the J/Psi. The flow measurement provides information on the stage at which charmonium states are formed during the system evolution, thus giving insights on the effects that modify their production. Add...

  10. Circular polarization measurements with a Ge(Li) detector

    Kopecký, J.; Warming, Inge Elisabeth

    1969-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained in measurements of the degree of circular polarization of gamma transitions to bound states of 33S, 36Cl, 49Ti, 56Mn, 57Fe, 60Co and 64Cu following the capture of polarized thermal neutrons. Spin values have been determined on the basis of these results....

  11. Transmutation detectors

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  12. Transmutation detectors

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  13. Tritium storage metal-bed pyrophoricity measurements

    Longhurst, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Porter, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    A safety concern for metal-bed tritium storage systems is the possibility of spontaneous combustion and/or explosion if the bed is accidentally exposed to air. This may result in the dispersion of tritium or tritiated compounds. Of several materials being considered for use in tritium storage beds, uranium (U), zirconium-cobalt (ZrCo), and lanthanum-nickel aluminide (LaNi 5-x Al x ) are of particular interest. It is well known that uranium that has been activated by cycles of hydriding and dehydriding is extremely pyrophoric when exposed to air or other oxidizers. Uranium hydride has also been found to be mildly pyrophoric, but less is known about the pyrophoric natures of the hydrides of the other materials. An experiment is in progress to evaluate the pyrophoric response of these materials and their hydrides and deuterides in air. Small (<100 mg) samples of depleted uranium were hydrided and then exposed to atmospheres of air, oxygen, or nitrogen using a thermogravimetric analyzer to monitor the sample weight and temperature. There was not an immediate pyrophoric response at room temperature, but ignition occured at moderately elevated temperatures for air and oxygen atmospheres. The experimental apparatus has been upgraded, and tests are continuing on these materials

  14. Investigation of the Section Thickness Measurement in Tomosynthesis by Thin Metal Plate Edge Method.

    Ikeno, Kaoru; Akita, Tsunemichi; Hanai, Kozo; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa

    When performing tomosynthesis, the section thickness needs to be set depending on a radiographic part and its diagnostic purpose. However, the section thickness in tomosynthesis has not been clearly defined and its measurement method has not been established yet. In this study, we devised the alternative measurement method to diagnose the section thickness using an edge of thin metal plate, and compared with the simulation results, the wire and bead method reported in the previous papers. The tomographic image of the thin metal plate positioned on the table top inclining 30 degrees, which showed the edge spread function (ESF) of each tomographic height, was taken, and then the line spread function (LSF) was obtained by differentiating the ESF image. For the next, a profile curve was plotted by maximum values of LSF of each tomographic height, and a section thickness was calculated using the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the profile curve. The edge method derived the section thickness close to the simulation results than the other methods. Further, the section thickness depends on the thickness of the metal plate and not the material. The thickness of the metal plate suitable for the evaluation of section thickness is 0.3 mm that is equivalent to pixel size of the flat panel detector (FPD). We conducted quantitative verification to establish the measurement method of the section thickness. The edge method is a useful technique as well as the wire and bead method for grasping basic characteristics of an imaging system.

  15. Measuring electric conductivity in liquid metals by eddy current method

    Zhuravlev, S.P.; Ostrovskij, O.I.; Grigoryan, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technique permitting to apply the method of vertiginous currents for investigation of electric conductivity of metal melts in the high temperature range is presented. Interferences affecting accuracy of measurements are specified and ways of their removing are pointed out. Scheme of measuring and design of the facility are described. Results of measuring electric resistance of liquid Fe, Co, Ni obtained for the first time by this method are presented. The data obtained agree with the results of measurements conducted by the method of the rotating magnetic field. Difference in absolute values of electric resistance in parallel experiments for each metal does not exceed 4%

  16. Measurement of neutron flux distribution by semiconductor detector; merenje raspodele neutronskog fluksa poluprovodnickim detektorom

    Obradovic, D; Bosevski, T [Institut za nuklearne nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1964-07-01

    Application of semiconductor detectors for measuring neutron flux distribution is about 10 times faster than measurements by activation foils and demands significantly lower reactor power. Following corrections are avoided: mass of activation foils which influences the self shielding, nuclear decay during activity measurements; counter dead-time. It is possible to control the measured data during experiment and repeat measurements if needed. Precision of the measurement is higher since it is possible to choose the wanted statistics. The method described in this paper is applied for measurements at the RB reactor. It is concluded that the method is suitable for fast measurements but the activation analysis is still indispensable.

  17. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-07

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  18. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed. (auth)

  19. Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals

    Metz, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed

  20. Photoemission measurements for low energy x-ray detector applications

    Day, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Photoemission has been studied for nearly 100 years as both a means of investigating quantum physics, and as a practical technique for transducing optical/x-ray photons into electrical currents. Numerous x-ray detection schemes, such as streak cameras and x-ray sensitive diodes, exploit this process because of its simplicity, adaptability, and speed. Recent emphasis on diagnostics for low temperature, high density, and short-lived, plasmas for inertial confinement fusion has stimulated interest in x-ray photoemission in the sub-kilovolt regime. In this paper, a review of x-ray photoemission measurements in the 50 eV to 10 keV x-ray region is given and the experimental techniques are reviewed. A semiempirical model of x-ray photoemission is discussed and compared to experimental measurements. Finally, examples of absolutely calibrated instruments are shown

  1. Measurement of Minimum Bias Observables with the ATLAS detector

    Kvita, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes. It has also a significant relevance for the simulation of the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (“pileup”). The ATLAS collaboration has provided new measurements of the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements cover a wide spectrum using charged particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities.

  2. Heterodyne detector for measuring the characteristic of elliptically polarized microwaves

    Leipold, Frank; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Michelsen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, a device is introduced, which is capable of determining the three characteristic parameters of elliptically polarized light (ellipticity, angle of ellipticity, and direction of rotation) for microwave radiation at a frequency of 110 GHz. The device consists of two perpendicu......In the present paper, a device is introduced, which is capable of determining the three characteristic parameters of elliptically polarized light (ellipticity, angle of ellipticity, and direction of rotation) for microwave radiation at a frequency of 110 GHz. The device consists of two...... be calculated. Results from measured and calculated wave characteristics of an elliptically polarized 110 GHz microwave beam for plasma heating launched into the TEXTOR-tokamak experiment are presented. Measurement and calculation are in good agreement. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  3. Measurements of ttbar+X using the ATLAS detector

    Hasib, Ahmed; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The large centre-of-mass energy available at the proton-proton collider LHC allows for the copious production of top quark pairs in association with other final state particles at high transverse momenta. The ATLAS experiment has measured several final state observables that are sensitive to additional radiation in top anti-top quark final states. Results on the top production in association with W and Z bosons are presented as well as top pair production with a photon. Analyses probing top pair production with additional QCD radiation are also presented, including top pair production in association with additional heavy flavour jets. These measurements are compared to predictions of modern Monte Carlo generators based on NLO QCD matrix element or LO multi-leg matrix elements.

  4. Measurement of Underlying Event Observables with the ATLAS detector

    Astalos, Robert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of the Underlying Event (UE) is a crucial component in the complete description of both soft and hard QCD processes at hadron colliders. The ATLAS collaboration presents new results on the number and transversemomentum sum of charged particles as a function of the leading high pT track in events taken at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV. These results are presented in regions towards, transverse, and away from the leading track and allow to test the modelling of the Underlying Event in modern MC generators. Furthermore, eventshape variables based on charged particles have been measured in Z-events at 7 TeV and have been compared with the predictions of different stateoftheart MC generators. These measurements test the Underlying Event in a complementary way.

  5. Measurements of ttbar+X using the ATLAS detector

    Kawade, Kentaro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The large centre-of-mass energy available at the proton-proton collider LHC allows for the copious production of top quark pairs in association with other final state particles at high transverse momenta. The ATLAS experiment has measured several final state observables that are sensitive to additional radiation in top anti-top quark final states. Results on the top production in association with W and Z bosons are presented as well as top pair production with a photon or with b quarks. Analyses probing the top pair production with additional QCD radiation include the multiplicity of jets for various transverse momentum thresholds in the 13 TeV data. These measurements are compared to modern Monte Carlo generators based on NLO QCD matrix element or LO multi-leg matrix elements.

  6. Hadronic resonance production measured with the ALICE detector

    Dash, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic resonances serve as a unique tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter pro- duced in heavy-ion collisions. These properties can be studied by measuring the ratios of hadronic resonance yields to the yields of longer-lived hadrons which can be used to investigate the re- scattering effects and the chemical freeze-out temperature. Resonance measurements in pp and p–Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle the initial- state effects from medium-induced effects. The ALICE Collaboration has measured resonances such as, K ∗ (892) 0 and φ (1020) in pp, p–Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC energies. These resonances are reconstructed via their hadronic decay channel in a wide momentum range at midrapidity. In this work, we present recent results on the transverse momentum spectra, mean transverse momentum, ratios of resonance production relative to that of long-lived hadrons.

