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Sample records for metal component temperatures

  1. Status of design code work for metallic high temperature components

    Bieniussa, K.; Seehafer, H.J.; Over, H.H.; Hughes, P.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical components of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, HTGR, are exposed to temperatures up to about 1000 deg. C and this in a more or less corrosive gas environment. Under these conditions metallic structural materials show a time-dependent structural behavior. Furthermore changes in the structure of the material and loss of material in the surface can result. The structural material of the components will be stressed originating from load-controlled quantities, for example pressure or dead weight, and/or deformation-controlled quantities, for example thermal expansion or temperature distribution, and thus it can suffer rowing permanent strains and deformations and an exhaustion of the material (damage) both followed by failure. To avoid a failure of the components the design requires the consideration of the following structural failure modes: ductile rupture due to short-term loadings; creep rupture due to long-term loadings; reep-fatigue failure due to cyclic loadings excessive strains due to incremental deformation or creep ratcheting; loss of function due to excessive deformations; loss of stability due to short-term loadings; loss of stability due to long-term loadings; environmentally caused material failure (excessive corrosion); fast fracture due to instable crack growth

  2. Application of new design methodologies to very high-temperature metallic components of the HTTR

    Hada, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Minoru; Baba, Osamu

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature piping and helium-to-helium intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are designed to be operating at very high temperatures of about 900deg C among the class 1 components of the HTTR. At such a high temperature, mechanical strength of heat-resistant metallic materials is very low and thermal expansions of structural members are large. Therefore, innovative design methodologies are needed to reduce both mechanical and thermal loads acting on these components. To the HTTR, the design methodologies which can separate the heat-resistant function from the pressure-retaining functions and allow them to expand freely are applied to reduce pressure and thermal loads. Since these design methodologies need to verify their applicability, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing many design and research works on their verifications. The details of the design methodologies and their verifications are given in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Multi parametric sensitivity study applied to temperature measurement of metallic plasma facing components in fusion devices

    Aumeunier, M-H.; Corre, Y.; Firdaouss, M.; Gauthier, E.; Loarer, T.; Travere, J-M.; Gardarein, J-L.; EFDA JET Contributor

    2013-06-01

    In nuclear fusion experiments, the protection system of the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) is commonly ensured by infrared (IR) thermography. Nevertheless, the surface monitoring of new metallic plasma facing component, as in JET and ITER is being challenging. Indeed, the analysis of infrared signals is made more complicated in such a metallic environment since the signals will be perturbed by the reflected photons coming from high temperature regions. To address and anticipate this new measurement environment, predictive photonic models, based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing (SPEOS R CAA V5 Based), have been performed to assess the contribution of the reflective part in the total flux collected by the camera and the resulting temperature error. This paper deals with the effects of metals features, as the emissivity and reflectivity models, on the accuracy of the surface temperature estimation. The reliability of the features models is discussed by comparing the simulation with experimental data obtained with the wide angle IR thermography system of JET ITER like wall. The impact of the temperature distribution is studied by considering two different typical plasma scenarios, in limiter (ITER start-up scenario) and in X-point configurations (standard divertor scenario). The achievable measurement performances of IR system and risks analysis on its functionalities are discussed. (authors)

  4. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hotpress evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity

  5. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    Quinby, T.C.

    A tool is described for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators. The target assembly comprising a uranum foil and an aluninum-alloy substrate. The tool is composed of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  6. Bulk ultrasonic NDE of metallic components at high temperature using magnetostrictive transducers

    Ashish, Antony Jacob; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Kumar, Anish; Rao, B. Purnachandra; Jayakumar, Tammana

    2017-02-01

    Online ultrasonic NDE at high-temperature is of much interest to the power, process and automotive industries in view of possible savings in downtime. This paper describes a novel approach to developing ultrasonic transducers capable of high-temperature in-situ operation using the principle of magnetostriction. Preliminary design from previous research by the authors [1] is extended for operation at 1 MHz, and at elevated temperatures by amorphous metallic strips as the magnetostrictive core. Ultrasonic signals in pulse-echo mode are experimentally obtained from the ultrasonic transducer thus developed, in a simulated high-temperature environment of 350 °C for 10 hours. Advantages and challenges for practical deployment of this approach are discussed.

  7. Estimation of metal temperature of MCrAlY coated IN738 components based on interdiffusion behaviour

    Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Hald, John

    2006-01-01

    Interdiffusion at the interface between a Co-36.5Ni-17.5Cr-8Al-0.5Y, MCrAlY coating and the underlying IN738 superalloy was studied in a large matrix of specimens isothermally heat treated up to 12,000 hours at temperatures 875°C, 925°C or 950°C. Microstructural investigations and calculated phas....... The developed model was used to estimate metal temperatures for a service exposed, first stage gas turbine blade....

  8. Fabrication and characterization of a metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating strain sensor for structural integrity monitoring of high-temperature components

    Tu, Yun; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of the structural integrity of components operating at high temperatures requires the development of novel sensors to measure strain. A metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) sensor is developed for measurement of strain using titanium–silver magnetron sputtering and nickel electroplating. The strain response of the sensor mounted onto a flat tensile specimen by spot welding is evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests at constant temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 °C. Similar tests are performed on a bare RFBG sensor for comparison. The metal-packaged RFBG strain sensor exhibits higher strain sensitivity than that of the bare RFBG sensor, as well as good linearity, stability and repeatability of strain measurements. A three-dimensional finite element model of the sensor is established to predict the strain sensitivity based on the sensing principle of the fiber Bragg grating. Comparisons of the experimental results with the numerical predictions for the strain sensitivity show a satisfactory agreement. These results demonstrate that the metal-packaged RFBG strain sensors can be successfully fabricated by combining magnetron sputtering with electroplating, and provide great promise for structural integrity monitoring of high-temperature components. (paper)

  9. High temperature metallic recuperator

    Ward, M. E.; Solmon, N. G.; Smeltzer, C. E.

    1981-06-01

    An industrial 4.5 MM Btu/hr axial counterflow recuperator, fabricated to deliver 1600 F combustion air, was designed to handle rapid cyclic loading, a long life, acceptable costs, and a low maintenance requirement. A cost benefit anlysis of a high temperature waste heat recovery system utilizing the recurperator and components capable of 1600 F combustion air preheat shows that this system would have a payback period of less than two years. Fifteen companies and industrial associations were interviewed and expressed great interest in recuperation in large energy consuming industries. Determination of long term environmental effects on candidate recuperator tubing alloys was completed. Alloys found to be acceptable in the 2200 F flue gas environment of a steel billet reheat furnace, were identified.

  10. Metal binding by food components

    Tang, Ning

    for zinc binding by the investigated amino acids, peptides and proteins. The thiol group or imidazole group containing amino acids, peptides and proteins which exhibited strong zinc binding ability were further selected for interacting with zinc salts in relation to zinc absorption. The interactions...... between the above selected food components and zinc citrate or zinc phytate will lead to the enhanced solubility of zinc citrate or zinc phytate. The main driving force for this observed solubility enhancement is the complex formation between zinc and investigated food components as revealed by isothermal...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  11. Cutting of metal components by intergranular cracking

    Chavand, J.; Gauthier, A.; Lopez, J.J.; Tanis, G.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to study a new steel-sheet cutting technique for dismantling nuclear installations without in principle producing secondary waste. This technique is based on intergranular cracking of steel induced by the combined action of penetration of molten metal into the steel and application of a mechanical load. Cutting has been achieved for stainless-steel sheets with thicknesses ranging from a few mm to 50 mm and for carbon-steel plates with thicknesses between 20 and 60 mm. For carbon steel is seems possible that components as thick as 100 mm can be cut. The tests have permitted selection of the heating methods and determination of the cracking parameters for the materials and range of thickness studied. In the case of thin sheets, results were obtained for cutting in varied positions suited to the techniques of dismantling in hot cells. A temperature-measuring system using an infrared camera has been developed to determine the variation of the temperature field established in the component. In association with the three-dimensional computation code COCO developed by the CEA, this system permits prediction of the changes in stresses in the cracked zone when the cutting parameters are modified. 34 figs

  12. High temperature component life assessment

    Webster, G A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book is to investigate and explain the rapid advances in the characterization of high temperature crack growth behaviour which have been made in recent years, with reference to industrial applications. Complicated mathematics has been minimized with the emphasis placed instead on finding solutions using simplified procedures without the need for complex numerical analysis.

  13. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    Cashion, Avery T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  14. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  15. High temperature corrosion of metals

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  16. Size effects in manufacturing of metallic components

    Vollertsen, F; Biermann, D; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim...... of this paper is to give a systematic review on Such effects and their potential use or remedy. First, the typology of size effects will be explained, followed by a description of size effects on strength and tribology. The last three sections describe size effects on formability, forming processes and cutting...... processes. (C) 2009 CIRP....

  17. Making components with controlled metal deposition

    Ribeiro, António Fernando

    1997-01-01

    Rapid Prototyping is a recent CAD/CAM/CIM based manufacturing technique which produces prototypes of components in a fraction of the time. This technique works by first drawing the part as a 3 Dimensional solid model using a CAD program and then ‘printing’ it in 3 Dimensions. The raw material can be a photopolymer or thermoplastic which solidifies when in contact with light. Other materials are available although 100% metal is not a very usual one. This paper presents a new approach for a ...

  18. Design criteria for high-temperature-affected, metallic and ceramic components, and for the prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessel of future HTR systems. Final report. Vol. 1-4

    1988-08-01

    This work in five separate volumes reports on the elaboration of basic data for the formulation of design criteria for HTR components and is arranged into the four following subject areas : (1) safety-specific limiting conditions; (2) metallic components; (3) prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels; (4) graphitic reactor internals. Under item 2, the mechanical and physical characteristics of the materials X20CrMoV 12 1, X10NiCrAlTi 32 20, and NiCr23Co12Mo are examined up to temperatures of 950deg C. Stress-strain rate laws are elaborated for description of the inelastic deformation behavior. The representation of the subject area reactor pressure vessels deals with four main topics: Prestressed concrete support structure, liner, vessel closures, thermal protection system. Quality-assurance classes are defined under item 4 for graphitic components and load levels for load categories. The material evaluation is discussed in detail (e.g. manufacturing monitoring from the raw material to the graphitization and manufacturing testing up to the acceptance test). In addition, the corrosion behavior and irradiation behavior of graphite is examined and rules for computation of stresses in irradiated and unirradiated graphitic components are elaborated. (MM) [de

  19. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  20. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO 2 is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO 2 and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO 2 cooling has

  1. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    Truchan, Thomas G.; Miller, Dean J.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Foley, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  2. Low temperature dissolution flowsheet for plutonium metal

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The H-Canyon flowsheet used to dissolve Pu metal for PuO2 production utilizes boiling HNO3. SRNL was requested to develop a complementary dissolution flowsheet at two reduced temperature ranges. The dissolution and H2 generation rates of Pu metal were investigated using a dissolving solution at ambient temperature (20-30 °C) and for an intermediate temperature of 50-60 °C. Additionally, the testing included an investigation of the dissolution rates and characterization of the off-gas generated from the ambient temperature dissolution of carbon steel cans and the nylon bags that contain the Pu metal when charged to the dissolver.

  3. Metal-organic frameworks with dynamic interlocked components

    Vukotic, V. Nicholas; Harris, Kristopher J.; Zhu, Kelong; Schurko, Robert W.; Loeb, Stephen J.

    2012-06-01

    The dynamics of mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes have been studied in solution as examples of rudimentary molecular switches and machines, but in this medium, the molecules are randomly dispersed and their motion incoherent. As a strategy for achieving a higher level of molecular organization, we have constructed a metal-organic framework material using a [2]rotaxane as the organic linker and binuclear Cu(II) units as the nodes. Activation of the as-synthesized material creates a void space inside the rigid framework that allows the soft macrocyclic ring of the [2]rotaxane to rotate rapidly, unimpeded by neighbouring molecular components. Variable-temperature 13C and 2H solid-state NMR experiments are used to characterize the nature and rate of the dynamic processes occurring inside this unique material. These results provide a blueprint for the future creation of solid-state molecular switches and molecular machines based on mechanically interlocked molecules.

  4. Finishing of precision generated metal optical components

    Baker, P.C.; Sonderman, J.B.

    1975-08-01

    Diamond turning and precision generation of aspheric metal surfaces has promoted a change in lapping techniques due to the extremely close figure tolerances and surface finishes that have been achieved. Special tooling, diamond abrasive, silicon oil and special techniques used to polish the unusual aspheric figures are described. The studies include small flat diamond turned samples of copper, electroplated copper, electroplated silver, electroplated nickel and silver as well as large aspheres such as an f/0.75, 35 cm dia copper ellipse. Results from cleaning studies on flat samples using ultrasonics and vapor degreasers are also summarized. Interferograms of wavefront distortion and analysis of focal volume are included as well as 10.6 μm reflectivity and a summary of laser damage experiments. (TFD)

  5. Hydrogen transport behavior of metal coatings for plasma facing components

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma-facing components for experimental and commercial fusion reactor studies may include cladding or coatings of refractory metals like tungsten on metallic structural substrates such as copper, vanadium alloys and austenitic stainless steel. Issues of safety and fuel economy include the potential for inventory buildup and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies with 3-keV D 3 + ion beams to investigate the hydrogen transport behavior in tungsten coatings on substrates of copper. These experiments entailed measurements of the deuterium re-emission and permeation rates for tungsten, copper, and tungsten-coated copper specimens at temperatures ranging from 638 K to 825 K and implanting particle fluxes of approximately 5 x 10 19 D/m 2 s. Diffusion constants and surface recombination coefficients with enhancement factors due to sputtering were obtained from these measurements. These data may be used in calculations to estimate permeation rates and inventory buildups for proposed diverter designs. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  7. Design and Measurement of Metallic Post-Wall Waveguide Components

    Coenen, T.J.; Bekers, D.J.; Tauritz, J.L.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper we discuss the design and measurement of a set of metallic post-wall waveguide components for antenna feed structures. The components are manufactured on a single layer printed circuit board and excited by a grounded coplanar waveguide. For a straight transmission line, a 90°

  8. Aging of metal components in US nuclear reactors

    Mayfield, M.E.; Strosnider, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the aging of metal components in U.S. Light Water Reactors. The types of degradation being experienced in components such as the pressure vessel, piping, reactor internals, and steam generators, and the programs being implemented to manage the degradation are discussed. (author)

  9. Modelling of the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials

    Mohr, R.

    1999-01-01

    The design of components of metallic high-temperature materials by the finite element method requires the application of phenomenological viscoplastic material models. The route from the choice of a convenient model, the numerical integration of the equations and the parameter identification to the design of components is described. The Chaboche-model is used whose evolution equations are explicitly integrated. The parameters are determined by graphical and numerical methods in order to use the material model for describing the deformation behaviour of a chromium steel and an intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy. (orig.)

  10. Handling and final storage of radioactive metal components

    Loennerberg, B.; Engelbrektson, A.; Neretnieks, I.

    1978-06-01

    After the dismounting of the fuel elements, the next stage is to undertake the final storing of the metal components, which have kept the fuel rods together. The components are transmitted to a pool where they are cut into pieces, compacted and placed in wire baskets. These are transferred in a water channel to a cell, where the metal components are embedded into concrete blocks. Thus the baskets are placed in prefabricated concrete containers, after which the metal parts are embedded into cement grout, injected from the bottom of the containers. The blocks are finally stored in rock tunnels constituting a storage similar to the repositories for vitrified waste and spent fuel, although somewhat simplified, taking advantage of the much lower amount of radioactive material in the case of metal components. Thus a depositioning depth of 300 m in rock is very much on the safe side and it is appropriate in this case to fill the tunnels with concrete, ensuring by its alcalinity a suffi ciently low rate of dissolution of the metal and migration of radioactive substances

  11. Metallic Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    Ma, Y.H.; Catalano, Jacopo; Guazzone, Federico

    2013-01-01

    membrane fabrication methods have matured over the last decades, and the deposition of very thin films (1–5 µm) of Pd over porous ceramics or modified porous metal supports is quite common. The H2 permeances and the selectivities achieved at 400–500 °C were in the order of 50–100 Nm3/m/h/bar0.5 and greater......Composite palladium membranes have extensively been studied in laboratories and, more recently, in small pilot industrial applications for the high temperature separation of hydrogen from reactant mixtures such as water-gas shift (WGS) reaction or methane steam reforming (MSR). Composite Pd...... than 1000, respectively. This chapter describes in detail composite Pd-based membrane preparation methods, which consist of the grading of the support and the deposition of the dense metal layer, their performances, and their applications in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) at high temperatures (400...

  12. Refractiry metal monocrystals in high temperature thermometry

    Kuritnyk, I.P.

    1988-01-01

    The regularities of changes in thermoelectric properties of refractory metals in a wide temperature range (300-2300 K) depending on their structural state and impurities, are generalized. It is found that the main reasons for changes in thermo-e.m.f. of refractory metals during their operation in various media are diffusion processes and local microvoltages appearing in nonhomogeneous thermoelectrodes. It is shown that microstructure formation and control of impurities in thermometric materials permit to improve considerably the metrologic parameters of thermal transformers. Tungsten and molybdenum with monocrystalline structure with their high stability of properties, easy to manufacture and opening new possibilities in high-temperature contact measurement are used in thermometry for the first time

  13. Bulk forming of industrial micro components in conventional metals and bulk metallic glasses

    Arentoft, Mogens; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer

    2007-01-01

    For production of micro components in large numbers, forging is an interesting and challenging process. The conventional metals like silver, steel and aluminum often require multi-step processes, but high productivity and increased strength justify the investment. As an alternative, bulk metallic...

  14. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  15. Strength versus temperature anomalies in metals

    Fisher, D J

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the best-known aspect of the behavior of metals, and indeed of most materials, is that they weaken with temperature. This weakening is however a problem in some applications. Only tungsten for instance, with its naturally high melting-point, was suitable for the manufacture of the filaments of incandescent light-bulbs. Even then, it was necessary to add oxide particles having a yethigher melting-point in order to prevent the weakening effect of grain-growth. These are alloys however which can be said to be weakened by heat, but nevertheless 'hang on' to enough strength to perform their

  16. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular...

  18. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-15

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA.

  19. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-01

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA

  20. Biosorption of Metals from Multi-Component Bacterial Solutions

    Tsertsvadze, L A; Petriashvili, Sh G; Chutkerashvili, D G; Kirkesali, E I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, S S; Gundorina, S F

    2002-01-01

    The method of extraction of metals from industrial solutions by means of economical and easy to apply biosorbents in subtropics such as products of tea manufacturing, moss, microorganisms is described. The multi-component solutions obtained in the process of leaching of ores, rocks and industrial wastes by peat suspension were used in the experiments. The element composition of sorbent biomass and solutions was investigated by epithermal neutron activation analysis and by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained evidence that the used biosorbents are applicable for extraction of the whole set of heavy metals and actinides (U, Th, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Li, Rb, Sr, Cd, As, Co and others) from industrial solutions.

  1. Refractory metal component technology for in-core sensor design

    Cannon, C.P.

    1986-02-01

    Within recent years, an increasing concern over reactor safety has prompted tests that characterize reactor core environments during transient conditions. Such tests include the Loss-of-Fluid-Tests (Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEL)), Severe Fuel Damage Tests (INEL), Core Debris Rubble Tests (Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)), and similar tests performed by foreign nations. The in-core sensors for these tests require refractory metal components to be compatible with electrical insulator materials as well as materials comprising highly corrosive service mediums. This paper presents the refractory metal technology utilized to provide basic sensor designs in the above mentioned reactor tests

  2. Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of ...

    Effect of Temperature and Hose Genotype on Components of Resistance to Groundnut Rust. P Subrahmanyam, PV Subba Rao, PM Reddy, D McDonald. Abstract. The effects of temperature on incubation period, infection frequency, lesion diameter, leaf area damage, pustule rupture, and sporulation were quantified for six ...

  3. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    Thiesen, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a vessel for handling molten metal having an interior refractory lining, apparatus for continuous high temperature measurement of the molten metal. It comprises a thermowell; the thermowell containing a multiplicity of thermocouples; leads being coupled to a means for continuously indicating the temperature of the molten metal in the vessel

  4. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-01-01

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than ± 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of ± 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented

  5. Engineering: Liquid metal pumped at a record temperature

    Lambrinou, Konstantina

    2017-10-01

    Although liquid metals are effective fluids for heat transfer, pumping them at high temperatures is limited by their corrosiveness to solid metals. A clever pump design addresses this challenge using only ceramics. See Article p.199

  6. High temperature embrittlement of metals by helium

    Schroeder, H.

    1983-01-01

    The present knowledge of the influence of helium on the high temperature mechanical properties of metals to be used as structural materials in fast fission and in future fusion reactors is reviewed. A wealth of experimental data has been obtained by many different experimental techniques, on many different alloys, and on different properties. This review is mostly concentrated on the behaviour of austenitic alloys -especially austenitic stainless steels, for which the data base is by far the largest - and gives only a few examples of special bcc alloys. The effect of the helium embrittlement on the different properties - tensile, fatigue and, with special emphasis, creep - is demonstrated by representative results. A comparison between data obtained from in-pile (-beam) experiments and from post-irradiation (-implantation) experiments, respectively, is presented. Theoretical models to describe the observed phenomena are briefly outlined and some suggestions are made for future work to resolve uncertainties and differences between our experimental knowledge and theoretical understanding of high temperature helium embrittlement. (author)

  7. Turbulent temperature fluctuations in liquid metals

    Lawn, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Examination of experimental data for the spectral distribution of velocity (u and v) and temperature (theta) fluctuations in the fully turbulent region of heated pipe-flow has suggested a schematic representation which incorporates the essential features. Evidence is cited to suggest that the -vtheta correlation coefficient maintains higher values that the uv coefficient at wave-numbers in the inertial subrange. The theory of Batchelor, Howells and Townsend, and limited evidence from experiments in mercury, then suggests the form of the theta 2 spectra and -vtheta cross-spectra in liquid metals. From this information, a limiting Peclet number is deduced, above which the correlation coefficient of v and theta should be a fairly weak function of Pe alone. An attempt to check this inference from published data for the RMS level of temperature fluctuations, and for the turbulent Prandtl number, proves inconclusive, because many of the correlation coefficients so estimated have values greater than unity. It is concluded that all these results for theta tilde must therefore be in error. However, since there is no evidence of very low correlation coefficients, they almost certainly lie in the range 0.5 multiply/divide 2 over a large proportion of the radius. Thus theta tilde can be estimated for any fluid in which the fluctuations are induced by uniform heating, at least to within a factor of 2, using the analysis presented. (author)

  8. Method and alloys for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Thompson, L.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Wrought, nickel-based alloys, suitable for components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures and include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength. The range of compositions of these alloys is given. (author)

  9. High-temperature spreading kinetics of metals

    Rauch, N.

    2005-05-15

    In this PhD work a drop transfer setup combined with high speed photography has been used to analyze the spreading of Ag on polished polycrystalline Mo and single crystalline Mo (110) and (100) substrates. The objective of this work was to unveil the basic phenomena controlling spreading in metal-metal systems. The observed spreading kinetics were compared with current theories of low and high temperature spreading such as a molecular kinetic model and a fluid flow model. Analyses of the data reveal that the molecular model does describe the fastest velocity data well for all the investigated systems. Therefore, the energy which is dissipated during the spreading process is a dissipation at the triple line rather than dissipation due to the viscosity in the liquid. A comparison of the determined free activation energy for wetting of {delta}G95{approx}145kJ/mol with literature values allows the statement that the rate determining step seems to be a surface diffusion of the Ag atoms along the triple line. In order to investigate possible ridge formation, due to local atomic diffusion of atoms of the substrate at the triple during the spreading process, grooving experiments of the polycrystalline Mo were performed to calculate the surface diffusities that will control ridge evolution. The analyses of this work showed that a ridge formation at the fastest reported wetting velocities was not possible if there is no initial perturbation for a ridge. If there was an initial perturbation for a ridge the ridge had to be much smaller than 1 nm in order to be able to move with the liquid font. Therefore ridge formation does not influence the spreading kinetics for the studied system and the chosen conditions. SEM, AFM and TEM investigations of the triple line showed that ridge formation does also not occur at the end of the wetting experiment when the drop is close to equilibrium and the wetting velocity is slow. (orig.)

  10. Development of low temperature solid state joining technology of dissimilar for nuclear heat exchanger tube components

    NONE

    2010-08-15

    By conventional fusion welding process (TIG), a realization of reliable and sound joints for the nuclear heat exchanger components is very difficult, especially for the parts comprising of the dissimilar metal couples (Ti-STS, Ti-Cu alloy etc.). This is mainly attributed to the formation of brittle intermetallics (Ti{sub x}Cu{sub y}, Ti{sub x}Fe{sub y}, Ti{sub x}Ni{sub y} etc.) and wide difference in physical properties. Moreover, it usually employs very high thermal input, so making it difficult to obtain sound joints due to generations of high residual stresses and degradation of the adjacent base metals, even for similar metal combinations. In this project, the low temperature solid-state joining technology was established by developing new alloy fillers, e.g. the multi-component eutectic based alloys or amorphous alloys, and thereby lowering the joining temperature down to {approx}800 .deg. C without affecting the structural properties of base metals. Based on a low temperature joining, the interlayer engineering technology was then developed to be able to eliminate the brittleness of the joints for strong Ti-STS dissimilar joints, and the diffusion brazing technology of Ti-Ti with a superior joining strength and corrosion-resistance comparable to those of base metal were developed. By using those developed technologies, the joining procedures feasible for the heat exchanger components were finally established for the dissimilar metal joints including Ti tube sheet to super STS tube, Ti tube sheet to super STS tube sheet, and the joints of the Ti tube to Ti tube sheet

  11. Sheet-bulk metal forming – forming of functional components from sheet metals

    Merklein Marion

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview on the application of sheet-bulk metal forming operations in both scientific and industrial environment. Beginning with the need for an innovative forming technology, the definition of this new process class is introduced. The rising challenges of the application of bulk metal forming operations on sheet metals are presented and the demand on a holistic investigation of this topic is motivated. With the help of examples from established production processes, the latest state of technology and the lack on fundamental knowledge is shown. Furthermore, perspectives regarding new research topics within sheet-bulk metal forming are presented. These focus on processing strategies to improve the quality of functional components by the application of process-adapted semi-finished products as well as the local adaption of the tribological system.

