WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal continuous emission

  1. 1997 Performance Testing of Multi-Metal Continuous Emissions Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sky +, Inc.

    1998-09-01

    Five prototype and two commercially available multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in September 1997 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The seven CEMs were tested side by side in a long section of duct following the secondary combustion chamber of the RKIS. Two different concentrations of six toxic metals were introduced into the incinerator-approximately 15 and 75 µg/dscm of arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury (We also tested for antimony but we are not reporting on it here because EPA recently dropped antimony from the list of metals addressed by the draft MACT rule). These concentrations were chosen to be close to emission standards in the draft MACT rule and the estimated Method Detection Limit (MDL) required of a CEM for regulatory compliance purposes. Results from this test show that no CEMs currently meet the performance specifications in the EPA draft MACT rule for hazardous waste incinerators. Only one of the CEMs tested was able to measure all six metals at the concentrations tested. Even so, the relative accuracy of this CEM varied between 35% and 100%, not 20% or less as required in the EPA performance specification. As a result, we conclude that no CEM is ready for long-term performance validation for compliance monitoring applications. Because sampling and measuring Hg is a recurring problem for multi-metal CEMs as well as Hg CEMs, we recommended that developers participate in a 1998 DOE-sponsored workshop to solve these and other common CEM measurement issues.

  2. Performance testing of a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) based continuous metal emissions monitor at a pyrolytic waste treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, D.W.; Hencken, K.R.; Johnsen, H.A.

    1997-07-01

    A program was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories to develop and demonstrate an advanced continuous emissions monitor that will provide realtime measurement of metal emissions in the wastestreams of thermal treatment facilities. This effort led to the development of a prototype metals monitor based on an optical technique referred to as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurements are performed in situ, and are both noninvasive and real-time. The automated software incorporates a new conditional analysis algorithm that utilizes single particle detection. The metal emissions monitor was tested during March 1997 at a pilot scale pyrolytic waste processing facility in Santa Fe Springs, California. This report describes the field test, including the monitor installation, test cycle, and overall instrument performance. The Clean Air Act metals chromium and manganese were recorded at concentrations from approximately 2 to 5 parts per billion. Iron was recorded at concentrations from 40 to 140 parts per billion. The overall accuracy was in very good agreement with contracted EPA Reference Method 29 results. Overall, the LIBS-based metals monitor performed exceptionally well on a waste treatment facility with very low metal emissions levels. 19 refs., 12 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Metals analysis for emission spectroscopic in the incandescent discharge operated with continuous flow of He to atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzate Londono, Hugo

    1990-01-01

    By means of a small power source a glow discharge in generated with he flowing at atmospheric pressure. Into a device situated to some distance from the discharge an aqueous sample of a metallic ion is injected. The device is then gradually moved to the discharge for producing solvent vaporization, charring, atomization, excitation and finally atomic emission of the sample. By emission spectrophotometer the following elements were analyzed: Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, K, Na, Pb and Zn. For every one the useful range and the detection limit were established after founding the best operation conditions for the discharge

  4. Continuous acoustic emission from aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenici, P.; Kiesewetter, N.; Schiller, P.

    1976-01-01

    Continuous acoustic emission of aluminum single crystals and polycrystals during tensile tests at constant cross-head speed and at room temperature is measured with a Root Mean Square Level recorder. By means of the Kaiser effect it is shown that the continuous emission is related to the plastic deformation. The plot of continuous emission against strain takes different shapes for pure single crystals, pure polycrystals and impure polycrystals. The measured voltages have about the same value for pure single and polycrystals and are considerably greater than that for impure polycrystals. A method is developed to distinguish between continuous emission and burst

  5. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The K-corona, a significant portion of the solar atmosphere, displays a continuous spectrum which closely parallels photospheric emission, though without the presence of overlying Fraunhofer lines. The E-corona exists in the same region and is characterized by weak emission lines from highly ionized atoms. For instance, the famous green emission line from coronium (FeXIV is part of the E-corona. The F-corona exists beyond the K/E-corona and, like the photospheric spectrum, is characterized by Fraunhofer lines. The F-corona represents photospheric light scattered by dust particles in the interplanetary medium. Within the gaseous models of the Sun, the K-corona is viewed as photospheric radiation which has been scattered by relativistic electrons. This scattering is thought to broaden the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum such that they can no longer be detected in the K-corona. Thus, the gaseous models of the Sun account for the appearance of the K-corona by distorting photospheric light, since they are unable to have recourse to condensed matter to directly produce such radiation. Conversely, it is now advanced that the continuous emission of the K-corona and associated emission lines from the E-corona must be interpreted as manifestations of the same phenomenon: condensed matter exists in the corona. It is well-known that the Sun expels large amounts of material from its surface in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. Given a liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, it is logical to assume that such matter, which exists in the condensed state on the solar surface, continues to manifest its nature once expelled into the corona. Therefore, the continuous spectrum of the K-corona provides the twenty-seventh line of evidence that the Sun is composed of condensed matter.

  6. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1...

  7. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 6 Table 6 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in the...

  8. Aerosol Beam Focused-Laser Induced Plasma Spectrometer (ABF-LIPS) Continuous Emissions Multi-Metals Analyzer. Cost and Performance Report: WP-0213

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Depot ( TEAD ), UT. The NADEP test produced useable data for only one emissions source, but these data did not correlate with spiking levels of the...three test metals (Cd, Cr, Ni). The ABF-LIPS was modified prior to TEAD field tests. These data correlated well with spiking levels, but agreement with...8 2.2.2 Test Facility Selection – TEAD (Tooele Army Depot

  9. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere I. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous spectrum of the solar photosphere stands as the paramount observation with regard to the condensed nature of the solar body. Studies relative to Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission (e.g. Robitaille P.-M. Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission: 150 years. Progr. Phys., 2009, v. 4, 3–13. and a detailed analysis of the stellar opacity problem (Robitaille P.M. Stellar opacity: The Achilles’ heel of the gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys., 2011, v. 3, 93–99 have revealed that gaseous models remain unable to properly account for the generation of this spectrum. Therefore, it can be stated with certainty that the photosphere is comprised of condensed matter. Beyond the solar surface, the chromospheric layer of the Sun also generates a weak continuous spectrum in the visible region. This emission exposes the presence of material in the condensed state. As a result, above the level of the photosphere, matter exists in both gaseous and condensed forms, much like within the atmosphere of the Earth. The continuous visible spectrum associated with the chromosphere provides the twenty-sixth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter.

  10. Pipe Rolling from Continuous Cast Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhordania, I.; Chkhartishvili, I.; Lordkipanidze, J.; Melashvili, Z.; Papava, K.; Khundadze, K.

    2007-01-01

    The approach to manufacturing of high quality pipes as a result of solid and hollow billet rolling from continuous cast metal is shown. Optimal parameters of piercing, temperature of piercing and piercing rolling mill rollers speed have been experimentally established. (author)

  11. Spontaneous Emission Enhancement at Finite-length Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, K.; Willatzen, Morten; Bordo, V.

    2013-01-01

    We study spontaneous emission enhancement of a two-level atomic emitter placed in a dielectric medium near a finite-length cylindrical metal nanowire. We calculate the dependence of the Purcell factor and the normalized decay rate to a continuous spectrum on the nanowire radius for several emitter...

  12. Heavy metal emissions for Danish road transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M.; Slentoe, E.

    2010-04-15

    This report presents new heavy metal emission factors for cars, vans, trucks, buses, mopeds and motorcycles for each of the emission sources fuel consumption, engine oil, tyre wear, brake wear and road abrasion. The emission components covered are Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), Selenium (Se) and Zinc (Zn), all of them relevant for emission reporting to the UNECE CLRTAP (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Convention on Long Range Transboundary Pollutants) convention. The report also presents a new Danish inventory for the year 2007. The following emissions in total TSP (in brackets) are calculated for the year 2007: As (8 kg), Cd (48 kg), Cr (197 kg), Cu (51 779 kg), Hg (28 kg), Ni (158 kg), Pb (6 989 kg), Se (33 kg) and Zn (28 556 kg). Per vehicle type cars are the most important source of emission for all heavy metal species, followed by vans, trucks, buses and 2-wheelers. By using the detailed emission factors and inventory calculation methods established in the present project, estimates of heavy metal emissions can be made for other years than 2007. (author)

  13. Mixing and settling in continuous metal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.J.; Laaspere, J.T.; Fitzpatrick, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern metallurgical processes produce metal from ore in a single converter operated in horizontal mode to permit staging of bath and oxygen potential by utilizing bottom-blowing of oxygen and fuel. The submerged injectors must create sufficient turbulence to provide excellent gas-liquid contact in order to maximize heat and mass transfer in the bath, but this turbulence must be selectively localized so as to provide adequate phase separation zones of metal and slag between the active turbulent zones. It is important to know the behavior of gas and liquids in the bubble plume, the nature and paths of liquids and entrainment into the plume, and separation phenomena including travel and behavior in the settling zones. Such knowledge is of fundamental value in designing reactors for continuous direct metal making. In this work the mixing caused by submerged injection of gas into a bath simulating a converter and subsequent phase separation of two immiscible liquids representing slag and metal respectively, are being studied experimentally and analytically. First results of experiments and of the numerical analysis are presented

  14. Architectural design of flue gas continuous emission monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Jiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Yong; Yao, Xifan

    2008-10-01

    The paper presents the architectural design of flue gas continuous emission monitoring system, which uses computer, acquisition card and serial port communication card as hardware in the flue gas continuous emission monitoring system. In the CEMS, continuous emission monitoring system, it monitors dust in the flue gas, SO2, NOX, and some parameter on the flue gas emission, which includes mass flow, pressure, and temperature. For the software in the monitoring system, the research designs monitoring program in VC++, and realizes flue gas monitor with the architecture.

  15. Continuous-emission monitoring: Proposed acid-rain rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed four rules containing the core acid rain requirements: the Permits Rule (40 CFR Part 72), the Allowances Rule (40 CFR Part 73), the Continuous Emission Monitoring Rule (40 CFR Part 75), and the Excess Emissions Rule (40 CRF Part 77). EPA will also propose additional rules at a future date. These rules will include requirements for facilities that elect to opt into the Acid Rain Program (40 CFR Part 74) and for the nitrogen oxide (NOx) control program (40 CFR Part 76). This fact sheet summarizes the key components of the proposed Continuous Emission Monitoring Rule (40 CFR Part 75)

  16. Improved inventory for heavy metal emissions from stationary combustion plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Hoffmann, Leif

    -2009. The report also include methodology, references and an uncertainty estimate. In Denmark, stationary combustion plants are among the most important emission sources for heavy metals. Emissions of all heavy metals have decreased considerably (73 % - 92 %) since 1990. The main HM emission sources are coal...... combustion, waste incineration, residual oil combustion and in 2009 also combustion of biomass. The emission from waste incineration plants has decreased profoundly also in recent years due to installation and improved performance of flue gas cleaning devices. The emission from power plants have also...

  17. In Situ Measurement of Alkali Metals in an MSW Incinerator Using a Spontaneous Emission Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations of the in situ diagnosis of the alkali metals in the municipal solid waste (MSW flame of an industrial grade incinerator using flame emission spectroscopy. The spectral radiation intensities of the MSW flame were obtained using a spectrometer. A linear polynomial fitting method is proposed to uncouple the continuous spectrum and the characteristic line. Based on spectra processing and a non-gray emissivity model, the flame temperature, emissivity, and intensities of the emission of alkali metals were calculated by means of measuring the spectral radiation intensities of the MSW flame. Experimental results indicate that the MSW flame contains alkali metals, including Na, K, and even Rb, and it demonstrates non-gray characteristics in a wavelength range from 500 nm to 900 nm. Peak intensities of the emission of the alkali metals were found to increase when the primary air was high, and the measured temperature varied in the same way as the primary air. The temperature and peak intensities of the lines of emission of the alkali metals may be used to adjust the primary airflow and to manage the feeding of the MSW to control the alkali metals in the MSW flame. It was found that the peak intensity of the K emission line had a linear relationship with the peak intensity of the Na emission line; this correlation may be attributed to their similar physicochemical characteristics in the MSW. The variation trend of the emissivity of the MSW flame and the oxygen content in the flue gas were almost opposite because the increased oxygen content suppressed soot formation and decreased soot emissivity. These results prove that the flame emission spectroscopy technique is feasible for monitoring combustion in the MSW incinerator in situ.

  18. Slow improvements of metal exposure, health- and breeding conditions of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) after decreased industrial heavy metal emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, A.M.M., E-mail: asa.berglund@emg.umu.se; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2011-09-15

    The environment around metal industries, such as smelters, is often highly contaminated due to continuous deposition of metals. We studied nest box breeding populations of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a well-studied pollution gradient from a sulfide ore smelter in Northern Sweden, after reduced aerial metal emissions (by 93-99%) from the smelter. The deposition of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc (based on moss samples) reflected the reduced emissions fairly well. However, nestling pied flycatchers had similar concentrations of these elements and mercury in tissues (bone, liver and blood) and feces in the 2000s, as in the 1980s, when the emissions were substantially higher. The exposure to high metal concentrations in the close vicinity of the smelter resulted in inhibited ALAD activities, depressed hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and increased mortality of nestlings. Our results indicate that in the highly contaminated environment around the smelter, nestlings reflected the slowly cycling soil pool, rather than the atmospheric deposition, and the concentration in soils plays an important role for the response of pied flycatchers to reduced atmospheric deposition. - Highlights: {yields} Pied flycatchers were studied in a pollution gradient from a sulfide smelter. {yields} Metal emissions from the smelter have decreased substantially. {yields} Nestling birds still had high metal concentrations in tissues. {yields} Health and survival rates of nestlings were negatively affected. {yields} Recovery of birds is not expected in the near future.

  19. Slow improvements of metal exposure, health- and breeding conditions of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) after decreased industrial heavy metal emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, A.M.M.; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    The environment around metal industries, such as smelters, is often highly contaminated due to continuous deposition of metals. We studied nest box breeding populations of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a well-studied pollution gradient from a sulfide ore smelter in Northern Sweden, after reduced aerial metal emissions (by 93-99%) from the smelter. The deposition of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc (based on moss samples) reflected the reduced emissions fairly well. However, nestling pied flycatchers had similar concentrations of these elements and mercury in tissues (bone, liver and blood) and feces in the 2000s, as in the 1980s, when the emissions were substantially higher. The exposure to high metal concentrations in the close vicinity of the smelter resulted in inhibited ALAD activities, depressed hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and increased mortality of nestlings. Our results indicate that in the highly contaminated environment around the smelter, nestlings reflected the slowly cycling soil pool, rather than the atmospheric deposition, and the concentration in soils plays an important role for the response of pied flycatchers to reduced atmospheric deposition. - Highlights: → Pied flycatchers were studied in a pollution gradient from a sulfide smelter. → Metal emissions from the smelter have decreased substantially. → Nestling birds still had high metal concentrations in tissues. → Health and survival rates of nestlings were negatively affected. → Recovery of birds is not expected in the near future.

  20. Continuous measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Magdalena; Lammirato, Carlo; Rütting, Tobias; Delin, Sofia; Weslien, Per; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture represents 59 % of the anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, according to the IPCC (Ciais et al. 2013). N2O emissions are typically irregular and vary widely in time and space, which makes it difficult to get a good representation of the emissions (Henault et al. 2012), particularly if measurements have low frequency and/or cover only a short time period. Manual measurements are, for practical reasons, often short-term and low-frequent, or restricted to periods where emissions are expected to be high, e.g. after fertilizing. However, the nature of N2O emissions, being largely unpredictable, calls for continuous or near-continuous measurements over long time periods. So far, rather few long-term, high resolution measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields are reported; among them are Flessa et al. (2002) and Senapati et al. (2016). In this study, we have a two-year data set (2015-2017) with hourly measurements from ten automatic chambers, covering unfertilized controls as well as different nitrogen fertilizer treatments. Grain was produced on the field, and effects of tillage, harvest and other cropping measures were covered. What we can see from the experiment is that (a) the unfertilized control plots seem to follow the same emission pattern as the fertilized plots, at a level similar to the standard mineral fertilized plots (120 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and (b) freeze/thaw emissions are comparable in size to emissions after fertilizing. These two findings imply that the importance of fertilizing to the overall N2O emissions from arable soils may be smaller than previously expected. References: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell et al. 2013: Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung et

  1. Estimation of greenhouse impacts of continuous regional emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinisalo, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-11-01

    In this thesis a method to calculate the greenhouse impact of continuous, time-dependent, non-global greenhouse gas emissions is used to estimate the impact of estimated anthropogenic pre-1990 and future (post 1990) emissions of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O from Finland and the Nordic countries. Estimates for the impact of Finnish CFCs and their substitutes and the significance of Finnish forests as carbon sink are also calculated. The method is also used to compare several different wood and peat energy production schemes with fossil fuel use, in terms of caused greenhouse impact. The uncertainty of the results is examined. The greenhouse impact is measured in this thesis as the global mean direct radiative forcing caused by the emissions. Radiative forcing is the driving force behind the climate change and as such it can be used to assess the ensuing climate change. The method is suitable for greenhouse agents that can be considered to be well mixed in the atmosphere (mainly CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and both CFCs and their substitutes). According to the results Finnish greenhouse impact due to anthropogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions has increased eight-fold during this century, and will very likely remain higher than current level throughout the next century. The impact of the Nordic countries has followed the same general pattern as Finland. It is likely that the per capita radiative forcing of the Nordic countries will remain above the global average. The uncertainty of the absolute results is quite high due to uncertain knowledge at several stages of the calculation. When the results are used in comparisons (e.g. between emission scenarios, or emissions of different countries), the accuracy of the results increases considerably. (orig.) 54 refs.

  2. Electron field emission from sp 2-induced insulating to metallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of concentration and size of 2 cluster on the transport properties and electron field emissions of amorphous carbon films have been investigated. The observed insulating to metallic behaviour from reduced activation energy derived from transport measurement and threshold field for electron emission of ...

  3. Concentration of heavy metals from traffic emissions on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, emission and combustion of fossils and fuels have been identified as primary sources of atmospheric metallic burden. Detailed information about this is not readily available in Nigeria. This study was therefore carried out to determine the concentration of heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury and cadmium} ...

  4. Goods in the Anthroposphere as a Metal Emission Source A Case Study of Stockholm, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerme, L.; Bergbaeck, B.; Lohm, U.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the diffuse emissions during use of metal containing goods in the capital of Sweden,Stockholm. The following metals were studied: Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni) and Zinc (Zn).A major part of the metals are found in a protected environment where degrading processes like corrosion are most limited. However, during the lifetime of some goods the metal release to the environment is significant. The quantitatively most dominant emissions were found for Cu and Zn. The tap water system and roofs/fronts (Cu) represent goods with large exposed areas but with relatively small release rates per unit. In contrast, brake linings, aerial lines and electrical grounding (Cu) and tyres, brake linings and chemicals (Zn) are all goods with high release rates but mostly limited exposed stocks.High yearly emissions are also found for Pb, ammunition and sinkers dominate the calculated emissions totally. For Cr and Ni, stainless steel represent the major part of the stocks, but corrosion was estimated to give only a minor contribution to the emissions. Potential emission sources, i.e. stabilisers,pigments and plated goods dominate the exposed Cd stock. These emissions were not quantified due to lack of data. Hg is currently phased out, but one major source of emission, i.e. the use of amalgam, will be continuously significant for several decades. The importance of the traffic sector is obvious. The emissions from brake linings (Cu, Zn and Pb), tyres (Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni)and asphalt wear (Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni and Pb) are all of large importance for the total emission from respectively metal

  5. Continuous and recurrent testing of acoustic emission sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, Markus G.R.; Schmitt, Stefan; Potstada, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In many fields of application of acoustic emission, the testing can lead to a lasting change in the sensor characteristics. This can be caused by mechanical damage, thermal stress or use under aggressive environmental conditions. Irrespective of visually testable damages of the sensors, a shift in the spectral sensitivity, a reduction in the absolute sensitivity or a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio can occur. During the test, this requires a possibility to periodically check the sensors, including the coupling aids used. For recurring testing, recommendations are given in Directive SE 02 ''Verification of acoustic emission sensors and their coupling in the laboratory''. This paper discusses possibilities for continuous monitoring of the sensors during the test and presents an application example for the partly automated recurring testing of acoustic emission sensors using Directive SE 02. For this purpose, a test stand for the supply of the sensors to be tested was constructed and the signal recording and data reduction implemented in freely available software programs. The operating principle is demonstrated using selected case studies. [de

  6. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  7. Metal–insulator–metal light absorber: a continuous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M

    2013-01-01

    A type of light absorber made of continuous layers of metal and dielectric films is studied. The metal films can have thicknesses close to their skin depths in the wavelength range concerned, which allows for both light transmission and reflection. Resonances induced by multiple reflections in the structure, when combined with the inherent lossy nature of metals, result in strong absorption spectral features. An eigen-mode analysis is carried out for the plasmonic multilayer nanostructures which provides a generic understanding of the absorption features. Experimentally, the calculation is verified by a reflection measurement with a representative structure. Such an absorber is simple to fabricate. The highly efficient absorption characteristics can be potentially deployed for optical filter designs, sensors, accurate photothermal temperature control in a micro-environment and even for backscattering reduction of small particles, etc. (paper)

  8. 40 CFR 60.4350 - How do I use data from the continuous emission monitoring equipment to identify excess emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I use data from the continuous....4350 How do I use data from the continuous emission monitoring equipment to identify excess emissions? For purposes of identifying excess emissions: (a) All CEMS data must be reduced to hourly averages as...

  9. Features of exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Veksler, A S; Morozov, I L; Semenov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the photothermostimulated exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys of the Fe sub 6 sub 4 Co sub 2 sub 1 B sub 1 sub 5 composition are studied. It is established that the temperature dependences of the exoelectron emission spectrum adequately reflect the two-stage character of the amorphous alloy transition into the crystalline state. The exoelectron emission spectrum is sensitive to the variations in the modes of the studied sample thermal treatment. The thermal treatment of the amorphous metallic alloy leads to growth in the intensity of the exoelectrons yield. The highest growth in the intensify of the exoelectron emission was observed in the alloys at the initial stage of their crystallization

  10. Stimulated emission of surface plasmons by electron tunneling in metal-barrier-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, D. P.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that correlation currents arising from the superposition of pairs of states on distinct sides of a potential barrier in metal-barrier-metal structures can result in inelastic tunneling through the emission of surface plasmons. Net gain of an externally excited plasmon field is possible.

  11. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  12. Directional Emission from Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structures: Effect of Mixed Metal Layers, Dye Location and Dielectric Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2015-02-12

    Metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structures provide directional emission close to the surface normal, which offers opportunities for new design formats in fluorescence based applications. The directional emission arises due to near-field coupling of fluorophores with the optical modes present in the MDM substrate. Reflectivity simulations and dispersion diagrams provide a basic understanding of the mode profiles and the factors that affect the coupling efficiency and the spatial distribution of the coupled emission. This work reveals that the composition of the metal layers, the location of the dye in the MDM substrate and the dielectric thickness are important parameters that can be chosen to tune the color of the emission wavelength, the angle of observation, the angular divergence of the emission and the polarization of the emitted light. These features are valuable for displays and optical signage.

  13. Trace metal emissions from the Estonian oil shale fired power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunela-Tapola, Leena A.; Frandsen, Flemming; Häsänen, Erkki K.

    1998-01-01

    a two-fraction particle sampling and subsequent absorption of the gaseous fraction. The analyses were principally performed with ICP-MS techniques. The trace metal contents of Estonian oil shale were found to be in the same order of magnitude as of coal on average. The high total particle concentrations...... in the flue gases of the studied oil shale plant contribute, however, to clearly higher total trace metal emission levels compared to modern coal fired power plants. Although the old electrostatic precipitators in the plant have been partly replaced by state-of-the-art electrostatic precipitators......, significant portions of some heavy metals (e.g., Hg, Cd, As and Pb) were found in the absorption liquids of the sampling line, indicating the presence of either vaporous metal species or metals condensed on very small particles in the flue gases. The experimental results were interpreted by theoretical...

  14. Electron field emission from sp 2-induced insulating to metallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 3. Electron field emission from 2-induced insulating to metallic behaviour of amorphous carbon (-C) films. Pitamber Mahanandia P N Viswakarma Prasad Vishnu Bhotla S V Subramanyam Karuna Kar Nanda. Thin Films and Nanomatter Volume 33 Issue 3 ...

  15. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-05

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Acoustic emission inspection and defect assessment for metal vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifeng Liu; Yaoguang Wan; Gongtian Shen; Qingru Duan

    1989-01-01

    Criteria for weld defects may be based on the concept of quality control or on the concept of fitness-for-purpose. In this paper the defect assessment technique is used to evaluate weld defects according to the concept of fitness-for-purpose. It makes use of the acoustic emission technique, which has some unique properties as a defect assessment tool for metal vessels. Acoustic emission testing has been accepted as a non-destructive testing method. This paper discusses the theory of Acoustic Emission Defect Assessment (AEDA) and a three-step procedure for AEDA for metal vessels is suggested. Two applications of AEDA carried out in the authors' laboratory are described. The theory and applications show that AEDA has some unique advantages compared to Fracture Mechanics Defect Assessment (FMDA). The disadvantages of AEDA are also discussed. (author)

  17. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits specified in...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What continuous emission monitoring...

  20. Improving catchment scale water quality modelling with continuous high resolution monitoring of metals in runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Markus; Rossi, Pekka; Blomberg von der Geest, Kalle; Mäkinen, Ari; Postila, Heini; Marttila, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    High metal concentrations in natural waters is one of the key environmental and health problems globally. Continuous in-situ analysis of metals from runoff water is technically challenging but essential for the better understanding of processes which lead to pollutant transport. Currently, typical analytical methods for monitoring elements in liquids are off-line laboratory methods such as ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and ICP-MS (ICP combined with a mass spectrometer). Disadvantage of the both techniques is time consuming sample collection, preparation, and off-line analysis at laboratory conditions. Thus use of these techniques lack possibility for real-time monitoring of element transport. We combined a novel high resolution on-line metal concentration monitoring with catchment scale physical hydrological modelling in Mustijoki river in Southern Finland in order to study dynamics of processes and form a predictive warning system for leaching of metals. A novel on-line measurement technique based on micro plasma emission spectroscopy (MPES) is tested for on-line detection of selected elements (e.g. Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb) in runoff waters. The preliminary results indicate that MPES can sufficiently detect and monitor metal concentrations from river water. Water and Soil Assessment Tool (SWAT) catchment scale model was further calibrated with high resolution metal concentration data. We show that by combining high resolution monitoring and catchment scale physical based modelling, further process studies and creation of early warning systems, for example to optimization of drinking water uptake from rivers, can be achieved.

  1. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  2. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  3. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  4. Improved field emission performance of carbon nanotube by introducing copper metallic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yiren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To improve the field emission performance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, a simple and low-cost method was adopted in this article. We introduced copper particles for decorating the CNTs so as to form copper particle-CNT composites. The composites were fabricated by electrophoretic deposition technique which produced copper metallic particles localized on the outer wall of CNTs and deposited them onto indium tin oxide (ITO electrode. The results showed that the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 4 × 10-5 S while the turn-on field was reduced from 3.4 to 2.2 V/μm. Moreover, the field emission current tended to be undiminished after continuous emission for 24 h. The reasons were summarized that introducing copper metallic particles to decorate CNTs could increase the surface roughness of the CNTs which was beneficial to field emission, restrain field emission current from saturating when the applied electric field was above the critical field. In addition, it could also improve the electrical contact by increasing the contact area between CNT and ITO electrode that was beneficial to the electron transport and avoided instable electron emission caused by thermal injury of CNTs.

  5. Continuing the quest for autoimmunity due to oral metal exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmawati, D.; Muris, J.; Scheper, R.J.; Rustemeyer, T.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; von Blomberg, B.M.E.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The role of metal exposure in the development of autoimmune disease (AID) is still controversial. Here, we studied the relationship between oral metal exposure, metal allergy and autoimmunity. Methods: A mixed population (n = 78) of non-allergic volunteers, metal-allergic patients and patients

  6. Secondary electron emission from metals and semi-conductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Susumu; Kanaya, Koichi

    1979-01-01

    Attempt was made to present the sufficient solution of the secondary electron yield of metals and semiconductor compounds except insulators, applying the free electron scattering theory to the absorption of secondary electrons generated within a solid target. The paper is divided into the sections describing absorption coefficient and escape depth, quantitative characteristics of secondary yield, angular distribution of secondary electron emission, effect of incident angle to secondary yield, secondary electron yield transmitted, and lateral distribution of secondary electron emission, besides introduction and conclusion. The conclusions are as follows. Based on the exponential power law for screened atomic potential, secondary electron emission due to both primary and backscattered electrons penetrating into metallic elements and semi-conductive compounds is expressed in terms of the ionization loss in the first collision for escaping secondary electrons. The maximum yield and the corresponding primary energy can both consistently be derived as the functions of three parameters: atomic number, first ionization energy and backscattering coefficient. The yield-energy curve as a function of the incident energy and the backscattering coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental results. The energy dependence of the yield in thin films and the lateral distribution of secondary yield are derived as the functions of the backscattering coefficient and the primary energy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Remote Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Metal Ware and Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Boris I.; Sutorikhin, Vladimir A.

    2017-10-01

    An unusual phenomenon was revealed in the metal-ultrasound interaction. Microwave sensor generates surface electric conductivity oscillations from exposure to elastic ultrasonic vibrations on regions of defects embracing micro-defects termed as “crack mouth.” They are known as the region of “acoustic activity,” method of Acoustic Emission (AE) method. It was established that the high phase-modulation coefficient of reflected field generates intentional Doppler radar signal with the following parameters: amplitude-1–5 nm, 6–30 dB adjusted to 70- 180 mm. This phenomenon is termed as “Gorbunov effect,” which is applied as a remote non-destructive testing method replacing ultrasonic flaw detection and acoustic emission methods.

  8. Silicon-based metallic micro grid for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehong; Jeon, Seok-Gy; Kim, Jung-Il; Kim, Geun-Ju; Heo, Duchang; Shin, Dong Hoon; Sun, Yuning; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2012-01-01

    A micro-scale metal grid based on a silicon frame for application to electron field emission devices is introduced and experimentally demonstrated. A silicon lattice containing aperture holes with an area of 80 × 80 µm 2 and a thickness of 10 µm is precisely manufactured by dry etching the silicon on one side of a double-polished silicon wafer and by wet etching the opposite side. Because a silicon lattice is more rigid than a pure metal lattice, a thin layer of Au/Ti deposited on the silicon lattice for voltage application can be more resistant to the geometric stress caused by the applied electric field. The micro-fabrication process, the images of the fabricated grid with 88% geometric transparency and the surface profile measurement after thermal feasibility testing up to 700 °C are presented. (paper)

  9. Stimulated X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy in Transition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Mercadier, Laurent; Majety, Vinay P.; Marinelli, Agostino; Lutman, Alberto; Guetg, Marc W.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Boutet, Sébastien; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason; Koralek, Jake; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kern, Jan; Fuller, Franklin D.; Pastor, Ernest; Fransson, Thomas; Zhang, Yu; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Rohringer, Nina; Bergmann, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified K α x-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an x-ray free electron laser to create the 1 s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over 4 orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1 s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ˜1.7 eV FWHM is constant over 3 orders of magnitude, pointing to the buildup of transform limited pulses of ˜1 fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and a shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated x-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities of ˜1020 W /cm2 for the incoming x-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) x-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, and materials science.

  10. Liquid metal field-emission ion sources and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prewett, P.D.; Jefferies, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The study of ion emission from liquid metal surfaces under the action of high electric fields has led to the development of ion sources of exceptionally high brightness. The design and operating characteristics of commercially manufactured sources of gallium and gold ions are described. Preliminary focusing and scanning experiments have produced spots estimated to be approximately 0.5 μm diameter at currents approximately 0.2 nA using an electrostatic ion optical system. A focused Ga + beam has been used as an ion microprobe for imaging and for elemental mapping of surfaces by SIMS. (author)

  11. Benchmarking Anthropogenic Heavy Metals Emissions: Australian and Global Urban Environmental Health Risk Based Indicators of Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejkovski, Nick

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, the impacts of urbanisation and human activity are evident in increased waste generation and the emissions of metals into the air, land or water. Metals that have accumulated in urban soils almost exclusively anthropogenically can persist for long periods in the environment. Anthropogenic waste emissions containing heavy metals are a…

  12. The use of continuous functions for a top-down temporal disaggregation of emission inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalchmayr, M.; Orthofer, R.

    1997-11-01

    This report is a documentation of a presentation at the International Speciality Conference 'The Emission Inventory: Planning for the Future', October 28-30, 1997 in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. The Conference was organized by the Air and Waste Management Association (AWMA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Emission data with high temporal resolution are necessary to analyze the relationship between emissions and their impacts. In many countries, however, emission inventories refer only to the annual countrywide emission sums, because underlying data (traffic, energy, industry statistics) are available for statistically relevant territorial units and for longer time periods only. This paper describes a method for the temporal disaggregation of yearly emission sums through application of continuous functions which simulate emission generating activities. The temporal patterns of the activities are derived through overlay of annual, weekly and diurnal variation functions which are based on statistical data of the relevant activities. If applied to annual emission data, these combined functions describe the dynamic patterns of emissions over year. The main advantage of the continuous functions method is that temporal emission patterns can be smoothed throughout one year, thus eliminating some of the major drawbacks from the traditional standardized fixed quota system. For handling in models, the continuous functions and their parameters can be directly included and the emission quota calculated directly for a certain hour of the year. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated with NMVOC emission data for Austria. Temporally disaggregated emission data can be used as input for ozone models as well as for visualization and animation of the emission dynamics. The analysis of the temporal dynamics of emission source strengths, e.g. during critical hours for ozone generation in summer, allows the implementation of efficient emission reduction

  13. Continuing the quest for autoimmunity due to oral metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Muris, Joris; Scheper, Rik J; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J; von Blomberg, B Mary E; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-01-01

    The role of metal exposure in the development of autoimmune disease (AID) is still controversial. Here, we studied the relationship between oral metal exposure, metal allergy and autoimmunity. A mixed population (n = 78) of non-allergic volunteers, metal-allergic patients and patients with oral problems putatively due to metal alloys was evaluated for oral Ni, Pd, Au and Hg exposure and skin hypersensitivity. Clinical autoimmune parameters were based on medical histories; additionally, serum levels of the four most common autoantibodies were measured. Skin hypersensitivity, as seen mainly for Ni and/or Pd, was not positively associated with autoimmune parameters. In contrast, metal hypersensitive individuals showed an extremely low frequency of thyroid autoantibodies (3% vs 20% in non-hypersensitive controls). Next, the relation between metal exposure and autoimmunity was evaluated in individuals >35 years (n = 58), since from that age on metal exposure had plateaued and was not correlated with age. In this subgroup, oral Ni exposure was associated (p oral Pd, Au or Hg contacts were not associated with any of the clinical or serological autoimmune phenomena tested. The results of this study support the view that development of metal contact allergies may prevent autoimmune activation, and, second, that oral exposure to Pd, Au or Hg does not facilitate the development of AID.

  14. Studies of light emission by continuously sensitive avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.; Dominik, W.; Fabre, J.P.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.; Suzuki, M.

    1988-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the optical recording of images of electron avalanches between parallel meshes have been studied. The emission spectra of gas mixtures have been investigated, where triethylamine (TEA), tetrakis(dimethylamine)ethylene (TMAE), and nitrogen, are used as the photon-emitting agents. For a given charge gain, the photon intensity decreases with electric field. This favours amplification between parallel meshes instead of wires. The use of intensified CCD cameras permits the recording of the local energy loss along the tracks. (orig.)

  15. Introduction of the continuous emission monitoring system at the thermal power plants of Hrvatska Elektroprivreda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramovic, B.; Jakovljevic, Z.; Stanic, Z. [EKONERG - Energy Research and Environmental Protection Institute Ltd. (Croatia)

    1999-07-01

    An overview of Croatian legislation in the field of air protection is given in this paper with special attention to the Decree on stationary sources emission limit values. The owner's obligations concerning first, occasional and continuous emission measurements are described, especially these of Hrvatska elektroprivreda (HEP) as the present owner of all thermal power plants in Croatia. The attention is drawn to HEP's activities on conducting of the emission measurement program, which has the introduction of Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEM) as its final purpose. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  17. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  18. 77 FR 23660 - Silicon Metal From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... International Trade Administration Silicon Metal From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of... International Trade Commission (``ITC'') that revocation of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from the... sunset review of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from the PRC, pursuant to section 751(c) of...

  19. Laboratory testing of a continuous emissions monitor for hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dene, Chuck; Pisano, John T; Durbin, Thomas D; Bumiller, Kurt; Crabbe, Keith; Muzio, Lawrence J

    2014-06-01

    Continuous monitoring of exhaust flue gas has become a common practice in power plants in response to Federal Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) standards. Under the current rules, hydrochloric acid (HCl) is not continuously measured at most plants; however, MATS standards have been proposed for HCl, and tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption spectroscopy is one method that can be used to measure HCl continuously. The focus of this work is on the evaluation and verification of the operation performance of an HCL TDL over a range of real-world operating environments. The testing was conducted at the University of California at Riverside (UCR) spectroscopy evaluation laboratory. Laboratory tests were conducted at three separate temperatures, 25 degrees C, 100 degrees C, and 200 degrees C, and two distinct moisture levels for the enhanced temperatures, 0%, (2 tests) and 4%, over a concentration range from 0 ppmv to 25 ppmv-m at each of the elevated temperatures. The results showed good instrument accuracy as afunction of changing temperature and moisture. Data analysis showed that the average percentage difference between the ammonia concentration and the calibration source was 3.33% for varying moisture from 0% to 4% and 2.69%for varying temperature from 25 to 100/200 degrees C. An HCl absorption line of 1.742 microm was selected for by the manufacturer for this instrument. The Hi Tran database indicated that CO2 is probably the only major interferent, although the CO2 absorption is very weak at that wavelength. Interference tests for NO, CO, SO2, NH3, and CO2 for a range of concentrations typical of flue gasses in coal-fired power plants did not show any interference with TDL HCl measurements at 1.742 microm. For these interference tests, CO2 was tested at a concentration of 11.9% concentration in N2 for these tests. Average precision over the entire range for all 10 tests is 3.12%. The focus of this study was.an evaluation of the operation performance of a

  20. ?Smart COPVs? - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and apply promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to CPV using acoustic emission (AE) and lay the foundation for continued development of an automated...

  1. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiuyan; Li Hong; Chen Zhipeng; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnostics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron temperature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method. (low temperature plasma)

  2. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  3. Optimization of Continuous Flow Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions on Continuous System Column by Peganum Harmala Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Elhameh Mohammadpour; Mohammad Reza Yaftian; Abasali Zamani; Parvin Gharbani

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims of the Study: Heavy metals discharge to environment is a worldwide problem growing in scale. When they accumulate in the environment and in food chains, they can profoundly disrupt biological processes. Peganum Harmala Seeds (PHS) was used as a bio-sorbent, using a continuous system for removing Pb2+, Co2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+ ions from aqueous solutions. Materials and Methods: PHS was used as adsorbent in adsorption of heavy metals from aqueous solutions....

  4. Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process; Alkalipaeaestoet PCFB-prosessissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula R and D Center since 1986. As a part of the development, 10 MW PCFB Test Facility was built in 1989. The Test Facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1995 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The project Y44 `Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process` was part of national LIEKKI 2 research program. The main object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measurements were performed using plasma assisted method by TUT Laboratory of Plasma Technology and wet absorption method of VTT Energy. The measured Na concentrations were below 30 ppb(w) in all measured data points. The results of K were below 10 ppb(w). The accuracies of the both methods are about + 50 % at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission. The measured emissions are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits estimated by gas turbine manufacturers. The measurements and development of the analyses methods are planned to be continued during PCFB test runs in spring 1996 for example within Joule II research program. (author)

  5. Continuous Emission Monitoring of Tetrafluoromethane Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geiser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in quantum cascade lasers have enabled the development of new sensors for in-situ applications that have so far only been possible with extractive systems. In this work, a sensor is presented using a unique Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy approach to measure tetrafluoromethane, a strong greenhouse gas. The sensor was characterized in a laboratory environment indicating a long-term detection limit of 20 ppb·m and a short-term value of well below 10 ppb·m. To demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor in a real-world environment, it was installed at an Alcoa aluminum smelter. A co-located Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer allowed direct comparison measurements of both systems. General agreement between the two methods was observed, leading to the conclusion that the developed in-situ quantum cascade laser based sensor has the potential to continuously measure tetrafluoromethane at aluminum smelters.

  6. Emission factors for heavy metals from diesel and petrol used in European vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulles, Tinus; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Appelman, Wilfred; Verheul, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Heavy metals constitute an important group of persistent toxic pollutants occurring in ambient air and other media. One of the suspected sources of these metals in the atmosphere is combustion of transport fuels in road vehicles. However, estimates of the emissions of these metals from road vehicles as reported in national emission inventories show a very high variability in emission factors used. This paper provides high quality data on concentrations of heavy metals in fuels and derives default emission factors from these. The paper discusses these values against the emission estimates presently reported by the Parties to the LRTAP Convention. The measured concentrations of heavy metals in petrol and diesel fuel show a high variability between different samples taken at gas stations throughout Europe. Metal concentrations in road transport fuels vary over two orders of magnitude, but all remain in the ppb region (a few tenths of a ppb to a few hundred ppb for all metals). The frequency distributions of the measurements could be approximated by lognormal distributions. The emission factors, including 95 percent confidence intervals were derived from a statistical analysis of the survey data. We could not detect a significant difference between samples from different countries. The fuel based emission factors as derived in this study are complemented with those related to unintentional lubricant oil combustion. This allowed an estimation of total exhaust heavy metal emissions for UNECE Europe, indicating that As, Hg and Se exhaust emissions were dominated by fuel combustion while Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn exhaust emissions were dominated by lubricant oil combustion. The proposed emission factors were generally lower than previously published emission factors. National emissions of heavy metals from vehicle exhaust, estimated in this study are in many cases considerably lower than those reported by the countries for this source.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  8. 40 CFR 60.1735 - Am I exempt from any appendix B or appendix F requirements to evaluate continuous emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems? Yes, the accuracy tests for your sulfur dioxide continuous emission monitoring system require you to also evaluate your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system. Therefore, your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system is exempt from two requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1240 Section 60.1240 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1240 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic...

  11. On the estimation of emissivity of metals within the framework of electron classical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvarev, K.M.; Baum, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    The well-known Hagen-Rubens and Ashkinass-Foot equations used for calculating the spectral and integral emissive powers of metals usually yield enhanced values of optical characteristics. Improved formulas for estimating emissive characteristics of metals from their electric conductivity are obtained with an allowance for the relaxation time and in the free-electron model approximation

  12. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with...

  14. Metal toxicity characterization factors for marine ecosystems: considering the importance of the estuary for freshwater emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    for metal emissions to freshwater and coastal seawater, respectively. The new CFs were applied to calculate endpoint impact scores for the same amount of metal emission to each compartment, to compare the relative ecotoxicity damages in freshwater and marine ecosystems in LCA. Site-dependent marine CFs...... as the best one. Endpoint marine and freshwater metals CFs were developed to calculate endpoint ecotoxicity impact scores. Marine ecotoxicity CFs are 1.5 orders of magnitude lower for emission to freshwater than for emission to seawater for Cr, Cu, and Pb, due to notable removal fractions both in freshwater...... CFs for emission to seawater are 1–4 orders of magnitude lower except for Pb. The new site-generic marine CFs for emission to freshwater lie within two orders of magnitude difference from USES-LCA 2.0 CFs. The comparative contribution share analysis shows a poor agreement of metal toxicity ranking...

  15. Emission factors for heavy metals from diesel and petrol used in European vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, M.P.J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Appelman, W.A.J.; Verheul, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Heavy metals constitute an important group of persistent toxic pollutants occurring in ambient air and other media. One of the suspected sources of these metals in the atmosphere is combustion of transport fuels in road vehicles. However estimates of the emissions of these metals from road

  16. Norwegian environmental policy: From continued increase of the emission of greenhouse gases to decrease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    According to Norway's Minister of the Environment, Norway will be one of the first among the industrialized countries to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on the emission of greenhouse gases. The tax on carbon dioxide will be continued and from 2005 there will be a national quota system for emission from sources not previously included. Several other measures have also been proposed. The current regulations admit 16 percent increase in the emissions up to 2008, while the measures proposed by the government and listed in this article may give a reduction of 12 percent

  17. Shape-controlled continuous synthesis of metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Victor; Smith, Christopher D.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-03-01

    A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5 nm; and Pt nanocubes with a 5.6 nm edge length, all in a synthesis time as low as 150 s.A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a

  18. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1730 Section 60.1730 Protection of Environment... continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 62.15185 Section 62.15185 Protection of Environment... make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or...

  20. Contribution of Metal Defects in the Assembly Induced Emission of Cu Nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zhennan

    2017-03-20

    Aggregation/assembly induced emission (AIE) has been observed for metal nanoclusters (NCs), but the origin of the enhanced emission is not fully understood, yet. In this work, the significant contribution of metal defects on AIE is revealed by engineering the self-assembly process of Cu NCs using ethanol. The presence of ethanol leads to a rapid assembly of NCs into ultrathin nanosheets, promoting the formation of metal defects-rich surface. Detailed studies and computer simulation confirm that the metal defects-rich nanosheets possess increased Cu(I)-to-Cu(0) ratio, which greatly influences ligand-to-metal-metal charge transfer and therewith facilitates the radiative relaxation of excitons. Consequently, the Cu NCs self-assembly nanosheets exhibit obvious emission enhancement.

  1. Controlled formation of emissive silver nanoclusters using rationally designed metal-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Vasily A; Ogawa, Michael Y

    2013-08-19

    The metal-binding properties of rationally designed, synthetic proteins were used to prepare a series of emissive silver nanoclusters having predictable sizes and emission energies. Metal-binding α-helical coiled coils were designed to exist as peptide trimers, tetramers, and hexamers and found to uniquely bind 6, 8, and 12 Ag(+) ions, respectively. Subsequent treatment with a chemical reducing agent produced a series of peptide-bound Ag(0) nanoclusters that display a strong visible fluorescence whose emission energies depend on the number of bound metal ions in excellent agreement with theory.

  2. Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine A. Yanca; Douglas C. Barth; Krag A. Petterson; Michael P. Nakanishi; John A. Cooper; Bruce E. Johnsen; Richard H. Lambert; Daniel G. Bivins [Cooper Environmental Services, LLC, Portland, OR (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Three new methods applicable to the determination of hazardous metal concentrations in stationary source emissions were developed and evaluated for use in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance applications. Two of the three independent methods, a continuous emissions monitor-based method (Xact) and an X-ray-based filter method (XFM), are used to measure metal emissions. The third method involves a quantitative aerosol generator (QAG), which produces a reference aerosol used to evaluate the measurement methods. A modification of EPA Method 301 was used to validate the three methods for As, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg, representing three hazardous waste combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) metal categories (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The measurement methods were evaluated at a hazardous waste combustor (HWC) by comparing measured with reference aerosol concentrations. The QAG, Xact, and XFM met the modified Method 301 validation criteria. All three of the methods demonstrated precisions and accuracies on the order of 5%. The measurement methods should be applicable to emissions from a wide range of sources, and the reference aerosol generator should be applicable to additional analytes. EPA recently approved an alternative monitoring petition for an HWC at Eli Lilly's Tippecanoe site in Lafayette, IN, in which the Xact is used for demonstrating compliance with the HWC MACT metal emissions (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The QAG reference aerosol generator was approved as a method for providing a quantitative reference aerosol, which is required for certification and continuing quality assurance of the Xact. 30 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in Chinese cities: A continuous dynamic distribution approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianxin; Wu, Yanrui; Guo, Xiumei; Cheong, Tsun Se

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in China. The analyses are conducted by employing a continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data of 286 cities at the prefecture and above-prefecture level. The results show that per capita CO 2 emissions tend to converge during the sample period of 2002–2011. However, multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. It is also found that there is more persistence in cities with low per capita CO 2 emissions, and more mobility in cities with high per capita CO 2 emissions. The analyses also show that the dynamics of per capita CO 2 emissions are significantly different among various geographical, income and environmental policy groups. The conditional distribution analyses indicate that multimodality cannot be explained independently by any one of the two factors, namely geographical location or income level. The findings in this study may have important policy implications for CO 2 abatement in China. - Highlights: •Spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in 286 Chinese cities. •A continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data. •Multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. •Significantly different dynamics among various city groups.

  4. Emission characteristics of particulate matter and heavy metals from small incinerators and boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Heon; Jang, Ha-Na; Seo, Yong-Chil; Seok, Kwang-Seol; Hong, Ji-Hyung; Jang, Min

    The characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emission such as the estimation of emission factors, size distributions and of heavy metal emission from small-size incinerators and boilers have been investigated. In PM-10 emission, a fine mode was found in the formation of sub-micron PM by growth of nucleated aerosol of metal vapor, having a bimodal particle size distribution in overall size range. The emission ratios of PM-10 to TPM (total PM) from boilers and incinerators ranged from 29% to 62% and 10% to 84%, respectively, which resulted in more and larger sized PM emission due to poorer combustion from solid waste incinerators than boilers. The targeted metals were copper, cadmium, manganese, chromium, magnesium, lead, zinc and copper, and their contents in bottom ash, fly ash and dust (PM) were compared. More volatile metals such as cadmium, lead and zinc showed higher enrichment in PM emitted through stack than bottom ashes. Cadmium, copper, lead and zinc on the fine PM under 2.5 μm accounted for approximately 90% of the total mass of each metal in PM-10. The effects of chlorine concentration and temperature on such metals emission were also observed due to their volatility changes.

  5. The CO2 emission permits market simulation using Continuous Double Auction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoszczuk, Pawel; Stanczak, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the buying and selling prices of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission permits in trading models with uncertainty. Permission prices, although usually omitted from standard models, may significantly influence the trading market. We thus construct a more realistic trade model. To do this, we introduced several important changes to the standard model, mainly we added The Continuous Double Action.

  6. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What continuous emission monitoring... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment... following methods in appendix A of this part to measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide) 1. Nitrogen Oxides (Class...

  8. Discussion of Carbon Emissions for Charging Hot Metal in EAF Steelmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-zhi; Jiang, Tao; Li, Guang-hui; Guo, Yu-feng

    2017-07-01

    As the cost of hot metal is reduced for iron ore prices are falling in the international market, more and more electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking enterprises use partial hot metal instead of scrap as raw materials to reduce costs and the power consumption. In this paper, carbon emissions based on 1,000 kg molten steel by charging hot metal in EAF steelmaking is studied. Based on the analysis of material and energy balance calculation in EAF, the results show that 146.9, 142.2, 137.0, and 130.8 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 %, while 143.4, 98.5, 65.81, and 31.5 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 % by using gas waste heat utilization (coal gas production) for EAF steelmaking unit process. However, carbon emissions are increased by charging hot metal for the whole blast furnace-electric arc furnace (BF-EAF) steelmaking process. In the condition that the hot metal produced by BF is surplus, as carbon monoxide in gas increased by charging hot metal, the way of coal gas production can be used for waste heat utilization, which reduces carbon emissions in EAF steelmaking unit process.