  7. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel Lima 32 (Peru); Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 89000 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valdivia, P., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru)

    2016-10-15

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E{sub min}), average critical angle (<Θ{sub c}>), and fraction of {sup 218}Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f{sub 1}), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  8. Completely automated measurement facility (PAVICOM) for track-detector data processing

    Aleksandrov, A B; Feinberg, E L; Goncharova, L A; Konovalova, N S; Martynov, A G; Polukhina, N G; Roussetski, A S; Starkov, NI; Tsarev, V A

    2004-01-01

    A review of technical capabilities and investigations performed using the completely automated measuring facility (PAVICOM) is presented. This very efficient facility for track-detector data processing in the field of nuclear and high-energy particle physics has been constructed in the Lebedev physical institute. PAVICOM is widely used in Russia for treatment of experimental data from track detectors (emulsion and solid-state trackers) in high- and low-energy physics, cosmic ray physics, etc. PAVICOM provides an essential improvement of the efficiency of experimental studies. In contrast to semi-automated microscopes widely used until now, PAVICOM is capable of performing completely automated measurements of charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsions and track detectors without employing hard visual work. In this case, track images are recorded by CCD cameras and then are digitized and converted into files. Thus, experimental data processing is accelerated by approximately a thousand times. Completely autom...

  9. Development of a combination detector system for simultaneous measurement of Alpha and Beta/Gamma radioactivity

    Thakur, Vaishali M.; Ashokkumar, P.; Rekha, A.K.; Jain, Amit; Rath, D.P.; Chaudhury, Probal; Chaudhari, L.M.

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of various samples for α and β/γ radioactivity is carried out in radiological laboratories. Using independent α and β/γ counting systems such measurements are done separately for same sample. In order to address the requirement of simultaneous measurement of α and β/γ activity content of radioactive samples, a counting system using combination of two detectors has been developed. Activity deposited on a 2 mm deep 30 mm diameter aluminum planchette was counted under the detector combination consisting of a ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for α and β/γ respectively. The design and fabrication of the combination detector, development of electronics associated with the system, its characterization and application are presented here

  10. Measured and simulated performance of Compton-suppressed TIGRESS HPGe clover detectors

    Schumaker, M. A.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Maharaj, R.; Morton, A. C.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Tests of the performance of a 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detector coupled to a 20-fold segmented Compton-suppression shield, which form a prototype element of the TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS), have been made. Peak-to-total ratios and relative efficiencies have been measured for a variety of γ-ray energies. These measurements were used to validate a GEANT4 simulation of the TIGRESS detectors, which was then used to create a simulation of the full 12-detector array. Predictions of the expected performance of TIGRESS are presented. These predictions indicate that TIGRESS will be capable, for single 1 MeV γ rays, of absolute detection efficiencies of 17% and 9.4%, and peak-to-total ratios of 54% and 61% for the "high-efficiency" and "optimized peak-to-total" configurations of the array, respectively.

  11. Spin correlation and entanglement detection in Cooper pair splitters by current measurements using magnetic detectors

    Busz, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Damian; Martinek, Jan

    2017-08-01

    We analyze a model of a double quantum dot Cooper pair splitter coupled to two ferromagnetic detectors and demonstrate the possibility of determination of spin correlation by current measurements. We use perturbation theory, taking account of the exchange interaction with the detectors, which leads to complex spin dynamics in the dots. This affects the measured spin and restricts the use of ferromagnetic detectors to the nonlinear current-voltage characteristic regime at the current plateau, where the relevant spin projection is conserved, in contrast to the linear current-voltage characteristic regime, in which the spin information is distorted. Moreover, we show that for separable states the spin correlation can only be determined in a limited parameter regime, much more restricted than in the case of entangled states. We propose an entanglement test based on the Bell inequality.

  12. Measurement of β-decay end point energy with planar HPGe detector

    Bhattacharjee, T., E-mail: btumpa@vecc.gov.in [Physics Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Pandit, Deepak [Physics Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Das, S.K. [RCD-BARC, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Chowdhury, A.; Das, P. [Physics Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Banerjee, D. [RCD-BARC, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Saha, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, S.; Banerjee, S.R. [Physics Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-12-11

    The β–γ coincidence measurement has been performed with a segmented planar Hyper-Pure Germanium (HPGe) detector and a single coaxial HPGe detector to determine the end point energies of nuclear β-decays. The experimental end point energies have been determined for some of the known β-decays in {sup 106}Rh→{sup 106}Pd. The end point energies corresponding to three weak branches in {sup 106}Rh→{sup 106}Pd decay have been measured for the first time. The γ ray and β particle responses for the planar HPGe detector were simulated using the Monte Carlo based code GEANT3. The experimentally obtained β spectra were successfully reproduced with the simulation.

  13. First neutron spectroscopy measurements with a pixelated diamond detector at JET

    Muraro, A., E-mail: muraro@ifp.cnr.it; Giacomelli, L.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Belli, F. [Centro Ricerca ENEA-Frascati, Via E.Fermi 45, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M. [CNR—Istituto di Struttura della Materia (ISM), Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, Rome (Italy); Figueiredo, J. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); EUROfusion Programme Management Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Popovichev, S. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    A prototype Single crystal Diamond Detector (SDD) was installed at the Joint European Torus (JET) in 2013 along an oblique line of sight and demonstrated the possibility to carry out neutron spectroscopy measurements with good energy resolution and detector stability in discharges heated by neutral beam injection and radio-frequency waves. Starting from these positive results, within the Vertical Neutron Spectrometer project of the Joint European Torus, we have developed a pixelated instrument consisting of a matrix of 12 independent SDDs, called the Diamond Vertical Neutron Spectrometer (DVNS), which boosts the detection efficiency of a single SDD by an order of magnitude. In this paper we describe the main features of the DVNS, including the detector design, energy resolution, and data acquisition system for on-line processing. Preliminary spectroscopy measurements of 2.5 MeV neutrons from the present deuterium plasma at JET are finally presented.

  14. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E.; Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L.; Valdivia, P.

    2016-10-01

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E min ), average critical angle (<Θ c >), and fraction of 218 Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f 1 ), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  15. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurements and Detector Development

    Longo, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The physics goal of this project is to measure forward production of neutrons and photons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. This will provide data essential to proton radiography. This work is being carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab Experiment 907 (MIPP) collaboration including physicists from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Our group is responsible for the E907 forward neutron/photon calorimeter. The project is on track to meet its technical milestones, though the overall schedule at Fermilab has slipped. The electromagnetic calorimeter and the hadron calorimeter were both assembled and ready for testing with beam in December 2003

  16. Measurements of Vector Boson Fusion with the ATLAS detector

    Calfayan, Philippe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The most recent results on the production of single W and Z bosons with two jets at high invariant mass at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV are presented. Integrated and differential cross sections are measured in many different phase space regions with varying degree of sensitivity to the electroweak production in vector boson fusion. The cross section for the electroweak W boson production has been extracted for both integrated and for the first time differential distributions. The results are compared to state-of-the-art theory predictions and are used to constrain anomalous gauge couplings.

  17. Measurements of the top quark mass with the ATLAS detector

    Nisius, Richard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of the top quark mass given are obtained from ATLAS data taken at proton--proton centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV. An extraction of the top quark pole mass ($m_{\\mathrm{top}}^{\\mathrm{pole}}$) at next-to-leading order (NLO) is presented. This result is obtained from normalised differential cross-sections in the $t\\bar{t}\\to\\mbox{dilepton}$ channel leading to: $m_{\\mathrm{top}}^{\\mathrm{pole}} = 173.2 \\pm 0.9 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.8 (\\mathrm{syst.}) \\pm 1.2 (\\mathrm{theo.})$ GeV. In addition, measurements of $m_{\\mathrm{top}}$ are discussed that are based on the template method performed in three $t\\bar{t}$ decay channels. For all results the uncertainty is dominated by systematic effects. Finally, the 2016 ATLAS combined value of $m_{\\mathrm{top}}$ is: $m_{\\mathrm{top}}=172.84 \\pm 0.34 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.61 (\\mathrm{syst.})$ GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.70 GeV, i.e.a precision of 0.4$\\%$.

  18. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, A.M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering Laboratory (AMNEL), Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering (CAMNE), Najran University, Najran, P.O. Box. 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-15

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211]method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  19. Measurement of photon production cross sections with the ATLAS detector

    Turra, Ruggero; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of prompt isolated photons at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD and can be used to probe the proton structure. The ATLAS Collaboration has performed precise measurements of the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, differential in both rapidity and photon transverse momentum. In addition, the integrated and differential cross sections for isolated photon pairs at 8 TeV have been measured. The results are compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in QCD and with predictions of several MC generators. The production of prompt photons in association with jets provides an additional testing ground for perturbative QCD (pQCD) with a hard colourless probe less affected by hadronisation effects than jet production. The dynamics of isolated-photon plus jet production in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 and 13 TeV will be presented and discussed.

  20. Measurement of radon permeability through polyethylene membrane using scintillation detector

    Ashry, A.H.; Abou-Leila, M.; Abdalla, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of Radon 222 through polyethylene membranes has been studied using activated charcoal technique. The permeability constant of Radon 222 through low-density polyethylene, linear low-density Polyethylene and high density polyethylene samples has been measured. There is a considerable agreement between the values obtained by our method and the method suggested by W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211], and SSNTD technique suggested by A. Hafez and G. Somogyi [1986. Determination of radon and thoron permeability through some plastics by track technique. Int. J. Radiat. Appl. Instrum. Nucl. Track Radiat. Meas. 12 (1-6), 697-700]. In this work Radon permeability through different polyethylene membranes has been measured using three different methods, i.e. solid state nuclear track technique, W. Arafa [2002. Permeability of radon 222 through some materials. Radiat. Meas. 35, 207-211] method and our proposed method. In addition to this, in this study, the diffusion coefficient of radon in charcoal as well as solubility of Radon in polyethylene membrane has been taken into consideration.