  12. Component and Technology Development for Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-01-30

    The following report details the significant developments to Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technologies made throughout the course of this funding. This report will begin with an overview of the sodium loop and the improvements made over the course of this research to make it a more advanced and capable facility. These improvements have much to do with oxygen control and diagnostics. Thus a detailed report of advancements with respect to the cold trap, plugging meter, vanadium equilibration loop, and electrochemical oxygen sensor is included. Further analysis of the university’s moving magnet pump was performed and included in a section of this report. A continuous electrical resistance based level sensor was built and tested in the sodium with favorable results. Materials testing was done on diffusion bonded samples of metal and the results are presented here as well. A significant portion of this work went into the development of optical fiber temperature sensors which could be deployed in an SFR environment. Thus, a section of this report presents the work done to develop an encapsulation method for these fibers inside of a stainless steel capillary tube. High temperature testing was then done on the optical fiber ex situ in a furnace. Thermal response time was also explored with the optical fiber temperature sensors. Finally these optical fibers were deployed successfully in a sodium environment for data acquisition. As a test of the sodium deployable optical fiber temperature sensors they were installed in a sub-loop of the sodium facility which was constructed to promote the thermal striping effect in sodium. The optical fibers performed exceptionally well, yielding unprecedented 2 dimensional temperature profiles with good temporal resolution. Finally, this thermal striping loop was used to perform cross correlation velocimetry successfully over a wide range of flow rates.

  13. Fabrication and Characterizations of Materials and Components for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells and Water Electrolysers

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Prag, Carsten Brorson; Li, Qingfeng

    The worldwide development of fuel cells and electrolysers has so far almost exclusively addressed either the low temperature window (20-200 °C) or the high temperature window (600-1000 °C). This work concerns the development of key materials and components of a new generation of fuel cells...... and electrolysers for operation in the intermediate temperature range from 200 to 400 °C. The intermediate temperature interval is of importance for the use of renewable fuels. Furthermore electrode kinetics is significantly enhanced compared to when operating at low temperature. Thus non-noble metal catalysts...... might be used. One of the key materials in the fuel cell and electrolyser systems is the electrolyte. Proton conducting materials such as cesium hydrogen phosphates, zirconium hydrogen phosphates and tin pyrophosphates have been investigated by others and have shown interesting potential....

  14. Small specimen technique for assessing mechanical properties of metallic components

    Lobo, Raquel M.; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Morcelli, Aparecido E., E-mail: rmlobo@ipen.br, E-mail: morcelliae@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Small Punch Test (SPT) is one of the most promising techniques of small specimen test, which was originally applied in testing of irradiated materials in nuclear engineering. Then it was introduced to other fields as an almost nondestructive method to measure the local mechanical properties that are difficult to be obtained using conventional mechanical tests. Most studies to date are focused on metallic materials, although SPT applications are recently spreading to other materials. The small punch test (SPT) employs small-sized specimens (for example, samples measuring 8 mm in diameter and 0.5 mm thick). The specimen is firmly clamped between two circular dies and is bi-axially strained until failure into a circular hole using a hemispherical punch. The 'load-punch displacement' record can be used to estimate the yield strength, the ultimate tensile strength, the tensile elongation, and the temperature of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Recently, some researchers are working on the use of miniature notched or pre-cracked specimens (denoted as p-SPT) to validate its geometry and dimensions for obtaining the fracture properties of metallic materials. In a first approach, the technique makes it possible to convert primary experimental data into conventional mechanical properties of a massive specimen. In this paper a comprehensive review of the different STP applications is presented with the aim of clarifying its usefulness. (author)

  15. Small specimen technique for assessing mechanical properties of metallic components

    Lobo, Raquel M.; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Morcelli, Aparecido E.

    2017-01-01

    Small Punch Test (SPT) is one of the most promising techniques of small specimen test, which was originally applied in testing of irradiated materials in nuclear engineering. Then it was introduced to other fields as an almost nondestructive method to measure the local mechanical properties that are difficult to be obtained using conventional mechanical tests. Most studies to date are focused on metallic materials, although SPT applications are recently spreading to other materials. The small punch test (SPT) employs small-sized specimens (for example, samples measuring 8 mm in diameter and 0.5 mm thick). The specimen is firmly clamped between two circular dies and is bi-axially strained until failure into a circular hole using a hemispherical punch. The 'load-punch displacement' record can be used to estimate the yield strength, the ultimate tensile strength, the tensile elongation, and the temperature of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Recently, some researchers are working on the use of miniature notched or pre-cracked specimens (denoted as p-SPT) to validate its geometry and dimensions for obtaining the fracture properties of metallic materials. In a first approach, the technique makes it possible to convert primary experimental data into conventional mechanical properties of a massive specimen. In this paper a comprehensive review of the different STP applications is presented with the aim of clarifying its usefulness. (author)

  16. Geometric component of charge pumping current in nMOSFETs due to low-temperature irradiation

    Witczak, S. C.; King, E. E.; Saks, N. S.; Lacoe, R. C.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Hash, G. L.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Mayer, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    The geometric component of charge pumping current was examined in n-channel metal-oxide-silicon field effect transistors (MOSFETs) following low-temperature irradiation. In addition to the usual dependencies on channel length and gate bias transition time, the geometric component was found to increase with radiation-induced oxide-trapped charge density and decreasing temperature. A postirradiation injection of electrons into the gate oxide reduces the geometric component along with the density of oxide-trapped charge, which clearly demonstrates that the two are correlated. A fit of the injection data to a first-order model for trapping kinetics indicates that the electron trapping occurs predominantly at a single type of Coulomb-attractive trap site. The geometric component results primarily from the bulk recombination of channel electrons that fail to transport to the source or drain during the transition from inversion to accumulation. The radiation response of these transistors suggests that Coulomb scattering by oxide-trapped charge increases the bulk recombination at low temperatures by impeding electron transport. These results imply that the geometric component must be properly accounted for when charge pumping irradiated n-channel MOSFETs at low temperatures.

  17. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)). © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Metal-semiconductor interface in extreme temperature conditions

    Bulat, L.P.; Erofeeva, I.A.; Vorobiev, Yu.V.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present an investigation of electrons' and phonons' temperatures in the volume of a semiconductor (or metal) sample and at the interface between metal and semiconductor. Two types of mismatch between electrons' and phonons' temperatures take place: at metal-semiconductor interfaces and in the volume of the sample. The temperature mismatch leads to nonlinear terms in expressions for heat and electricity transport. The nonlinear effects should be taken into consideration in the study of electrical and heat transport in composites and in electronic chips

  19. Study on the behavior of heavy metals during thermal treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) components.

    Yu, Jie; Sun, Lushi; Wang, Ben; Qiao, Yu; Xiang, Jun; Hu, Song; Yao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the volatilization behavior of heavy metals during pyrolysis and combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) components at different heating rates and temperatures. The waste fractions comprised waste paper (Paper), disposable chopstick (DC), garbage bag (GB), PVC plastic (PVC), and waste tire (Tire). Generally, the release trend of heavy metals from all MSW fractions in rapid-heating combustion was superior to that in low-heating combustion. Due to the different characteristics of MSW fractions, the behavior of heavy metals varied. Cd exhibited higher volatility than the rest of heavy metals. For Paper, DC, and PVC, the vaporization of Cd can reach as high as 75% at 500 °C in the rapid-heating combustion due to violent combustion, whereas a gradual increase was observed for Tire and GB. Zn and Pb showed a moderate volatilization in rapid-heating combustion, but their volatilities were depressed in slow-heating combustion. During thermal treatment, the additives such as kaolin and calcium can react or adsorb Pb and Zn forming stable metal compounds, thus decreasing their volatilities. The formation of stable compounds can be strengthened in slow-heating combustion. The volatility of Cu was comparatively low in both high and slow-heating combustion partially due to the existence of Al, Si, or Fe in residuals. Generally, in the reducing atmosphere, the volatility of Cd, Pb, and Zn was accelerated for Paper, DC, GB, and Tire due to the formation of elemental metal vapor. TG analysis also showed the reduction of metal oxides by chars forming elemental metal vapor. Cu2S was the dominant Cu species in reducing atmosphere below 900 °C, which was responsible for the low volatility of Cu. The addition of PVC in wastes may enhance the release of heavy metals, while GB and Tire may play an opposite effect. In controlling heavy metal emission, aluminosilicate- and calcium-based sorbents can be co-treated with fuels. Moreover

  20. Liquid-metal plasma-facing component research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Jaworski, M A; Khodak, A; Kaita, R

    2013-01-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) have been proposed as a means of solving several problems facing the creation of economically viable fusion power reactors. Liquid metals face critical issues in three key areas: free-surface stability, material migration and demonstration of integrated scenarios. To date, few demonstrations exist of this approach in a diverted tokamak and we here provide an overview of such work on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The liquid lithium divertor (LLD) was installed and operated for the 2010 run campaign using evaporated coatings as the filling method. Despite a nominal liquid level exceeding the capillary structure and peak current densities into the PFCs exceeding 100 kA m −2 , no macroscopic ejection events were observed. The stability can be understood from a Rayleigh–Taylor instability analysis. Capillary restraint and thermal-hydraulic considerations lead to a proposed liquid-metal PFCs scheme of actively-supplied, capillary-restrained systems. Even with state-of-the-art cooling techniques, design studies indicate that the surface temperature with divertor-relevant heat fluxes will still reach temperatures above 700 °C. At this point, one would expect significant vapor production from a liquid leading to a continuously vapor-shielded regime. Such high-temperature liquid lithium PFCs may be possible on the basis of momentum-balance arguments. (paper)

  1. Liquid-metal plasma-facing component research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Jaworski, M. A.; Khodak, A.; Kaita, R.

    2013-12-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) have been proposed as a means of solving several problems facing the creation of economically viable fusion power reactors. Liquid metals face critical issues in three key areas: free-surface stability, material migration and demonstration of integrated scenarios. To date, few demonstrations exist of this approach in a diverted tokamak and we here provide an overview of such work on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The liquid lithium divertor (LLD) was installed and operated for the 2010 run campaign using evaporated coatings as the filling method. Despite a nominal liquid level exceeding the capillary structure and peak current densities into the PFCs exceeding 100 kA m-2, no macroscopic ejection events were observed. The stability can be understood from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability analysis. Capillary restraint and thermal-hydraulic considerations lead to a proposed liquid-metal PFCs scheme of actively-supplied, capillary-restrained systems. Even with state-of-the-art cooling techniques, design studies indicate that the surface temperature with divertor-relevant heat fluxes will still reach temperatures above 700 °C. At this point, one would expect significant vapor production from a liquid leading to a continuously vapor-shielded regime. Such high-temperature liquid lithium PFCs may be possible on the basis of momentum-balance arguments.

  2. Temperature dependence of critical resolved shear stress for cubic metals

    Rashid, H.; Fazal-e-Aleem; Ali, M.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental measurements for critical resolved shear stress of various BCC and FCC metals have been explained by using Radiation Model. The temperature dependence of CRSS for different cubic metals is found to the first approximation, to upon the type of the crystal. A good agreement between experimental observations and predictions of the Radiation Model is found. (author)

  3. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Jovanovic, A. [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  4. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Roos, E; Maile, K; Jovanovic, A [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  5. Thermomechanical fatigue life prediction of high temperature components

    Seifert, Thomas; Hartrott, Philipp von; Riedel, Hermann; Siegele, Dieter [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the work described in this paper is to provide a computational method for fatigue life prediction of high temperature components, in which the time and temperature dependent fatigue crack growth is a relevant damage mechanism. The fatigue life prediction is based on a law for microcrack growth and a fracture mechanics estimate of the cyclic crack tip opening displacement. In addition, a powerful model for nonisothermal cyclic plasticity is employed, and an efficient laboratory test procedure is proposed for the determination of the model parameters. The models are efficiently implemented into finite element programs and are used to predict the fatigue life of a cast iron exhaust manifold and a notch in the perimeter of a turbine rotor made of a ferritic/martensitic 10%-chromium steel. (orig.)

  6. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    Cesari, Franco G.; Conforti, Gianmario; Rogante, Massimo; Giostri, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  7. High temperature brazing of primary-system components in the nuclear field

    Belicic, M.; Fricker, H.W.; Iversen, K.; Leukert, W.

    1981-01-01

    Apart from the well-known welding procedures, high-temperature brazing is successfully applied in the manufacture of primary components in the field of nuclear reactor construction. This technique is applied in all cases where apart from sufficient resistance and high production safety importance is laid on dimensional stability without subsequent mechanical processing of the components. High-temperature brazing is therefore very important in the manufacture of fuel rod spacers or control rod guide tubes. In this context, during one brazing process many brazing seams have to be produced in extremely narrow areas and within small tolerances. As basic materials precipitation hardening alloys with a high nickel percentage, austenitic Cr-Ni-steels or the zirconium alloy Zry 4 are used. Generally applied are: boron free nickel or zirconium brazing filler metals. (orig.)

  8. Apparatus and method for temperature mapping a turbine component in a high temperature combustion environment

    Baleine, Erwan; Sheldon, Danny M

    2014-06-10

    Method and system for calibrating a thermal radiance map of a turbine component in a combustion environment. At least one spot (18) of material is disposed on a surface of the component. An infrared (IR) imager (14) is arranged so that the spot is within a field of view of the imager to acquire imaging data of the spot. A processor (30) is configured to process the imaging data to generate a sequence of images as a temperature of the combustion environment is increased. A monitor (42, 44) may be coupled to the processor to monitor the sequence of images of to determine an occurrence of a physical change of the spot as the temperature is increased. A calibration module (46) may be configured to assign a first temperature value to the surface of the turbine component when the occurrence of the physical change of the spot is determined.

  9. High temperature metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors

    1989-06-01

    The Specialists' Meeting was organized in conjunction with an earlier meeting on this topic held in Vienna, Austria, 1981, which provided for a comprehensive review of the status of materials development and testing at that time and for a description of test facilities. This meeting provided an opportunity (1) to review and discuss the progress made since 1981 in the development, testing and qualification of high temperature metallic materials, (2) to critically assess results achieved, and (3) to give directions for future research and development programmes. In particular, the meeting provided a form for a close interaction between component designers and materials specialists. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from France, People's Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USSR and USA presenting 22 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Components Design and Testing - Implications for Materials (4 papers); Microstructure and Environmental Compatibility (4 papers); Mechanical Properties (9 papers); New Alloys and Developments (6 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. This volume contains all papers presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Metal nanoparticle direct inkjet printing for low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Nam, Koo Hyun; Chung, Jaewon; Hotz, Nico; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials is a key technology toward ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. We demonstrate low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication by direct inkjet printing of metal nanoparticles (NPs) as a versatile, direct 3D metal structuring approach representing an alternative to conventional vacuum deposition and photolithographic methods. Metal NP ink was inkjet-printed to exploit the large melting temperature drop of the nanomaterial and the ease of the NP ink formulation. Parametric studies on the basic conditions for stable 3D inkjet printing of NP ink were carried out. Furthermore, diverse 3D metal microstructures, including micro metal pillar arrays, helices, zigzag and micro bridges were demonstrated and electrical characterization was performed. Since the process requires low temperature, it carries substantial potential for fabrication of electronics on a plastic substrate

  11. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    Deibler, Lisa Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Characterization and Performance

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  12. Temperature dependent quasiparticle renormalization in nickel metal

    Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Fink, Joerg; Duerr, Hermann A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany). BESSY II

    2009-07-01

    One of the fundamental consequences of electron correlation effects is that the bare particles in solids become 'dressed', i.e. they acquire an increased effective mass and a lifetime. We studied the spin dependent quasiparticle band structure of Ni(111) with high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. At low temperatures (50 K) a renormalization of quasiparticle energy and lifetime indicative of electron-phonon coupling is observed in agreement with literature. With increasing temperature we observe a decreasing quasiparticle lifetime at the Fermi level for all probed minority spin bands as expected from electron phonon coupling. Surprisingly the majority spin states behave differently. We actually observe a slightly increased lifetime at room temperature. The corresponding increase in Fermi velocity points to a temperature dependent reduction of the majority spin quasiparticle renormalization.

  13. Microscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components In A Diverted Plasma

    Jaworski, M.A.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Morley, N.B.; Abrams, T.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) have been identified as an alternative material for fusion plasma experiments. The use of a liquid conductor where significant magnetic fields are present is considered risky, with the possibility of macroscopic fluid motion and possible ejection into the plasma core. Analysis is carried out on thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) forces caused by temperature gradients in the liquid-container system itself in addition to scrape-off-layer currents interacting with the PFC from a diverted plasma. Capillary effects at the liquid-container interface will be examined which govern droplet ejection criteria. Stability of the interface is determined using linear stability methods. In addition to application to liquidmetal PFCs, thin film liquidmetal effects have application to current and future devices where off-normal events may liquefy portions of the first wall and other plasma facing components.

  14. Initial stages of high temperature metal oxidation

    Yang, C.Y.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The application of XPS and UPS to the study of the initial stages of high temperature (> 350 0 C) electrochemical oxidation of iron and nickel is discussed. In the high temperature experiments, iron and nickel electrodes were electrochemically oxidized in contact with a solid oxide electrolyte in the uhv system. The great advantages of this technique are that the oxygen activity at the interface may be precisely controlled and the ability to run the reactions in uhv allows the simultaneous observation of the reactions by XPS

  15. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    Carlson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced

  16. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  17. The attenuation of temperature oscillations in passing through liquid metal boundary layers

    Lawn, C.J.

    1975-08-01

    One aspect of predicting the endurance of components subject to thermal fatigue in liquid metal cooled reactors is the extent to which oscillations in fluid temperature are transmitted to metal surfaces, such as the above-core structure. The first geometry considered is that of a solid plate in contact with a layer of stagnant fluid, in which temperature oscillations are imposed at a given distance from the plate. Transmission through a laminar boundary layer developing over the plate surface is then considered. An approximate calculation based on the slug-flow analysis of Sucec (1975) is developed. (U.K.)

  18. Ultrasonic Resonance of Metallic Spheres at Elevated Temperatures

    Johnson , W.

    1996-01-01

    A unique ultrasonic system has been constructed for measuring resonant frequencies and damping of metallic spheres at elevated temperatures. This system employs electromagnetic-acoustic transduction, with a solenoid coil surrounding the sphere in a uniform magnetic field. Temperature is measured with an optical pyrometer. Since the acoustic and temperature measurements are noncontacting, the uncertainties associated with external damping are relatively small. The resonant frequency and Q of t...

  19. High temperature equation of state of metallic hydrogen

    Shvets, V. T.

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures from 3000 to 20 000 K and densities from 0.2 to 3 mol/cm 3 , which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron-proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local-field approximation. The proton-proton interaction is taken into account in the hard-spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and third-order perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately high temperatures and densities, although it is much smaller than the second-order term. The thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen are monotonically increasing functions of density and temperature. The values of pressure for the temperatures and pressures that are characteristic of the conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth coincide with the corresponding values reported by the discoverers of metallic hydrogen to a high degree of accuracy. The temperature and density ranges are found in which there exists a liquid phase of metallic hydrogen

  20. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  1. Flaw assessment procedure for high temperature reactor components

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Takahashi, Y.

    1990-01-01

    An interim high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the USA, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the UK. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack growth laws may be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. Some of these limitations are to be addressed in an extension of the current collaborative program. 20 refs

  2. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    2010-04-01

    ... appliances and accessories. 888.3030 Section 888.3030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....3030 Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. (a) Identification. Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories are devices intended to be...

  3. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS AMONG THE COMPONENTS OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS (REVIEW)

    N. Kolesnyk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review scientific sources on the distribution of heavy metals among the components of freshwater ecosystems. Findings. The review of the works of many scientists showed that heavy metals are widespread in the biotic and abiotic components of freshwater ecosystems. The article highlights the distribution of heavy metals in water, bottom sediments, natural food base, fish organs and tissues. It has been shown that as a result of global pollution of the ecosystem, the majority of...

  4. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ∼ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ∼ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity

  5. Gap and impact of LMR [Liquid Metal Reactor] piping systems and reactor components

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Because of high operation temperature, the LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) plant is characterized by the thin-walled piping and components. Gaps are often present to allow free thermal expansion during normal plant operation. Under dynamic loadings, such as seismic excitation, if the relative displacement between the components exceeds the gap distance, impacts will occur. Since the components and piping become brittle over their design lifetime, impact is of important concern for it may lead to fractures of components and other serious effects. This paper deals with gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components and piping systems. Emphasis is on the impacts due to seismic motion. Eight sections are contained in this paper. The gap and impact problems in LMR piping systems are described and a parametric study is performed on the effects of gap-induced support nonlinearity on the dynamics characteristics of the LMR piping systems. Gap and impact problems in the LMR reactor components are identified and their mathematical models are illustrated, and the gap and impact problems in the seismic reactor scram are discussed. The mathematical treatments of various impact models are also described. The uncertainties in the current seismic impact analyses of LMR components and structures are presented. An impact test on a 1/10-scale LMR thermal liner is described. The test results indicated that several clusters of natural modes can be excited by the impact force. The frequency content of the excited modes depends on the duration of the impact force; the shorter the duration, the higher the frequency content

  6. Acoustic study of the characteristic temperature of metals

    Tekuchev, V.V.; Rygalov, L.N.; Ivanova, I.V.; Barashkov, B.I.

    2000-01-01

    The calculation of the Debye temperature for 64 metals, including Be, La, Mo, W, Os, Ni, Cd, In, Ta, U, Sc, Cs, Sr, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Th is carried out. The data on polonium and promethium are obtained for the first time. The calculation is performed with application of ultrasound velocity value at the melting temperature of the given metal. The average derivation of the calculational data on the Debye temperature from the published ones equals 12%. It is noted, that application of the acoustic method for determination of the characteristic temperature makes it possible to solve the wide range of theoretical and applied problems [ru

  7. Utilization of Plant Refuses as Component of Heavy Metal Ion ...

    The ability of the fabricated sensors to detect the presence of heavy metals was analyzed using electrochemical methods like cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Results showed that the fabricated electrode were able to detect the presence of mercury and lead ions in aqueous solutions ...

  8. High temperature reactions between molybdenum and metal halides

    Boeroeczki, A.; Dobos, G.; Josepovits, V.K.; Hars, Gy.

    2006-01-01

    Good colour rendering properties, high intensity and efficacy are of vital importance for high-end lighting applications. These requirements can be achieved by high intensity discharge lamps doped with different metal halide additives (metal halide lamps). To improve their reliability, it is very important to understand the different failure processes of the lamps. In this paper, the corrosion reactions between different metal halides and the molybdenum electrical feed-through electrode are discussed. The reactions were studied in the feed-through of real lamps and on model samples too. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to establish the chemical states. In case of the model samples we have also used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) to measure the reaction product amounts. Based on the measurement results we were able to determine the most corrosive metal halide components and to understand the mechanism of the reactions

  9. Metal-coated optical fibers for high temperature sensing applications

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Wysokiński, Karol; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Kołakowska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowski, Piotr; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    An novel low-temperature method was used to enhance the corrosion resistance of copper or gold-coated optical fibers. A characterization of the elaborated materials and reports on selected studies such as cyclic temperature tests together with tensile tests is presented. Gold-coated optical fibers are proposed as a component of optical fiber sensors working in oxidizing atmospheres under temperatures exceeding 900 °C.

  10. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/N2 and Xe/O2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  11. Pumping liquid metal at high temperatures up to 1,673 kelvin

    Amy, C.; Budenstein, D.; Bagepalli, M.; England, D.; Deangelis, F.; Wilk, G.; Jarrett, C.; Kelsall, C.; Hirschey, J.; Wen, H.; Chavan, A.; Gilleland, B.; Yuan, C.; Chueh, W. C.; Sandhage, K. H.; Kawajiri, Y.; Henry, A.

    2017-10-01

    Heat is fundamental to power generation and many industrial processes, and is most useful at high temperatures because it can be converted more efficiently to other types of energy. However, efficient transportation, storage and conversion of heat at extreme temperatures (more than about 1,300 kelvin) is impractical for many applications. Liquid metals can be very effective media for transferring heat at high temperatures, but liquid-metal pumping has been limited by the corrosion of metal infrastructures. Here we demonstrate a ceramic, mechanical pump that can be used to continuously circulate liquid tin at temperatures of around 1,473-1,673 kelvin. Our approach to liquid-metal pumping is enabled by the use of ceramics for the mechanical and sealing components, but owing to the brittle nature of ceramics their use requires careful engineering. Our set-up enables effective heat transfer using a liquid at previously unattainable temperatures, and could be used for thermal storage and transport, electric power production, and chemical or materials processing.