  9. A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs

  10. Optimization of Continuous Flow Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions on Continuous System Column by Peganum Harmala Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhameh Mohammadpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Heavy metals discharge to environment is a worldwide problem growing in scale. When they accumulate in the environment and in food chains, they can profoundly disrupt biological processes. Peganum Harmala Seeds (PHS was used as a bio-sorbent, using a continuous system for removing Pb2+, Co2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+ ions from aqueous solutions. Materials and Methods: PHS was used as adsorbent in adsorption of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. A stock solution of Pb(II, Co(II, Cu (II and Ni (II was prepared and experiments were down in a column as a reactor. The concentration was determined by atomic adsorption spectroscopy. The effect of various parameters such as pH, contact time, heavy metal concentration, ionic strength, particle size and adsorbent dosage on the process was investigated. Langmuir, Frundlich and Temkin isotherms were studied to evaluate of adsorption isotherms. Results: The adsorption efficiency was found to be pH dependent and enhanced by increasing the solution pH. Maximum removal of ions were obtained at pH=4-8. The equilibrium time was attained after 30 min and desorption studies were performed, using diluted HNO3, H2SO4 and HCl solution (1M on adsorbed metal ions from PHS. Results illustrated that adsorbed metal ions could be recovered under acidic conditions. Investigation of the process kinetic was best fitted with pseudo second-order model. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models were tested for describing the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm illustrated the best description of the cobalt and copper adsorption mechanism and Freundlich model describes lead and nickel ions adsorption on PHS. Conclusion: It was found that PHS would be a good adsorbent for removal of heavy metals.

  11. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  12. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO{sub x} in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Takuya [Department of Products Engineering and Environmental Management, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Minamisaitama, Saitama 345-8501 (Japan); Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Okubo, Masaaki, E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • High-efficiency continuous diesel NO{sub x} reduction method is proposed. • Characteristics of diesel NO{sub x} adsorption and desorption on adsorbent is provided. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with nonthermal plasma is evaluated. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with exhaust gas component recirculation is evaluated. • High NO{sub x} removal efficiency equal to only 1.0% penalty of engine power is achieved. - Abstract: Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO{sub x} emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO{sub x} in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NO{sub x} adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO{sub x} in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO{sub x} in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO{sub x} in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components’ recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO{sub x} reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO{sub x} removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO{sub 2})/kWh for NO{sub x} removal and continuous NO{sub x} reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5–7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  13. Towards continuous global measurements and optimal emission estimates of NF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T.; Muhle, J.; Salameh, P.; Harth, C.; Ivy, D. J.; Weiss, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    We present an analytical method for the continuous in situ measurement of nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) - an anthropogenic gas with a global warming potential of ~16800 over a 100 year time horizon. NF3 is not included in national reporting emissions inventories under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). However, it is a rapidly emerging greenhouse gas due to emission from a growing number of manufacturing facilities with increasing output and modern end-use applications, namely in microcircuit etching, and in production of flat panel displays and thin-film photovoltaic cells. Despite success in measuring the most volatile long lived halogenated species such as CF4, the Medusa preconcentration GC/MS system of Miller et al. (2008) is unable to detect NF3 under remote operation. Using altered techniques of gas separation and chromatography after initial preconcentration, we are now able to make continuous atmospheric measurements of NF3 with average precisions NF3 produced. Emission factors are shown to have reduced over the last decade; however, rising production and end-use have caused the average global atmospheric concentration to double between 2005 and 2011 i.e. half the atmospheric NF3 present today originates from emissions after 2005. Finally we show the first continuous in situ measurements from La Jolla, California, illustrating how global deployment of our technique could improve the temporal and spatial scale of NF3 'top-down' emission estimates over the coming years. These measurements will be important for independent verification of emissions should NF3 be regulated under a new climate treaty.

  14. Airborne heavy metals over Europe: emissions, long-range transport and deposition fluxes to natural ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the processes by which airborne heavy metals are transported from the main emission areas in Europe and become subject to deposition and absorption into terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with subsequent transport and transformation within the biotic and abiotic media that comprise these ecosystems. Results from numerical simulation models capable of simulating long-range transport of heavy metals over Europe together with measurement data of heavy metal concentrations in air and precipitation and the corresponding dry and wet deposition fluxes are reported. European wide inventories of anthropogenic heavy metal emissions based on location and capacity of their dominating source categories such as fossil fuel burning in power plants, industrial and residential combustion, waste incineration and road traffic are briefly described. Emission reduction scenarios with respect to introduction of lead free gasoline are outlined. The critical gaps of knowledge on heavy metals in the atmosphere are identified focusing on uncertainties associated with emission fluxes in Eastern Europe and the scarcity of measurement data in that area. Future research is needed to estimate the effects of emission reductions on deposition fluxes of heavy metals to sensitive ecosystems such as forested areas in Europe is recommended. Special emphasis is placed on mercury, lead and cadmium which have been defined within the European convention on long-range transboundary air pollution of the United Nations-Economic Commission Europe (UN-ECE) to be the priority heavy metals of concern. (orig.)

  15. Metal content in street dust as a reflection of atmospheric dust emissions from coal power plants, metal smelters, and traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Žibret, Gorazd; Van Tonder, Danel; Žibret, Lea

    2012-01-01

    Resuspended street dust is a source of inhalable particles in urban environments. Despite contaminated street dust being a possible health risk factor for local population, little is known about the contribution of atmospheric dust emissions and other factors to the content of toxic metals in street dust. The impact of smelting, traffic, and power plants on metal contaminates in street dust is the focus of street dust sampling at 46 locations in the Witbank area (Republic...

  16. Measurement of particle emission in automobil exhaust - application of continuous radiometric aerosol measurement to the emission of diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasenbrink, A.; Georgi, B.

    1989-01-01

    The well-known method of measuring continuously dust by β-absorption is transferred to the problem of particle emission in automobile exhaust. With two similar dust-monitors FH62 having different sampling air flow rates and two low-pressure impactors the reliability of radiometric mass determination was verified. First static experiments with diesel soot showed the necessity of a dilution system, a new mass calibration with regard to the changed β-absorptivity and a quicker calculation of concentration for realtime measurements. (orig.) [de

  17. Atmospheric toxic metals emission inventory and spatial characteristics from anthropogenic sources of Guangdong province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, S.; Menghua, L.; Xiao, X.; Yuqi, W.; Zhuangmin, Z.; Zhijiong, H.; Cheng, L.; Guanglin, J.; Zibing, Y.; Junyu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric toxic metals (TMs) are part of particulate matters, and may create adverse effects on the environment and human health depending upon their bioavailability and toxicity. Localized emission inventory is fundamental for parsing of toxic metals to identify key sources in order to formulate efficient toxic metals control strategies. With the use of the latest municipal level environment statistical data, this study developed a bottom-up emission inventory of five toxic metals (Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr) from anthropogenic activities in Guangdong province for the year of 2014. Major atmospheric toxic metals sources including combustion sources (coal, oil, biomass, municipal solid waste) and industrial process sources (cement production, nonferrous metal smelting, iron and steel industry, battery and fluorescent lamp production) were investigated. Results showed that: (1) The total emissions of Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr in Guangdong province were 18.14, 32.59, 411.34, 13.13, 84.16 t, respectively. (2) Different pollutants have obvious characteristics of emission sources. For total Hg emission, 46% comes from combustion sources, of which 32% from coal combustion and 8% from MSW combustion. Other 54% comes from industrial processes, which dominated by the cement (19%), fluorescent lamp (18%) and battery production (13%). Of the total Hg emission, 69% is released as Hg0 , 29% as Hg2+ , and only 2% as Hgp due to strict particulate matters controls policies. For As emissions, coal combustion, nonferrous metal smelting and iron and steel industry contributed approximate 48%, 25% and 24%, respectively. Pb emissions primarily come from battery production (42%), iron and steel industry (21%) and on-road mobile gasoline combustion (17%). Cd and Cr emissions were dominated by nonferrous metal smelting (71%) and iron and steel industry (82%), respectively. (3) In term of the spatial distribution, emissions of atmospheric toxic metals are mainly concentrated in the central region of

  18. X-ray-emission studies of chemical bonding in transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Leuken, H. van; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.; Reiter, S.; Wiech, G.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We present Si L2,3 emission-band spectra of a series of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) silicides, together wtih Si K emission-band spectra of four 3d TM disilicides. The data are compared with augmented-spherical-wave density-of-states (DOS) calculations, and good agreement is found. The trends we

  19. Interaction of beam and coated metals at high power continuous irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hyeon; Baek, Won-Kye; Yoh, Jack J.

    2011-07-01

    The beam-matter interaction with various coating effects has received continued attention in the high power laser community. Previous works suggest that coatings promote target damage when compared to beaming on uncoated surface. Three types of paint coatings (acrylic urethane, silicone alkyd and stealth blend) and a water coat on metals (Al, Ti and STS) are irradiated with a CO 2 laser. Both strain and temperature measurements are provided for assessing the instantaneous response characteristics of each coating on different metals. A selective combination of surface coats with metals has been proven to be effective in either preventing or enhancing damage, both thermal and mechanical, associated with focused beaming on a target.

  20. Investigations of the Impact of Biodiesel Metal Contaminants on Emissions Control Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookshear, D. W.; Lance, M. J.; McCormick, Robert L.; Toops, T. J.

    2017-02-27

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel with the potential to displace a portion of petroleum use. However, as with any alternative fuel, in order to be a viable choice it must be compatible with the emissions control devices. The finished biodiesel product can contain up to 5 ppm Na+K and 5 ppm Ca+Mg, and these metal impurities can lead to durability issues with the devices used to control emissions in diesel vehicles. Significant work has been performed to understand how the presence of these metals impacts each individual component of diesel emissions control systems, and this chapter summarizes the findings of these research efforts.

  1. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b...

  2. Influence of metallic based fuel additives on performance and exhaust emissions of diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali [Tarsus Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin, E-mail: mguru@gazi.edu.t [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    In this experimental study, influence of the metallic-based additives on fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of diesel engine were investigated. The metallic-based additives were produced by synthesizing of resin acid (abietic acid) with MnO{sub 2} or MgO. These additives were doped into diesel fuel at the rate of 8 {mu}mol/l and 16 {mu}mol/l for preparing test fuels. Both additives improved the properties of diesel fuel such as viscosity, flash point, cloud point and pour point. The fuels with and without additives were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. Maximum reduction of specific fuel consumption was recorded as 4.16%. CO emission and smoke opacity decreased by 16.35% and by 29.82%, respectively. NO{sub x} emission was measured higher and CO{sub 2} emission was not changed considerably with the metallic-based additives.

  3. Continuously tunable sub-half-wavelength localization via coherent control of spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fei; Tan Xin-Yu; Gong Cheng; Shi Wen-Xing

    2012-01-01

    We propose a continuously tunable method of sub-half-wavelength localization via the coherent control of the spontaneous emission of a four-level Y-type atomic system, which is coupled to three strong coupling fields including a standing-wave field together with a weak probe field. It is shown that the sub-half-wavelength atomic localization is realized for both resonance and off-resonance cases. Furthermore, by varying the probe detuning in succession, the positions of the two localization peaks are tuned continuously within a wide range of probe field frequencies, which provides convenience for the realization of sub-half-wavelength atomic localization experimentally

  4. Pennsylvania's proposed continuous emission monitoring system data telemetry requirements for municipal, hospital and infectious waste incinerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazzaro, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources which has established minimum plan approval, criteria which require certain affected sources to provide the Department with access to continuous emission monitoring (CEM) data via telephone line computer link or other approved means of transfer. The Department has specified formats for logging of CEM data to computer media, a general data telemetry access protocol, floppy disk reporting formats and hardcopy reporting formats

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Continuous Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...—Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Continuous Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Continuous Process Vents 1 Table 1 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1245 - Am I exempt from any appendix B or appendix F requirements to evaluate continuous emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... your sulfur dioxide continuous emission monitoring system require you to also evaluate your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system. Therefore, your oxygen (or carbon dioxide... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Am I exempt from any appendix B or...

  7. 40 CFR 63.6003 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? 63.6003... compliance with the emission limits for tire production affected sources? (a) You must monitor and collect..., calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments), you must monitor continuously (or collect data at...

  8. Removal of heavy metals using a microbial active, continuously operated sand filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy metals play an important role within the spectrum of the various pollutants, emitted into the environment via human activities. In contrast to most organic pollutants, heavy metal can not be degraded. Many soils, lakes and rivers show a high contamination with heavy metals due to the enrichment of these pollutants. In addition to existing chemical-physical and biological technologies for the treatment of heavy metal containing waste waters a demand for new, efficient and low-cost cleaning technologies exists, particularly for high volumes of weakly contaminated waters. Such a technology was developed within the framework of a scientific project of the European Union. The approach makes use of a continuously operated, moving-bed Astrasand filter, which has been operated as a continuous biofilm reactor. By inoculation of the reactor with bacteria providing different, defined mechanisms of metal immobilization, and by continuous supply of suitable nutrients, a metal-immobilizing biofilm is built up and regenerated continuously. Metal-enriched biomass is removed continuously from the system, and the contained metals can be recycled by pyrometallurgical treatment of the biomass. The subjects of the present work were the optimization of the nutrient supply for the process of metal removal, the investigation of the toxicity of different waste waters, the optimization of inoculation and biofilm formation, set-up and operation of a lab scale sand filter and the operation of a pilot scale sand filter treating rinsing water of a chemical nickel plating plant. First, basic parameters like toxicity of heavy metal-containing waste waters and the influence of the nutrition of bacteria on biosorption and total metal removal were examined, using freely suspended bacteria in batch culture. Concerning toxicity great differences could be found within the spectrum of heavy metal-containing waste waters tested. Some waters completely inhibited growth, while others did not

  9. Characterization modelling of aquatic ecotoxicity from metal emission to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan

    on bioavailability. However, ecotoxicity of several metals that commonly appear in Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) have not yet been characterized in freshwater by the novel method. Ecotoxicity CF in marine ecosystem has received even less attention. In the previous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) model, marine CF...... speciation varies in different water chemistries. Thus for each metal spatially differentiated freshwater CF was developed in seven different EU freshwater archetypes. Considering that emission location is often unknown in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies, different averaging principles were tested...... mentioned above, this Ph.D. project aims at developing aquatic CFs for metals, including freshwater CF for 14 metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn) and marine CF for nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cu, Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) both for emission...

  10. Comparative study of gas-analyzing systems designed for continuous monitoring of TPP emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    Determining the composition of combustion products is important in terms of both control of emissions into the atmosphere from thermal power plants and optimization of fuel combustion processes in electric power plants. For this purpose, the concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and sulfur oxides in flue gases is monitored; in case of solid fuel combustion, fly ash concentration is monitored as well. According to the new nature conservation law in Russia, all large TPPs shall be equipped with continuous emission monitoring and measurement systems (CEMMS) into the atmosphere. In order to ensure the continuous monitoring of pollutant emissions, direct round-the-clock measurements are conducted with the use of either domestically produced or imported gas analyzers and analysis systems, the operation of which is based on various physicochemical methods and which can be generally used when introducing CEMMS. Depending on the type and purposes of measurement, various kinds of instruments having different features may be used. This article represents a comparative study of gas-analysis systems for measuring the content of polluting substances in exhaust gases based on various physical and physicochemical analysis methods. It lists basic characteristics of the methods commonly applied in the area of gas analysis. It is proven that, considering the necessity of the long-term, continuous operation of gas analyzers for monitoring and measurement of pollutant emissions into the atmosphere, as well as the requirements for reliability and independence from aggressive components and temperature of the gas flow, it is preferable to use optical gas analyzers for the aforementioned purposes. In order to reduce the costs of equipment comprising a CEMMS at a TPP and optimize the combustion processes, electrochemical and thermomagnetic gas analyzers may also be used.

  11. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Testino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR, has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1−xNixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO42 nanoparticles (NPs can be obtained with a production rate of about 1–10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  12. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Andrea; Pilger, Frank; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Stähli, Christoph; Bowen, Paul

    2015-06-08

    Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR), has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1-x)NixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape) and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO4)2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be obtained with a production rate of about 1-10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  13. Continuous leaching modifies the surface properties and metal(loid) sorption of sludge-derived biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingyu; Zhang, Weihua; Wu, Xueyong; Jia, Yanming; Jiang, Chixiao; Wei, Hang; Qiu, Rongliang; Tsang, Daniel C W

    2018-06-01

    After the application of sludge derived biochar (SDBC) for soil stabilization, it is subjected to continuous leaching that may change its surface properties and metal(loid) immobilization performance. This study simulated the continuous leaching through the fresh SDBC sample in columns with unsaturated and saturated zones under flushing with 0.01M NaNO 3 solution (pH5.5) and acidic solution (pH adjusted to 3.2 by HNO 3 :H 2 SO 4 =1:2), respectively. The resultant changes were assessed in terms of the SDBC surface characteristics and metal(loid) sorption capacities. Continuous leaching was found to gradually decrease the density of basic functional groups and increase the density of carboxyl groups as well as cation exchange capacity on the SDBC surface. It was attributed to the surface acidification and oxidation process by the leaching process, yet it occurred to a lesser extent than the atmospheric exposure. Continuous leaching increased Pb(II), Cr(VI), and As(III) sorption capacity of the SDBC, probably because the increase in carboxyl groups promoted inner-sphere complexation and Fe oxidation as revealed by spectroscopic analysis. It was noteworthy that the SDBC in the unsaturated and saturated zones under continuous leaching displayed distinctive effects on metal(loid) sorption capacity than the atmospheric exposure. Future investigations are needed for understanding the fate and interactions of the SDBC under varying redox conditions and intermittent leaching process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Air emission in France. Metropolitan area heavy metals; Emissions dans l'air en France. Metropole metaux lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    Substances and index currently in survey are: Heavy metals: Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Mercury (Hg), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), Selenium (Se), Zinc (Zn). Density ratios relating to population, area, gross product, primary energy consumption, etc. Annual emissions are provided for each substance since 1990. Dates corresponding to the maximum and minimum values are also included. Results are provisional for 2001. (author)

  15. Effect of metallic and hyperbolic metamaterial surfaces on electric and magnetic dipole emission transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, X.; Naik, G. V.; Kildishev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous emission patterns of electric and magnetic dipoles on different metallic surfaces and a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) surface were simulated using the dyadic Green’s function technique. The theoretical approach was verified by experimental results obtained by measuring angular-depende......-dependent emission spectra of europium ions on top of different films. The results show the modified behavior of electric and magnetic dipoles on metallic and HMM surfaces. The results of numerical calculations agree well with experimental data.......Spontaneous emission patterns of electric and magnetic dipoles on different metallic surfaces and a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) surface were simulated using the dyadic Green’s function technique. The theoretical approach was verified by experimental results obtained by measuring angular...

  16. Ion and neutral emission from pulsed laser irradiation of metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Andó, L.; Gammino, S.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 184, - (2001), s. 327-336 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : pulse laser irradiation * ion neutral emission * plasma * time of flight Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2001

  17. Electron field emission from sp -induced insulating to metallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    possible applications as semiconductor materials (Silva et al 1998) and as potential field emission cathode ... Though post treatment and annealing results in higher sp. 2 content cluster sizes, graphitization of the ... The samples were prepared by a simple pyrolysis method at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900°C) ...

  18. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS2 and Metal/WSe2 Heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds, therefore make more `ideal' Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce recombination centers at the interface with metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10X enhancement in the indirect band gap PL of TMDCs deposited on various metals, while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2, and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier of the Σ-point band makes electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wavefunctions in the metal. This enhancement only occurs for thick flakes, and is absent in monolayer and few-layer flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures. Reference: DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b00885

  19. High cycle fatigue study of metal-ceramic co-continuous composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavese, Matteo [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: matteo.pavese@polito.it; Fino, Paolo [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy); Ugues, Daniele [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy); Badini, Claudio [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Co-continuous metal-ceramic composites synthesised by the reactive metal penetration method, starting from silica prms and a 99.5% pure aluminium alloy, were characterised in high cycle tension-compression fatigue. The tests were performed at ambient temperature, in load control and with R = -1; the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope. The Woehler curve is rather flat, suggesting that these composites behave similarly to ceramics, and the fatigue limit at 10{sup 7} cycles is 91 MPa.

  20. Optimization of the uniformity of a metal flow during continuous extrusion by the Conform method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubanova, A. Sh.; Gorokhov, Yu. V.; Solopko, I. V.; Ziborov, A. Yu.

    2010-03-01

    The scheme of plastic deformation of a billet in a container is considered as part of continuous extrusion by the Conform method. A mathematical model of the motion of a viscoplastic Bingham liquid is used to determine the metal velocity distribution in the plastic-deformation zone. As a result, the optimum angle between the longitudinal axes of the die and container is estimated. This angle is found to be one of the main factors affecting the nonuniformity of deformation when a metal flows into the die. The calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  1. Barkhausen Effect and Acoustic Emission in a Metallic Glass - Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Sanchez, R.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Armeite, M.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Magneto Acoustic Emission, which is Barkhausen Noise (BN) and Acoustic Emission (AE), depends on microstructure and existing residual stresses in magnetic materials. Preliminary results obtained by magnetization along two perpendicular directions on a metal glass foil are presented. Signals were analyzed with Statistic, Fast Fourier and Wavelet methods. Results are part of a Joint Research Project of the Faculty of Science, Cantabria University, Spain, and the Elastic Waves Group of the National Atomic Energy Commission, Argentina

  2. Automated installation for atomic emission determination of gold, silver and platinum group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakina, S.B.; Anoshin, G.N.; Gerasimov, P.A.; Smirnov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    An automated installation for the direct atomic emission determination of silver, gold and platinum-group metals (Ru) in geological and geochemical materials with software for automated data acquisition and handling is designed and developed. The installation consists of a DFS-458 diffraction spectrograph, a MAES-10 multichannel analyzer of emission spectra, and a dual-jet plasmatron. A library of spectral lines of almost all elements excited in the dual-jet plasmatron is complied [ru

  3. Changes in distortion product oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to continuous and impulsive noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Temporary changes in the hearing of human subjects were monitored with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) after control sound exposures in a laboratory. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate whether the +5~dB penalty for impulsiveness used in international standards...... and legislation correlates to a higher risk of hearing damage. Subjects were exposed to two types of binaural recordings consisting of a continuous broad-band noise-exposure normalized to LEX,8h = 80~dB and the interaction of the previous stimulus with a noise of impulsive character normalized to LEX,8h = 75 + 5...

  4. Watt-Level Continuous-Wave Emission from a Bi-Functional Quantum Cascade Laser/Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    ed em is si on sp ec tra Wavenumbers (cm−1) Wavelength (µm) subthreshold 1480 mA 1530 mA 1600 mA 2000 mA 2500 mA 3000 mA Figure 3: Emission spectra of...cally authorized by the U.S. Government may violate any copyrights that exist in this work. Watt-level continuous-wave emission from a bi-functional...facet continuous wave emission at 15◦C. Apart from the general performance benets, this enables sensing techiques which rely on continuous wave

  5. Electron and ion induced electron emission from metals and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbatz, M

    2001-01-01

    gradually exposed to oxygen as an experimental probe. The experimental data are fitted with an analytical model, that is able to describe the observed kinetics. The fit parameters give absolute values of sticking probabilities and of surface reaction rates. During oxidation of aluminum and magnesium also spontaneous emission of electrons (exoelectrons) is observed. This effect is quantitatively studied for different oxygen partial pressures. The experimental data also indicate a significant influence of the surface morphology on the exoemission process. An important consequence of atomic collisions in solids is ionization leading to electron ejection from the target atoms with subsequent migration through the solid. A certain fraction of these electrons finally reaches the surface and is ejected into vacuum. A standard measurement of this phenomenon is the observation of the particle (electron, ion) induced electron emission yield g, defined as the average number of ejected electrons per incoming projectile. ...

  6. Release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliance: an in vitro study in continuous flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Wołowiec, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances. A new system for in vitro testing of dental materials was constructed and consisted of a thermostatic glass reactor that enabled immersion of the studied material. Experimental conditions reflected the human oral cavity, with a temperature of 37°C and a saliva flow rate of 0.5mL/min. The simulated fixed orthodontic appliance made of stainless steel was evaluated. Sampling was performed at several time points during the 28-day study, and the metal ion concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The total mass of released metal ions from the appliance during 4 weeks of the experiment was as follows nickel 18.7 μg, chromium 5.47 μg, copper 31.3 μg. The estimated doses of nickel, chromium, and copper determined by extrapolation of experimental data released during the treatment period were far below the toxic dose to humans. This shows that orthodontic treatment might not be a significant source of exposure to these metal ions.

  7. Stable field emission from arrays of vertically aligned free-standing metallic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Ferain, E.

    2008-01-01

    the nanowire surface is developed to explain this particular field emission behaviour. Finally, we present an in situ cleaning procedure by ion bombardment that collectively removes this oxide layer, leading to a stable and reproducible emission behaviour. After treatment, the emission current density is ∼1 m......We present a fully elaborated process to grow arrays of metallic nanowires with controlled geometry and density, based on electrochemical filling of nanopores in track-etched templates. Nanowire growth is performed at room temperature, atmospheric pressure and is compatible with low cost...

  8. Mechanical properties of permeable materials with an organized structure on the base of continuous metal fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpinos, D.M.; Rutkovskij, A.E.; Zorin, V.A.; Ivanchuk, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical properties were studied for permeable fibrous materials with an organized structure on the base of continuous metal fibers (from Kh18N9T steel) subjected to preliminary reprocessing volumetric net half-finished products. The effect of geometrical parameters of the net half-finished products and of their orientation in packing are shown to affect the mechanical properties within a wide range of porosities

  9. The emission spectroscopy for evaluation of concentration of the metal vapor concentration in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarakovskis, A.; Gromuls, I.; Tale, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Evaluation of the absolute concentration of the impurity metal vapors in plasma using emission spectroscopy requires development of the principles and procedure of in situ calibration of equipment. Several approaches can be used for calibration of the equipment. In the case the emission rate of single metal atom under ionizing conditions is known, the calibration of the spectroscopic equipment reduces to the calibration in radiometric units (irradiance). For unknown emission rate the routine calibration procedure involves use of the set of etalons of material under investigation with known concentration of impurity metal. For evaluation of impurity concentration in plasma it is necessary to develop a corresponding plasma source having certain plasma parameters - temperature and concentration of electrons and metal vapors in concentration, which can be measured independent procedure. Present report deals with problems of estimation of Ga impurity concentration in ISSTOK ( Portugal) tokamak plasma using decay data of atom emission lines. Emission spectra of Ga atoms show that collisions with hydrogen electrons and ions results in ionization of Ga followed by multi step radiative recombination. The main emission lines corresponds to the capture of electron to the 4s 2 5p (639 nm), transition 4s 2 5p - 4s 2 5s (1,211 μm ); and transition to the ground state 4s 2 5s - 4s 2 4p (403 nm). Some of the excited state lifetimes obtained from decay kinetics are reported. Analysis of emission line intensity ratios together with lifetime data will allow elaborate the procedure for evaluation of Ga impurity concentration in the tokamak plasma

  10. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Timothy D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Dykes, Charles D.

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  11. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equivalent carbon dioxide level). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen (or the equivalent carbon dioxide level). (b) Obtain at least two...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equivalent carbon dioxide level). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent oxygen (or the equivalent carbon dioxide level). (b) Obtain at least two...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon...

  14. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your...

  15. Trace moisture emissions from heated metal surfaces in hydrogen service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, Hans H.; Yao Jianlong; Raynor, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of trace moisture by exposure of dry heated surfaces of 316 L stainless-steel, Restek Silcosteel registered , and nickel 1/8 in. outer diameter line segments to purified Ar and H 2 was studied using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry at flow rates of 2 slpm. Prior to H 2 exposure, adsorbed moisture was removed by heating incrementally to 500 deg. C in an argon matrix, where the Restek Silcosteel registered material released a maximum of 50 ppb moisture at 300 deg. C and moisture spikes from the Ni and stainless-steel surfaces reached several 100 ppb. Upon exposure to H 2 , persistent low ppb moisture emissions due to the reduction of surface oxide species were observed at temperatures as low as 100 deg. C. Spikes at 300-500 deg. C ranged from ∼100 ppb for the stainless-steel lines to 400 ppb for the Restek Silcosteel registered material. The observed moisture emissions have to be considered as a potential contamination source for high-purity processes utilizing H 2 purge at elevated temperatures

  16. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected facilities...

  17. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... oxygen. (d) For approval, a State plan shall include emission limits for nitrogen oxides at least as...

  18. Short-term variability of mineral dust, metals and carbon emission from road dust resuspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amato, F.; Schaap, M.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Keuken, M.; Querol, X.

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities has severe impact on morbidity and mortality of their population. In these cities, road dust resuspension contributes largely to PM and airborne heavy metals concentrations. However, the short-term variation of emission through resuspension is not well

  19. The effects of agglomeration/defluidization on emission of heavy metals for various fluidized parameters in fluidized-bed incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chih-Hung [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, 811 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The agglomeration/defluidization may be produced to generate the secondary pollutant during incineration. However, the effects of agglomeration/defluidization on heavy metal distribution have rarely been examined. Therefore, the effects of the agglomeration/defluidization process on heavy metal emission in flue gas are studied. The artificial waste is employed to simulate municipal waste and to form agglomerates, which contain alkali metals, earth alkali metals, a mixture of metals (Pb, Cr and Cd) and sawdust. The fluidized parameters (including gas velocity, sand particle size and static bed height) are varied to determine their influences on heavy metal emission. The results indicate that addition of Na increases the risk of agglomeration/defluidization, but the emission concentration of heavy metals decreases during agglomeration/defluidization. The heavy metals may react with Na to form the eutectics or are covered and adhered by the liquid-phase eutectics of Na to stay in sand particle and lead to a decrease in the emission of heavy metals. The system was operated at a low gas velocity that not only easily resulted in agglomeration/defluidization but also increased the emission concentration of heavy metals. Large particles (920 {mu}m), which have a poor fluidized quality, had the highest emission concentration. Small particles (645 {mu}m) were uniformly fluidized to enhance the fluidization quality and to decrease the emission concentration. Additionally, adding Ca did not decrease the heavy metal emission concentration, but maintained the fluidization during eutectic accumulation. The Ca prevented the sand bed from quickly achieving defluidization and prolonged the increased emission of heavy metals after defluidization. (author)

  20. [Continuous remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil by co-cropping system enhanced with chelator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ze-Bin; Guo, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Qi-Tang; Long, Xin-Xian

    2014-11-01

    In order to elucidate the continuous effectiveness of co-cropping system coupling with chelator enhancement in remediating heavy metal contaminated soils and its environmental risk towards underground water, soil lysimeter (0.9 m x 0.9 m x 0.9 m) experiments were conducted using a paddy soil affected by Pb and Zn mining in Lechang district of Guangdong Province, 7 successive crops were conducted for about 2.5 years. The treatments included mono-crop of Sedum alfredii Hance (Zn and Cd hyperaccumulator), mono-crop of corn (Zea mays, cv. Yunshi-5, a low-accumulating cultivar), co-crop of S. alfredii and corn, and co-crop + MC (Mixture of Chelators, comprised of citric acid, monosodium glutamate waste liquid, EDTA and KCI with molar ratio of 10: 1:2:3 at the concentration of 5 mmol x kg(-1) soil). The changes of heavy metal concentrations in plants, soil and underground water were monitored. Results showed that the co-cropping system was suitable only in spring-summer seasons and significantly increased Zn and Cd phytoextraction. In autumn-winter seasons, the growth of S. alfredii and its phytoextraction of Zn and Cd were reduced by co-cropping and MC application. In total, the mono-crops of S. alfredii recorded a highest phytoextraction of Zn and Cd. However, the greatest reduction of soil Zn, Cd and Pb was observed with the co-crop + MC treatment, the reduction rates were 28%, 50%, and 22%, respectively, relative to the initial soil metal content. The reduction of this treatment was mainly attributed to the downwards leaching of metals to the subsoil caused by MC application. The continuous monitoring of leachates during 2. 5 year's experiment also revealed that the addition of MC increased heavy metal concentrations in the leaching water, but they did not significantly exceed the III grade limits of the underground water standard of China.

  1. Emission spectra of alkali-metal (K,Na,Li)-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed emission spectra of excimers and exciplexes composed of a light alkali-metal atom in the first excited state and 4 He atoms [K*He n (n=1-6), Na * He n (n=1-4), and Li * He n (n=1,2)] in cryogenic He gas (the temperature 2 K -1 . Differently from exciplexes with heavier alkali-metal atoms, the spectra for the different number of He atoms were well separated, so that their assignment could be made experimentally. Comparing with the spectra of K * He n , we found that the infrared emission spectrum of the K atom excited in liquid He was from K*He 6 . To confirm the assignment, we have also carried out ab initio calculation of adiabatic potential curves and peak positions of the emission spectra of the exciplexes

  2. Pilot study on using an alternative method of estimating emission of heavy metals from wood combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Bożym, Marta

    2014-09-01

    This thesis presents pilot studies concerning the assessment of the possibility of using organic materials of vegetative origin as indices of heavy metals emissions (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) from domestic wood-fired fireplaces. Mosses of the Pleurozium schreberi species as well as cellulose and cotton wool were used during the study as the potential indices for the elements emission. It was proved that mosses are more reliable as indices of metals emissions than cellulose or cotton wool. It was found that the quantity of Ni accumulated in the moss tissue is comparable with the concentration of this compound in the dust assessed with the reference method. A correlation between the Ni, Cr, Zn and Pb concentrations defined in the mosses and dust filter was found. It was proved that mosses as adsorbers, more clearly than in the case of cellulose and cotton, react to the change of the size of the particulates emitted.

  3. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  4. Forest land cover continues to exacerbate freshwater acidification despite decline in sulphate emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, Robert W.; Donoghue, Daniel N.M.; Burt, Tim P.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from a multi-date regional-scale analysis of both high-flow and annual-average water quality data from Galloway, south-west Scotland, demonstrates that forest land cover continues to exacerbate freshwater acidification. This is in spite of significant reductions in airborne pollutants. The relationship between freshwater sulphate and forest cover has decreased from 1996 to 2006 indicating a decrease in pollutant scavenging. The relationship between forest cover and freshwater acidity (pH) is, however, still present over the same period, and does not show conclusive signs of having declined. Furthermore, evidence for forest cover contributing to a chlorine bias in marine ion capture suggests that forest scavenging of sea-salts may mean that the forest acidification effect may continue in the absence of anthropogenic pollutant inputs, particularly in coastal areas. - Highlights: ► Forest cover and water chemistry remain linked despite decreased sulphate emissions. ► Forest cover has significant relationships SO 4 2− , Cl − , Na + , pH, ANC and Na:Cl ratio. ► Forest cover: pH relationships shows some evidence of decline 1996–2006. ► Forest cover: freshwater sulphate relationships show evidence of decline 1996–2006. ► Natural forest-mechanisms may exacerbate acidification, particularly sea-salt scavenging. - Relationships between forest land cover and freshwater pH continue to be evident despite declines in anthropogenic pollutant sulphate deposition; sea-salt scavenging may play a role.

  5. OXYGEN METALLICITY DETERMINATIONS FROM OPTICAL EMISSION LINES IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athey, Alex E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the oxygen abundances of the warm (T ∼ 10 4 K) phase of gas in seven early-type galaxies through long-slit observations. A template spectra was constructed from galaxies void of warm gas and subtracted from the emission-line galaxies, allowing for a clean measurement of the nebular lines. The ratios of the emission lines are consistent with photoionization, which likely originates from the ultraviolet flux of postasymototic giant branch stars. We employ H II region photoionization models to determine a mean oxygen metallicity of 1.01 ± 0.50 solar for the warm interstellar medium (ISM) in this sample. This warm ISM 0.5-1.5 solar metallicity is consistent with modern determinations of the metallicity in the hot (T ∼ 10 6 -10 7 K) ISM and the upper range of this warm ISM metallicity is consistent with stellar population metallicity determinations. A solar metallicity of the warm ISM favors an internal origin for the warm ISM such as asymptotic giant branch mass loss within the galaxy.

  6. Method for continuously recovering metals using a dual zone chemical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, M.C.

    1995-02-14

    A dual zone chemical reactor continuously processes metal-containing materials while regenerating and circulating a liquid carrier. The starting materials are fed into a first reaction zone of a vessel containing a molten salt carrier. The starting materials react to form a metal product and a by-product that dissolves in the molten salt that flows to a second reaction zone in the reaction vessel. The second reaction zone is partitioned from, but in fluid communication with, the first reaction zone. The liquid carrier continuously circulates along a pathway between the first reaction zone and the second reaction zone. A reactive gas is introduced into the second reaction zone to react with the reaction by-product to generate the molten salt. The metal product, the gaseous waste products, and the excess liquid carrier are removed without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The design of the dual zone reactor can be adapted to combine a plurality of liquid carrier regeneration zones in a multiple dual zone chemical reactor for production scale processing. 6 figs.

  7. Ice-core based assessment of historical anthropogenic heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Sb, Zn) emissions in the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Anja; Tobler, Leonhard; Eyrikh, Stella; Malygina, Natalia; Papina, Tatyana; Schwikowski, Margit

    2014-01-01

    The development of strategies and policies aiming at the reduction of environmental exposure to air pollution requires the assessment of historical emissions. Although anthropogenic emissions from the extended territory of the Soviet Union (SU) considerably influenced concentrations of heavy metals in the Northern Hemisphere, Pb is the only metal with long-term historical emission estimates for this region available, whereas for selected other metals only single values exist. Here we present the first study assessing long-term Cd, Cu, Sb, and Zn emissions in the SU during the period 1935-1991 based on ice-core concentration records from Belukha glacier in the Siberian Altai and emission data from 12 regions in the SU for the year 1980. We show that Zn primarily emitted from the Zn production in Ust-Kamenogorsk (East Kazakhstan) dominated the SU heavy metal emission. Cd, Sb, Zn (Cu) emissions increased between 1935 and the 1970s (1980s) due to expanded non-ferrous metal production. Emissions of the four metals in the beginning of the 1990s were as low as in the 1950s, which we attribute to the economic downturn in industry, changes in technology for an increasing metal recovery from ores, the replacement of coal and oil by gas, and air pollution control.

  8. LIGO/Virgo GW170817: Chandra X-ray Emission Continues to Rise 156 Days Post-Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Nynka, Melania; Ruan, John J.; Evans, Phil; Kalogera, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    We have obtained new X-ray observations of GW170817 via Chandra Director's Discretionary Time (PI: Wilkes, Program Number 19408607). The X-ray counterpart to GW170817/GRB170817A/SSS17a continues to be detected and the X-ray emission continues to brighten approximately 156 days after the neutron star merger.

  9. Annihilation electrogenerated chemiluminescence of mixed metal chelates in solution: modulating emission colour by manipulating the energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Emily; Doeven, Egan H.; Bower, David J.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Connell, Timothy U.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the mixed annihilation electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) with various cyclometalated iridium(iii) chelates. Compared to mixed ECL systems comprising organic luminophores, the absence of T-route pathways enables effective predictions of the observed ECL based on simple estimations of the exergonicity of the reactions leading to excited state production. Moreover, the multiple, closely spaced reductions and oxidations of the metal chelates provide the ability to finely tune the energetics and therefore the observed emission colour. Distinct emissions from multiple luminophores in the same solution are observed in numerous systems. The relative intensity of these emissions and the overall emission colour are dependent on the particular oxidized and reduced species selected by the applied electrochemical potentials. Finally, these studies offer insights into the importance of electronic factors in the question of whether the reduced or oxidized partner becomes excited in annihilation ECL. PMID:28694941

  10. Source-specific speciation profiles of PM2.5 for heavy metals and their anthropogenic emissions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayong; Xing, Jia; Wang, Shuxiao; Fu, Xiao; Zheng, Haotian

    2018-04-20

    Heavy metals are concerned for its adverse effect on human health and long term burden on biogeochemical cycling in the ecosystem. In this study, a provincial-level emission inventory of 13 kinds of heavy metals including V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba and Pb from 10 anthropogenic sources was developed for China, based on the 2015 national emission inventory of primary particulate matters and source category-specific speciation profiles collected from 50 previous studies measured in China. Uncertainties associated with the speciation profiles were also evaluated. Our results suggested that total emissions of the 13 types of heavy metals in China are estimated at about 58000 ton for the year 2015. The iron production is the dominant source of heavy metal, contributing 42% of total emissions of heavy metals. The emissions of heavy metals vary significantly at regional scale, with largest amount of emissions concentrated in northern and eastern China. Particular, high emissions of Cr, Co, Ni, As and Sb (contributing 8%-18% of the national emissions) are found in Shandong where has large capacity of industrial production. Uncertainty analysis suggested that the implementation of province-specific source profiles in this study significantly reduced the emission uncertainties from (-89%, 289%) to (-99%, 91%), particularly for coal combustion. However, source profiles for industry sectors such as non-metallic mineral manufacturing are quite limited, resulting in a relative high uncertainty. The high-resolution emission inventories of heavy metals are essential not only for their distribution, deposition and transport studies, but for the design of policies to redress critical atmospheric environmental hazards at local and regional scales. Detailed investigation on source-specific profile in China are still needed to achieve more accurate estimations of heavy metals in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  12. The effect of technogenic emissions on the heavy metals accumulation by herbaceous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplygin, Victor; Minkina, Tatiana; Mandzhieva, Saglara; Burachevskaya, Marina; Sushkova, Svetlana; Poluektov, Evgeniy; Antonenko, Elena; Kumacheva, Valentina

    2018-02-07

    The effect of technogenic emissions on the input of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ni into plants from the Poaceae and Asteraceae families has been studied. Soil and plant contamination by anthropogenic emissions from industrial enterprises leads the decreasing of crop quality; therefore, the monitoring investigation of plants and soils acquires special importance. The herbaceous plants may be used as bioindicators for main environmental changes. It was found that the high level of anthropogenic load related to atmospheric emissions from the power plant favors the heavy metal (HM) accumulation in herbaceous plants. Contamination with Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni was revealed in plants growing near the power plant. Heavy metals arrive to plants from the soil in the form of mobile compounds. Plant family is one of the main factors affecting the HM distribution in the above- and underground parts of plants. Plants from the Poaceae family accumulate less chemical elements in their aboveground parts than the Asteraceae plants. Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Artemisia austriaca are HM accumulators. For assessing the stability of plants under contamination with HMs, metal accumulation by plants from soil (the bioconcentration factor) and metal phytoavailability from plants above- and underground parts (the acropetal coefficient) were calculated. According to the bioconcentration factor and translocation factor values, Poaceae species are most resistant to technogenic contamination with HMs. The translocation factor highest values were found for Tanacetum vulgare; the lowest bioconcentration factor values were typical for Poa pratensis.

  13. Investigation of coherent molecular resonances in quantum dot–metallic nanoparticle systems using their spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, S.M.; Patty, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of metallic nanoparticles the nature of the optical excitations (pumping) of semiconductor quantum dots can be determined by their molecular states and resonances formed via coherent coupling of excitons and plasmons. We show that the spontaneous emission of such quantum dots can provide key information regarding formation and characteristics of such molecular properties. This includes an ultra-fast switching process associated with optical transition between the molecular states of the quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle system or its plasmonic meta-resonance when the intensity of the laser field responsible for the exciton–plasmon coupling reaches a critical value. We also show that by varying the intensity of this laser, the spontaneous emission exhibits characteristic features indicating tunability of the molecular resonances and excitation-power dependence of plasmonic fields of the metallic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Investigation of collective molecular properties of quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems. • Impact of such collective properties on the optical excitation of quantum dots. • Effects of exciton–plasmon coupling in the spontaneous emission of the quantum dots. • Signatures of plasmonic meta-resonances in the fluorescence of quantum dots

  14. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A., E-mail: ja.conesa@ua.es; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO{sub 2005}-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) is studied. • Important differences were found at the different experimental conditions. • Emission of brominated pollutants is much higher than that of chlorinated. • Metal enhances emission of halogenated compounds. • An increase in the temperature produces the destruction of pollutants.

  15. Monitoring of heavy metal particle emission in the exhaust duct of a foundry using LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutouquet, C; Gallou, G; Le Bihan, O; Sirven, J B; Dermigny, A; Torralba, B; Frejafon, E

    2014-09-01

    Heavy metals have long been known to be detrimental to human health and the environment. Their emission is mainly considered to occur via the atmospheric route. Most of airborne heavy metals are of anthropogenic origin and produced through combustion processes at industrial sites such as incinerators and foundries. Current regulations impose threshold limits on heavy metal emissions. The reference method currently implemented for quantitative measurements at exhaust stacks consists of on-site sampling of heavy metals on filters for the particulate phase (the most prominent and only fraction considered in this study) prior to subsequent laboratory analysis. Results are therefore known only a few days after sampling. Stiffer regulations require the development of adapted tools allowing automatic, on-site or even in-situ measurements with temporal resolutions. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was deemed as a potential candidate to meet these requirements. On site experiments were run by melting copper bars and monitoring emission of this element in an exhaust duct at a pilot-scale furnace in a French research center dedicated to metal casting. Two approaches designated as indirect and direct analysis were broached in these experiments. The former corresponds to filter enrichment prior to subsequent LIBS interrogation whereas the latter entails laser focusing right through the aerosol for detection. On-site calibration curves were built and compared with those obtained at laboratory scale in order to investigate possible matrix and analyte effects. Eventually, the obtained results in terms of detection limits and quantitative temporal monitoring of copper emission clearly emphasize the potentialities of the direct LIBS measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Neupane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP. Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed.

  17. Were mercury emission factors for Chinese non-ferrous metal smelters overestimated? Evidence from onsite measurements in six smelters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Wang Shuxiao; Wu Qingru; Meng Yang; Yang Hai; Wang Fengyang; Hao Jiming

    2012-01-01

    Non-ferrous metal smelting takes up a large proportion of the anthropogenic mercury emission inventory in China. Zinc, lead and copper smelting are three leading sources. Onsite measurements of mercury emissions were conducted for six smelters. The mercury emission factors were 0.09–2.98 g Hg/t metal produced. Acid plants with the double-conversion double-absorption process had mercury removal efficiency of over 99%. In the flue gas after acid plants, 45–88% was oxidized mercury which can be easily scavenged in the flue gas scrubber. 70–97% of the mercury was removed from the flue gas to the waste water and 1–17% to the sulfuric acid product. Totally 0.3–13.5% of the mercury in the metal concentrate was emitted to the atmosphere. Therefore, acid plants in non-ferrous metal smelters have significant co-benefit on mercury removal, and the mercury emission factors from Chinese non-ferrous metal smelters were probably overestimated in previous studies. - Highlights: ► Acid plants in smelters provide significant co-benefits for mercury removal (over 99%). ► Most of the mercury in metal concentrates for smelting ended up in waste water. ► Previously published emission factors for Chinese metal smelters were probably overestimated. - Acid plants in smelters have high mercury removal efficiency, and thus mercury emission factors for Chinese non-ferrous metal smelters were probably overestimated.

  18. TA [2] Continuous, regional methane emissions estimates in northern Pennsylvania gas fields using atmospheric inversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauvaux, Thomas [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-12-31

    Natural Gas (NG) production activities in the northeastern Marcellus shale have significantly increased in the last decade, possibly releasing large amounts of methane (CH4) into the atmosphere from the operations at the productions sites and during the processing and transmission steps of the natural gas chain. Based on an intensive aircraft survey, leakage rates from the NG production were quantified in May 2015 and found to be in the order of 0.5% of the total production, higher than reported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but below the usually observed leakage rates over the shale gases in the US. Thanks to the high production rates on average at each well, leakage rates normalized by production appeared to be low in the northeastern Marcellus shale. This result confirms that natural gas production using unconventional techniques in this region is emitting relatively less CH4 into the atmosphere than other shale reservoirs. The low emissions rate can be explained in part by the high productivity of wells drilled across the northeastern Marcellus region. We demonstrated here that atmospheric monitoring techniques can provide an independent quantification of NG leakage rates using aircraft measurements. The CH4 analyzers were successfully calibrated at four sites across the region, measuring continuously the atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios and isotopic 13Ch4. Our preliminary findings confirm the low leakage rates from tower data collected over September 2015 to November 2016 compared to the aircraft mass-balance estimates in may 2015. However, several episodes revealing large releases of natural gas over several weeks showed that temporal variations in the emissions of CH4 may increase the actual leakage rate over longer time periods.

  19. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  20. Continuous and recurrent testing of acoustic emission sensors; Kontinuierliche und wiederkehrende Pruefung von Schallemissionssensoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sause, Markus G.R.; Schmitt, Stefan; Potstada, Philipp [Augsburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Materials Resource Management, Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    In many fields of application of acoustic emission, the testing can lead to a lasting change in the sensor characteristics. This can be caused by mechanical damage, thermal stress or use under aggressive environmental conditions. Irrespective of visually testable damages of the sensors, a shift in the spectral sensitivity, a reduction in the absolute sensitivity or a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio can occur. During the test, this requires a possibility to periodically check the sensors, including the coupling aids used. For recurring testing, recommendations are given in Directive SE 02 ''Verification of acoustic emission sensors and their coupling in the laboratory''. This paper discusses possibilities for continuous monitoring of the sensors during the test and presents an application example for the partly automated recurring testing of acoustic emission sensors using Directive SE 02. For this purpose, a test stand for the supply of the sensors to be tested was constructed and the signal recording and data reduction implemented in freely available software programs. The operating principle is demonstrated using selected case studies. [German] In vielen Anwendungsbereichen der Schallemission kann es bei der Pruefung zu einer nachhaltigen Veraenderung der Sensorcharakteristik kommen. Dies kann durch mechanische Beschaedigung, thermische Belastung oder Verwendung unter aggressiven Umweltbedingungen geschehen. Unabhaengig von visuell pruefbaren Beschaedigungen der Sensoren kann es dabei zu einer Verschiebung der spektralen Empfindlichkeit, einer Verringerung der absoluten Empfindlichkeit oder einer Erniedrigung des Signal-Rausch Verhaeltnis kommen. Bei der Pruefung erfordert dies eine Moeglichkeit zur periodischen Ueberpruefung der Sensoren inklusive der verwendeten Koppelhilfsmittel. Fuer die wiederkehrende Pruefung finden sich entsprechende Handlungsempfehlungen in der Richtlinie SE 02 ''Verifizierung von

  1. Fossil fuel consumption and heavy metal emissions into the atmosphere in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.; Gromov, S.