  1. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    Zang, A; Ballabriga, R; Bisello, F; Campbell, M; Celi, J C; Fauler, A; Fiederle, M; Jensch, M; Kochanski, N; Llopart, X; Michel, N; Mollenhauer, U; Ritter, I; Tennert, F; Wölfel, S; Wong, W; Michel, T

    2015-01-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation wa...

  2. Uncertainties of retrospective radon concentration measurements by multilayer surface trap detector

    Bastrikov, V.; Kruzhalov, A.; Zhukovsky, M.

    2006-01-01

    The detector for retrospective radon exposure measurements is developed. The detector consists of the multilayer package of solid-state nuclear track detectors LR-115 type. Nitrocellulose films works both as α-particle detector and as absorber decreasing the energy of α-particles. The uncertainties of implanted 210 Pb measurements by two- and three-layer detectors are assessed in dependence on surface 210 Po activity and gross background activity of the glass. The generalized compartment behavior model of radon decay products in the room atmosphere was developed and verified. It is shown that the most influencing parameters on the value of conversion coefficient from 210 Po surface activity to average radon concentration are aerosol particles concentration, deposition velocity of unattached 218 Po and air exchange rate. It is demonstrated that with the use of additional information on surface to volume room ratio, air exchange rate and aerosol particles concentration the systematic bias of conversion coefficient between surface activity of 210 Po and average radon concentration can be decreased up to 30 %. (N.C.)

  3. Monte Carlo Studies of two Different Conversion Layers for Neutron Measurements with Medipix Silicon Detector.

    Larsen, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 the ventilation system of CNGS failed and investigations showed that the failure was due to Single Event Upset (SEU). Since then there has been increased interest in studies of neutron flux, that can potentially cause SEU. Two Medipix detectors have previously been installed in the CMS cavern on a test basis and have shown to work as intended[1]. More Medipix detectors will be installed to provide high resolution measurements of the particle flux in the vicinity of the CMS, focusing on measurements of the neutron flux. The measurements will provide an important basis to know what precautions to take to avoid another failure due to SEU. The measurements will also constitute a valuably reference to the FLUKA simulations of the general flux in the CMS cavern, that can potentially lead to important corrections of the simulations. Furthermore, measurements from the Medipix detectors will act as a cross check on the hadronic forward detector radiation monitoring system (HF radmon). Bonnos spheres are alread...

  4. Output factor determination for dose measurements in axial and perpendicular planes using a silicon strip detector

    Abou-Haïdar, Z.; Bocci, A.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Espino, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Ovejero, M. C.; Quesada, J. M.; Arráns, R.; Prieto, M. Ruiz; Vega-Leal, A. Pérez; Nieto, F. J. Pérez

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present the output factor measurements of a clinical linear accelerator using a silicon strip detector coupled to a new system for complex radiation therapy treatment verification. The objective of these measurements is to validate the system we built for treatment verification. The measurements were performed at the Virgin Macarena University Hospital in Seville. Irradiations were carried out with a Siemens ONCOR™ linac used to deliver radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. The linac was operating in 6 MV photon mode; the different sizes of the fields were defined with the collimation system provided within the accelerator head. The output factor was measured with the silicon strip detector in two different layouts using two phantoms. In the first, the active area of the detector was placed perpendicular to the beam axis. In the second, the innovation consisted of a cylindrical phantom where the detector was placed in an axial plane with respect to the beam. The measured data were compared with data given by a commercial treatment planning system. Results were shown to be in a very good agreement between the compared set of data.

  5. Quantifying metal artefact reduction using virtual monochromatic dual-layer detector spectral CT imaging in unilateral and bilateral total hip prostheses

    Wellenberg, R.H.H., E-mail: r.h.wellenberg@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boomsma, M.F., E-mail: m.f.boomsma@isala.nl [Department of Radiology, Isala, Zwolle (Netherlands); Osch, J.A.C. van, E-mail: j.a.c.van.osch@isala.nl [Department of Radiology, Isala, Zwolle (Netherlands); Vlassenbroek, A., E-mail: alain.vlassenbroek@philips.com [Philips Medical Systems, Brussels (Belgium); Milles, J., E-mail: julien.milles@philips.com [Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Edens, M.A., E-mail: m.a.edens@isala.nl [Department of Innovation and Science, Isala, Zwolle (Netherlands); Streekstra, G.J., E-mail: g.j.streekstra@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slump, C.H., E-mail: c.h.slump@utwente.nl [MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maas, M., E-mail: m.maas@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Dual-layer detector CT reduces metal artefacts at high monochromatic energies (keV). • 130 keV images were optimal based on quantitative analysis on CNRs. • Optimal keVs varied from 74 to 150 keV for different hip prostheses configurations. • The Titanium alloy resulted in less severe artefacts compared to the Cobalt alloy. • Severe metal artefacts, caused by extensive photon-starvation, were not reduced. - Abstract: Purpose: To quantify the impact of prosthesis material and design on the reduction of metal artefacts in total hip arthroplasties using virtual monochromatic dual-layer detector Spectral CT imaging. Methods: The water-filled total hip arthroplasty phantom was scanned on a novel 128-slice Philips IQon dual-layer detector Spectral CT scanner at 120-kVp and 140-kVp at a standard computed tomography dose index of 20.0 mGy. Several unilateral and bilateral hip prostheses consisting of different metal alloys were inserted and combined which were surrounded by 18 hydroxyapatite calcium carbonate pellets representing bone. Images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction and analysed at monochromatic energies ranging from 40 to 200 keV. CT numbers in Hounsfield Units (HU), noise measured as the standard deviation in HU, signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were analysed within fixed regions-of-interests placed in and around the pellets. Results: In 70 and 74 keV virtual monochromatic images the CT numbers of the pellets were similar to 120-kVp and 140-kVp polychromatic results, therefore serving as reference. A separation into three categories of metal artefacts was made (no, mild/moderate and severe) where pellets were categorized based on HU deviations. At high keV values overall image contrast was reduced. For mild/moderate artefacts, the highest average CNRs were attained with virtual monochromatic 130 keV images, acquired at 140-kVp. Severe metal artefacts were not reduced. In 130 keV images

  6. Dosimetric measurements of an 192Ir HDR source with a diamond detector

    Rustgi, Surendra N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of using a diamond detector for the dosimetry of a high dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir source and to compare the measurement results with published data and calculations from a commercial treatment planning system. Materials and methods: The sensitive volume of the diamond detector consists of a disk of 0.26 mm thickness and 3 mm diameter. The detector was applied an external bias of +100 V and was preirradiated to a dose of 500 cGy to stabilize its response. The 192 Ir source from the Nucletron microSelectron unit has an active diameter of 0.6 mm and a length of 3.5 mm. Photon fluence anisotropy factors in air were measured at distances of 5 and 10 cm from two sources and compared with TLD measurements. Dose profiles and isodose distributions were measured at several distances from the source and compared with calculations from a Nucletron treatment planning system. These dose calculations in water use a point source approximation with the anisotropy factors independent of the radial distance from the source. Results: The photon fluence around the 192 Ir HDR source, measured with a diamond detector at distances of 5 and 10 cm from the source, is very anisotropic. Compared to the source transverse direction, the photon fluence intensity along the source axis reduces to approximately 60%. Measurements performed on two sources indicate that the photon anisotropy does not change with distance in air. Within experimental uncertainty, similar results were obtained with TLD rods and are in excellent agreement with published anisotropy factors 1 . Dose profiles, measured with the diamond detector in a water phantom, at distances of 1,2,3 and 5 cm from the source, are found to be in excellent agreement with the Nucletron planning system calculations. Similar excellent agreement is observed between the measured and calculated isodose curves in planes parallel to the source plane. Conclusion: The diamond detector has been demonstrated to be suitable

  7. Fully hadronic ttbar cross section measurement with ATLAS detector

    Bertella, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The top quark pair production cross section in the fully hadronic final state is characterized by a six jet topology, two of which could be identified as originating from a b-quark using ATLAS b-tagging algorithms. Compared to other decay channels, this final state presents an advantageous larger branching ratio; on the other hand it suffers from a very large QCD multi-jet background, generally difficult to estimate from Monte Carlo simulation and therefore evaluated using data-driven techniques. It is essential, to efficiently trigger on these fully hadronic ttbar events, to use dedicated triggers. An overview of the analysis for ttbar production cross section measurement in the fully hadronic final state and the state-of-the-art of the b-jet trigger performance estimation are presented in this contribution.

  8. Measurements probing small-x physics using the ATLAS detector.

    Myagkov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The high-energy pp collisions at the LHC provide unique opportunity to study particle flow and event shapes of the hadronic final state particles. Evolution of the event shape variables, such as the transverse thrust, thrust minor and transverse sphericity have been studied for minimum bias events. Particle distributions sensitive to the underlying event have been measured using calorimeter jet events. Separate inclusive jet and exclusive dijet event selections are included in this study for various observables. The production of jets in association with a vector boson is an important process to study the contribution of multi-particle interactions and for understanding the effect of QCD radiation on forward and central jet activity. ATLAS results on events with vector boson plus jets are compared with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Status and prospects of measurements of exclusive and diffractive processes with the ATLAS detector

    Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Fiducial and differential cross-sections are presented for the exclusive production of pairs of leptons and W bosons, measured across a range of centre-of-mass energies by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC. All measurements are compatible with Standard Model predictions. A measurement of the dijet production cross-section is presented differentially in variables which distinguish between diffractive and non-diffractive scattering. The first analysis utilising the new AFP detectors at ATLAS is detailed.