  12. Correlation between temperature dependence of elastic moduli and Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal

    Bodryakov, V.Yu.; Povzner, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The correlation between the temperature dependence of elastic moduli and the Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal is analyzed in neglect of the temperature dependence of the Poison coefficient σ within the frames of the Debye-Grueneisen presentations. It is shown, that namely the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli determines primarily the temperature dependence of the Debye temperature Θ(T). On the other hand, the temperature dependence Θ(T) very weakly effects the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli. The later made it possible to formulate the self-consistent approach to calculation of the elastic moduli temperature dependence. The numerical estimates of this dependence parameters are conducted by the example of the all around compression modulus of the paramagnetic lutetium [ru

  13. Heat Transfer in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers at High Temperature

    Hafeez, Pakeeza

    Heat transfer though open-cell metal foam is experimentally studied for heat exchanger and heat shield applications at high temperatures (˜750°C). Nickel foam sheets with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per linear inch (PPI), have been used to make the heat exchangers and heat shields by using thermal spray coating to deposit an Inconel skin on a foam core. Heat transfer measurements were performed on a test rig capable of generating hot gas up to 1000°C. The heat exchangers were tested by exposing their outer surface to combustion gases at a temperature of 550°C and 750°C while being cooled by air flowing through them at room temperature at velocities up to 5 m/s. The temperature rise of the air, the surface temperature of the heat exchangers and the air temperature inside the heat exchanger were measured. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number were calculated for different velocities. The heat transfer performance of the 40PPI sample brazed with the foil is found to be the most efficient. Pressure drop measurements were also performed for 10 and 40PPI metal foam. Thermographic measurements were done on 40PPI foam heat exchangers using a high temperature infrared camera. A high power electric heater was used to produce hot air at 300°C that passed over the foam heat exchanger while the cooling air was blown through it. Heat shields were made by depositing porous skins on metal foam and it was observed that a small amount of coolant leaking through the pores notably reduces the heat transfer from the hot gases. An analytical model was developed based assuming local thermal non-equilibrium that accounts for the temperature difference between solid and fluid phase. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predicted values of the model.

  14. Anomalous Temperature Dependence in Metal-Black Phosphorus Contact.

    Li, Xuefei; Grassi, Roberto; Li, Sichao; Li, Tiaoyang; Xiong, Xiong; Low, Tony; Wu, Yanqing

    2018-01-10

    Metal-semiconductor contact has been the performance limiting problem for electronic devices and also dictates the scaling potential for future generation devices based on novel channel materials. Two-dimensional semiconductors beyond graphene, particularly few layer black phosphorus, have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic properties such as anisotropy and high mobility. However, due to its ultrathin body nature, few layer black phosphorus-metal contact behaves differently than conventional Schottky barrier (SB) junctions, and the mechanisms of its carrier transport across such a barrier remain elusive. In this work, we examine the transport characteristic of metal-black phosphorus contact under varying temperature. We elucidated the origin of apparent negative SB heights extracted from classical thermionic emission model and also the phenomenon of metal-insulator transition observed in the current-temperature transistor characteristic. In essence, we found that the SB height can be modulated by the back-gate voltage, which beyond a certain critical point becomes so low that the injected carrier can no longer be described by the conventional thermionic emission theory. The transition from transport dominated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for the high energy tail states, to that of a Fermi distribution by low energy Fermi sea electrons, is the physical origin of the observed metal-insulator transition. We identified two distinctive tunneling limited transport regimes in the contact: vertical and longitudinal tunneling.

  15. Trabecular metal acetabular components in primary total hip arthroplasty

    Laaksonen, Inari; Lorimer, Michelle; Gromov, Kirill

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose - Trabecular metal (TM) cups have demonstrated favorable results in acetabular revision and their use in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing. Some evidence show that TM cups might decrease periprosthetic infection (PPI) incidence. We compared the survivorship...... of TM cups with that of other uncemented cups in primary THA, and evaluated whether the use of TM cups is associated with a lower risk of PPI. Patients and methods - 10,113 primary THAs with TM cup and 85,596 THAs with other uncemented cups from 2 high-quality national arthroplasty registries were...

  16. Heavy metals in the landscape components of the Kalmykia

    L. Ch. Sangadzhieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb in the soil of nord-west part of Precaspian low-land and their subsequent distribution over the trophic chain: plant fodder - sheep are investiqаtеd. It was revealed that the highest biogenic accumulation is characteristic of Zn and Cu at all the levels of trophic chain. An increase in the transition coefficients for the most toxic elements Pb, Cd is observed, which is an evidence of their accumulation in the higher levels of trophic chain.

  17. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V.; Mashirev, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  18. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research, Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  19. Consistent Practices for Characterizing the Detection Limits of Fracture Critical Metallic Component Inspection Systems

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA-STD-5009 requires that successful flaw detection by NDE methods be statistically qualified for use on fracture critical metallic components using Probability of...

  20. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    Radiation effects on metals or alloys used in fast reactor core components are examined in the papers presented at this conference, the accent being put on swelling and irradiation creep of steels and nickel alloys

  1. HTR-E project. High-temperature components and systems

    Breuil, E.; Exner, R.

    2002-01-01

    The HTR-E European project (four years project) is proposed for the 5th Framework Programme and concerns the technical developments needed for the innovative components of a modern HTR with a direct cycle. These components have been selected with reference to the present projects (GT-MHR, PBMR): (1) the helium turbine, the recuperator heat exchanger, the electro-magnetic bearings and the helium rotating seal; (2) the tribology. Sliding innovative components in helium environment are particularly concerned. (3) the helium purification system. Recommendations on impurities contents have to be provided in accordance with the materials proposed for the innovative components. The main outcomes expected from the HTR-E project are the design recommendations and identification of further R and D needs for these components. This will be based: (1) on experience feedback from European past helium test loops and reactors; (2) on design studies, thermal-hydraulic and structural analyses; (3) and on experimental tests

  2. Measurement of mechanical properties of metallic glass at elevated temperature using sonic resonance method

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Zhang, Haifeng; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are fully amorphous multi-component alloys with homogeneous and isotropic structure down to the atomic scale. Some attractive attributes of bulk metallic glasses include high strength and hardness as well as excellent corrosion and wear resistance. However, there are few reports and limited understanding of their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. We used a nondestructive sonic resonance method to measure the Young's modulus and Shear modulus of a bulk metallic glass, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, at elevated temperatures. The measurement system was designed using a laser displacement sensor to detect the sonic vibration produced by a speaker on the specimen in high-temperature furnace. The OMICRON Bode-100 Vector Network Analyzer was used to sweep the frequency and its output was connected to the speaker which vibrated the material in its flexural mode and torsional modes. A Polytec OFV-505 laser vibrometer sensor was used to capture the vibration of the material at various frequencies. The flexural and torsional mode frequency shift due to the temperature variation was used to determine the Young's modulus and Shear modulus. The temperature range of measurement was from 50°C to 350°C. The Young's modulus was found to reduce from 100GPa to 94GPa for the 300°C temperature span. Similarly, the Shear modulus decreased from 38.5GPa at 50°C to 36GPa at 350°C.

  3. Molybdenum-A Key Component of Metal Alloys

    Kropschot, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum, whose chemical symbol is Mo, was first recognized as an element in 1778. Until that time, the mineral molybdenite-the most important source of molybdenum-was believed to be a lead mineral because of its metallic gray color, greasy feel, and softness. In the late 19th century, French metallurgists discovered that molybdenum, when alloyed (mixed) with steel in small quantities, creates a substance that is remarkably tougher than steel alone and is highly resistant to heat. The alloy was found to be ideal for making tools and armor plate. Today, the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloying agent in stainless steel, alloy steels, and superalloys to enhance hardness, strength, and resistance to corrosion.

  4. Hydrogen transport behavior of metal coatings for plasma-facing components

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Plasma-facing components for experimental and commercial fusion reactor studies may include cladding or coatings of refractory metals like tungsten on metallic structural substrates such as copper, vanadium alloys and austenitic stainless steel. Issues of safety and fuel economy include the potential for inventory buildup and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies with 3 keV D{sub 3}{sup +} ion beams to investigate the hydrogen transport behavior in tungsten coatings on substrates of copper. These experiments entailed measurements of the deuterium re-emission and permeation rates of tungsten, copper, and tungsten-coated copper specimens at temperatures ranging from 638 to 825 K and implanting particle fluxes of approximately 5x10{sup 19} D/m{sup 2} s. Diffusion constants and surface recombination coefficients with enhancement factors due to sputtering were obtained from these measurements. These data may be used in calculations to estimate permeation rates and inventory buildups for proposed diverter designs. (orig.).

  5. Hydrogen transport behavior of metal coatings for plasma-facing components

    Anderl, R. A.; Holland, D. F.; Longhurst, G. R.

    1990-12-01

    Plasma-facing components for experimental and commercial fusion reactor studies may include cladding or coatings of refractory metals like tungsten on metallic structural substrates such as copper, vanadium alloys and austenitic stainless steel. Issues of safety and fuel economy include the potential for inventory buildup and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies with 3 keV D +3 ion beams to investigate the hydrogen transport behavior in tungsten coatings on substrates of copper. These experiments entailed measurements of the deuterium re-emission and permeation rates for tungsten, copper, and tungsten-coated copper specimens at temperatures ranging from 638 to 825 K and implanting particle fluxes of approximately 5 × 10 19 D/m 2 s. Diffusion constants and surface recombination coefficients with enhancement factors due to sputtering were obtained from these measurements. These data may be used in calculations to estimate permeation rates and inventory buildups for proposed diverter designs.

  6. Numerical simulation of stress distribution in Inconel 718 components realized by metal injection molding during supercritical debinding

    Agne, Aboubakry; Barrière, Thierry

    2018-05-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a process combining advantages of thermoplastic injection molding and powder metallurgy process in order to manufacture components with complex and near net-shape geometries. The debinding of a green component can be performed in two steps, first by using solvent debinding in order to extract the organic part of the binder and then by thermal degradation of the rest of the binder. A shorter and innovative method for extracting an organic binder involves the use of supercritical fluid instead of a regular solvent. The debinding via a supercritical fluid was recently investigated to extract organic binders contained in components obtained by Metal Injection Molding. It consists to put the component in an enclosure subjected to high pressure and temperature. The supercritical fluid has various properties depending on these two conditions, e.g., density and viscosity. The high-pressure combined with the high temperature during the process affect the component structure. Three mechanisms contributing to the deformation of the component can been differentiated: thermal expansion, binder extraction and supercritical fluid effect on the outer surfaces of the component. If one supposes that, the deformation due to binder extraction is negligible, thermal expansion and the fluid effect are probably the main mechanisms that can produce several stress. A finite-element model, which couples fluid-structures interaction and structural mechanics, has been developed and performed on the Comsol Multiphysics® finite-element software platform allowed to estimate the stress distribution during the supercritical debinding of MIM component composed of Inconel 718 powders, polypropylene, polyethylene glycol and stearic acid as binder. The proposed numerical simulations allow the estimation of the stress distribution with respect to the processing parameters for MIM components during the supercritical debinding process using a stationary solver.

  7. Creative design-by-analysis solutions applied to high-temperature components

    Dhalla, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    Elevated temperature design has evolved over the last two decades from design-by-formula philosophy of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Sections I and VIII (Division 1), to the design-by-analysis philosophy of Section III, Code Case N-47. The benefits of design-by-analysis procedures, which were developed under a US-DOE-sponsored high-temperature structural design (HTSD) program, are illustrated in the paper through five design examples taken from two U.S. liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants. Emphasis in the paper is placed upon the use of a detailed, nonlinear finite element analysis method to understand the structural response and to suggest design optimization so as to comply with Code Case N-47 criteria. A detailed analysis is cost-effective, if selectively used, to qualify an LMR component for service when long-lead-time structural forgings, procured based upon simplified preliminary analysis, do not meet the design criteria, or the operational loads are increased after the components have been fabricated. In the future, the overall costs of a detailed analysis will be reduced even further with the availability of finite element software used on workstations or PCs

  8. Metal nanoparticle film-based room temperature Coulomb transistor.

    Willing, Svenja; Lehmann, Hauke; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Single-electron transistors would represent an approach to developing less power-consuming microelectronic devices if room temperature operation and industry-compatible fabrication were possible. We present a concept based on stripes of small, self-assembled, colloidal, metal nanoparticles on a back-gate device architecture, which leads to well-defined and well-controllable transistor characteristics. This Coulomb transistor has three main advantages. By using the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett method, we combine high-quality chemically synthesized metal nanoparticles with standard lithography techniques. The resulting transistors show on/off ratios above 90%, reliable and sinusoidal Coulomb oscillations, and room temperature operation. Furthermore, this concept allows for versatile tuning of the device properties such as Coulomb energy gap and threshold voltage, as well as period, position, and strength of the oscillations.

  9. Metal nanoparticle film–based room temperature Coulomb transistor

    Willing, Svenja; Lehmann, Hauke; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Single-electron transistors would represent an approach to developing less power–consuming microelectronic devices if room temperature operation and industry-compatible fabrication were possible. We present a concept based on stripes of small, self-assembled, colloidal, metal nanoparticles on a back-gate device architecture, which leads to well-defined and well-controllable transistor characteristics. This Coulomb transistor has three main advantages. By using the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett method, we combine high-quality chemically synthesized metal nanoparticles with standard lithography techniques. The resulting transistors show on/off ratios above 90%, reliable and sinusoidal Coulomb oscillations, and room temperature operation. Furthermore, this concept allows for versatile tuning of the device properties such as Coulomb energy gap and threshold voltage, as well as period, position, and strength of the oscillations. PMID:28740864

  10. Comparative study of material loss at the taper interface in retrieved metal-on-polyethylene and metal-on-metal femoral components from a single manufacturer.

    Bills, Paul; Racasan, Radu; Bhattacharya, Saugatta; Blunt, Liam; Isaac, Graham

    2017-08-01

    There have been a number of reports on the occurrence of taper corrosion and/or fretting and some have speculated on a link to the occurrence of adverse local tissue reaction specifically in relation to total hip replacement which have a metal-on-metal bearing. As such a study was carried out to compare the magnitude of material loss at the taper in a series of retrieved femoral heads used in metal-on-polyethylene bearings with that in a series of retrieved heads used in metal-on-metal bearings. A total of 36 metal-on-polyethylene and 21 metal-on-metal femoral components were included in the study all of which were received from a customer complaint database. Furthermore, a total of nine as-manufactured femoral components were included to provide a baseline for characterisation. All taper surfaces were assessed using an established corrosion scoring method and measurements were taken of the female taper surface using a contact profilometry. In the case of metal-on-metal components, the bearing wear was also assessed using coordinate metrology to determine whether or not there was a relationship between bearing and taper material loss in these cases. The study found that in this cohort the median value of metal-on-polyethylene taper loss was 1.25 mm 3 with the consequent median value for metal-on-metal taper loss being 1.75 mm 3 . This study also suggests that manufacturing form can result in an apparent loss of material from the taper surface determined to have a median value of 0.59 mm 3 . Therefore, it is clear that form variability is a significant confounding factor in the measurement of material loss from the tapers of femoral heads retrieved following revision surgery.

  11. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  12. Temperatures and enthalpies of melting of alkali-metal perrhenates

    Lukas, W.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    1982-01-01

    Melting temperatures and enthalpies of melting were determined for alkali-metal perrhenates by differential enthalpic analysis using a high-temperature Calvet microcalorimeter. The following values were obtained: for LiReO 4 : 692 K and 24.9 kJ.mol -1 ; for NaReO 4 : 693 K and 33 kJ.mol -1 ; for KReO 4 : 828 K and 36 kJ.mol -1 ; for RbReO 4 : 878 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 ; for CsReO 4 : 893 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 . (author)

  13. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  14. Hillock Formation, Metal Lifting and Voiding of an AlCu Metallization due to Temperature Treatment

    Foerster, J.; Schuderer, B.; Haeuser, M.; Kallensee, O.; Gross, Th.

    2004-01-01

    A metalstack with a layer composition of Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN was evaluated in an AlCu metallization. Reliability results show a higher electromigration lifetime compared to a Ti/AlCu/Ti/TiN stack. During the metallization process flow large elevations were seen by optical inspection. Analysis by SEM cross sections showed different deviations. A metal lifting with void formation as consequence was found in large aluminum areas above tungsten plugs. Also voiding in the passivated Metal 2 and the unpassivated Metal 3 with a cracked anti-reflective coating as a result of the expansion of the aluminum was seen. The influence of processes with high thermal budget on the stress behaviour of the new metalstack was investigated. The final annealing was found as the process with the most critical influence. This study shows the influence of different final annealing temperatures on hillock formation and voiding using a Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN metalstack. A reduction of the maximum temperature of the final annealing process is necessary for using the new AlCu metallization stack. The use of a surface treatment before deposition showed an optimization of the adhesion

  15. Thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses at ultralow temperatures

    Rothfuss, Daniel Simon

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the first investigation of thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses in the range between 6mK and 300K. Measuring the thermal conductivity provides the possibility to probe the fundamental interactions governing the heat flow in solids. At ultralow temperatures a novel contactless measuring technique was used, which is based on optical heating and paramagnetic temperature sensors that are read out by a SQUID magnetometer. Below the critical temperature T c the results can be described by resonant scattering of phonons by tunneling systems. Above T c the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity can be described successfully within a model considering not only electrons and phonons but also localized modes as scattering centres. To expand the accessible temperature range for experiments an adiabatic nuclear demagnetization refrigerator was set up. For measuring the base temperature a novel noise thermometer was developed which enables continuous measuring of the temperature in this temperature range for the first time. Therefore the magnetic Johnson noise of a massive copper cylinder is simultaneously monitored by two SQUID magnetometers. A subsequent cross-correlation suppresses the amplifier noise by more than one order of magnitude. The thermometer was characterized between 42μK and 0.8K showing no deviation from the expected linear behaviour between the power spectral density of the thermal noise and the temperature.

  16. The effects of fire temperatures on water soluble heavy metals.

    Pereira, P.; Ubeda, X.; Martin, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Fire ash are majority composed by base cations, however the mineralized organic matter, led also available to transport a higher quantity of heavy metals that potentially could increase a toxicity in soil and water resources. The amount availability of these elements depend on the environment were the fire took place, burning temperature and combusted tree specie. The soil and water contamination from fire ash has been neglected, because the majority of studies are focused on base cations dynamic. Our research, beside contemplate major elements, is focused in to study the behavior of heavy metals released from ash slurries created at several temperatures under laboratory environment, prescribed fires and wildland fires. The results presented in these communication are preliminary and study the presence of Aluminium (Al3+), Manganese (Mn2+), Iron (Fe2+) and Zinc (Zn2+) of ash slurries generated in laboratory environment at several temperatures (150°, 200°, 250°, 300°, 350°, 400°,450°, 500°, 550°C) from Quercus suber, Quercus robur, Pinus pinea and Pinus pinaster and from a low medium temperature prescribed fire in a forest dominated Quercus suber trees. We observed that ash produced at lower and medium temperatures (Pinus ashes. Fe2+ and Zn2+ showed a reduced concentration in test solution in relation to unburned sample at all temperatures of exposition. In the results obtained from prescribed fire, we identify a higher release of Al3+ and a decrease of the remain elements. The solubilization of these elements are related with pH levels and ash calcite content, because their ability to capture ions in solution. Moreover, the amount and the type of ions released in relation to unburned sample vary in each specie. In this study Al3+ release is related with Quercus species and Mn2+ with Pinus species. Fire ashes can be an environmental problem, because at long term can increase soil acidity. After all base cations have being leached, pH values decrease, and

  17. Metallurgical considerations in the design of creep exposed, high temperature components for advanced power plants

    Schubert, F.

    1990-08-01

    Metallic components in advanced power generating plants are subjected to temperatures at which the material properties are significantly time-dependent, so that the creep properties become dominant for the design. In this investigation, methods by which such components are to be designed are given, taking into account metallurgical principles. Experimental structure mechanics testing of component related specimens carried out for representative loading conditions has confirmed the proposed methods. The determination of time-dependent design values is based on a scatterband evaluation of long-term testing data obtained for a number of different heats of a given alloy. The application of computer-based databank systems is recommendable. The description of the technically important secondary creep rate based on physical metallurgy principles can be obtained using the exponential relationship originally formulated by Norton, ε min = k.σ n . The deformation of tubes observed under internal pressure with a superimposed static or cyclic tensile stress and a torsion loading can be adequately described with the derived, three-dimensional creep equation (Norton). This is also true for the description of creep ratcheting and creep buckling phenomena. By superimposing a cyclic stress, the average creep rate is increased in one of the principal deformation axes. This is also true for the creep crack growth rate. The Norton equation can be used to derive this type of deformation behaviour. (orig.) [de

  18. Forging of metallic nano-objects for the fabrication of submicron-size components

    Roesler, J; Mukherji, D; Schock, K; Kleindiek, S

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, nanoscale fabrication has developed considerably, but the fabrication of free-standing nanosize components is still a great challenge. The fabrication of metallic nanocomponents utilizing three basic steps is demonstrated here. First, metallic alloys are used as factories to produce a metallic raw stock of nano-objects/nanoparticles in large numbers. These objects are then isolated from the powder containing thousands of such objects inside a scanning electron microscope using manipulators, and placed on a micro-anvil or a die. Finally, the shape of the individual nano-object is changed by nanoforging using a microhammer. In this way free-standing, high-strength, metallic nano-objects may be shaped into components with dimensions in the 100 nm range. By assembling such nanocomponents, high-performance microsystems can be fabricated, which are truly in the micrometre scale (the size ratio of a system to its component is typically 10:1)

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS AMONG THE COMPONENTS OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS (REVIEW

    N. Kolesnyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review scientific sources on the distribution of heavy metals among the components of freshwater ecosystems. Findings. The review of the works of many scientists showed that heavy metals are widespread in the biotic and abiotic components of freshwater ecosystems. The article highlights the distribution of heavy metals in water, bottom sediments, natural food base, fish organs and tissues. It has been shown that as a result of global pollution of the ecosystem, the majority of Ukrainian rivers belong to polluted and very polluted. Of special interest are the studies of the distribution of heavy metals in phytoplankton, zooplankton, and zoobenthos because these components occupy a certain position in fish food chain. The presence of heavy metals in the natural food base showed that, on one hand, it could accumulate heavy metals in large amounts in such a way cleaning the water; and on the other hand, the heavy metals could migrate in the food web and contaminate fish. Ones of objects, which should be given attention when assessing toxicologic pollution, are aquatic plants, in particular phytoplankton. Studies showed that the accumulation of heavy metals in plants occurred first of all by their adsorption on the cellular wall. It explains the maximum adsorption of heavy metals by plants immediately after introduction of heavy metals into their culture. Fish as a rule occupy in the food web of water bodies one of the last places. They actively move in the aquatic environment and accumulating heavy metals at the same time they provide the most integrated and precise estimate of environmental pollution. By analyzing the distribution of heavy metals in fish organs and tissues, depending on their ability to accumulate them, it can be noted that the accumulation is the most intensive in such organs as gills, liver, and kidneys. Usually, their lowest content is observed in muscles that is important for human life because they are the main

  20. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of metallic work functions at low temperatures. Progress report

    Pipes, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made under ERDA Contract No. EY-76-S-02-2314.002 is described. Efforts to gain theoretical insight into the temperature dependence of the contact potential of Nb near the superconducting transition have only been qualitatively successful. Preliminary measurements of adsorbed 4 He gas on the temperature dependence of the contact potentials of metals were performed and compared with a previously developed theory

  1. Thermal Simulation of the Component Rework Profile Temperature

    Nurminen, Janne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the possibilities and feasibility of the ther-mal simulation for the modeling of the rework process. The rework process modeling could enable an easy and fast access to the component and PWB level thermally critical effects like over and under heating of the component during the rework process. The modeling could also be used as a help of the real rework profile definition at an early phase of the electrical device development. The work includes a...

  2. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  3. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  4. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    Mlynek, Jaroslav, E-mail: jaroslav.mlynek@tul.cz; Knobloch, Roman, E-mail: roman.knobloch@tul.cz [Department of Mathematics, FP Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Srb, Radek, E-mail: radek.srb@tul.cz [Institute of Mechatronics and Computer Engineering Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  5. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    Mlynek, Jaroslav; Knobloch, Roman; Srb, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article

  6. Effect of temperature on swelling and bubble growth in metals

    Tiwari, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the swelling of copper-boron alloys has been studied in the temperature range of 900-1040deg C. It is observed that beyond 1030deg C, swelling as well as the rate of bubble growth decrease. Similar characteristics of the bubble growth have been observed in aluminium-boron alloys also. At 590deg C, the bubble growth in aluminium-boron alloys is faster as compared to that at 640deg C. It thus appears that the swelling as well as the growth of the gas bubble are retarded at temperatures near the melting point in metals. Possible reasons for this kind of behaviour are discussed. (author)

  7. Exploring liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) concepts-Liquid metal film flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

    Narula, M.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.; Morley, N.B.; Ni, M.; Miraghaie, R.; Burris, J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fast moving liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has been looked upon with considerable interest over the past several years, both by the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. Flowing liquid walls provide an ever replenishing contact surface to the plasma, leading to very effective particle pumping and surface heat flux removal. A key feasibility issue for flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, pertains to their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior under the spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device. MHD forces hinder the development of a smooth and controllable liquid metal flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

  8. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    Palmer, A. J.; Woolstenhulme, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  9. Brazing Refractory Metals Used In High-Temperature Nuclear Instrumentation

    Palmer, A.J.; Woolstenhulme, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR 1) experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed

  10. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    Palmer, A. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Woolstenhulme, C. J. [EG and G Services, Inc., (United States)

    2009-07-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  11. Monitoring of coolant temperature stratification on piping components in WWER-440 NPPs

    Hudcovsky, S.; Slanina, M.; Badiar, S.