    1999-01-01

    In recent decades more and more attention has been paid to the problem of ecosystem pollution by heavy metals. Many trace elements are registered now as a global pollutant due to their toxic nature. Their negative influence on the environment is caused by accumulation in different ecosystem components and increased involvement in biochemical cycles. The atmosphere is the main medium through which pollutants transported from emission sources to background territories where heavy metals are deposited into water and on plants. Heavy metal emissions into the atmosphere cause certain global environmental problems due to their long lifetime and the long-term transport of these elements in the atmosphere, as well as the increasing rate of their accumulation in the environment even at most remote territories. Moreover, heavy metals have evidently entered human food chains. The influence of global ecosystem pollution by heavy metals on human health is not well known as yet. Most trace elements comes into the atmosphere with natural and man-made aerosols. The main sources of natural aerosols in the atmosphere are soil erosion and weathering of mountain rocks, volcanic and space dust, forest firing smoke, and others. Major anthropogenic sources of toxic elements are fossil fuel combustion, mining, industrial processes, and waste incineration. The anthropogenic flow of heavy metals to the atmosphere is about 94-97 per cent of the total. An inventory of emission sources should be the first step in developing a control strategy and modelling global and regional cycles of trace elements. In this article the situation with lead, cadmium and mercury emissions from coal combustion of power plants and gasoline combustion by road transport is discussed. Pollutant amounts released into the atmosphere in industrial regions induce not only local deterioration of air, but they also affect on remote areas, and areas sensitive to contamination, such as the Arctic region. Problems on the

  2. Enhanced quantum efficiency of photoelectron emission, through surface textured metal electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Anna; Bandaru, Prabhakar R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Program in Materials Science, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, 92130 (United States); Moody, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    It is predicted that the quantum efficiency (QE) of photoelectron emission from metals may be enhanced, possibly by an order of magnitude, through optimized surface texture. Through extensive computational simulations, it is shown that the absorption enhancement in select surface groove geometries may be a dominant contributor to enhanced QE and corresponds to localized Fabry–Perot resonances. The inadequacy of extant analytical models in predicting the QE increase, and suggestions for further improvement, are discussed.

  3. Electron emission from a metal nano-tip by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, G; Lemell, C; Burgdörfer, J

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of near-infrared few cycle laser pulses of moderate intensity with nano-scale metal tips. Macroscopic field enhancement leads to coherent electron emission from the tip apex. Electron spectra are simulated with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We investigate the dependence of the simulated electron spectra on the choice of exchange-correlation potential and atomic core pseudo-potential.

  4. Transition absorption as a mechanism of surface photoelectron emission from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh

    2015-01-01

    Transition absorption of a photon by an electron passingthrough a boundary between two media with different permit-tivities is described both classically and quantum mechani-cally. Transition absorption is shown to make a substantialcontribution to photoelectron emission at a metal....../semicon-ductor interface in nanoplasmonic systems, and is put forth asa possible microscopic mechanism of the surface photoelec-tric effect in photodetectors and solar cells containing plas-monic nanoparticles....

  5. Removal of metal ions by Phormidium bigranulatum (cyanobacteria)-dominated mat in batch and continuous flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Rai, Jyoti; Gaur, J P

    2012-01-01

    Live Phormidium bigranulatum-dominated mat successfully removed Pb(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution. Percent metal removal approached equilibrium within 4h, independent of mat thickness (0.2-1.6 mm), in batch system. But % metal removal increased with increase in mat thickness due to enhancement of biomass, which provided more metal binding sites. Metal accumulation decreased with increase in mat thickness due to lessened metal availability vis-à-vis biomass. Metal removal (%) increased with increasing mat area, but decreased with increasing metal concentration in the solution. In continuous flow system, metal accumulation increased with increasing volume of single or multi-metal solution passed over the mat. The mat removed all the tested metals from the multi-metal solution with almost the same efficiency. The maximum removal of the test metals occurred at the lowest tested flow rate. Raceway type ponds can be employed for large-scale use of Phormidium mat in bioremediation of metalliferous wastewaters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Classification Identification of Acoustic Emission Signals from Underground Metal Mine Rock by ICIMF Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawback that fuzzy classifier was sensitive to noises and outliers, Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm was developed, in which bilateral Gaussian membership function parameters were set as constraint conditions and the indexes of fuzzy classification effectiveness and number of correct samples of fuzzy classification as the subgoal of fitness function. Moreover, Iris database was used for simulation experiment, classification, and recognition of acoustic emission signals and interference signals from stope wall rock of underground metal mines. The results showed that Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm could effectively improve the prediction accuracy of classification of data sets with noises and outliers and the classification accuracy of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines was 90.00%. It was obvious that the improved chaos immune Mamdani fuzzy (ICIMF classifier was useful for accurate diagnosis of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines.

  7. Potential hazards of particulate noble metal emissions from car exhaust catalysts. Gefaehrdungspotential von partikulaeren Edelmetallemissionen aus Automobilabgas-Katalysatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeber, W.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the present bibliographical study is to investigate into the possibility of health impairment by emissions of eroded and particulate precious metals of catalytic converters for motor-car exhaust gas. Connected therewith is a survey of environmental pollution so far caused by platinum metals and of their biological impact. The risk estimation relates solely to the data on emission obtained during normal operation; research work is still needed with respect to the chemical composition, the size distribution and the particle forms of the precious metals emitted. Besides, only limited data are available as to the environmental behaviour of the precious metals.

  8. Field emission and high voltage cleaning of particulate contaminants on extended metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The vacuum insulation properties of extended metallic surfaces depends strongly on their cleanliness. The usual technique to reduce electronic field emission from such surfaces consists in exposing them to very high electric fields during limited periods of time. This kind of processing also reduces the occurrence of vacuum breakdown. The processing of the surface is generally believed to be due to a thermomechanical destruction of the emitting sites, initiated by the emission itself. Comparison of the electric forces vs adherence forces which act on dust particles lying on the surface shows that the processing could also be due simply to the mechanical removal of the dust particles, with a subsequent reduction of field emission from the contaminated surface. (author)

  9. Effect of sputtered lanthanum hexaboride film thickness on field emission from metallic knife edge cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirley, M. P.; Novakovic, B.; Sule, N.; Weber, M. J.; Knezevic, I.; Booske, J. H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We report experiments and analysis of field emission from metallic knife-edge cathodes, which are sputter-coated with thin films of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}), a low-work function material. The emission current is found to depend sensitively on the thickness of the LaB{sub 6} layer. We find that films thinner than 10 nm greatly enhance the emitted current. However, cathodes coated with a thicker layer of LaB{sub 6} are observed to emit less current than the uncoated metallic cathode. This result is unexpected due to the higher work function of the bare metal cathode. We show, based on numerical calculation of the electrostatic potential throughout the structure, that the external (LaB{sub 6}/vacuum) barrier is reduced with respect to uncoated samples for both thin and thick coatings. However, this behavior is not exhibited at the internal (metal/LaB{sub 6}) barrier. In thinly coated samples, electrons tunnel efficiently through both the internal and external barrier, resulting in current enhancement with respect to the uncoated case. In contrast, the thick internal barrier in thickly coated samples suppresses current below the value for uncoated samples in spite of the lowered external barrier. We argue that this coating thickness variation stems from a relatively low (no higher than 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) free carrier density in the sputtered polycrystalline LaB{sub 6}.

  10. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushige, I.

    1990-01-01

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  11. A rapid screening method for heavy metals in biological materials by emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, E C; Sadler, P A

    1981-06-02

    A semi-quantitative screening method for heavy metals in biological material is described. The metals are complexed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and potassium sodium tartrate. The solutions are adjusted to pH 4 and then extracted into chloroform. The chloroform phase is evaporated onto a matrix mixture of lithium fluoride and graphite. The sample is analysed by direct current arc emission spectroscopy using a 3 metre grating spectrograph. The spectra are recorded on a photographic plate. The method is developed on aqueous and spiked samples and then applied to in vivo samples containing toxic levels of heavy metals. Atomic absorption spectroscopy is used to check standard concentrations and to monitor the efficiency of the extraction procedure.

  12. Subtask 4.24 - Field Evaluation of Novel Approach for Obtaining Metal Emission Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlish, John; Laudal, Dennis; Thompson, Jeffrey

    2013-12-31

    Over the past two decades, emissions of mercury, nonmercury metals, and acid gases from energy generation and chemical production have increasingly become an environmental concern. On February 16, 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) to reduce mercury, nonmercury metals, and HCl emissions from coal-fired power plants. The current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, EPA Method (M) 29 and M26A, respectively. As a possible alternative to EPA M29 and M26A, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a novel multielement sorbent trap (ME-ST) method to be used to sample for trace elements and/or halogens. Testing was conducted at three different power plants, and the results show that for halogens, the ME-ST halogen (ME-ST-H) method did not show any significant bias compared to EPA M26A and appears to be a potential candidate to serve as an alternative to the reference method. For metals, the ME-ST metals (ME-ST-M) method offers a lower detection limit compared to EPA M29 and generally produced comparable data for Sb, As, Be, Cd, Co, Hg, and Se. Both the ME-ST-M and M29 had problems associated with high blanks for Ni, Pb, Cr, and Mn. Although this problem has been greatly reduced through improved trap design and material selection, additional research is still needed to explore possible longer sampling durations and/or selection of lower background materials before the ME-ST-M can be considered as a potential alternative method for all the trace metals listed in MATS.

  13. Atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals from open burning of municipal solid waste in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cheng, Ke; Wu, Weidong; Tian, Hezhong; Yi, Peng; Zhi, Guorui; Fan, Jing; Liu, Shuhan

    2017-03-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) contains considerable hazardous components and the widely-distributed open MSW burning in heavily-populated urban areas can cause direct exposure of hazardous materials to citizens. By determining the best available representation of composition-varying and time-varying emission factors with fuzzy mathematics method and S-shape curves, a comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of 9 typical toxic heavy metals (THMs, e.g. mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and nickel (Ni)) from open MSW burning activities in China is established during the period of 2000-2013 for the first time. Further, the emissions in 2013 are allocated at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° grid by surrogate indexes. The results show that 9 typical THMs emissions from open MSW burning are estimated at 21.25 t for Hg, 131.52 t for As, 97.12 t for Pb, 10.12 t for Cd, 50.58 t for Cr, 81.95 t for Se, 382.42 t for Cu, 1790.70 t for Zn, and 43.50 t for Ni, respectively. In terms of spatial variation, the majority of emissions are concentrated in relatively developed and densely-populated regions, especially for the eastern, central and southern regions. Moreover, future emissions are also projected for the period of 2015-2030 based on different scenarios of the independent and collaborative effects of control proposals including minimizing waste, improving MSW incineration ratio, and enhancing waste sorting and recycling, etc. The collaborative effect of the above proposals is expected to bring the most effective reduction to THMs emissions from open MSW burning in China except for Hg. The results will be supplementary to all anthropogenic emissions and useful for relevant policy-making and the improvement of urban air quality as well as human health.

  14. Shallow tillage generates higher N2O emissions: results of continuous chamber-based measurement in a winter wheat field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broux, François; Lognoul, Margaux; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard; Heinesch, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture is one of the most important contributors to GHG emission, notably through fertilized croplands. Though, few publications have studied simultaneously and through continuous measurement the N2O and CO2 emissions in cultivated lands. We conducted this study to assess the effect of farming practices and climate on both N2O and CO2 emissions from a winter wheat crop. The experiment was held in an experimental field in the loamy region in Belgium from March 2016 till crop harvest in August 2016. The fluxes were measured on two nearby parcels in a winter wheat field with restitution of the residues from previous crop. For the past 8 years, one parcel was subjected to a shallow tillage (ST, 10 cm depth) and the other one to a conventional tillage (CT, 25 cm depth). On each parcel, the emissions are assessed with homemade automated closed chambers. Measurement continuity and good temporal resolution (one mean flux every 4 hours) of the system allowed a fine detection and quantification of the emission peaks which usually represent the major part of N2O fluxes. In addition to gas fluxes, soil water content and temperature were measured continuously. Soil samples were taken regularly to determine soil pH, soil organic carbon and nitrogen pools (total, NO3- and NH4+) and study microbial diversity and nitrification/denitrification gene expression. Unexpectedly, results showed N2O emissions twice as large in the ST parcel as in the CT parcel. On the contrary, less important CO2 emissions were observed under ST. Several emission peaks of N2O were observed during the measurement period. The peaks occurred after fertilization events and seemed to be triggered by an elevation of soil water content. Interesting links could be made between soil NH4-N and NO3-N pools and N2O emissions. Nitrification being the main process originating the fluxes was suggested on the one hand by the temporal evolution of nitrogen pools and N2O emissions and on the other hand by the relation

  15. Risk assessment of excessive CO{sub 2} emission on diatom heavy metal consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengjiao; Li, Shunxing, E-mail: shunxing_li@aliyun.com; Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xuguang

    2016-10-01

    Diatoms are the dominant group of phytoplankton in the modern ocean, accounting for approximately 40% of oceanic primary productivity and critical foundation of coastal food web. Rising dissolution of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in seawater may directly/indirectly cause ocean acidification and desalination. However, little is known about dietary diatom-associated changes, especially for diatom heavy metal consumption sensitivity to these processes, which is important for seafood safety and nutrition assessment. Here we show some links between ocean acidification/desalination and heavy metal consumption by Thalassiosira weissflogii. Excitingly, under desalination stress, the relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated, especially between Cu and Zn (r = 0.989, total intracellular concentration) and between Zn and Cd (r = 0.962, single-cell intracellular concentration). Heavy metal consumption activity in decreasing order was acidification < acidification + desalination < desalination for Zn, acidification < desalination < acidification + desalination for Cu and Cd, i.e., heavy metal uptake (or release) were controlled by environmental stress. Our findings showed that heavy metal uptake (or release) was already responded to ongoing excessive CO{sub 2} emission-driven acidification and desalination, which was important for risk assessment of climate change on diatom heavy metal consumption, food web and then seafood safety in future oceans. - Highlights: • Excessive CO{sub 2} in seawater may causes ocean acidification and desalination. • The relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated by desalination. • Significant effects of salinity on intracellular concentration of Cu and Cd • Cu and Cd in marine phytoplankton could be regulated by metal excretion. • Heavy metal consumption was affect by excessive CO{sub 2}.

  16. Risk assessment of excessive CO2 emission on diatom heavy metal consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fengjiao; Li, Shunxing; Zheng, Fengying; Huang, Xuguang

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are the dominant group of phytoplankton in the modern ocean, accounting for approximately 40% of oceanic primary productivity and critical foundation of coastal food web. Rising dissolution of anthropogenic CO 2 in seawater may directly/indirectly cause ocean acidification and desalination. However, little is known about dietary diatom-associated changes, especially for diatom heavy metal consumption sensitivity to these processes, which is important for seafood safety and nutrition assessment. Here we show some links between ocean acidification/desalination and heavy metal consumption by Thalassiosira weissflogii. Excitingly, under desalination stress, the relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated, especially between Cu and Zn (r = 0.989, total intracellular concentration) and between Zn and Cd (r = 0.962, single-cell intracellular concentration). Heavy metal consumption activity in decreasing order was acidification < acidification + desalination < desalination for Zn, acidification < desalination < acidification + desalination for Cu and Cd, i.e., heavy metal uptake (or release) were controlled by environmental stress. Our findings showed that heavy metal uptake (or release) was already responded to ongoing excessive CO 2 emission-driven acidification and desalination, which was important for risk assessment of climate change on diatom heavy metal consumption, food web and then seafood safety in future oceans. - Highlights: • Excessive CO 2 in seawater may causes ocean acidification and desalination. • The relationships between Cu, Zn, and Cd were all positively correlated by desalination. • Significant effects of salinity on intracellular concentration of Cu and Cd • Cu and Cd in marine phytoplankton could be regulated by metal excretion. • Heavy metal consumption was affect by excessive CO 2 .

  17. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  18. Loss of strain energy in metal belt for continuously variable transmission (CVT) pulley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wu; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Chuanwei; Kou, Farong [University of Science and Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-07-15

    Pulley SENE (Strain energy) losses affect the transmission efficiency of metal belt continuously variable transmissions. The present research focuses on analysis of the SENE power loss. Mechanical and deformation models of the pulley have been developed. The pulley stress, strain and SENE analyses were performed using finite element method software. The results indicate that with an increase in the transmission ratio, the SENE of the driving pulley decreases, while that of the driven pulley increases, and the SENE-induced total power loss increases after initially decreasing; the minimum and maximum pulley SENE total power losses are 43.92 and 240.69 W respectively. The pulley working radius was also found to have a major impact on the stress, strain and SENE. Our conclusion that the SENE power loss is at a minimum when the transmission ratio is 1 is consistent with the real behavior of these pulleys.

  19. Electronic defect levels in continuous wave laser annealed silicon metal oxide semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M.; Garcia, B. J.; Martinez, J.; Garrido, J.; Piqueras, J.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of laser treatment on the bulk and interface states of the Si-SiO2 structure has been investigated. The annealing was performed prior to the gate metallization using a continuous wave Ar+ laser. For low laser powers the interface state density seems to decrease slightly in comparison with untreated samples. However, for the highest irradiating laser powers a new bulk level at 0.41 eV above the valence band with concentrations up to 1015 cm-3 arises probably due to the electrical activation of the oxygen diluted in the Czochralski silicon. Later postmetallization annealings reduce the interface state density to values in the 1010 cm-2 eV-1 range but leave the concentration of the 0.41-eV center nearly unchanged.

  20. Impact strength of denture polymethyl methacrylate reinforced with continuous glass fibers or metal wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K; Vojtkova, H; Lassila, V P

    1995-12-01

    The impact strength of heat-cured acrylic resin test specimens that had been reinforced in various ways was compared in this study. Ten rectangular test specimens were fabricated for each test group. The strengtheners included 1.0-mm-diameter steel wire and continuous E-glass fibers. Both notched and unnotched test specimens were tested in a Charpy-type impact test. In a further analysis the concentration of glass fibers in the test specimens was determined and plotted against the impact strength of the test specimens. The results showed that, compared with the unreinforced specimens, both types of reinforcement increased the impact strength of the test specimens considerably (p test specimens reinforced with metal wire and that of the specimens reinforced with glass fiber. The correlation coefficient between the fiber concentration of the test specimens and their impact strength was 0.818 (p < 0.005). Specimens with fiber concentrations greater than 25 wt% yielded to the higher impact strength more readily than those with metal wire reinforcement did.

  1. CONTINUOUS CHELATION-EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION AND PURIFICATION OF METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.R.; Hicks, T.E.; Rubin, B.; Crandall, H.W.

    1959-12-01

    A continuous process is presented for separating metal values and groups of metal values from each other. A complex mixture. e.g., neutron-irradiated uranium, can be resolved into component parts. In the present process the values are dissolved in an acidic solution and adjusted to the proper oxidation state. Thenceforth the solution is contacted with an extractant phase comprising a fluorinated beta -diketone in an organic solvent under centain pH conditions whereupon plutonium and zirconium are extracted. Plutonium is extracted from the foregoing extract with reducing aqueous solutions or under specified acidic conditions and can be recovered from the aqueous solution. Zirconium is then removed with an oxalic acid aqueous phase. The uranium is recovered from the residual original solution using hexone and hexone-diketone extractants leaving residual fission products in the original solution. The uranium is extracted from the hexone solution with dilute nitric acid. Improved separations and purifications are achieved using recycled scrub solutions and the "self-salting" effect of uranyl ions.

  2. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  3. Analysis of metal(loid)s contamination and their continuous input in soils around a zinc smelter: Development of methodology and a case study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung-Wook; Baveye, Philippe C; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kang, Dong-Hyeon; Lee, Si-Young; Kong, Min-Jae; Park, Chan-Gi; Kim, Hae-Do; Son, Jinkwan; Yu, Chan

    2018-03-16

    Soil contamination due to atmospheric deposition of metals originating from smelters is a global environmental problem. A common problem associated with this contamination is the discrimination between anthropic and natural contributions to soil metal concentrations: In this context, we investigated the characteristics of soil contamination in the surrounding area of a world class smelter. We attempted to combine several approaches in order to identify sources of metals in soils and to examine contamination characteristics, such as pollution level, range, and spatial distribution. Soil samples were collected at 100 sites during a field survey and total concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn were analyzed. We conducted a multivariate statistical analysis, and also examined the spatial distribution by 1) identifying the horizontal variation of metals according to particular wind directions and distance from the smelter and 2) drawing a distribution map by means of a GIS tool. As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn in the soil were found to originate from smelter emissions, and As also originated from other sources such as abandoned mines and waste landfill. Among anthropogenic metals, the horizontal distribution of Cd, Hg, Pb, and Zn according to the downwind direction and distance from the smelter showed a typical feature of atmospheric deposition (regression model: y = y 0  + αe -βx ). Lithogenic Fe was used as an indicator, and it revealed the continuous input and accumulation of these four elements in the surrounding soils. Our approach was effective in clearly identifying the sources of metals and analyzing their contamination characteristics. We believe this study will provide useful information to future studies on soil pollution by metals around smelters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modification of emission photon statistics from single quantum dots using metal/SiO2 core/shell nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiki, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Hidetoshi; Masuo, Sadahiro

    2017-04-12

    Emission photon statistics, i.e., single-photon and multi-photon emissions, of isolated QDs is required for tailoring optoelectronic applications. In this article, we demonstrate that the emission photon statistics can be modified by the control of the spectral overlap of the QDs with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the metal nanoparticle (metal NP) and by the distance between the QD and the metal NP. Moreover, the contribution to the modification of the emission photon statistics, which is the excitation and emission enhancements and the quenching generated by the spectral overlap and the distance, is elucidated. By fabricating well-defined SiO 2 -coated AgNPs and AuNPs (metal/SiO 2 ), the spectral overlap originated from the metal species of Ag and Au and the distance constituted by the thickness of the SiO 2 shell are controlled. The probability of single-photon emission of single QD was increased by the enhancement of the excitation rate via adjusting the distance using Ag/SiO 2 while the single-photon emission was converted to multi-photon emission by the effect of exciton quenching at a short distance and a small spectral overlap. By contrast, the probability of multi-photon emission was increased by enhancement of the multi-photon emission rate and the quenching via the spectral overlap using Au/SiO 2 . These results indicated the fundamental finding to control emission photon statistics in single QDs by controlling the spectral overlap and the distance, and understand the interaction of plasmonic nanostructures and single QD systems.

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - Continuous Compliance Demonstration Methods With the Emission Reduction and PM Concentration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Methods With the Emission Reduction and PM Concentration Requirements 4 Table 4 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part... Concentration Requirements If you are demonstrating compliance with the * * * You must demonstrate continuous...) or an outlet concentration of 0.03 gr/dscf or less Using one of the following monitoring methods:a. A...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 52 - Determination of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions From Stationary Sources by Continuous Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the event that significant repair work is performed in the system, the company shall demonstrate to... which a measurement system is expected to operate within certain performance specifications without... dioxide by a continuously operating emission measurement system. Performance specifications for the...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Eee of... - Quality Assurance Procedures for Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... determination and adjustment of CEMS. 4. Integration of CEMS with the automatic waste feed cutoff (AWFCO) system... Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors Appendix to Subpart EEE of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Hazardous Waste Combustors Pt. 63, Subpt. EEE, App. Appendix to Subpart EEE of...

  8. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment... levels Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide) 1...

  9. Time series analysis of tool wear in sheet metal stamping using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh Shanbhag, V.; Pereira, P. Michael; Rolfe, F. Bernard; Arunachalam, N.

    2017-09-01

    Galling is an adhesive wear mode that often affects the lifespan of stamping tools. Since stamping tools represent significant economic cost, even a slight improvement in maintenance cost is of high importance for the stamping industry. In other manufacturing industries, online tool condition monitoring has been used to prevent tool wear-related failure. However, monitoring the acoustic emission signal from a stamping process is a non-trivial task since the acoustic emission signal is non-stationary and non-transient. There have been numerous studies examining acoustic emissions in sheet metal stamping. However, very few have focused in detail on how the signals change as wear on the tool surface progresses prior to failure. In this study, time domain analysis was applied to the acoustic emission signals to extract features related to tool wear. To understand the wear progression, accelerated stamping tests were performed using a semi-industrial stamping setup which can perform clamping, piercing, stamping in a single cycle. The time domain features related to stamping were computed for the acoustic emissions signal of each part. The sidewalls of the stamped parts were scanned using an optical profilometer to obtain profiles of the worn part, and they were qualitatively correlated to that of the acoustic emissions signal. Based on the wear behaviour, the wear data can be divided into three stages: - In the first stage, no wear is observed, in the second stage, adhesive wear is likely to occur, and in the third stage severe abrasive plus adhesive wear is likely to occur. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of lumps on the stamping tool, which represents galling behavior. Correlation between the time domain features of the acoustic emissions signal and the wear progression identified in this study lays the basis for tool diagnostics in stamping industry.

  10. Metal content in street dust as a reflection of atmospheric dust emissions from coal power plants, metal smelters, and traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibret, Gorazd; Van Tonder, Danel; Žibret, Lea

    2013-07-01

    Resuspended street dust is a source of inhalable particles in urban environments. Despite contaminated street dust being a possible health risk factor for local population, little is known about the contribution of atmospheric dust emissions and other factors to the content of toxic metals in street dust. The impact of smelting, traffic, and power plants on metal contaminates in street dust is the focus of street dust sampling at 46 locations in the Witbank area (Republic of South Africa). This area is characterized by numerous open-pit coal mines in the Karoo coal basin, which provides a cheap source of energy to numerous metallurgical smelters and ironworks and supplies coal to the coal-fired power plants located nearby. Street dust was collected on asphalt or concrete surfaces with hard plastic brushes, avoiding collecting of possible sand, soil, or plant particles. Chemical analysis was done on the <0.125 mm fraction using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry subsequent to total digestion. Exceptionally high concentrations of metals were detected with concentrations of Fe reaching 17.7%, Cr 4.3%, Mn 2%, Ni 366 mg/kg, and V 4,410 mg/kg. Factor analysis indicates three sources for the pollution. Road traffic which contributes to the high concentrations of Cu, Pb, Sb, and Sn, with the highest impacts detected in the town of Witbank. The second source is associated with the metal smelting industry, contributing to Fe, Co, Mn, and V emissions. The highest factor scores were observed around four metallurgical smelter operations, located in the Ferrobank, Highveld, and Clewer industrial areas. Impact of vanadium smelter to street dust composition could still be detected some 20 km away from the sources. Exceptionally high concentrations of Cr were observed in four samples collected next to the Ferrobank industrial area, despite Cr not being loaded in factor 2. The last source of the pollution is most probably fly ash associated with the coal-fired power plants

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 3 Table 3 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  12. Modelling and Evaluation of Environmental Impact due to Continuous Emissions of the Severonickel Plant (Kola Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, A.; Gonzalez-Aparicio, I.; Nuterman, R.; Baklanov, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, evaluation of potential impact - through concentration, deposition and loadings patterns - on population and environment due to continuous anthropogenic emissions (on example of sulfates) of the Cu-Ni smelters of the Russian North is given. To estimate impact, the Danish Emergency Response Model for Atmosphere (DERMA) was employed to perform long-term simulations of air concentration, time integrated air concentration (TIAC), dry (DD) and wet (WD) deposition patterns resulting from continuous emissions of the Severonickel smelters located on the Kola Peninsula (Murmansk region, Russia). To perform such simulations the 3D meteorological fields (from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, ECMWF) for the year 2000 were used as input. For simplicity, it has been assumed that normalized releases of sulfates from smelters location occurred at a constant rate every day. For each daily release the atmospheric transport, dispersion, dry and wet deposition due to removal processes were estimated during 10 day interval. Output from these long-term simulations is an essential input for evaluation of impact, doses, risks, and short- and long-term consequences, etc. Detailed analyses of simulated concentration and deposition fields allowed evaluating the spatial and temporal variability of resulted patterns on different scales. Temporal variability of both wet and dry deposition as well as their contribution into total deposition have been estimated. On an annual scale, the concentration and deposition patterns were estimated for the most populated cities of the North-West Russia. The modeled annual fields were also integrated into GIS environment as well as layers with population density (from the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, CIESIN) and standard administrative division of the North-West Russia and bordering countries. Furthermore, the estimation of deposited amounts (loadings) of sulfates for selected regions of

  13. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weijun; Shi, Zongbo; Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-01-01

    Intensive firecracker/firework displays during Chinese New Year (CNY) release fine particles and gaseous pollutants into the atmosphere, which may lead to serious air pollution. We monitored ambient PM 2.5 and black carbon (BC) concentrations at a regional background site in the Yellow River Delta region during the CNY in 2011. Our monitoring data and MOUDI images showed that there was a haze event during the CNY. Daily average PM 2.5 concentration reached 183 μg m −3 during the CNY, which was six times higher than that before and after the CNY. Similarly, the black carbon (BC) concentrations were elevated during the CNY. In order to confirm whether the firecracker/firework related emission is the main source of the haze particles, we further analyzed the morphology and chemical composition of individual airborne particles collected before, during and after the CNY by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM/EDS). We found that sulfate and organic-rich particles were dominant in the atmosphere before and after the CNY. In contrast, K-rich sulfates and other metal (e.g., Ba-rich, Al-rich, Mg-rich, and Fe-rich) particles were much more abundant than ammoniated sulfate particles during the CNY. These data suggest that it was the aerosol particles from the firecracker/firework emissions that induced the regional haze episode during the CNY. In individual organic and K-rich particles, we often found more than two types of nano-metal particles. These metal-bearing particles also contained abundant S but not Cl. In contrast, fresh metal-bearing particles from firecrackers generated in the laboratory contained abundant Cl with minor amounts of S. This indicates that the firecracker/firework emissions during the CNY significantly changed the atmospheric transformation pathway of SO 2 to sulfate. - Highlights: ► TEM was used to observe the aged individual particles from firecrackers/fireworks during the Chinese New

  14. Individual metal-bearing particles in a regional haze caused by firecracker and firework emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weijun, E-mail: liweijun@sdu.edu.cn [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); State Key of Laboratory of Atmospheric Boundary Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Zongbo [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Yan, Chao; Yang, Lingxiao; Dong, Can; Wang, Wenxing [Environment Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Intensive firecracker/firework displays during Chinese New Year (CNY) release fine particles and gaseous pollutants into the atmosphere, which may lead to serious air pollution. We monitored ambient PM{sub 2.5} and black carbon (BC) concentrations at a regional background site in the Yellow River Delta region during the CNY in 2011. Our monitoring data and MOUDI images showed that there was a haze event during the CNY. Daily average PM{sub 2.5} concentration reached 183 μg m{sup −3} during the CNY, which was six times higher than that before and after the CNY. Similarly, the black carbon (BC) concentrations were elevated during the CNY. In order to confirm whether the firecracker/firework related emission is the main source of the haze particles, we further analyzed the morphology and chemical composition of individual airborne particles collected before, during and after the CNY by using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM/EDS). We found that sulfate and organic-rich particles were dominant in the atmosphere before and after the CNY. In contrast, K-rich sulfates and other metal (e.g., Ba-rich, Al-rich, Mg-rich, and Fe-rich) particles were much more abundant than ammoniated sulfate particles during the CNY. These data suggest that it was the aerosol particles from the firecracker/firework emissions that induced the regional haze episode during the CNY. In individual organic and K-rich particles, we often found more than two types of nano-metal particles. These metal-bearing particles also contained abundant S but not Cl. In contrast, fresh metal-bearing particles from firecrackers generated in the laboratory contained abundant Cl with minor amounts of S. This indicates that the firecracker/firework emissions during the CNY significantly changed the atmospheric transformation pathway of SO{sub 2} to sulfate. - Highlights: ► TEM was used to observe the aged individual particles from firecrackers

  15. Nanoscale semiconductor-insulator-metal core/shell heterostructures: facile synthesis and light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gong Ping; Chen, Rui; Guo, Dong Lai; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shi Jie; Sun, Han Dong; Wu, Tom

    2011-08-01

    Controllably constructing hierarchical nanostructures with distinct components and designed architectures is an important theme of research in nanoscience, entailing novel but reliable approaches of bottom-up synthesis. Here, we report a facile method to reproducibly create semiconductor-insulator-metal core/shell nanostructures, which involves first coating uniform MgO shells onto metal oxide nanostructures in solution and then decorating them with Au nanoparticles. The semiconductor nanowire core can be almost any material and, herein, ZnO, SnO(2) and In(2)O(3) are used as examples. We also show that linear chains of short ZnO nanorods embedded in MgO nanotubes and porous MgO nanotubes can be obtained by taking advantage of the reduced thermal stability of the ZnO core. Furthermore, after MgO shell-coating and the appropriate annealing treatment, the intensity of the ZnO near-band-edge UV emission becomes much stronger, showing a 25-fold enhancement. The intensity ratio of the UV/visible emission can be increased further by decorating the surface of the ZnO/MgO nanowires with high-density plasmonic Au nanoparticles. These heterostructured semiconductor-insulator-metal nanowires with tailored morphologies and enhanced functionalities have great potential for use as nanoscale building blocks in photonic and electronic applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  16. Formation of Ultrathin, Continuous Metal-Organic Framework Membranes on Flexible Polymer Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingwei; Sutrisna, Putu D; Zhang, Yatao; Chen, Vicki

    2016-03-14

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have an enormous potential in separation applications, but to realize their potential as semipermeable membranes they need to be assembled into thin continuous macroscopic films for fabrication into devices. By using a facile immersion technique, we prepared ultrathin, continuous zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) membranes on titania-functionalized porous polymeric supports. The coherent ZIF-8 layer was surprisingly flexible and adhered well to the support, and the composite membrane could sustain bending and elongation. The membranes exhibited molecular sieving behavior, close to the theoretical permeability of ZIF-8, with hydrogen permeance up to 201×10(-7)  mol m(-2)  s(-1)  Pa(-1) and an ideal H2 /CO2 selectivity of 7:1. This approach offers significant opportunities to exploit the unique properties of MOFs in the fabrication of separation and sensing devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  18. Heavy Metals in Soil and Salad in the Proximity of Historical Ferroalloy Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Roberta; Donna, Filippo; Smith, Donald R.; Guazzetti, Stefano; Zacco, Annalisa; Rizzo, Luigi; Bontempi, Elza; Zimmerman, Neil J.; Lucchini, Roberto G.

    2016-01-01

    Emissions of manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) from ferro-alloy operations has taken place in Valcamonica, a pre-Alp valley in the province of Brescia, Italy, for about a century until 2001. Metal concentrations were measured in the soil of local home gardens and in the cultivated vegetables. Soil analysis was carried out using a portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer in both surface soil and at 10 cm depth. A subset of soil samples (n = 23) additionally was analysed using the modified BCR sequential extraction method and ICP-OES for intercalibration with XRF (XRF Mn = 1.33 * total OES Mn – 71.8; R = 0.830, p < 0.0001). Samples of salads (Lactuca sativa and Chichorium spp.) were analyzed with a Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) technique. Vegetable and soil metal measurements were performed in 59 home gardens of Valcamonica, and compared with 23 gardens from the Garda Lake reference area. Results indicate significantly higher levels of soil Mn (median 986 ppm vs 416 ppm), Pb (median 46.1 ppm vs 30.2 ppm), Fe (median 19,800 ppm vs 13,100 ppm) in the Valcamonica compared to the reference area. Surface soil levels of all metals were significantly higher in surface soil compared to deeper soil, consistent with atmospheric deposition. Significantly higher levels of metals were shown also in lettuce from Valcamonica for Mn (median 53.6 ppm vs 30.2) and Fe (median 153 vs 118). Metals in Chichorium spp. did not differ between the two areas. Surface soil metal levels declined with increasing distance from the closest ferroalloy plant, consistent with plant emissions as the source of elevated soil metal levels. A correlation between Mn concentrations in soil and lettuce was also observed. These data show that historic ferroalloy plant activity, which ended nearly a decade before this study, has contributed to the persistence of increased Mn levels in locally grown vegetables. Further research is needed to assess whether this

  19. Field emission from entangled carbon nanotubes coated on/in a hollow metallic tube

    CERN Document Server

    Tokura, Y; Ohigashi, N; Akita, S; Nakayama, Y; Imasaki, K; Mima, K; Nakai, S

    2001-01-01

    Field emission properties of entangled carbon nanotubes were studied for an electron beam source of Cherenkov or Smith-Purcell free electron laser. The cathode was made of carbon nanotubes which were mixed with a very small amount of resin and coated on/in a hollow metallic tube with outer diameter of 0.5 mm. The emission current was as high as 2.2 mA with a fluctuation of <4%. It seems that some entangled nanotubes were frayed under the high electric field and then electrons were emitted mainly from their tips. Reduction of the work function of the carbon nanotubes was observed with the degradation of vacuum pressure in the experimental apparatus.

  20. On the emission of radiation by an isolated vibrating metallic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, M. V.; Babushkin, I.; Pul'kin, N. S.; Arkhipov, R. M.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts the appearance of radiation in an empty cavity in which one of the mirrors is vibrating. It also predicts the appearance of radiation from an isolated vibrating mirror. Such effects can be described within the framework of classical electrodynamics. We present the qualitative explanation of the effect, along with the results of numerical simulation of the emission of radiation by an isolated vibrating metallic mirror, which can be induced by mirror illumination by an ultrashort pulse of light. The dynamics of conduction electrons in the metallic mirror is described by the classical Drude model. Simulation was performed for the cases of mirror illumination by either a bipolar or a unipolar pulse.

  1. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, P.R.; Meeker, K. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro (USA)); Finnegan, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    SO{sub 2} emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO{sub 2} emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing partcle and {sup 7}LiOH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. The authors infer HCl and HF emissions in 1983 to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Anarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in Central Antarctica snow.

  2. “Smart COPVs” - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Developed and applied promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to COPVs using acoustic emission (AE) and developed automated data analysis software. This lays the...

  3. Fugitive coke oven gas emission profile by continuous line averaged open-path Fourier transform infrared monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chitsan; Liou, Naiwei; Chang, Pao-Erh; Yang, Jen-Chin; Sun, Endy

    2007-04-01

    Although most coke oven research is focused on the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, well-known carcinogens, little has been done on the emission of volatile organic compounds, some of which are also thought to be hazardous to workers and the environment. To profile coke oven gas (COG) emissions, we set up an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) system on top of a battery of coke ovens at a steel mill located in Southern Taiwan and monitored average emissions in a coke processing area for 16.5 hr. Nine COGs were identified, including ammonia, CO, methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, cyclohexane, and O-xylene. Time series plots indicated that the type of pollutants differed over time, suggesting that different emission sources (e.g., coke pushing, quench tower, etc.) were involved at different times over the study period. This observation was confirmed by the low cross-correlation coefficients of the COGs. It was also found that, with the help of meteorological analysis, the data collected by the OP-FTIR system could be analyzed effectively to characterize differences in the location of sources. Although the traditional single-point samplings of emissions involves sampling various sources in a coke processing area at several different times and is a credible profiling of emissions, our findings strongly suggest that they are not nearly as efficient or as cost-effective as the continuous line average method used in this study. This method would make it easier and cheaper for engineers and health risk assessors to identify and to control fugitive volatile organic compound emissions and to improve environmental health.

  4. Design and Development of a Continuous-Flow Countercurrent Metal Extraction System to Remove Heavy Metals from Contaminated Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neale, Christopher M. U

    1997-01-01

    .... The research focused on eight contaminated soils from Army installations and the metal extraction capabilities of eight extracting agents including HNO3, HCI, fluorosilicic acid, citric acid, EDTA, DTPA, NTA, and NaOH...

  5. 76 FR 13356 - Magnesium Metal From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-896] Magnesium Metal From the... the antidumping duty order on magnesium metal from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') would... magnesium metal from the PRC, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act...

  6. Method and electrochemical cell for synthesis and treatment of metal monolayer electrocatalysts metal, carbon, and oxide nanoparticles ion batch, or in continuous fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2015-04-28

    An apparatus and method for synthesis and treatment of electrocatalyst particles in batch or continuous fashion is provided. In one embodiment, the apparatus comprises a sonication bath and a two-compartment chamber submerged in the sonication bath. The upper and lower compartments are separated by a microporous material surface. The upper compartment comprises a cover and a working electrode (WE) connected to a Pt foil contact, with the foil contact connected to the microporous material. The upper chamber further comprises reference counter electrodes. The lower compartment comprises an electrochemical cell containing a solution of metal ions. In one embodiment, the method for synthesis of electrocatalysts comprises introducing a plurality of particles into the apparatus and applying sonication and an electrical potential to the microporous material connected to the WE. After the non-noble metal ions are deposited onto the particles, the non-noble metal ions are displaced by noble-metal ions by galvanic displacement.

  7. Secondary electron emission from rough metal surfaces: a multi-generation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Meng; Zhang, Na; Wang, Fang; Hu, Tian-Cun; Cui, Wan-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    We develop a multi-generation model to examine secondary electron emission (SEE) from a rough metal surface. In this model, the traces of both primary electrons (PEs) and secondary electrons (SEs) are tracked by combining the electron scattering in the material and the multi-interaction with the rough surface. The effective secondary electron emission yield (SEY) is then obtained from the final states of the multi-generation SEs. Using this model, the SEE properties of the surfaces with rectangular and triangular grooves have been examined. We find that a rectangular groove can be used for effective SEE suppression. For a triangular groove, the criterion of SEY enhancement/suppression has been achieved, indicating that a small groove angle is required for effective SEE suppression, especially for a high PE energy. Furthermore, the SEE properties for some random rough surfaces are examined and some preliminary results are presented. Accordingly, our model and results could provide a powerful tool to give a comprehensive insight into the SEE of rough metal surfaces. (paper)

  8. Fate of metals and emissions of organic pollutants from torrefaction of waste wood, MSW, and RDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Mar; Skoglund, Nils; Gao, Qiuju; Persson, Per-Erik; Jansson, Stina

    2017-10-01

    Torrefaction of municipal solid waste (MSW), refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and demolition and construction wood (DC) was performed at 220°C and a residence time of 90min in a bench-scale reactor. The levels of toxic polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF) contained in emission from the torrefaction process were evaluated. In addition, main ash-forming elements and trace metals in the raw feedstock and char were determined. The use of MSW in fuel blends with DC resulted in lower PCDD and PCDF emissions after torrefaction, compared with the RDF blends. The migration of chlorine from the feedstock to the gas phase reduces the chlorine content of the char which may reduce the risk of alkali chloride-corrosion in char combustion. However, trace metals catalytically active in the formation of PCDD and PCDF remain in the char, thereby may promote PCDD and PCDF formation during subsequent char combustion for energy recovery; this formation is less extensive than when the feedstock is used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Actual issues of introduction of continuous emission monitoring systems for control of negative impact of TPP to atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrateva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.; Borovkova, A. M.; Loktionov, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    Over the past 3 years there have been significant changes in Russian environmental legislation related to the transition to technological regulation based on the principles of the best available technologies (BAT). These changes also imply control and accounting of the harmful impact of industrial enterprises on the environment. Therefore, a mandatory requirement for equipping automatic continuous emission monitoring systems (ACEMS) is established for all large TPPs. For a successful practical solution of the problem of introducing such systems in the whole country there is an urgent need to develop the governing regulatory document for the design and operation of systems for continuous monitoring of TPP emissions into the air, allowing within reasonable limits to unify these systems for their work with the state data fund of state environmental monitoring and make easier the process of their implementation at operating facilities for industrial enterprises. Based on the large amount of research in the field of creation of ACEMS, which conducted in National Research University “MPEI”, a draft guidance document was developed, which includes the following regulatory provisions: goals and objectives of ACEMS, the stages of their introduction rules of carrying out preliminary inspection of energy facilities, requirements to develop technical specifications, general requirements for the operation of ACEMS, requirements to the structure and elements of ACEMS, recommendations on selection of places of measuring equipment installation, rules for execution, commissioning and acceptance testing, continuous measurement method, method for determination of the current gross and specific emissions. The draft guidance document, developed by the National Research University “MPEI”, formed the basis of the Preliminary national standards PNST 187-2017 “Automatic systems for continuous control and metering of contaminants emissions from thermal electric power stations into

  10. Characterization of atmospheric emission sources in lichen from metal and organic contaminant patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratier, Aude; Dron, Julien; Revenko, Gautier; Austruy, Annabelle; Dauphin, Charles-Enzo; Chaspoul, Florence; Wafo, Emmanuel

    2018-03-01

    Lichen samples from contrasted environments, influenced by various anthropic activities, were investigated focusing on the contaminant signatures according to the atmospheric exposure typologies. Most of the contaminant concentrations measured in the 27 lichen samples, collected around the industrial harbor of Fos-sur-Mer (France), were moderate in rural and urban environments, and reached extreme levels in industrial areas and neighboring cities (Al up to 6567 mg kg -1 , Fe 42,398 mg kg -1 , or ΣPAH 1417 μg kg -1 for example). At the same time, a strong heterogeneity was noticed in industrial samples while urban and rural ones were relatively homogeneous. Several metals could be associated to steel industry (Fe, Mn, Cd), road traffic, and agriculture (Sb, Cu, Sn), or to a distinct chemical installation (Mo). As well, PCDFs dominated in industrial samples while PCDDs prevailed in urban areas. The particularities observed supported the purpose of this work and discriminated the contributions of various atmospheric pollution emission sources in lichen samples. A statistical approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) was applied and resolved these potential singularities into specific component factors. Even if a certain degree of mixing of the factors is pointed out, relevant relationships were observed with several atmospheric emission sources. By this methodology, the contribution of industrial emissions to the atmospheric metal, PAH, PCB, and PCDD/F levels was roughly estimated to be 60.2%, before biomass burning (10.2%) and road traffic (3.8%). These results demonstrate that lichen biomonitoring offers an encouraging perspective of spatially resolved source apportionment studies.

  11. Interference effects in laser-induced plasma emission from surface-bound metal micro-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, Eyal; Malik, Omer; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2017-05-01

    The light-matter interaction of an optical beam and metal micro-particulates at the vicinity of an optical substrate surface is critical to the many fields of applied optics. Examples of impacted fields are laser-induced damage in high power laser systems, sub-wavelength laser machining of transmissive materials, and laser-target interaction in directed energy applications. We present a full-wave-based model that predicts the laser-induced plasma pressure exerted on a substrate surface as a result of light absorption in surface-bound micron-scale metal particles. The model predictions agree with experimental observation of laser-induced shallow pits, formed by plasma emission and etching from surface-bound metal micro-particulates. It provides an explanation for the prototypical side lobes observed along the pit profile, as well as for the dependence of the pit shape on the incident laser and particle parameters. Furthermore, the model highlights the significance of the interference of the incident light in the open cavity geometry formed between the micro-particle and the substrate in the resulting pit shape.

  12. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Goeroge P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2001-01-01

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the absorbed signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time

  13. Effects of Co-Processing Sewage Sludge in the Cement Kiln on PAHs, Heavy Metals Emissions and the Surrounding Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dong; Zhu, Tianle; Liu, Runwei; Li, Xinghua; Zhao, Yuan; Sun, Ye; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Qinglin

    2018-04-08

    To understand the effects of co-processing sewage sludge in the cement kiln on non-criterion pollutants emissions and its surrounding environment, the flue gas from a cement kiln stack, ambient air and soil from the background/downwind sites were collected in the cement plant. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals of the samples were analyzed. The results show that PAHs in flue gas mainly exist in the gas phase and the low molecular weight PAHs are the predominant congener. The co-processing sewage sludge results in the increase in PAHs and heavy metals emissions, especially high molecular weight PAHs and low-volatile heavy metals such as Cd and Pb in the particle phase, while it does not change their compositions and distribution patterns significantly. The concentrations and their distributions of the PAHs and heavy metals between the emissions and ambient air have a positive correlation and the co-processing sewage sludge results in the increase of PAHs and heavy metals concentrations in the ambient air. The PAHs concentration level and their distribution in soil are proportional to those in the particle phase of flue gas, and the co-processing sewage sludge can accelerate the accumulation of the PAHs and heavy metals in the surrounding soil, especially high/middle molecular weight PAHs and low-volatile heavy metals.

  14. Characteristics of a continuous denitration by formic acid - electrolytic trimming of residual acid with accompanying the precipitation of metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G. W.; Kim, S. H.; Lim, J. G.; Lee, I. H.

    2003-01-01

    This work has studied the characteristics of destruction of nitric acid and precipitation of several metal ions in a continuous denitration process combining a denitration by formic acid and a residual acid-electrolytic trimming system. The metal ions of Zr, Mo, Fe, and Nd did not affect the electrodes at the step of electrolytic trimming of the residual acid after denitration by formic acid. The Mo ion in electrolytic solution enhanced the generation of nitrite ion during the electrolytic reaction. The mole ratio of formic acid to nitric acid fed into the continuous denitration reactor using formic acid affected much the final acidity, the precipitation yields of metal ions, the precipitate morphology. At the ratio of 1.65, the process had the lowest final acidity of less than 0.1 M, and the precipitation yields of Zr and Mo reached 95% and 83%, respectively as the highest values

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Cccc of... - Continuous Compliance With Emission Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... yeast in a fermentation stage (last (Trade), second-to-last (First Generation), or third-to-last (Stock... the applicable maximum concentration. 2. Each fed-batch fermenter producing yeast in a fermentation... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Manufacturing of Nutritional Yeast Part...

  16. Micro-Capillary Coatings Based on Spiropyran Polymeric Brushes for Metal Ion Binding, Detection, and Release in Continuous Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishling Dunne

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro-capillaries, capable of light-regulated binding and qualitative detection of divalent metal ions in continuous flow, have been realised through functionalisation with spiropyran photochromic brush-type coatings. Upon irradiation with UV light, the coating switches from the passive non-binding spiropyran form to the active merocyanine form, which binds different divalent metal ions (Zn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, as they pass through the micro-capillary. Furthermore, the merocyanine visible absorbance spectrum changes upon metal ion binding, enabling the ion uptake to be detected optically. Irradiation with white light causes reversion of the merocyanine to the passive spiropyran form, with simultaneous release of the bound metal ion from the micro-capillary coating.

  17. A comparative evaluation on the emission characteristics of ceramic and metallic catalytic converter in internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Jajuli, Afiqah; Rahman, Fakhrurrazi; Feriyanto, Dafit; Zakaria, Supaat

    2017-09-01

    Enforcement of a stricter regulation on exhaust emission by many countries has led to utilization of catalytic converter to reduce the harmful pollutant emission. Ceramic and metallic catalytic converters are the most common type of catalytic converter used. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the ceramic and metallic catalytic converter on its conversion efficiency using experimental measurement. Both catalysts were placed on a modified exhaust system equipped with a Mitshubishi 4G93 single cylinder petrol engine that was tested on an eddy current dynamometer under steady state conditions for several engine speeds. The experimental results show that the metallic catalytic converter reduced a higher percentage of CO up to 98.6% reduction emissions while ceramic catalytic converter had a better reduction efficiency of HC up to 85.4% and 87.2% reduction of NOx.