  10. Lung counting: Comparison of a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fiber end caps, and the effect on array performance characteristics

    Sabbir Ahmed, Asm; Kramer, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the performance of an array of HPGe detectors, made by ORTEC. In the existing system, a metal end cap was used in the detector construction. In general, the natural metal contains some radioactive materials, create high background noises and signals during in vivo counting. ORTEC proposed a novel carbon fiber to be used in end cap, without any radio active content. This paper described the methodology of developing a model of the given HPGe array-detectors, comparing the detection efficiency and cross talk among the detectors using two end cap materials: either metal or carbon fiber and to provide a recommendation about the end cap material. The detector's counting efficiency were studied using point and plane sources. The cross talk among the array detectors were studied using a homogeneous attenuating medium made of tissue equivalent material. The cross talk was significant when single or multiple point sources (simulated to heterogeneous hot spots) were embedded inside the attenuating medium. With carbon fiber, the cross talk increased about 100% for photon energy at about 100 keV. For a uniform distribution of radioactive material, the cross talk increased about 5-10% when the end cap was made of carbon instead of steel. Metal end cap was recommended for the array of HPGe detectors.

  11. Fully hadronic ttbar cross section measurement with ATLAS detector

    Bertella, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The top quark pair production cross section in the fully hadronic final state is characterized by a six jet topology, two of which could be identified as originating from a b-quark using ATLAS b-tagging algorithms. Compared to other decay channels, this final state presents an advantageous larger branching ratio; on the other hand it suffers from a very large QCD multi-jet background, generally difficult to estimate from Monte Carlo simulation and therefore evaluated using data-driven techniques. The analysis is performed using 36pb-1 of pp collisions produced at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The observed upper limit is set at 261 pb at 95% confidence level, where the expected Standard Model cross-section for the ttbar process is 165+11-16 pb. In the future, when the LHC luminosity increases, it is essential, to efficiently trigger on these fully hadronic ttbar events, to use dedicated triggers. An overview of the analysis for ttbar production cross section measurement in the fully hadronic f...

  12. Direct Photon and Neutral Mesons Measurements with the ALICE Detector

    Matyja, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC is dedicated to studies of the Quark– Gluon Plasma (QGP) state, which is going to be created in heavy-ion collisions. Both photons and neutral mesons are excellent probes for QGP formation. Photons are produced during the different stages of the expan- sion of the initial hot matter fireball. They do not interact strongly with the medium and passing through it, they carry information on their emis- sion point. The prompt photons which are formed at the early stage of the collision enable us to test perturbative QCD constraining parton distri- butions and fragmentation functions. Looking into the regime of thermal photons, one can extract the temperature of the medium. The medium- induced energy loss of particles can be investigated via the measurement of neutral meson spectra for different centrality classes as well as via neutral meson–hadron correlations. A decrease of the nuclear modification factor ( R AA ) with centrality of the collision is observed. The suppression of th...

  13. Instrument for measuring metal-thermoelectric semiconductor contact resistence

    Lanxner, M.; Nechmadi, M.; Meiri, B.; Schildkraut, I.

    1979-02-01

    An instrument for measuring electrical, metal-thermoelectric semiconductor contact resistance is described. The expected errors of measurement are indicated. The operation of the instrument which is based on potential traversing perpendicularly to the contact plane is illustrated for the case of contacts of palladium and bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric material

  14. Measurement of Standard Model VBS/VBF production with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Proceeding for the poster presentation at Blois2017, France on the topic of "Measurements of Standard Model VBS/VBF productions with ATLAS+CMS detectors" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2017-333 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2267458) Deadline: 15/10/2017

  15. A precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Beecher, Daniel Paul; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bizjak, Ilija; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Eusebi, Ricardo; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Nurse, Emily L; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Riddick, Thomas C; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shekhar, Ravi; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Sun, Siyuan; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-04-03

    We present a measurement of the $W$-boson mass, $M_W$, using data corresponding to 2.2/fb of integrated luminosity collected in ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The selected sample of 470126 $W\\to e\

  16. Top quark differential cross-section measurement with the ATLAS detector

    Scornajenghi, Matteo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The most recent results on top quark pairs and single top quark differential cross-sections measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at $\\sqrt{s}\\,=\\,$8 and 13~TeV are presented. The results are compared to the latest QCD theoretical calculations.

  17. Cryogenic germanium detectors for dark matter search: Surface events rejection by charge measurements

    Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Juillard, A.; Berge, L.

    2006-01-01

    Test experiments have been performed on a Ge detector of the Edelweiss collaboration, combining time-resolved acquisition of the ionization signals with heat measurements. Pulse-shape analysis of the charge signals demonstrates the capability to reject surface events of poor charge collection with energies larger than 50 keV in ionization

  18. Measurements and simulations of the responses of the cluster Ge detectors to gamma rays

    Hara, Kaoru Y.; Goko, Shinji; Harada, Hideo; Hirose, Kentaro; Kimura, Atsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Kitatani, Fumito; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Shoji; Toh, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    Responses of cluster Ge detectors have been measured with standard γ-ray sources and the 35 Cl(n,γ) 36 Cl reaction in ANNRI at J-PARC/MLF. Experimental results and simulations using the EGS5 code are compared. (author)

  19. Kodak cellulose nitrate plastic detector for isotope measurements on cosmic ray nuclei

    Beaujean, R.; Enge, W.; Sprenger, R.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of Kodak cellulose nitrate CA 80-15 which is especially produced as a visual track detector are studied. The material has a slightly different response on the two surfaces, it is very homogeneous and has a very low threshold. The standard deviation for multiple dE/dx-measurements is about 0.5 mass units for single cones. (orig.) [de

  20. A neutron detector for measurement of total neutron production cross sections

    Sekharan, K K; Laumer, H; Kern, B D; Gabbard, F [Kentucky Univ., Lexington (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1976-03-01

    A neutron detector has been constructed and calibrated for the accurate measurement of total neutron production cross sections. The detector consists of a polyethylene sphere of 60 cm diameter in which eight /sup 10/BF/sub 3/ counters have been installed radially. The relative efficiency of this detector has been determined for average neutron energies from 30 keV to 1.5 MeV by counting neutrons from /sup 7/Li(p, n)/sup 7/Be. By adjusting the radial positions of the BF/sub 3/ counters in the polyethylene sphere the efficiency for neutron detection was made nearly constant for this energy range. Measurement of absolute efficiency for the same neutron energy range has been done by counting the neutrons from /sup 51/V(p, n)/sup 51/Cr and /sup 57/Fe(p, n)/sup 57/Co reactions and determining the absolute number of residual nuclei produced during the measurement of neutron yield. Details of absolute efficiency measurements and the use of the detector for determination of neutron production cross sections are given.

  1. A neutron detector for measurement of total neutron production cross sections

    Sekharan, K.K.; Laumer, H.; Kern, B.D.; Gabbard, F.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron detector has been constructed and calibrated for the accurate measurement of total neutron production cross sections. The detector consists of a polyethylene sphere of 60 cm diameter in which eight 10 BF 3 counters have been installed radially. The relative efficiency of this detector has been determined for average neutron energies from 30 keV to 1.5 MeV by counting neutrons from 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be. By adjusting the radial positions of the BF 3 counters in the polyethylene sphere the efficiency for neutron detection was made nearly constant for this energy range. Measurement of absolute efficiency for the same neutron energy range has been done by counting the neutrons from 51 V(p, n) 51 Cr and 57 Fe(p, n) 57 Co reactions and determining the absolute number of residual nuclei produced during the measurement of neutron yield. Details of absolute efficiency measurements and the use of the detector for determination of neutron production cross sections are given. (Auth.)

  2. CALIBRATION OF MODIFIED LIULIN DETECTOR FOR COSMIC RADIATION MEASUREMENTS ON-BOARD AIRCRAFT

    Kyselová, Dagmar; Ambrožová, Iva; Krist, Pavel; Kubančák, Ján; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Ploc, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 489-492 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Liulin detector * on-board aircraft * cosmic radiation measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  3. Measurement of D{sup 0} and D{sup +} meson masses with the KEDR detector

    Anashin, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Aulchenko, V.M.; Baldin, E.M. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Barladyan, A.K.; Barnyakov, A.Yu.; Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Baru, S.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Bedny, I.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Beloborodova, O.L. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Blinov, A.E. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Blinov, V.E. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical Univ., 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Bobrov, A.V.; Bobrovnikov, V.S. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Bogomyagkov, A.V.; Bondar, A.E. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Univ., 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Bondarev, D.V.; Buzykaev, A.R. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, 11, Akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-22

    The masses of the neutral and charged D mesons have been measured with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider: M{sub D}{sup 0}=1865.30+-0.33+-0.23 MeV, M{sub D}{sup +}=1869.53+-0.49+-0.20 MeV.