    2001-01-01

    The presentation deals with the aims of non-standard temperature measurements installed on primary and secondary circuit in WWER-440 NPPs, explains reasons of coolant temperature stratification on the piping components. It describes methods of the measurements on pipings, range of installation of the temperature measurements in EBO and EMO units and illustrates results of measurements of coolant temperature stratification. (Authors)

  12. Temperature effect on X-ray photoelectron spectra of 3d transition metal ions

    Kochur, A.G.; Kozakov, A.T.; Yavna, V.A.; Daniel, Ph.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 2p XPS of 3d metal ions are calculated in an isolated ion approximation. • 2p XPS of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe ions are temperature dependent even at room temperature. • Temperature effect on 3p XPS is slight. • No temperature effect on 3s XPS is discovered. - Abstract: Temperature effect on 2p- 3s- and 3p X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of various ions of Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe is studied theoretically within an isolated ion approximation. It is shown that the 2p XPS of those ions are temperature dependent even at room temperature due to a very slight energy splitting between the ground-state-term total-momentum J-components which can be thermally populated. Most significant temperature effect is expected in the 2p-spectra of Ti 2+ (3d 2 ), V 2+ (3d 3 ), Cr 2+ (3d 4 ), Mn 3+ (3d 4 ), and Mn 3+ (3d 4 ) ions. The temperature effect on 3p XPS is slight. No temperature effect on 3s XPS is expected

  13. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  14. Release of gases from uranium metal at high temperatures

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Shankaran, P.S.; Chhapru, G.C.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Venugopal, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the ambient environmental conditions, different gaseous species could get entrapped in uranium metal ingots or pellets. On heating, melting or vapourising uranium metal, these get released and depending on the composition, may cause detrimental effects either within the metal matrix itself or on the surrounding materials/environment. For instance, these gases may affect the performance of the uranium metal, which is used as fuel in the heavy water moderated research reactors, CIRUS and DHRUVA. Hence, detailed investigations have been carried out on the release of gases over a temperature range 875-1500 K employing hot vacuum extraction technique, in specimen uranium pellets made from uranium rods/ingots. Employing an on-line quadrupole mass spectrometer, the analysis of released gases was carried out. The isobaric interference between carbon monoxide and nitrogen at m/e = 28 in the mass spectrometric analysis has been resolved by considering their fragmentation patterns. Since no standards are available to evaluate the results, only the reproducibility is tested. The precision (relative standard deviation at 3σ level) of the method is ±5%. The minimum detectable gas content employing the method is 5.00 x 10 -09 m 3 . About 4 x 10 -04 m 3 /kg of gas is released from uranium pellets, with hydrogen as the main constituent. The gas content increases with storage in air

  15. Xenon Recovery at Room Temperature using Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Elsaidi, Sameh K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Ongari, Daniele [Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, Institut des Sciences et Ingeénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de l' Industrie 17 1951 Sion Valais Switzerland; Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mohamed, Mona H. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, P. O. Box 426 Ibrahimia Alexandria 21321 Egypt; Haranczyk, Maciej [IMDEA Materials Institute, c/Eric Kandel 2 28906 Getafe, Madrid Spain; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical and Computational Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-07-24

    Xenon is known to be a very efficient anesthetic gas but its cost prohibits the wider use in medical industry and other potential applications. It has been shown that Xe recovery and recycle from anesthetic gas mixture can significantly reduce its cost as anesthetic. The current technology uses series of adsorbent columns followed by low temperature distillation to recover Xe, which is expensive to use in medical facilities. Herein, we propose much efficient and simpler system to recover and recycle Xe from simulant exhale anesthetic gas mixture at room temperature using metal organic frameworks. Among the MOFs tested, PCN-12 exhibits unprecedented performance with high Xe capacity, Xe/O2, Xe/N2 and Xe/CO2 selectivity at room temperature. The in-situ synchrotron measurements suggest the Xe is occupied in the small pockets of PCN-12 compared to unsaturated metal centers (UMCs). Computational modeling of adsorption further supports our experimental observation of Xe binding sites in PCN-12.

  16. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    Sato, Toshimi; Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components. (author)

  17. Evaluation test of high temperature strain gages used in a stethoscope for OGL-1 components in an elevated temperature service

    Sato, Toshimi (Kyowa Electronic Inst. Co. Ltd. (Japan)); Tanaka, Isao; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki; Toshiaki

    1982-08-01

    The stethoscope for OGL-1 components in a elevated temperature service (SOCETS) is a measuring system of evaluation integrity of structures for high temperature pipings during operations of Japan Material Testing Reactor. This paper is described about the results on fundamental performance on high temperature strain gages. From their test results that have been based on correlation of temperature-timestrain factors, it became clear that two weldable strain gages and a capacitance strain gage were available for strain measurements of OGL-1 components.

  18. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: Metal components of BWR containment systems

    2000-10-01

    plant components addressed in the reports. This report addresses the metal components of BWR containment systems. The primary ageing mechanisms that may potentially impact the structural capacity, leaktight integrity, or service life of BWR containments are corrosion of metal components and stress corrosion cracking of bellows. Other potential degradation mechanisms include fatigue and mechanical wear. Areas of concern are where surfaces are inaccessible for inspection (e.g areas adjacent to floors, where the containment vessel is embedded in concrete, and locations adjacent to equipment or other structures)

  19. Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) assessment of critical component unavailability in liquid metal reactors

    Koger, K.H.; Haire, M.J.; Humphrys, B.L.; Manneschmidt, J.F.; Setoguchi, K.; Nakai, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) is the largest repository of liquid metal reactor (LMR) component reliability data in the world. It is jointly sponsored by the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. The CREDO data base contains information on a population of more than 20,000 components and approximately 1500 event records. A conservative estimation is that the total component operating hours is approaching 2.2 billion hours. The work reported here focuses on the availability information contained in CREDO and the development of availability critical items lists. That is, individual components are ranked in prioritized lists from worst to best performers from an availability standpoint. Availability as used here is an inherent characteristics of the component and is not necessarily related to plant operability. A major observation is that a few components have a much higher unavailability factor than the average. The top fifteen components contribute 93%, 77%, and 87% of the total system unavailability for EBR-II, FFTF, and JOYO respectively. Critical components common to all three sites are mechanical pumps and electromagnetic pumps. Application of resources to these components with the highest unavailability will have the greatest effect on overall availability. All three sites demonstrate that low maintainability (i.e., long repair times), rather than unreliability (i.e., high failure rates), are the main contributors, by about a two-to-one margin, to liquid metal system unavailability

  20. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells.

    Tripković, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-03-07

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO(2), SnO(2), NbO(2), ZrO(2), SiO(2), Ta(2)O(5) and Nb(2)O(5)) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtO(x) (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO(2) might be a good support for platinum redispersion at PEMFC cathodes.

  1. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  2. Low temperature intermediate band metallic behavior in Ti implanted Si

    Olea, Javier, E-mail: oleaariza@fis.ucm.es; Pastor, David; Garcia-Hemme, Eric; Garcia-Hernansanz, Rodrigo; Prado, Alvaro del; Martil, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Diaz, German

    2012-08-31

    Si samples implanted with very high Ti doses and subjected to Pulsed-Laser Melting (PLM) have been electrically analyzed in the scope of a two-layer model previously reported based on the Intermediate Band (IB) theory. Conductivity and Hall effect measurements using the van der Pauw technique suggest that the insulator-metal transition takes place for implantation doses in the 10{sup 14}-10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} range. Results of the sample implanted with the 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} dose show a metallic behavior at low temperature that is explained by the formation of a p-type IB out of the Ti deep levels. This suggests that the IB would be semi-filled, which is essential for IB photovoltaic devices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricated high dose Ti implanted Si samples for intermediate band research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the electronic transport properties in the 7-300 K range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show an insulator to metallic transition when the intermediate band is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intermediate band is semi-filled and populated by holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We satisfactorily explain the electrical behavior by an intermediate band model.

  3. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    Gundiler, I.H.; Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support The Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials. SNL developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies

  4. Mechanical properties, reliability assessment and design of ceramic components used in high temperature assemblies

    Bendeich, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of ceramic materials in high temperature structural components holds may advantages over conventional materials such as metals. These include high temperature strength, creep resistance, wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and stiffness. The tradeoff for these improved properties is the brittle nature of ceramics and their tendency for catastrophic failure and lack of damage tolerance. In this work some the various strategies available to overcome these limitations are reviewed. These include stochastic design strategies using the Weibull and Batdorf methods of failure probability prediction rather than the more familiar deterministic methods. Fracture mechanics analysis is also used extensively in this work to predict damage tolerance and failure conditions. A range of testing methods was utilised to provide material information for the methods outlined above. These included: flexural strength measurement for the determination of failure probability parameters; fracture toughness measurement using indentation methods and crack growth measurement; thermal expansion measurement; temperature dependant dynamic Young's modulus measurement; and thermal shock testing using a central heating laser. A new inverse method for measuring specific heat was developed and critically examined for practical use. This is particularly valuable in modelling transient thermal conditions for use in thermal shock analysis. A shape optimisation technique utilising a biological growth law was adapted for use with ceramic components utilising failure probability as the objective function. These methods were utilised in the design and subsequent failure analysis of a high temperature hotpress ram. The results of the failure probability analysis showed that the design had a very low probability of failure under normal operating conditions. Fracture mechanics analysis indicated that damage tolerance in the critical retaining bolt mechanism was high with damage likely to cause

  5. Mechanical properties of 1950's vintage 304 stainless steel weldment components after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.; Thomas, J.K.; Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L.; Lott, R.A.; Begley, J.A.; Shogan, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    The reactor vessels of the nuclear production reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were constructed in the 1950's from Type 304 stainless steel plates welded with Type 308 stainless steel filler using the multipass metal inert gas process. An irradiated mechanical properties database has been developed for the vessel with materials from archival primary coolant system piping irradiated at low temperatures (75 to 150 degrees C) in the State University of New York at Buffalo reactor (UBR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses of 0.065 to 2.1 dpa. Fracture toughness, tensile, and Charpy-V impact properties of the weldment components (base, weld, and weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ)) have been measured at temperatures of 25 degrees C and 125 degrees C in the L-C and C-L orientations for materials in both the irradiated and unirradiated conditions for companion specimens. Fracture toughness and tensile properties of specimens cut from an SRS reactor vessel sidewall with doses of 0.1 and 0.5 dpa were also measured at temperatures of 25 and 125 degrees C. The irradiated materials exhibit hardening with loss of work hardenability and a reduction in toughness relative to the unirradiated materials. The HFIR-irradiated materials show an increase in yield strength between about 20% and 190% with a concomitant tensile strength increase between about 15% to 30%. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameters and Charpy-V energy absorption both decrease and show only a slight sensitivity to dose. The irradiation-induced decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J def at 1 mm crack extension) is between 20% to 65%; the range of J 1C values are 72.8 to 366 kJ/m 2 for the irradiated materials. Similarly, Charpy V-notch results show a 40% to 60% decrease in impact energies

  6. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Fritioff, A. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fritioff@botan.su.se; Kautsky, L. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Greger, M. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants.

  7. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Fritioff, A.; Kautsky, L.; Greger, M.

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants

  8. Dynamics of a metal overlayer on metallic substrates: High temperature effects

    Rahman, T.S.; Black, J.E.; Tian, Zeng Ju

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the structure and the dynamics of a bimetallic system consisting of a hexagonal (almost) overlayer of Ag on a square lattice (Ni(100) and Cu(100)), as a function of the surface temperature. In each case the structure is ''nearly'' incommensurate giving rise to a low frequency Goldstone mode. Also, the overlayer atoms slosh back and forth over the substrate in a corrugated fashion. The calculated dispersion of the Ag/metal vertical mode, at room temperature, is in excellent agreement with experimental data. At higher temperatures floater atoms appear on top of the overlayer displaying a variety of cluster formations and also exchanges with the substrate atoms leading to surface disordering, interdiffusion and melting

  9. High temperature tribological properties of plasma-sprayed metallic coatings containing ceramic particles

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    For sealing a moving metal component with a dense silica-based ceramic pre-heated at 800 C, coatings with a low coefficient of friction and moderate wear loss are required. As reported previously, plasma-sprayed coatings containing solid lubricants could reduce sliding wear in high-temperature applications. Plasma-sprayed metal-based coatings containing ceramic particles have been considered for high temperature sealing. Selected metal powders (NiCoCrAlY, CuNi, CuNiIn, Ag, Cu) and ceramic particles (boron nitride, Zeta-B ceramic) were agglomerated to form suitable spray powders. Plasma-sprayed composite coatings and reference materials were tested in a modified pin-on-disc apparatus in which the stationary disc consisted of a dense silica-based ceramic piece initially heated at 800 C and allowed to cool down during tests. The influence of single exposure and repeated contacts with a dense silica-based ceramic material pre-heated to 800 C on the coefficient of friction, wear loss and damage to the ceramic piece was evaluated. Being submitted to a single exposure at high temperature, coatings containing malleable metals such as indium, silver and copper performed well. The outstanding tribological characteristics of the copper-Zeta-B ceramic coating was attributed to the formation of a glazed layer on the surface of this coating which lasted over exposures to high temperature. This glazed layer, composed of fine oxidation products, provided a smooth and polished surface and helped maintaining the coefficient of friction low

  10. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  11. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    -, layer-, and temperature-dependent. The last part of this work is concerned about the temperature-driven reorientation transition in thin metallic films. For the description of the magnetic anisotropy in thin films the dipole interaction as well as the spin-orbit interaction have to be included in the model. By calculating the temperature-dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy it is found that both types of temperature-driven reorientation transitions, from out-of-plane to in-plane (''Fe-type'') and from in-plane to out-of-plane(''Ni-type'') magnetization are possible within the generalized Hubbard films

  12. Energetical fly ashes – separation and utilization of metallic valuable components

    Michalíková Františka

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution, methods of separating metals – Fe, Al, Ge from energetic wastes – fly ashes are presented along with further possibilities of utilization of particular valuable components for industrial purposes.In the contribution, properties of energetic wastes are presented influencing the contents, separability, and utilizability of metal-bearing valuable components. From among physical properties these are grain size distribution and surface area. Chemical properties are characterized by elements contained in combusted coal whose content after combustion is increased 2 to 4 times, depending on the content of ash and combustible matters in original coal. Mineralogical properties of energetic wastes are determined by the combustion process conditions in the course of which mineral novelties are produced in concentrations suitable for separation.In the contribution, methods of separation and utilization of metals such as Fe, Al, Ge are described. From literature information on the processing of Fe component, as well as from results of experiments made at the Department of Mineral Processing and Environmental Protection, Technical University of Kosice follows that the highest concentration and mass yield of the component can be obtained from black coal fly ashes produced in smelting boilers. The content of Al in Slovak energetic wastes is lower than the 30 % Al2O3 limit that conditions an economic technological processing. Only in the case of black coal fly ash from TEKO Kosice and EVO Vojany was the Al2O3 content of 32.93 %. Therefore, in an indirect way – by separating the residues of uncombusted coal and magnetite Fe – the content of Al in fly ash was increased.For Ge, a principle of selective sizing has been utilized.A complex utilization of energetic wastes, that is the separation of metallic components, elimination of particular metals and the subsequent treatment of nonmetallic residue, should be an effective solution in various

  13. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  14. Competitive sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components

    Covelo, E.F.; Vega, F.A.; Andrade, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components should be useful for modelling the behaviour of soils of arbitrary composition when contaminated by heavy metals, and for designing amendments increasing the fixation of heavy metals by soils polluted by these species. In this study the competitive sorption and desorption of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by humified organic matter, Fe and Mn oxides, kaolinite, vermiculite and mica were investigated. Due to the homogeneity of the sorbents, between-metal competition for binding sites led to their preferences for one or another metal being much more manifest than in the case of whole soils. On the basis of k d100 values (distribution coefficients calculated in sorption-desorption experiments in which the initial sorption solution contained 100 mg L -1 of each metal), kaolinite and mica preferentially sorbed and retained chromium; vermiculite, copper and zinc; HOM, Fe oxide and Mn oxide, lead (HOM and Mn oxide also sorbed and retained considerable amounts of copper). Mica only retained sorbed chromium, Fe oxide sorbed cadmium and lead, and kaolinite did not retain sorbed copper. The sorbents retaining the greatest proportions of sorbed metals were vermiculite and Mn oxide, but the ratios of k d100 values for retention and sorption suggest that cations were least reversibly bound by Mn oxide, and most reversibly by vermiculite

  15. Temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of metallic Y-Ba-Cu-O single crystals in the normal phase

    Miljak, M.; Zlatic, V.; Kos, I.; Aviani, I.; Hamzic, A.; Collin, G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy measurements of metallic Y-Ba-Cu-O compounds in the normal phase reveal a temperature-dependent diamagnetic component of the susceptibility that increases with decreasing temperature. The temperature variation of the susceptibility anisotropy and its total change do not seem to be much affected by the presence of the superconductivity at some lower temperature and could not be accounted for by superconducting fluctuations. Rather, the data remind one of the behavior of some quasi-two-dimensional metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces, reflecting the properties of the low-energy excitations in the normal phase. The anisotropy measurements above the bulk superconducting transition temperature T c reveal the nonlinear effects, which are due to the onset of superconductivity in disconnected grains. The existence of a two-step transition, typical for granular superconductors, should be taken into consideration if the normal-phase susceptibility data are compared with the theoretical predictions in the vicinity of T c

  16. Design rule for fatigue of welded joints in elevated-temperature nuclear components

    O'Connor, D.G.; Corum, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Elevated-temperature weldment fatigue failures have occurred in several operating liquid-metal reactor plants. Yet, ASME Code Case N-47, which governs the design of such plants in the United States, does not currently address the Code Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design recently proposed a fatigue strength reduction factor for austenitic and ferritic steel weldments. The factor is based on a variety of weld metal and weldment fatigue data generated in the United States, Europe, and Japan. This paper describes the factor and its bases, and it presents the results of confirmatory fatigue tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on 316 stainless steel tubes with axial and circumferential welds of 16-8-2 filler metal. These test results confirm the suitability of the design factor, and they support the premise that the metallurgical notch effect produced by yield strength variations across a weldment is largely responsible for the observed elevated-temperature fatigue strength reduction

  17. Metal Phosphates as Intermediate Temperature Proton Conducting Electrolytes

    Huang, Yunjie; Li, Q.F.; Pan, Chao

    2012-01-01

    A series of metal phosphates were synthesized and screened as potential proton conductor electrolytes for fuel cells and electrolysers operational at intermediate temperatures. Among the selected, niobium and bismuth phosphates exhibited a proton conductivity of 10-2 and 10-7 S cm-1, respectively......, under the anhydrous atmosphere at 250 °C, showing close correlation with the presence of hydroxyl groups in the phosphate phases. At the water partial pressure of above 0.6 atm, both phosphates possessed a proton conductivity to a level of above 3 x 10-2 S cm-1. Reasonable stability of the proton...... conductivity was observed under either a constant low water partial pressure or under a humidity cycling test within a period of more than 80 hours....

  18. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  19. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  20. Void growth and coalescence in metals deformed at elevated temperature

    Klöcker, H.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For metals deformed at elevated temperatures the growth of voids to coalescence is studied numerically. The voids are assumed to be present from the beginning of deformation, and the rate of deformation considered is so high that void growth is dominated by power law creep of the material, without...... any noticeable effect of surface diffusion. Axisymmetric unit cell model computations are used to study void growth in a material containing a periodic array of voids, and the onset of the coalescence process is defined as the stage where plastic flow localizes in the ligaments between neighbouring...... voids. The focus of the study is on various relatively high stress triaxialties. In order to represent the results in terms of a porous ductile material model a set of constitutive relations are used, which have been proposed for void growth in a material undergoing power law creep....

  1. A model for temperature dependent resistivity of metallic superlattices

    J. I. Uba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent resistivity of metallic superlattices, to first order approximation, is assumed to have same form as bulk metal, ρ(T = ρo + aT, which permits describing these structures as linear atomic chain. The assumption is, substantiated with the derivation of the above expression from the standard magnetoresistance equation, in which the second term, a Bragg scattering factor, is a correction to the usual model involving magnon and phonon scatterings. Fitting the model to Fe/Cr data from literature shows that Bragg scattering is dominant at T < 50 K and magnon and phonon coefficients are independent of experiment conditions, with typical values of 4.7 × 10−4 μΩcmK−2 and −8 ± 0.7 × 10−7μΩcmK−3. From the linear atomic chain model, the dielectric constant ε q , ω = 8 . 33 × 10 − 2 at Debye frequency for all materials and acoustic speed and Thomas – Fermi screening length are pressure dependent with typical values of 1.53 × 104 m/s and 1.80 × 109 m at 0.5 GPa pressure for an Fe/Cr structure.

  2. The precious metal effect in high temperature corrosion

    Wit, J.H.W. de (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Manen, P.A. van (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    Additions of platinum and to a smaller extent rhodium, to aluminium oxide forming alloys are known to improve the high temperature corrosion resistance of the alloys. This effect is known as the ''precious metal effect''. The expensive Pt-additions are used because of the increased lifetime of turbine-vanes especially in marine environments. Only a limited number of coating systems is commercially available, as JML-1, LDC-2 and RT22. Normally Pt is deposited electrochemically or by a fused salt method. After deposition the high or low activity pack-cementation-process is applied to obtain a PtNiAl-coating. In this paper the effect of platinum on the oxidation mechanism is discussed by comparing the oxidation mechanism of [beta]-NiAl and Pt20Ni30Al50. This composition agrees with the average composition of a platinum modified aluminide coating. The alloys were oxidized at temperatures from 1000 to 1200 C. The growth of the oxide scale on the NiAl alloy proceeds both by aluminium and by oxygen diffusion through the scale resulting in growth within the scale. On Pt20Ni30Al50 the growth of the scale is limited to the oxide/gas interface due to a predominant aluminium transport through the scale. The morphology of the oxide scales did not show large differences. However, the extensive void formation at the [beta]-NiAl/oxide interface was not observed on the Pt20Ni30Al50 samples. The absence of voids at the interface and the reduction of growth stresses, as a result of the outward growth of the scale, are the two likely reasons for the improved oxide scale adherence and can thus be considered, to be two elements of the ''precious metal effect''. (orig.)

  3. Additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V components by shaped metal deposition: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Baufeld, Bernd; Biest, Omer Van der; Gault, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    Shaped metal deposition (SMD) is a relatively new technology of additive manufacturing, which creates near-net shaped components by additive manufacture utilizing tungsten inert gas welding. Especially for Ti alloys, which are difficult to shape by traditional methods and for which the loss of material during machining is also very costly, SMD has great advantages. In the case of Ti-6Al-4V the dense SMD components exhibit large, columnar prior β grains, with a Widmanstaetten α/β microstructure. These prior β grains are slightly tilted in a direction following the temperature field resulting from the moving welding torch. The ultimate tensile strength is between 929 and 1014 MPa, depending on orientation and location of the tensile specimens. Tensile testing vertically to the deposition layers exhibits a strain at failure of 16 ± 3%, while testing parallel to the layers gives a lower value of about 9%.

  4. The Role of the Component Metals in the Toxicity of Military-Grade Tungsten Alloy

    Christy A. Emond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based composites have been recommended as a suitable replacement for depleted uranium. Unfortunately, one of these mixtures composed of tungsten (W, nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co induced rhabdomyosarcomas when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats and mice to simulate a shrapnel wound. The question arose as to whether the neoplastic effect of the mixture could be solely attributed to one or more of the metal components. To investigate this possibility, pellets with one or two of the component metals replaced with an identical amount of the biologically-inert metal tantalum (Ta were manufactured and implanted into the quadriceps of B6C3F1 mice. The mice were followed for two years to assess potential adverse health effects. Implantation with WTa, CoTa or WNiTa resulted in decreased survival, but not to the level reported for WNiCo. Sarcomas in the implanted muscle were found in 20% of the CoTa-implanted mice and 5% of the WTa- and WCoTa-implanted rats and mice, far below the 80% reported for WNiCo-implanted mice. The data obtained from this study suggested that no single metal is solely responsible for the neoplastic effects of WNiCo and that a synergistic effect of the three metals in tumor development was likely.

  5. Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature state-space components

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-Space Decomposition of Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C....

  6. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  7. Catalysis of metal-clay intercalation compound in the low temperature coal hydrogasification

    Fuda, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuhiko; Miyamoto, Norimitsu; Matsunaga, Toshiaki

    1986-10-23

    Focusing the hydrogenating methanation by gaseous phase catalytic reactions of low temperature volatile components, the catalytic effects of Ni metal and the effects of carriers having sensitive effects on the catalytic activities of Ni metal were studied. Sample coals were prepared from Shin-Yubari coal, and Ni hydride-montmorillonite complex catalysts and the catalysts produced by carring Ni nitrate on alumina and burning in hydrogen gas flows were prepared. The hydrogasification were carried out in a reaction tube. As a result, the montmorillonite-Ni compounds catalysts had high catalitic effects and high conversion ratio of 90% or more in the low temperature coal gasification. The catalitic effects of carried Ni metal strongly depended on the carrier substances, and the rank of effects for the carriers was montmorillonite>zeorite>TiO/sub 2/>alpha-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/>MgO>SiO/sub 2/=gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (3 figs, 3 tabs, 3 refs)

  8. Endogenous and exogenous components in the circadian variation of core body temperature in humans

    Hiddinga, AE; Beersma, DGM; VandenHoofdakker, RH

    Core body temperature is predominantly modulated by endogenous and exogenous components. In the present study we tested whether these two components can be reliably assessed in a protocol which lasts for only 120 h. In this so-called forced desynchrony protocol, 12 healthy male subjects (age 23.7

  9. Modelling and numerical simulation of Supercritical CO2 debinding of Inconel 718 components elaborated by Metal Injection Molding

    Aboubakry Agne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A debinding step using the supercritical state of a fluid has been increasingly investigated for extracting organic binders from components obtained by metal-injection molding. It consists of placing the component in an enclosure subjected to pressure and temperatures higher than the critical point to perform polymer extraction of the Metal-injection molding (MIM component. It is an alternative to conventional solvent debinding. The topic of this study is to model and simulate the supercritical debinding stage to elucidate the mechanism of polymer degradation and stabilization with a three-dimensional model. Modelling this extraction process would optimize the process on an industrial scale. It can be physically described by Fick’s law of diffusion. The model’s main parameter is the diffusion coefficient, which is identified by using linear regression based on the least-squares method. In the model, an effective length scale is specially developed to take into account the diffusion in all directions. The tests were performed for extracting polyethylene glycol, an organic additive, using supercritical CO2 in injected components. The feedstock is composed of polypropylene, polyethylene glycol, and stearic-acid as binder mixed with Inconel 718 super-alloy powders. The identified parameters were used to calculate the diffusion coefficient and simulate the supercritical debinding step on the Comsol Multiphysics® finite-element software platform to predict the remaining binder. The obtained numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed numerical simulations allow for the determination of the remaining polyethylene glycol (PEG binder distribution with respect to processing parameters for components during the supercritical debinding process at any time. Moreover, this approach can be used in other formulation, powder, and binder systems.