  18. Thermal Emission of Alkali Metal Ions from Al30-Pillared Montmorillonite Studied by Mass Spectrometric Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motalov, V B; Karasev, N S; Ovchinnikov, N L; Butman, M F

    2017-01-01

    The thermal emission of alkali metal ions from Al 30 -pillared montmorillonite in comparison with its natural form was studied by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 770-930 K. The measurements were carried out on a magnetic mass spectrometer MI-1201. For natural montmorillonite, the densities of the emission currents ( j ) decrease in the mass spectrum in the following sequence (T = 805 K, A/cm 2 ): K + (4.55 · 10 -14 ), Cs + (9.72 · 10 -15 ), Rb + (1.13 · 10 -15 ), Na + (1.75 · 10 -16 ), Li + (3.37 · 10 -17 ). For Al 30 -pillared montmorillonite, thermionic emission undergoes temperature-time changes. In the low-temperature section of the investigated range (770-805 K), the value of j increases substantially for all ions in comparison with natural montmorillonite (T = 805 K, A/cm 2 ): Cs + (6.47 · 10 -13 ), K + (9.44 · 10 -14 ), Na + (3.34 · 10 -15 ), Rb + (1.77 · 10 -15 ), and Li + (4.59 · 10 -16 ). A reversible anomaly is observed in the temperature range 805-832 K: with increasing temperature, the value of j of alkaline ions falls abruptly. This effect increases with increasing ionic radius of M + . After a long heating-up period, this anomaly disappears and the ln j - 1/ T dependence acquires a classical linear form. The results are interpreted from the point of view of the dependence of the efficiency of thermionic emission on the phase transformations of pillars.

  19. Thermal Emission of Alkali Metal Ions from Al30-Pillared Montmorillonite Studied by Mass Spectrometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Motalov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal emission of alkali metal ions from Al30-pillared montmorillonite in comparison with its natural form was studied by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 770–930 K. The measurements were carried out on a magnetic mass spectrometer MI-1201. For natural montmorillonite, the densities of the emission currents (j decrease in the mass spectrum in the following sequence (T = 805 K, A/cm2: K+ (4.55 · 10−14, Cs+ (9.72 · 10−15, Rb+ (1.13 · 10−15, Na+ (1.75 · 10−16, Li+ (3.37 · 10−17. For Al30-pillared montmorillonite, thermionic emission undergoes temperature-time changes. In the low-temperature section of the investigated range (770–805 K, the value of j increases substantially for all ions in comparison with natural montmorillonite (T = 805 K, A/cm2: Cs+ (6.47 · 10−13, K+ (9.44 · 10−14, Na+ (3.34 · 10−15, Rb+ (1.77 · 10−15, and Li+ (4.59 · 10−16. A reversible anomaly is observed in the temperature range 805–832 K: with increasing temperature, the value of j of alkaline ions falls abruptly. This effect increases with increasing ionic radius of M+. After a long heating-up period, this anomaly disappears and the lnj-1/T dependence acquires a classical linear form. The results are interpreted from the point of view of the dependence of the efficiency of thermionic emission on the phase transformations of pillars.

  20. Will the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation produce an incentive to continue carbon emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Moreno-Cruz, Juan; Caldeira, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Integrated assessment models are commonly used to generate optimal carbon prices based on an objective function that maximizes social welfare. Such models typically project an initially low carbon price that increases with time. This framework does not reflect the incentives of decision makers who are responsible for generating tax revenue. If a rising carbon price is to result in near-zero emissions, it must ultimately result in near-zero carbon tax revenue. That means that at some point, policy makers will be asked to increase the tax rate on carbon emissions to such an extent that carbon tax revenue will fall. Therefore, there is a risk that the use of a carbon tax to generate revenue could eventually create a perverse incentive to continue carbon emissions in order to provide a continued stream of carbon tax revenue. Using the Dynamic Integrated Climate Economy (DICE) model, we provide evidence that this risk is not a concern for the immediate future but that a revenue-generating carbon tax could create this perverse incentive as time goes on. This incentive becomes perverse at about year 2085 under the default configuration of DICE, but the timing depends on a range of factors including the cost of climate damages and the cost of decarbonizing the global energy system. While our study is based on a schematic model, it highlights the importance of considering a broader spectrum of incentives in studies using more comprehensive integrated assessment models. Our study demonstrates that the use of a carbon tax for revenue generation could potentially motivate implementation of such a tax today, but this source of revenue generation risks motivating continued carbon emissions far into the future.

  1. Characterization of binding and mobility of metals and xenobiotics in continuous flow and soil biosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunovska, A.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the dissertation thesis was to contribute to development of analytical tools and approaches application in characterization of binding and mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds (xenobiotics) in continuous flow and soil biosystems. Within the solution of this aim, a wide range of analytical methods (gamma-spectrometry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, AAS, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, ion chromatography, and stripping volt-amperometry) and approaches (mathematical modelling - methods of nonlinear regression and in silico prediction modelling; chemometrics and statistical analysis of the data; single-step extraction methods, and lysimetry) were applied. In the first step of thesis solution, alternative sorbents of biological origin (biomass of microalgae, freshwater mosses, and waste biomass of hop) were obtained and physico-chemically characterized mainly in order to prediction of sorption capacities of Cd and synthetic dyes thioflavine T (TT), malachite green (MG) or methylene blue (MB) removal from single component or binary aqueous solutions and under conditions of batch or continuous flow systems. For these purposes, mathematical models of adsorption isotherms and models originated from chromatographic separation methods by application of methods of nonlinear regression analysis were used. In the second part of the work, methods of multivariate analysis in the evaluation of processes of synthetic dyes TT and MB binding in terms of the finding of relationships between sorption-desorption variables describing the stability of the bond and parameters defining the physic-chemical properties of river sediments and the environment of real or model waters were applied. In the last part of the work, a special laboratory lysimeter system was designed and applied within the soil biosystem defined by: soil additive (SA) derived from sewage sludge representing the source of microelements Zn and Cu <-> agriculturally used soil <-> soil solution <-> root

  2. Light-Up of Rhodamine Hydrazide to Generate Emissive Initiator for Polymerization and to Afford Photochromic Polypeptide Metal Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhen-Yan Gao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ring-opening polymerization (ROP of cyclic peptide monomer of γ-propargyl-l-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride (PLG–NCA was originally initiated by non-emissive, ring-close rhodamine 6G hydrazide (R-C. However, instantaneously after adding PLG–NCA to R-C, the spirolactam ring of R-C was opened by PLG–NCA, rendering emissive, ring-open R-O to initiate ROP of PLG–NCA. The emissive R-O moiety therefore produced fluorescent R–PLG with aggregation-induced emission (AIE properties. Moreover, R–PLG was found to exhibit photochromic properties with good fatigue resistance and long lifetime when forming metal complexes with Sn(II and Fe(III. In the dark, irradiated metal complexes slowly (~50 min restored to the initial state. This research provides foundation for the development of new photochromic materials with long lifetime.

  3. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    with respect to the emission of a dislocation from the crack tip, whereas for all other metals studied the sharp crack is unstable. This result cannot be explained by existing criteria for the intrinsic ductile/brittle behaviour of crack tips, but is probably caused by surface stresses. When the crack...... is no longer atomically sharp dislocation emission becomes easier in all the studied metals. The effect is relatively strong; the critical stress intensity factor for emission to occur is reduced by up to 20%. This behaviour appears to be caused by the surface stress near the crack tip. The surface stress...... is a consequence of the many-body nature of the interatomic interactions. The enhanced dislocation emission can cause an order-of-magnitude increase in the fracture toughness of certain materials, in which a sharp crack would propagate by cleavage. Collisions with already existing dislocations will blunt the crack...

  4. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 μm, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

  5. Size distribution and concentrations of heavy metals in atmospheric aerosols originating from industrial emissions as predicted by the HYSPLIT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Stein, Ariel F.; Maldonado, Pabla Guerrero; Sanchez de la Campa, Ana M.; Gonzalez-Castanedo, Yolanda; Castell, Nuria; de la Rosa, Jesus D.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a description of the emission, transport, dispersion, and deposition of heavy metals contained in atmospheric aerosols emitted from a large industrial complex in southern Spain using the HYSPLIT model coupled with high- (MM5) and low-resolution (GDAS) meteorological simulations. The dispersion model was configured to simulate eight size fractions (17 μm) of metals based on direct measurements taken at the industrial emission stacks. Twelve stacks in four plants were studied and the stacks showed considerable differences for both emission fluxes and size ranges of metals. We model the dispersion of six major metals; Cr, Co, Ni, La, Zn, and Mo, which represent 77% of the total mass of the 43 measured elements. The prediction shows that the modeled industrial emissions produce an enrichment of heavy metals by a factor of 2-5 for local receptor sites when compared to urban and rural background areas in Spain. The HYSPLIT predictions based on the meteorological fields from MM5 show reasonable consistence with the temporal evolution of concentrations of Cr, Co, and Ni observed at three sites downwind of the industrial area. The magnitude of concentrations of metals at two receptors was underestimated for both MM5 (by a factor of 2-3) and GDAS (by a factor of 4-5) meteorological runs. The model prediction shows that heavy metal pollution from industrial emissions in this area is dominated by the ultra-fine (<0.66 μm) and fine (<2.5 μm) size fractions.

  6. Using ballistic electron emission microscopy to investigate the metal-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baykul, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the possibility of using the ballistic electron microscope (BEEM) to study the metal-vacuum interface. In order to do that, we have designed and built a novel experimental setup which consists of an STM tip from which electrons tunnel into a thin (<60 nm), free-standing metal film in vacuum ambient. When the tunnel bias exceeds the work function of the metal, some small fraction of the tunneling electrons traverses through the film without any energy loss, and emits into the vacuum through the back side of the film. The rate of emission of such ballistic electrons, which is called the collector current, is measured by a channel electron multiplier. One of the major challenges for this investigation was preparing free-standing thin films by the following steps: (a) evaporating Au onto a (100) face of NaCl at room temperature, (b) dissolving the NaCl in a 50-50 mixture of ethyl alcohol and distilled water, and (c) catching the Au film that floats on the surface of the solvent onto a Cu grid. Subsequent annealing increased the grain size, and improved the bonding of the film onto the grid. We have succeeded in observing ballistic electron emission through these free-standing thin films, even though the collector current tended to decay in a time interval of a few tenths of a second. The exact cause of this decay is not known, however we have suggested some possibilities. By ramping the bias voltage from about 0.2 V to about 10.5 V, we find the threshold bias voltage at which the collector current begins. This threshold voltage is an upper limit for the work function of AU. From our data we obtained a value of 5.2 V for this upper limit. We also have plotted the collector current, that was averaged over a scan area of 375 nm x 375 nm, against the tunnel bias. This plot shows that, for this region, the lowest threshold bias voltage for ballistic electron emission is between 3.5 V and 4.5 V

  7. Continuous Monitoring of CH4 Emissions from Marcellus Shale Gas Extraction in South West Pennsylvania Using Top Down Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, D. P.; Belmecheri, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Sowers, T. A.; Bryant, S.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Aikins, J.; Sweeney, C.; Petron, G.; Davis, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Natural gas extraction from shale formations via hydraulic-fracturing (fracking) is expanding rapidly in several regions of North America. In Pennsylvania, the number of wells drilled to extract natural gas from the Marcellus shale has grown from 195 in 2008 to 1,386 in 2010. The gas extraction process using the fracking technology results in the escape of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas and the principal component of natural gas, into the atmosphere. Emissions of methane from fracking operations remain poorly quantified, leading to a large range of scenarios for the contribution of fracking to climate change. A mobile measurement campaign provided insights on methane leakage rates and an improved understanding of the spatio-temporal variability in active drilling areas in the South West of Pennsylvania. Two towers were then instrumented to monitor fugitive emissions of methane from well pads, pipelines, and other infrastructures in the area. The towers, one within a drilling region and one upwind of active drilling, measured atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios continuously. Isotopic measurements from air flasks were also collected. Data from the initial mobile campaign were used to estimate emission rates from single sites such as wells and compressor stations. Tower data will be used to construct a simple atmospheric inversion for regional methane emissions. Our results show the daily variability in emissions and allow us to estimate leakage rates over a one month period in South West Pennsylvania. We discuss potential deployment strategies in drilling zones to monitor emissions of methane over longer periods of time.

  8. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic-emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a four year research program on the utilization of acoustic emission techniques on light water reactor component applications. Two techniques of the acoustic emission technology were applied to specific problems occurring within the light water reactor system. Crack detection AE monitoring was applied to thermal cycle fatigue cracking problems and stress corrosion cracking problems. Leak detection AE monitoring was applied to valve leakage in the main steam safety relief valves and incontainment packing gland valves. The report provides AE data showing how AE crack detection can be used as an on-line diagnostic monitoring tool. By having an active monitor on light water reactor components, the inservice inspection of the components is being performed during operation rather than refueling periods, thereby reducing critical path time during outages. The resultant benefit is increased plant availability and a reduction in accumulated radiation exposure

  9. More frequent moments in the climate change debate as emissions continue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntingford, Chris; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have witnessed unprecedented interest in how the burning of fossil fuels may impact on the global climate system. Such visibility of this issue is in part due to the increasing frequency of key international summits to debate emissions levels, including the 2015 21st Conference of Parties meeting in Paris. In this perspective we plot a timeline of significant climate meetings and reports, and against metrics of atmospheric greenhouse gas changes and global temperature. One powerful metric is cumulative CO2 emissions that can be related to past and future warming levels. That quantity is analysed in detail through a set of papers in this ERL focus issue. We suggest it is an open question as to whether our timeline implies a lack of progress in constraining climate change despite multiple recent keynote meetings—or alternatively—that the increasing level of debate is encouragement that solutions will be found to prevent any dangerous warming levels?

  10. Changes in distortion product oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to continuous and impulsive noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Temporary changes in the hearing of human subjects were monitored with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) after control sound exposures in a laboratory. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate whether the +5~dB penalty for impulsiveness used in international standards......~dB penalty = 80~dB. The results show that the effects on DPOAE levels from the two stimuli could be compared in terms of their total acoustic energy....

  11. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.W.; Hartman, W.F.

    1980-09-01

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 400 0 F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 250 0 F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments

  12. High resolution of anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of 12 heavy metals in the three biggest metropolitan areas, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.; Zhu, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals from anthropogenic sources have received worldwide concerns due to their adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem. An integrated inventory of anthropogenic emissions of twelve HMs (Hg, As, Se, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn) in the three biggest metropolitan areas, including Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region, Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region and Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, are developed for 1980-2012 by combining with detailed activity data and inter-annual dynamic emission factors which are determined by S-shaped curves on account of technology progress, economic development, and emission control. The results indicate total emissions of twelve HMs in the three metropolitan regions have increased from 5448.8 tons in 1980 to 19054.9 tons in 2012, with an annual average growth rate of about 4.0%. Due to significant difference in industrial structures and energy consumption compositions, remarkable distinctions can be observed with respect to source contributions of total HM emissions from above three metropolitan areas. Specifically, the ferrous metal smelting sector, coal combustion by industrial boilers and coal combustion by power plants are found to be the primary source of total HM emissions in the BTH region (about 34.2%), YRD region (about 28.2%) and PRD region (about 24.3%), respectively. Furthermore, we allocate the annual emissions of these heavy metals in 2012 at a high spatial resolution of 9 km × 9 km grid with ArcGIS methodology and surrogate indexes, such as regional population and gross domestic product (GDP). The peak of HM emissions are mainly distributed over the grid cells of Beijing, Tianjin, Tangshan, Shijiazhuang, Handan and Baoding in the BTH region; Shanghai, Suzhou, Wuxi, Nanjing, Hangzhou, Ningbo in the YRD region; Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Dongguan, Foshan in the PYD region, respectively. Additionally, monthly emission profiles are established in order to further identify

  13. The use of emission spectrometry for the determination of impurities in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaes, G.E.E.; Watson, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the separation of a number of impurities in high-purity Co, Mn, and Ni, and for their determination by emission spectrometry using the induction-coupled plasma torch. The metals are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, and the elements are extracted into organic solvents with various chelating agents. The organic extracts, to which scandium and gold are added as internal standards, are excited direct in an induction-coupled plasma excitation source. The elements determined are Ag, Al, Be, Bi, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, Ti, V, and Zr. The relative standard deviation ranges from 2,3 to 26,2 per cent over a concentration range of 0,6mg.g- 1 to 0,003mg.g- 1 in the sample

  14. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  15. Progress toward acoustic emission characterization for continuous monitoring reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in an operating reactor vessel using acoustic emission (AE) data. A preliminary AE-flaw growth relationship has been developed encompassing six variables. This model relates AE count and energy to fatigue crack driving force ΔK. Pattern recognition has been examined as a means of distinguishing crack growth AE from other acoustic signals with encouraging results. The program is moving into hardware implementation of relationships for testing and refinement by monitoring tests in heavy section specimens and subscale structures. The hardware system will become a reactor monitor prototype

  16. Human hemispheric infarction studied by positron emission tomography and the 150 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.-C.; Bousser, M.G.; Comar, D.; Kellershohn, C.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers an entirely new approach to the study of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemic disorders. This is so because for the first time it is possible to obtain functional tomographic images that represent cerebral perfusion and metabolism in a regional basis. We report here a study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction by means of the 15 O inhalation technique in a large number of human hemispheric infarctions. PET imaging with this non-invasive technique has permitted the description of hitherto unreported focal patterns of changes in the CBF/EO2 couple that may have important pathophysiologic and prognostic implications

  17. Possible overexposure of pregnant women to emissions from a walk through metal detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dagang; Qiang Rui; Chen Ji; Seidman, Seth; Witters, Donald; Kainz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic procedure to evaluate the induced current densities and electric fields due to walk-through metal detector (WTMD) exposure. This procedure is then used to assess the exposure of nine pregnant women models exposed to one WTMD model. First, we measured the magnetic field generated by the WTMD, then we extracted the equivalent current source to represent the WTMD emissions and finally we calculated the induced current densities and electric fields using the impedance method. The WTMD emissions and the induced fields in the pregnant women and fetus models are then compared to the ICNIRP Guidelines and the IEEE C95.6 exposure safety standard. The results prove the consistency between maximum permissible exposure (MPE) levels and basic restrictions for the ICNIRP Guidelines and IEEE C95.6. We also found that this particular WTMD complies with the ICNIRP basic restrictions for month 1-5 models, but leads to both fetus and pregnant women overexposure for month 6-9 models. The IEEE C95.6 restrictions (MPEs and basic restrictions) are not exceeded. The fetus overexposure of this particular WTMD calls for carefully conducted safety evaluations of security systems before they are deployed

  18. Terahertz emission enhancement in semi-insulating gallium arsenide integrated with subwavelength one-dimensional metal line array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Maria Angela B; Lopez, Lorenzo P; Pauline Afalla, Jessica; Muldera, Joselito; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Salvador, Arnel A; Somintac, Armando S; Estacio, Elmer S

    2016-10-01

    A one-order-of-magnitude terahertz (THz) emission enhancement in the transmission geometry, over a 0.7-THz broadband range, was observed in semi-insulating gallium arsenide (SI-GaAs) integrated with a subwavelength one-dimensional metal line array (1DMLA). THz emission of the 1DMLA samples showed an intensity increase and exhibited a full-width-at-half-maximum broadening relative to the emission of the bare substrate. Improved index matching could not account for the observed phenomenon. A nonlinear dependence of the integrated THz emission intensity on the number of illuminated lines and on the pump power was observed. The actual origin of the increased THz emission is still under investigation. At present, it is attributed to extraordinary optical transmission.

  19. On the possibility of universal interstitial emission induced annihilation in metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyan; Xu, Yichun; Duan, Guohua; Sun, Jingjing; Hao, Congyu; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.

    2018-03-01

    Nano-structured metals have been explored as self-healing materials for radiation damage due to vacancy-interstitial recombination at interfaces, such as grain boundaries (GBs) in nanocrystals (NCs) and free surfaces in nanoporous metals (NPs). The annihilation in copper was recently proposed to be via the interstitial-emission (IE) from the GB. However, whether the IE is applied as a possibly universal mechanism in other NPs and NCs deserves further investigation. The interstitial is often considered to overcome a large binding energy with the GB/surface to migrate out of the GB/surface and induce annihilation. In this work, with emphasis on the IE in tungsten where the interstitial is exceptionally tightly bound to the tungsten GB/surface, we found that the interstitial only needed to migrate over a small distance from the GB/surface to recombine with the vacancy nearby at a small energy barrier. During the process, the annihilation region around a static interstitial at the GB/surface propagated or extended greatly to the adjacent bulk area. The annihilation was found to be via the IE from the GB/surface or coupled vacancy hop with the IE. The ratio of the interstitial-GB/surface binding energy to the trapping-radius of the GB/surface for the interstitial was proposed to be a better qualitative indicator for the difficulty in the IE than the binding energy. Given that the IE works in the investigated NPs and NCs tungsten, iron and copper where the interstitials of distinct configurations bind with the GBs/surfaces at diverse levels, the IE mechanism may work universally in various nano-structured metals.

  20. A new methodology for automating acoustic emission detection of metallic fatigue fractures in highly demanding aerospace environments: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Hensman, James J.; Pullin, Rhys; Evans, Sam L.; Dervilis, Nikolaos; Worden, Keith

    2017-04-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) phenomenon has many attributes that make it desirable as a structural health monitoring or non-destructive testing technique, including the capability to continuously and globally monitor large structures using a sparse sensor array and with no dependency on defect size. However, AE monitoring is yet to fulfil its true potential, due mainly to limitations in location accuracy and signal characterisation that often arise in complex structures with high levels of background noise. Furthermore, the technique has been criticised for a lack of quantitative results and the large amount of operator interpretation required during data analysis. This paper begins by introducing the challenges faced in developing an AE based structural health monitoring system and then gives a review of previous progress made in addresing these challenges. Subsequently an overview of a novel methodology for automatic detection of fatigue fractures in complex geometries and noisy environments is presented, which combines a number of signal processing techniques to address the current limitations of AE monitoring. The technique was developed for monitoring metallic landing gear components during pre-flight certification testing and results are presented from a full-scale steel landing gear component undergoing fatigue loading. Fracture onset was successfully identify automatically at 49,000 fatigue cycles prior to final failure (validated by the use of dye penetrant inspection) and the fracture position was located to within 10 mm of the actual location.

  1. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Zzzz of... - Continuous Compliance With Emission Limitations and Operating Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63, Subpt. ZZZZ, Table 6 Table 6 to... continuous compliance by . . . 1. 2SLB and 4SLB stationary RICE >500 HP located at a major source and CI... stationary RICE >500 HP located at a major source and CI stationary RICE >500 HP located at a major source a...

  2. Influence of dams on sediment continuity: A study case of a natural metallic contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémion, Franck; Bordas, François; Mourier, Brice; Lenain, Jean-François; Kestens, Tim; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra

    2016-03-15

    Sediments play an important role on the quality of aquatic ecosystems, notably in the reservoir areas where they can either be a sink or a source of contaminants, depending on the management and hydrological conditions. The physicochemical properties of 25 surface sediments samples of a reservoir catchment (Vaussaire, Cantal, France) were studied. Results show a strong influence of dam presence, notably on the grain size and organic matter (OM) contents. The concentrations of trace metals and metalloids (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were also measured and compared with worldwide reservoir concentrations and international sediment quality guideline levels in order to assess the intensity of the metallic contamination. Cr and Ni are the trace elements presenting the significantly highest values at the catchment scale. Enrichment Factors (EF), calculated using both local and national backgrounds, show that metals have mainly a natural origin, explaining especially the Cr and Ni values, linked with the composition of parental rocks. Unexpectedly, all the observed metal concentrations are lower in the reservoir than upstream and downstream, which might be related to the high fresh OM inputs in the reservoir, diluting the global metallic contamination. Multivariate statistical analyses, carried out in order to identify the relationship between the studied metals and sediment characteristics, tend to support this hypothesis, confirming the unusually low influence of such poorly-degraded OM on trace element accumulation in the reservoir. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process; Alkali- ja raskasmetallipaeaestoet PCFB-prosessista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula R and D Center since 1986. As part of the development, 10 MW PCFB test facility was built in 1989. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1995 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measurements were performed using plasma assisted method of TUT Laboratory of Plasma Technology and wet absorption method of VTT Energy. The measurements were carried out during three test campaigns at PCFB Test Facility in Karhula. In autumn 1995 both VTT and TUT methods were used. The measurements of the following test period in spring 1996 were performed by VTT, and during the last test segment in autumn 1996 TUT method was in use. During the last test period, the TUT instrument was used as semi-continuous (3 values/minute) alkali analyzer for part of the time. The measured Na concentrations were below 30 ppb(w) in all measured data points. The results of K were below 10 ppb(w). The accuracies of the both methods are about +50 % at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission. The measured emissions are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits estimated by gas turbine manufacturers

  4. Enhanced Emission by Accumulated Charges at Organic/Metal Interfaces Generated during the Reverse Bias of Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Nozoe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A high frequency rectangular alternating voltage was applied to organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs with the structure ITO/TPD/Alq3/Al and ITO/CoPc/Alq3/Al, where ITO is indium-tin-oxide, TPD is 4,4′-bis[N-phenyl-N-(m-tolylamino]biphenyl, CoPc is cobalt phthalocyanine, and Alq3 is Tris(8-quinolinolatoaluminum, and the effect on emission of the reverse bias was examined. The results reveal that the emission intensity under an alternating reverse-forward bias is greater than that under an alternating zero-forward bias. The difference in the emission intensity (∆I increased both for decreasing frequency and increasing voltage level of the reverse bias. In particular, the change in emission intensity was proportional to the voltage level of the reverse bias given the same frequency. To understand ΔI, this paper proposes a model in which an OLED works as a capacitor under reverse bias, where positive and negative charges accumulate on the metal/organic interfaces. In this model, the emission enhancement that occurs during the alternating reverse-forward bias is rationalized as a result of the charge accumulation at the organic/metal interfaces during the reverse bias, which possibly modulates the vacuum level shifts at the organic/metal interfaces to reduce both the hole injection barrier at the organic/ITO interface and the electron injection barrier at the organic/Al interface under forward bias.

  5. Continuous transfer of liquid metal droplets across a fluid-fluid interface within an integrated microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, Berrak; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J; Kurdzinski, Michael E; Tang, Shi-Yang; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-06-07

    Micro scale liquid metal droplets have been hailed as the potential key building blocks of future micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). However, most of the current liquid metal enabled systems involve millimeter scale droplets, which are manually injected onto the desired locations of the microchip. Despite its simplicity, this method is impractical for patterning large arrays or complex systems based on micro scale droplets. Here, we present a microfluidic chip, which integrates continuous generation of micro scale galinstan droplets in glycerol, and the hydrodynamic transfer of these droplets into sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Observation via high-speed imaging along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis are utilised to comprehend the lateral migration of droplets from the glycerol to NaOH fluid. This platform is simple, can be readily integrated into other microfluidic systems, and creates flexibility by separating the continuous phase for droplet generation from the eventual target carrier fluid within a monolithic chip.

  6. Continuous-flow synthesis of primary amines: Metal-free reduction of aliphatic and aromatic nitro derivatives with trichlorosilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Porta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The metal-free reduction of nitro compounds to amines mediated by trichlorosilane was successfully performed for the first time under continuous-flow conditions. Aromatic as well as aliphatic nitro derivatives were converted to the corresponding primary amines in high yields and very short reaction times with no need for purification. The methodology was also extended to the synthesis of two synthetically relevant intermediates (precursors of baclofen and boscalid.

  7. Design and simulation of an activated sludge unit associated to a continuous reactor to remove heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Avila, J.S.; Nascimento, R.R. [Ambientec Consultoria Ltda., Aracaju, SE (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A software was developed to design and simulate an activated sludge unit associated to a new technology to remove heavy metals from wastewater. In this process, a continuous high efficiency biphasic reactor operates by using particles of activated peat in conjugation with the sludge unit. The results obtained may be useful to increase the efficiency or to reduce the design and operational costs involved in a activated sludge unit. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Continuous-wave infrared optical gain and amplified spontaneous emission at ultralow threshold by colloidal HgTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiregat, Pieter; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sagar, Laxmi Kishore; Infante, Ivan; Zapata, Felipe; Grigel, Valeriia; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe; Van Thourhout, Dries; Hens, Zeger

    2018-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) raise more and more interest as solution-processable and tunable optical gain materials. However, especially for infrared active QDs, optical gain remains inefficient. Since stimulated emission involves multifold degenerate band-edge states, population inversion can be attained only at high pump power and must compete with efficient multi-exciton recombination. Here, we show that mercury telluride (HgTe) QDs exhibit size-tunable stimulated emission throughout the near-infrared telecom window at thresholds unmatched by any QD studied before. We attribute this unique behaviour to surface-localized states in the bandgap that turn HgTe QDs into 4-level systems. The resulting long-lived population inversion induces amplified spontaneous emission under continuous-wave optical pumping at power levels compatible with solar irradiation and direct current electrical pumping. These results introduce an alternative approach for low-threshold QD-based gain media based on intentional trap states that paves the way for solution-processed infrared QD lasers and amplifiers.

  9. NASA's MODIS/VIIRS Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Products: Asssessment of Accuracy, Continuity and Science Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, G. C.; Malakar, N.; Islam, T.

    2017-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E) are an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR) and Environmental Climate Variable (ECV) defined by NASA and GCOS respectively. LST&E data are key variables used in land cover/land use change studies, in surface energy balance and atmospheric water vapor retrieval models and retrievals, and in climate research. LST&E products are currently produced on a routine basis using data from the MODIS instruments on the NASA EOS platforms and by the VIIRS instrument on the Suomi-NPP platform that serves as a bridge between NASA EOS and the next-generation JPSS platforms. Two new NASA LST&E products for MODIS (MxD21) and VIIRS (VNP21) are being produced during 2017 using a new approach that addresses discrepancies in accuracy and consistency between the current suite of split-window based LST products. The new approach uses a Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm, originally developed for the ASTER instrument, to physically retrieve both LST and spectral emissivity consistently for both sensors with high accuracy and well defined uncertainties. This study provides a rigorous assessment of accuracy of the MxD21/VNP21 products using temperature- and radiance-based validation strategies and demonstrates continuity between the products using collocated matchups over CONUS. We will further demonstrate potential science use of the new products with studies related to heat waves, monitoring snow melt dynamics, and land cover/land use change.

  10. Continuous-wave infrared optical gain and amplified spontaneous emission at ultralow threshold by colloidal HgTe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiregat, Pieter; Houtepen, Arjan J.; Sagar, Laxmi Kishore; Infante, Ivan; Zapata, Felipe; Grigel, Valeriia; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe; van Thourhout, Dries; Hens, Zeger

    2018-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) raise more and more interest as solution-processable and tunable optical gain materials. However, especially for infrared active QDs, optical gain remains inefficient. Since stimulated emission involves multifold degenerate band-edge states, population inversion can be attained only at high pump power and must compete with efficient multi-exciton recombination. Here, we show that mercury telluride (HgTe) QDs exhibit size-tunable stimulated emission throughout the near-infrared telecom window at thresholds unmatched by any QD studied before. We attribute this unique behaviour to surface-localized states in the bandgap that turn HgTe QDs into 4-level systems. The resulting long-lived population inversion induces amplified spontaneous emission under continuous-wave optical pumping at power levels compatible with solar irradiation and direct current electrical pumping. These results introduce an alternative approach for low-threshold QD-based gain media based on intentional trap states that paves the way for solution-processed infrared QD lasers and amplifiers.

  11. Calculation of thermal stress condition in long metal cylinder under heating by continuous laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uglov, A.A.; Uglov, S.A.; Kulik, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    The method of determination of temperature field and unduced thermal stresses in long metallic cylinder under its heating by cw-laser normally distributed heat flux is offered. The graphically presented results of calculation show the stress maximum is placed behind of center of laser heat sport along its movement line on the cylinder surface

  12. Developing a Continuous Hemispheric View of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The GeoCARB Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B.; Chatfield, R. B.; Chenette, D. L.; Crowell, S.; Kawa, S. R.; Kumer, J. B.; Mobilia, J.; OBrien, D. M.; Polonsky, I. N.; Rairden, R. L.; Rayner, P. J.; Roche, A. E.; Zaccheo, T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents discussion of an instrument and space mission concept (GeoCARB) that would provide measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO) from geostationary orbit. The GeoCARB mission would deliver multiple maps daily of column integrated mixing ratios over the observed landmasses with spatial sampling of 3 km x 3 km and resolution of 4 x 5 km at sub satellite point (SSP), degrading predictably on moving away from SSP. Observing system simulation studies demonstrate that these data will enable CO2 and CH4 flux determination at unprecedented time and space scales. This determination would produce fundamental change in our scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle as well as produce the kind of flux information that will be needed to support international agreements on greenhouse gas emission reductions. The instrumentation concept is based on an approach and components that are of high technology readiness level. Following heritage greenhouse gas instruments, it would exploit four spectral regions: the weak and strong bands of CO2 near 1.61 and 2.06 microns; a region near 2.32 microns for CO and CH4, and the Oxygen A-band for pressure. Prototype testing and performance simulations indicate that the median mission retrieval for CO2, CH4 and CO column mixing ratio are expected to be < 0.7, 1.0 and 10.0%, respectively. These measurements over several years would provide a breakthrough reduction in errors and enhanced attribution of the CO2, CH4 and CO sources within the geostationary field of regard. The GeoCARB instrument is designed to fly as a hosted payload on a commercial communications satellite or a weather satellite thereby lowering the cost while retaining the potential for global expansion.

  13. Metal oxide core shell nanostructures as building blocks for efficient light emission (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane P [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dorman, James [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cheung, Cyrus [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this research is to synthesize core-shell nano-structured metal oxide materials and investigate their structural, electronic and optical properties to understand the microscopic pathways governing the energy conversion process, thereby controlling and improving their efficiency. Specifically, the goal is to use a single metal oxide core-shell nanostructure and a single excitation source to generate photons with long emission lifetime over the entire visible spectrum and when controlled at the right ratio, generating white light. In order to achieve this goal, we need to control the energy transfer between light emitting elements, which dictates the control of their interatomic spacing and spatial distribution. We developed an economical wet chemical process to form the nanostructured core and to control the thickness and composition of the shell layers. With the help from using DOE funded synchrotron radiation facility, we delineated the growth mechanism of the nano-structured core and the shell layers, thereby enhancing our understanding of structure-property relation in these materials. Using the upconversion luminescence and the lifetime measurements as effective feedback to materials sysnthes is and integration, we demonstrated improved luminescence lifetimes of the core-shell nano-structures and quantified the optimal core-multi-shell structure with optimum shell thickness and composition. We developed a rare-earths co-doped LaPO4 core-multishell structure in order to produce a single white light source. It was decided that the mutli-shell method would produce the largest increase in luminescence efficiency while limiting any energy transfer that may occur between the dopant ions. All samples resulted in emission spectra within the accepted range of white light generation based on the converted CIE color coordinates. The white light obtained varied between warm and cool white depending on the layering architecture, allowing for the

  14. The signatures of acoustic emission waveforms from fatigue crack advancing in thin metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasin Bhuiyan, Md; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2018-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) waveforms from a fatigue crack advancing in a thin metallic plate possess diverse and complex spectral signatures. In this article, we analyze these waveform signatures in coordination with the load level during cyclic fatigue. The advancing fatigue crack may generate numerous AE hits while it grows under fatigue loading. We found that these AE hits can be sorted into various groups based on their AE waveform signatures. Each waveform group has a particular time-domain signal pattern and a specific frequency spectrum. This indicates that each group represents a certain AE event related to the fatigue crack growth behavior. In situ AE-fatigue experiments were conducted to monitor the fatigue crack growth with simultaneous measurement of AE signals, fatigue loading, and optical crack growth measurement. An in situ microscope was installed in the load-frame of the mechanical testing system (MTS) to optically monitor the fatigue crack growth and relate the AE signals with the crack growth measurement. We found the AE signal groups at higher load levels (75%–85% of maximum load) were different from the AE signal groups that happened at lower load levels (below 60% of load level). These AE waveform groups are highly related to the fatigue crack-related AE events. These AE signals mostly contain the higher frequency peaks (100 kHz, 230 kHz, 450 kHz, 550 kHz). Some AE signal groups happened as a clustered form that relates a sequence of small AE events within the fatigue crack. They happened at relatively lower load level (50%–60% of the maximum load). These AE signal groups may be related to crack friction and micro-fracture during the friction process. These AE signals mostly contain the lower frequency peaks (60 kHz, 100 kHz, 200 kHz). The AE waveform based analysis may give us comprehensive information of the metal fatigue.

  15. On-line dynamic extraction system hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for automatic determination of oral bioaccessible trace metal fractions in airborne particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Victoria; Miró, Manuel; Limbeck, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    For a realistic evaluation of the potential hazard emanating from airborne particulate matter (APM), the determination of the total inhaled metal amounts associated with APM is insufficient in risk assessment. Additional information about metal fractions that can be mobilized by the human body is necessary, because only those soluble (also called bioaccessible) fractions can be absorbed by the human body, and thus potentially cause adverse health effects. In the present study, a dynamic flow-through approach as a front end to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) exploiting advanced flow analysis is employed for on-line handling of multiple APM samples and determination of bioaccessible trace metals under worst case extraction scenarios. The method is based on on-line continuous extraction of filter samples with synthetic gastric fluid followed by on-line ICP-OES measurement of the dissolved fraction of trace metals. The assembly permits an automated successive measurement of three sample replicates in less than 19 min. The on-line extraction procedure offers increased sample throughput and reduced risk of sample contamination and overcomes metal re-adsorption processes compared to the traditional batch-wise counterparts. Furthermore, it provides deeper information on the kinetics of the leaching process. The developed procedure was applied to the determination of bioaccessible metal fractions (Al, Ba, Cu, Fe and Mn as model analytes) in PM10 samples from Palma de Mallorca (Spain) and Vienna (Austria). Graphical Abstract On-line gastric bioaccessibility of elements in airborne particulate matter.

  16. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  17. Depth distribution of abiotic drivers of N mineralization and methane emission from a continuously and intermittently flooded Bangladeshi paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Masuda; Kader, Md. Abdul; Pierreux, Sofie; Boeckx, Pascal; Kamal, Ahammad Mostafa; Sleutel, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Water-saving irrigation such as AWD may significantly alter depth profiles of moisture content, pH, Eh and soil microbial activity. Modelling the effect of irrigation management on soil N mineralization, therefore requires detailed insight into depth distribution of these variables and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and evolution of electron acceptors. We set up a field experiment at Bangladesh Agricultural University from January to May' 2015. The cultivated rice variety (BRRI dhan28) was grown under continuous flooding (CF) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) management, with 120 kg N ha-1(N120) or without (N0)N fertilizer application. We measured soil mineral N and plant N uptake to evaluate N mineralization. CH4 emissions were monitored with timely gas sample collection and GC-analysis. Soil Eh at four depths and temperature at two depths were monitored continuously by Eh/T°-probes connected to a HYPNOS III data logger (MVH, The Netherlands). Simultaneously, soil solution from three depths were sampled with rhizon samplers to track DOC, Fe and Mn in solution. Over the growing season soil and air temperature increased by 8°C, and soil pH stayed near neutral (6.7 to 7.8). In all depths of AWD and CF, Eh dropped sharply to methanic conditions within 21 days after transplanting (DAT). Low redox-potential continued until 77DAT in all cases, except in the puddle layers under AWD, where redox raised to -200mV during drainage. Fe and Mn in soil solution increased gradually over the growing season, indicating continued reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydro-)oxides. DOC increased continuously as well in all depths. Besides to release of DOC bound to pedogenic oxides upon their reductive dissolution, higher plant and soil microbial activity with increasing soil temperature (till 28°C) through the growing season explains the increasing DOC levels. Increasing methanogenic activity as indicated by the high CH4 emissions at 70-84DAT under both CF and AWD is

  18. Computer Simulation of the Formation of Non-Metallic Precipitates During a Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisz D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors own computer software, based on the Ueshima mathematical model with taking into account the back diffusion, determined from the Wołczyński equation, was developed for simulation calculations. The applied calculation procedure allowed to determine the chemical composition of the non-metallic phase in steel deoxidised by means of Mn, Si and Al, at the given cooling rate. The calculation results were confirmed by the analysis of samples taken from the determined areas of the cast ingot. This indicates that the developed computer software can be applied for designing the steel casting process of the strictly determined chemical composition and for obtaining the required non-metallic precipitates.

  19. Continuous Eddy Covariance Measurements of N2O Emissions and Controls from an Intensively Grazed Dairy Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, L. A.; Liang, L. L.; Wall, A.; Campbell, D.

    2017-12-01

    New Zealand's greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is disproportionally dominated by methane and nitrous oxide which account for 54% of emissions. These GHGs are derived from pastoral agriculture that supports dairying and meat production. To date, most studies on quantifying or mitigating agricultural N2O emissions have used flux chamber measurements. Recent advances in detector technology now means that routine field-to-farm scale measurements of N2O emissions might be possible using the eddy covariance technique. In late 2016, we established an eddy covariance tower that measured N2O emissions from a dairy farm under year-round grazing. An Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to measure N2O, CH4 and H2O concentration at 10 Hz and housed in a weatherproof and insulated enclosure (0.9 m ´ 1.2 m) and powered by mains power (240 VAC). The enclosure maintained a stable setpoint temperature (30±0.2°C) by using underground cooling pipes, fans and recirculating instrument heat. QCL (true 10 Hz digital) and CSAT3B sonic anemometer high frequency data are aligned using Network Time Protocol and EddyPro covariance maximisation during flux processing. Fluxes generally integrated over about 6-8 ha. Stable summertime baseline N2O fluxes (FN2O) were around 12-24 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 (0.5-1.0 nmol N2O m-2 s-1). Grazing by cows during dry summer resulted in only modest increases in FN2O to 24-48 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 (1.0-2.0 nmol N2O m-2 s-1). However, the first rain events after grazing resulted in large, short-lived (1-3 days) FN2O pulses reaching peaks of 144-192 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 (6-8 nmol N2O m-2 s-1). During these elevated N2O emissions, FN2O displayed a significant diurnal signal, with peak fluxes mid-afternoon which was best explained by variation in shallow soil temperature in summer. In winter (both cooler and wetter) FN2O were not as easily explained on a daily basis but were generally greater than summer. Throughout the year, FN2O was strongly dependent on water filled

  20. Technique for obtaining an engine emissions model based on continuous EPA-CVS test data and a dynamic vehicle model. SAE Paper 760156

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, R.; Frank, A.; Beachley, N.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for obtaining engine emission flow rate maps has been developed. The maps are based on specific emissions data obtained on a continuous basis over a single EPA-CVS urban driving cycle test. The data are averaged for the various torque-speed ranges of the engine. It has been found that these dynamic average emission flow rate maps, which are functions only of engine torque and speed, allow instantaneous emissions to be fairly accurately predicted. It also appears that the technique might be used advantageously to determine engine calibration parameters.

  1. Wave packet study of the secondary emission of negatively charged, monoatomic ions from sputtered metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindona, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)]. E-mail: sindona@fis.unical.it; Riccardi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Maletta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Rudi, S.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Falcone, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Via P. Bucci 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    Secondary emission of Ag{sup -} and Au{sup -} particles, following the sputtering of clean Ag(1 0 0) and Au(1 0 0) targets, respectively, is studied with a Crank-Nicholson wave-packet propagation method. A one-electron pseudo-potential is used to describe the plane metal surface, with a projected band gap, the ejected ion, whose charge state is investigated, and its nearest-neighbor substrate ion, put in motion by the collision cascade generated by the primary ion beam. Time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved backwards in time to determine the evolution of the affinity orbital of the negative particles from an instant when they are unperturbed, at distances of the order of {approx}10{sup 2} a.u. from the surface, to the instant of ejection. The probability that a band electron will be eventually detected in affinity state of the ejected particle is, thus, calculated and compared with the result of another method based on the spectral decomposition of the one-electron Hamiltonian.

  2. Effects of Biochar on the Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions under Continuous Flooding and Water-Saving Irrigation Conditions in Paddy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Qi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the greenhouse gas emission under different application of biochar in the conditions of continuous flooding and water-saving irrigation in paddy fields, whereas, plant and soil carbon sequestration were considered in the calculation of net greenhouse gas emissions. The emission rates of methane (CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2, and nitrous oxide (N2O gases were simultaneously monitored once every 7–10 days using the closed-chamber method. As a whole, the net greenhouse gas emission in the water-saving irrigation was more than that of the continuous flooding irrigation conditions. Compared with the water-saving irrigation, the continuous flooding irrigation significantly increased the CH4 in the control (CK and chemical fertilizer treatments (NPK. The CO2 emissions increased in each treatment of the water-saving irrigation condition, especially in the chemical fertilizer treatments (NPKFW. Similarly, the soil N2O emission was very sensitive to the water-saving irrigation condition. An interesting finding is that the biochar application in soils cut down the soil N2O emission more significantly than NPKFW in the water-saving irrigation condition while the effect of biochar increased under the continuous flooding irrigation condition.

  3. Field evaluation of a total mercury continuous emissions monitor at a U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Dunn, J.E. Jr.; Baker, R.L.; Sigl, W.; Skegg, I.

    1999-01-01

    In conjunction with proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors, extended duration testing sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of three mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) was conducted in the 1996--97 timeframe at a commercial cement kiln burning hazardous wastes at Holly Hill, South Carolina. The emission characteristics of the kiln, specifically the combination of high particulate matter, moisture, and acid gases, were believed to have contributed to the failure of the tested CEMs. The MERCEM mercury analyzer for stack gases manufactured by Perkin Elmer and represented by Aldora Technologies was selected for further evaluation on a DOE mixed waste incinerator at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, expected to present less adverse conditions. The overall scope of the evaluation was carried out over a two-month period from September through October 1998. Not only was the performance of the MERCEM evaluated according to proposed EPA Performance Specification 12 but also were alternative methods of calibration with reference concentrations of mercury and a qualitative assessment of long-term endurance under wet stack conditions

  4. Material Properties of Various Light Metals Produced by Heated Mold Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Miyamoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt was made to develop high quality cast aluminum alloys via a new casting technology, e.g., the heated mold continuous casting (HMC with ultrasonic vibration (UV process. With the UV process in the continuous casting process, fine and spherical grains were obtained, where the lattice structure is formed similarly before the UV process while dislocation density increases. The mechanical properties of the UV-HMC Al alloys are higher than those for the related cast Al alloys without UV although still high material ductility is obtained. The lattice and dislocation characteristics of the continuous cast samples made with and without the UV processes were analyzed systematically by the EBSD observations to interrupt clearly their mechanical properties.

  5. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  6. Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission from quantum cascades inside mirror-grating metal cavities at THz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Yanko; Sagnes, Isabelle; Abram, Izo; Minot, Christophe

    2007-11-30

    Quantum cascade devices processed into double metal cavities with subwavelength thickness and a grating on top are studied at terahertz frequencies. The power extracted from the devices as a function of the device thickness and the grating period is analyzed owing to electrodynamical modeling of dipole emission based on a modal method in multilayer systems. The experimental data thus reveal a strong Purcell enhancement, with Purcell factors up to approximately 50.

  7. A new two-photon mechanism of the formation of a continuous spectrum of photons emitted by secondary emission products of atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veksler, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    A two-photon mechanism of the formation of a continuous spectrum of photons emitted by products of metal sputtering is considered. The following process of the two-photon mechanism is considered: the continuous spectrum is formed under quadrupole two-photon transitions in sputtered excited atoms having vacancies at the d level in atoms of transition metals or at the of level in lanthanides found against the filled conduction band. It is shown that the suggested mechanism should play an essential role in the formation of the continuous spectrum of optical radiation

  8. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Pillar Arrays Patterned Directly on Metal Alloy Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Killian, Jessica L; Niemann, Darrell L; Silan, Nathaniel Zuckerman ;Jeremy; Ribaya, Bryan P; Rahman, Mahmud; Meyyappan, M; Nguyen, Cattien V

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube pillar arrays (CPAs) for cold field emission were fabricated using a conventional photolithography process, and the geometry of these arrays was studied and the effect of pillar height on field emission was quantified...

  9. Including exposure variability in the life cycle impact assessment of indoor chemical emissions: the case of metal degreasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsteijn, Laura; Huizer, Daan; Hauck, Mara; van Zelm, Rosalie; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2014-10-01

    The present paper describes a method that accounts for variation in indoor chemical exposure settings and accompanying human toxicity in life cycle assessment (LCA). Metal degreasing with dichloromethane was used as a case study to show method in practice. We compared the human toxicity related to the degreasing of 1m(2) of metal surface in different exposure scenarios for industrial workers, professional users outside industrial settings, and home consumers. The fraction of the chemical emission that is taken in by exposed individuals (i.e. the intake fraction) was estimated on the basis of operational conditions (e.g. exposure duration), and protective measures (e.g. local exhaust ventilation). The introduction of a time-dependency and a correction for protective measures resulted in reductions in the intake fraction of up to 1.5 orders of magnitude, compared to application of existing, less advanced models. In every exposure scenario, the life cycle impacts for human toxicity were mainly caused by indoor exposure to metal degreaser (>60%). Emissions released outdoors contributed up to 22% of the life cycle impacts for human toxicity, and the production of metal degreaser contributed up to 19%. These findings illustrate that human toxicity from indoor chemical exposure should not be disregarded in LCA case studies. Particularly when protective measures are taken or in the case of a short duration (1h or less), we recommend the use of our exposure scenario-specific approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Continuous Flooding in No-rice Growing Season on CH4 and CO2 Emissions of Rice Growing Season with Straw Returning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Xiang-yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Straw returning is a straw utilization pattern which is widely promoted in China. It can increase the soil organic carbon and fertility, but straw returning also increase the CH4 and CO2 emissions. The effects of continuous flooding in no rice growing season on CH4 and CO2 emission in rice season with straw returning is not clear. This study was conducted with two different water managements in no rice growing season, one was the middle rice-natural drainage (RD and another was the middle rice-continuous flooding (RW. The aim was to investigate the characteristic of CH4 and CO2 emission flux in rice season under different water management with straw returning, and to provide data support for accurate assessment of paddy greenhouse gas emissions. The results showed that RD significantly reduced the CH4 accumulation emission flux in rice growing season compared with the RW, and 80% total CH4 emission flux in rice growing season was emission before the first drainage whether RD or RW. RW could cutdown the CO2 accumulation emission flux in rice growing season compared with RD, and about 60% total CO2 emission flux in rice growing season was emission after the first drainage whether RD or RW. RW reduced the soil NO3--N, NH4+-N and DOC concentration in rice growing season, and decreased the Eh value at 10 cm soil layer, but increased the acetic acid concentration. This might be the main reason of increasing the CH4 accumulation emission flux from RD.

  11. Characterization of Continuous and Pulsed Emission modes of a Hybrid Micro Focus X-ray Source for Medical Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Wong, Molly D; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Rong, John X; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16-50 μm as the source output power changes from 10-39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (μA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 μm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 μm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications.