  4. Measurements of the electron dose distribution near inhomogeneities using a plastic scintillation detector

    Wells, C.M.M.; Mackie, T.R.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Holmes, M.A.; Papanikolaou, N.; Reckwerdt, P.J.; Cygler, J.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Bielajew, A.F.; Schmidt, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity is difficult with traditional dosimeters which themselves perturb the electron field. The authors tested the performance of a new high resolution, water-equivalent plastic scintillation detector which has ideal properties for this application. A plastic scintillation detector with a 1 mm diameter, 3 mm long cylindrical sensitive volume was used to measure the dose distributions behind standard benchmark inhomogeneities in water phantoms. The plastic scintillator material is more water equivalent than polystyrene in terms of its mass collision stopping power and mass scattering power. Measurements were performed for beams of electrons having initial energies of 6 and 18 MeV at depths from 0.2-4.2 cm behind the inhomogeneities. The detector reveals hot and cold spots behind heterogeneities at resolutions equivalent to typical film digitizer spot sizes. Plots of the dose distributions behind air, aluminum, lead, and formulations for cortical and inner bone-equivalent materials are presented. The plastic scintillation detector is suited for measuring the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity. 14 refs., 9 figs

  5. Application of Faraday cup array detector in measurement of electron-beam distribution homogeneity

    Xu Zhiguo; Wang Jinchuan; Xiao Guoqing; Guo Zhongyan; Wu Lijie; Mao Ruishi; Zhang Li

    2005-01-01

    It is described that a kind of Faraday cup array detector, which consists of Faraday cup, suppressor electrode insulation PCB board, Base etc. The homogeneity of electron-beam distribution is measured and the absorbed dose for the irradiated sample is calculated. The results above provide the important parameters for the irradiation experiment and the improvement for the quality of electron beam. (authors)

  6. Precision half-life measurement of .sup.140 La with Ge-detector

    Adam, Jindřich; Belov, A. G.; Brandt, R.; Chaloun, P.; Honusek, Milan; Kalinnikov, V. G.; Krivopustov, M. I.; Kulakov, B. A.; Langrock, E. J.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Sosnin, A. N.; Stegailov, V. I.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Wan, J. S.; Westmeier, W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 187, - (2002), s. 419-426 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Keywords : radioastive nuclei * Ge-detectors * half-life measurements Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.158, year: 2002

  7. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy.

    Haughey, Aisling; Coalter, George; Mugabe, Koki

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy.

  8. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in DHR brachytherapy

    Haughey, A.; Coalter, G.; Mugabe, K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±1O%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ± 10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy. (author)

  9. Development of measuring system with self-powered neutron detectors for the LR-0 reactor

    Erben, O.; Horinek, K.; Szasz, Z.

    1989-01-01

    A measuring channel with self-powered detectors was developed for measuring neutron fluxs density in the reactor core. The measuring channel consists of a measuring probe with standard self-powered detectors of Soviet make, a signal pathway, a current/voltage converter and a measuring and recording unit. Neutron flux density in the LR-0 reactor core reaches a maximum of 10 13 m -2 s -1 . Experiments using the channel were carried out both in steady-state operation and after emergency shutdown of the reactor, this from power levels of 2,096 W and 1,830 W. The results of the experiments are tabulated and briefly analyzed. (Z.M.). 4 figs., 3 tabs., 5 refs

  10. A high performance Time-of-Flight detector applied to isochronous mass measurement at CSRe

    Mei Bo; Tu Xiaolin; Wang Meng; Xu Hushan; Mao Ruishi; Hu Zhengguo; Ma Xinwen; Yuan Youjin; Zhang Xueying; Geng Peng; Shuai Peng; Zang Yongdong; Tang Shuwen; Ma Peng; Lu Wan; Yan Xinshuai; Xia Jiawen; Xiao Guoqing; Guo Zhongyan; Zhang Hongbin

    2010-01-01

    A high performance Time-of-Flight detector has been designed and constructed for isochronous mass spectrometry at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe). The detector has been successfully used in an experiment to measure the masses of the N∼Z∼33 nuclides near the proton drip-line. Of particular interest is the mass of 65 As. A maximum detection efficiency of 70% and a time resolution of 118±8 ps (FWHM) have been achieved in the experiment. The dependence of detection efficiency and signal average pulse height (APH) on atomic number Z has been studied. The potential of APH for Z identification has been discussed.

  11. Measurement of 235U enrichment with a LaBr3 scintillation detector

    Mortreau, P.; Berndt, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a 1.5 in.x1.5 in. LaBr 3 gamma radiation detector for determining 235 U enrichment by non-destructive analysis. The spectrometric properties of the detector, brought to market under the trade name BrillanCe-380 , were first evaluated. Enrichment measurements were subsequently carried out in different experimental conditions on certified uranium samples with enrichment ranging from 0.31% to 60% and on UF 6 containers of the type 30B and 48Y.

  12. Measuring the attenuation length of water in the CHIPS-M water Cherenkov detector

    Amat, F.; Bizouard, P. [Aix Marseille University Saint-Jerome, 13013 Marseille (France); Bryant, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Carroll, T.J.; Rijck, S. De [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Germani, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Joyce, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kriesten, B. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Marshak, M.; Meier, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nelson, J.K. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Perch, A.J.; Pfützner, M.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Salazar, R. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Thomas, J., E-mail: jennifer.thomas@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Trokan-Tenorio, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Vahle, P. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Wade, R. [Avenir Consulting, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Wendt, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Whitehead, L.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-02-01

    The water at the proposed site of the CHIPS water Cherenkov detector has been studied to measure its attenuation length for Cherenkov light as a function of filtering time. A scaled model of the CHIPS detector filled with water from the Wentworth 2W pit, proposed site of the CHIPS deployment, in conjunction with a 3.2 m vertical column filled with this water, was used to study the transmission of 405 nm laser light. Results consistent with attenuation lengths of up to 100 m were observed for this wavelength with filtration and UV sterilization alone.

  13. Electron performance measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2010 LHC proton-proton collision data

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-03-09

    Detailed measurements of the electron performance of the ATLAS detector at the LHC are reported, using decays of the Z, W and J/psi particles. Data collected in 2010 at sqrt(s)=7 TeV are used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of almost 40 pb^-1. The inter-alignment of the inner detector and the electromagnetic calorimeter, the determination of the electron energy scale and resolution, and the performance in terms of response uniformity and linearity are discussed. The electron identification, reconstruction and trigger efficiencies, as well as the charge misidentification probability, are also presented.

  14. The Use of Low Temperature Detectors for Direct Measurements of the Mass of the Electron Neutrino

    A. Nucciotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed many exciting breakthroughs in neutrino physics. The detection of neutrino oscillations has proved that neutrinos are massive particles, but the assessment of their absolute mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in today particle physics and cosmology. Since low temperature detectors were first proposed for neutrino physics experiments in 1984, there has been tremendous technical progress: today this technique offers the high energy resolution and scalability required to perform competitive experiments challenging the lowest electron neutrino masses. This paper reviews the thirty-year effort aimed at realizing calorimetric measurements with sub-eV neutrino mass sensitivity using low temperature detectors.

  15. Measurement of fission track of uranium particle by solid state nuclear track detector

    Son, S. C.; Pyo, H. W.; Ji, K. Y.; Kim, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we discussed results of the measurement of fission tracks for the uranium containing particles by solid state nuclear track detector. Uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were prepared by uranium sorption onto silica powder in weak acidic medium and laser ablation on uranium pellet, respectively. Fission tracks for the uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were detected on Lexan plastic detector. It was found that the fission track size and shapes depend on the particle size uranium content in particles. Correlation of uranium particle diameter with fission track radius was also discussed

  16. Charge correlation measurements of double-sided direct-coupled silicon mirostrip detectors

    Wood, M.L.; Kuehler, J.F.; Kalbfleisch, G.R.; Kaplan, D.H.; Skubic, P.; Lucas, A.D.; Wilburn, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Charge correlation measurements of several Micron 38 mm by 58 mm by 300 micron thick double-sided DC-coupled microstripe detectors have been made. They have been bench tested with a Sr-90 source, with the detectors operated at -22C. The correlation of the charges collected from both the diode ('holes') and the ohmic ('electrons') stripes are equal within a signal to noise resolution of 20:1 (i.e., 1,200 electrons noise) using common-mode subtracted double-correlated sampling with the Berkeley SVXD readout chip

  17. Measurement of the spatial resolution of wide-pitch silicon strip detectors with large incident angle

    Kawasaki, T.; Hazumi, M.; Nagashima, Y.

    1996-01-01

    As a part of R ampersand D for the BELLE experiment at KEK-B, we measured the spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors for particles with incident angles ranging from 0 degrees to 75 degrees. These detectors have strips with pitches of 50, 125 and 250 μm on the ohmic side. We have obtained the incident angle dependence which agreed well with a Monte Carlo simulation. The resolution was found to be 11 μm for normal incidence with a pitch of 50 μm, and 29 μm for incident angle of 75 degrees with a pitch of 250μm

  18. Radon measurements by etched track detectors applications in radiation protection, earth sciences and the environment

    Durrani, Saeed A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas, which is present in the environment naturally, constitutes over half the radiation dose received by the general public annually. At present, the most widely used method of measuring radon concentration levels throughout the world, both in dwellings and in the field, is by etched track detectors - also known as Solid State Nuclear Detectors (SSNTDs). Although this is not only the most widely used method but is also the simplest and the cheapest, yet there is at present no book available on the market globally, devoted exclusively or largely to the methodology of, and deal

  19. Measurement and analysis of field-induced crystallographic texture using curved position-sensitive diffraction detectors

    Simons, Hugh; Daniels, John E.; Studer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines measurement and analysis methodologies created for determining the structural responses of electroceramics to an electric field. A sample stage is developed to apply electric fields to ceramic materials at elevated temperatures during neutron diffraction experiments. The tested...... employing a curved positive sensitive detector. Methodologies are proposed to account for the geometrical effects when vector fields are applied to textured materials with angularly dispersive detector geometries. Representative results are presented for the ferroelectric (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-6%BaTiO3 (BNT-6BT...