  10. Investigation of the connection between plasma temperature and electrode temperature in metal-halide lamps

    Fromm, D.C.; Gleixner, K.H.; Lieder, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial profiles of electrode temperatures and plasma temperatures have been measured on 'real' HID lamps filled with a commercial metal-halide compound. The absolute accuracy of pyrometric determination of electrode tip temperatures was ±30 K, while the determination of plasma core temperatures, using a modified Bartels method, has an accuracy of ±100 K. We could deduce a close correlation between the plasma temperature in front of an electrode T p and its tip temperature T t due to the influence of the cataphoresis. If T p is reduced at the cathode the T t value has also lowered, whereas T p at the anode is raised together with its T t data. This correlation disappears at ballast frequencies above 100 Hz, whereas the cataphoresis influence on T p continues up to 500 Hz. Based on the latter limit, a rough estimation of the cataphoresis velocity delivers 700 cm s -1 . As a tentative interpretation, we suggest that the connection between T p and T t is caused by an increase of the ion part of the total current at the cathode due to Na accumulation before it. Thus, the cathode has to emit fewer electrons and works at a lower temperature. Further results are the temporal behaviour of T t depends on the ballast type. For vertical operation the strong influence of convection on T t has also to be taken into account. Above 100 Hz, where only convection plays a role, the upper electrode T t exceeds the T t value of the lower electrode by nearly 400 K. This discrepancy one may explain, tentatively, by convection heating of the upper electrode and convection cooling of the lower one. (author)

  11. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  12. A proposal to develop a high temperature structural design guideline for HTGR components

    Hada, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents some proposals for developing a high-temperature structural design guideline for HTGR structural components. It is appropriate that a basis for developing high-temperature structural design rules is rested on well-established elevated-temperature design guidelines, if the same failure modes are expected for high-temperature components as considered in such design guidelines. As for the applicability of ASME B and PV Code Case N-47 to structural design rules for high-temperature components (service temperatures ≥ 900 deg. C), the following critical issues on material properties and service life evaluation rules have been pointed out. (i) no work-hardening of stress-strain curves at high temperatures due to dynamic recrystallization; (ii) issues relating to very significant creep; (iii) ductility loss after long-term ageing at high temperatures; (iv) validity of life-fraction rule (Robinson-Taira rule) as creep-fatigue damage evaluation rule. Furthermore, the validity of design margins of elevated-temperature structural design guidelines to high-temperature design rules should be clarified. Solutions and proposals to these issues are presented in this paper. Concerning no work-hardening due to dynamic recrystallization, it is shown that viscous effects cannot be neglected even at high extension rate for tensile tests, and that changes in viscous deformation rates by dynamic recrystallization should be taken into account. The extension rate for tensile tests is proposed to change at high temperatures. The solutions and proposals to the above-mentioned issues lead to the conclusion that the design methodologies of N-47 are basically applicable to the high-temperature structural design guideline for HTGR structural components in service at about 900 deg. C. (author). 9 refs, 5 figs

  13. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of 'pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90 degrees C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants

  14. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  15. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  16. Agile Production of Sheet Metal Aviation Components Using Disposable Electromagnetic Actuators

    Carson, B.; Daehn, G.; Psyk, V.; Tekkaya, A. E.; Weddeling, C.; Woodward, S.

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic forming is a process used to produce high strain rates that improve the formability of sheet metal. The objective of this paper is to discuss the feasibility of the use of disposable actuators during electromagnetic forming of two aluminum components: an industry part whose main feature is a convex flange with two joggles, and a simple part with a one-dimensional curve throughout. The main forming complications after the parts were formed using conventional methods were the pr...

  17. High-temperature-structural design and research and development for reactor system components

    Matsumura, Makoto; Hada, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    The design of reactor system components requires high-temperature-structural design guide with the consideration of the creep effect of materials related to research and development on structural design. The high-temperature-structural design guideline for the fast prototype reactor MONJU has been developed under the active leadership by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and Toshiba has actively participated to this work with responsibility on in-vessel components, performing research and development programs. This paper reports the current status of high-temperature-structural-design-oriented research and development programs and development of analytical system including stress-evaluation program. (author)

  18. Hybrid Metal/Electrolyte Monolithic Low Temperature SOFCs

    Cochran, Joe

    2004-01-01

    The program objective is to develop SOFCs, operating in the 500-700 degrees C range, based on Metal/Electrolyte square cell honeycomb formed by simultaneous powder extrusion of electrolyte and metal...

  19. Elaboration in the area of low temperature chlorination of rare-metal crude ore

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical base of low temperature chlorination of rare-metal crude ore was elaborated. The chemical nature of chlorination process which pass at low temperature was decoded and scientifically elaborated

  20. Modeling FBG sensors sensitivity from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature as a function of metal coating thickness

    Vendittozzi, Cristian; Felli, Ferdinando; Lupi, Carla

    2018-05-01

    Fiber optics with photo-imprinted Bragg grating have been studied in order to be used as temperature sensors in cryogenic applications. The main disadvantage presented by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors is the significant drop in sensitivity as temperature decreases, mainly due to the critical lowering of the thermo-optic coefficient of the fiber and the very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of fused silica at cryogenic temperatures. Thus, especially for the latter, it is important to enhance sensitivity to temperature by depositing a metal coating presenting higher CTE. In this work the thermal sensitivity of metal-coated FBG sensors has been evaluated by considering their elongation within temperature variations in the cryogenic range, as compared to bare fiber sensors. To this purpose, a theoretical model simulating elongation of metal-coated sensors has been developed. The model has been used to evaluate the behaviour of different metals which can be used as coating (Ni, Cu, Al, Zn, Pb and In). The optimal coating thickness has been calculated at different fixed temperature (from 5 K to 100 K) for each metal. It has been found that the metal coating effectiveness depends on thickness and operating temperature in accordance to our previous experimental work and theory suggest.

  1. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  2. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Iwabuchi, Taku; Saito, Kensuke; Obara, Makoto; Honda, Masatoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T 1 , of both the methylene (CH 2 ) chain and terminal methyl (CH 3 ) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P 2 signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH 3 to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T 1 of CH 2 seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat. (author)

  3. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  4. Workshop Report on Additive Manufacturing for Large-Scale Metal Components - Development and Deployment of Metal Big-Area-Additive-Manufacturing (Large-Scale Metals AM) System

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Love, Lonnie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility; Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    2016-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is considered an emerging technology that is expected to transform the way industry can make low-volume, high value complex structures. This disruptive technology promises to replace legacy manufacturing methods for the fabrication of existing components in addition to bringing new innovation for new components with increased functional and mechanical properties. This report outlines the outcome of a workshop on large-scale metal additive manufacturing held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on March 11, 2016. The charter for the workshop was outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office program manager. The status and impact of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for polymer matrix composites was presented as the background motivation for the workshop. Following, the extension of underlying technology to low-cost metals was proposed with the following goals: (i) High deposition rates (approaching 100 lbs/h); (ii) Low cost (<$10/lbs) for steel, iron, aluminum, nickel, as well as, higher cost titanium, (iii) large components (major axis greater than 6 ft) and (iv) compliance of property requirements. The above concept was discussed in depth by representatives from different industrial sectors including welding, metal fabrication machinery, energy, construction, aerospace and heavy manufacturing. In addition, DOE’s newly launched High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4MFG) program was reviewed. This program will apply thermo-mechanical models to elucidate deeper understanding of the interactions between design, process, and materials during additive manufacturing. Following these presentations, all the attendees took part in a brainstorming session where everyone identified the top 10 challenges in large-scale metal AM from their own perspective. The feedback was analyzed and grouped in different categories including, (i) CAD to PART software, (ii) selection of energy source, (iii

  5. Current trends in degradation assesment on metallic materials of industrial components

    Herrera Palma, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    To needs to assess objectively a structural integrity analysis in nuclear and termal power-, oil- and chemical- industry system, represents a large challenge for engineer and researches related to Materials Science, equipment manufactures or users. These systems share many of their problems with regards to aging mechanism of components metallic materials, high replacement costs and increasing requirements on efficiency and safety. This paper makes an attempt to give an overview of the current trends on material damage and residual life assessment for installation of power-, oil- and chemical industry. Some of the currently existing ideas on components inspection, as an activity for damage detection are shown. A summary on mechanism of material damage and experimental techniques for their characterization is also presented. Finally, some analytical methods with wide appliance in materials damage evaluation and residual life assesment of components are described

  6. Preparation of 147Pm metal and the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures

    Angelini, P.; Adair, H.L.

    1976-07-01

    The promethium metal used in the determination of the melting point and phase transformation temperatures was prepared by reduction of promethium oxide with thorium metal at 1600 0 C and distilling the promethium metal into a quartz dome. The melting point and phase transformation temperatures of promethium metal were found to be 1042 +- 5 0 C and 890 +- 5 0 C, respectively. The ratio for the heat of the high-temperature transformation to the heat of fusion was determined to be 0.415

  7. Melting temperature and structural transformation of some rare-earth metals

    Vu Van Hung; Hoang Van Tich; Dang Thanh Hai

    2009-01-01

    the pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of rare-earth metals is studied using the equation of states derived from the statistical moment (SMM). SMM studies were carried out order to calculate the Helmholtz free energy of hcp, bcc Dy and fcc, bcc Ce metals at a wide range of temperatures. the stable phase of Dy and Ce metals can be determined by examining the Helmholtz free energy at a given temperature, i, e. the phase that gives the lowest free energy will be stable. For example, we found that at T lower than 1750 K the hcp Dy metal is stable. At T higher than 1750 K the bcc Dy metal is also stable. Thus 1750 K marks the phase transition temperature of Dy metal. These findings are in agreement with previous experiments. (author)

  8. Corrugated metal surface with pillars for terahertz surface plasmon polariton waveguide components

    Yuehong, Xu

    2018-01-12

    In the terahertz regime, due to perfect conductivity of most metals, it is hard to realize a strong confinement of Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) although a propagation loss could be sufficiently low. We experimentally demonstrated a structure with periodic pillars arranged on a thin metal surface that supports bound modes of spoof SPPs at terahertz (THz) frequencies. By using scanning near-field THz microscopy, the electric field distribution above the metal surface within a distance of 130 μm was mapped. The results proved that this structure could guide spoof SPPs propagating along subwavelength waveguides, and at the same time reduce field expansion into free space. Further, for the development of integrated optical circuits, several components including straight waveguide, S-bend, Y-splitter and directional couplers were designed and characterized by the same method. We believe that the waveguide components proposed here will pave a new way for the development of flexible, wideband and compact photonic circuits operating at THz frequencies.

  9. Corrugated metal surface with pillars for terahertz surface plasmon polariton waveguide components

    Yuehong, Xu; Yanfeng, Li; Chunxiu, Tian; Jiaguang, Han; Quan, Xu; Xueqian, Zhang; Xixiang, Zhang; Ying, Zhang; Weili, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    In the terahertz regime, due to perfect conductivity of most metals, it is hard to realize a strong confinement of Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) although a propagation loss could be sufficiently low. We experimentally demonstrated a structure with periodic pillars arranged on a thin metal surface that supports bound modes of spoof SPPs at terahertz (THz) frequencies. By using scanning near-field THz microscopy, the electric field distribution above the metal surface within a distance of 130 μm was mapped. The results proved that this structure could guide spoof SPPs propagating along subwavelength waveguides, and at the same time reduce field expansion into free space. Further, for the development of integrated optical circuits, several components including straight waveguide, S-bend, Y-splitter and directional couplers were designed and characterized by the same method. We believe that the waveguide components proposed here will pave a new way for the development of flexible, wideband and compact photonic circuits operating at THz frequencies.

  10. Study of the degradation of power generation combustion components at elevated temperature

    Castrejon, J.; Serna, S.; Wong-Moreno, A.; Fragiel, A.; Lopez-Lopez, D.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated temperature combustion of fuel oil that contains large amounts of vanadium, asphaltenes and mostly sulfur, presents a major challenge for materials selection and design of combustion components for the electric power generation. The combustion system, which consists of air nozzles and air swirlers, plays a key role in the performance of electric power plants. Air nozzles and air swirlers, which were operated for one year in a 350 MW boiler, were analyzed, presenting accelerated degradation. The particular features of corrosion behavior of these components made by stainless steels: 304, 446 and HH, are presented. The results obtained after optical, metallographic, and microprobe analysis revealed that the components flame contact at very high operating temperature promoted all materials degradation mechanisms. Under this scenario, it is very difficult to find a material resistant to such accelerated wastage conditions. So, the solution of the problem must be oriented to re-design and improve the efficiency of the flame contact with these components

  11. Research on Evaluation Methodology for High Temperature Components and Technical Issues

    Kim, Y.J.; Han, S.B.

    2007-03-01

    The research on evaluation methodology for high temperature components and technical issues includes the comparison of evaluation technology of Very High Temperature Reactors(VHTRs) with that of present commercial reactors, the review of Hot Gas Duct(HGD) insulation designs, the analysis of the codes related to VHTR component construction and the analysis of technical issues on application of present codes to HGD construction. Codes to assure the integrity of the VHTR components are not fully prepared yet in any country. To understand the evaluation technology of the VHTR-related codes, key requirements of ASME B and PV Code Section III, Subsection NB and NH were compared. Six kinds of HGD designs were reviewed and compared. A reference which analyzed seven kinds of present component codes were reviewed and the limitations of them were summarized. Especially it was found that the selection of materials is limited, material property data are not enough, and design analysis methodology is not fully specified

  12. Study of the degradation of power generation combustion components at elevated temperature

    Castrejon, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas-UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico (Mexico); Serna, S. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas-UAEM, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: aserna@uaem.mx; Wong-Moreno, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central No. 152, Col. San. Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Fragiel, A. [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada-UNAM, Km 7 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22800, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Lopez-Lopez, D. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central No. 152, Col. San. Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2006-01-15

    Elevated temperature combustion of fuel oil that contains large amounts of vanadium, asphaltenes and mostly sulfur, presents a major challenge for materials selection and design of combustion components for the electric power generation. The combustion system, which consists of air nozzles and air swirlers, plays a key role in the performance of electric power plants. Air nozzles and air swirlers, which were operated for one year in a 350 MW boiler, were analyzed, presenting accelerated degradation. The particular features of corrosion behavior of these components made by stainless steels: 304, 446 and HH, are presented. The results obtained after optical, metallographic, and microprobe analysis revealed that the components flame contact at very high operating temperature promoted all materials degradation mechanisms. Under this scenario, it is very difficult to find a material resistant to such accelerated wastage conditions. So, the solution of the problem must be oriented to re-design and improve the efficiency of the flame contact with these components.

  13. Interrelationship betwen material strength and component design under elevated temperature for FBR

    Nakagawa, Y.

    Structural design under elevated temperature for fast breeder reactor plant is very troublesome compared to that of for lower temperature. This difficulty can be mainly discussed from two different stand points. One is design and design code, another is material strength. Components in FBR are operated under creep regime and time dependent creep behaviour should be elevated properly. This means the number and combinations of design code and material strength are significantly large and makes these systems very complicated. Material selection is, in no words, not an easy job. This should be done by not only material development but also component design stand point. With valuable experience of construction and research on FBR, a lot of information on component design and material behaviour is available. And it is a time to choose the ''best material'' from the entire stand points of component construction. (author)

  14. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Beryllium-metals joints for application in the plasma-facing components

    Barabash, V.R.; Gitarsky, L.S.; Ignakovskaya, G.S.; Prokofiev, Yu.G.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the technological development for Be joining with other metals for high heat flux application are presented. The different types of joining technology - high temperature brazing by using the different brazing alloys and solid state diffusion bonding are compared. The results of diffusion bonding technology development for Be-Cu and Be-dispersion strengthened copper alloys joinings are presented. It was shown that for the joining of Be with austenitic stainless steels, the vacuum high temperature brazing using the ternary brazing alloy of Ag-Cu-Me system is more preferable than common eutectic Ag-Cu alloy. The high temperature brazing technology for joining Be-Be using the Al brazing alloys was also analyzed. The problems of nondestructive examination of Be joints, the data on mechanical properties, microhardness testing and results of microstructural examination of Be joint are presented. ((orig.))

  16. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare-earth permanent magnets

  17. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    Shwarze, G.E.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets

  18. Epitaxial heterojunctions of oxide semiconductors and metals on high temperature superconductors

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Foote, Marc C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Epitaxial heterojunctions formed between high temperature superconductors and metallic or semiconducting oxide barrier layers are provided. Metallic perovskites such as LaTiO3, CaVO3, and SrVO3 are grown on electron-type high temperature superconductors such as Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-x). Alternatively, transition metal bronzes of the form A(x)MO(3) are epitaxially grown on electron-type high temperature superconductors. Also, semiconducting oxides of perovskite-related crystal structures such as WO3 are grown on either hole-type or electron-type high temperature superconductors.

  19. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  20. Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 Base Metal and Welded Joints at Room Temperature and 850 .deg. C for VHTR Applications

    Kim, Seon Jin; Dew, Rando T. [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Min Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) is an important design consideration for high temperature IHX components. Moreover, some of the components are joined by welding techniques and therefore the welded joints are unavoidable in the construction of mechanical structures. Since Alloy 617 was introduced in early 1970s, many attempts have been made in the past two decades to evaluate the LCF and creep-fatigue behavior in Alloy 617 base metal at room temperature and high temperature. However, little research has focused on the evaluation and characterization of the Alloy 617 welded joints. butt-welded joint specimens was performed at room temperature and 850 .deg. C. Fatigue lives of GTAW welded joint specimens were lower than those of base metal specimens. LCF cracking and failure in welded specimens initiated in the weld metal zone and followed transgranluar dendritic paths for both at RT and 850 .deg. C.

  1. Development of flaw assesment methodology for elevated temperature components of FBR plants

    Shimakawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Yukio; Miura, Naoki; Nakayama, Yasunari; Sawai, Tatsuaki; Tooya, Yuuji

    1999-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is applicable for the safety assessment of FBR component if a crack is assumed to exist. Inelastic response should be taken into account due to high temperature operation of FBR components. However, methodology for the application of inelastic fracture mechanics has not been established sufficiently. CRIEPI has been conducted research projects to develop a flaw assessment guideline for FBR components. This guideline consists of evaluation methods for creep-fatigue crack propagation, ductile fracture and sodium leak rate. The summary of evaluation methods on creep-fatigue crack and ductile fracture is presented in this paper. (author)

  2. Consistent Practices for the Probability of Detection (POD) of Fracture Critical Metallic Components Project

    Hughitt, Brian; Generazio, Edward (Principal Investigator); Nichols, Charles; Myers, Mika (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Floyd (Principal Investigator); Waller, Jess (Principal Investigator); Wladyka, Jordan (Principal Investigator); Aldrin, John; Burke, Eric; Cerecerez, Laura; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA-STD-5009 requires that successful flaw detection by NDE methods be statistically qualified for use on fracture critical metallic components, but does not standardize practices. This task works towards standardizing calculations and record retention with a web-based tool, the NNWG POD Standards Library or NPSL. Test methods will also be standardized with an appropriately flexible appendix to -5009 identifying best practices. Additionally, this appendix will describe how specimens used to qualify NDE systems will be cataloged, stored and protected from corrosion, damage, or loss.

  3. On the glass transition of the one-component metallic melts

    Fedorchenko, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 475, October (2017), s. 362-367 ISSN 0022-0248 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : equilibrium and non-equilibrium solidification * criterion of the phase transition scenario * one-component metal melts Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics OBOR OECD: Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0022024817304281/1-s2.0-S0022024817304281-main.pdf?_tid=a12ba97e-873b-11e7-b6be-00000aacb35e&acdnat=1503407763_5cdbcdb15d504baf5f8dfb94886b3100

  4. Effect of metal surface composition on deposition behavior of stainless steel component dissolved in liquid sodium

    Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro

    1988-01-01

    Deposition behavior of corrosion products has been investigated to clarify the effect of metal surface composition on the deposition process in liquid sodium. For the study a sodium loop made of Type 304 stainless steel was employed. Deposition test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, iron, nickel or Inconel 718, were immersed in the sodium pool of the test pot. Corrosion test pieces, which were Type 304 stainless steel, 50 at% Fe-50 at%Mn and Inconel 718, were set in a heater pin assembly along the axial direction of the heater pin surface. Sodium temperatures at the outlet and inlet of the heater pin assembly were controlled at 943 and 833 K, respectively. Sodium was purified at a cold trap temperature of 393 K and the deposition test was carried out for 4.3 x 10 2 - 2.9 x 10 4 ks. Several crystallized particles were observed on the surface of the deposition test pieces. The particles had compositions and crystal structures which depended on both the composition of deposition test pieces and the concentration of iron and manganese in sodium. Only iron-rich particles having a polyhedral shape deposited on the iron surface. Two types of particles, iron-rich α-phase and γ-phase with nearly the same composition as stainless steel, were deposited on Type 304 stainless steel. A Ni-Mn alloy was deposited on the nickel surface in the case of a higher concentration of manganese in sodium. On the other hand, for a lower manganese concentration, a Fe-Ni alloy was precipitated on the nickel surface. Particles deposited on nickel had a γ-phase crystal structure similar to the deposition test piece of nickel. Hence, the deposition process can be explained as follows: Corrosion products in liquid sodium were deposited on the metal surface by forming a metal alloy selectively with elements of the metal surface. (author)

  5. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    You, J.-H.

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated

  6. Design feasibility study of a divertor component reinforced with fibrous metal matrix composite laminate

    You, J.-H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: j.h.you@ipp.mpg.de

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous metal matrix composites possess advanced mechanical properties compared to conventional alloys. It is expected that the application of these composites to a divertor component will enhance the structural reliability. A possible design concept would be a system consisting of tungsten armour, copper composite interlayer and copper heat sink where the composite interlayer is locally inserted into the highly stressed domain near the bond interface. For assessment of the design feasibility of the composite divertor concept, a non-linear multi-scale finite element analysis was performed. To this end, a micro-mechanics algorithm was implemented into a finite element code. A reactor-relevant heat flux load was assumed. Focus was placed on the evolution of stress state, plastic deformation and ductile damage on both macro- and microscopic scales. The structural response of the component and the micro-scale stress evolution of the composite laminate were investigated.

  7. On high temperature internal friction in metallic glasses

    Zolotukhin, I.V.; Kalinin, Yu.E.; Roshchupkin, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature background of internal friction in amorphous lanthanum-aluminium alloys was investigated. More rapid growth of internal friction was observed at temperature ∼ 453 K reaching maximal value at 495 K. Crystallization process was accompanied by decrease of internal friction. Increase of mechanical vibration frequency to 1000 Hz leads to rise of internal friction background in the range of room temperatures and to decrease at temperatures above 370 K. Bend was observed on temperature dependence of internal friction at 440 K

  8. Combination scattering of dissociating gas applied to measurements of temperature and concentration of components

    Pashkov, V.A.; Kurganova, F.I.; Grishchuk, M.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The method to calculate the combination scattering power of the components of the dissociating N 2 O 4 ↔ 2NO 2 → 2NO+O 2 gas subjected to the laser radiation effect is given. The combination scattering power has been calculated for temperatures 400-600 K, pressures 1-3 MPa, with the neodymium laser (λ=1.06 μm) as a source and the possibility of measuring the local temperatures and concentration of the given gas components with the help of the combination scattering has been analysed. It follows from the calculated data that combination scattering power of N 2 O 4 ↔ 2NO 2 ↔ 2NO+O 2 gas in excitation with the neodymium laser as a source is sufficient for detection. Gas temperature is likely to be measured with the minimum error relative to stokes and anti-stokes bands of the combination scattering, produced by nitrogen tetroxide. From calculated data it also follows that measurement of NO 2 concentration in the range 400-600 K is possible. At the same time combination scattering power, produced by NO and O 2 components is sufficient for measurement merely with the concentration of the components of the order of 10 18 molecules/cm 3 guaranteed in static conditions only at N 2 O 4 ↔ 2NO 2 ↔ 2NO+O 2 gas temperature 500 K and higher

  9. Molecular Orientation in Two Component Vapor-Deposited Glasses: Effect of Substrate Temperature and Molecular Shape

    Powell, Charles; Jiang, Jing; Walters, Diane; Ediger, Mark

    Vapor-deposited glasses are widely investigated for use in organic electronics including the emitting layers of OLED devices. These materials, while macroscopically homogenous, have anisotropic packing and molecular orientation. By controlling this orientation, outcoupling efficiency can be increased by aligning the transition dipole moment of the light-emitting molecules parallel to the substrate. Light-emitting molecules are typically dispersed in a host matrix, as such, it is imperative to understand molecular orientation in two-component systems. In this study we examine two-component vapor-deposited films and the orientations of the constituent molecules using spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. The role of temperature, composition and molecular shape as it effects molecular orientation is examined for mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3 and in TPD. Deposition temperature relative to the glass transition temperature of the two-component mixture is the primary controlling factor for molecular orientation. In mixtures of DSA-Ph in Alq3, the linear DSA-Ph has a horizontal orientation at low temperatures and slight vertical orientation maximized at 0.96Tg,mixture, analogous to one-component films.