  12. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  13. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Steel Continuous Casting Billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ying; Wang, Yufeng; Li, Shusen; Zhang, Lifeng; Zuo, Xiangjun; Lekakh, Simon N.; Peaslee, Kent

    2014-08-01

    This work applied automated particle analysis to study non-metallic inclusions in steel. Compared with traditional methods, the approach has the advantage of capturing the morphology, measuring the size, recording the original positions, and identifying the composition of inclusions on a selected area in a short time. The morphology and composition of typical inclusions were analyzed using partial acid extraction and discussed through thermodynamic calculation. Steel samples were collected from the entire cross section of billets cast during times of steady state and ladle change. The spatial distribution of inclusions agreed well with the measurement of the total oxygen. The spatial distribution of inclusions was plotted to represent the entrapment positions of inclusions on the casting strand and their concentration on the cross section of the billet. Also, regarding the different size and type of inclusions, the spatial distribution of classified inclusions was explored such as the distribution of sulfide, oxide, and high sodium and potassium content inclusions. The sufficient information could be used to identify the source of inclusions and guide the steel refining process.

  14. Development of a low-temperature two-stage fluidized bed incinerator for controlling heavy-metal emission in flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Tzu-Huan; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Wey, Ming-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study develops a low-temperature two-stage fluidized bed system for treating municipal solid waste. This new system can decrease the emission of heavy metals, has low construction costs, and can save energy owing to its lower operating temperature. To confirm the treatment efficiency of this system, the combustion efficiency and heavy-metal emission were determined. An artificial waste containing heavy metals (chromium, lead, and cadmium) was used in this study. The tested parameters included first-stage temperature and system gas velocity. Results obtained using a thermogravimetric analyzer with a differential scanning calorimeter indicated that the first-stage temperature should be controlled to at least 400 °C. Although, a large amount of carbon monoxide was emitted after the first stage, it was efficiently consumed in the second. Loss of the ignition values of ash residues were between 0.005% and 0.166%, and they exhibited a negative correlation with temperature and gas velocity. Furthermore, the emission concentration of heavy metals in the two-stage system was lower than that of the traditional one-stage fluidized bed system. The heavy-metal emissions can be decreased by between 16% and 82% using the low-temperature operating process, silica sand adsorption, and the filtration of the secondary stage. -- Graphical abstract: Heavy-metal emission concentrations in flue gases under different temperatures and gas velocities (dashed line: average of the heavy-metal emission in flue gases in the one-stage fluidized-bed incinerator). Highlights: • Low temperature two-stage system is developed to control heavy metal. • The different first-stage temperatures affect the combustion efficiency. • Surplus CO was destroyed efficiently by the secondary fluidized bed combustor. • Metal emission in two-stage system is lower than in the traditional system. • Temperature, bed adsorption, and filtration are the main control mechanisms

  15. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 7 Table 7 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment... emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device...

  16. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Issac O, K.; Martinez, A.; Lavoisier, E.; Martinez, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for...

  18. Exercise-induced stunning continues for at least one hour: evaluation with quantitative gated single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.K.; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun; Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Tokita, Naoki; Maruyama, Atsushi; Xiuli, Mu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the after-effect of exercise on left ventricular (LV) function, end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were evaluated at 1 h after exercise and at rest by technetium-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using an automated program in 53 subjects. The subjects were grouped as follows: normal scan (n = 16), ischaemia (n = 19) and infarction (n = 18), based on the interpretation of perfusion images. Postexercise LVEF did not differ from resting LVEF in the groups with normal scan and infarction. In patients with ischaemia, postexercise EDV (90±17 ml, mean ±SD) and ESV (44±15 ml) were significantly higher than EDV (84±15 ml, P = 0.001) and ESV (36±14 ml, P<0.0005) at rest. LVEF was significantly depressed 1 h after exercise (53%±9% vs 58%±9%, P<0.0001). In ischaemic patients with depressed postexercise LVEF, LVEF difference between rest and postexercise showed a significant correlation with the sum of defect scores, which were reversible from exercise to rest perfusion images (r = 0.92, P<0.0001). These results indicate that exercise-induced LV dysfunction (myocardial stunning) continues for at least 1 h in ischaemic patients and that the extent of LVEF depression is determined by the severity of ischaemia. (orig.)

  19. Exercise-induced stunning continues for at least one hour: evaluation with quantitative gated single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, A.K.; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun; Tsujimura, Eiichiro; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Tokita, Naoki; Maruyama, Atsushi; Xiuli, Mu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Division of Tracer Kinetics, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-29

    To elucidate the after-effect of exercise on left ventricular (LV) function, end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) were evaluated at 1 h after exercise and at rest by technetium-99m tetrofosmin gated myocardial single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using an automated program in 53 subjects. The subjects were grouped as follows: normal scan (n = 16), ischaemia (n = 19) and infarction (n = 18), based on the interpretation of perfusion images. Postexercise LVEF did not differ from resting LVEF in the groups with normal scan and infarction. In patients with ischaemia, postexercise EDV (90{+-}17 ml, mean {+-}SD) and ESV (44{+-}15 ml) were significantly higher than EDV (84{+-}15 ml, P = 0.001) and ESV (36{+-}14 ml, P<0.0005) at rest. LVEF was significantly depressed 1 h after exercise (53%{+-}9% vs 58%{+-}9%, P<0.0001). In ischaemic patients with depressed postexercise LVEF, LVEF difference between rest and postexercise showed a significant correlation with the sum of defect scores, which were reversible from exercise to rest perfusion images (r = 0.92, P<0.0001). These results indicate that exercise-induced LV dysfunction (myocardial stunning) continues for at least 1 h in ischaemic patients and that the extent of LVEF depression is determined by the severity of ischaemia. (orig.) With 7 figs., 19 refs.

  20. The metal industry in Norway: Economy, employment and emission of climate gases; Metallindustrien i Norge: Oekonomi, sysselsetting og utslipp av klimagasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godal, Odd

    1998-11-01

    This document presents various types of data on the metal industry in Norway as a basis for further analysis and discussion. Being energy intensive, the Norwegian metal industry has profited from the availability of hydroelectric power. The factories are often located in sparsely populated areas. In the production of aluminium, carbon dioxide is emitted to the atmosphere. A table lists all the Norwegian smelteries and their emissions of the greenhouse gases. Some of these emissions are fluoride gases with heating potentials up to 9200 times that of carbon dioxide. The emissions of SF6 are small in mass, but large in heating effect, 23900 times that of carbon dioxide. The total emission of climate gases from Norway is 59 million ton CO2 equivalents and 11% of this is due to the part of the metal industry described in this document. The total consumption of electricity of the factories included in this analysis is 25 TWh, which is 2/3 of the consumption by private households. The metal industry is not work intensive; the last twenty years the numbers of employees have decreased by 50%. But these factories are very important for the local communities. The metal industry is exposed to competition; the large fluctuation in prices on metals leads to fluctuation in the profit of the companies. Finally the report discusses the metal industry in a global context. Norway is committed to the Kyoto Protocol and the impact of this commitment on the metal industry is not clear. 2 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Semi-continuous detection of mercury in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2011-12-06

    A new method for the semi-continuous detection of heavy metals and metalloids including mercury in gaseous streams. The method entails mass measurement of heavy metal oxides and metalloid oxides with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor having an uncoated substrate. An array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can be used where each sensor is for the semi-continuous emission monitoring of a particular heavy metal or metalloid.

  2. Solar hydrogen from an aqueous, noble-metal-free hybrid system in a continuous-flow sampling reaction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Ward, Antony J; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2014-06-10

    We introduce the visible-light photocatalytic H2 evolution reaction as catalyzed by a cobaloxime/carbon nitride (C3N4) noble-metal-free hybrid photosystem by using a continuous-flow sampling reaction system. The photocatalytic H2 evolution rate is highly dependent on the structure of C3N4, in which porous C3N4 shows the best activity compared with bulk C3N4 (lamellar) and C3N4 nanosheets. When using porous C3N4, the system is neither affected by the solution pH, nor the C3N4 concentration, nor the structure of the cobaloxime complex. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Enhanced terahertz emission by coherent optical absorption in ultrathin semiconductor films on metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, G.; Ramanandan, G.K.P.; Adam, A.J.L.; Xu, M.; Kumar, N.; Hendrikx, R.W.A.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the surprisingly strong, broadband emission of coherent terahertz pulses from ultrathin layers of semiconductors such as amorphous silicon, germanium and polycrystalline cuprous oxide deposited on gold, upon illumination with femtosecond laser pulses. The strength of the emission is

  4. Long term continuous field survey to assess nutrient emission impact from irrigated paddy field into river catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In order to achieve good river environment, it is very important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. As we could reduce impact from urban and industrial activities by wastewater treatment, pollution from point sources are likely to be controlled. Besides them, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. In many countries in Asia and Africa, rice is widely cultivated and paddy field covers large areas. In Japan 54% of its arable land is occupied with irrigated paddy field. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality due to fertilization, it is also suggested that paddy field can purify water. We carried out field survey in middle reach of the Tone River Basin with focus on a paddy field IM. The objectives of the research are 1) understanding of water and nutrient balance in paddy field, 2) data collection for assessing nutrient emission. Field survey was conducted from June 2015 to October 2016 covering two flooding seasons in summer. In our measurement, all input and output were measured regarding water, N and P to quantify water and nutrient balance in the paddy field. By measuring water quality and flow rate of inflow, outflow, infiltrating water, ground water and flooding water, we tried to quantitatively understand water, N and P cycle in a paddy field including seasonal trends, and changes accompanied with rainy events and agricultural activities like fertilization. Concerning water balance, infiltration rate was estimated by following equation. Infiltration=Irrigation water + Precipitation - Evapotranspiration -Outflow We estimated mean daily water balance during flooding season. Infiltration is 11.9mm/day in our estimation for summer in 2015. Daily water reduction depth (WRD) is sum of Evapotranspiration and Infiltration. WRD is 21.5mm/day in IM and agrees with average value in previous research. Regarding nutrient balance, we estimated an annual N and

  5. Broadly tunable metal halide perovskites for solid-state light-emission applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjokatse, Sampson; Fang, Hong-Hua; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed heightened interest in metal-halide perovskites as promising optoelectronic materials for solid-state light emitting applications beyond photovoltaics. Metal-halide perovskites are low-cost solution-processable materials with excellent intrinsic properties such as

  6. The Performance of Chrome-Coated Copper as Metallic Catalytic Converter to Reduce Exhaust Gas Emissions from Spark-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warju; Harto, S. P.; Soenarto

    2018-01-01

    One of the automotive technologies to reduce exhaust gas emissions from the spark-ignition engine (SIE) is by using a catalytic converter. The aims of this research are firstly to conduct a metallic catalytic converter, secondly to find out to what extend chrome-coated copper plate (Cu+Cr) as a catalyst is efficient. To measure the concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) on the frame there are two conditions required. First is when the standard condition, and second is when Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter is applied using exhaust gas analyzer. Exhaust gas emissions from SIE are measured by using SNI 19-7118.1-2005. The testing of CO and HC emissions were conducted with variable speed to find the trend of exhaust gas emissions from idle speed to high speed. This experiment results in the fact that the use of Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter can reduce the production of CO and HC of a four-stroke gasoline engine. The reduction of CO and HC emission are 95,35% and 79,28%. Using active metal catalyst in form of metallic catalytic converter, it is gained an optimum effective surface of a catalyst which finally is able to decrease the amount of CO and HC emission significantly in every spinning happened in the engine. Finally, this technology can be applied to the spark ignition engine both car and motorcycle to support blue sky program in Indonesia.

  7. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-01-01

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  8. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  9. Plasmonic enhancement in upconversion emission of La2O3:Er3+/Yb3+ phosphor via introducing silver metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. P.; Kumar, K.; Rai, V. K.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, authors have synthesized silver (Ag) nanoparticle (NP) embedded La2O3:Er3+/Yb3+ powder phosphor. The synthesis method has resulted in silver oxide-lanthanum oxide composite material. Through subsequent heat treatment of sample in pellet form, the silver metal nanoparticles were formed. The presence of plasmonic Ag NPs in the matrix is confirmed by various techniques. Large enhancement in downconversion as well as upconversion emission intensity of Er3+ ions at various concentrations of Ag NPs is obtained. Large enhancement in the upconversion emission intensity is correlated to the reduction in decay time of 4S3/2 level in the presence of Ag NPs, and possible reasons for intensity enhancement are discussed. The application of phosphor in fingermark detection is demonstrated.

  10. The influence of heavy metal emissions and Fasciola hepatica infestation on the immunogenicity of a Listeria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistl, J; Mikula, I; Krupicer, I; Snirc, J

    1995-04-01

    The effect of oral dosing with emissions containing heavy metals (mercury, lead, copper, cadmium, zinc and chromium) on immune status was tested in 3 groups of sheep. Two groups (Groups I and II) were given emissions for 15 d. One of these groups (Group I) was then also infested with Fasciola hepatica metacercaria on day 16. These 2 groups (Groups I and II) and a control group (Group C) were immunized with a Listeria vaccine on days 8 and 22. A decreased index of metabolic response (IMR) of phagocytes and reduced responses of lymphocytes to mitogenic activation with phytohemagglutinin and L monocytogenes antigen stimulation in the leukocyte migration-inhibition test were recorded. Decreased agglutination titers of serum antibodies against L monocytogenes were observed. The F hepatica infestation had no significant effect on the migration index or IMR.

  11. Emissions of heavy metals and lindane into German river basins; Schwermetalleintraege in die Oberflaechengewaesser Deutschlands. Quantifizierung der Schwermetalleintraege aus Deutschland zur Umsetzung der Beschluesse der Internationalen Nordseeschutzkonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, S.; Scherer, U.; Hillenbrand, T.; Marscheider-Weidemann, F.; Behrendt, H.; Opitz, D.

    2002-12-01

    According to international agreements, encouraging all partners to diminish the emission of priority pollutants into North- and Baltic Sea significantly within a time period of 1985 to 2000, the aim of this project was to quantify the changes in the emission situation for both heavy metals and lindane within the mentioned period To reach this aim the total emissions of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn) and the pesticide lindane ({gamma}-HCH) into German river systems were quantified for the periods of 1983-1985, 1993-1995 and 1999/2000. For the quantification of the emissions via point sources a nation-wide survey on heavy metal data of municipal wastewater treatment plants and industrial direct discharges was carried out. The input via diffuse pathways was calculated using an adapted version of the model MONERIS. This model accounts for the significant transport processes, and it includes a geographical information system (GIS) that provides digital maps as well as extensive statistical information. For a comparison of the calculated heavy metal emission with the measured heavy metal load at monitoring stations the losses of heavy metals due to retention processes within the river systems have to be considered. Therefore heavy metal retention was calculated according to the retention function given by Vink/Behrendt (2002). For the large river basins a good correspondence could be found between estimated and measured heavy metal loads in rivers. The total emission into the German river basins decreased for each metal during the period of 1985 to 2000. The reduction varies between 36 and 85% mainly caused by the decline of emissions via point sources. Today's emissions of heavy metals into river basins of Germany are dominated by the input via diffuse pathways. The most important diffuse pathways are paved urban areas (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Zn), erosion (Pb, Cr) and groundwater (As, Ni). Since the application of the pesticide lindane is illegal today a

  12. Evolution of vent system during continuous ash emissions with Strombolian eruptions in 2000-2011 at Suwanosejima volcano, SW Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, T.; Iguchi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Strombolian and vulcanian eruptions are characterized by surface manifestation of unsteadiness such as the alternation of fountaining and successive ash emission with/without explosions. The activity sometimes evolves into much more destructive styles such as plinian eruption. The time evolution of these surface eruptive phenomena is strongly dependent on the history of magmas ascending in volcanic conduits as well as that of conduit condition itself. Suwanosejima volcano has been continuously active for more than several decades. The eruption styles it has shown were strombolian to small vulcanian that emit ash particles with small amount of ballistic bombs. Geological records show that such weak eruptions for several decades seemed to have preceded some major historical sub-plinian eruptions at this volcano. Thus, continuous observation for such kind of activities would be helpful for understanding or predicting the evolution of activity toward major eruptions. Although Suwanosejima is a remote island, with population of ca. 50, we had collected ash fall samples occasionally for ten years. Now we set up automatic ashfall sampling machine at the foot of Suwanosejima and are collecting ashfall sample every 2.5 days to investigate evolution of chemistry and crystallization processes of magma during ascent in conduit. The advantage of observing activities at Suwanosejima is that we can look into active vents from the rim of the caldera, 400 m apart and 300 m higher than the main central vent. We set up a camera to observe surface phenomena in the vicinity of vent, and correlated characteristics of eruptive materials with surface phenomena. The 2000-2011 activity of Suwanosejima volcano can be divided into three phases; phase I from 2000-2003, phase II from 2004-2008, and phase III from 2009-2011. Each phase is alternation of active and quiescent periods for weeks to months. There is a tendency that in active periods glassy particles are dominant whereas crystalline

  13. Recommendations on the choice of gas analysis equipment for systems of continuous monitoring and accounting of emissions from thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.; Burdyukov, D. A.; Khudolei, O. D.; Loktionov, O. A.

    2017-10-01

    According to Federal Law no. 219-FZ, dated July 21, 2014, all enterprises that have a significant negative impact on the environment shall continuously monitor and account emissions of harmful substances into the atmospheric air. The choice of measuring equipment that is included in continuous emission monitoring and accounting systems (CEM&ASs) is a complex technical problem; in particular, its solution requires a comparative analysis of gas analysis systems; each of these systems has its advantages and disadvantages. In addition, the choice of gas analysis systems for CEM&ASs should be maximally objective and not depend on preferences of separate experts and specialists. The technique of choosing gas analysis equipment that was developed in previous years at Moscow Power Engineering Institute (MPEI) has been analyzed and the applicability of the mathematical tool of a multiple criteria analysis to choose measuring equipment for the continuous emission monitoring and accounting system have been estimated. New approaches to the optimal choice of gas analysis equipment for systems of the continuous monitoring and accounting of harmful emissions from thermal power plants have been proposed, new criteria of evaluation of gas analysis systems have been introduced, and weight coefficients have been determined for these criteria. The results of this study served as a basis for the Preliminary National Standard of the Russian Federation "Best Available Technologies. Automated Systems of Continuous Monitoring and Accounting of Emissions of Harmful (Polluting) Substances from Thermal Power Plants into the Atmospheric Air. Basic Requirements," which was developed by the Moscow Power Engineering Institute, National Research University, in cooperation with the Council of Power Producers and Strategic Electric Power Investors Association and the All-Russia Research Institute for Materials and Technology Standardization.

  14. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 13 Table 13 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet each...

  15. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 24 Table 24 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  16. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 27 Table 27 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(c)(1), you shall meet...

  17. 40 CFR Table 20 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 20 Table 20 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(c)(1), you shall meet each...

  18. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 10 Table 10 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  19. 40 CFR Table 28 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 28 Table 28 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63...

  20. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 17 Table 17 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  1. Metallic nanoparticle shape and size effects on aluminum oxide-induced enhancement of exciton-plasmon coupling and quantum dot emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wing, Waylin J.; Sadeghi, Seyed M., E-mail: seyed.sadeghi@uah.edu; Gutha, Rithvik R.; Campbell, Quinn [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Mao, Chuanbin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    We investigate the shape and size effects of gold metallic nanoparticles on the enhancement of exciton-plasmon coupling and emission of semiconductor quantum dots induced via the simultaneous impact of metal-oxide and plasmonic effects. This enhancement occurs when metallic nanoparticle arrays are separated from the quantum dots by a layered thin film consisting of a high index dielectric material (silicon) and aluminum oxide. Our results show that adding the aluminum oxide layer can increase the degree of polarization of quantum dot emission induced by metallic nanorods by nearly two times, when these nanorods have large aspect ratios. We show when the aspect ratio of these nanorods is reduced to half, the aluminum oxide loses its impact, leading to no improvement in the degree of polarization. These results suggest that a silicon/aluminum oxide layer can significantly enhance exciton-plasmon coupling when quantum dots are in the vicinity of metallic nanoantennas with high aspect ratios.

  2. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely ;off-the-shelf; components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  3. Volcanic sulfur degassing and the role of sulfides in controlling volcanic metal emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Liu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes emit prodigious quantities of sulfur and metals, their behaviour inextricably linked through pre-eruptive sulfide systematics and through degassing and speciation in the volcanic plume. Fundamental differences exist in the metal output of ocean island versus arc volcanoes, with volcanoes in Hawaii and Iceland outgassing large fluxes of gaseous and particulate chalcophiles; and arc volcanoes' plumes, in contrast, enriched in Zn, Cu, Tl and Pb. Metals and metalloids partition into a magmatic vapor phase from silicate melt at crustal pressures. Their abundance in magmatic vapor is influenced strongly by sulfide saturation and by the composition of the magmatic vapor phase, particularly with respect to chloride. These factors are highly dependent on tectonic setting. Metal outgassing is controlled by magma water content and redox: deep saturation in vapor and minimal sulfide in arc basalts yields metal-rich vapor; shallow degassing and resorption of sulfides feeds the metal content of volcanic gas in ocean islands. We present a detailed study of the sulfide systematics of the products of the 2014-2015 Holuhraun basaltic fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) to illustrate the interplay between late water and sulfur outgassing; sulfide saturation and breakdown; and metal partitioning into a vapor phase. Sulfide globules, representing quenched droplets of an immiscible sulfide liquid, are preserved within erupted tephra. Sulfide globules in rapidly quenched tephra are preserved within both matrix glass and as inclusions in crystals. The stereologically-corrected 3D size distribution of sulfide globules ranges from eruption and co-existed with an immiscible sulfide liquid throughout much of ol-cpx-plag crystallisation. Individual globules are associated with locally elevated dissolved sulfur concentrations, with concentration gradients away from sulfides preserved over distances of 10-40 µm from the melt-sulfide interfaces. We discuss the

  4. Drawing the geometry of 3d transition metal-boron pairs in silicon from electron emission channeling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Augustyns, Valerie; De Lemos Lima, Tiago Abel; Granadeiro Costa, Angelo Rafael; David Bosne, Eric; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of transition metal-boron pairs is currently well established in silicon processing, the geometry of these complexes is still not completely understood. We investigated the lattice location of the transition metals manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel in n- and p+-type silicon by means of electron emission channeling. For manganese, iron and cobalt, we observed an increase of sites near the ideal tetrahedral interstitial position by changing the doping from n- to p+-type Si. Such increase was not observed for Ni. We ascribe this increase to the formation of pairs with boron, driven by Coulomb interactions, since the majority of iron, manganese and cobalt is positively charged in p+-type silicon while Ni is neutral. We propose that breathing mode relaxation around the boron ion within the pair causes the observed displacement from the ideal tetrahedral interstitial site. We discuss the application of the emission channeling technique in this system and, in particular, how it provides insi...

  5. Effectiveness of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts on particle number emissions from diesel and biodiesel exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Gupta, Tarun; Labhasetwar, Nitin Kumar; Khobaragade, Rohini; Gupta, Neeraj K; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Two new formulations of non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts based on CoCe based mixed oxide (DOC 2 ) and perovskite catalysts (DOC 3 ) were prepared and retrofitted in a 4-cylinder diesel engine fueled by diesel and Karanja biodiesel blend (KB20). In this study, their effectiveness in reducing raw exhaust particulate emissions vis-à-vis a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC 1 ) was evaluated. Emission characteristics such as particle number-size distribution, mass-size distribution, and surface area-size distribution, total particle number concentration and count mean diameter as a function of engine load at constant engine speed were evaluated. Variations in total particle number concentration as a function of engine speed were also determined. The prepared DOCs and the commercial DOC showed varying degrees of performance as a function of engine operating conditions. Overall, effectiveness of the prepared DOC's appeared to be more fuel specific. For diesel exhaust, overall performance of DOC 1 was more effective compared to both prepared DOCs, with DOC 2 being superior to DOC 3 . In case of KB20 exhaust, the overall performance of DOC 2 was either more effective or nearly comparable to DOC 1, while DOC 3 being not so effective. This showed that the DOCs based on CoCe based mixed oxide catalysts have potential to replace commercial noble metal based DOC's, especially in engines fueled by biodiesel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Continued emissions of carbon tetrachloride from the United States nearly two decades after its phaseout for dispersive uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Montzka, Stephen A.; Miller, Ben R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Miller, John B.; Lehman, Scott J.; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Scot M.; Thoning, Kirk; Siso, Carolina; Atlas, Elliot L.; Blake, Donald R.; de Gouw, Joost; Gilman, Jessica B.; Dutton, Geoff; Elkins, James W.; Hall, Bradley; Chen, Huilin; Fischer, Marc L.; Mountain, Marikate E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Moore, Fred L.; Tans, Pieter

    2016-03-01

    National-scale emissions of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) are derived based on inverse modeling of atmospheric observations at multiple sites across the United States from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's flask air sampling network. We estimate an annual average US emission of 4.0 (2.0-6.5) Gg CCl4 y-1 during 2008-2012, which is almost two orders of magnitude larger than reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) (mean of 0.06 Gg y-1) but only 8% (3-22%) of global CCl4 emissions during these years. Emissive regions identified by the observations and consistently shown in all inversion results include the Gulf Coast states, the San Francisco Bay Area in California, and the Denver area in Colorado. Both the observation-derived emissions and the US EPA TRI identified Texas and Louisiana as the largest contributors, accounting for one- to two-thirds of the US national total CCl4 emission during 2008-2012. These results are qualitatively consistent with multiple aircraft and ship surveys conducted in earlier years, which suggested significant enhancements in atmospheric mole fractions measured near Houston and surrounding areas. Furthermore, the emission distribution derived for CCl4 throughout the United States is more consistent with the distribution of industrial activities included in the TRI than with the distribution of other potential CCl4 sources such as uncapped landfills or activities related to population density (e.g., use of chlorine-containing bleach).

  7. Improving appropriate use of echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging: a continuous quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas V; Rose, Geoffrey A; Fenner, Deborah J; Rozario, Nigel L

    2014-07-01

    Appropriate use criteria for cardiovascular imaging have been published, but compliance in practice has been incomplete, with persistent high rates of inappropriate use. The aim of this study was to show the efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative to favorably influence the appropriate use of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in a large cardiovascular practice. In this prospective study, a multiphase CQI initiative was implemented, and its impact on ordering patterns for outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and SPECT MPI was assessed. Between November and December 2010, a baseline analysis of the application of appropriate use criteria to indications for outpatient transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 203) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 205) was performed, with studies categorized as "appropriate," "inappropriate," "uncertain," or "unclassified." The CQI initiative was then begun, with (1) clinician education, including didactic lectures and case-based presentations with audience participation; (2) system changes in ordering processes, with redesigned image ordering forms; and (3) peer review and feedback. A follow-up analysis was then performed between June and August 2012, with categorization of indications for transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 206) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 206). At baseline, 73.9% of echocardiographic studies were categorized as appropriate, 16.7% as inappropriate, 5.9% as uncertain, and 3.4% as unclassified. Similarly, for SPECT MPI studies 71.7% were categorized as appropriate, 18.5% as inappropriate, 7.8% as uncertain, and 1.9% as unclassified. Separate analysis of the two most important categories, appropriate and inappropriate, demonstrated a significant improvement after the CQI initiative, with a 63% reduction in inappropriate echocardiographic studies (18.5% vs 6.9%, P = .0010) and a 46% reduction

  8. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  9. On-line system for preconcentration and determination of metals in vegetables by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Marcos A.; Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Korn, Maria das Gracas A.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead in digested vegetable samples. The method involves solid-phase extraction of the metals using a minicolumn of Amberlite XAD-4 modified with dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and detection by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The elution of the metals from minicolumn was performed with 1.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid. Variables associated with flow preconcentration system performance, such as pH, buffer concentration, eluent concentration and sampling flow rate, were optimized. The developed procedure provides enrichment factors of 100, 72, 16, 91 and 53, for cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead, respectively. Detection limits (3σ B ) were 0.02 (Cd), 0.23 (Cu), 0.58 (Cr), 0.060 (Ni) and 0.54 (Pb) μg L -1 . The procedure was applied for determination of metals in samples of guarana and cabbage. The accuracy of the method was checked by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST 1571, Orchard leaves). Results found were in agreement with certified values

  10. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2001-05-04

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end we shall use an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined.

  11. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-01-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million

  12. Efficient continuous biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by activated sludge micromycetes with enhanced tolerance to metal ion toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyupa, Dmitry V; Kalenov, Sergei V; Baurina, Marina M; Yakubovich, Liubov M; Morozov, Alexander N; Zakalyukin, Ruslan M; Sorokin, Vladimir V; Skladnev, Dmitry A

    2016-12-01

    The method for producing AgNPs by granules of activated sludge micromycetes with enhanced tolerance to metal ion toxicity - Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium nivale and Fusarium oxysporum has been developed; the optimum conditions for AgNP biosynthesis being found: the Ag + ion concentration, duration of the contact of microbial cells with silver ions, a growth phase of microorganisms, medium composition, a рН value, mixing conditions, and also lighting intensity. The effect of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HPO 4 2- ions binding Ag + ions was eliminated, that brought to significant increase of the yield of NPs. Under batch conditions, silver particles of 60-110 nanometers in size were formed with a 65% yield. It was established that the nanoparticles were covered with microbial cell membrane proteins composed up to 70% by weight of the NPs that prevented their aggregation. In addition, it was the first time stable AgNPs had been formed by continuous AgNP biosynthesis by living cells of F. oxysporum with an 80% yield for a long time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE SIMULATED OPEN-BURNING OF NON-METALLIC AUTOMOBILE SHREDDER RESIDUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study in which the open combustion of a nonmetallic waste product called "fluff" was simulated and the resulting emissions collected and characterized to gain insight into the types and quantities of these air pollutants. (NOTE: The reclamation proce...

  14. Kinetic electron emission from metal surfaces induced by impact of slow ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šroubek, Zdeněk; Lorinčík, Jan

    -, č. 625 (2014), s. 7-9 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10086 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Ion induced kinetic electron emission * Electronic excitation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.925, year: 2014

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of kinetic electron emission from metal due to impact of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, J.; Ohya, K.

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation is performed for study of the dependence of kinetic electron emission on nuclear charge of projectile Z 1 , using the nonlinear response theory with the density-functional (DF) formalism to calculate electron excitation cross section. The kinetic yield, energy distribution, excitation depth distribution and emission statistics of emitted electrons showed clear Z 1 oscillations, however, the Z 1 oscillations of them are different from that of the inelastic stopping power, in particular for high Z 1 , due to large elastic energy loss of the ions and secondary cascade process of primary excited electrons within the solid. For high Z 1 , the linear relationship does not exist between them and the inelastic stopping power, although they are closely related to it. The emission of high-energy primary electrons excited by the ion within shallow depth without experiencing the secondary cascade process, results in the Z 1 dependence in the energy distribution, excitation depth distribution and emission statistics of emitted electrons

  16. Modelling assessment of regional groundwater contamination due to historic smelter emissions of heavy metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, B. van der; Griffioen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Historic emissions from ore smelters typically cause regional soil contamination. We developed a modelling approach to assess the impact of such contamination on groundwater and surface water load, coupling unsaturated zone leaching modelling with 3D groundwater transport modelling. Both historic

  17. Continued emissions of carbon tetrachloride from the United States nearly two decades after its phaseout for dispersive uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Montzka, Stephen A.; Miller, Ben R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Miller, John B.; Lehman, Scott J.; Sweeney, Colm; Miller, Scot M.; Thoning, Kirk; Siso, Carolina; Atlas, Elliot L.; Blake, Donald R.; de Gouw, Joost; Gilman, Jessica B.; Dutton, Geoff; Elkins, James W.; Hall, Bradley; Chen, Huilin; Fischer, Marc L.; Mountain, Marikate E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Moore, Fred L.; Tans, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    National-scale emissions of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) are derived based on inverse modeling of atmospheric observations at multiple sites across the United States from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s flask air sampling network. We estimate an annual average US emission of 4.0 (2.0–6.5) Gg CCl4 y−1 during 2008–2012, which is almost two orders of magnitude larger than reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) (mean of 0.06 Gg y−1) but only 8% (3–22%) of global CCl4 emissions during these years. Emissive regions identified by the observations and consistently shown in all inversion results include the Gulf Coast states, the San Francisco Bay Area in California, and the Denver area in Colorado. Both the observation-derived emissions and the US EPA TRI identified Texas and Louisiana as the largest contributors, accounting for one- to two-thirds of the US national total CCl4 emission during 2008–2012. These results are qualitatively consistent with multiple aircraft and ship surveys conducted in earlier years, which suggested significant enhancements in atmospheric mole fractions measured near Houston and surrounding areas. Furthermore, the emission distribution derived for CCl4 throughout the United States is more consistent with the distribution of industrial activities included in the TRI than with the distribution of other potential CCl4 sources such as uncapped landfills or activities related to population density (e.g., use of chlorine-containing bleach). PMID:26929368

  18. The influence of superficial properties of ceramic-metal layers on acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.П. Бабак

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available  The influence of idle time on operational properties of friction pairs with ceramic-metal superficial layers is investigated in this article. The application of AE information for the control and diagnostics of complex tribotechnical systems directly during their operation is offered.

  19. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-08-15

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO2 control, NOx control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research has yielded data on trace metal partitioning for MSS by itself, with natural gas assist, for coal plus MSS combustion together, and for coal alone. We have re-evaluated the inhalation health effects of ash aerosol from combustion of MSS both by itself and also together with coal. We have concluded that ash from the co-combustion of MSS and coal is very much worse from an inhalation health point of view, than ash from either MSS by itself or coal by itself. The reason is that ZnO is not the ''bad actor'' as had been suspected before, but the culprit is, rather, sulfated Zn. The MSS supplies the Zn and the coal supplies the sulfur, and so it is the combination of coal and MSS that makes that process environmentally bad. If MSS is to be burned, it should be burned without coal, in the absence of sulfur.

  20. Depuration Study of Heavy Metal Lead (Pb) and Copper (Cu) in Green Mussels Perna viridis through Continues-discontinues and Acid Extraction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiawan; Bakri, Ridla; Cahaya Dani, Intan; Handayani, Sri; Ade Kurnia Putri, Rizki; Tamala, Riska

    2018-01-01

    Green mussel or Perna viridis is filter feeder, which is very susceptible to heavy metals. It takes an effort to release heavy metal contents on the green shell, one of method that can be used to release heavy metal from green shell is depuration proccess. In this research, the depuration process was conducted by continues method of depuration, discontinues method by using various kind of water and acid extraction. The optimum time of continues depuration method is 1.5 hours, with circulation speed 250 L/h and result of Pb metal content decreased is equal to 30.048% and 29.748% for Cu. In the discontinues method, the optimum result was reached at 100oC by using PAM water as the media at 3 h immersion period with decrease of Pb metal content 35.001% and Cu metal content 39.015%. In the acid extraction method, the optimum condition was achieved by 11% acetic acid solvent with decreasing of Pb and Cu levels are 88.224% and 76.298%. For the determination of protein content, the decrease of protein content obtained by treatment with 11% acetic acid extract showed decrease of protein content 36.656% with Kjeldahl method.

  1. Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of China’s Non-Metallic Mineral Products Industry: Present State, Prospects and Policy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available China is the largest non-metallic mineral producer in the world and one of the key consumers of four major non-metallic mineral products, including cement, refractories, plate glass and ceramics. The non-metallic mineral products industry’s rapid growth has brought about a large demand for energy. The present study provides an overview of China’s non-metallic mineral products industry in terms of production, energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. In this industry, the energy efficiency is relatively low and the level of carbon dioxide emission is much higher than developed countries’ average. This study interprets the effects of some newly issued policies and analyses the influential factors in achieving energy conservation and emission reduction goals. It also discusses the prospects for saving energy and emission reduction in the industry. Retrofitting facilities and using new production technologies is imperative. Additionally, implementing market-based policies, promoting industrial transformation and effective international cooperation would help decrease carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption.

  2. Performance evaluation of a biodiesel fuelled transportation engine retrofitted with a non-noble metal catalysed diesel oxidation catalyst for controlling unregulated emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pravesh Chandra; Gupta, Tarun; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2018-02-15

    In present study, engine exhaust was sampled for measurement and analysis of unregulated emissions from a four cylinder transportation diesel engine using a state-of-the-art FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) emission analyzer. Test fuels used were Karanja biodiesel blend (B20) and baseline mineral diesel. Real-time emission measurements were performed for raw exhaust as well as exhaust sampled downstream of the two in-house prepared non-noble metal based diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) and a baseline commercial DOC based on noble metals. Two prepared non-noble metal based DOCs were based on Co-Ce mixed oxide and Lanthanum based perovskite catalysts. Perovskite based DOC performed superior compared to Co-Ce mixed oxide catalyst based DOC. Commercial noble metal based DOC was found to be the most effective in reducing unregulated hydrocarbon emissions in the engine exhaust, followed by the two in-house prepared non-noble metal based DOCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  4. Effects of heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Zn and Pb) in agricultural soils near different emission sources on quality, accumulation and food safety in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, María Julieta; Rodriguez, Judith Hebelen; Nieto, Gastón Leonardo; Pignata, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soybean grown near metal sources presents a toxicological hazard from heavy metals for Chinese consumers. ► Rhizosphere soil is the most suitable compartment for toxicological studies. ► Soil guidelines should be modified considering the exchangeable metals. - Abstract: Argentina is one of the major producers of soybean in the world, this generates a high global demand for this crop leading to find it everywhere, even close to human activities involving pollutant emissions. This study evaluated heavy metal content, the transfer of metals and its relation to crop quality, and the toxicological risk of seed consumption, through soil and soybean sampling. The results show that concentrations of Pb and Cd in soils and soybeans at several sites were above the maximum permissible levels. The heavy metal bioaccumulation depending on the rhizosphere soil compartment showed significant and high regression coefficients. In addition, the similar behavior of Cd and Zn accumulation by plants reinforces the theory of other studies indicating that these metals are incorporated into the plant for a common system of transport. On the other hand, the seed quality parameters did not show a clear pattern of response to metal bioacumulation. Taken together, our results show that soybeans grown nearby to anthropic emission sources might represent a toxicological hazard for human consumption in a potential Chinese consumer. Hence, further studies should be carried out taking into account the potential negative health effects from the consumption of soybeans (direct or indirect through consumption of meat from cattle) in these conditions.

  5. Determination of heavy metals contamination of trees and soils due vehicular emission in Karachi city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, F.; Iqbal, M.Z.; Qureshi, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The concentration of Cu, Fe, Ni, and Pb in Eucalyptus sp. and Ficus religiosa leaves were at highest at those sites where the traffic density was highest, but the level of Zn in Eucalyptus sp. was highest at the other site. Cr was not detected in both the species in any area, while Cd was fund only in samples of Eucalyptus sp. Other site is comparatively less polluted area, therefore the level of these metals in leaves of above mentioned trees were low. The levels of above metals in soil were low as compared to leaves samples. Cu was highest at the site where the traffic is highest and lowest at other site, while level of P was highest in heavily traffic area and lowest at comparatively less traffic site soil samples. Zn showed significant results, highest concentration was detected at the highly polluted areas. (orig/A.B.)

  6. Accumulation of heavy metals in an ecosystem influenced by zinc-plant emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Czuchajowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Fe and Mg reaching the selected ecosystem in the dust emitted by a zinc-mill, was estimated in the leaves of Pinus silvestris, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea, the main plant components of the system, and in the five upper soil layers. The values of metal concentration were different for the three considered species and showed-for each of them - dependence on the pollution degree of the stand. This regularity concerned Pb, Zn, Cd and Mn but not Fe and Mg. A significant positive correlation exists between the content of Pb, Zn and Cd in the soil and their concentration in leaves, the correlation for Mil is significant but negative. Manganese in leaves proved to be an antagonist in respect to the other metals.

  7. Recent progress in the determination of gases in metals by emission spectrography (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G.; Melamed, J.

    1963-01-01

    The Fassel method for analysis of bases in metals was used. By employing a smaller, completely cooled chamber greater sensitivity and lover blank values were obtained. A straight calibration curve, independent of the sample nature was established for oxygen using graphite pellets containing known amounts of ZnO and SnO 2 . The calibration curve for hydrogen was obtained from previously analysed Zircaloy samples. In bath cases a lower limit of sensitivity of 15 μg was attained. (authors) [fr

  8. Directional Thermal Emission and Absorption from Surface Microstructures in Metalized Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    directional thermal emitter with enhanced surface durability due to its extended metal deposition thickness. 1.3.3 Dual-Cavity-Width Structure Design...crystals. The definition is applied to one-dimensionally periodic stacks, two-dimensionally periodic slabs , and three- dimensionally periodic complex...sufficiently to significantly effect the film durability and thermal conductivity, the profile of the cavity begins to change shape. Although a case

  9. Analysis of ancient Egyptian finds of metal artefacts by alpha-induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mommsen, H.; Bauer, K.G.; Fazly, Q.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Schurkes, P.

    1982-05-01

    The application of the particle-induced X-ray fluorescence method for the determination of the quantitative composition of objects is described. This is a non-destructive method of analysis, is accurate and highly sensitive. The method is particularly attractive for the examination of valuable archeological finds. The results of the analyses of various Egyptian metal artefacts carried out with the method are presented and discussed

  10. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of metals or metalloids for protecting marine life by use of quantitative ion characteristic-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Yu; Chen, Cheng; Guo, Fei; Mu, Yunsong; Sun, Fuhong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Ying; Wang, Huanhua; Wu, Fengchang; Hu, Qing; Dang, Zhi; Giesy, John P

    2017-11-30

    Marine pollution by metals has been a major challenge for ecological systems; however, water quality criteria (WQC) for metals in saltwater is still lacking. Especially from a regulatory perspective, chronic effects of metals on marine organisms should receive more attention. A quantitative ion characteristic-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) model, based on chronic toxicities for eight marine organisms, was established to predict the criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) of 21 metals. The results showed that the chronic toxicities of various metals had good relationships with their physicochemical properties. Predicted CCCs of six metals (Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ ) were in accordance with the values recommended by the U.S. EPA, with prediction errors being less than an order of magnitude. The QICAR-SSD approach provides an alternative tool to empirical methods and can be useful for deriving scientifically defensible WQC for metals for marine organisms and conducting ecological risk assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Note: study of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission of metal targets produced by laser-plasma-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantouvalou, I; Jung, R; Tuemmler, J; Legall, H; Bidu, T; Stiel, H; Malzer, W; Kanngiesser, B; Sandner, W

    2011-06-01

    Different metal targets were investigated as possible source material for tailored laser-produced plasma-sources. In the wavelength range from 1 to 20 nm, x-ray spectra were collected with a calibrated spectrometer with a resolution of λ/Δλ = 150 at 1 nm up to λ/Δλ = 1100 at 15 nm. Intense line emission features of highly ionized species as well as continuum-like spectra from unresolved transitions are presented. With this knowledge, the optimal target material can be identified for the envisioned application of the source in x-ray spectrometry on the high energy side of the spectra at about 1 keV. This energy is aimed for because 1 keV-radiation is ideally suited for L-shell x-ray spectroscopy with nm-depth resolution. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Reply to Comment on ‘Metallic nanowire–graphene hybrid nanostructures for highly flexible field emission devices’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Hyungwoo; Lee, Byung Yang; Hong, Seunghun; Heo, Kwang

    2012-01-01

    In our previous paper (Arif et al 2011 Nanotechnology 22 355709), we developed a method to prepare metallic nanowire–graphene hybrid nanostructures and applied it to the fabrication of flexible field emission devices. For the quantitative analysis of the devices, the basic Fowler–Nordheim model was used. However, as pointed out by Forbes (2012 Nanotechnology 23 288001) the basic Fowler–Nordheim model should be corrected when the quantum confinement effect and the screening effect are considered. Forbes also developed a method that checks quantitatively the consistency between the experimental data and the theoretical assumptions. These discussions should provide an important theoretical framework in the quantitative analysis of our devices as well as large area field emitters in general. (reply)

  13. X-ray fluorescence spectrometric and optical emission spectographic analysis of thoria in thoriated copper metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Khanna, P.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods, one using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometric technique and another using optical emission spectrographic (OES) technique are described for the determination of thoria in the concentration range 0.5-10% in thoriated copper metal powder. The precision of XRF method is superior to OES method but when sample quantity is very small, the OES method is useful. For XRF method, 500 mg sample is mixed with boric acid binding material and converted to a tablet for analysis. For OES method, only 200 mg sample is needed which is glued to the flat ends of two graphite electrodes for excitation by AC arc. The precision obtained in XRF is better than +-1% and in OES it is +-23%. (author)

  14. Estimating soil emissions and toxicity impacts from the application of livestock manure: application to heavy metals at national scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclerc, Alexandra Segolene Corinne; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Aiming for a more efficient use of resources, the European Commission encourages the use of animal manure as a fertilizer providing nutrients and organic matter to improve crop productivity and soil fertility [1,2]. However livestock manure contains traces from pathogens, veterinary medicines...... and feed additives (e.g. antibiotics and heavy metals), which may cause damages to ecosystems and human health. To prevent large damages from happening, tools such as Environmental risk assessment (ERA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) are used to evaluate the environmental risks and impacts...... on the use of such substances in livestock production, large-scale assessments are required. To date, the total emissions of harmful substances resulting from the application of manure at country level have however been rarely quantified. We therefore developed a framework to estimate these releases to soil...

  15. Exploiting the Metal-Chelating Properties of the Drug Cargo for In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Liposomal Nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmonds, Scott; Volpe, Alessia; Shmeeda, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    The clinical value of current and future nanomedicines can be improved by introducing patient selection strategies based on noninvasive sensitive whole-body imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, a broad method to radiolabel and track preformed nanomedicines...... such as liposomal drugs with PET radionuclides will have a wide impact in nanomedicine. Here, we introduce a simple and efficient PET radiolabeling method that exploits the metal-chelating properties of certain drugs (e.g., bisphosphonates such as alendronate and anthracyclines such as doxorubicin) and widely used...... ionophores to achieve excellent radiolabeling yields, purities, and stabilities with 89Zr, 52Mn, and 64Cu, and without the requirement of modification of the nanomedicine components. In a model of metastatic breast cancer, we demonstrate that this technique allows quantification of the biodistribution...

  16. Continuous-wave infrared optical gain and amplified spontaneous emission at ultralow threshold by colloidal HgTe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geiregat, Pieter; Houtepen, Arjan J.; Sagar, Laxmi Kishore; Infante, Ivan; Zapata, Felipe; Grigel, Valeriia; Allan, Guy; Delerue, Christophe; Van Thourhout, Dries; Hens, Zeger

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) raise more and more interest as solution-processable and tunable optical gain materials. However, especially for infrared active QDs, optical gain remains inefficient. Since stimulated emission involves multifold degenerate band-edge states, population inversion can be

  17. 40 CFR 63.5890 - How do I calculate an organic HAP emissions factor to demonstrate compliance for continuous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance... per year Oc=controlled oven organic HAP emissions, lbs per year R=total usage of neat resin plus, tpy G=total usage of neat gel coat plus, tpy (b) Averaging option. Use Equation 2 of this section to...

  18. Determination of some inorganic metals in edible vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen edible vegetable oils were analyzed spectrometrically for their metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn contents. Toxic metals in edible vegetable oils were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. The highest metal concentrations were measured as 0.0850, 0.0352, 0.0220, 0.0040, 0.0010, 0.0074, 0.0045, 0.0254 and 0.2870 mg/kg for copper in almond oil, for iron in corn oil-(c, for manganese in soybean oil, for cobalt in sunflower oil-(b and almond oil, for chromium in almond oil, for lead in virgin olive oil, for cadmium in sunflower oil-(e, for nickel almond oil and for zinc in almond oil respectively. The method for determining toxic metals in edible vegetable oils by using ICP-AES is discussed. The metals were extracted from low quantities of oil (2-3 g with a 10% nitric acid solution. The extracted metal in acid solution can be injected into the ICPAES. The proposed method is simple and allows the metals to be determined in edible vegetable oils with a precision estimated below 10% relative standard deviation (RSD for Cu, 5% for Fe, 15% for Mn, 8% for Co, 10% for Cr, 20% for Pb, 5% for Cd, 16% for Ni and 11% for Zn.En este estudio se analizó espectrométricamente el contenido en metales (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn de 17 aceites vegetales comestibles mediante ICP-AES. Las concentaciones más elevadas se encontraron para el cobre en el aceite de almendra (0.0850 mg/kg, para el hierro en el aceite de maiz(c,(0.0352 mg/kg, para el manganeso en el aceite de soja (0.0220 mg/kg, para el cobalto en el aceite de girasol (b (0.0040 mg/kg, para el cromo en el aceite de almendra (0.0010 mg/kg, para el plomo en el aceite de oliva virgen (0.0074 mg/kg, para el cadmio en el aceite de girasol (e (0.0045 mg/kg, para el niquel en el aceite de almendra (0.0254 mg/kg y para el zincen el aceite de almendra (0.2870 mg/kg. Los metales se extrajeron a partir de bajas cantidades de aceite (2-3 g, con

  19. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely “off-the-shelf” components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  20. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the impact of diffuse ionized gas on emission-line ratios, interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas metallicity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Walterbos, René; Maiolino, Roberto; Tremonti, Christy; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Belfiore, Francesco; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nitschelm, Christian; Andrews, Brett; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cheung, Edmond; Li, Cheng; Law, David R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of 365 nearly face-on star-forming galaxies observed by Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impacts the measurements of emission-line ratios, hence the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas-phase metallicity measurements. At fixed metallicity, DIG-dominated low ΣHα regions display enhanced [S II]/Hα, [N II]/Hα, [O II]/Hβ and [O I]/Hα. The gradients in these line ratios are determined by metallicity gradients and ΣHα. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves H II regions towards composite or low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LI(N)ER)-like regions. A harder ionizing spectrum is needed to explain DIG line ratios. Leaky H II region models can only shift line ratios slightly relative to H II region models, and thus fail to explain the composite/LI(N)ER line ratios displayed by DIG. Our result favours ionization by evolved stars as a major ionization source for DIG with LI(N)ER-like emission. DIG can significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradients derived using strong-line methods. Metallicities derived using N2O2 are optimal because they exhibit the smallest bias and error. Using O3N2, R23, N2 = [N II]/Hα and N2S2Hα to derive metallicities introduces bias in the derived metallicity gradients as large as the gradient itself. The strong-line method of Blanc et al. (IZI hereafter) cannot be applied to DIG to get an accurate metallicity because it currently contains only H II region models that fail to describe the DIG.