  20. In-beam measurement of the position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector

    Descovich, M.; Lee, I.Y.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Radford, D.C.; Vetter, K.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Stephens, F.S.; Ward, D.

    2005-01-01

    The position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector was determined by analyzing the 2055keV γ-ray transition of Zr90 excited in a fusion-evaporation reaction. The high velocity of the Zr90 nuclei imparted large Doppler shifts. Digital analysis of the detector signals recovered the energy and position of individual γ-ray interactions. The location of the first interaction in the crystal was used to correct the Doppler energy shift. Comparison of the measured energy resolution with simulations implied a position resolution (root mean square) of 2mm in three-dimensions

  1. Measuring Pu in a glove box using portable NaI and germanium detectors

    Hankins, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    A NaI crystal or germanium detector inside a portable lead shield can determine the amount of plutonium in a glove box. The number of counts required are defined and the locations outside the box where the detector needs to be positioned are given. The calculated accuracy for measuring the Pu when these locations are used is within +/-30% for most glove boxes. Other factors that may affect this accuracy, such as γ-ray absorption by glove-box materials, self-absorption by Pu, absorption by equipment in the glove box, and the limits of the counting equipment are also discussed

  2. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  3. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  4. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  5. Needle Type Solid State Detectors for In-Vivo Measurement of Tracer Activity

    Lauber, A [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Wolgast, W [Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden). Inst. of Physiology and Medical Biophysics

    1970-07-15

    A set of miniature detector probes for in-vivo-measurement of beta and gamma tracer activity is described. The probes use a lithium-compensated p-i-n silicon detector as sensing element. The standard 'needle probe' contains a cylindrical detector 0.9 mm in diameter and 3 mm long, enclosed in a stainless steel tube 1.1 mm in outer diameter and with walls 0. 05 mm thick. For particular applications several modified types have been developed: probes with larger sensing elements, probes with extra thin walls for low-energy beta detection, probes with two or three sensing elements in the same needle and probes containing a movable sensing element. This report describes the construction and the properties of the different needle probes.

  6. Needle Type Solid State Detectors for In-Vivo Measurement of Tracer Activity

    Lauber, A.; Wolgast, W.

    1970-07-01

    A set of miniature detector probes for in-vivo-measurement of beta and gamma tracer activity is described. The probes use a lithium-compensated p-i-n silicon detector as sensing element. The standard 'needle probe' contains a cylindrical detector 0.9 mm in diameter and 3 mm long, enclosed in a stainless steel tube 1.1 mm in outer diameter and with walls 0. 05 mm thick. For particular applications several modified types have been developed: probes with larger sensing elements, probes with extra thin walls for low-energy beta detection, probes with two or three sensing elements in the same needle and probes containing a movable sensing element. This report describes the construction and the properties of the different needle probes

  7. ENC Measurement for ASIC Preamp Board as a Detector Module for PET System

    N. Nagara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We developed a gamma ray detector with an LuAG:Pr scintillator and an avalanche photodiode as a detector for a positron emission tomography (PET system. Studies have been performed on the influences of gamma irradiation on application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC preamp boards used as a detector module. As a device used in nuclear environments for substantial durations, the ASIC has to have a lifetime long enough to ensure that there will be a negligible failure rate during this period. These front-end systems must meet the requirements for standard positron emission tomography (PET systems. Therefore, an equivalent noise charge (ENC experiment is needed to measure the front-end system's characteristics. This study showed that minimum ENC conditions can be achieved if a shorter shaping time could be applied.

  8. Neutron peak velocity measurements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using novel quartz detectors

    Grim, Gary; Eckart, Mark; Hartouni, Edward; Hatarik, Robert; Moore, Alastair; Root, Jaben; Sayre, Daniel; Schlossberg, David; Waltz, Cory

    2017-10-01

    In mid-2017 the NIF implemented quartz based neutron time-of-flight (nToF) detectors which have a faster and narrower impulse response function (IRF) relative to traditional scintillator detectors. In this presentation we report on comparisons between fusion neutron first moments as measured by quartz and scintillator based detectors using DT layered implosions at the NIF. We report on the change in precision presaged by the quartz converter and quantify the change in both in shot, line-of-site velocity variability. as well as, shot-to-shot variation. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734511-DRAFT.

  9. A homodyne detector integrated onto a photonic chip for measuring quantum states and generating random numbers

    Raffaelli, Francesco; Ferranti, Giacomo; Mahler, Dylan H.; Sibson, Philip; Kennard, Jake E.; Santamato, Alberto; Sinclair, Gary; Bonneau, Damien; Thompson, Mark G.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2018-04-01

    Optical homodyne detection has found use as a characterisation tool in a range of quantum technologies. So far implementations have been limited to bulk optics. Here we present the optical integration of a homodyne detector onto a silicon photonics chip. The resulting device operates at high speed, up 150 MHz, it is compact and it operates with low noise, quantified with 11 dB clearance between shot noise and electronic noise. We perform on-chip quantum tomography of coherent states with the detector and show that it meets the requirements for characterising more general quantum states of light. We also show that the detector is able to produce quantum random numbers at a rate of 1.2 Gbps, by measuring the vacuum state of the electromagnetic field and applying off-line post processing. The produced random numbers pass all the statistical tests provided by the NIST test suite.

  10. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil); Almazan, H.; Buck, C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Appel, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Baussan, E.; Brugière, T. [IPHC, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Bekman, I. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Bezerra, T.J.C. [SUBATECH, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 44307 Nantes (France); Bezrukov, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Blucher, E. [The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Busenitz, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Cabrera, A. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Camilleri, L.; Carr, R. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cerrada, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, CIEMAT, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Chauveau, E. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Chimenti, P., E-mail: hgomez@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP, 09210-580 (Brazil); and others

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −4} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10{sup −5} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α {sub T} = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  11. Time-resolved triton burnup measurement using the scintillating fiber detector in the Large Helical Device

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Nishitani, T.; Murakami, S.; Seki, R.; Nakata, M.; Takada, E.; Kawase, H.; Pu, N.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved measurement of triton burnup is performed with a scintillating fiber detector system in the deuterium operation of the large helical device. The scintillating fiber detector system is composed of the detector head consisting of 109 scintillating fibers having a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 100 mm embedded in the aluminum substrate, the magnetic registrant photomultiplier tube, and the data acquisition system equipped with 1 GHz sampling rate analogies to digital converter and the field programmable gate array. The discrimination level of 150 mV was set to extract the pulse signal induced by 14 MeV neutrons according to the pulse height spectra obtained in the experiment. The decay time of 14 MeV neutron emission rate after neutral beam is turned off measured by the scintillating fiber detector. The decay time is consistent with the decay time of total neutron emission rate corresponding to the 14 MeV neutrons measured by the neutron flux monitor as expected. Evaluation of the diffusion coefficient is conducted using a simple classical slowing-down model FBURN code. It is found that the diffusion coefficient of triton is evaluated to be less than 0.2 m2 s-1.

  12. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  13. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    Schell, W.R.; Tobin, M.J.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S.R.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min. This paper presents the design features, operational methods, calibration, and detector applications. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    Schell, W. R.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S. R.; Tobin, M. J.

    1999-02-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min [1, 2]. This paper presents the design features, operational methods, calibration, and detector applications.

  15. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    Schell, W.R.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S.R; Tobin, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min . This paper presents the design features, operational methods, calibration, and detector applications

  16. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 99 acad. Krasin str., Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-03-11

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  17. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2012-01-01

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  18. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Abrahão, T.; Almazan, H.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Brugière, T.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.; Corpace, O.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Dawson, J. V.; Dhooghe, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Franco, D.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Givaudan, A.; Gögger-Neff, M.; Gómez, H.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M.; Hara, T.; Haser, J.; Hellwig, D.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Kale, K.; Kampmann, P.; Kaneda, M.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C.; Laserre, T.; Lastoria, C.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H.; Lindner, M.; López-Castaño, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Maeda, J.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Minotti, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Navas-Nicolás, D.; Novella, P.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Onillon, A.; Oralbaev, A.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I.; Pronost, G.; Reinhold, B.; Rybolt, B.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Sharankova, R.; Sibille, V.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, P.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Veyssiere, C.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wurm, M.; Yang, G.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2017-02-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ~120 and ~300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10-4 cm-2s-1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10-5 cm-2s-1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of αT = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  19. Cosmic-muon characterization and annual modulation measurement with Double Chooz detectors

    Abrahão, T.; Anjos, J.C. dos; Almazan, H.; Buck, C.; Appel, S.; Baussan, E.; Brugière, T.; Bekman, I.; Bezerra, T.J.C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.