  10. Neurocognitive and somatic components of temperature increases during g-tummo meditation: legend and reality.

    Maria Kozhevnikov

    Full Text Available Stories of g-tummo meditators mysteriously able to dry wet sheets wrapped around their naked bodies during a frigid Himalayan ceremony have intrigued scholars and laypersons alike for a century. Study 1 was conducted in remote monasteries of eastern Tibet with expert meditators performing g-tummo practices while their axillary temperature and electroencephalographic (EEG activity were measured. Study 2 was conducted with Western participants (a non-meditator control group instructed to use the somatic component of the g-tummo practice (vase breathing without utilization of meditative visualization. Reliable increases in axillary temperature from normal to slight or moderate fever zone (up to 38.3°C were observed among meditators only during the Forceful Breath type of g-tummo meditation accompanied by increases in alpha, beta, and gamma power. The magnitude of the temperature increases significantly correlated with the increases in alpha power during Forceful Breath meditation. The findings indicate that there are two factors affecting temperature increase. The first is the somatic component which causes thermogenesis, while the second is the neurocognitive component (meditative visualization that aids in sustaining temperature increases for longer periods. Without meditative visualization, both meditators and non-meditators were capable of using the Forceful Breath vase breathing only for a limited time, resulting in limited temperature increases in the range of normal body temperature. Overall, the results suggest that specific aspects of the g-tummo technique might help non-meditators learn how to regulate their body temperature, which has implications for improving health and regulating cognitive performance.

  11. Modelling temporal variance of component temperatures and directional anisotropy over vegetated canopy

    Bian, Zunjian; du, yongming; li, hua

    2016-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) as a key variable plays an important role on hydrological, meteorology and climatological study. Thermal infrared directional anisotropy is one of essential factors to LST retrieval and application on longwave radiance estimation. Many approaches have been proposed to estimate directional brightness temperatures (DBT) over natural and urban surfaces. While less efforts focus on 3-D scene and the surface component temperatures used in DBT models are quiet difficult to acquire. Therefor a combined 3-D model of TRGM (Thermal-region Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) and energy balance method is proposed in the paper for the attempt of synchronously simulation of component temperatures and DBT in the row planted canopy. The surface thermodynamic equilibrium can be final determined by the iteration strategy of TRGM and energy balance method. The combined model was validated by the top-of-canopy DBTs using airborne observations. The results indicated that the proposed model performs well on the simulation of directional anisotropy, especially the hotspot effect. Though we find that the model overestimate the DBT with Bias of 1.2K, it can be an option as a data reference to study temporal variance of component temperatures and DBTs when field measurement is inaccessible

  12. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  13. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  14. High temperature, high pressure gas loop - the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL)

    Gat, U.; Sanders, J.P.; Young, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature, gas-circulating Component Flow Test Loop located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was designed and constructed utilizing Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The quality assurance program for operating and testing is also based on applicable ASME standards. Power to a total of 5 MW is available to the test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger rated at 4.4 MW serves as heat sink. The three gas-bearing, completely enclosed gas circulators provide a maximum flow of 0.47 m 3 /s at pressures to 10.7 MPa. The control system allows for fast transients in pressure, power, temperature, and flow; it also supports prolonged unattended steady-state operation. The data acquisition system can access and process 10,000 data points per second. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor components are being tested

  15. Study of displacement cascades in metals by means of component analysis

    Hou, M.

    1981-01-01

    Component analysis is used to study the spatial distributions of point defects resulting from collision cascades in solids. The components are the three (orthogonal) eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the spatial distribution. Those corresponding to the extreme eigenvalues determine the directions maximizing and minimizing the variance of the spatial distribution. The intermediate one is the direction maximizing the variance of the distribution projected on a plane perpendicular to the principal component. The standard deviations of the distribution projected on the three components give a measure of its size. This measure is only dependent on the cascade structure. Vacancy and interstitial distributions generated in metals by the computer code MARLOWE based on the binary collision approximation are analysed and compared in this picture. The simulation of hundreds of cascades generated by projectiles in the keV energy range incident on polycrystalline gold makes it possible to collect information on their average spatial anisotropy, energy density and on the casade development. The dependence of characteristics on the energy and the masses involved is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  17. Numerical studies on a plasmonic temperature nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal ring resonator structure for optical integrated circuit applications

    Al-mahmod, Md. Jubayer; Hyder, Rakib; Islam, Md Zahurul

    2017-07-01

    A nanosensor, based on a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic ring resonator, is proposed for potential on-chip temperature sensing and its performance is evaluated numerically. The sensor components can be fabricated by using planar processes on a silicon substrate, making its manufacturing compatible to planar electronic fabrication technology. The sensor, constructed using silver as the metal rings and a thermo-optic liquid ethanol film between the metal layers, is capable of sensing temperature with outstanding optical sensitivity, as high as -0.53 nm/°C. The resonance wavelength is found to be highly sensitive to the refractive index of the liquid dielectric film. The resonance peak can be tuned according to the requirement of intended application by changing the radii of the ring resonator geometries in the design phase. The compact size, planar and silicon-based design, and very high resolutions- these characteristics are expected to make this sensor technology a preferred choice for lab-on-a-chip applications, as compared to other contemporary sensors.

  18. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  19. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer

    Kazi, T.G.; Jalbani, N.; Arain, M.B.; Jamali, M.K.; Afridi, H.I.; Sarfraz, R.A.; Shah, A.Q.

    2009-01-01

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy

  20. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar, E-mail: subratagh82@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Tripura 799055 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.

  1. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO 2 and B 4 C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al 2 O 3 , TiC, and TiB 2 were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al 2 O 3 , TiC, and TiB 2 were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB 2 and Al 2 O 3 in the composite

  2. Crystalline Microporous Organosilicates with Reversed Functionalities of Organic and Inorganic Components for Room-Temperature Gas Sensing.

    Fabbri, Barbara; Bonoldi, Lucia; Guidi, Vincenzo; Cruciani, Giuseppe; Casotti, Davide; Malagù, Cesare; Bellussi, Giuseppe; Millini, Roberto; Montanari, Luciano; Carati, Angela; Rizzo, Caterina; Montanari, Erica; Zanardi, Stefano

    2017-07-26

    A deepened investigation on an innovative organic-inorganic hybrid material, referred to as ECS-14 (where ECS = Eni carbon silicates), revealed the possibility to use them as gas sensors. Indeed, among ECS phases, the crystalline state and the hexagonal microplateletlike morphology characteristic of ECS-14 seemed favorable properties to obtain continuous and uniform films. ECS-14 phase was used as functional material in screen-printable compositions and was thus deposited by drop coating for morphological, structural, thermal, and electrical characterizations. Possible operation at room temperature was investigated as technological progress, offering intrinsic safety in sensors working in harsh or industrial environments and avoiding high power consumption of most common sensors based on metal oxide semiconductors. Electrical characterization of the sensors based on ECS-14 versus concentrations of gaseous analytes gave significant results at room temperature in the presence of humidity, thereby demonstrating fundamental properties for a good quality sensor (speed, reversibility, and selectivity) that make them competitive with respect to systems currently in use. Remarkably, we observed functionality reversal of the organic and inorganic components; that is, in contrast to other hybrids, for ECS-14 the functional site has been ascribed to the inorganic phase while the organic component provided structural stability to the material. The sensing mechanism for humidity was also investigated.

  3. On the microstructure analysis of FSW joints of aluminium components made via direct metal laser sintering

    Scherillo, Fabio; Astarita, Antonello; di Martino, Daniela; Contaldi, Vincenzo; di Matteo, Luca; di Petta, Paolo; Casarin, Renzo; Squillace, Antonino; Langella, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), applied to metal industry, is a family of processes that allow complex shape components to be realized from raw materials in the form of powders. The compaction of the powders can be achieved by local melting of the powder bed or by solid state sintering. Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing process in which a focalized laser beam is the heat source that allows the powders to be compacted. By DMLS it is possible to realize complex shape components. One of the limits of DMLS, as for every additive layer manufacturing techniques, is the unfeasibility to realize large dimension parts. Due to this limit the study of joining process of parts made via ALM is of great interest. One of the most promising options is the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique that has been proven to be very effective in the welding of metals difficult to weld, above all aluminium alloys. Since FSW is a solid-state technique, the microstructure of the various zone of the weld bead depends not only by the process itself but also by the parent microstruct ure of the parts to be welded. Furthermore, parts made of aluminium alloy via DMLS have a particular microstructure that is the result of repeated severe thermal cycles. In the present work the authors, starting from the description of the parent microstructure of parts made of AlSi10Mg aluminium alloy, study the microstructure evolution occurred within the joint made by Friction Stir Welding, analysing in details the microstructure of the main well recognized zone of the weld bead. The structure of the parent material is characterized by the presence of melting pools with a very fine microstructure. In the joint the recrystallization, the grain refinement and, above all, the redistribution of intermetallic phases occurs, resulting in an homogenization of the microstructure and in an increase of micro hardness.

  4. Hot metal temperature prediction by neural networks in the blast furnace

    Cantera, C.; Jimenez, J.; Varela, I.; Formoso, A.

    2002-01-01

    Based on a simplified model, the underlying temperature criteria is proposed as a method to study the temperature trends in a blast furnace. As an application, a neural network able to forecast hot metal temperatures from 2 to 16 h in advance (with decreasing precision) has been built. This neural network has been designed to work at real time in a production plant. (Author)

  5. Creep behaviour of austenitic stainless steels, base and weld metals used in liquid metal fast breeder reactors, during temperature variations

    Felsen, M.F.

    1982-07-01

    Creep rupture and deformation during temperature variations have been studied for 316 austenitic steel, base and weld metals. Loaded specimens were heated to 900 0 C or 1000 0 C and maintained at this temperature for different durations. The heating rate to these temperatures was between 5 and 50 0 C h -1 , whilst the cooling rate was between 5 and 20 0 C h -1 . The above tests were coupled with short time creep and tensile tests (straining rate 10 -2 h -1 to 10 3 h -1 ) at constant temperature. These tests were used for predicting the creep behaviour of the materials under changing temperature condition. The predictions were in good agreement with the changing temperature and creep experimental results. In addition, a correlation between certains tensile properties, such as the rupture time as a function of stress was observed at high temperature

  6. High-temperature stability of laser-joined silicon carbide components

    Herrmann, Marion, E-mail: marion.herrmann@tu-dresden.de; Lippmann, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio

    2013-11-15

    Silicon carbide is recommended for applications in energy technology due to its good high-temperature corrosion resistance, mechanical durability, and abrasion resistance. The prerequisite for use is often the availability of suitable technologies for joining or sealing the components. A laser-induced process using fillers and local heating of the components represents a possible low-cost option. Investigations in which yttrium aluminosilicate glass was used for laser-induced brazing of SiC components of varying geometry are presented. A four-point bending strength of 112 MPa was found for these joints. In burst tests, laser-joined components were found to withstand internal pressures of up to 54 MPa. Helium leak tests yielded leak rates of less than 10{sup –8} mbar l s{sup −1}, even after 300 h at 900 °C. In contrast, the assemblies showed an increased leak rate after annealing at 1050 °C. The short process time of the laser technique – in the range of a few seconds to a few minutes – results in high temperature gradients and transients. SEM analysis showed that the filler in the seam predominantly solidifies in a glassy state. Crystallization occurred during later thermal loading of the joined components, with chemical equilibrium being established. Differences in seam structures yielded from different cooling rates in the laser process could not be equalized by annealing. The results demonstrated the long-term stability of laser-brazed SiC assemblies to temperatures in the range of glass transformation (900 °C) of the yttrium aluminosilicate filler. In technological investigations, the suitability of the laser joining technique for sealing of SiC components with a geometry approximating that of a fuel element sleeve pin (pin) in a gas-cooled fast reactor was proven.

  7. Laser rapid forming technology of high-performance dense metal components with complex structure

    Huang, Weidong; Chen, Jing; Li, Yanming; Lin, Xin

    2005-01-01

    Laser rapid forming (LRF) is a new and advanced manufacturing technology that has been developed on the basis of combining high power laser cladding technology with rapid prototyping (RP) to realize net shape forming of high performance dense metal components without dies. Recently we have developed a set of LRF equipment. LRF experiments were carried out on the equipment to investigate the influences of processing parameters on forming characterizations systematically with the cladding powder materials as titanium alloys, superalloys, stainless steel, and copper alloys. The microstructure of laser formed components is made up of columnar grains or columnar dendrites which grow epitaxially from the substrate since the solid components were prepared layer by layer additionally. The result of mechanical testing proved that the mechanical properties of laser formed samples are similar to or even over that of forging and much better than that of casting. It is shown in this paper that LRF technology is providing a new solution for some difficult processing problems in the high tech field of aviation, spaceflight and automobile industries.

  8. A new model for predicting thermodynamic properties of ternary metallic solution from binary components

    Fang Zheng; Zhang Quanru

    2006-01-01

    A model has been derived to predict thermodynamic properties of ternary metallic systems from those of its three binaries. In the model, the excess Gibbs free energies and the interaction parameter ω 123 for three components of a ternary are expressed as a simple sum of those of the three sub-binaries, and the mole fractions of the components of the ternary are identical with the sub-binaries. This model is greatly simplified compared with the current symmetrical and asymmetrical models. It is able to overcome some shortcomings of the current models, such as the arrangement of the components in the Gibbs triangle, the conversion of mole fractions between ternary and corresponding binaries, and some necessary processes for optimizing the various parameters of these models. Two ternary systems, Mg-Cu-Ni and Cd-Bi-Pb are recalculated to demonstrate the validity and precision of the present model. The calculated results on the Mg-Cu-Ni system are better than those in the literature. New parameters in the Margules equations expressing the excess Gibbs free energies of three binary systems of the Cd-Bi-Pb ternary system are also given

  9. Effects of long-term exposure to particulate matter and metal components on mortality in the Rome longitudinal study

    Badaloni, Chiara; Cesaroni, Giulia; Cerza, Francesco; Davoli, Marina; Brunekreef, Bert; Forastiere, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of long-term exposure to metal components in particulate matter on mortality are still controversial. OBJECTIVES: To study the association between long-term exposure to PM10, PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance, particulate matter components (copper, iron, zinc, sulfur, silicon,

  10. Surface chemistry of metals and their oxides in high temperature water

    Tomlinson, M.

    1975-01-01

    Examination of oxide and metal surfaces in water at high temperature by a broad spectrum of techniques is bringing understanding of corrosion product movement and alleviation of activity transport in CANDU-type reactor primary coolant circuits. (Author)

  11. Low temperature synthesis of ternary metal phosphides using plasma for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Liang, Hanfeng; Xia, Chuan; Jiang, Qiu; Gandi, Appala; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We report a versatile route for the preparation of metal phosphides using PH plasma for supercapacitor applications. The high reactivity of plasma allows rapid and low temperature conversion of hydroxides into monometallic, bimetallic, or even more

  12. Thermophysical and transport properties of metals at high pressure and very high temperature

    Shaner, J.W.; Gathers, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of enthalpy, specific volume, temperature, and electrical resistivity for lead and uranium were measured. From the measured data, estimates of the bulk modulus and sound velocity in these metals are made

  13. Finite-temperature symmetry restoration in the four-dimensional Φ4 model with four components

    Jansen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The finite-temperature symmetry restoration in the four-dimensional φ 4 theory with four components and with an infinite self-coupling is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations on lattices with time extensions L t =4,5,6 and space extensions 12 3 -28 3 . The numerical calculations are done by means of the Wolff cluster algorithm which is very efficient for simulations near a phase transition. The numerical results are in good agreement with an improved one-loop expansion and with the 1/N-expansion, indicating that in the electroweak theory the symmetry restoration temperature T sr is about 350 GeV. (orig.)

  14. Electromagnetic-acoustic coupling in ferromagnetic metals at liquid-helium temperatures

    Gordon, R A

    1981-01-01

    Electromagnetic-acoustic coupling at the surface and in the bulk of ferromagnetic metals at liquid-helium temperatures has been studied using electromagnetically excited acoustic standing-wave resonances at MHz frequencies in a number of ferromagnetic metals and alloys of commercial interest...

  15. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  16. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    Bekeris, V I [Nunez Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Faculdad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Ramos, E D [Santa Rosa Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Y Naturales; Sanchez, D H [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1975-09-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented.

  17. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  18. Volume dependence of the melting temperature for alkali metals with Debye's model

    Soma, T.; Kagaya, H.M.; Nishigaki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Using the volume dependence of the Grueneisen constant at higher temperatures, the volume effect on the melting temperature of alkali metals is studied by Lindeman's melting law and Debye's model. The obtained melting curve increases as a function of the compressed volume and shows the maximum of the melting point at the characteristic volume. The resultant data are qualitatively in agreement with the observed tendency for alkali metals. (author)

  19. Apparatus to measure emissivities of metallic films between 90K and room temperature

    Bekeris, V.I.; Ramos, E.D.; Sanchez, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    The development of multilayer insulations is aerospace and cryogenic required to know the emissivity of the metallic films used as reflective layers. This work describes an emissometer that measures the total hemispherical emissivity of metallic films evaporated on polyester substrates. The apparatus works at liquid oxigen temperatures and permits to get emissivities from 90K to room temperatures within a 15% precision. The emissometer construction and operation are described in detail. Results of measurements done on Single Aluminized Mylar are presented [pt

  20. High temperature microcalorimetry. Study of metal-oxygen systems

    Tetot, R.; Picard, C.; Boureau, G.; Gerdanian, P.

    1981-01-01

    Determination of partial molar enthalpy in metal-oxygen systems at 1050 0 C. Three representative systems are studied: the solution of oxygen in titanium, the titanium-oxygen system and the uranium-oxygen system from UOsub(2.00) to UOsub(2.60) [fr

  1. Peculiar features of low temperature deformation and strengthening of Cu-Nb bimetal components

    Lototskaya, V.A.; Il'ichev, V.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The Cu-Nb bimetal treated in different ways is studied under conditions of uniaxial tension within the temperature range of 4.2...20 K. Stresses of the components being in the bimetal itself are estimated from the load jumps of the strain curve caused by the niobium layer failure. Stresses of components in the bimetal and in its separated layers are found to be different. Variation in the stressed state of a colddrawn and annealed bimetals is, in this case, a factor which determines the stress difference. This variation is accounted for by different structural states of the copper layer under low-temperature localization of the plastic niobium deformation the plastic niobium deformation

  2. Machined GRP laminates for components in heavy electrical engineering and their use at very low temperatures

    Fuchs, H.

    1982-01-01

    Safe and economical components can be produced from machined GRP laminates. Matrix system, fibre reinforcement and elastic properties are described. Onset of damage and long-term properties are given with detailed charting of tests. Application of the laminate studies at stresses of up to half their short-term strength can be made, provided creep strain and its dependence on time and temperature are considered

  3. Degradation of Solar Array Components in a Combined UV/VUV High Temperature Test Environment

    Nömayr Christel

    2017-01-01

    A design verification test under UV/VUV conditions of sun exposed materials and technologies on component level is presented which forms part of the overall verification and qualification of the solar array design of the MTM and MPO. The test concentrates on the self-contamination aspects and the resulting performance losses of the solar array under high intensity and elevated temperature environment representative for the photovoltaic assembly (PVA.

  4. Boiling of the Interface between Two Immiscible Liquids below the Bulk Boiling Temperatures of Both Components

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V.; Goldobin, Denis S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becomin...

  5. Early recognition of damage and course of damage on metal components

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, the German Research Association set up the programme 'Early recognition of damage and course of damage on metal components'. The concept worked out by a programme committee provided that scientifically secured bases for the understanding of the occurrence of damage, the prevention of damage, affecting damage, and the mechanism triggering damage, or cumulation of damage should be obtained. 36 individual projects costing 14 million DM were supported in the course of 6 years. The task of a test group was to find these projects from a far larger number of applications which promised an increase in knowledge in the sense of the target of the programme. For the final colloquium, the test group chose those contributions which had not previously been published to the wider technical public. (orig.) [de

  6. Process for the fixing of a metallic end piece on a tubular component

    Charpin, Jean.

    1975-01-01

    Under this invention the process makes it possible to joint a tubular component and in particular a tubular filter and an end piece, with a connection of great mechanical strength, perfectly leak proof and with excellent corrosion resistance, particularly with respect to fluorinated by-products. This process is therefore of great worth in fixing to a bearer a thin ceramic compound tubular filter element, since such a filter can be used in particular for the separation of uranium isotopes by gaseous diffusion and for the separation of hydrocarbons in petrochemicals. To this end, the process under consideration is characterised in that it consists in depositing a layer of ceramic material, by hot projection, at the end of the tubular element and in sealing the end piece to the end of the tubular element by the hot projection of a ceramic or metallic substance [fr

  7. Effect of component substitution on the atomic dynamics in glass-forming binary metallic melts

    Nowak, B.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Yang, F.; Voigtmann, Th.; Evenson, Z.; Hansen, T. C.; Meyer, A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the substitution of early transition metals (Zr, Hf, and Nb) in Ni-based binary glass-forming metallic melts and the impact on structural and dynamical properties by using a combination of neutron scattering, electrostatic levitation (ESL), and isotopic substitution. The self-diffusion coefficients measured by quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) identify a sluggish diffusion as well as an increased activation energy by almost a factor of 2 for Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr36Ni64 . This finding can be explained by the locally higher packing density of Hf atoms in Hf35Ni65 compared to Zr atoms in Zr36Ni64 , which has been derived from interatomic distances by analyzing the measured partial structure factors. Furthermore, QENS measurements of liquid Hf35Ni65 prepared with 60Ni , which has a vanishing incoherent scattering cross section, have demonstrated that self-diffusion of Hf is slowed down compared to the concentration weighted self-diffusion of Hf and Ni. This implies a dynamical decoupling between larger Hf and smaller Ni atoms, which can be related to a saturation effect of unequal atomic nearest-neighbor pairs, that was observed recently for Ni-rich compositions in Zr-Ni metallic melts. In order to establish a structure-dynamics relation, measured partial structure factors have been used as an input for mode-coupling theory (MCT) of the glass transition to calculate self-diffusion coefficients for the different atomic components. Remarkably, MCT can reproduce the increased activation energy for Hf35Ni65 as well as the dynamical decoupling between Hf and Ni atoms.

  8. Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutetic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

  9. Magnetic Flux Leakage and Principal Component Analysis for metal loss approximation in a pipeline

    Ruiz, M; Mujica, L E; Quintero, M; Florez, J; Quintero, S

    2015-01-01

    Safety and reliability of hydrocarbon transportation pipelines represent a critical aspect for the Oil an Gas industry. Pipeline failures caused by corrosion, external agents, among others, can develop leaks or even rupture, which can negatively impact on population, natural environment, infrastructure and economy. It is imperative to have accurate inspection tools traveling through the pipeline to diagnose the integrity. In this way, over the last few years, different techniques under the concept of structural health monitoring (SHM) have continuously been in development.This work is based on a hybrid methodology that combines the Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) approaches. The MFL technique induces a magnetic field in the pipeline's walls. The data are recorded by sensors measuring leakage magnetic field in segments with loss of metal, such as cracking, corrosion, among others. The data provide information of a pipeline with 15 years of operation approximately, which transports gas, has a diameter of 20 inches and a total length of 110 km (with several changes in the topography). On the other hand, PCA is a well-known technique that compresses the information and extracts the most relevant information facilitating the detection of damage in several structures. At this point, the goal of this work is to detect and localize critical loss of metal of a pipeline that are currently working. (paper)

  10. Heavy metals in the ecosystem components at 'Degelen' testing ground of the former Semipalatinsk test site

    Yankauskas, A.B.; Lukashenko, S.N.; Amirov, A.A.; Govenko, P.V.

    2012-01-01

    The ecological situation in the former Semipalatinsk test site is characterized by a combination of both radiative and nonradiative factors. There were investigated near-portal areas of the tunnels with water seepage at 'Degelen' site. All the tunnel waters are characterized by higher concentrations of uranium, beryllium, and molybdenum. The watercourse of the tunnel number 504 is unique for its elemental composition, in particular, the content of rare earth elements, whose concentration in the water is in the range n*10 -5 -n*10 -7 %. Of all the rare earth elements in the samples were found 13, the concentrations of aluminum, manganese, zinc are comparable to the concentrations of macro-components. Concentration of 238 U in the studied waters lie in the range of n*10 -4 - n*10 -6 %, which suggests the influence of uranium, not only as a toxic element, but its significance as the radiation factor. The analysis of complex data obtained showed that the elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the soils of the areas under study, as a rule, are a consequence of the carry-over of these metals by water flows and their subsequent deposition in the sediments. (authors)

  11. Magnetic Flux Leakage and Principal Component Analysis for metal loss approximation in a pipeline

    Ruiz, M.; Mujica, L. E.; Quintero, M.; Florez, J.; Quintero, S.

    2015-07-01

    Safety and reliability of hydrocarbon transportation pipelines represent a critical aspect for the Oil an Gas industry. Pipeline failures caused by corrosion, external agents, among others, can develop leaks or even rupture, which can negatively impact on population, natural environment, infrastructure and economy. It is imperative to have accurate inspection tools traveling through the pipeline to diagnose the integrity. In this way, over the last few years, different techniques under the concept of structural health monitoring (SHM) have continuously been in development. This work is based on a hybrid methodology that combines the Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) approaches. The MFL technique induces a magnetic field in the pipeline's walls. The data are recorded by sensors measuring leakage magnetic field in segments with loss of metal, such as cracking, corrosion, among others. The data provide information of a pipeline with 15 years of operation approximately, which transports gas, has a diameter of 20 inches and a total length of 110 km (with several changes in the topography). On the other hand, PCA is a well-known technique that compresses the information and extracts the most relevant information facilitating the detection of damage in several structures. At this point, the goal of this work is to detect and localize critical loss of metal of a pipeline that are currently working.