  1. X-points in the spectral emissivity of solid and liquid refractory transition metals measured by multichannel pyrometry. Discussion of the experimental method and physical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hyland, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    The spectral emissivities of some refractory Transition metals (Hf, Mo, Nb, Re, V, W and Zr) have been measured from about 2500 K up to temperatures above the melting point T m . The experimental method adopted is based on multiwavelength pyrometric measurements, where the determination of the spectral emissivity is implicitly related to the evaluation of temperature through the radiation emission law and an assumed relationship between the spectral emissivity ε and the wavelength λ. Heating was produced with a pulsed laser in times of the order of 100 ms. A specially constructed pyrometer was used which enabled measurements at six different wavelengths to be carried out at time intervals of the order of 0.1 ms. A model for the evaluation of temperature and spectral emissivities has been developed and its limitations due to statistical and systematic errors are discussed. Our experiments confirm the existence of a unique wavelength, λ-x for each metal to which different ε λ -isotherms converge for λ x and from which they diverge for λ>λ x and at which ε λ is independent of T, and thus equal, in particular, to its value at T m , indicate that λ x is preserved through T m and reveal that at T m these metals are effectively 'grey'. Detailed theoretical investigations reveal that the occurrence of the λ x points is intimately connected with the particular T and λ dependences of the interband contribution to the imaginary part of the complex dielectric function entailed by specific features of the electronic band-structure of the Transition metals concerned. Finally, in connection with the 'grey' phenomenon at T m , it should be stressed that this is not found in the case of the Noble metals, although, like Transition metals, they exhibit λ x points, despite their quite different band-structures. (author). 56 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Emission channeling studies on transition-metal doped GaN and ZnO: Cation versus anion substitution

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070176; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Silva, Daniel; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Temst, Kristiaan; Vantomme, André

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic and electric properties of impurities in semiconductors are strongly dependent on the lattice sites which they occupy. While the majority site can often be predicted based on chemical similarities with the host elements and is usually simple to confirm experimentally, minority sites are far more complicated to predict, detect and identify. We have carried out extensive beta− emission channeling studies on the lattice location of transition metal impurities in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors, namely Co and Mn in GaN and ZnO, making use of radioactive 61Co and 56Mn implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. In addition to the majority occupation of cation (Ga, Zn) sites, we located significant fractions (of the order of 20%) of the Co and Mn impurities in anion (N, O) sites, which are virtually unaffected by thermal annealing up to 900 °C. Here, we present the beta− emission channeling experiments on 61Co-implanted GaN. We discuss these results in the context of our recent reports of mi...

  3. Effect of aerotechnogenic emissions on the content of heavy metals in herbaceous plants of the Lower Don region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkina, T. M.; Mandzhieva, S. S.; Chaplygin, V. A.; Motuzova, G. V.; Burachevskaya, M. V.; Bauer, T. V.; Sushkova, S. N.; Nevidomskaya, D. G.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of soil properties and distance from the source of technogenic emission on the input of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ni into daisy family plants ( Asteraceae) has been studied. It has been found that the high level of anthropogenic load related to the atmospheric emissions from the Novocherkassk power plant (NPP) favors the accumulation of heavy metals (HMs) in herbaceous plants. Contamination with Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni is revealed in plants growing near the NPP. The main factors affecting the distribution of HMs in the above- and underground organs of plants include individual physiological features of plant species controlling the barrier functions of different plant organs. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., Artemisia austriaca Pall. ex. Wild. Jack., and Tanacetum vulgare L. are accumulators of HMs. The resistance of herbaceous plants to pollution has been determined from the acropetal coefficient and actual biogeochemical mobility of HMs. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. is most resistant to contamination with Mn; Achillea nobilis L. is most resistant to Pb, Ni, and Cd; Cichorium intybus L. is most resistant to Zn and Cu.

  4. Continuous metal scavenging and coupling to one-pot copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction in flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vural - Gursel, Dr. Iris; Aldiansyah, Ferry; Wang, Qi; Noël, Timothy; Hessel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Increasing usage of catalytic chemistry calls for efficient removal of metal traces. This paper describes the development and optimization of a scavenger-based extraction in flow to remove metal catalysts. It enables liquid-liquid extraction with slug flow and phase separation with a porous

  5. Preconcentration of heavy metals on activated carbon and their determination in fruits by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Barbara; Mikula, Barbara

    2014-03-15

    A method of separation and preconcentration of cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc at trace level using activated carbon is proposed. Activated carbon with the adsorbed trace metals was mineralised using a high-pressure microwave mineraliser. The heavy metals were determined after preconcentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influence of several parameters, such as pH, sorbent mass, shaking time was examined. Moreover, effects of inorganic matrix on recovery of the determined elements were studied. The experiment shows that foreign ions did not influence recovery of the determined elements. The detection limits (DL) of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were 0.17, 0.19, 1.60, 2.60, 0.92 and 1.50 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The recovery of the method for the determined elements was better than 95% with relative standard deviation from 1.3% to 3.7%. The preconcentration factor was 80. The proposed method was applied for determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fruits materials. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified using certified reference material (NCS ZC85006 Tomato). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emission processes of molecule-metal cluster ions from self-assembled monolayers of octanethiols on gold and silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezki, B.; Delcorte, A.; Bertrand, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution, we focus on the emission processes of molecule-metal cluster ions from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octanethiols CH 3 (CH 2 ) 7 SH on gold and silver. To improve our understanding of these complex phenomena, mass spectra and kinetic energy distributions (KEDs) of these two systems have been measured and compared using time-of-flight-SIMS under 15 keV Ga + bombardment. First, the spectra obtained from SAMs/Ag exhibit positive (M-H) m Ag m+1 + and negative (M-H) m Ag m-1 - cluster ions that are generally more intense than the (M-H) m Au n - observed for SAMs/Au. This trend is attributed to the electronegativity difference between S and these two metals resulting in a more ionic Ag-S bond. Second, our results show that, like for the SAM/Au system already investigated, unimolecular dissociation of Ag-thiolate clusters in the acceleration section of the spectrometer is an important formation mechanism. The fraction of the (M-H) m Ag n +,- aggregates formed in the vacuum via this process is even significantly higher than that of the (M-H) m Au n - cluster ions. This suggests that the cluster ions ejected from SAMs/Ag are less stable than those ejected from SAMs/Au. It is also observed that the high energy parts of the KEDs are steeper than for gold, which is probably due to the same phenomenon

  7. Lyman alpha emission in nearby star-forming galaxies with the lowest metallicities and the highest [OIII]/[OII] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    The Lyman alpha line of hydrogen is the strongest emission line in galaxies and the tool of predilection for identifying and studying star-forming galaxies over a wide range of redshifts, especially in the early universe. However, it has become clear over the years that not all of the Lyman alpha radiation escapes, due to its resonant scattering on the interstellar and intergalactic medium, and absorption by dust. Although our knowledge of the high-z universe depends crucially on that line, we still do not have a complete understanding of the mechanisms behind the production, radiative transfer and escape of Lyman alpha in galaxies. We wish here to investigate these mechanisms by studying the properties of the ISM in a unique sample of 8 extreme star-forming galaxies (SFGs) that have the highest excitation in the SDSS spectral data base. These dwarf SFGs have considerably lower stellar masses and metallicities, and higher equivalent widths and [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratios compared to all nearby SFGs with Lyman alpha emission studied so far with COS. They are, however, very similar to the dwarf Lyman alpha emitters at redshifts 3-6, which are thought to be the main sources of reionization in the early Universe. By combining the HST/COS UV data with data in the optical range, and using photoionization and radiative transfer codes, we will be able to study the properties of the Lyman alpha in these unique objects, derive column densities of the neutral hydrogen N(HI) and compare them with N(HI) obtained from the HeI emission-line ratios in the optical spectra. We will derive Lyman alpha escape fractions and indirectly Lyman continuum escape fractions.

  8. Metal particle emissions in the exhaust stream of diesel engines: an electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liati, Anthi; Schreiber, Daniel; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira

    2013-12-17

    Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to investigate the morphology, mode of occurrence and chemical composition of metal particles (diesel ash) in the exhaust stream of a small truck outfitted with a typical after-treatment system (a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a downstream diesel particulate filter (DPF)). Ash consists of Ca-Zn-P-Mg-S-Na-Al-K-phases (lube-oil related), Fe, Cr, Ni, Sn, Pb, Sn (engine wear), and Pd (DOC coating). Soot agglomerates of variable sizes (1-5 μm, exceptionally 13 μm), rarely engine wear and escape into the atmosphere.

  9. Infrared spectral emissivity studies on metals and materials for solar thermal power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Echaniz Ariceta, Telmo

    2016-01-01

    181 p. Dentro del marco industrial mundial y del País Vasco en particular el sector metalúrgico ha tenido y tiene un peso muy importante. En muchos de los materiales utilizados es vital conocer las pérdidas de calor por radiación, ya bien sea durante el proceso de obtención de éstos o mientras están en funcionamiento. Para ello es necesario estudiar las propiedades termorradiativas y ópticas de estos materiales, siendo la medida de la emisividad espectral la mejor de entender los procesos ...

  10. Semiconductor-metal subwavelength grating VCSELs: new concept of emission mirror enabling vertical current injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyszanowski, Tomasz; Gebski, Marcin; Dems, Maciej; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-02-01

    We propose semiconductor-metal subwavelength grating (SMSG) which can be implemented as VCSEL mirror. Such new type of SMSG plays a double role of the electric contact and mirror simultaneously. It facilitates high optical power reflectance, perfectly vertical current injection. Such construction eliminates the inbuilt current confinement and allows scaling of emitted power by simple variation of SMSG spatial dimensions. To give the credibility to proposed design we perform numerical analysis of VCSEL with SMSG using fully vectorial optical model. We discuss properties of the proposed design realized in arsenide-based material configuration.

  11. NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt

    2002-02-05

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

  12. Aerosol Beam Focused-Laser Induced Plasma Spectrometer (ABF-LIPS) Continuous Emissions Multi-Metals Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    19 3.2.1.3 Kirksite Furnace ...................................................................... 20 3.2.2 Test Facility Selection – TEAD ... TEAD ........................................................................................................ 45 4.1.2.1 October 2004 Test...52 4.3.2 TEAD 2005 Performance Assessment...................................................... 54 4.4 TECHNOLOGY

  13. Emissions from a Diesel Engine using Fe-based Fuel Additives and a Sintered Metal Filtration System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D; Hummer, Jon A; Stachulak, Jozef S; Miller, Arthur; Patts, Larry D; Cauda, Emanuele G

    2016-03-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of Fe-containing fuel additives on aerosols emitted by a diesel engine retrofitted with a sintered metal filter (SMF) system. Emission measurements performed upstream and downstream of the SMF system were compared, for cases when the engine was fueled with neat ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and with ULSD treated with two formulations of additives containing Fe-based catalysts. The effects were assessed for four steady-state engine operating conditions and one transient cycle. The results showed that the SMF system reduced the average total number and surface area concentrations of aerosols by more than 100-fold. The total mass and elemental carbon results confirmed that the SMF system was indeed very effective in the removal of diesel aerosols. When added at the recommended concentrations (30 p.p.m. of iron), the tested additives had minor adverse impacts on the number, surface area, and mass concentrations of filter-out (FOut) aerosols. For one of the test cases, the additives may have contributed to measurable concentrations of engine-out (EOut) nucleation mode aerosols. The additives had only a minor impact on the concentration and size distribution of volatile and semi-volatile FOut aerosols. Metal analysis showed that the introduction of Fe with the additives substantially increased Fe concentration in the EOut, but the SMF system was effective in removal of Fe-containing aerosols. The FOut Fe concentrations for all three tested fuels were found to be much lower than the corresponding EOut Fe concentrations for the case of untreated ULSD fuel. The results support recommendations that these additives should not be used in diesel engines unless they are equipped with exhaust filtration systems. Since the tested SMF system was found to be very efficient in removing Fe introduced by the additives, the use of these additives should not result in a measurable increase in emissions of de novo generated

  14. Transition Metal Nanoparticle Oxidation in a Chemically Non-Homogenous Environment Revealed by 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.; Suljoti, E.; Campos-Cuerva, C.; Gosselink, R.W.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Schlappa, J.; Zhou, K.J.; Monney, C.; Schmitt, T.; de Groot, F.M.F.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is often employed in fields such as catalysis to determine whether transition-metal nanoparticles are oxidized. Here we show 2p3/2 XAS and 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) data of oleate-coated cobalt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.0,

  15. Engine performance and exhaust emission analysis of a single cylinder diesel engine fuelled with water-diesel emulsion fuel blended with manganese metal additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsin Ithnin, Ahmad; Jazair Yahya, Wira; Baun Fletcher, Jasmine; Kadir, Hasannuddin Abd

    2017-10-01

    Water-in-diesel emulsion fuel (W/D) is one of the alternative fuels that capable to reduce the exhaust emission of diesel engine significantly especially the nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). However, the usage of W/D emulsion fuels contributed to higher CO emissions. Supplementing metal additive into the fuel is the alternate way to reduce the CO emissions and improve performance. The present paper investigates the effect of using W/D blended with organic based manganese metal additives on the diesel engine performance and exhaust emission. The test were carried out by preparing and analysing the results observed from five different tested fuel which were D2, emulsion fuel (E10: 89% D2, 10% - water, 1% - surfactant), E10Mn100, E10Mn150, E10Mn200. Organic based Manganese (100ppm, 150ppm, 200ppm) used as the additive in the three samples of the experiments. E10Mn200 achieved the maximum reduction of BSFC up to 13.66% and has the highest exhaust gas temperature. Whereas, E10Mn150 achieved the highest reduction of CO by 14.67%, and slightly increased of NOx emissions as compared to other emulsion fuels. Organic based manganese which act as catalyst promotes improvement of the emulsion fuel performance and reduced the harmful emissions discharged.

  16. Automated Collection of Real-Time Alerts of Citizens as a Useful Tool to Continuously Monitor Malodorous Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattoli, Magda; Mazzone, Antonio; Giua, Roberto; Assennato, Giorgio; de Gennaro, Gianluigi

    2016-02-26

    The evaluation of odor emissions and dispersion is a very arduous topic to face; the real-time monitoring of odor emissions, the identification of chemical components and, with proper certainty, the source of annoyance represent a challenge for stakeholders such as local authorities. The complaints of people, often not systematic and variously distributed, in general do not allow us to quantify the perceived annoyance. Experimental research has been performed to detect and evaluate olfactory annoyance, based on field testing of an innovative monitoring methodology grounded in automatic recording of citizen alerts. It has been applied in Taranto, in the south of Italy where a relevant industrial area is located, by using Odortel(®) for automated collection of citizen alerts. To evaluate its reliability, the collection system has been integrated with automated samplers, able to sample odorous air in real time, according to the citizen alerts of annoyance and, moreover, with meteorological data (especially the wind direction) and trends in odor marker compounds, recorded by air quality monitoring stations. The results have allowed us, for the first time, to manage annoyance complaints, test their reliability, and obtain information about the distribution and entity of the odor phenomena, such that we were able to identify, with supporting evidence, the source as an oil refinery plant.

  17. Catching a glimpse of the X-ray emission from galaxies in the early Universe by studying nearby low-metallicity galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret; Ptak, Andrew; Yukita, Mihoko

    2015-09-01

    Deep studies of X-ray emission from galaxies, such as the Chandra Deep Field-South 4 Ms (soon to be 7Ms) survey, have allowed us to peer back in history at X-ray binary formation and evolution over cosmic timescales. X-ray stacking observations of z=1-4 star-forming galaxies reveal that the metallicity evolution of the Universe drives the evolution of the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity per star formation rate (SFR), which is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). By finding local (z=0.02-0.2), rare, analogs of these high redshift galaxies, we have found further evidence that the X-ray emission per SFR is elevated compared to typical local star-forming galaxies and this appears to be due to the lower metallicities of these galaxies. Theoretically, metal poor stars produce weaker stellar winds, which results in higher numbers of more massive binaries and therefore leads to higher X-ray luminosities in metal poor populations. Since galaxies in the early universe (and their binaries) formed in a more pristine universe, with few metals, the analogs that we have been studying have cosmological significance. X-ray emission from X-ray binaries and hot gas within galaxies at these early epochs is expected to be important for heating and reionization of the Universe. We will present our current results on the study of HMXB populations in nearby metal-poor starbursts. These primordial analog galaxies represent a challenge for current X-ray facilities, but with modest exposures with Athena, we will obtain high-resolution X-ray spectra permitting detailed study of their properties. We use simulations of the X-ray spectra from these galaxies with Athena to explore the potential capability for measuring column densities (n_H) and metallicities, as well as line shifts to detect outflows that may ultimately enrich the intergalactic medium (IGM).

  18. FORWARD AND INVERSE MODELING OF THE EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF GJ 436B: INVESTIGATING METAL ENRICHMENT, TIDAL HEATING, AND CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Caroline V. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Knutson, Heather [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Line, Michael [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 South Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J.; Teal, Dillon [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorngren, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana, E-mail: caroline.morley@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Neptune-mass GJ 436b is one of the most studied transiting exoplanets with repeated measurements of its thermal emission and transmission spectra. We build on previous studies to answer outstanding questions about this planet, including its potentially high metallicity and tidal heating of its interior. We present new observations of GJ 436b’s thermal emission at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m, which reduce uncertainties in estimates of GJ 436b’s flux at those wavelengths and demonstrate consistency between Spitzer observations spanning more than 7 yr. We analyze the Spitzer thermal emission photometry and Hubble WFC3 transmission spectrum. We use a dual-pronged modeling approach of both self-consistent and retrieval models. We vary the metallicity, intrinsic luminosity from tidal heating, disequilibrium chemistry, and heat redistribution. We also study clouds and photochemical hazes, but do not find strong evidence for either. The self-consistent and retrieval models combine to suggest that GJ 436b has a high atmospheric metallicity, with best fits at or above several hundred times solar metallicity, tidal heating warming its interior with best-fit intrinsic effective temperatures around 300–350 K, and disequilibrium chemistry. High metal enrichments (>600× solar) occur from the accretion of rocky, rather than icy, material. Assuming the interior temperature T {sub int} ∼ 300–350 K, we find a dissipation factor Q ′ ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6}, larger than Neptune’s Q ′, implying a long tidal circularization timescale for the orbit. We suggest that Neptune-mass planets may be more diverse than imagined, with metal enhancements spanning several orders of magnitude, to perhaps over 1000× solar metallicity. High-fidelity observations with instruments like the James Webb Space Telescope will be critical for characterizing this diversity.

  19. Lattice location of transition metals in silicon by means of emission channeling

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Daniel José; Wahl, Ulrich; Correia, João Guilherme

    The behavior of transition metals (TMs) in silicon is a subject that has been studied extensively during the last six decades. Their unintentional introduction during the Si production, crystal growth and device manufacturing have made them difficult contaminants to avoid. Once in silicon they easily form deep levels, either when in the isolated form or when forming precipitates. One important effect is the reduction of efficiency of silicon-based devices, being dramatic, in particular, in photovoltaic applications. One way to avoid such effects is by engineering the location of the TM: some TM complexes or lattice sites of the isolated form do not introduce any level in the silicon bandgap. Which point defects lead to such passivation is still under debate. Another way is to mitigate the reduction of efficiency by reducing the dangling bonds of TMs with hydrogen. The most important and commonly used procedures to diminish the unwanted effects of the introduced deep levels are, nevertheless, based on the so-c...

  20. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of 34 metals or metalloids by use of quantitative ion character-activity relationships–species sensitivity distributions (QICAR–SSD) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Yunsong; Wu, Fengchang; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yuedan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Haiqing Liao; Giesy, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) are useful for describing chronic exposure to pollutants and setting water quality standards to protect aquatic life. However, because of financial, practical, or ethical restrictions on toxicity testing, few data are available to derive CCCs. In this study, CCCs for 34 metals or metalloids were derived using quantitative ion character-activity relationships–species sensitivity distributions (QICAR–SSD) and the final acute-chronic ratio (FACR) method. The results showed that chronic toxic potencies were correlated with several physico-chemical properties among eight species chosen, where the softness index was the most predictive characteristic. Predicted CCCs for most of the metals, except for Lead and Iron, were within a range of 10-fold of values recommended by the U.S. EPA. The QICAR–SSD model was superior to the FACR method for prediction of data-poor metals. This would have significance for predicting toxic potencies and criteria thresholds of more metals or metalloids. - Highlights: • We investigate relationships between σp and log-NOEC in eight species. • The QICAR–SSD model, FACR, and CMC/CCC were used to predict CCCs. • They are as a supplement to screening for toxicities, criteria and standards. - CCCs for 34 metals/metalloids were predicted by use of QICAR–SSD model and FACR method

  1. A probabilistic framework for single-sensor acoustic emission source localization in thin metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    Tracking edge-reflected acoustic emission (AE) waves can allow the localization of their sources. Specifically, in bounded isotropic plate structures, only one sensor may be used to perform these source localizations. The primary goal of this paper is to develop a three-step probabilistic framework to quantify the uncertainties associated with such single-sensor localizations. According to this framework, a probabilistic approach is first used to estimate the direct distances between AE sources and the sensor. Then, an analytical model is used to reconstruct the envelope of edge-reflected AE signals based on the source-to-sensor distance estimations and their first arrivals. Finally, the correlation between the probabilistically reconstructed envelopes and recorded AE signals are used to estimate confidence contours for the location of AE sources. To validate the proposed framework, Hsu-Nielsen pencil lead break (PLB) tests were performed on the surface as well as the edges of an aluminum plate. The localization results show that the estimated confidence contours surround the actual source locations. In addition, the performance of the framework was tested in a noisy environment simulated by two dummy transducers and an arbitrary wave generator. The results show that in low-noise environments, the shape and size of the confidence contours depend on the sources and their locations. However, at highly noisy environments, the size of the confidence contours monotonically increases with the noise floor. Such probabilistic results suggest that the proposed probabilistic framework could thus provide more comprehensive information regarding the location of AE sources.

  2. Noble metal emissions. Final presentation, Hanover, October 17/18, 1996; Edelmetall - Emissionen. Abschlusspraesentation, Hannover, 17. und 18. Oktober 1996. Kurzfassung der Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, D. [comp.

    1997-12-31

    The discussion concerning noble metal emissions, in particular platinum emissions, and their environmental effects, started with the introduction of catalytical cleaning of gasoline engine exhaust. The Research Association for Noble Metal Emissions (Forschungsverbund Edelmetallemissionen) ws founded for the purpose of investigating problems concerning the types and volumes of noble metal emissions as well as their toxicological and allergological potential. In order to make valid statements on physiological and toxicological effects, it was necessary to identify the chemical forms of platinum and to develop powerful methods of analysis. Investigations of platinum concentrations in environmental samples suggest a 10 percent bioavailability. [Deutsch] Mit der Einfuehrung der katalytischen Abgasreinigung von Ottomotoren begann gleichzeitig die Diskussion ueber moegliche Emissionen von Edelmetallen, insbesondere von Platin, sowie ueber ihre eventuell moeglichen negativen Wirkungen in der Umwelt. Zur Erforschung der Fragestellungen zur Art und Menge der emittierten Platinmetalle, ihrer Aufnahme und dem Uebergang in den Nahrungskreislauf, sowie zu ihrem toxikologischen und allergologischen Potential wurde der Forschungsverbund ``Edelmetallemissionen`` gegruendet. Um Aussagen ueber physiologische und toxikologische Einfluesse zu machen, war es notwendig, die chemischen Erscheinungsformen des Platins zu identifizieren und nachweisstarke Analysenmethoden zu entwickeln. Untersuchungen zu Platinkonzentrationen in Umweltproben deuten auf eine Bioverfuegbarkeit von ca. 10 % hin. (ABI)

  3. Particulate matter emissions, and metals and toxic elements in airborne particulates emitted from biomass combustion: The importance of biomass type and combustion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosima, Angela T; Tsakanika, Lamprini-Areti V; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria Th

    2017-05-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of biomass combustion with respect to burning conditions and fuel types on particulate matter emissions (PM 10 ) and their metals as well as toxic elements content. For this purpose, different lab scale burning conditions were tested (20 and 13% O 2 in the exhaust gas which simulate an incomplete and complete combustion respectively). Furthermore, two pellet stoves (8.5 and 10 kW) and one open fireplace were also tested. In all cases, 8 fuel types of biomass produced in Greece were used. Average PM 10 emissions ranged at laboratory-scale combustions from about 65 to 170 mg/m 3 with flow oxygen at 13% in the exhaust gas and from 85 to 220 mg/m 3 at 20% O 2 . At pellet stoves the emissions were found lower (35 -85 mg/m 3 ) than the open fireplace (105-195 mg/m 3 ). The maximum permitted particle emission limit is 150 mg/m 3 . Metals on the PM 10 filters were determined by several spectrometric techniques after appropriate digestion or acid leaching of the filters, and the results obtained by these two methods were compared. The concentration of PM 10 as well as the total concentration of the metals on the filters after the digestion procedure appeared higher at laboratory-scale combustions with flow oxygen at 20% in the exhaust gas and even higher at fireplace in comparison to laboratory-scale combustions with 13% O 2 and pellet stoves. Modern combustion appliances and appropriate types of biomass emit lower PM 10 emissions and lower concentration of metals than the traditional devices where incomplete combustion conditions are observed. Finally, a comparison with other studies was conducted resulting in similar results.

  4. Effects of heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Zn and Pb) in agricultural soils near different emission sources on quality, accumulation and food safety in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Maria Julieta [Multidisciplinary Institute of Plant Biology, Pollution and Bioindicator Section, Faculty of Physical and Natural Sciences, National University of Cordoba, Av. Velez Sarsfield 1611, X5016CGA Cordoba (Argentina); Rodriguez, Judith Hebelen, E-mail: jrodriguez@com.uncor.edu [Multidisciplinary Institute of Plant Biology, Pollution and Bioindicator Section, Faculty of Physical and Natural Sciences, National University of Cordoba, Av. Velez Sarsfield 1611, X5016CGA Cordoba (Argentina); Nieto, Gaston Leonardo; Pignata, Maria Luisa [Multidisciplinary Institute of Plant Biology, Pollution and Bioindicator Section, Faculty of Physical and Natural Sciences, National University of Cordoba, Av. Velez Sarsfield 1611, X5016CGA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soybean grown near metal sources presents a toxicological hazard from heavy metals for Chinese consumers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rhizosphere soil is the most suitable compartment for toxicological studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil guidelines should be modified considering the exchangeable metals. - Abstract: Argentina is one of the major producers of soybean in the world, this generates a high global demand for this crop leading to find it everywhere, even close to human activities involving pollutant emissions. This study evaluated heavy metal content, the transfer of metals and its relation to crop quality, and the toxicological risk of seed consumption, through soil and soybean sampling. The results show that concentrations of Pb and Cd in soils and soybeans at several sites were above the maximum permissible levels. The heavy metal bioaccumulation depending on the rhizosphere soil compartment showed significant and high regression coefficients. In addition, the similar behavior of Cd and Zn accumulation by plants reinforces the theory of other studies indicating that these metals are incorporated into the plant for a common system of transport. On the other hand, the seed quality parameters did not show a clear pattern of response to metal bioacumulation. Taken together, our results show that soybeans grown nearby to anthropic emission sources might represent a toxicological hazard for human consumption in a potential Chinese consumer. Hence, further studies should be carried out taking into account the potential negative health effects from the consumption of soybeans (direct or indirect through consumption of meat from cattle) in these conditions.

  5. Modeling the CO2 and N2O Emissions From Stover Removal for Biofuel Production From Continuous Corn Production in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paustian, K.; Killian, K.; Brenner, J.

    2003-12-01

    Corn stover, an agricultural residue, can be used as feedstock for near term bioethanol production and is available today at levels that can significantly impact energy supply. We evaluated the environmental impact of such a large-scale change in agricultural practices on green house gas production, soil erosion and soil carbon using the Century model. Estimates of soil C changes and GHG emissions were performed for the 99 counties in Iowa where previous environmental, management and erosion data was available. We employed climate, soil and historical management databases from a separate USDA-funded project as input to Century. RUSLE estimates of the residue requirements for acceptable soil loss rates under continuous corn agriculture were available from a previous study done Dr. Richard Nelson (Enersol Resources). Two mulch tillage and a no-till systems, where erosion estimates were available, were used as the basis for the simulations. Century simulations of these systems were run under a variety of stover removal rates. For each soil type within each county the model was run for 15 years (1980-1995) under continuous corn with convention tillage, and full residue return. Model simulation of crop yields and residue production were then calibrated to match those used by the Polysys model team at Oak Ridge and the simulation was repeated with the addition of the three corn tillage regimes, and several residue removal rates. County-average soil C changes (and net CO2 emissions) were calculated as area-weighted averages of the individual soil types in each county. For this study, we have utilized the IPCC approach to estimate annual N2O emissions. At low or zero residue removal rates, county-averaged soil C stocks were predicted to increase (i.e. net CO2 emissions are negative). Where the allowable residue removal rates (based on erosion tolerance) for mulch-tillage are on the order of 40-50% or more, the reduced input of C is such that the soils no longer sequester C

  6. Development of a four-zone carousel process packed with metal ion-imprinted polymer for continuous separation of copper ions from manganese ions, cobalt ions, and the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution used as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Se-Hee; Park, Chanhun; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Dukjoon; Mun, Sungyong

    2011-08-19

    A three-zone carousel process, in which Cu(II)-imprinted polymer (Cu-MIP) and a buffer solution were employed as adsorbent and eluent respectively, has been developed previously for continuous separation of Cu²⁺ (product) from Mn²⁺ and Co²⁺ (impurities). Although this process was reported to be successful in the aforementioned separation task, the way of using a buffer solution as eluent made it inevitable that the product stream included the buffer-related metal ions (i.e., the constituent metal ions of the buffer solution) as well as copper ions. For a more perfect recovery of copper ions, it would be necessary to improve the previous carousel process such that it can remove the buffer-related metal ions from copper ions while maintaining the previous function of separating copper ions from the other 2 impure heavy-metal ions. This improvement was made in this study by proposing a four-zone carousel process based on the following strategy: (1) the addition of one more zone for performing the two-step re-equilibration tasks and (2) the use of water as the eluent of the washing step in the separation zone. The operating conditions of such a proposed process were determined on the basis of the data from a series of single-column experiments. Under the determined operating conditions, 3 runs of carousel experiments were carried out. The results of these experiments revealed that the feed-loading time was a key parameter affecting the performance of the proposed process. Consequently, the continuous separation of copper ions from both the impure heavy-metal ions and the buffer-related metal ions could be achieved with a purity of 91.9% and a yield of 92.8% by using the proposed carousel process based on a properly chosen feed-loading time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Amorphous Metal-Free Room-Temperature Phosphorescent Small Molecules with Multicolor Photoluminescence via a Host-Guest and Dual-Emission Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengfeng; Lu, Feifei; Wang, Jie; Hu, Wende; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Xiang; Tian, He

    2018-02-07

    Metal-free room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) materials offer unprecedented potentials for photoelectric and biochemical materials due to their unique advantages of long lifetime and low toxicity. However, the achievements of phosphorescence at ambient condition so far have been mainly focused on ordered crystal lattice or on embedding into rigid matrices, where the preparation process might bring out poor repeatability and limited application. In this research, a series of amorphous organic small molecular compounds were developed with efficient RTP emission through conveniently modifying phosphor moieties to β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The hydrogen bonding between the cyclodextrin derivatives immobilizes the phosphors to suppress the nonradiative relaxation and shields phosphors from quenchers, which enables such molecules to emit efficient RTP emission with decent quantum yields. Furthermore, one such cyclodextrin derivative was utilized to construct a host-guest system incorporating a fluorescent guest molecule, exhibiting excellent RTP-fluorescence dual-emission properties and multicolor emission with a wide range from yellow to purple including white-light emission. This innovative and universal strategy opens up new research paths to construct amorphous metal-free small molecular RTP materials and to design organic white-light-emitting materials using a single supramolecular platform.

  8. FINE PARTICAL AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Wayne S. Seames; Art Fernandez

    2003-09-21

    This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal. The objective was to determine potential tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} mitigation through using a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel, such as municipal sewage sludge, and the emergence of other potential problems such as the emission of toxic fly ash particles. The work led to new insight into mechanisms governing the partitioning of major and trace metals from the combustion of sewage sludge, and mixtures of coal and sewage sludge. The research also showed that the co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge emitted fine particulate matter that might potentially cause greater lung injury than that from the combustion of either coal alone or municipal sewage sludge alone. The reason appeared to be that the toxicity measured required the presence of large amounts of both zinc and sulfur in particles that were inhaled. MSS provided the zinc while coal provided the sulfur. Additional research showed that the toxic effects could most likely be engineered out of the process, through the introduction of kaolinite sorbent downstream of the combustion zone, or removing the sulfur from the fuel. These results are consequences of applying ''Health Effects Engineering'' to this issue. Health Effects Engineering is a new discipline arising out of this work, and is derived from using a collaboration of combustion engineers and toxicologists to mitigate the potentially bad health effects from combustion of this biomass fuel.

  9. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  10. Effects of heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Zn and Pb) in agricultural soils near different emission sources on quality, accumulation and food safety in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, María Julieta; Rodriguez, Judith Hebelen; Leonardo Nieto, Gastón; Pignata, María Luisa

    2012-09-30

    Argentina is one of the major producers of soybean in the world, this generates a high global demand for this crop leading to find it everywhere, even close to human activities involving pollutant emissions. This study evaluated heavy metal content, the transfer of metals and its relation to crop quality, and the toxicological risk of seed consumption, through soil and soybean sampling. The results show that concentrations of Pb and Cd in soils and soybeans at several sites were above the maximum permissible levels. The heavy metal bioaccumulation depending on the rhizosphere soil compartment showed significant and high regression coefficients. In addition, the similar behavior of Cd and Zn accumulation by plants reinforces the theory of other studies indicating that these metals are incorporated into the plant for a common system of transport. On the other hand, the seed quality parameters did not show a clear pattern of response to metal bioacumulation. Taken together, our results show that soybeans grown nearby to anthropic emission sources might represent a toxicological hazard for human consumption in a potential Chinese consumer. Hence, further studies should be carried out taking into account the potential negative health effects from the consumption of soybeans (direct or indirect through consumption of meat from cattle) in these conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous preparation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles through Impinging Stream-Rotating Packed Bed reactor and their electrochemistry detection toward heavy metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Hong-Lei; Zhou, Shao-Feng; Gao, Jing; Liu, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    We reported the continuous preparation and electrochemical behavior toward heavy metal ions of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 NPs). This Fe 3 O 4 NPs were fabricated through a novel Impinging Stream-Rotating Packed Bed reactor with a high production rate of 2.23 kg/hour. The as-prepared Fe 3 O 4 NPs were quasi-spherical with a mean diameter of about 10 nm and shown the characteristics of superparamagnetism with the saturated magnetization of 60.5 emu/g. The electrochemical characterization of the as-prepared Fe 3 O 4 NPs toward heavy metal ions were evaluated using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) analysis. The results indicated that the modified electrode could be used to individual detection of Pb(II), Cu(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II). In particular, the modified electrode exhibited the selective detection toward Pb(II) with higher sensitivity of 14.9 μA/μM, while the response to Cu(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II) were negligible. Besides, the modified electrode shown good stability and potential practical applicability in the electrochemical determination of Pb(II). This above results offered a simple method for continuous preparation sensing materials in the application field of electrochemical detection of toxic metal ions through the technology of process intensification. - Highlights: • Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were continuous prepared through IS-RPB reactor. • The Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles showed selective detection of heavy metal ions. • It exhibited favorable sensitivity (14.9 μA μM −1 ) and LOD (0.119 μM) for Pb(II). • The as-prepared nanoparticles showed favorable potential application.

  12. Continuous preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles through Impinging Stream-Rotating Packed Bed reactor and their electrochemistry detection toward heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hong-Lei [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Zhou, Shao-Feng [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Functional Nanocomposites, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Gao, Jing [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, You-Zhi, E-mail: lyzzhongxin@126.com [Shanxi Province Key Laboratory of Higee-Oriented Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2016-06-25

    We reported the continuous preparation and electrochemical behavior toward heavy metal ions of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs). This Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were fabricated through a novel Impinging Stream-Rotating Packed Bed reactor with a high production rate of 2.23 kg/hour. The as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were quasi-spherical with a mean diameter of about 10 nm and shown the characteristics of superparamagnetism with the saturated magnetization of 60.5 emu/g. The electrochemical characterization of the as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs toward heavy metal ions were evaluated using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) analysis. The results indicated that the modified electrode could be used to individual detection of Pb(II), Cu(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II). In particular, the modified electrode exhibited the selective detection toward Pb(II) with higher sensitivity of 14.9 μA/μM, while the response to Cu(II), Hg(II) and Cd(II) were negligible. Besides, the modified electrode shown good stability and potential practical applicability in the electrochemical determination of Pb(II). This above results offered a simple method for continuous preparation sensing materials in the application field of electrochemical detection of toxic metal ions through the technology of process intensification. - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were continuous prepared through IS-RPB reactor. • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles showed selective detection of heavy metal ions. • It exhibited favorable sensitivity (14.9 μA μM{sup −1}) and LOD (0.119 μM) for Pb(II). • The as-prepared nanoparticles showed favorable potential application.

  13. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure

  14. Determination of Heavy Metals through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES in Iranian Cheese and Their Potential Health Risks to the Adult Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Baseri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, cheese is one of the dairy products that widely consumed as a main diet for breakfast. Moreover, trace metals in dairy products have recently gained considerable attention. Iranian cheese samples were collected from Tehran, Iran (February in May 2013. Trace metals including Pb, Cd, Ni, Fe, Sn, Zn, Cr, and Cu were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES after dry ashing. All the tested metals were detected in the cheese samples. The mean concentration of metals in cheese showed the following decreasing order Zn > Fe > Cu > Ni > Sn > Cr > Pb > Cd, with values of 12.98, 7.95, 1.96, 0.83, 0.46, 0.37, 0.34, and 0.01 mg/kg, respectively. There were no significant differences between types of cheese samples in terms of content of trace metals (p>0.05. All the samples had Pb contents of greater than Codex limit (0.02 mg/kg. According to the measured values of the metals in this study, the intake of all the studied elements through the common consumption of cheese in Iran was below the dangerous level according to permissible intake value for each metal. Also, levels of correlations between the element pairs were analyzed.

  15. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  16. Characterisation of charging kinetics of dielectrics under continuous electron irradiation through real time electron emission collecting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerch, Kévin, E-mail: kevin.guerch@onera.fr [ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); CIRIMAT – Institut Carnot (CNRS) Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Paulmier, Thierry [ONERA, 2 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Lenormand, Pascal [CIRIMAT – Institut Carnot (CNRS) Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)

    2015-04-15

    Dielectric materials used for spacecraft applications are often characterised under electron irradiation in order to study their physical and electrical mechanisms. For surface potential measurement, a small removable flat device based on the secondary electron spectrometer method has been developed and installed in the CEDRE irradiation test facility at ONERA (Toulouse, France). This technique was developed to get rid off specific issues inherent to the Kelvin Probe technique. This experimental device named REPA (Repulsive Electron Potential Analyser) allows in situ and real time assessment of the surface potential built up on dielectric materials under continuous electron irradiation. A calibration has been performed in order to validate this experimental setup. Furthermore, to optimise its efficiency, the physical behaviour of this device has been modelled and numerically simulated using Particle In Cell (PIC) model and a dedicated numerical code called SPIS (Spacecraft Plasma Interactions System). In a final step, electrical characterisations of a charged dielectric have been carried out under continuous electron irradiation with this new method. These results have been compared with measurements performed in same experimental conditions with conventional Kelvin Probe method. The experimental results have been discussed in this paper. To conclude, advantages of this experimental setup in regard of this application will be emphasised.

  17. Is metal pollution a threat to the continued survival of the starfish in False Bay, South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan J. Reinecke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Urbanisation and industrial development in the catchment area of False Bay in South Africa are increasing and concern was raised about the effect of environmental pollutants on intertidal fauna such as starfish. The aim of the present study was to obtain initial descriptive baseline data over several seasons during 2000–2001 of metal concentrations in water, sediment and body samples of the chosen cushion starfish Parvulastra exigua (Lamarck, 1816 that occurs widely in the intertidal zone of False Bay. Concentrations of cadmium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc were measured in samples of the cushion starfish, water and sediment at five localities along the coast of False Bay. The samples were chemically analysed for metals by atomic spectrophotometry. The highest individually measured concentrations of cadmium (Cd in starfish and sediment were found in the northern coastal region between Strand and Muizenberg where most industrial activity and human settlement occur. Large variation in concentrations of all metals occurred between localities and seasons. The mean concentrations of Cd and Pb in water and sediment were in a few instances slightly higher than the recommended levels or target values of the South African marine water and sediment quality norms but still lower than those in various developed countries. Indications are that the bay was at the time of this study still less contaminated by metals in comparison with the coastal waters of various other countries. The accumulation of nonessential metals such as cadmium and lead in both sediment and bodies of starfish was nevertheless such that it can be assumed that environmental concentrations in some parts of the bay could over time build up to levels that are detrimental to the species as well as their predators. This study provided evidence that the cushion starfish in False Bay is exposed to several metals of which some are potentially hazardous since they tend to gradually accumulate

  18. Predicting criteria continuous concentrations of 34 metals or metalloids by use of quantitative ion character-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yunsong; Wu, Fengchang; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yuedan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Haiqing Liao; Giesy, John P

    2014-05-01

    Criteria continuous concentrations (CCCs) are useful for describing chronic exposure to pollutants and setting water quality standards to protect aquatic life. However, because of financial, practical, or ethical restrictions on toxicity testing, few data are available to derive CCCs. In this study, CCCs for 34 metals or metalloids were derived using quantitative ion character-activity relationships-species sensitivity distributions (QICAR-SSD) and the final acute-chronic ratio (FACR) method. The results showed that chronic toxic potencies were correlated with several physico-chemical properties among eight species chosen, where the softness index was the most predictive characteristic. Predicted CCCs for most of the metals, except for Lead and Iron, were within a range of 10-fold of values recommended by the U.S. EPA. The QICAR-SSD model was superior to the FACR method for prediction of data-poor metals. This would have significance for predicting toxic potencies and criteria thresholds of more metals or metalloids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility of biodiesel production and CO2 emission reduction by Monoraphidium dybowskii LB50 under semi-continuous culture with open raceway ponds in the desert area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haijian; He, Qiaoning; Hu, Chunxiang

    2018-01-01

    Compared with other general energy crops, microalgae are more compatible with desert conditions. In addition, microalgae cultivated in desert regions can be used to develop biodiesel. Therefore, screening oil-rich microalgae, and researching the algae growth, CO 2 fixation and oil yield in desert areas not only effectively utilize the idle desertification lands and other resources, but also reduce CO 2 emission. Monoraphidium dybowskii LB50 can be efficiently cultured in the desert area using light resources, and lipid yield can be effectively improved using two-stage induction and semi-continuous culture modes in open raceway ponds (ORPs). Lipid content (LC) and lipid productivity (LP) were increased by 20% under two-stage industrial salt induction, whereas biomass productivity (BP) increased by 80% to enhance LP under semi-continuous mode in 5 m 2 ORPs. After 3 years of operation, M. dybowskii LB50 was successfully and stably cultivated under semi-continuous mode for a month during five cycles of repeated culture in a 200 m 2 ORP in the desert area. This culture mode reduced the supply of the original species. The BP and CO 2 fixation rate were maintained at 18 and 33 g m -2  day -1 , respectively. Moreover, LC decreased only during the fifth cycle of repeated culture. Evaporation occurred at 0.9-1.8 L m -2  day -1 , which corresponded to 6.5-13% of evaporation loss rate. Semi-continuous and two-stage salt induction culture modes can reduce energy consumption and increase energy balance through the energy consumption analysis of life cycle. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining biodiesel production and CO 2 fixation using microalgae grown as feedstock under culture modes with ORPs by using the resources in the desert area. The understanding of evaporation loss and the sustainability of semi-continuous culture render this approach practically viable. The novel strategy may be a promising alternative to existing technology for CO 2 emission

  20. Microstructural evolution in ultra-low-carbon steel weldments—Part I: Controlled thermal cycling and continuous cooling transformation diagram of the weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, R. W.; Spanos, G.

    2000-09-01

    The transformation behavior and microstructural evolution of the as-deposited weld metal from an ultra-low-carbon (ULC) weldment were characterized by dilatometry, optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness measurements. These results were used to construct a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram for this weld metal. The major microconstituents observed in this ULC weldment were (in order of decreasing cooling rate) coarse autotempered martensite, fine lath martensite, lath ferrite, and degenerate lath ferrite. No polygonal ferrite was observed. These results were also used to develop criteria to differentiate between the two predominant microstructures in these ULC steels, lath martensite, and lath ferrite, which can look quite similar but have very different properties.

  1. Growing season methane emission from a boreal peatland in the continuous permafrost zone of Northeast China: effects of active layer depth and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Boreal peatlands are significant natural sources of methane and especially vulnerable to abrupt climate change. However, the controlling factors of CH4 emission in boreal peatlands are still unclear. In this study, we investigated CH4 fluxes and abiotic factors (temperature, water table depth, active layer depth, and dissolved CH4 concentrations in pore water during the growing seasons in 2010 and 2011 in both shrub-sphagnum- and sedge-dominated plant communities in the continuous permafrost zone of Northeast China. The objective of our study was to examine the effects of vegetation types and abiotic factors on CH4 fluxes from a boreal peatland. In an Eriophorum-dominated community, mean CH4 emissions were 1.02 and 0.80 mg m−2 h−1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. CH4 fluxes (0.38 mg m−2 h−1 released from the shrub-mosses-dominated community were lower than that from Eriophorum-dominated community. Moreover, in the Eriophorum-dominated community, CH4 fluxes showed a significant temporal pattern with a peak value in late August in both 2010 and 2011. However, no distinct seasonal variation was observed in the CH4 flux in the shrub-mosses-dominated community. Interestingly, in both Eriophorum- and shrub-sphagnum-dominated communities, CH4 fluxes did not show close correlation with air or soil temperature and water table depth, whereas CH4 emissions correlated well to active layer depth and CH4 concentration in soil pore water, especially in the Eriophorum-dominated community. Our results suggest that CH4 released from the thawed CH4-rich permafrost layer may be a key factor controlling CH4 emissions in boreal peatlands, and highlight that CH4 fluxes vary with vegetation type in boreal peatlands. With

  2. Daily and hourly sourcing of metallic and mineral dust in urban air contaminated by traffic and coal-burning emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Boldo, E.; Linares, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-analytical approach to chemical analysis of inhalable urban atmospheric particulate matter (PM), integrating particle induced X-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy, chromatography and thermal-optical transmission methods, allows comparison

  3. Contact Pressure and Sliding Velocity Maps of the Friction, Wear and Emission from a Low-Metallic/Cast-Iron Disc Brake Contact Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wahlström

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm (PM10 from car disc brakes contribute up to 50% of the total non-exhaust emissions from road transport in the EU. These emissions come from the wear of the pad and rotor contact surfaces. Yet few studies have reported contact pressures and offered sliding speed maps of the friction, wear, and particle emission performance of disc brake materials at a material level. Such maps are crucial to understanding material behaviour at different loads and can be used as input data to numerical simulations. A low-metallic pad and grey cast-iron rotor contact pair commonly used today in passenger car disc brakes was studied using a pin-on-disc tribometer at twelve contact pressure and sliding speed combinations. Maps of the coefficient of friction, specific wear rate, particle number, and mass rate are presented and discussed.

  4. Specifics of d-metals (Au) emission in case of non-equilibrium heating of electrons and lattice with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkevich, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper refers to the mechanisms of emission of noble metals taking into account the specifics associated with the two-temperature state of matter. The emission is caused by the action of an ultrashort infrared laser pulse. It is shown that the two-temperature state results in two effects contributing to the radiated emission of hot electrons. The first effect is interband radiative recombination of electrons induced by thermal smearing of the Fermi distribution of conduction-band electrons. The second effect is radiation of hot conduction-band electrons in case of inelastic electron–phonon interaction. This effect is due to the fact that thermal smearing of the Fermi distribution of conduction-band electrons, taking into account the electron–phonon interaction, and in the presence of strong near fields, enables intraband radiative transitions for electrons in the sp-band.

  5. Active galactic nuclei emission line diagnostics and the mass-metallicity relation up to redshift z ∼ 2: The impact of selection effects and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gobat, Raphael; Jean-Baptiste, Ingrid; Le Floc'h, Émeric; Pannella, Maurilio; Schreiber, Corentin; Charlot, Stéphane; Lehnert, M. D.; Pacifici, Camilla; Trump, Jonathan R.; Brinchmann, Jarle; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Emission line diagnostic diagrams probing the ionization sources in galaxies, such as the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram, have been used extensively to distinguish active galactic nuclei (AGN) from purely star-forming galaxies. However, they remain poorly understood at higher redshifts. We shed light on this issue with an empirical approach based on a z ∼ 0 reference sample built from ∼300,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, from which we mimic selection effects due to typical emission line detection limits at higher redshift. We combine this low-redshift reference sample with a simple prescription for luminosity evolution of the global galaxy population to predict the loci of high-redshift galaxies on the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagrams. The predicted bivariate distributions agree remarkably well with direct observations of galaxies out to z ∼ 1.5, including the observed stellar mass-metallicity (MZ) relation evolution. As a result, we infer that high-redshift star-forming galaxies are consistent with having normal interstellar medium (ISM) properties out to z ∼ 1.5, after accounting for selection effects and line luminosity evolution. Namely, their optical line ratios and gas-phase metallicities are comparable to that of low-redshift galaxies with equivalent emission-line luminosities. In contrast, AGN narrow-line regions may show a shift toward lower metallicities at higher redshift. While a physical evolution of the ISM conditions is not ruled out for purely star-forming galaxies and may be more important starting at z ≳ 2, we find that reliably quantifying this evolution is hindered by selections effects. The recipes provided here may serve as a basis for future studies toward this goal. Code to predict the loci of galaxies on the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams and the MZ relation as a function of emission line luminosity limits is made publicly available.

  6. Tests of star formation metrics in the low-metallicity galaxy NGC 5253 using ALMA observations of H30α line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendo, G. J.; Miura, R. E.; Espada, D.; Nakanishi, K.; Beswick, R. J.; D'Cruze, M. J.; Dickinson, C.; Fuller, G. A.

    2017-11-01

    We use Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of H30α (231.90 GHz) emission from the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 to measure the star formation rate (SFR) within the galaxy and to test the reliability of SFRs derived from other commonly used metrics. The H30α emission, which originates mainly from the central starburst, yields a photoionizing photon production rate of (1.9 ± 0.3) × 1052 s-1 and an SFR of 0.087 ± 0.013 M⊙ yr-1 based on conversions that account for the low metallicity of the galaxy and for stellar rotation. Among the other star formation metrics we examined, the SFR calculated from the total infrared flux was statistically equivalent to the values from the H30α data. The SFR based on a previously published version of the H α flux that was extinction corrected using Paα and Paβ lines was lower than but also statistically similar to the H30α value. The mid-infrared (22 μm) flux density and the composite star formation tracer based on H α and mid-infrared emission give SFRs that were significantly higher because the dust emission appears unusually hot compared to typical spiral galaxies. Conversely, the 70 and 160 μm flux densities yielded SFRs lower than the H30α value, although the SFRs from the 70 μm and H30α data were within 1σ-2σ of each other. While further analysis on a broader range of galaxies is needed, these results are instructive of the best and worst methods to use when measuring SFR in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies like NGC 5253.