    2017-01-01

    A study on cosmic muons has been performed for the two identical near and far neutrino detectors of the Double Chooz experiment, placed at ∼120 and ∼300 m.w.e. underground respectively, including the corresponding simulations using the MUSIC simulation package. This characterization has allowed us to measure the muon flux reaching both detectors to be (3.64 ± 0.04) × 10 −4 cm −2 s −1 for the near detector and (7.00 ± 0.05) × 10 −5 cm −2 s −1 for the far one. The seasonal modulation of the signal has also been studied observing a positive correlation with the atmospheric temperature, leading to an effective temperature coefficient of α T = 0.212 ± 0.024 and 0.355 ± 0.019 for the near and far detectors respectively. These measurements, in good agreement with expectations based on theoretical models, represent one of the first measurements of this coefficient in shallow depth installations.

  20. Development of SiC Neutron Detector Assembly to Measure the Neutron Flux of the Reactor Core

    Park, Se Hwan; Park, June Sic; Shin, Hee Sung; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    At present, the conventional detector to measure the neutron at harsh environment is a Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND). Rhodium(Rh)-103 is in the SPND. When neutron is incident on the Rhodium, the neutron capture reaction occurs, and the Rh-103 is converted to Rh-104. The Rh-104 is decayed to Pd-104 by {beta}-decay, and electrons are generated as the decay products. Because of the half life of Rh-104, approximately 5 minutes are required for the SPND output to reach the equilibrium condition. Therefore the on-line monitoring of the nuclear reactor state is limited if the neutron flux in the reactor core is monitored with the SPND. Silicon carbide (SiC) has the possibility to be developed as neutron detector at harsh environment, because the SiC can be operative at high temperature and high neutron flux conditions. Previously, the basic operation properties of the SiC detector were studied. Also, the radiation response of the SiC detector was studied at high neutron and gamma dose rate. The measurement results for an ex-core neutron flux monitor or a neutron flux monitor of the spent fuel were published. The SiC detector was also developed as neutron detector to measure the fissile material with active interrogation method. However, the studies about the development of SiC detector are still limited. In the present work, the radiation damage effect of the SiC detector was studied. The detector structure was determined based on the study, and a neutron detector assembly was made with the SiC detectors. The neutron and gamma-ray response of the detector assembly is presented in this paper. The detector assembly was positioned in the HANARO research reactor core, the performance test was done. The preliminary results are also included in this paper

  1. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws.

    Filli, Lukas; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio; Finkenstädt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was "almost perfect" (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is a helpful imaging tool for scaphoid fixation. The correction algorithm significantly reduces artefacts in FDCT induced by scaphoid fixation screws. This may facilitate intra

  2. Calculation of induced current densities and specific absorption rates (SAR) for pregnant women exposed to hand-held metal detectors

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Chan, Dulciana D; Casamento, Jon P; Bassen, Howard I

    2003-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method in combination with a well established frequency scaling method was used to calculate the internal fields and current densities induced in a simple model of a pregnant woman and her foetus, when exposed to hand-held metal detectors. The pregnant woman and foetus were modelled using a simple semi-heterogeneous model in 10 mm resolution, consisting of three different types of tissue. The model is based on the scanned shape of a pregnant woman in the 34th gestational week. Nine different representative models of hand-held metal detectors operating in the frequency range from 8 kHz to 2 MHz were evaluated. The metal detectors were placed directly on the abdomen of the computational model with a spacing of 1 cm. Both the induced current density and the specific absorption rate (SAR) are well below the recommended limits for exposure of the general public published in the ICNIRP Guidelines and the IEEE C95.1 Standard. The highest current density is 8.3 mA m -2 and the highest SAR is 26.5 μW kg -1 . Compared to the limits for the induced current density recommended in the ICNIRP Guidelines, a minimum safety factor of 3 exists. Compared to the IEEE C95.1 Standard, a safety factor of 60,000 for the specific absorption rate was found. Based on the very low specific absorption rate and an induced current density below the recommended exposure limits, significant temperature rise or nerve stimulation in the pregnant woman or in the foetus can be excluded

  3. Measurement of spatial dose-rate distribution using a position sensitive detector

    Emoto, T.; Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the radiation detectors using plastic scintillation fibers (PSF) have been developed to measure the positions exposed to radiation such as neutrons and high energy charged particles. In particular, the time of flight (TOF) method for measuring the difference of time that two directional signals of scintillation light reach both ends of a PSF is a rather simple method for the measurement of the spatial distribution of fast neutron fluence rate. It is possible to use the PSF in nuclear facility working areas because of its flexibility, small diameter and long length. In order to apply TOF method to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution, the characteristic tests of a detector using PSFs were carried out. First, the resolution of irradiated positions and the counting efficiency were measured with collimated gamma ray. The sensitivity to unit dose rate was also obtained. The measurement of spatial dose rate distribution was also carried out. The sensor is made of ten bundled PSFs, and the experimental setup is described. The experiment and the results are reported. It was found that the PSF detector has the good performance to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution. (K.I.)

  4. DINS measurements on VESUVIO in the Resonance Detector configuration: proton mean kinetic energy in water

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Andreani, Carla; Filabozzi, Alessandra; Senesi, Roberto; Gorini, Giuseppe; Perelli-Cippo, Enrico; Tardocchi, Marco; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.

    2006-04-01

    Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements have been performed on a liquid water sample at two different temperatures and pressures. The experiments were carried out using the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. This experiment represents the first DINS measurement from water using the Resonance Detector configuration, employing yttrium-aluminum-perovskite scintillator and a 238U analyzer foil. The maximum energy of the scattered neutrons was about 70 eV, allowing to access an extended kinematic space with energy and wave vector transfers at the proton recoil peak in the range 1 eV <= hbarω <= 20 eV and 25 Å-1 <= q <= 90 Å-1, respectively. Comparison with DINS measurements on water performed in the standard Resonance Filter configuration indicates the potential advantages offered by the use of Resonance Detector approach for DINS measurements at forward scattering angles.

  5. Testing digital recursive filtering method for radiation measurement channel using pin diode detector

    Talpalariu, C. M.; Talpalariu, J.; Popescu, O.; Mocanasu, M.; Lita, I.; Visan, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have studied a software filtering method implemented in a pulse counting computerized measuring channel using PIN diode radiation detector. In case our interest was focalized for low rate decay radiation measurement accuracies improvement and response time optimization. During works for digital mathematical algorithm development, we used a hardware radiation measurement channel configuration based on PIN diode BPW34 detector, preamplifier, filter and programmable counter, computer connected. We report measurement results using two digital recursive methods in statically and dynamically field evolution. Software for graphical input/output real time diagram representation was designed and implemented, facilitating performances evaluation between the response of fixed configuration software recursive filter and dynamically adaptive configuration recursive filter. (authors)

  6. International comparison of radon measurement using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Hu Dan; Yang Weigen; Song Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    It introduces the radon measurements international comparison using solid state track detectors among Zhejiang Environmental Radiation Monitoring Center (RMTC), Japan Chemical Analysis Center (JCAC) and National Institute for Radiological Protection of China CDC (NIRP). The results of the international comparison show that: Compared to the reference values, the measurements' relative deviations of detectors from 3 labs were 2%∼22%, which were exposed in radon chambers with different radon concentration, while the measurements' relative deviations were 0.5%∼13% when exposed in the environment. The measurement's relative deviations of RMTC were 5%∼3% in radon chambers and 0.5%∼9% in the environment, the results met requirements of the relative standards both at home and abroad. (authors)

  7. Experience of using MOSFET detectors for dose verification measurements in an end-to-end 192Ir brachytherapy quality assurance system.

    Persson, Maria; Nilsson, Josef; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa

    Establishment of an end-to-end system for the brachytherapy (BT) dosimetric chain could be valuable in clinical quality assurance. Here, the development of such a system using MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) detectors and experience gained during 2 years of use are reported with focus on the performance of the MOSFET detectors. A bolus phantom was constructed with two implants, mimicking prostate and head & neck treatments, using steel needles and plastic catheters to guide the 192 Ir source and house the MOSFET detectors. The phantom was taken through the BT treatment chain from image acquisition to dose evaluation. During the 2-year evaluation-period, delivered doses were verified a total of 56 times using MOSFET detectors which had been calibrated in an external 60 Co beam. An initial experimental investigation on beam quality differences between 192 Ir and 60 Co is reported. The standard deviation in repeated MOSFET measurements was below 3% in the six measurement points with dose levels above 2 Gy. MOSFET measurements overestimated treatment planning system doses by 2-7%. Distance-dependent experimental beam quality correction factors derived in a phantom of similar size as that used for end-to-end tests applied on a time-resolved measurement improved the agreement. MOSFET detectors provide values stable over time and function well for use as detectors for end-to-end quality assurance purposes in 192 Ir BT. Beam quality correction factors should address not only distance from source but also phantom dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a novel scintillation-trigger detector for the MTV experiment using aluminum-metallized film tapes

    Tanaka, S.; Ozaki, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Tanuma, R.; Yoshida, T.; Murata, J.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of a trigger-scintillation counter array designed for the MTV experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC has been developed, which uses aluminum-metallized film tape for wrapping to achieve the required assembling precision of ±0.5 mm. The MTV experiment uses a cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) as the main electron-tracking detector. The barrel-type trigger counter is placed inside the CDC to generate a trigger signal using 1 mm thick, 300 mm long thin plastic scintillation counters. Detection efficiency and light attenuation compared with conventional wrapping materials are studied.