  12. Structural characterization of biomedical Co–Cr–Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Barucca, G.; Santecchia, E.; Majni, G.; Girardin, E.; Bassoli, E.; Denti, L.; Gatto, A.; Iuliano, L.; Moskalewicz, T.; Mengucci, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111} γ planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. - Highlights: • Samples of a Co–Cr–Mo biomedical alloy were produced by direct metal laser sintering. • Hardness values unexpectedly high were attributed to a peculiar microstructure. • Fine lamellae of the ε-phase alternated to the γ-phase were observed for the first time. • A nucleation and growth model for the observed microstructure is proposed

  13. Structural characterization of biomedical Co–Cr–Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Barucca, G., E-mail: g.barucca@univpm.it [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Santecchia, E.; Majni, G. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Girardin, E. [DISCO, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Bassoli, E.; Denti, L.; Gatto, A. [DIMeC, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905/B, Modena 41125 (Italy); Iuliano, L. [DISPEA, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moskalewicz, T. [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Mengucci, P. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}{sub γ} planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. - Highlights: • Samples of a Co–Cr–Mo biomedical alloy were produced by direct metal laser sintering. • Hardness values unexpectedly high were attributed to a peculiar microstructure. • Fine lamellae of the ε-phase alternated to the γ-phase were observed for the first time. • A nucleation and growth model for the observed microstructure is proposed.

  14. Effects of heat production on the temperature pattern and stresses on frictional hardening of cylindrical components

    Maksimovich, V.M.; Kratyuk, P.B.; Babei, Yu.I.; Maksimishin, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Metal heating occurs during pulse hardening which influences the structure, state of strain, and physicomechanical properties, which in turn affects the viability. Difficulties exists in measuring the resulting temperature distributions because of the lag in existing methods. More accurate estimates of temperature distributions may often be obtained using theoretical methods, which involve solving coupled problems in the theory of elasticity and thermal conductivity. In this work, a planar contact case in thermoelasticity is considered for frictional hardening, in which the friction disk and the workpiece are represented as an elastic plunger and the body.It is assumed that the contact normal and tangential stresses are related by Coulomb's law. Also given is a method of solving which enables the definition of the thermoelastic state with a given accuracy in the contact region for high disk speeds. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Non-equilibrium thermionic electron emission for metals at high temperatures

    Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Tierno, S. P.; Conde, L.

    2015-08-01

    Stationary thermionic electron emission currents from heated metals are compared against an analytical expression derived using a non-equilibrium quantum kappa energy distribution for the electrons. The latter depends on the temperature decreasing parameter κ ( T ) , which decreases with increasing temperature and can be estimated from raw experimental data and characterizes the departure of the electron energy spectrum from equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics. The calculations accurately predict the measured thermionic emission currents for both high and moderate temperature ranges. The Richardson-Dushman law governs electron emission for large values of kappa or equivalently, moderate metal temperatures. The high energy tail in the electron energy distribution function that develops at higher temperatures or lower kappa values increases the emission currents well over the predictions of the classical expression. This also permits the quantitative estimation of the departure of the metal electrons from the equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  16. Thick-Film and LTCC Passive Components for High-Temperature Electronics

    A. Dziedzic

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available At this very moment an increasing interest in the field of high-temperature electronics is observed. This is a result of development in the area of wide-band semiconductors’ engineering but this also generates needs for passives with appropriate characteristics. This paper presents fabrication as well as electrical and stability properties of passive components (resistors, capacitors, inductors made in thick-film or Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics (LTCC technologies fulfilling demands of high-temperature electronics. Passives with standard dimensions usually are prepared by screen-printing whereas combination of standard screen-printing with photolithography or laser shaping are recommenced for fabrication of micropassives. Attainment of proper characteristics versus temperature as well as satisfactory long-term high-temperature stability of micropassives is more difficult than for structures with typical dimensions for thick-film and LTCC technologies because of increase of interfacial processes’ importance. However it is shown that proper selection of thick-film inks together with proper deposition method permit to prepare thick-film micropassives (microresistors, air-cored microinductors and interdigital microcapacitors suitable for the temperature range between 150°C and 400°C.

  17. Room temperature desorption of helium-3 from metal tritides

    Beavis, L.C.; Kass, W.J.

    1976-10-01

    It has long been known that helium-3 accumulates in metal tritides as tritium decays. Early in life nearly 100% of the helium-3 is retained in the lattice, but when a critical concentration is reached (material dependent), the lattice will no longer retain the helium-3 and it is emitted at about the generation rate. Measurements were recently made on a number of erbium tritides with varying concentrations in the ditritide phase. The expected early release characteristics are observed for all of the samples. However, ditritides with higher tritium concentrations reach the rapid release state at much lower helium-3 concentrations. For instance, the helium to metal concentration for rapid release in the unsaturated ditritide is about 0.22, whereas it is only one-tenth this value in the saturated ditritide. The additional tritium in the tritide appears to be the cause of this effect

  18. Materials and Components for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells – an Overview

    D. Radhika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the recent advancements made in the area of materials and components for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs. LT-SOFC is a new trend in SOFCtechnology since high temperature SOFC puts very high demands on the materials and too expensive to match marketability. The current status of the electrolyte and electrode materials used in SOFCs, their specific features and the need for utilizing them for LT-SOFC are presented precisely in this review article. The section on electrolytes gives an overview of zirconia, lanthanum gallate and ceria based materials. Also, this review article explains the application of different anode, cathode and interconnect materials used for SOFC systems. SOFC can result in better performance with the application of liquid fuels such methanol and ethanol. As a whole, this review article discusses the novel materials suitable for operation of SOFC systems especially for low temperature operation.

  19. Effects of elevated temperature postharvest on color aspect, physiochemical characteristics, and aroma components of pineapple fruits.

    Liu, Chuanhe; Liu, Yan

    2014-12-01

    In this work, 2 separate experiments were performed to describe the influence of elevated temperature treatments postharvest on the color, physiochemical characteristics and aroma components of pineapple fruits during low-temperature seasons. The L* (lightness) values of the skin and pulp of pineapple fruits were decreased. The a* (greenness-redness) and b* (blueness-yellowness) values of the skin and pulp were all markedly increased. The elevated temperature significantly increased the contents of total soluble solids (TSS) and slightly affected contents of vitamin C (nonsignificant). Titratable acidity (TA) of pineapple fruits were notably decreased, whereas the values of TSS/TA of pineapple fruits were significantly increased. The firmness of the pineapple fruits decreased and more esters and alkenes were identified. The total relative contents of esters were increased, and the total relative contents of alkenes were decreased. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO2, SnO2, NbO2, ZrO2, SiO2, Ta2O5 and Nb2O5) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in ...

  1. Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature

    Wada, Yoichi; Tachibana, Masahiko; Ishida, Kazushige; Ota, Nobuyuki; Shigenaka, Naoto; Inagaki, Hiromitsu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Effects of seawater components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature have been studied with a radiolysis model in order to evaluate influence on integrity of materials used in an ABWR. In 2011, seawater flowed into a wide part of the nuclear power plant system of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Reactor No. 5 owned by Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. after condenser tubes broke during the plant shutdown operation. The reactor water temperature was 250°C and its maximum Cl − concentration was ca. 450 ppm when seawater was mixed with reactor water. In order to clarify effects of the sea water components on radiolysis of water at elevated temperature, a radiolysis model calculation was conducted with Hitachi's radiolysis analysis code 'SIMFONY'. For the calculation, the temperature range was set from 50 to 250°C with 50°C increments and the gamma dose rate was set at 60 Gys −1 to see the effect of gamma irradiation from fuels under shutdown conditions. Concentrations of radiolytic species were calculated for 10 5 s. Dilution ratio of seawater was changed to see the effects of concentration of seawater components. Reaction rate constants of the Cl − , Br − , HCO 3 − , and SO 4 2− systems were considered. The main radiolytic species were predicted to be hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide of low concentration was produced in seawater-mixed water at elevated temperatures. Compared with these main products, concentrations of radiolytic products originating from chloride ion and other seawater components were found to be rather low. The dominant product among them was ClO 3 − and its concentration was found to be below 0.01ppm at 10 5 s. Then, during the plant shutdown operation, the harmful influence from radiolytic species originating from seawater components on integrity of fuel materials must be smaller than that of chloride ion which is the main ionic species in seawater. (author)

  2. Advances in model-based software for simulating ultrasonic immersion inspections of metal components

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; Taylor, Jared L.; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2018-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was initiated in 2015 to repackage existing research-grade software into user-friendly tools for the rapid estimation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based graphical user interface for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signals and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The later makes use the Thompson-Gray measurement model for the response from an internal defect, and the Thompson-Margetan independent scatterer model for backscattered grain noise. This paper, the third in the series [1-2], provides an overview of the ongoing modeling effort with emphasis on recent developments. These include the ability to: (1) treat microstructures where grain size, shape and tilt relative to the incident sound direction can all vary with depth; and (2) simulate C-scans of defect signals in the presence of backscattered grain noise. The simulation software can now treat both normal and oblique-incidence immersion inspections of curved metal components. Both longitudinal and shear-wave inspections are treated. The model transducer can either be planar, spherically-focused, or bi-cylindrically-focused. A calibration (or reference) signal is required and is used to deduce the measurement system efficiency function. This can be "invented" by the software using center frequency and bandwidth information specified by the user, or, alternatively, a measured calibration signal can be used. Defect types include flat-bottomed-hole reference reflectors, and spherical pores and inclusions. Simulation outputs include estimated defect signal amplitudes, root-mean-square values of grain noise amplitudes, and SNR as functions of the depth of the defect within the metal component. At any particular depth, the user can view

  3. Direct high-temperature ohmic heating of metals as liquid pipes.

    Grosse, A V; Cahill, J A; Liddell, W L; Murphy, W J; Stokes, C S

    1968-05-03

    When a sufficiently high electric current is passed through a liquid metal, the electromagnetic pressure pinches off the liquid metal and interrupts the flow of current. For the first time the pinch effect has been overcome by use of centrifugal acceleration. By rotation of a pipe of liquid metal, tin or bismuth or their alloys, at sufficiently high speed, it can be heated electrically without intermission of the electric current. One may now heat liquid metallic substances, by resistive (ohmic) heating, to 5000 degrees K and perhaps higher temperatures.

  4. Copper Metallic Substrates for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors

    Yust, Nicholas A; Nekkanti, Rama; Brunke, Lyle B; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Barnes, Paul N

    2006-01-01

    .... Detailed x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) were performed to measure the in-plane alignment, out-of-plane alignment, and microtexture at various deformation levels and annealing temperatures...

  5. Effects of radiation and temperature on gallium nitride (GaN) metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors

    Chiamori, Heather C.; Angadi, Chetan; Suria, Ateeq; Shankar, Ashwin; Hou, Minmin; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    The development of radiation-hardened, temperature-tolerant materials, sensors and electronics will enable lightweight space sub-systems (reduced packaging requirements) with increased operation lifetimes in extreme harsh environments such as those encountered during space exploration. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a ceramic, semiconductor material stable within high-radiation, high-temperature and chemically corrosive environments due to its wide bandgap (3.4 eV). These material properties can be leveraged for ultraviolet (UV) wavelength photodetection. In this paper, current results of GaN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) UV photodetectors behavior after irradiation up to 50 krad and temperatures of 15°C to 150°C is presented. These initial results indicate that GaN-based sensors can provide robust operation within extreme harsh environments. Future directions for GaN-based photodetector technology for down-hole, automotive and space exploration applications are also discussed.

  6. A METALLICITY-SPIN TEMPERATURE RELATION IN DAMPED Lyα SYSTEMS

    Kanekar, Nissim; Smette, Alain; Briggs, Frank H.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2009-01-01

    We report evidence for an anti-correlation between spin temperature T s and metallicity [Z/H], detected at 3.6σ significance in a sample of 26 damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at redshifts 0.09 s = (-0.68 ± 0.17) x [Z/H] + (2.13 ± 0.21) from a linear regression analysis. Our results indicate that the high T s values found in DLAs do not arise from differences between the optical and radio sightlines, but are likely to reflect the underlying gas temperature distribution. The trend between T s and [Z/H] can be explained by the larger number of radiation pathways for gas cooling in galaxies with high metal abundances, resulting in a high cold gas fraction, and hence, a low spin temperature. Conversely, low-metallicity galaxies have fewer cooling routes, yielding a larger warm gas fraction and a high T s . Most DLAs at z > 1.7 have low metallicities, [Z/H] s and [Z/H] is consistent with the presence of a mass-metallicity relation in DLAs, suggested by the tight correlation between DLA metallicity and the kinematic widths of metal lines. Most high-z DLAs are likely to arise in galaxies with low masses (M vir 10.5 M sun ), low metallicities ([Z/H] <-1), and low cold gas fractions.

  7. Temperature-dependent thermo-elastic properties of s-, p- and d-block liquid metals

    Singh, R.N.; Arafin, S.; George, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Thermodynamic relations involving experimentally known physical quantities are used to determine the ratio of specific heats, γ, for s-block (Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg), d-block (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg,) and p-block (Al, Ga, In, Tl, Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi, Se, Te) liquid metals. γ is further utilized to determine reliable values for the isothermal compressibility (κ T ) and the specific heat at constant volume (C V ) for these liquid metals near and above the melting temperatures. These data are of considerable significance for various thermo-physical analysis of liquid metals. We have also evaluated the Grueneisen function and its temperature dependence to establish the correlation between the thermal expansion and the elastic response to thermally induced stress. The values of acoustic impedance for liquid metals are evaluated and its physical significance is discussed for the transmission of elastic waves across metallic interfaces

  8. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation. (Author) 66 refs

  9. Multiscale imaging and characterization of the effect of mixing temperature on asphalt concrete containing recycled components.

    Cavalli, M C; Griffa, M; Bressi, S; Partl, M N; Tebaldi, G; Poulikakos, L D

    2016-10-01

    When producing asphalt concrete mixture with high amounts of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), the mixing temperature plays a significant role in the resulting spatial distribution of the components as well as on the quality of the resulting mixture, in terms of workability during mixing and compaction as well as in service mechanical properties. Asphalt concrete containing 50% RAP was investigated at mixing temperatures of 140, 160 and 180°C, using a multiscale approach. At the microscale, using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy the RAP binder film thickness was visualized and measured. It was shown that at higher mixing temperatures this film thickness was reduced. The reduction in film thickness can be attributed to the loss of volatiles as well as the mixing of RAP binder with virgin binder at higher temperatures. X-ray computer tomography was used to characterize statistically the distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates geometric features: volume, width and shape anisotropy. In addition using X-ray computer tomography, the packing and spatial distribution of the RAP and virgin aggregates was characterized using the nearest neighbour metric. It was shown that mixing temperature may have a positive effect on the spatial distribution of the aggregates but did not affect the packing. The study shows a tendency for the RAP aggregates to be more likely distributed in clusters at lower mixing temperatures. At higher temperatures, they were more homogeneously distributed. This indicates a higher degree of blending both at microscale (binder film) and macroscale (spatial distribution) between RAP and virgin aggregates as a result of increasing mixing temperatures and the ability to quantify this using various imaging techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of temperature on the stability of metal soaps ...

    The thermal stability of calcium and zinc dicarboxylates was studied. The kinetics of the decomposition was studied thermogravimetrically at various temperatures. The rates of the first stage decomposition were used to assess the effect of temperature on the susceptibility of the metal soaps of dicarboxylic acids to ...

  11. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  12. Low-temperature properties of a superconducting disordered metal

    Graebner, J.E.; Golding, B.; Schutz, R.J.; Hsu, F.S.L.; Chen, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    Specific heat C/sub p/ and thermal conductivity kappa measurements between 0.1 and 10 K on the superconducting (T/sub c/ = 2.53 K) and structurally disordered metal Zr/sub 0.7/Pd/sub 0.3/ exhibit an approximately linear term in C/sub p/ and a T/sup 1.9/ dependence of kappa below T/sub c/. The magnitudes of these terms are close to those found for insulating glasses, thereby suggesting that disorder-induced localized excitations exist at similar densities in very different classes of disordered solids

  13. Stevia rebaudiana Leaves: Effect of Drying Process Temperature on Bioactive Components, Antioxidant Capacity and Natural Sweeteners.

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto; Ah-Hen, Kong; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Honores, Carolina; Moraga, Nelson O

    2016-03-01

    Stevia leaves are usually used in dried state and undergo the inevitable effect of drying process that changes the quality characteristics of the final product. The aim of this study was to assess temperature effect on Stevia leaves through analysis of relevant bioactive components, antioxidant capacity and content of natural sweeteners and minerals. The drying process was performed in a convective dryer at constant temperatures ranging from 30 to 80 °C. Vitamin C was determined in the leaves and as expected showed a decrease during drying proportional to temperature. Phenolics and flavonoids were also determined and were found to increase during drying below 50 °C. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ORAC assays, and the latter showed the highest value at 40 °C, with a better correlation with the phenolics and flavonoids content. The content of eight natural sweeteners found in Stevia leaves was also determined and an increase in the content of seven of the sweeteners, excluding steviol bioside, was found at drying temperature up to 50 °C. At temperatures between 60 and 80 °C the increase in sweeteners content was not significant. Stevia leaves proved to be an excellent source of antioxidants and natural sweeteners.

  14. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  15. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-01-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: (1) Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements; (2) Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout; (3) Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required; (4) Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems; (5) Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs; and (6) Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs

  16. Rules for design of Alloy 617 nuclear components to very high temperatures

    Corum, J.M.; Blass, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactors provide attractive options for electric power generation using a direct gas-turbine cycle and for process-heat applications. For the latter, temperatures of at least 950 degree C (1742 degree F) are desirable. As a first step to providing rules for the design of nuclear components operating at very high temperatures, a draft ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case has been prepared by an ad hoc Code task force. The Case, which is patterned after the high-temperature nuclear Code Case N-47, covers Ni-Cr-Co-Mo Alloy 617 for temperatures to 982 degree C (1800 degree F). The purpose of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the draft Case and the significant differences between it and Case N-47. Particular emphasis is placed on the material behavior and allowables. The paper also recommends some materials and structures development activities that are needed to place the design methodology on a sound and defensible footing. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. STABILITY OF BETACYANIN PIGMENTS FROM RED PURPLE PITAYA FRUIT (Hylocereus polyrhizus : INFLUENCE OF PH, TEMPERATURE, METAL IONS AND ASCORBIC ACID

    Tang, C.S Tang, C.S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Betacyanin pigments from red-purple pitaya fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus could be an attractive source of red colourant for food application. This paper presents results on the extraction of betacyanin pigments from pitaya fruits grown locally in Malaysia. Both the flesh of the fruit and its mesocarp were investigated and it was found that the flesh had higher pigment contents compared to its peel component. The concentration of betacyanins expressed as betanin equivalents per 100 g of flesh and peel were 10.1 ± 0.6 mg and 6.7 ± 0.2 mg, respectively when 80% methanol was used.  The stability of betacyanin pigments were investigated at different pH, temperature and in presence of different concentrations of metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ and ascorbic acid. The results showed that the pigment was most stable at pH range between 5 and 6. However, it forfeited its stability to the heat induced at elevated temperatures. Metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ proved to be capable of accelerating betacyanin degradation, with Cu2+ exhibiting the greatest effect. By contrast, supplementation with ascorbic acid could enhance the pigment stability against the detrimental effects caused by pH, temperature and metal ions. Nevertheless, if the concentration of ascorbic acid exceeds 0.7 %, it may change its role from pigment stabilizer to become a pro-oxidant.    Keywords: Betacyanin, pigments, pitaya fruit, Hylocereus polyrhizus, ascorbic acid

  18. A New Class of Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors

    Jain, Mohit; Skandan, Ganesh; Khose, Gordon E.; Maro, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 C. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  19. "A New Class od Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors"

    Dr. Mohit Jain; Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Gordon E. Khose; Mrs. Judith Maro, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT

    2008-05-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 oC. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  20. Temperature analysis of laser ignited metalized material using spectroscopic technique

    Bassi, Ishaan; Sharma, Pallavi; Daipuriya, Ritu; Singh, Manpreet

    2018-05-01

    The temperature measurement of the laser ignited aluminized Nano energetic mixture using spectroscopy has a great scope in in analysing the material characteristic and combustion analysis. The spectroscopic analysis helps to do in depth study of combustion of materials which is difficult to do using standard pyrometric methods. Laser ignition was used because it consumes less energy as compared to electric ignition but ignited material dissipate the same energy as dissipated by electric ignition and also with the same impact. Here, the presented research is primarily focused on the temperature analysis of energetic material which comprises of explosive material mixed with nano-material and is ignited with the help of laser. Spectroscopy technique is used here to estimate the temperature during the ignition process. The Nano energetic mixture used in the research does not comprise of any material that is sensitive to high impact.

  1. High temperature testing - a contribution to alloy development, alloy qualification and simulation of component Loading

    Scholz, A.; Schwienheer, M.; Mueller, F.; Linn, S.; Schein, M.; Walther, C.; Berger, C.

    2007-01-01

    In parallel to continued developments of steam and gas turbines as well as traffic engineering machines on the one hand, and marginal conditions like low specific fuel consumption and sufficient environment-friendliness on the other hand, the aim of improving the degree of efficiency by augmenting process parameters such as temperature and pressure is being followed. These efforts impact especially components of thermic machines and facilities subject to high thermal and mechanic exposure. Still largely unexplored is the interaction between microstructure characteristics determined through chemical composition, production processes and heat treatment, changes in the microstructure due to multiaxial load and the time-dependent deformation and stability resulting hereof. With regard to this background, improved methods of material properties determination, their modelling and transfer on the component enable to optimize wall thicknesses and degrees of efficiency. In the course of evaluation of static and cyclic material properties carried out also on faulty specimens, uncertainties occur which can originate from the testing process and analysis, as well as being influenced by the material itself and its process of production. Altogether, the demand for reliable determination of material properties and methods of scatterband treatment and their mathematical-statistical evaluation is in business. For simulation, consistent material datasets that describe the complex interaction between temperature, period of exposure and type of exposure are needed. Summarizing, the tasks dealt with qualify the entire process from production to the operational behaviour of components. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  2. Systems and Methods for Implementing Bulk Metallic Glass-Based Strain Wave Gears and Strain Wave Gear Components

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass-based strain wave gears and strain wave gear components. In one embodiment, a strain wave gear includes: a wave generator; a flexspline that itself includes a first set of gear teeth; and a circular spline that itself includes a second set of gear teeth; where at least one of the wave generator, the flexspline, and the circular spline, includes a bulk metallic glass-based material.

  3. ATR-IR study of skin components: Lipids, proteins and water. Part I: Temperature effect

    Olsztyńska-Janus, S.; Pietruszka, A.; Kiełbowicz, Z.; Czarnecki, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we report the studies of the effect of temperature on skin components, such as lipids, proteins and water. Modifications of lipids structure induced by increasing temperature (from 20 to 90 °C) have been studied using ATR-IR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool for characterization of the molecular structure and properties of tissues, such as skin. Due to the small depth of penetration (0.6-5.6 μm), ATR-IR spectroscopy probes only the outermost layer of the skin, i.e. the stratum corneum (SC). The assignment of main spectral features of skin components allows for the determination of phase transitions from the temperature dependencies of band intensities [e.g. νas(CH2) and νs(CH2)]. The phase transitions were determined by using two methods: the first one was based on the first derivative of the Boltzmann function and the second one employed tangent lines of sigmoidal, aforementioned dependencies. The phase transitions in lipids were correlated with modifications of the structure of water and proteins.

  4. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ...

  5. High-temperature complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS)

    McBrayer, J.D.

    1979-10-01

    Silicon CMOS devices were studied, tested, and evaluated at high temperatures to determine processing, geometric, operating characteristics, and stability parameters. After more than 1000 hours at 300 0 C, most devices showed good stability, reliability, and operating characteristics. Processing and geometric parameters were evaluated and optimization steps discussed

  6. Surface intermediates on metal electrodes at high temperatures

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms widely conceived for the O(2)-reduction or H(2)-oxidation reactions in SOFC's involve intermediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In air at moderate temperatures (500 degrees C) Pt...

  7. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc

  8. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint-Etienne (ENISE), DIPI Laboratory, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Smurov, I. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Saint-Etienne (ENISE), DIPI Laboratory, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: smurov@enise.fr

    2009-03-31

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  9. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  10. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  11. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  12. Room-Temperature Synthesis of Transition Metal Clusters and Main Group Polycations from Ionic Liquids

    Ahmed, Ejaz

    2011-01-01

    Main group polycations and transition metal clusters had traditionally been synthesized via high-temperature routes by performing reactions in melts or by CTR, at room-temperature or lower temperature by using so-called superacid solvents, and at room-temperature in benzene–GaX3 media. Considering the major problems associated with higher temperature routes (e.g. long annealing time, risk of product decomposition, and low yield) and taking into account the toxicity of benzene and liquid SO2 i...