  7. Active galactic nuclei emission line diagnostics and the mass-metallicity relation up to redshift z ∼ 2: The impact of selection effects and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gobat, Raphael; Jean-Baptiste, Ingrid; Le Floc' h, Émeric; Pannella, Maurilio; Schreiber, Corentin [CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Charlot, Stéphane; Lehnert, M. D.; Pacifici, Camilla [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Trump, Jonathan R. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Dickinson, Mark, E-mail: stephanie.juneau@cea.fr [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Emission line diagnostic diagrams probing the ionization sources in galaxies, such as the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagram, have been used extensively to distinguish active galactic nuclei (AGN) from purely star-forming galaxies. However, they remain poorly understood at higher redshifts. We shed light on this issue with an empirical approach based on a z ∼ 0 reference sample built from ∼300,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, from which we mimic selection effects due to typical emission line detection limits at higher redshift. We combine this low-redshift reference sample with a simple prescription for luminosity evolution of the global galaxy population to predict the loci of high-redshift galaxies on the BPT and Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic diagrams. The predicted bivariate distributions agree remarkably well with direct observations of galaxies out to z ∼ 1.5, including the observed stellar mass-metallicity (MZ) relation evolution. As a result, we infer that high-redshift star-forming galaxies are consistent with having normal interstellar medium (ISM) properties out to z ∼ 1.5, after accounting for selection effects and line luminosity evolution. Namely, their optical line ratios and gas-phase metallicities are comparable to that of low-redshift galaxies with equivalent emission-line luminosities. In contrast, AGN narrow-line regions may show a shift toward lower metallicities at higher redshift. While a physical evolution of the ISM conditions is not ruled out for purely star-forming galaxies and may be more important starting at z ≳ 2, we find that reliably quantifying this evolution is hindered by selections effects. The recipes provided here may serve as a basis for future studies toward this goal. Code to predict the loci of galaxies on the BPT and MEx diagnostic diagrams and the MZ relation as a function of emission line luminosity limits is made publicly available.

  8. Using semi-continuous, in-situ measurements of nitrous oxide isotopic composition at a suburban site to track emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Eliza; Henne, Stephan; Christoph, Hüglin; Christoph, Zellweger; Béla, Tuzson; Erkan, Ibraim; Lukas, Emmenegger; Joachim, Mohn

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the strongest ozone-destroying substance emitted this century. The atmospheric N2O mole fraction has been increasing at a rate of 0.2-0.3% per year over the past decades due to anthropogenic emissions; in addition, recent results suggest that the rate of increase is rising - therefore effective mitigation of N2O emissions is a critical point for environmental policy. However, N2O sources are poorly defined and disperse, complicating the development of targeted mitigation strategies. Online isotopic measurements using preconcentration and laser spectroscopy [1,2,3] have great potential to unravel spatial and temporal variations in sources, sinks and chemistry of trace gases such as N2O. Semi-continuous, real-time measurements of N2O isotopic composition (δ18O, site preference [SP = 14N15N16O - 15N14N16O] and δ15Nbulk) were performed at the suburban site of Dübendorf, Switzerland, for 19 months between July 2014 and February 2016. The data precision reached 0.1‰ in the final months, thus the results could clearly identify nocturnal build-up of N2O, with a corresponding decrease in δ18O, SP and δ15Nbulk due to isotopically depleted anthropogenic sources. Daily mean source isotopic composition was calculated by considering the measured and the background mole fraction and isotopic composition. Delta values of the mean emission source were highest in winter, with a seasonal cycle of 12, 8 and 5‰ for δ18O, SP and δ15Nbulk respectively. The chemical and meteorological parameters controlling source isotopic composition were considered using data from the Swiss National Air Pollution Monitoring Network (NABEL) as well as a transport regime cluster analysis. A clear spatial distribution for source isotopic composition was observed for δ18O, as well as a significant relationship with the level of urban pollution, indicating δ18O may be a strong indicator of combustion/industrial vs. agricultural N2O. In contrast

  9. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A⋅cm−3 at 0.9 V or 450 A⋅cm−3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed. PMID:26261338

  10. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  11. A close look to subthreshold kinetic emission from clean metal surfaces: "Surface-assisted kinetic emission" and "potential excitation of plasmons"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, H. P.; Aumayr, F.; Lörinčík, Jan; Šroubek, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 4 (2002), s. 548-550 ISSN 0367-6765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0881 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electron-emission * slow ions * Al(111) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.088, year: 2001

  12. Simultaneous multiple element detection by particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy as a tool for metallomic studies: determinations of metal binding with apo-transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy (PB/HC-OES) is presented as a tool for the determination of metal ion loading in transferrin (Tf). The elemental specificity of optical emission spectroscopy provides a means of assessing metal ion concentrations as well as the relative amounts of metal per unit protein concentration (up to 2 moles of Fe per mole of protein). The PB/HC-OES method allows for the simultaneous detection of metal content (Fe (I) 371.99, Ni (I) 341.41 nm, Zn (I) 213.86 nm, and Ag (I) 338.28 nm in this case), as well as elemental carbon and sulfur (C (I) 156.14 nm and S (I) 180.73 nm) that are reflective of the protein composition and concentration. Quantification for the metal species is based on calibration functions derived from aqueous solutions, with limits of detection for the entire suite being less than 1.0 μM. Determinations in this manner eliminate much of the ambiguity inherent in UV-VIS absorbance determinations of Tf metal binding. Validation of this method is obtained by analyzing loading response of Fe(3+) into Tf using the PB/HC-OES method and comparing the results with those of the standard UV-VIS absorbance method. Maximum Fe(3+) loading of Tf (based on the number of available binding sites) was determined to be 71.2 ± 4.7% by the PB/HC-OES method and 67.5 ± 2.5% for the UV-VIS absorbance method. Element emission ratios between the dopant metals and the carbon and sulfur protein constituents allow for concentration independent determinations of metal binding into Tf. Loading percentages were determined for Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Ag(+) into Tf with maximum loading values of 19.5 ± 0.4%, 41.0 ± 4.4%, and 141.2 ± 4.3%, respectively. While of no apparent biological significance, Ag(+) presents an interesting case as a surrogate for Pt(2+), whose binding with Tf has shown to be quite different from the other metals. A different mode from the others is indeed observed, and is consistent with conjecture on the Pt(2

  13. Persistent free radicals, heavy metals and PAHs generated in particulate soot emissions and residue ash from controlled combustion of common types of plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Gotsis, George; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    The production and use of polymeric materials worldwide has reached levels of 150 million tonnes per year, and the majority of plastic materials are discarded in waste landfills where are burned generating toxic emissions. In the present study we conducted laboratory experiments for batch combustion/burning of commercial polymeric materials, simulating conditions of open fire combustion, with the purpose to analyze their emissions for chemical characteristics of toxicological importance. We used common types of plastic materials: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), low and high density poly(ethylene) (LDPE, HDPE), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Samples of particulate smoke (soot) collected on filters and residue solid ash produced by controlled burning conditions at 600-750 deg. C are used for analysis. Emissions of particulate matter, persistent free radicals embedded in the carbonaceous polymeric matrix, heavy metals, other elements and PAHs were determined in both types of samples. Results showed that all plastics burned easily generating charred residue solid ash and black airborne particulate smoke. Persistent carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals, known for their toxic effects in inhalable airborne particles, were detected in both particulate smoke emissions and residue solid ash. Concentrations of heavy metals and other elements (determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry, ICP, method) were measured in the airborne soot and residue ash. Toxic heavy metals, such as Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd were relatively at were found at low concentrations. High concentrations were found for some lithophilic elements, such as Na, Ca, Mg, Si and Al in particulate soot and residue solid ash. Measurements of PAHs showed that low molecular weight PAHs were at higher concentrations in the airborne particulate soot than in the residue solid ash for all types of plastic. Higher-ringed PAHs were detected at higher

  14. Persistent free radicals, heavy metals and PAHs generated in particulate soot emissions and residue ash from controlled combustion of common types of plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Gotsis, George; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2008-08-15

    The production and use of polymeric materials worldwide has reached levels of 150 million tonnes per year, and the majority of plastic materials are discarded in waste landfills where are burned generating toxic emissions. In the present study we conducted laboratory experiments for batch combustion/burning of commercial polymeric materials, simulating conditions of open fire combustion, with the purpose to analyze their emissions for chemical characteristics of toxicological importance. We used common types of plastic materials: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), low and high density poly(ethylene) (LDPE, HDPE), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Samples of particulate smoke (soot) collected on filters and residue solid ash produced by controlled burning conditions at 600-750 degrees C are used for analysis. Emissions of particulate matter, persistent free radicals embedded in the carbonaceous polymeric matrix, heavy metals, other elements and PAHs were determined in both types of samples. Results showed that all plastics burned easily generating charred residue solid ash and black airborne particulate smoke. Persistent carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals, known for their toxic effects in inhalable airborne particles, were detected in both particulate smoke emissions and residue solid ash. Concentrations of heavy metals and other elements (determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry, ICP, method) were measured in the airborne soot and residue ash. Toxic heavy metals, such as Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd were relatively at were found at low concentrations. High concentrations were found for some lithophilic elements, such as Na, Ca, Mg, Si and Al in particulate soot and residue solid ash. Measurements of PAHs showed that low molecular weight PAHs were at higher concentrations in the airborne particulate soot than in the residue solid ash for all types of plastic. Higher-ringed PAHs were detected at higher

  15. Manipulating the alkali metal charge compensation and tungsten oxide to continuously enhance the red fluorescence in (Li,Na,K)Ca(Mo,W)O4:Eu3+ solid solution compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Li, Jiaxin; Tian, Canxin; Wang, Zesong; Xie, Mubiao; Zou, Changwei; Sun, Guohuan; Kang, Fengwen

    2018-02-01

    When compared to other phosphors typically the blue and green phosphors, red phosphors, which can be used for white light-emitting diodes (wLEDs), always suffer from various problems such as higher cost, lower luminescence efficiency and bad thermal stability. And thus, great interests have been paid to how to enhance the red fluorescence intensity in the recent years. Here we report on a red-emitting solid solutions, (Li,Na,K)Ca(Mo,W)O4:Eu3+, which enable exhibiting continuous Eu3+ emission enhancement through manipulating the alkali metal ions and the relative content ratios between tungsten and molybdenum oxides. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) has been employed to check the phase purity, and results show that all samples crystallize in a scheelite structure with space group of I41/a (No.88). A regular blue-shifting of XRD peaks, which indicates the increase of crystal plane spacing, appears as the alkali cationic radius increases from 0.92 Å (for Li), 1.18 Å (for Na) and to 1.38 Å (for K). Replacing Mo ion (0.41 Å) by W ion (0.42 Å) enables not only forming the solid solution compounds (Li,Na,K)Ca(Mo,W)O4:Eu3+, but also blue-shifting the XRD position. Similar to the XRD position shifting, our samples also exhibit the regular change in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, in which the charge transfer (CT) band position as the alkali cationic radii increase from Li, Na and to K and further from Mo to W shows a continuous red-shifting behavior. As for the CT and Eu3+ intensity, our experimental results show that the alkali ion that corresponds to the maximum intensity is Li, and this intensity can be further enhanced by adding W. In coincidence with the change in the excitation spectral intensity, the continuous enhanced Eu3+ emission intensity can be observed up excitation at the CT band and Eu3+ lines. We have discussed the above CT band shifting and Eu3+ fluorescence enhancement and give a feasible mechanism profile that base on the energy transfer from CT

  16. Development of novel micro swirl mixer for producing fine metal oxide nanoparticles by continuous supercritical hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Shin-ichiro; Sue, Kiwamu; Ookawara, Ryuto; Wakashima, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Novel micro swirl mixers were developed to synthesize nanoparticles, and the effect of their mixing performance on the characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined. The results were compared with those obtained using simple T-shaped mixers under the same reaction conditions. The synthesis of NiO, whose characteristics depend on the mixing performance of the mixer, was chosen as a model reaction. Initial investigations highlighted that the average particle size decreased from 32 to 23 to 20 nm as the inner diameter of the swirl mixers was decreased from 3.2 mm (Swirl mixer, SM-3.2) to 0.8 mm (Micro swirl mixer, MSM-0.8) to 0.5 mm (Micro swirl mixer, MSM-0.5), respectively. On the other hand, a similar decrease in the average particle size from 34 to 20 nm was observed with a decrease in the inner diameter of the T-shaped mixers from 1.3 mm (Tee union, T-1.3) to 0.3 mm (Micro tee union, T-0.3), respectively. Further, narrow particle size distributions were observed with a decrease in the inner diameter of each mixer. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation indicated an excellent mixing mechanism, which contributed to the improvement in the heating rate and the formation of nanoparticles of smaller size with a narrow particle size distribution. The result presented here indicates that the micro swirl mixers produce high-quality metal oxide nanoparticles. The size of the obtained particles with improved size distributions was comparable to that of the particles obtained using the T-shaped mixers, although the inner diameter of the swirl mixers was larger. Therefore, preliminary evidence suggests that the swirl flow mixers have the ability to produce rapid and homogeneous fluid mixing, thus controlling the particle size.

  17. Design and testing of a continuous metal biosorption system. Final report, March 10, 1994--June 9, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Reeves, M.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McGraw, T.F.; Gupte, U.; Haris, W.G. [Scientific and Commercial Systems Corp., Beltsville, Maryland (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The research pursued in this project consisted of two portions that were conducted with constant coordination to allow the ultimate merger of research results. ORNL was assigned the task of developing the biomass portion of the bioreactor, while SCSC was responsible for the mechanical portions of the bioreactor. This report describes the technical aspects of a novel biological sorbent, consisting of microbial biomass immobilized within a polyurethane gel matrix, that was developed and characterized (on a bench scale, within batch and flow-through systems) for use in a novel, continuous-flow bioreactor system. The report also addresses an initial effort to develop a delivery technology that takes advantage of the specific characteristics of the biosorbent material to permits its deployment against contamination problems. The report concludes with recommendations for future work that would allow the designated wastes to be treated on a large scale.

  18. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four...

  19. Inference of strata separation and gas emission paths in longwall overburden using continuous wavelet transform of well logs and geostatistical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2014-06-01

    Prediction of potential methane emission pathways from various sources into active mine workings or sealed gobs from longwall overburden is important for controlling methane and for improving mining safety. The aim of this paper is to infer strata separation intervals and thus gas emission pathways from standard well log data. The proposed technique was applied to well logs acquired through the Mary Lee/Blue Creek coal seam of the Upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, using well logs from a series of boreholes aligned along a nearly linear profile. For this purpose, continuous wavelet transform (CWT) of digitized gamma well logs was performed by using Mexican hat and Morlet, as the mother wavelets, to identify potential discontinuities in the signal. Pointwise Hölder exponents (PHE) of gamma logs were also computed using the generalized quadratic variations (GQV) method to identify the location and strength of singularities of well log signals as a complementary analysis. PHEs and wavelet coefficients were analyzed to find the locations of singularities along the logs. Using the well logs in this study, locations of predicted singularities were used as indicators in single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) to generate equi-probable realizations of potential strata separation intervals. Horizontal and vertical variograms of realizations were then analyzed and compared with those of indicator data and training image (TI) data using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A sum of squared differences was employed to select the most probable realization representing the locations of potential strata separations and methane flow paths. Results indicated that singularities located in well log signals reliably correlated with strata transitions or discontinuities within the strata. Geostatistical simulation of these discontinuities provided information about the location and extents of the continuous channels that may form during mining. If there is a gas

  20. Solvent-switchable continuous-breathing behaviour in a diamondoid metal-organic framework and its influence on CO2 versus CH4 selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Elliot J.; McAnally, Craig A.; Fletcher, Ashleigh J.; Thompson, Stephen P.; Warren, Mark; Brammer, Lee

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the behaviour of flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)—porous crystalline materials that undergo a structural change upon exposure to an external stimulus—underpins their design as responsive materials for specific applications, such as gas separation, molecular sensing, catalysis and drug delivery. Reversible transformations of a MOF between open- and closed-pore forms—a behaviour known as 'breathing'—typically occur through well-defined crystallographic transitions. By contrast, continuous breathing is rare, and detailed characterization has remained very limited. Here we report a continuous-breathing mechanism that was studied by single-crystal diffraction in a MOF with a diamondoid network, (Me2NH2)[In(ABDC)2] (ABDC, 2-aminobenzene-1,4-dicarboxylate). Desolvation of the MOF in two different solvents leads to two polymorphic activated forms with very different pore openings, markedly different gas-adsorption capacities and different CO2 versus CH4 selectivities. Partial desolvation introduces a gating pressure associated with CO2 adsorption, which shows that the framework can also undergo a combination of stepped and continuous breathing.

  1. Environmental interventions based on the Health Belief Model and the Ecological-social model in the continuation of consumption of rice, free from toxic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Leili; Maleki, Afshin; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim Continuation of healthy nutritional behaviors is one of the important factors in effectiveness of educational intervention programs. The aim of this research is to compare the Health Belief Model and the Ecological-social model in reducing consumption of rice contaminated with toxic metals after completion of environmental intervention and continuation of consumption of healthy rice. Methods This research was the implementation of a six-month randomized controlled trial interventional program in two groups’ interventions along with a control group, with 80 people for each group totally, amounting to 240 women, between 18 and 50 years of age in Ilam, Iran in 2014. The questionnaires of the three groups consisted of demographic information, knowledge, the constructs of the models, performance of rice consumption. Friedman test and repeated measures used for data analysis with SPSS (version 20), and confidence interval of 95% were considered. Results The results of the Friedman test indicated a significant increase in the number of women consuming healthy rice over six months after intervention in both intervention groups (pintervention (pintervention methods caused the altered diet of people regarding consumption of healthy rice over six months after the intervention. Increased social support also probably had a more effective role in continuation of healthy diet among the people. PMID:29588814

  2. Interferences by transition metals and their elimination by cyanide as a complexing agent in the determination of arsenic using continuous flow HG-ICP-AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamoussi, B; Zafzouf, M; Hassine, B B

    1996-10-01

    The interfering effects of various foreign ions on the determination of arsenic were studied by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES). There were serious inhibiting interferences by Cu, Pb, Co, Au, Pd and Ni. However, by using cyanide as a complexing agent these interferences could be completely eliminated over a wide range of interferent concentration. The optimum chemical parameters for continuous arsine generation were studied. A major advantage of this technique is that it only needs low acid concentrations and produces less hazardous waste. Sensivity, selectivity and accuracy of the determination of arsenic by HG-ICP-AES were investigated. The detection limit (in 1 mol/l HCl medium) for arsenic(III) was 0.82 ng/ml. The relative standard deviation for ten determinations of a solution containing 50 ng/ml arsenic was 1.3%.

  3. Spatial-temporal Variations and Source Apportionment of typical Heavy Metals in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China Based on Localized Air Pollutants Emission Inventory and WRF-CMAQ modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.; Liu, S.; Zhu, C.; Liu, H.; Wu, B.

    2017-12-01

    Abstract: Anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of air pollutants have caused worldwide concerns due to their adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem. By determining the best available emission factors for varied source categories, we established the comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of hazardous air pollutants including 12 typical toxic heavy metals (Hg, As, Se, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu, and Zn) from primary anthropogenic activities in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China for the period of 2012 for the first time. The annual emissions of these pollutants were allocated at a high spatial resolution of 9km × 9km grid with ArcGIS methodology and surrogate indexes, such as regional population and gross domestic product (GDP). Notably, the total heavy metal emissions from this region represented about 10.9% of the Chinese national total emissions. The areas with high emissions of heavy metals were mainly concentrated in Tangshan, Shijiazhuang, Handan and Tianjin. Further, WRF-CMAQ modeling system were applied to simulate the regional concentration of heavy metals to explore their spatial-temporal variations, and the source apportionment of these heavy metals in BTH region was performed using the Brute-Force method. Finally, integrated countermeasures were proposed to minimize the final air pollutants discharge on account of the current and future demand of energy-saving and pollution reduction in China. Keywords: heavy metals; particulate matter; emission inventory; CMAQ model; source apportionment Acknowledgment. This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21377012 and 21177012) and the Trail Special Program of Research on the Cause and Control Technology of Air Pollution under the National Key Research and Development Plan of China (2016YFC0201501).

  4. Studies on regional cerebral pH in patients with cerebral tumors using continuous inhalation of 11CO2 and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, D.J.; Beaney, R.P.; Thomas, D.G.; Marshall, J.; Jones, T.

    1986-01-01

    Regional cerebral pH (rpH) was measured in 12 patients with cerebral tumours and in 5 normal subjects using continuous inhalation of 11 CO 2 and positron emission tomography (PET). Cerebral tumours with a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) on computed tomography scanning had a similar rpH to that of equivalent regions of contralateral brain tissue (mean tumour rpH, 6.98; mean contralateral brain pH, 6.99). Cerebral tumours with an intact BBB were consistently found to be more alkaline than contralateral brain tissue (mean tumour rpH, 7.09). There was no significant difference between the mean rpH values obtained for peripheral cortical gray and central white matter in normal subjects (7.02 and 6.98, respectively). It is concluded that in spite of reports of raised levels of aerobic glycolysis in neoplastic tissue, there is no evidence that cerebral tumour rpH values are depressed

  5. Enhanced X-ray emission from Lyman Break Analogues and a Possible $L_{\\rm X}$--SFR--Metallicity Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea; Mirabel, I. Felix

    2016-01-01

    The source of energetic photons that heated and reionized the early Universe remains uncertain. Early galaxies had low metallicity and recent population synthesis calculations suggest that the number and luminosity of high-mass X-ray binaries are enhanced in star-forming galaxies with low metallicity, offering a potentially important and previously overlooked source of heating and reionization. Lyman break analogue (LBA) galaxies are local galaxies that strongly resemble the high-redshift, st...

  6. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing; Analyse der Schallemissionssignale aus Ermuedungsrisswachstum und Korrosionsprozessen. Untersuchung der Moeglichkeiten fuer die kontinuierliche Zustandsueberwachung von Transportbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  7. Determination of Metals Present in Textile Dyes Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Cross-Validation Using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was used for the quantitative analysis of elements present in textile dyes at ambient pressure via the fundamental mode (1064 nm of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Three samples were collected for this purpose. Spectra of textile dyes were acquired using an HR spectrometer (LIBS2000+, Ocean Optics, Inc. having an optical resolution of 0.06 nm in the spectral range of 200 to 720 nm. Toxic metals like Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn along with other elements like Al, Mg, Ca, and Na were revealed to exist in the samples. The %-age concentrations of the detected elements were measured by means of standard calibration curve method, intensities of every emission from every species, and calibration-free (CF LIBS approach. Only Sample 3 was found to contain heavy metals like Cr, Cu, and Ni above the prescribed limit. The results using LIBS were found to be in good agreement when compared to outcomes of inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES.

  8. Evaluation of sample preparation methods for the detection of total metal content using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in wastewater and sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimpe, K. M.; Ngila, J. C.; Mabuba, N.; Nomngongo, P. N.

    Heavy metal contamination exists in aqueous wastes and sludge of many industrial discharges and domestic wastewater, among other sources. Determination of metals in the wastewater and sludge requires sample pre-treatment prior to analysis because of certain challenges such as the complexity of the physical state of the sample, which may lead to wrong readings in the measurement. This is particularly the case with low analyte concentration to be detected by the instrument. The purpose of this work was to assess and validate the different sample preparation methods namely, hot plate and microwave-assisted digestion procedures for extraction of metal ions in wastewater and sludge samples prior to their inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric (ICP-OES) determination. For the extraction of As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, three acid mixtures, that is, HNO3/H2O2, HNO3/HClO4/H2O2 and aqua regia + H2O2, were evaluated. Influent wastewater spiked with the SRM (CWW-TM-B) was used for the optimization of acid mixtures affecting the extraction procedure. After sample digestion, the filtration capabilities of cellulose-acetate filter paper and the acrodisc syringe filter with the pore size of 0.45 μm were compared. In terms of performance, acrodisc syringe filter in terms of the improved recoveries obtained, was found to be the best filtration method compared to the filter paper. Based on the analytical results obtained, microwave-assisted digestion (MAD) using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was found to be the most suitable method for extraction of heavy metals and major elements in all the sample matrices. Therefore, MAD using aqua regia + H2O2 mixture was used for further investigations. The precision of the developed MAD method expressed in terms of relative standard deviations (% RSD) for different metals was found to be wastewater and sludge.

  9. Enhanced X-ray emission from Lyman break analogues and a possible LX-SFR-metallicity plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, M.; Kaaret, P.; Prestwich, A.; Mirabel, I. F.

    2016-04-01

    The source of energetic photons that heated and reionized the early Universe remains uncertain. Early galaxies had low metallicity and recent population synthesis calculations suggest that the number and luminosity of high-mass X-ray binaries are enhanced in star-forming galaxies with low metallicity, offering a potentially important and previously overlooked source of heating and reionization. Lyman break analogue (LBA) galaxies are local galaxies that strongly resemble the high-redshift, star-forming Lyman break galaxies and have been suggested as local analogues to these metal-deficient galaxies found in the early Universe. We studied a sample of 10 LBAs in order to measure the relation between star formation rate and X-ray luminosity. We found that for LBAs with metallicities in the range 12 + log10(O/H) = 8.15-8.80, the LX -SFR relation was log _{10} (L_X/SFR {[erg s^{-1} M_{⊙}^{-1} yr]}) = 39.85(± 0.10) in the 0.5-8 keV band with a dispersion of σ = 0.25 dex. This is an enhancement of nearly a factor of 2 in the L0.5-8 keV-SFR relation relative to results for nearby, near-solar metallicity galaxies. The enhancement is significant at the 98.2 per cent level (2.4σ). Our enhanced LX/SFR relation is consistent with the metallicity-dependent predicted value from population synthesis models. We discuss the possibility of an LX-SFR-metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies. These results are important to our understanding of reionization and the formation of early galaxies.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of reducing national emissions of SO2 and metals in Poland on background pollution using a bioindication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozdowski, Dariusz; Baczewska-Dąbrowska, Aneta H.; Dąbrowski, Piotr; Gworek, Barbara; Suwara, Irena

    2018-01-01

    Changes in environmental pollution by S, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in 2006–2014 were evaluated using a bioindication method. This method was based on measurements of pollutants in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles. The measurements were performed in the Chojnowskie Forests, a region recognized as a background area for central Poland. The changes in the contents of sulfur (S) and metals in needles were not comparable with the changes in the global emissions of the pollutants in Poland. On average, the pollution level in the study area decreased by 9.9% for S, 61.4% for Pb, 22.5% for Cd, 11.7% for Zn and 10.4% for Cu. During the same period, global emissions in Poland decreased by 38.1% for S, 8.0% for Pb, 63.2% for Cd, 11.7% for Zn and 14.0% for Cu. Therefore, the differences in the changes in emissions and the needle contents of each element should be examined separately which was not a goal of this study. However, the discrepancy between these results did not prevent the use of bioindication methods. Evaluation of pollutant contents in plants reflected their incorporation in biological processes rather than air or soil pollution levels. PMID:29474417

  11. Evaluation of the impact of reducing national emissions of SO2 and metals in Poland on background pollution using a bioindication method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmuchowski, Wojciech; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Baczewska-Dąbrowska, Aneta H; Dąbrowski, Piotr; Gworek, Barbara; Suwara, Irena

    2018-01-01

    Changes in environmental pollution by S, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in 2006-2014 were evaluated using a bioindication method. This method was based on measurements of pollutants in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles. The measurements were performed in the Chojnowskie Forests, a region recognized as a background area for central Poland. The changes in the contents of sulfur (S) and metals in needles were not comparable with the changes in the global emissions of the pollutants in Poland. On average, the pollution level in the study area decreased by 9.9% for S, 61.4% for Pb, 22.5% for Cd, 11.7% for Zn and 10.4% for Cu. During the same period, global emissions in Poland decreased by 38.1% for S, 8.0% for Pb, 63.2% for Cd, 11.7% for Zn and 14.0% for Cu. Therefore, the differences in the changes in emissions and the needle contents of each element should be examined separately which was not a goal of this study. However, the discrepancy between these results did not prevent the use of bioindication methods. Evaluation of pollutant contents in plants reflected their incorporation in biological processes rather than air or soil pollution levels.

  12. Determination of heavy metals and their speciation in street dusts by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry after a Community Bureau of Reference sequential extraction procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Huseyin; Imamoglu, Mustafa; Doganci, Secil; Baysal, Erkan; Albayrak, Sinem; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Sequential selective extraction techniques are commonly used to fractionate the solid-phase forms of metals in soils. This procedure provides measurements of extractable metals from media, such as acetic acid (0.11 M), hydroxyl ammonium chloride (0.1 M), hydrogen peroxide (8.8 M) plus ammonium acetate (1 M), and aqua regia stages of the sequential extraction procedure. In this work, the extractable Pb, Cu, Mn, Sr, Ni, V, Fe, Zn, and Cr were evaluated in street dust samples from Sakarya, Turkey, between May and October 2009 using the three-step sequential extraction procedure described by the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR, now the Standards, Measurements, and Testing Programme) of the European Union. The sampling sites were divided into 10 categories; a total of 50 street dusts were analyzed. The determination of multielements in the samples was performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Validation of the proposed method was performed using BCR 701 certified reference material. The results showed good agreement between the obtained and the certified values for the metals analyzed.

  13. Metal-Free Poly-Cycloaddition of Activated Azide and Alkynes toward Multifunctional Polytriazoles: Aggregation-Induced Emission, Explosive Detection, Fluorescent Patterning, and Light Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongwei; He, Benzhao; Quan, Changyun; Zheng, Chao; Deng, Haiqin; Hu, Rongrong; Zhao, Zujin; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The metal-free click polymerization (MFCP) of activated alkynes and azides or activated azide and alkynes have been developed into powerful techniques for the construction of polytriazoles without the obsession of metallic catalyst residues problem. However, the MFCP of activated azides and alkynes is rarely applied in preparation of functional polytriazoles. In this paper, soluble multifunctional polytriazoles (PIa and PIb) with high weight-average molecular weights (M w up to 32 000) are prepared via the developed metal-free poly-cycloaddition of activated azide and alkynes in high yields (up to 90%). The resultant PIa and PIb are thermally stable, and show aggregation-induced emission characteristics, enabling their aggregates to detect explosives with superamplification effect. Moreover, thanks to their containing aromatic rings and polar moieties, PIa and PIb exhibit high refractive indices. In addition, they can also be cross-linked upon UV irradiation to generate 2D fluorescent patterning due to their remaining azide groups and containing ester groups. Thus, these multifunctional polytriazoles are potentially applicable in the optoelectronic and sensing fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Examining Heavy Metals in Acid Mine Drainage Wetlands in Western Pennsylvania through the use of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Drone Aerial Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, N.; Mount, G.

    2017-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) emanating from three abandoned mines feed an estimated 126 pounds of iron per day into the Tanoma remediation wetlands located in Tanoma, Pennsylvania. Along with the iron released into the system, 1500-2800 gallons of AMD per minute is seasonally discharged into the passive system. This high rate of discharge produces areas of high velocity flow that scour the wetland bottom moving precipitants and destroying vegetation roots. Although the discharge into Tanoma is known to be damaging, other discharges to surface waters have shown iron and heavy metal concentrations several times higher, and are left untreated to enter reservoir systems. This draws attention to these remediation sites, the processes used to treat them, and the effectiveness of each site. With most of the research that's been conducted in the AMD remediation field relating to in-lab experiments on iron concentrations, there is very little information in the literature about the effects of these large influxes of heavy metals and the effects it has on the biodiversity and methane production within a AMD remediation site. This research investigates the presence and concentration of heavy metals with the treatment wetland and other surface water sources using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and drone based aerial photography. Furthermore, our ICP data is compared with biodiversity patterns and methane levels within the Tanoma AMD site to identify relationships and the potential effect they have on the productivity and effectiveness of the remediation site through time.

  15. 40 CFR Table 21 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units 21 Table 21 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63...

  16. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63...

  17. Acoustic emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Universidade do Minho, Department Engineering Mecânica, Azurém,. 4800058 Guimar˜aes, Portugal e-mail: mathew@dem.uminho.pt. Abstract. Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring man- ufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the ...

  18. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(5), you shall meet each requirement in the...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the following...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1564 - What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1564 What are my... emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1564 Section 63.1564 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. PET/MRI in the presence of metal implants: Completion of the attenuation map from PET emission data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuin, Niccolo; Pedemonte, Stefano; Catalano, Onofrio A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel technique for accurate whole-body attenuation correction in the presence of metallic endoprosthesis, on integrated non-time-of-flight (non-TOF) PET/MRI scanners. The proposed implant PET-based attenuationmap completion (IPAC) method performs a joint reconstruction of radioactiv...

  2. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 266 - Tier I and Tier II Feed Rate and Emissions Screening Limits for Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. I Appendix I to Part 266... Complex Terrain Values for urban and rural areas Terrain adjusted eff. stack ht. (m) Antimony (g/hr...

  4. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in core sediment samples in Gulf of Izmir, Aegean Sea, Turkey (by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Kurt, Dilek

    2017-04-01

    Heavy metal and radionuclide analysis studies are crucial in explaining biotic and abiotic interactions in ecosystems. This type of analysis is highly needed in environments such as coastal areas, gulfs or lakes where human activities are generally concentrated. Sediments are one of the best biological indicators for the environment since the pollution accumulates in the sediments by descent to the sea floor. In this study, sediments were collected from the Gulf of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey) considering the accumulated points of domestic and industrial wastes to make an anthropogenic pollution analysis. The core sediments had different depths of 0.00-30.00 m at four different locations where Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Incialti and Cesmealti in the Gulf of Izmir. The purpose of the study was determining Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the drilling samples to assess their levels and spatial distribution in crucial areas of the Aegean Sea by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with microwave digestion techniques. The heavy metal concentrations found in sediments varied for Cd: metals. Keywords: Gulf of Izmir, heavy metals, ICP-OES, pollution, sediment.

  5. Mercury emission monitoring on municipal waste combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Gerig, A.

    1991-01-01

    In waste incineration, mercury is the only heavy metal to be released as a gas, mostly as mercury(II) chloride, because of its high volatility. Continuous emission monitoring is possible only when mercury occurs in its elemental form. This paper reports on various possibilities of converting Hg(II) into Hg(0) that has been studied and tested on a laboratory scale and in the TAMARA refuse incineration pilot facility. Continuous mercury emission measurement appears to be possible, provided mercury is converted in the flue gas condensate precipitated. The measuring results obtained on two municipal solid waste and on one sewage treatment sludge incineration plants show that the mercury monitor is a highly sensitive and selective continuously working instrument for mercury emission monitoring

  6. Continuous syntheses of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles using microwave-assisted core particle formation coupled with galvanic metal displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Masato; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Nishioka, Masateru; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Miyazawa, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2014-08-07

    Continuous synthesis of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles was performed using flow processes including microwave-assisted Pd (or Cu) core-nanoparticle formation followed by galvanic displacement with a Pt (or Ag) shell. The core-shell structure and the nanoparticle size were confirmed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) observation and EDS elemental mapping. The Pd@Pt nanoparticles with a particle size of 6.5 ± 0.6 nm and a Pt shell thickness of ca. 0.25 nm were synthesized with appreciably high Pd concentration (Pd 100 mM). This shell thickness corresponds to one atomic layer thickness of Pt encapsulating the Pd core metal. The particle size of core Pd was controlled by tuning the initial concentrations of Na2[PdCl4] and PVP. Core-shell Cu@Ag nanoparticles with a particle size of 90 ± 35 nm and an Ag shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained using similar sequential reactions. Oxidation of the Cu core was suppressed by the coating of Cu nanoparticles with the Ag shell.

  7. High-energy electron emission from metallic nano-tips driven by intense single-cycle terahertz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Jones, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons ejected from atoms and subsequently driven to high energies in strong laser fields enable techniques from attosecond pulse generation to imaging with rescattered electrons. Analogous processes govern strong-field electron emission from nanostructures, where long wavelength radiation and large local field enhancements hold the promise for producing electrons with substantially higher energies, allowing for higher resolution time-resolved imaging. Here we report on the use of single-cycle terahertz pulses to drive electron emission from unbiased nano-tips. Energies exceeding 5 keV are observed, substantially greater than previously attained at higher drive frequencies. Despite large differences in the magnitude of the respective local fields, we find that the maximum electron energies are only weakly dependent on the tip radius, for 10 nmemission is predicted to be confined to a single burst, potentially enabling a variety of applications. PMID:27830701

  8. Synthesis of Poly(phenyltriazolylcarboxylate)s with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics by Metal-Free 1,3-Dipolar Polycycloaddition of Phenylpropiolate and Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Chi, Weiwen; Liu, Ruimin; Li, Hongkun; Li, Yongfang; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Two soluble poly(phenyltriazolylcarboxylate)s (PPTCs) with high molecular weights (M w up to 26 800) are synthesized by the metal-free 1,3-dipolar polycycloadditions of 4,4'-isopropylidenediphenyl diphenylpropiolate (1) and tetraphenylethene-containing diazides (2) in dimethylformamide at 150 °C for 12 h in high yields (up to 93%). The resultant polymers are soluble in common organic solvents and are thermally stable with 5% weight loss temperatures higher than 375 °C. The PPTCs are nonemissive in solutions, but become highly luminescent upon aggregation, showing a phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission. Their aggregates can be used as fluorescent chemosensors for high-sensitivity detection of explosives. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Physico-chemical characterisation of particulate heavy metals from municipal solid waste incinerator emissions and their contributions to ambient air quality. Case of Toulon MSWI (South of France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Floch, M.

    2004-07-01

    The aims of this study are the physico-chemical characterisation, the apportionment and the following of particulate heavy metals from MSWI emissions. Various methods (in situ data treatment, unmixing models and codes, UNMIX or CMB, sequential extractions and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) agree in the following: - identification of the MSWI source in two profiles (Zn - Ca and Ba - Cu - Fe - Zn - Pb - Ca); - estimation of its contribution of up to 25% of the total sources contribution; - showing the seasonal variability in term of profile and contribution of this source; - suggest the potential of emitted elements to enter the food chain; This EXAFS first approach on atmospheric particulate matter shows that zinc and lead are in an atomic environment with calcium, silicon and aluminum. In spite of disputable conclusions, isotopic lead ratios define a 'MSWI' end-member and confirm that the town-center of Toulon is outside the MSWI plume influence. (author)

  10. Stable luminescent metal-organic frameworks as dual-functional materials to encapsulate ln(3+) ions for white-light emission and to detect nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Bao, Shao-Juan; Li, Jing; Su, Zhong-Min; He, Wen-Wen; Fu, Qiang; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2015-04-06

    A stable porous carbazole-based luminescent metal-organic framework, NENU-522, was successfully constructed. It is extremely stable in air and acidic/basic aqueous solutions, which provides the strategy for luminescent material encapsulation of Ln(3+) ions with tunable luminescence for application in light emission. More importantly, Ln(3+)@NENU-522 can emit white light by encapsulating different molar ratios of Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions. Additionally, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 is found to be useful as a fluorescent indicator for the qualitative and quantitative detection of nitroaromatic explosives with different numbers of -NO2 groups, and the concentrations of complete quenching are about 2000, 1000, and 80 ppm for nitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, respectively. Meanwhile, Tb(3+)@NENU-522 displays high selectivity and recyclability in the detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  11. Bioinspired systems for metal-ion sensing: new emissive peptide probes based on benzo[d]oxazole derivatives and their gold and silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Elisabete; Genovese, Damiano; Juris, Riccardo; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Capelo, José Luis; Raposo, M Manuela M; Costa, Susana P G; Prodi, Luca; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2011-09-19

    Seven new bioinspired chemosensors (2-4 and 7-10) based on fluorescent peptides were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR, melting point, matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and IR and UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy. The interaction with transition- and post-transition-metal ions (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Ag(+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), and Fe(3+)) has been explored by absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF-MS. The reported fluorescent peptide systems, introducing biological molecules in the skeleton of the probes, enhance their sensitivity and confer them strong potential for applications in biological fields. Gold and silica nanoparticles functionalized with these peptides were also obtained. All nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Stable gold nanoparticles (diameter 2-10 nm) bearing ligands 1 and 4 were obtained by common reductive synthesis. Commercial silica nanoparticles were decorated at their surface using compounds 8-10, linked through a silane spacer. The same chemosensors were also taken into aqueous solutions through their dispersion in the outer layer of silica core/poly(ethylene glycol) shell nanoparticles. In both cases, these complex nanoarchitectures behaved as new sensitive materials for Ag(+) and Hg(2+) in water. The possibility of using these species in this solvent is particularly valuable because the impact on human health of heavy- and transition-metal-ion pollution is very severe, and all analytical and diagnostics investigations involve a water environment.

  12. The nature of the interstellar medium of the starburst low-metallicity galaxy Haro 11: a multi-phase model of the infrared emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, D.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Abel, N.; Hony, S.; Galliano, F.; Baes, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; Galametz, M.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Parkin, T. J.; Rémy, A.; Sauvage, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Wilson, C. D.; Wu, R.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The low-metallicity interstellar medium (ISM) is profoundly different from that of normal systems, being clumpy with low dust abundance and little CO-traced molecular gas. Yet many dwarf galaxies in the nearby universe are actively forming stars. As the complex ISM phases are spatially mixed with each other, detailed modeling is needed to understand the gas emission and subsequent composition and structure of the ISM. Aims: Our goal is to describe the multi-phase ISM of the infrared bright low-metallicity galaxy Haro 11, dissecting the photoionised and photodissociated gas components. Methods: We present observations of the mid-infrared and far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines obtained with the Spitzer/IRS and Herschel/PACS spectrometers. We use the spectral synthesis code Cloudy to methodically model the ionised and neutral gas from which these lines originate. Results: We find that the mid- and far-infrared lines account for ~1% of the total infrared luminosity LTIR, acting as major coolants of the gas. Haro 11 is undergoing a phase of intense star formation, as traced by the brightest line, [O iii] 88 μm, with L [O III] /LTIR ~ 0.3%, and high ratios of [Ne iii]/[Ne ii] and [S iv]/[S iii]. Due to their different origins, the observed lines require a multi-phase modeling comprising: a compact H ii region, dense fragmented photodissociation regions (PDRs), a diffuse extended low-ionisation/neutral gas which has a volume filling factor of at least 90%, and porous warm dust in proximity to the stellar source. For a more realistic picture of the ISM of Haro 11 we would need to model the clumpy source and gas structures. We combine these 4 model components to explain the emission of 17 spectral lines, investigate the global energy balance of the galaxy through its spectral energy distribution, and establish a phase mass inventory. While the ionic emission lines of Haro 11 essentially originate from the dense H ii region component, a diffuse low

  13. Effects of Alumina Nano Metal Oxide Blended Palm Stearin Methyl Ester Bio-Diesel on Direct Injection Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, K.; Kumar, B. Sudheer Prem; Reddy, K. Vijaya Kumar; Charan Kumar, S.; Kumar, K. Ravi

    2017-08-01

    The Present Investigation was carried out to study the effect of Alumina Metal Oxide (Al2O3) Nano Particles as additive for Palm Stearin Methyl Ester Biodiesel (B 100) and their blends as an alternate fuel in four stroke single cylinder water cooled, direct injection diesel engine. Alumina Nano Particles has high calorific value and relatively high thermal conductivity (30-1 W m K-1) compare to diesel, which helps to promote more combustion in engines due to their higher thermal efficiency. In the experimentation Al2O3 were doped in various proportions with the Palm Stearin Methyl Ester Biodiesel (B-100) using an ultrasonicator and a homogenizer with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as the cationic surfactant. The test were performed on a Kirsloskar DI diesel engine at constant speed of 1500 rpm using different Nano Biodiesel Fuel blends (psme+50 ppm, psme+150 ppm, and psme+200 ppm) and results were compared with those of neat conventional diesel and Palm Stearin Methyl Ester Bio diesel. It was observed that for Nano Biodiesel Fuel blend (psme+50ppm) there is an significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and Nox emissions compared to diesel and the brake thermal efficiency for (psme+50ppm) was almost same as diesel.

  14. The application and comparison of several chemometric methods of excitation-emission matrix spectra in studying the interactions of metal complexes with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fang; Zhang Qianqian; Wang Weiguo; Zhu Chenjian; Wang Xiulin

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of fs DNA and two metal complexes [Cu(phen)SO 4 ].2H 2 O and [Ni(phen)SO 4 ].2H 2 O were explored by several chemometric methods, including parallel factor (PARAFAC), singular value decomposition-least squares (SVD-LS), and singular value decomposition-nonnegative least squares (SVD-NNLS) of excitation-emission matrix spectra (EEMs). The applications of SVD-LS and SVD-NNLS in this domain have been discussed. Rayleigh scatter part is avoided by ordered zero and reconstructed by linear interpolation. The importance of avoiding Rayleigh scatter has also been discussed. All the three methods do well in qualitative analysis. SVD-LS does best in present small changes of ethidium bromide (EB). In order to get accurate results, PARAFAC and SVD-NNLS can be utilized together in quantitative analysis. All the three chemometric methods indicate that the DNA binding modes of [Cu(phen)SO 4 ].2H 2 O are hydrogen bond effect and intercalation, while intercalation is the only DNA binding mode for [Ni(phen)SO 4 ].2H 2 O. These results are verified by the electronic absorption and emission fluorescence spectra. Just like PARAFAC, both SVD-LS and SVD-NNLS are proven to be convenient and convincing in studying the interactions between nucleic acids and complexes

  15. Madelung's potentials structure of X-ray emission spectra, and reactivity of alkali metal metavanadates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, V.V.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tskhaj, V.A.; Cherkashenko, V.M. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Khimii)

    1983-07-01

    Madelung constants of ionic sublattices, describing the dependence of Madelung potentials on ionic charges in crystallographically non-equivalent V, O and M positions, were calculated for metavanadates MVO/sub 3/ (M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs). Semiempirical interpretation of the fine structure and shifts of intensity maximums of X-ray VKsub(..beta..''..beta..sup(5))- and VLsub(..cap alpha..)-emission spectra and X-ray spectral assessment of the degree of chemical bond ionicity in metavanadate oxy-vanadium sublattice are given. The reactivity of these compounds during their interaction with vanadium pentoxide and the activity of different ions in this process were considered.

  16. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to "projectile molecular effects" (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  17. Experimental Study on the Sensitive Emission Lines Intensities of Metal Samples Using Laser Ablation Technique and Its Comparison to Arc Discharge Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Susilowati

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study has been carried out to measure the sensitive emission lines intensities of several metal samples (copper, zinc, silver, gold, gallium, nickel, silicone and iron using laser ablation technique conducted in low pressure surrounding gas by means of Laser Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS and in atmospheric pressure region using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS. In both cases the Nd-YAG laser was operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm with pulse duration of 8 ns and its intensity tightly focused on the metal samples in helium or air as an ambient gas. The laser energy was fixed at approximately 100 mJ using a set of neutral density filters placed tilted in front of the laser output window. The result of the intensity measurements showed a good agreement which those obtained using arc discharge technique as shown in Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wavelength Table. Further evaluation of these results on the basis of standard deviation leads to the conclusion that LISPS is more favorable for quantitative analysis compared to LIBS. It was further shown that replacing air by helium gas at low pressure improve to some extent the LISPS reproducibility and sensitivity.

  18. Simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in foods by high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E; Prats, Soledad; Todolí, José L

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of the HPLC-ICP-AES coupling for the simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in a single chromatographic run has been demonstrated in the present work. Five saccharides, glucose, fructose, sucrose, sorbitol, and lactose; five carboxylic acids, citric, tartaric, malic, lactic, and acetic; and three alcohols, glycerol, ethanol, and methanol, have been determined. A H+ cation exchange column has been used to separate these compounds. The chromatograms have been obtained by monitoring the carbon emission signal at 193.09 nm. The results obtained by HPLC-ICP-AES have been compared against those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., refractive index, UV, and photodyode array detectors). The HPLC-ICP-AES method has shown the following features: (i) organic compounds and metals can be simultaneously determined; (ii) the detection method is universal; (iii) for nonvolatile organic compounds, a complete calibration line can be obtained from a single injection; and (iv) it provides absolute limits of detection similar to or lower than those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., on the order of several tens of nanograms of organic compound). The methodology has been validated through the analysis of food samples such as juices, isotonic beverages, wines, and a certified nonfat milk powder sample.

  19. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in oxygen sensitive emission from hybrid Langmuir–Blodgett films of amphiphilic iridium complexes with the exfoliated nanosheets using a metal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Ryotaro; Yamada, Tetsuya; Yudate, Shinji; Kadowaki, Kazunori; Sato, Hisako

    2018-03-01

    Cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes are attracting extensive attention due to their high emission properties in the visible region. Oxygen sensitive photoluminescence (PL) emissions from single- and multi-layered Ir(III) Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films are measured. The single-layered LB film on a non-aluminum coated glass substrate shows oxygen sensitive PL emission but its intensity is very weak. In contrast, the multi-layered LB film shows higher intensity but their oxygen sensitivity is lower than that of the single-layered sample. To break the trade-off between intensity and sensitivity, PL characteristics from the LB film on an aluminum-coated glass substrate are investigated. The PL emission from the LB film on the metal layer show higher intensity and good oxygen sensitivity. The mechanism of the emission enhancement is also discussed in this paper.

  20. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1-4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m(2)) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m(2)) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m(2)) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick, E-mail: mark.taylor@mq.edu.au; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-15

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m{sup 2}) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m{sup 2}) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m{sup 2}) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust.

  2. Effect of metal stress on the thermal infrared emission of soybeans: A greenhouse experiment - Possible utility in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R.; Schwaller, M. R.; Foy, C. D.; Weidner, J. R.; Schnetzler, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Manganese-sensitive forest and manganese-tolerant lee soybean cultivars were subjected to differential manganese stress in loring soil in a greenhouse experiment. Leaf temperature measurements were made using thermistors for forest and lee. Manganese-stressed plants had higher leaf temperatures than control plants in both forest and lee. Results of this experiment have potential applications in metal stress detection using remote sensing thermal infrared data over large areas of vegetation. This technique can be useful in reconnaissance mineral exploration in densely-vegetated regions where conventional ground-based methods are of little help.

  3. Standard practice for examination of liquid-Filled atmospheric and Low-pressure metal storage tanks using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of new and in-service aboveground storage tanks of the type used for storage of liquids. 1.2 This practice will detect acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. For flat-bottom tanks these areas will generally include the sidewalls (and roof if pressure is applied above the liquid level). The examination may not detect flaws on the bottom of flat-bottom tanks unless sensors are located on the bottom. 1.3 This practice may require that the tank experience a load that is greater than that encountered in normal use. The normal contents of the tank can usually be used for applying this load. 1.4 This practice is not valid for tanks that will be operated at a pressure greater than the examination pressure. 1.5 It is not necessary to drain or clean the tank before performing this examination. 1.6 This practice applies to tanks made of carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum and oth...