  9. Development of a novel scintillation-trigger detector for the MTV experiment using aluminum-metallized film tapes

    Tanaka, S.; Ozaki, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Tanuma, R.; Yoshida, T.; Murata, J.

    2014-01-01

    A new type of a trigger-scintillation counter array designed for the MTV experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC has been developed, which uses aluminum-metallized film tape for wrapping to achieve the required assembling precision of ±0.5 mm. The MTV experiment uses a cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) as the main electron-tracking detector. The barrel-type trigger counter is placed inside the CDC to generate a trigger signal using 1 mm thick, 300 mm long thin plastic scintillation counters. Detection efficiency and light attenuation compared with conventional wrapping materials are studied

  10. Timing performance measurements of Si-PM-based LGSO phoswich detectors

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Okumura, Satoshi; Yeom, Jung Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Since the timing resolution was significantly improved using silicon photomultipliers (Si-PMs) combined with fast scintillators, we expect that phoswich detectors will be used in future TOF-PET systems. However, no practical phoswich detector has been proposed for TOF-PET detectors. We conducted timing performance measurements of phoswich detectors comprised of two types of Ce-doped LGSO scintillators with different decay times coupled to Si-PMs and digitized the output signals using a high bandwidth digital oscilloscope. We prepared three types of LGSOs (LGSO-fast, LGSO-standard, and LGSO-slow) with different Ce concentrations. After measuring the decay time, the energy performance, and the timing performance of each LGSO, we conducted pulse shape analysis and timing resolution measurements for two versions of phoswich LGSOs: LGSO-standard/LGSO-fast and LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combinations. The pulse shape spectra for a 10-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination showed good separation of the front and back crystals with a peak-to-valley ratio of 2.0. The timing resolutions for the 20-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination were ~300 ps FWHM. The timing resolutions for the phoswich LGSOs were slightly inferior than that measured with the individual LGSO fast, but the acquired timing resolution for the phoswich configuration, ~300 ps with a LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination, is adequate for TOF-PET systems. We conclude that LGSO phoswich detectors are promising for TOF-DOI-PET systems.

  11. Systematic measurements of the gain and the energy resolution of single and double mask GEM detectors

    Biswas, S.; Schmidt, D.J.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Garabatos, C.; Hehner, J.; Kleipa, V.; Morhardt, T.; Schmidt, C.J.; Schmidt, H.R.; Wiechula, J.

    2016-01-01

    Systematic studies on the gain and the energy resolution have been carried out by varying the voltage across the GEM foils for both single mask and double mask triple GEM detector prototypes. Variation of the gain and the energy resolution has also been measured by varying either the drift voltage, transfer voltage and induction voltage keeping other voltages constant. The results of the systematic measurements have been presented.

  12. Charge collection measurements with p-type Magnetic Czochralski silicon single pad detectors

    Tosi, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Scaringella, M.; Petterson, M.K.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Betancourt, C.; Manna, N.; Creanza, D.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Borrello, L.; Messineo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The charge collected from beta source particles in single pad detectors produced on p-type Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon wafers has been measured before and after irradiation with 26 MeV protons. After a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 1x10 15 cm -2 the collected charge is reduced to 77% at bias voltages below 900 V. This result is compared with previous results from charge collection measurements

  13. Measurement of the $W$ boson mass with the D0 detector

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2014-01-30

    We give a detailed description of the measurement of the $W$ boson mass, $M_W$, performed on an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb$^{-1}$, which is based on similar techniques as used for our previous measurement done on an independent data set of 1 fb$^{-1}$ of data. The data were collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This data set yields $1.68\\times 10^6$ $W\\rightarrow e\

  14. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  15. Space imaging measurement system based on fixed lens and moving detector

    Akiyama, Akira; Doshida, Minoru; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2006-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Measurement System based on the fixed lens and fast moving detector to the control of the autonomous ground vehicle. The space measurement is the most important task in the development of the autonomous ground vehicle. In this study we move the detector back and forth along the optical axis at the fast rate to measure the three-dimensional image data. This system is just appropriate to the autonomous ground vehicle because this system does not send out any optical energy to measure the distance and keep the safety. And we use the digital camera of the visible ray range. Therefore it gives us the cost reduction of the three-dimensional image data acquisition with respect to the imaging laser system. We can combine many pieces of the narrow space imaging measurement data to construct the wide range three-dimensional data. This gives us the improvement of the image recognition with respect to the object space. To develop the fast movement of the detector, we build the counter mass balance in the mechanical crank system of the Space Imaging Measurement System. And then we set up the duct to prevent the optical noise due to the ray not coming through lens. The object distance is derived from the focus distance which related to the best focused image data. The best focused image data is selected from the image of the maximum standard deviation in the standard deviations of series images.

  16. Calibration of track detectors and measurement of radon exhalation rate from solid samples

    Singh, Ajay Kumar; Jojo, P.J.; Prasad, Rajendra; Khan, A.J.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    CR-39 and LR-115 type II track detectors to be used for radon exhalation measurements have been calibrated. The configurations fitted with detectors in Can technique in the open cup mode are cylindrical plastic cup (PC) and conical plastic cup (CPC). The experiment was performed in radon exposure chamber having monodisperse aerosols of 0.2 μm size, to find the relationship between track density and the radon concentration. The calibration factors for PC and CPC type dosimeters with LR-115 type II detector were found to be 0.056 and 0.083 tracks cm -2 d -1 (Bqm -3 ) -1 respectively, while with CR-39 detector the values were 0.149 and 0.150 tracks cm -2 d -1 (Bq m -3 ) -1 . Employing the Can technique, measurements of exhalation rates from solid samples used as construction materials, are undertaken. Radon exhalation rate is found to be minimum in cement samples while in fly ash it is not enhanced as compared to coal samples. (author)

  17. Correlation between the physical performances measured from detectors and the diagnostic image quality in digital mammography

    Perez-Ponce, H.

    2009-05-01

    In digital mammography two approaches exist to estimate image quality. In the first approach, human observer assesses the lesion detection in mammograms. Unfortunately, such quality assessment is subject to interobserver variability, and requires a large amount of time and human resources. In the second approach, objective and human-independent parameters relating to image spatial resolution and noise (MTF and NPS) are used to evaluate digital detector performance; even if these parameters are objective, they are not directly related to lesion detection. A method leading to image quality assessment which is both human independent, and directly related to lesion detection is very important for the optimal use of mammographic units. This Ph.D thesis presents the steps towards such a method: the computation of realistic virtual images using an 'X ray source/digital detector' model taking into account the physical parameters of the detector (spatial resolution and noise measurements) measured under clinical conditions. From results obtained in this work, we have contributed to establish the link between the physical characteristics of detectors and the clinical quality of the image for usual exposition conditions. Furthermore, we suggest the use of our model for the creation of virtual images, in order to rapidly determine the optimal conditions in mammography, which usually is a long and tedious experimental process. This is an essential aspect to be taken into account for radioprotection of patients, especially in the context of organized mass screening of breast cancer. (author)

  18. Fission distribution measurements of Atucha's fuel pellets with solid state track detectors

    Ricabarra, M.D. Bovisio de; Waisman, Dina.

    1979-08-01

    Distribution of fissions in a UO 2 rod has been measured by means of solid state detectors. Mica muscovite and Makrofol-N detectors were used in the experiment. The merits of mica muscovite relative to the Makrofol-N for the detection of fission fragments have been verified. However both fission track detectors closely agree (0,5%) in the final fission distribution of the UO 2 rod. Sensitivity of the detectors shows to be linear in the range between 50.000and 360.000 fission tracks per square centimeter. Due to the high spatial resolution this method is better than any other technique. Determination were made in UO 2 pellets similar to the fuel element of the Atucha reactor. The average fission rate in the rod has been measured within 0,8% error, and provides an accurate determination for the distribution of fissions in the rod wich is needed for the determination of energy liberated per fission in the natural uranium rod.(author) [es

  19. A readout system for position sensitive measurements of X-ray using silicon strip detectors

    Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Idzik, M; Kudlaty, J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a readout system for X-ray measurements using silicon strip detectors. The limitation concerning the inherent spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors has been evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation and the results are discussed. The developed readout system is based on the binary readout architecture and consists of two ASICs: RX32 front-end chip comprising 32 channels of preamplifiers, shapers and discriminators, and COUNT32 counter chip comprising 32 20-bit asynchronous counters and the readout logic. This work focuses on the design and performance of the front-end chip. The RX32 chip has been optimised for a low detector capacitance, in the range of 1-3 pF, and high counting rate applications. It can be used with DC coupled detectors allowing the leakage current up to a few nA per strip. For the prototype chip manufactured in a CMOS process all basic parameters have been evaluated by electronic measurements. The noise below 140 el rms has been achieved for a ...

  20. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using LaBr3 Detectors With Stable and Radioactive Beams

    Regan P.H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been carried out using arrays which include a number of Cerium-doped Lanthanum-Tribromide (LrBr3(Ce scintillation detectors used in conjunction with high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors. Examples of the spectral and temporal responses of such set-ups, using both standard point radioactive sources 152Eu and 56Co, and in-beam fusionevaporation reaction experiments for precision measurements of nuclear excited states in 34P and 138Ce are presented. The current and future use of such arrays at existing (EURICA at RIKEN and future (NUSTAR at FAIR secondary radioactive beam facilities for precision measurements of excited nuclear state lifetimes in the 10 ps to 10 ns regime are also discussed.