  4. Exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process: part 1--exposure technique and external exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P; Havlicek, P; Steiners, M; Holzinger, K; Reisgen, U; Kraus, T; Gube, M

    2013-01-01

    Studies concerning welding fume-related adverse health effects in welders are hampered by the heterogeneity of workplace situations, resulting in complex and non-standardized exposure conditions. In order to carry out welding fume exposure studies under controlled and standardized conditions, the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory was developed. This laboratory consists of an emission room, in which welding fume is produced, and an exposure room in which human subjects are exposed to these fumes. Both rooms are connected by a ventilation system which allows the welding fume concentration to be regulated. Particle mass concentration was measured with a TEOM microbalance and the particle number-size distribution using a Grimm SMPS device. In a study, which is the subject of this paper, it has been shown that welding fume concentration can easily be regulated between 1 and about 3 mg m(-3). The chosen concentration can be kept constant for more than 8 h. However, transport of the particles from the emission room into the exposure room leads to a change in particle size distribution, which is probably due to coagulation of the fraction of smallest particles. The Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory is suitable for controlled exposure studies with human subjects.

  5. Metais pesados em plantas de milho cultivadas em Latossolos repetidamente tratados com biossólido Heavy metals in corn grown on oxisols continuously amended with biosolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rosa Martins dos Anjos

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A presença de metais pesados em biossólidos é motivo de preocupação quando do uso agrícola desse resíduo em função da possibilidade de absorção desses metais pelas plantas crescendo nesse solo. A fitodisponibilidade de metais pesados, em solos repetidamente tratados com biossólido, foi avaliada num experimento em vasos de 0,5 m³, contendo LATOSSOLO AMARELO Distrófico (LAd e LATOSSOLO VERMELHO Distrófico (LVd. O experimento foi montado no delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com quatro tratamentos (LAd+lodo, LAd, LVd+lodo e LVd e quatro repetições utilizando milho como planta teste. Incorporou-se biossólido, proveniente da Estação de Tratamento de Esgotos ETE-SABESP-Barueri, São Paulo, na camada 0-0,2 m dos solos durante um período de até doze meses antes do plantio, numa quantidade total correspondente a 388 Mg ha-1, base seca. Antes da semeadura, os tratamentos testemunhas receberam calcário e adubação NPK, porém houve necessidade de adubação NPK nos tratamentos com biossólido, durante o desenvolvimento das plantas. As análises do tecido vegetal foram feitas por digestão nitro-perclórica, seguindo-se a quantificação dos metais por absorção atômica, nas seguintes partes da plantas: pendão, folha diagnose, folhas ao final do ciclo, colmo, bainha, grãos, sabugo e palha. As sucessivas aplicações do biossólido, em doses correspondentes a 78 Mg ha-1, não proporcionaram aumento de produtividade. Foi observado aumento dos teores de Cu e Zn nas plantas, evidenciando a disponibilidade desses metais adicionados via biossólido. Não foi observada disponibilidade de Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni e Pb para as plantas de milho.The presence of heavy metals in sewage sludge amended soils can cause concern due to the possibility of the absorption of these metals by plants growing on these soils. The availability of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn to corn plants in soils continuously treated with biosolids (sewage sludge was evaluated by an

  6. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  7. Influence of atmospheric emission from coal fuel cycle on the levels of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1983-07-01

    From the determination of Ra, Pb, Zn and Cd concentrations in air and various human tissues of inhabitants exposed to large industrial emissions as well as of those of other regions it could be seen that geographical distribution of these elements is rather related to local natural background factors than to industrial activity in the region. The concentrations of 226 Ra and Pb increased during the last century in precipitations in Southern Poland, but in the same time they decreased dramatically in the bones of the Polish population. The contemporary Polish bones contain about 10 times less Pb and 2 times less 226 Ra than 11th to 19th century Polish bones and 18th century Peruvian bones. The decrease of 226 Ra content probably results from the introduction of drinking-water treatment systems which remove majority of 226 Ra and from decrease in consumption of cereals, which are principal sources of 226 Ra intake in the diet

  8. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  9. Benchmark results and theoretical treatments for valence-to-core x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition metal compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Kas, Joshua J.; Govind, Niranjan; Schwartz, Craig P.; Pemmaraju, Sri; Prendergast, David G.

    2017-09-01

    We report measurement of the valence-to-core (VTC) region of the K-shell x-ray emission spectra from several Zn and Fe inorganic compounds, and their critical comparison with several existing theoretical treatments. We find generally good agreement between the respective theories and experiment, and in particular find an important admixture of dipole and quadrupole character for Zn materials that is much weaker in Fe-based systems. These results on materials whose simple crystal structures should not, a prior, pose deep challenges to theory, will prove useful in guiding the further development of DFT and time-dependent DFT methods for VTC-XES predictions and their comparison to experiment.

  10. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  12. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy compared with conventional plasma optical emission techniques for the analysis of metals - A review of applications and analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, A.

    2017-08-01

    This review is focused on a comparison of LIBS with the two most common plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) techniques for analysis of metals; spark OES and glow discharge (GD) OES. It is shown that these two techniques have only minor differences in analytical performance. An important part of the paper reviews a direct comparison of the analytical figures of merit for bulk analysis of steels using spark and LIBS sources. The comparison was carried out using one instrument with interchangeable sources, eliminating differences related to the optical system and detectors. It was found that the spark provides slightly better analytical figures of merit. The spark analysis is considerably faster, the simple design of the spark stand has enabled complete automation, both properties of great importance in the metallurgical industry for routine analysis. The analysis of non-metallic inclusions (NMI) with spark and LIBS is presented, in the case of the spark this has become known as Pulse Distribution Analysis (PDA). A very significant difference between the techniques is that the electrical spark typically evaporates 100 times more material than a single laser pulse, resulting in complete evaporation of an NMI present in the evaporated metal. The major advantage of LIBS is that it is localised with very good lateral resolution. The major advantages of spark is that it is much faster (can be done simultaneous with the bulk analysis) and easier to quantify. Compositional Depth Profiling (CDP) is compared for GD-OES and LIBS. It is shown that for applications where GD-OES is well suited, e.g. coated metallic sheet, GD-OES still performs slightly better than LIBS. Similar to the case of NMI analysis, the major advantage of LIBS is the great lateral resolution. This allows elemental surface mapping, as well as CDP of very small areas on μm scale. One further advantage of LIBS is that samples of almost any material, shape and size can be analysed, whereas GD-OES has

  13. Electronic Reporting of Air Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulations require affected sources to perform emissions source tests, conduct continuous emissions monitoring, and submit compliance and emissions reports. This site provides technical resources and access for providing such submissions.

  14. Evaluation of heavy metals in atmospheric emissions from automotive industry by total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Weber Neto, Jose, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de, E-mail: aesvives@unimep.b [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo

    2009-07-01

    This study had as goal to determine heavy metals and other elements (Ba, Br, Ca, Pb, Cl, Cr, Sr, Fe, Mn, Ni, K, Si, Ti and Zn) in atmospheric pollutants generated by an automotive industry located in the city of Engenheiro Coelho, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The sampling and sample preparation procedures were based on methods established by the Company of Sanitation and Technology (CETESB L9.234) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA - Method 29). The analysis was performed at XRF Beamline (D09B-XRF) in the Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (Campinas/SP). A white beam of synchrotron radiation was used for sample and standard excitation which were irradiated by 100 seconds. For X-ray lines detection, a Ge (HP) detector with 150 eV of resolution at 5.9 keV was employed. For zinc, iron, barium, calcium and potassium, the values obtained were in the range of 30 mg/Nm{sup 3} and, for other elements, the concentrations were approximately 1 mg/Nm{sup 3}. The sum of As, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Zn concentration was compared with the limits established by CONAMA 264/1999 and SEMA 041/2002 resolutions (7.0 mg/Nm{sup 3}) and it was observed that, for all samples, sums are higher than the permissive value mainly due to the high concentration of zinc. Detection limits for SR-TXRF technique were 0.10 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Pb and 0.02 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Zn. (author)

  15. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  16. Evaluation of heavy metals in atmospheric emissions from automotive industry by total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Weber Neto, Jose; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de

    2009-01-01

    This study had as goal to determine heavy metals and other elements (Ba, Br, Ca, Pb, Cl, Cr, Sr, Fe, Mn, Ni, K, Si, Ti and Zn) in atmospheric pollutants generated by an automotive industry located in the city of Engenheiro Coelho, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The sampling and sample preparation procedures were based on methods established by the Company of Sanitation and Technology (CETESB L9.234) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA - Method 29). The analysis was performed at XRF Beamline (D09B-XRF) in the Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (Campinas/SP). A white beam of synchrotron radiation was used for sample and standard excitation which were irradiated by 100 seconds. For X-ray lines detection, a Ge (HP) detector with 150 eV of resolution at 5.9 keV was employed. For zinc, iron, barium, calcium and potassium, the values obtained were in the range of 30 mg/Nm 3 and, for other elements, the concentrations were approximately 1 mg/Nm 3 . The sum of As, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Zn concentration was compared with the limits established by CONAMA 264/1999 and SEMA 041/2002 resolutions (7.0 mg/Nm 3 ) and it was observed that, for all samples, sums are higher than the permissive value mainly due to the high concentration of zinc. Detection limits for SR-TXRF technique were 0.10 μg/Nm 3 for Pb and 0.02 μg/Nm 3 for Zn. (author)

  17. Analysis of six heavy metals in Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Kee-Yeon; Zhu, Qiang; Safavi, Kamran; Gu, Yu; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Chang, Seok Woo

    2013-12-01

    Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a mineral aggregate newly developed for perforation repair, root end filling and pulp capping. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in Ortho MTA and ProRoot MTA. A total of 0.2 g of each MTA was digested using a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids and filtered. Six heavy metals in the resulting filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (n = 5). The results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in Ortho MTA were 0.10, 7.73, 49.51, 2.58, 0.82 and 10.09 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in ProRoot MTA were 0.16, 9.38, 1438.11, 74.51, 18.98 and 4.05 p.p.m., respectively. In conclusion, Ortho MTA had lower levels of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni than ProRoot MTA. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2012 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  18. Exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process: part 3--biological effect markers and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P; Bischof, K; Siry, L; Bertram, J; Schettgen, T; Reisgen, U; Kraus, T; Gube, M

    2013-01-01

    Metal active gas welding (MAG) is a widely-used welding technique resulting in high emissions of welding fume particles. This study investigated whether short-term exposure to these fume particles results in changes in lung function and early stages of inflammatory reactions. Twelve healthy, young male subjects were exposed to MAG fumes for 6 h with three different exposure concentrations in a three-fold cross-over study design. Exposure was performed in the "Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory" under controlled conditions with constant fume concentration. Fume concentrations were 0, 1, and 2.5 mg m(-3) in randomized order. Before and after each exposure, spirometry, and impulse oscillometry were performed and breath condensate samples were collected in order to quantify inflammatory markers like Nitrate, Nitrite, Nitrotyrosine, Hydroxyprolin and Malondialdehyde. A significant dependency on the exposure concentration could not be established for any of the endpoint parameters. In healthy, young subjects neither changes in spirometry nor changes in inflammatory markers measured in exhaled breath condensate could be detected after short-term exposure.

  19. Polution of the environment by heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houtman, J.P.W.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is given of the problems caused by pollution of the environment by heavy metals and the important role played by nuclear examination methods such as activation analysis and particle induced X-ray emission. A number of examples taken from work initiated by the interuniversitair Reactor Instituut, demonstrate that this research should be continued and extended, particularly in relation to the expected increase in the use of coal for energy generation in electricity centres. (C.F.)

  20. Continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1 improves myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with ischemic heart disease assessed by positron emission tomography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Lun; Wu, Yen-Wen; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Tseng, Chuen-Den; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Lee, Chii-Ming; Tzen, Kai-Yuan

    2011-08-01

    Recent investigation has demonstrated that prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) therapy increased capillary density in explanted hearts. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) is reliable for non-invasive measurement of myocardial blood flow and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PGE(1) therapy during 4 weeks on reduction of myocardial perfusion abnormalities and increase of MPR in the patients with ischemic heart disease. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 11 patients who had symptomatic heart failure and documented myocardial ischemia to 4 weeks intravenous infusion of PGE(1) (2.5 ng/kg/min; 8 patients, age 60 ± 13 years) or saline (3 patients, age 57 ± 13 years). Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET scans at rest and during adenosine stress were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment completion. Quantitative size/severity of perfusion defects and MPR change from baseline to follow-up PET were determined using a 17-segment model. Compared with the control group, baseline MPR in the PGE(1) group was significantly lower (1.96 ± 0.78 vs. 2.71 ± 0.73; P ischemic heart disease. This may be an attractive therapeutic approach for no-option patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1 improves myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with ischemic heart disease assessed by positron emission tomography. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chilun; Wu Yenwen; Wang Shoeishen; Tseng Chuenden; Chiang Futien; Lee Chiiming; Tzen Kaiyuan; Hsu Kwanlih

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigation has demonstrated that prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) therapy increased capillary density in explanted hearts. Dynamic 13 N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) is reliable for non-invasive measurement of myocardial blood flow and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PGE 1 therapy during 4 weeks on reduction of myocardial perfusion abnormalities and increase of MPR in the patients with ischemic heart disease. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 11 patients who had symptomatic heart failure and documented myocardial ischemia to 4 weeks intravenous infusion of PGE 1 (2.5 ng/kg/min; 8 patients, age 60±13 years) or saline (3 patients, age 57±13 years). Dynamic 13 N-ammonia PET scans at rest and during adenosine stress were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment completion. Quantitative size/severity of perfusion defects and MPR change from baseline to follow-up PET were determined using a 17-segment model. Compared with the control group, baseline MPR in the PGE 1 group was significantly lower (1.96±0.78 vs. 2.71±0.73; P 1 infusion (1.96±0.78 to 2.16±0.77; P 1 infusion sustained MPR improvement in patients with ischemic heart disease. This may be an attractive therapeutic approach for no-option patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  2. Noble metal recycling. Project 2: Optimization of discontinuous thermal processes (emission reduction). Final report; Edelmetallrecycling. Teilvorhaben 2: Weiterentwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik bei diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozessen (Emissionsminderung). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, G.; Berger, R.

    2000-10-01

    A batch operated incineration process, used for the recycling of precious metals is described in the report. The development of a new combined pyrolysis/oxidation Process is the main focus of the work. This new process has several remarkable advantages compared to traditionally used techniques. The optimisation of the process with a modern fuzzy based control technique is described in detail. The emissions of the process were reduced considerably applying the new process and the innovative control technique. Furthermore the layout of several components of the new process can be reduced in the future. The developed techniques can also be applied in other thermal processes, especially batch processes. Additionally the application of catalysts for PCDD/PCDF reduction in the flue gas upstream and downstream of the filter was investigated. Whereas the catalyst performed well, as expected, downstream of the filter, no acceptable operation was possible upstream of the filter. As the reheating downstream the filter is economically not feasible the application of catalysts is not applicable for the describe process. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit beschreibt einen diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozess, der zur Rueckgewinnung von Edelmetallen eingesetzt wird. Der Schwerpunkt der Arbeit liegt auf der Entwicklung eines neuartigen kombinierten Pyrolyse/Oxidations-Prozesses, der gegenueber den traditionell eingesetzten Anlagen grosse Vorteile aufweist. Die Optimierung dieses Prozesses mit Hilfe modernster Fuzzy-Regelungstechnik wird detailliert beschrieben. Mit dem neuen Verfahren und den innovativen Regelungstechniken konnten die Emissionen des Prozesses merklich gesenkt werden, ohne den Energiebedarf negativ zu beeinflussen. Ausserdem koennen zukuenftige Anlagen kleiner ausgelegt werden. Die entwickelten Verfahren koennen auch auf andere thermische Prozesse uebertragen werden. Weiterhin wurde der Einsatz von Katalysatoren zur PCDD/PCDF-Minderung im Rein- und Rohgas untersucht

  3. 1.9 W continuous-wave single transverse mode emission from 1060 nm edge-emitting lasers with vertically extended lasing area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. J., E-mail: jarez.miah@tu-berlin.de; Posilovic, K.; Kalosha, V. P.; Rosales, R.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kettler, T. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); PBC Lasers GmbH, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Skoczowsky, D. [PBC Lasers GmbH, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Pohl, J.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-10-13

    High-brightness edge-emitting semiconductor lasers having a vertically extended waveguide structure emitting in the 1060 nm range are investigated. Ridge waveguide (RW) lasers with 9 μm stripe width and 2.64 mm cavity length yield highest to date single transverse mode output power for RW lasers in the 1060 nm range. The lasers provide 1.9 W single transverse mode optical power under continuous-wave (cw) operation with narrow beam divergences of 9° in lateral and 14° (full width at half maximum) in vertical direction. The beam quality factor M{sup 2} is less than 1.9 up to 1.9 W optical power. A maximum brightness of 72 MWcm{sup −2}sr{sup −1} is obtained. 100 μm wide and 3 mm long unpassivated broad area lasers provide more than 9 W optical power in cw operation.

  4. Catalytic hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis liquids in batch and continuous set-ups using a bimetallic Ni-Cu catalyst with a high metal content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Wang; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Venderbosch, Robertus H.; Bykova, Maria V.; Khromova, Sofia A.; Yakovlev, Vadim A.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental study on the hydrotreatment of fast pyrolysis liquids is reported in both batch and continuous set-ups using a novel bimetallic Ni-Cu based catalyst with high Ni loading (up to 50%) prepared by a sol-gel method. The experiments were carried out in a wide temperature

  5. The first demonstration of room temperature stimulated emission from metal halides -its evidence in CsPbBr3 films

    OpenAIRE

    中西, 貴之; 高橋, 一彰; 斎藤, 忠昭; 近藤, 新一

    2005-01-01

    Photoluminescence from CsPbBr3 films prepared by crystallization from the amorphous phase is measured under N2 laser excitation. Stimulated emission due to free exaction-free exaction inelastic collision occurs not only at cryogenic temperature but also elevated temperatures. The intensity of the stimulated emission more rapidly increases with pumping intensity at room temperature than at 77K. The temperature dependence of the stimulated emission measured under 1100kW cm-2 pumping shows th...

  6. Measurement of cerebral blood flow using bolus inhalation of C15O2 and positron emission tomography: description of the method and its comparison with the C15O2 continuous inhalation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, I.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Heather, J.D.; Gibbs, J.M.; Rhodes, C.G.; Clark, J.C.; Jones, T.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes a rapid method for the regional measurement of cerebral blood flow using a single breath of C 15 O 2 and positron emission tomography. The technique is based on the bolus distribution principle and utilises a reference table for the calculation of flow. Seven subjects were studied using both this method and the C 15 O 2 continuous inhalation steady-state technique. The single-breath method gave flow values 20% higher than those obtained using the steady-state method. A simulation study was performed in an attempt to define the reasons for the difference between the two techniques. Estimations were made of identified sources of error in the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow using the single-breath technique and compared with results from a similar study previously described for the steady-state technique. However, further comparative studies will be necessary to satisfactorily explain the difference between both techniques

  7. Dicarboxylic acids, metals and isotopic compositions of C and N in atmospheric aerosols from inland China: implications for dust and coal burning emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10, metals, elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and stable isotopic compositions of total carbon (TC and total nitrogen (TN were determined for PM10 samples collected at three urban and one suburban sites of Baoji, an inland city of China, during winter and spring 2008. Oxalic acid (C2 was the dominant diacid, followed by succinic (C4 and malonic (C3 acids. Total diacids in the urban and suburban areas were 1546±203 and 1728±495 ng m−3 during winter and 1236±335 and 1028±193 ng m−3 during spring. EC in the urban and the suburban atmospheres were 17±3.8 and 8.0±2.1 μg m−3 during winter and 20±5.9 and 7.1±2.7 μg m−3 during spring, while OC at the urban and suburban sites were 74±14 and 51±7.9 μg m−3 in winter and 51±20 and 23±6.1 μg m−3 in spring. Secondary organic carbon (SOC accounted for 38±16% of OC in winter and 28±18% of OC in spring, suggesting an enhanced photochemical production of secondary organic aerosols in winter under an inversion layer development. Total metal elements in winter and spring were 34±10 and 61±27 μg m−3 in the urban air and 18±7 and 32±23 μg m−3 in the suburban air. A linear correlation (r2>0.8 in winter and r2>0.6 in spring was found between primary organic carbon (POC and Ca2+/Fe, together with a strong dependence of pH value of sample extracts on water-soluble inorganic carbon, suggesting fugitive dust as an important source of the airborne particles. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, sulfate, and Pb in the samples well correlated each other (r2>0.6 in winter, indicating an importance of emissions from coal burning for house heating. Stable carbon isotope compositions of TC (δ13C became higher with an increase

  8. Continuous auditing & continuous monitoring : Continuous value?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillo, Rutger; Weigand, Hans; Espana, S; Ralyte, J; Souveyet, C

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in information technology, new laws and regulations and rapidly changing business conditions have led to a need for more timely and ongoing assurance with effectively working controls. Continuous Auditing (CA) and Continuous Monitoring (CM) technologies have made this possible by

  9. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the

  10. Continuous leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, S.; Yamashita, T.; Kameda, M.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described which comprises sprinkling continuously and uniformly a solvent selected from an acid, an alkali and an organic solvent on the surface of each of a plurality of multi-staged, moving continuous unit layers formed of pulverized uranium ore fed in a predetermined amount from a multi-staged, metering, continuous feed apparatus. Layers composed of a uniform mixture of the pulverized ore and solvent are thermally cured and then subjected to repulping and solid-liquid separation to recover a pregnant liquor containing the extracted metal component

  11. Optical properties and applications of dendrimer-metal nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, T.; Varnavski, O.; Wang, Y.

    The use of novel nanostructured materials for optical applications continues to be an important issue for the creation of new devices. New materials including metal nanoparticles have played an important role for applications in photonics, biology, as well as medicine. This review primarily concerns the use of one particular metal nanoparticle topology, dendrimer-metal nanocomposites. The focus of this review is to describe the optical properties of dendrimer-metal nanocomposites as well as functionalized dendrimer-metal nanocomposites. The description of various synthetic methodologies to produce transition metal (Au, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Cu) dendrimer nanocomposites as well as lanthanide ion-cored dendrimers are presented in this review, with further details regarding the basic characterization of these systems. The experimental procedures of the optical measurements used to probe the steady-state and time-resolved dynamics in these novel nanoparticle architectures are provided. Analysis of optical properties of dendrimer nanocomposites (DNCs) includes a description of the characterization of the metal nanoparticles as well as the size and distribution of metal nanoparticles formed by use of organic dendrimer template synthetic procedures (such as PAMAM). The non-linear transmission properties of certain dendrimer-metal nanocomposites show promising behaviour, which may be useful for applications involving eye and sensor protection. Reports of non-linear transmission properties of both Au and Ag dendrimer nanocomposites are discussed. Metal nanoparticles have also been suggested as useful materials for biological fluorescence imaging and sensing applications. However, it is well known that the efficiency of metal emission is very small. Recent measurements using ultra-fast spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence upconversion) have shed new light on this matter in metal nanoparticles and in dendrimer-metal nanocomposites. Dendrimer-metal nanocomposites have been used to

  12. Characterization and Quantification of Hexavalent Chromium and Other Toxic Metals in the Air of Communities Surrounding Metal Processing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikelnaya, O.; Polidori, A.; Low, J.

    2017-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and other toxic metals are often emitted during metal forging, cutting, grinding and plating operations. In the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) many of such operations are conducted by relatively small facilities intertwined within residential communities in the cities of Paramount, Compton, Long Beach and Anaheim. In response to the city of Paramount community members' complaints of "metallic" odors, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) initiated a local air sampling study for toxic metals, which found elevated Cr(VI) and nickel levels in the community downwind of selected metal processing facilities. SCAQMD worked with these facilities to reduce the emissions from their metal grinding operations, which resulted in substantial reduced nickel levels, but did not reduce Cr(VI) levels. In order to fully understand the source(s) of these emissions, SCAQMD has been deploying portable samplers for Cr(VI) monitoring throughout the city of Paramount since October 2016. During this presentation we will discuss the results of more than a year of Cr(VI) analyses of samplers collected throughout the City of Paramount, as well as data from a continuous metal monitor deployed at one of the sites. We will also discuss options and challenges for expanding of Cr(VI) monitoring to other communities in the SCAB that are adjacent to metal forging and grinding operations; and explore emerging new technologies to address such monitoring challenges.

  13. High-Performance Flexible Thin-Film Transistors Based on Single-Crystal-like Silicon Epitaxially Grown on Metal Tape by Roll-to-Roll Continuous Deposition Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Yao, Yao; Dutta, Pavel; Galstyan, Eduard; Shervin, Shahab; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Pouladi, Sara; Sun, Sicong; Li, Yongkuan; Rathi, Monika; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-11-02

    Single-crystal-like silicon (Si) thin films on bendable and scalable substrates via direct deposition are a promising material platform for high-performance and cost-effective devices of flexible electronics. However, due to the thick and unintentionally highly doped semiconductor layer, the operation of transistors has been hampered. We report the first demonstration of high-performance flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) using single-crystal-like Si thin films with a field-effect mobility of ∼200 cm 2 /V·s and saturation current, I/l W > 50 μA/μm, which are orders-of-magnitude higher than the device characteristics of conventional flexible TFTs. The Si thin films with a (001) plane grown on a metal tape by a "seed and epitaxy" technique show nearly single-crystalline properties characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The realization of flexible and high-performance Si TFTs can establish a new pathway for extended applications of flexible electronics such as amplification and digital circuits, more than currently dominant display switches.

  14. Radiative parameters for multi-channel visible and near-infrared emission transitions of Sm3+ in heavy-metal-silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhai, Bin; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Hai

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel visible and near-infrared (NIR) emission transitions originating from 4G5/2 emitting state of Sm3+ in cadmium-aluminum-silicate (CAS) glasses with maximum-phonon-energy of ˜980 cm-1 have been investigated. Based on the measured absorption spectrum, the Judd-Ofelt parameters Ωt (t=2, 4, 6) are derived to be 2.87×10-20, 3.34×10-20 and 1.86×10-20 cm2, respectively. From the evaluated Judd-Ofelt parameters, the radiative parameters such as spontaneous emission probabilities (Arad), branching ratios (β), and radiative lifetime (τrad) are obtained from the 4G5/2 excited level to different lower energy levels. The efficient visible and NIR transition emissions have been observed in the Sm3+ doped CAS glasses, and the maximum stimulated emission cross-sections (σe-max) corresponding to emission peaks are calculated and demonstrated to lay in the same order of magnitude. The quantum efficiency of 4G5/2 level of Sm3+ has been derived to be 60%. Investigations on multi-channel radiative transition emissions originated from 4G5/2 level of Sm3+ in CAS glasses expose its potential applications in tunable laser, medical light source and NIR optoelectronic devices.

  15. Numerical Modelling of Metal/Flux Interface in a Continuous Casting Mould / Modelowanie Numeryczne Powierzchni Międzyfazowej Metal/Ciekły Żużel W Krystalizatorze Do Ciągłego Odlewania Stali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jowsa J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of liquid slag in the mould is one of the key research areas of the continuous steel casting process. Numerical simulations of steel casting in the mould equipped with submerged entry nozzle, intended for slab casting, have been carried out within the study. For modelling the behaviour of the interfaces of the liquid steel - liquid slag - air system, the VOF method was employed. In the conducted simulations, seven different procedures for the discretization of the interface of individual phases were tested. The computation results have revealed that the “entrapment” of fine slag portions into liquid steel occurs in the system under investigation; the cause of this phenomenon is explicated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz theory.

  16. Business continuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunhoelder, Gert

    2002-01-01

    This presentation deals with the following keypoints: Information Technology (IT) Business Continuity and Recovery essential for any business; lessons learned after Sept. 11 event; Detailed planning, redundancy and testing being the key elements for probability estimation of disasters

  17. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  18. Danish emission inventories for agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mette Hjorth; Albrektsen, Rikke; Gyldenkærne, Steen

    . This report contains a description of the emissions from the agricultural sector from 1985 to 2009. Furthermore, the report includes a detailed description of methods and data used to calculate the emissions, which is based on national methodologies as well as international guidelines. For the Danish...... emissions calculations and data management an Integrated Database model for Agricultural emissions (IDA) is used. The emission from the agricultural sector includes emission of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3), particulate matter (PM), non-methane volatile organic...... compounds (NMVOC) and other pollutants related to the field burning of agricultural residue such as NOx, CO2, CO, SO2, heavy metals, dioxin and PAH. The ammonia emission from 1985 to 2009 has decreased from 119 300 tonnes of NH3 to 73 800 tonnes NH3, corresponding to a 38 % reduction. The emission...

  19. Evaluation of the use of multiple lines for determination of metals in water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry with axial viewing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiavo, Daniela [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Trevizan, Lilian C. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CENA/USP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Pereira-Filho, Edenir R. [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: djan@ufscar.br

    2009-06-15

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometers (ICP OES) allow fast simultaneous measurements of several spectral lines for multiple elements. The combination of signal intensities of two or more emission lines for each element may bring such advantages as improvement of the precision, the minimization of systematic errors caused by spectral interferences and matrix effects. In this work, signal intensities for several spectral lines were combined for the determination of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Pb, and Zn in water. Afterwards, parameters for evaluation of the calibration model were calculated to select the combination of emission lines leading to the best accuracy (lowest values of PRESS-Predicted error sum of squares and RMSEP-Root means square error of prediction). Limits of detection (LOD) obtained using multiple lines were 7.1, 0.5, 4.4, 0.042, 3.3, 28 and 6.7 {mu}g L{sup - 1} (n = 10) for Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn, respectively, in the presence of concomitants. On the other hand, the LOD established for the most intense emission line were 16, 0.7, 8.4, 0.074, 23, 26 and 9.6 {mu}g L{sup - 1} (n = 10) for these same elements in the presence of concomitants. The accuracy of the developed procedure was demonstrated using water certified reference material. The use of multiple lines improved the sensitivity making feasible the determination of these analytes according to the target values required for the current environmental legislation for water samples and it was also demonstrated that measurements in multiple lines can also be employed as a tool to verify the accuracy of an analytical procedure in ICP OES.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction by positron emission tomography: theoretical study and experimental evidence of cerebral blood flow measurement with the C15O2 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinling, M.

    1983-01-01

    The method of the continuous inhalation technique of oxygen-15 labelled CO 2 coupled with positron emission tomography for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (C.B.F.) is described. An indirect experimental verification that this technique allowed the measurement of C.B.F. has been carried out in baboons by showing the expected change in the measured parameter with variations in the PaCO 2 . A critical investigation of the C 15 O 2 model was performed. The amount of tracer present in the cerebral vascular pool has a negligible effect on C.B.F. value. The use of a mean brain-blood partition coefficient of water instead of that specific to gray or to white matter is commented upon, and its influence on the final C.B.F. value is studied. Lastly, the problem of the limited diffusion of water across the blood-brain-barrier is discussed. The study of the combined effects of gray-white mixing and limited wates extraction of the C.B.F. value shows that the C 15 O 2 technique tends to understimate real C.B.F., and that this error is more severe with high flows and even gray white mixing. These limitations do not depart from the possibility to estimate in the same brain locus not only C.B.F. but oxygen utilization as well by the consecutive inhalation of C 15 O 2 and 15 O 2 . The advantages of this possibility has already been shown in a number of clinical studies [fr

  1. Generation of spectrally-stable continuous-wave emission and ns pulses at 800 nm and 975 nm with a peak power of 4 W using a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a ridge-waveguide power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor based sources which emit high-power spectrally stable nearly diffraction-limited optical pulses in the nanosecond range are ideally suited for a lot of applications, such as free-space communications, metrology, material processing, seed lasers for fiber or solid state lasers, spectroscopy, LIDAR and frequency doubling. Detailed experimental investigations of 975 nm and 800 nm diode lasers based on master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) light sources are presented. The MOPA systems consist of distributed Bragg reflector lasers (DBR) as master oscillators driven by a constant current and ridge waveguide power amplifiers which can be driven DC and by current pulses. In pulse regime the amplifiers modulated with rectangular current pulses of about 5 ns width and a repetition frequency of 200 kHz act as optical gates, converting the continuous wave (CW) input beam emitted by the DBR lasers into a train of short optical pulses which are amplified. With these experimental MOPA arrangements no relaxation oscillations in the pulse power occur. With a seed power of about 5 mW at a wavelength of 973 nm output powers behind the amplifier of about 1 W under DC injection and 4 W under pulsed operation, corresponding to amplification factors of 200 (amplifier gain 23 dB) and 800 (gain 29 dB) respectively, are reached. At 800 nm a CW power of 1 W is obtained for a seed power of 40 mW. The optical spectra of the emission of the amplifiers exhibit a single peak at a constant wavelength with a line width 50 dB. The output beams are nearly diffraction limited with beam propagation ratios M2lat ~ 1.1 and M2ver ~ 1.2 up to 4 W pulse power.

  2. Experimental exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process--part II: biomonitoring of chromium and nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gube, Monika; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Bertram, Jens; Gerards, Kerstin; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the external exposure dose of chromium and nickel caused by a metal active gas welding process with a solid high-alloyed steel welding wire and inner exposure of subjects. In order to perform welding fume exposure under controlled and standardized conditions, the investigations were conducted in the "Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory". To perform biological monitoring of chromium and nickel, blood and urine samples of 12 healthy male non-smokers who never worked as welders were collected before and after a 6-h exposure to ambient air (0 mg/m(3)) and to welding fumes of a metal active gas welding process once with a concentration of the welding fume of 1 mg/m(3) and once with a concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3). Although the internal exposure to chromium and nickel in this study was comparatively low, the subjects showed significantly increased concentrations of these metals in urine after exposure to welding fume compared to the values at baseline. Moreover, the observed increase was significantly dose dependent for both of the substances. For the biological monitoring of chromium and nickel in urine of subjects exposed to welding fumes, a dependency on exposure dose was seen under standardized conditions after a single exposure over a period of 6 h. Thus, this study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between ambient and biological exposures from welding fumes and provides a good basis for evaluating future biological threshold values for these metals in welding occupation.

  3. Two 3D metal-organic frameworks as multi-functional materials to detect Fe3+ ions and nitroaromatic explosives and to encapsulate Ln3+ ions for white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing; Xu, Jianing; Qi, Hui; Sun, Jing; Chai, Juan; Jia, Jia; Jing, Shubo; Fan, Yong; Wang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely {[Zn3(L)2(4,4‧-bipy)(DMF)2]·2H2O}n(1) and {[Cd3(L)2(4,4‧-bipy)(H2O)2].2DMF}n(2) (4,4‧-bipy = 4,4‧-bipyridine, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), were solvothermally prepared based on a rigid tricarboxylic acid 3-(3,5-dicarboxylphenyl)-5-(3-carboxylphenyl)-1-H-1,2,4-triazole (H3L). X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that 1 and 2 are isostructural and both emit blue light. Notably, 1 exhibits good luminescent sensing for nitro-containing compounds and Fe3+ ions. In addition, the emission colors of 1 can be tuned from yellow to white and to blue by encapsulating different mole ratios of Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions and changing the excitation wavelength. A white emission with the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.331, 0.337), which fall within the white-light region, emerges upon excitation at 340 nm.

  4. Electron emission resulting from fast ion impact on thin metal foils: Implications of these data for development of track structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, R.D.; Drexler, C.G.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental information useful in improving and testing theoretical models of energy deposition and redistribution in particle-condensed phase media is discussed. An overview of information available from previous, and ongoing, studies of the electron emission from thin foils is presented and the need for doubly differential electron energy and angular distribution data stressed. Existing data are used to demonstrate that precisely known, and controllable, surface and bulk conditions of the condensed-phase media are required for experimental studies of this type. Work in progress and improvements planned for future studies at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are outlined.

  5. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 109 (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 106 (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 1012 (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min-1; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower

  6. Microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of transition metal ions doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots with tunable white-light emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Qiuhang; Zhang, Wanlu; Mei, Shiliang; He, Liangjie; Zhu, Jiatao; Chen, Guoping; Guo, Ruiqian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnSe-based QDs were formed via a microwave-assisted aqueous approach. • The stabilizer, ZnS coats and UV irradiation played a role in the PL enhancement. • Tunable white-light-emitting Mn:ZnSe QDs and Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized. • The formation mechanism of Cu,Mn:ZnSe QDs was clarified. • The corresponding CIE color coordinates of different PL spectra were obtained. - Abstract: Synthesis of bright white-light emitting Mn and Cu co-doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) (Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS) was reported. Water-soluble ZnSe-based QDs with Mn and Cu doping were prepared using a versatile hot-injection method in aqueous solution with a microwave-assisted approach. Influence of the Se/S ratio, stabilizer, refluxing time and the concentration of Cu/Mn dopant ions on the particle size and photoluminescence (PL) were investigated. The as-prepared QDs in the different stages of growth were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence spectrophotometer. It is found that these ZnSe-based QDs synthesized under mild conditions exhibit emission in the range of 390–585 nm. The PL quantum yield (QY) of the as-prepared water-soluble ZnSe QDs can be up to 24.3% after the UV-irradiation treatment. The band-gap emission of ZnSe is effectively restrained through Mn and Cu doping. The refluxing time influences the doping of not only Mn, but also Cu, which leads to the best refluxing time of Mn:ZnSe and the red-shift of the emission of Cu:ZnSe d-dots. Co-doping induced white-light emission (WLE) from Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell QDs were obtained, which can offer the opportunity for future-generation white-light emitting diodes (LEDs)

  7. Microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis of transition metal ions doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots with tunable white-light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438 (China); Chen, Qiuhang; Zhang, Wanlu; Mei, Shiliang; He, Liangjie; Zhu, Jiatao [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Institute for Electric Light Sources, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Guoping [School of Information Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, Ruiqian, E-mail: rqguo@fudan.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Institute for Electric Light Sources, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • ZnSe-based QDs were formed via a microwave-assisted aqueous approach. • The stabilizer, ZnS coats and UV irradiation played a role in the PL enhancement. • Tunable white-light-emitting Mn:ZnSe QDs and Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized. • The formation mechanism of Cu,Mn:ZnSe QDs was clarified. • The corresponding CIE color coordinates of different PL spectra were obtained. - Abstract: Synthesis of bright white-light emitting Mn and Cu co-doped ZnSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) (Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS) was reported. Water-soluble ZnSe-based QDs with Mn and Cu doping were prepared using a versatile hot-injection method in aqueous solution with a microwave-assisted approach. Influence of the Se/S ratio, stabilizer, refluxing time and the concentration of Cu/Mn dopant ions on the particle size and photoluminescence (PL) were investigated. The as-prepared QDs in the different stages of growth were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence spectrophotometer. It is found that these ZnSe-based QDs synthesized under mild conditions exhibit emission in the range of 390–585 nm. The PL quantum yield (QY) of the as-prepared water-soluble ZnSe QDs can be up to 24.3% after the UV-irradiation treatment. The band-gap emission of ZnSe is effectively restrained through Mn and Cu doping. The refluxing time influences the doping of not only Mn, but also Cu, which leads to the best refluxing time of Mn:ZnSe and the red-shift of the emission of Cu:ZnSe d-dots. Co-doping induced white-light emission (WLE) from Cu,Mn:ZnSe/ZnS core/shell QDs were obtained, which can offer the opportunity for future-generation white-light emitting diodes (LEDs)

  8. Nutrient and metal loads estimated by using discrete, automated, and continuous water-quality monitoring techniques for the Blackstone River at the Massachusetts-Rhode Island State line, water years 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Jason R.; Granato, Gregory E.; Smith, Kirk P.

    2018-01-10

    Flow-proportional composite water samples were collected in water years 2013 and 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, from the Blackstone River at Millville, Massachusetts (U.S. Geological Survey station 01111230), about 0.5 mile from the border with Rhode Island. Samples were collected in order to better understand the dynamics of selected nutrient and metal constituents, assist with planning, guide activities to meet water-quality goals, and provide real-time water-quality information to the public. An automated system collected the samples at 14-day intervals to determine total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, to provide accurate monthly nutrient concentration data, and to calculate monthly load estimates. Concentrations of dissolved trace metals and total aluminum were determined from 4-day composite water samples that were collected twice monthly by the automated system. Results from 4-day composites provide stakeholders with information to evaluate trace metals on the basis of chronic 4-day exposure criteria for aquatic life, and the potential to use the biotic ligand model to evaluate copper concentrations. Nutrient, trace metal, suspended sediment, dissolved organic carbon, and chlorophyll a concentrations were determined from discrete samples collected at the Millville station and from across the stream transect at the upstream railroad bridge, and these concentrations served as a means to evaluate the representativeness of the Millville point location.Analytical results from samples collected with the automated flow-proportional sampling system provided the means to calculate monthly and annual loading data. Total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads in water year (WY) 2013 were about 447,000 and 36,000 kilograms (kg), respectively. In WY 2014, annual loads of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were about 342,000 and 21,000 kg, respectively. Total nitrogen

  9. Emission inventory for fugitive emissions from fuel in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Nielsen, Malene

    This report presents the methodology and data used in the Danish inventory of fugitive emissions from fuels for the years until 2013. The inventory of fugitive emissions includes CO2, CH4, N2O, SO2, NOx, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter, Black carbon, heavy metals, dioxin and PAHs. In 2013 the total...... Danish emission of greenhouse gasses was 54 584 Gg CO2 equivalents. Fugitive emissions from fuels account for 387 Gg CO2 equivalents or approximately 1 %. The major part of the fugitive emissions are emitted as CO2 (61 %) mainly from flaring in upstream oil and gas production. The major source...... of fugitive CH4 emission is production of oil and gas in the North Sea, refining of oil and loading of oil onto ships both offshore and onshore. The fugitive emissions of NMVOC originate for the major part from oil and gas production, loading of ships, transmission and distribution of oil, and to a less...

  10. Continuation calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Geron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Programs with control are usually modeled using lambda calculus extended with control operators. Instead of modifying lambda calculus, we consider a different model of computation. We introduce continuation calculus, or CC, a deterministic model of computation that is evaluated using only head reduction, and argue that it is suitable for modeling programs with control. It is demonstrated how to define programs, specify them, and prove them correct. This is shown in detail by presenting in CC a list multiplication program that prematurely returns when it encounters a zero. The correctness proof includes termination of the program. In continuation calculus we can model both call-by-name and call-by-value. In addition, call-by-name functions can be applied to call-by-value results, and conversely.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with multi-kHz fibre laser for mobile metal analysis tasks — A comparison of different analysis methods and with a mobile spark-discharge optical emission spectroscopy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharun, Michael; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The identification and separation of different alloys are a permanent task of crucial importance in the metal recycling industry. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers important advantages in comparison to the state-of-the-art techniques for this application. For LIBS measurement no additional sample preparation is necessary. The overall analysis time is much smaller than for the state-of-the-art techniques. The LIBS setup presented in this study enables mobile operation with a handheld probe for the analysis of metallic materials. Excitation source is a fibre laser with a repetition rate of 30 kHz and a pulse energy of 1.33 mJ. The compact optical setup allows measurements at almost every point of a sample within 5 ms. The generated plasma light is analysed using a Multi-CCD spectrometer. The broad spectral coverage and high resolution provide an outstanding amount of spectroscopic information thereby enabling a variety of calibration approaches. Using a set of Al-based and a set of Fe-based samples the analytical performance of uni- and multivariate calibrations is evaluated. The same sample sets are analysed with a commercial state-of-the-art spark-discharge optical emission spectrometer allowing an assessment of the achieved results. Even though the possible analytical correctness of the fibre laser based LIBS measurements is found to similar or even better than that of the conventional technique, advantages of the multivariate data evaluation have not yet been realised in the investigations. However, due to the in situ sample preparation and short measurement times, fibre-laser based LIBS offers superior features. - Highlights: • Mobile, hand-guided LIBS apparatus for metal analysis, even for steel • Comparable results as state-of-the-art SD-OES instrument • New sectioned calibration function resulting in smaller deviations • Comparison of univariate and multivariate analysis methods

  12. Radiative properties of opaque materials, examination of experimental methods, measurements of emissivity of metallic compounds, analysis of oxidised layers and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ane, Jean Marc

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the interaction between electromagnetic waves and matter while taking polarization into account. After having reported a bibliographical study, the author reports the study of electromagnetic flow sensors, of their theoretical and technological limits which define the minimum detectable flow. An experimental installation is then presented. Then, after a review of reflectometers with specular reflecting surfaces, the author shows that a uniform and isotropic flow, necessary for the determination of the directional hemispherical reflectivity, can be obtained by using a specific surface, named Fokon. A study performed by using Monte Carlo methods and ray tracing methods allows the quality of radiation uniformity and isotropy to be assessed. Diffuse reflection reflectometers are then studied. A technical adaptation is proposed to improve their performance. Analytical calculations and calculations based on a Monte Carlo method are performed. The apparatus sizing, its operation domain, and corrective terms to be applied to measurements are also indicated. After a theoretical recall, monochromatic, directional and polarised emissivities are computed for iron, nickel, chromium and more or less oxidised steels. Bibliographic data and sample analysis by optic spectroscopy lead to the proposition of structures for surface layers. Measured and computed values of emissivities are compared and discussed

  13. Proceedings of 15th International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barganska, Z.; Beyer, A; Klimaszewska, K.; Namiesnik, J.; Tobiszewski, M.; Rutkiewicz, I.

    2010-01-01

    15 th International Conference on Heavy Metals in the Environment (15 th ICHMET) is a continuation of a series of conferences that have been held since 1975. These conferences typically draw 500-1000 participants from countries in many parts of the world. The ICHMETs are the only forum that provide an integrated perspective on research and policy initiatives on all heavy metals in a trans-disciplinary context. There is a need to understand not only the unique features and behavior of individual heavy metals but also the differences, similarities and interactions of different metals at the ecosystem, systemic and cellular levels if we are to deal with the problems of global heavy metal pollution in a sustainable manner. The presented contributions concerned problems: (1) trend tracking/analysis of heavy metals data; (2) analytical tools and techniques; (3) heavy metals in the marine environment; (4) accumulation in foods and crops; (5) soil contamination; (6) heavy metals in sediments and remediation technologies; (7) effects on human health; (8) heavy metals in the atmosphere; (9) sources, emissions and control of heavy metals; (10) phytoremediation; (11) wastewater treatment; (12) heavy metals in the historical pollution record.

  14. Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) Analysis to Measure Trace Metals in Soil Along the East River in Queens, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalise, Sajju; Conlan, Skye; Porat, Zachary; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Lab's 1.1 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator is used to determine the presence of heavy trace metals in Queens, NY between Astoria Park and 3.5 miles south to Gantry State Park. A PIXE analysis was performed on 0.5 g pelletized soil samples with a 2.2 MeV proton beam. The results show the presence of elements ranging from Ti to Pb with the concentration of Pb in Astoria Park (2200 +/-200 ppm) approximately ten times that of the Gantry State Park. We hypothesize that the high lead concentration at Astoria Park is due to the nearby Hell Gate Bridge, painted in 1916 with lead based paint, then sandblasted and repainted in the '90s. If the lead is from the repair of the bridge, then we should see the concentration decrease as we go further from the bridge. To test this, soil samples were collected and analyzed from seven different locations north and south of the bridge. The concentrations of lead decreased drastically within a 500 m radius and were approximately constant at greater distances. More soil samples need to be collected within the 500 m radius from bridge to identify the potential source of Pb. We will describe the experimental procedure, the PIXE analysis of soil samples, and present preliminary results on the distribution of heavy trace metals.

  15. Emissões naturais e antrópicas de nitrogênio, fósforo e metais para a bacia do Rio Macaé (Macaé, RJ, Brasil sob influência das atividades de exploração de petroleo e gás na Bacia de Campos Natural and anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen, phosphorous and metals into the Macaé river basin (Macaé, RJ, Brazil Influenced by oil and gas exploration in Campos Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Mussi Molisani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors of natural processes and anthropogenic activities were used to estimate nutrients and metal loads for the lower Macaé river basin, which hosts the operational base for the offshore oil and gas exploration in the Campos Basin. The estimates indicated that emissions from anthropogenic activities are higher than natural emissions. Major contributing drivers include husbandry and urbanization, whose effluents receive no treatment. The increasing offshore oil exploration along the Brazilian littoral has resulted in rapid urbanization and, therefore might increase the inshore emission of anthropogenic chemicals in cases where effective residue control measures are not implemented in fluvial basins of the region.

  16. Method for the continuous production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, John Paul; Orr, Mark T.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

  17. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Lbs/Ton Organic HAP Emissions Limit.../Ton Organic HAP Emissions Limit on a Per Line Basis As required in § 63.5865(b), in order to comply with a lbs/ton organic HAP emissions limit for continuous lamination lines and continuous casting lines...

  18. Emissions from Pre-Hispanic Metallurgy in the South American Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanneste, Heleen; Mauquoy, Dmitri; Piotrowska, Natalia; Torrejón, Fernando; Roland, Thomas; Stein, Ariel; Le Roux, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Metallurgical activities have been undertaken in northern South America (NSA) for millennia. However, it is still unknown how far atmospheric emissions from these activities have been transported. Since the timing of metallurgical activities is currently estimated from scarce archaeological discoveries, the availability of reliable and continuous records to refine the timing of past metal deposition in South America is essential, as it provides an alternative to discon...

  19. A 3-year continuous record of nitrogen trace gas fluxes from untreated and limed soil of a N-saturated spruce and beech forest ecosystem in Germany: 1. N2O emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papen, Hans; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    1999-08-01

    For 3 years we followed the complete annual cycles of N2O emission rates with 2-hour resolution in spruce and beech plantations of the Höglwald Forest, Bavaria, Germany, in order to gain detailed information about seasonal and interannual variations of N2O emissions. In addition, microbiological process studies were performed for identification of differences in N turnover rates in the soil of a spruce and a beech site and for estimation of the contribution of nitrification and denitrification to the actual N2O emission. Both pronounced seasonal and extreme interannual variations of N2O emissions were identified. During long-term frost periods, while the soil was frozen, and during soil thawing, extremely high N2O emissions occurred, contributing up to 73% to the total annual N2O loss. The enormous N2O releases during the long-term frost period were due to high microbial N turnover rates (tight coupling of ammonification, nitrification, denitrification) in small unfrozen water films of the frozen soil at high concentrations of easily degradable substrates derived from the enormous pool of dead microbial biomass produced during the long-term frost period. Liming of a spruce site resulted in a significant increase in ammonification, nitrification, and N2O emissions as compared with an untreated spruce control site. The beech control site exhibited 4-5 times higher N2O emissions than the spruce control site, indicating that forest type itself is an important modulator of N2O release from soil. At all sites, nitrification contributed ˜70% to the N2O flux, whereas denitrification contributed markedly less (˜30%). There was a significant positive correlation between amount of in situ N input by wet deposition and magnitude of in situ N2O emissions. At the beech site, 10% of the actual N input was released from the soil in form of N2O, whereas at the spruce site the fraction was 0.5%. N2O emission rates were positively correlated with net nitrification rates. The

  20. Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA regulations codified in 40 CFR Part 60 and 63 require affected sources to perform emissions source tests, conduct continuous emissions monitoring, and submit...