  13. Positron annihilation lifetime study of low temperature irradiated metals

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been made for electron and neutron irradiated Fe, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Si, Fe-16Cr-17Ni specimens, and isochronal annealing behaviors were obtained for these metals and alloys. It was found that vacancies start to migrate at about 200 K in Fe and form microvoids, but by the addition of small amount of alloying elements this behavior was changed depending on the alloying elements. Positron lifetime calculations were made to explain the experimental results using EAM (embedded atom method) type potential for the lattice relaxation and the atomic superposition method for the lifetime calculation. Fairly good agreements were obtained for the positron lifetime in a vacancy in Fe and other alloys. (author)

  14. Evaluation of metal matrix composite to replace spheroidal graphite iron for a critical component, steering knuckle

    Vijayarangan, S.; Rajamanickam, N.; Sivananth, V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A FE model is developed to study the suitability of MMC for steering knuckle. ► Structural analysis of steering knuckle is carried out for 12 load cases. ► The cross section of the critical region is optimized using genetic algorithm. ► The life of the MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) knuckle is compared before and after optimization. ► MMC material could replace SG iron for automotive steering knuckle. -- Abstract: Steering knuckle is considered as one of the critical component in automotive suspension system. It is subjected to time varying loads during its service life, leading to fatigue failure. Therefore, its design is an important aspect in the product development cycle. Currently, spheroidal graphite (SG) iron is widely used to manufacture steering knuckle in the commercial automobile sector. It has been observed from the knuckle manufacturers that advanced materials and weight reduction are the real need for the current automobile industry. Due to their high strength to weight ratio, Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have the potential to meet the demanded design requirements of the automotive industry, compared to conventional materials. In this work, an aluminum alloy reinforced with titanium carbide particulate is suggested as an alternate material in place of existing SG iron. Structural analysis of steering knuckle made of alternate material Al-10 wt.% TiC was performed using commercial code ANSYS. The results of steering knuckle made of MMC (Al-10 wt.% TiC) were compared with that of aluminum alloy and SG iron steering knuckles for its performance based on real time load cases. It is found from this analysis, the knuckle strut region has maximum stress and deflection during its life time. The critical strut region cross section area of knuckle was analyzed and geometrically optimized for minimum bending stress and deflection using genetic algorithm available in MatLab. Since, the knuckle experiences time varying loads, fatigue analysis also

  15. Nanofluid based on self-nanoencapsulated metal/metal alloys phase change materials with tuneable crystallisation temperature.

    Navarrete, Nuria; Gimeno-Furio, Alexandra; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Cabedo, Luis; Cordoncillo, Eloisa; Julia, J Enrique

    2017-12-14

    Nanofluids using nanoencapsulated Phase Change Materials (nePCM) allow increments in both the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the base fluid. Incremented heat capacity is produced by the melting enthalpy of the nanoparticles core. In this work two important advances in this nanofluid type are proposed and experimentally tested. It is firstly shown that metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be used as self-encapsulated nePCM using the metal oxide layer that forms naturally in most commercial synthesis processes as encapsulation. In line with this, Sn/SnOx nanoparticles morphology, size and thermal properties were studied by testing the suitability and performance of encapsulation at high temperatures and thermal cycling using a commercial thermal oil (Therminol 66) as the base fluid. Secondly, a mechanism to control the supercooling effect of this nePCM type based on non-eutectic alloys was developed.

  16. Galvanic corrosion evaluation of high activity nuclear waste container metals components

    Semino, C.J.

    1990-04-01

    The final disposal container for vitrified high-level waste is assumed to have three metallic layers: a stainless steel inner layer, and external one of a metal to be selected and a thick lead layer (10 cm) in the middle. As design limit, the container shall act as an engineering barrier, granting the isolation of the radionuclides for approximately 1000 years. Preliminary titanium-lead galvanic couple tests showed that titanium behaved always as a cathode in the galvanic couple, promoting the galvanic corrosion of lead. This corrosion study focused on the behaviour of lead-AISI 304 stainless steel and lead-carbon steel (SAE 1010 and 1020) galvanic couples with different area relationships, temperature and media composition. High purity lead (99,999%) and commercial lead (99,9%) were used for galvanic couples tests. Tests were performed at 75, 50, 45 and 40 deg. C. Test solution was either synthetic groundwater, a suspension of 10% bentonite in groundwater, or synthetic sea water. The synthetic sea water was used at 100, 50 and 25% concentration by dilution with distilled water. Tests with lead-304 stainless steel galvanic couples showed that lead always behaves as an anode, corroding preferentially. Very low lead corrosion rates were found in lead-carbon steel galvanic couple in 10% bentonite suspension in synthetic groundwater test at 75 deg. C. An increase of carbon content in steel has very little influence on steel corrosion rate. Commercial lead has a higher corrosion rate and presented a more pronounced attack than high purity lead. Its corrosion rate is at least twice when lead-carbon steel area relationship increases from 1:10 to 1:40. There are higher steel corrosion rates in sea water than in groundwater. Lead behaves as a cathode to the end of the test. 8 refs, 85 figs, 10 tabs

  17. Future needs for inelastic analysis in design of high-temperature nuclear plant components

    Corum, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The role that inelastic analyses play in the design of high-temperature nuclear plant components is described. The design methodology, which explicitly accounts for nonlinear material deformation and time-dependent failure modes, requires a significant level of realism in the prediction of structural response. Thus, material deformation and failure modeling are, along with computational procedures, key parts of the methodology. Each of these is briefly discussed along with validation by comparisons with benchmark structural tests, and problem areas and needs are discussed for each

  18. ARCHER Project: Progress on Material and component activities for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Buckthorpe, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) integrated project is a four year project which was started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7th Framework Programme (FP7) to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R&D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research & Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on ARCHER materials and component activities since the start of the project and underlines some of the main conclusions reached. (author)

  19. Material and component progress within ARCHER for advanced high temperature reactor

    Buckthorpe, D.E.; Davies, M.; Pra, F.; Bonnamy, P.; Fokkens, J.; Heijna, M.; Bout, N. de; Vreeling, A.; Bourlier, F.; Lhachemi, D.; Woayehune, A.; Dubiez-le-Goff, S.; Hahner, P.; Futterer, M.; Berka, J.; Kalivodora, J.; Pouchon, M.A.; Schmitt, R.; Homerin, P.; Marsden, B.; Mummery, P.; Mutch, G.; Ponca, D.; Buhl, P.; Hoffmann, M.; Rondet, F.; Pecherty, A.; Baurand, F.; Alenda, F.; Esch, M.; Kohlz, N.; Reed, J.; Fachinger, J.; Klower, Dr.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R and D) integrated project started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7. Framework Programme (FP7) for a period of four years to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R and D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research and Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on materials and component technologies within ARCHER over the first two years of the project. (authors)

  20. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  1. Temperature-dependent chemical changes of metallic fuel

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; KimJong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Yun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We observed the temperature-dependent variations of UZr alloy using surface analysis techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive Xray spectroscope (EDS). In this work, we exhibited the results of XPS, Raman, XRD, and SEM-EDS for U-10wt%Zr alloy at room temperature, 610 and 1130 .deg. C. In SEM-EDS data, we observed that uranium and zirconium elements uniformly exist. After the annealing of U-10Zr sample at 1130 .deg. C, the formation of zirconium carbide is verified through Raman spectroscopy and XRD results. Additionally, the change of valence state for uranium element is also confirmed by XPS analysis.

  2. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  3. Low-temperature embrittlement and fracture of metals with different crystal lattices – Dislocation mechanisms

    V.M. Chernov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of a low-temperature embrittlement (cold brittleness and dislocation mechanisms for formation of the temperature of a ductile-brittle transition and brittle fracture of metals (mono- and polycrystals with various crystal lattices (BCC, FCC, HCP are considered. The conditions for their formation connected with a stress-deformed state and strength (low temperature yield strength as well as the fracture breaking stress and mobility of dislocations in the top of a crack of the fractured metal are determined. These conditions can be met for BCC and some HCP metals in the initial state (without irradiation and after a low-temperature damaging (neutron irradiation. These conditions are not met for FCC and many HCP metals. In the process of the damaging (neutron irradiation such conditions are not met also and the state of low-temperature embrittlement of metals is absent (suppressed due to arising various radiation dynamic processes, which increase the mobility of dislocations and worsen the strength characteristics.

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  5. Modeling of helium effects in metals: High temperature embrittlement

    Trinkaus, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of helium on swelling, creep rupture and fatigue properties of fusion reactor materials subjected to (n,α)-reactions and/or direct α-injection, are controlled by bubble formation. The understanding of such effects requires therefore the modeling of (1) diffusional reactions of He atoms with other defects; (2) nucleation and growth of He bubbles; (3) transformation of such bubbles into cavities under continuous He generation and irradiation or creep stress. The present paper is focussed on the modeling of the (coupled) high temperature bubble nucleation and growth processes within and on grain boundaries. Two limiting cases are considered: di-atomic nucleation described by the simplest possible sets of rate equations, and multi-atomic nucleation described by classical nucleation theory. Scaling laws are derived which characterize the dependence of the bubble densities upon time (He-dose), He generation rate and temperature. Comparison with experimental data of AISI 316 SS α-implanted at temperatures around 1000 K indicates bubble nucleation of the multi-atomic type. The nucleation and growth models are applied to creep tests performed during α-implantation suggesting that in these cases gas driven bubble growth is the life time controlling mechanism. The narrow (creep stress/He generation rate) range of this mechanism in a mechanism map constructed from these tests indicates that in many reactor situations the time to rupture is probably controlled by stress driven cavity growth rather than by gas driven bubble growth. (orig.)

  6. Measuring the temperature history of isochorically heated warm dense metals

    McGuffey, Chris; Kim, J.; Park, J.; Moody, J.; Emig, J.; Heeter, B.; Dozieres, M.; Beg, Fn; McLean, Hs

    2017-10-01

    A pump-probe platform has been designed for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy near edge structure measurements in isochorically heated Al or Cu samples with temperature of 10s to 100s of eV. The method is compatible with dual picosecond-class laser systems and may be used to measure the temperature of the sample heated directly by the pump laser or by a laser-driven proton beam Knowledge of the temperature history of warm dense samples will aid equation of state measurements. First, various low- to mid-Z targets were evaluated for their suitability as continuum X-ray backlighters over the range 200-1800 eV using a 10 J picosecond-class laser with relativistic peak intensity Alloys were found to be more suitable than single-element backlighters. Second, the heated sample package was designed with consideration of target thickness and tamp layers using atomic physics codes. The results of the first demonstration attempts will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-SC0014600.

  7. Theory of the transition temperature of superconducting amorphous transition metals

    Zwicknagel, G.

    1979-11-01

    In the present paper first the transition temperature Tsub(c) is shown to be a local quantity, which depends on the (average) short range order, and second it is demonstrated how to calculate local electronic properties in the framework of a short range order model and the transition temperature of amorphous systems based on accepted structure models of the amorphous state. In chapter I the theoretical basis of this work is presented in brief. The model used to study the role of short range order (in periodically ordered as well as in disordered system) is described in chapter II. The results of this model for the periodically ordered case are compared in chapter III with band structure calculations. In chapter IV it is shown how to establish short range order models for disordered systems and what kind of information can be obtained with respect to the electronic properties. Finally in chapter V it is discussed to what extend the interpretation of the transition temperature Tsub(c) as being determined by short range order effects can be supported by the electronic properties, which are calculated in the chapters III and IV. (orig.) [de

  8. Evaluation of internal boiler components and gases using a high-temperature infrared (IR) lens

    Hammaker, Robert G.; Colsher, Richard J.; Miles, Jonathan J.; Madding, Robert P.

    1996-03-01

    Fuel accounts for an average of seventy percent of the yearly operational and maintenance costs of all the fossil stations in the United States. This amounts to 30 billion dollars spent for fuel each year. In addition, federal and state environmental codes have been enforcing stricter regulations that demand cleaner environments, such as the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which are a by-product of the fossil fuel flame. If the burn of the flame inside a boiler could be optimized, the usage of fuel and the amounts of pollution produced would be significantly reduced, and many of the common boiler tube failures can be avoided. This would result in a major dollar savings to the utility industry, and would provide a cleaner environment. Accomplishing these goals will require a major effort from the designers and operators that manufacture, operate, and maintain the fossil stations. Over the past few years re-designed burners have been installed in many boilers to help control the temperatures and shape of the flame for better performance and NOx reduction. However, the measurement of the processes and components inside the furnace, that could assist in determining the desired conditions, can at times be very difficult due to the hostile hot environment. In an attempt to resolve these problems, the EPRI M&D Center and a core group of EPRI member utilities have undertaken a two-year project with various optical manufacturers, IR manufacturers, and IR specialists, to fully develop an optical lens that will withstand the high furnace temperatures. The purpose of the lens is to explore the possibilities of making accurate high temperature measurements of the furnace processes and components in an ever-changing harsh environment. This paper provides an introduction to EPRI's internal boiler investigation using an IR high temperature lens (HTL). The paper describes the objectives, approach, benefits, and project progress.

  9. Damages detection in cylindrical metallic specimens by means of statistical baseline models and updated daily temperature profiles

    Villamizar-Mejia, Rodolfo; Mujica-Delgado, Luis-Eduardo; Ruiz-Ordóñez, Magda-Liliana; Camacho-Navarro, Jhonatan; Moreno-Beltrán, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    In previous works, damage detection of metallic specimens exposed to temperature changes has been achieved by using a statistical baseline model based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), piezodiagnostics principle and taking into account temperature effect by augmenting the baseline model or by using several baseline models according to the current temperature. In this paper a new approach is presented, where damage detection is based in a new index that combine Q and T2 statistical indices with current temperature measurements. Experimental tests were achieved in a carbon-steel pipe of 1m length and 1.5 inches diameter, instrumented with piezodevices acting as actuators or sensors. A PCA baseline model was obtained to a temperature of 21º and then T2 and Q statistical indices were obtained for a 24h temperature profile. Also, mass adding at different points of pipe between sensor and actuator was used as damage. By using the combined index the temperature contribution can be separated and a better differentiation of damages respect to undamaged cases can be graphically obtained.

  10. Direct band gap electroluminescence from bulk germanium at room temperature using an asymmetric fin type metal/germanium/metal structure

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: wang.dong.539@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Maekura, Takayuki; Kamezawa, Sho [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrated direct band gap (DBG) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from n-type bulk germanium (Ge) using a fin type asymmetric lateral metal/Ge/metal structure with TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, which was fabricated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Small electron and hole barrier heights were obtained for TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, respectively. DBG EL spectrum peaked at 1.55 μm was clearly observed even at a small current density of 2.2 μA/μm. Superlinear increase in EL intensity was also observed with increasing current density, due to superlinear increase in population of elections in direct conduction band. The efficiency of hole injection was also clarified.

  11. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  12. K-band spectroscopic metallicities and temperatures of M-dwarf stars

    Rojas-Ayala Bárbara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I present the metallicity and effective temperature techniques developed for M dwarf stars by Rojas-Ayala et al. (2010, 2012. These techniques are based on absorption features present in the modest resolution K-band spectra (R∼2700 of M dwarfs and have been calibrated using FGK+M dwarf pairs and synthetic atmosphere models. The H2O-K2 index seems to overestimate the effective temperatures of M dwarfs when compared to interferometric measurements. The metallicity distribution of the M dwarf host candidates by the Kepler Mission hints that jovian-size planets form preferentially around solar and super-solar metallicity environments, while small rocky planet host exhibit a wide range of metallicities, just like in their solar-type counterparts.

  13. Interfacial thermal resistance at low temperature between a superconductive metal and a normally resistive metal

    Fouaidy, M.

    1996-01-01

    This lecture is the preliminary of a research program on superconducting cavity resonators. The lecture topic aims at characterizing thermal conduction (and hence thermal losses) at the interface of two metals, one of them being superconductive. Some major works (Barnes and Dillinger, Little) are explained and discussed. (D.L.)

  14. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable

  15. Structural characterization of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering.

    Barucca, G; Santecchia, E; Majni, G; Girardin, E; Bassoli, E; Denti, L; Gatto, A; Iuliano, L; Moskalewicz, T; Mengucci, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co-Cr-Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}γ planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hybrid Metal/Electrolyte Monolithic Low Temperature SOFCs

    2004-10-15

    ScSz system. • Modeling and simulation of steady state heat transfer and temperature distribution in externally insulated hybrid LCA fuel cell stack...amorphous LSM powder derived from the GNP was then annealed at 800oC for 4 hours to form the perovskite structure, as determined by X-ray diffraction...analysis. The perovskite LSM powder was then ball milled with YSZ in weight ratio of LSM:YSZ= 60:40, together with proper amount of an organic

  17. General purpose nonlinear analysis program FINAS for elevated temperature design of FBR components

    Iwata, K.; Atsumo, H.; Kano, T.; Takeda, H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents currently available capabilities of a general purpose finite element nonlinear analysis program FINAS (FBR Inelastic Structural Analysis System) which has been developed at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) since 1976 to support structural design of fast breeder reactor (FBR) components in Japan. This program is capable of treating inelastic responses of arbitrary complex structures subjected to static and dynamic load histories. Various types of finite element covering rods, beams, pipes, axisymmetric, two and three dimensional solids, plates and shells, are implemented in the program. The thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis is possible for each element type, with primary emphasis on the application to FBR components subjected to sustained or cyclic loads at elevated temperature. The program permits large deformation, buckling, fracture mechanics, and dynamic analyses for some of the element types and provides a number of options for automatic mesh generation and computer graphics. Some examples including elevated temperature effects are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the program

  18. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Tettamanti, S. [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R. [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1998-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  19. Small punch creep test: A promising methodology for high temperature plant components life evaluation

    Tettamanti, S [CISE SpA, Milan (Italy); Crudeli, R [ENEL SpA, Milan (Italy)

    1999-12-31

    CISE and ENEL are involved for years in a miniaturization creep methodology project to obtain similar non-destructive test with the same standard creep test reliability. The goal can be reached with `Small punch creep test` that collect all the requested characteristics; quasi nondestructive disk specimens extracted both on external or internal side of components, than accurately machined and tested on little and cheap apparatus. CISE has developed complete creep small punch procedure that involved peculiar test facility and correlation`s law comparable with the more diffused isostress methodology for residual life evaluation on ex-serviced high temperature plant components. The aim of this work is to obtain a simple and immediately applicable relationship useful for plant maintenance managing. More added work is need to validate the Small Punch methodology and for relationship calibration on most diffusion high temperature structural materials. First obtained results on a comparative work on ASTM A355 P12 ex-serviced pipe material are presented joint with a description of the Small Punch apparatus realized in CISE. (orig.) 6 refs.

  20. Gallium-Based Room-Temperature Liquid Metals: Actuation and Manipulation of Droplets and Flows

    Leily Majidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gallium-based room-temperature liquid metals possess extremely valuable properties, such as low toxicity, low vapor pressure, and high thermal and electrical conductivity enabling them to become suitable substitutes for mercury and beyond in wide range of applications. When exposed to air, a native oxide layer forms on the surface of gallium-based liquid metals which mechanically stabilizes the liquid. By removing or reconstructing the oxide skin, shape and state of liquid metal droplets and flows can be manipulated/actuated desirably. This can occur manually or in the presence/absence of a magnetic/electric field. These methods lead to numerous useful applications such as soft electronics, reconfigurable devices, and soft robots. In this mini-review, we summarize the most recent progresses achieved on liquid metal droplet generation and actuation of gallium-based liquid metals with/without an external force.

  1. Amine promoted, metal enhanced degradation of Mirex under high temperature conditions

    Jallad, Karim N. [American University of Sharjah, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)]. E-mail: kjallad@runbox.com; Lynn, Bert C. [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry, Lexington, KY 40506-055 (United States); Alley, Earl G. [Mississippi State University, Department of Chemistry, MS State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2006-07-31

    In this study, zero-valent metal dehalogenation of mirex was conducted with amine solvents at high temperatures. Mirex was treated with excess amine in sealed glass tube reactors under nitrogen. The amines used were n-butyl amine (l), ethyl amine (l), dimethyl amine (g), diethyl amine (l), triethyl amine (l), trimethyl amine (g) and ammonia (g). The metals used were copper, zinc, magnesium, aluminum and calcium. The most suitable amine solvent and metal were selected by running a series of reactions with different amines and different zero-valent metals, in order to optimize the conditions under which complete degradation of mirex takes place. These dehalogenation reactions illustrated the role of zero-valent metals as reductants, whereas the amine solvents acted as proton donors. In this study, we report that mirex was completely degraded with diethyl amine (l) in the presence of copper at 100 deg. C and the hydrogenated products accounted for more than 94 of the degraded mirex.

  2. Effects of holding pressure and process temperatures on the mechanical properties of moulded metallic parts

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Esteves, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal injection moulding is gaining more and more importance over the time and needs more research to be done to understand the sensitivity of process to different process parameters. The current paper makes an attempt to better understand the effects of holding pressure and process temperatures...... on the moulded metallic parts. Stainless steel 316L is used in the investigation to produce the specimen by metal injection moulding (MIM) and multiple analyses were carried out on samples produced with different combinations of holding pressure, mould temperature and melt temperature. Finally, the parts were...... characterized to investigate mechanical properties like density, ultimate tensile strength, shrinkage etc. The results are discussed in the paper. The main conclusion from this study is unlike plastic moulding, the tensile properties of MIM parts doesn’t vary based on the flow direction of the melt, and tensile...

  3. Wide gap active brazing of ceramic-to-metal-joints for high temperature applications

    Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Kopp, N.; Samadian Anavar, S.

    2014-03-01

    Applications like solid oxide fuel cells and sensors increasingly demand the possibility to braze ceramics to metals with a good resistance to high temperatures and oxidative atmospheres. Commonly used silver based active filler metals cannot fulfill these requirements, if application temperatures higher than 600°C occur. Au and Pd based active fillers are too expensive for many fields of use. As one possible solution nickel based active fillers were developed. Due to the high brazing temperatures and the low ductility of nickel based filler metals, the modification of standard nickel based filler metals were necessary to meet the requirements of above mentioned applications. To reduce thermally induced stresses wide brazing gaps and the addition of Al2O3 and WC particles to the filler metal were applied. In this study, the microstructure of the brazed joints and the thermo-chemical reactions between filler metal, active elements and WC particles were analyzed to understand the mechanism of the so called wide gap active brazing process. With regard to the behavior in typical application oxidation and thermal cycle tests were conducted as well as tensile tests.

  4. Low temperature uniform plastic deformation of metallic glasses during elastic iteration

    Fujita, Takeshi; Wang Zheng; Liu Yanhui; Sheng, Howard; Wang Weihua; Chen Mingwei

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and dynamic mechanical analysis experiments were employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses subjected to iteration deformation in a nominally elastic region. It was found that cyclic deformation leads to the formation of irreversible shear transformation zones (STZs) and a permanent uniform strain. The initiation of STZs is directly correlated with the atomic heterogeneity of the metallic glass and the accumulated permanent strain has a linear relation with the number of STZs. This study reveals a new deformation mode and offers insights into the atomic mechanisms of STZ formation and low temperature uniform plastic deformation of metallic glasses.

  5. On the temperatures, colours, and ages of metal-poor stars predicted by stellar models

    Van den Berg, D A

    2008-01-01

    Most (but not all) of the investigations that have derived the effective temperatures of metal-poor, solar-neighbourhood field stars, from analyses of their spectra or from the infrared flux method, favour a T eff scale that is ∼100-120 K cooler than that given by stellar evolutionary models. This seems to be at odds with photometric results, given that the application of current colour-T eff relations to the observed subdwarf colours suggests a preference for hotter temperatures. Moreover, the predicted temperatures for main-sequence stars at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] eff for them unless some fundamental modification is made to the adopted physics. No such problems are found if the temperatures of metal-poor field stars are ∼100-120 K warmer than most determinations. In this case, stellar models would appear to provide consistent interpretations of both field and globular cluster (GC) stars of low metallicity. However, this would imply, e.g. that M 92 has an [Fe/H] value of approximately - 2.2, which is obtained from analyses of Fe I lines, instead of approximately equal to - 2.4, as derived from Fe II lines (and favoured by studies of three-dimensional model atmospheres). Finally, the age of the local, Population II subgiant HD 140283 (and GCs having similar metal abundances) is estimated to be ∼13 Gyr, if diffusive processes are taken into account.

  6. Investigation on structural integrity of graphite component during high temperature 950degC continuous operation of HTTR

    Sumita, Junya; Shimazaki, Yosuke; Shibata, Taiju

    2014-01-01

    Graphite material is used for internal structures in high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The core components and graphite core support structures are so designed as to maintain the structural integrity to keep core cooling capability. To confirm that the core components and graphite core support structures satisfy the design requirements, the temperatures of the reactor internals are measured during the reactor operation. Surveillance test of graphite specimens and in-service inspection using TV camera are planned in conjunction with the refueling. This paper describes the evaluation results of the integrity of the core components and graphite core support structures during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation, a high temperature continuous operation with reactor outlet temperature of 950degC for 50 days, in high temperature engineering test reactor. The design requirements of the core components and graphite core support structures were satisfied during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation. The dimensional change of graphite which directly influences the temperature of coolant was estimated considering the temperature profiles of fuel block. The magnitude of irradiation-induced dimensional change considering temperature profiles was about 1.2 times larger than that under constant irradiation temperature of 1000degC. In addition, the programs of surveillance test and ISI using TV camera were introduced. (author)

  7. The influence of hydrogen on the fatigue life of metallic leaf spring components in a vacuum environment

    Kouters, M.H.M.; Slot, H.M.; Zwieten, W. van; Veer, J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is used as a process gas in vacuum environments for semiconductor manufacturing equipment. If hydrogen dissolves in metallic components during operation it can result in hydrogen embrittlement. In order to assess if hydrogen embrittlement occurs in such a vacuum environment a special

  8. Chemical composition and effective temperatures of metallic line white dwarfs

    Hammond, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    Model atmosphere techniques have been employed to determine the composition, effective temperatures, radii, masses and surface gravities of white dwarfs Ross 640 and van Maanen 2. The non-gray, LTE, convective, constant flux models employed collisional damping constants for the Ca II H and K lines that were measured in a laboratory device that simulated white dwarf atmospheric conditions. Ross 640 was found to have an extremely helium-rich composition and T/sub eff/ = 8500K, while the observed properties of van Maanen 2 were fitted best by a model with 91 percent helium, 9 percent hydrogen and T/sub eff/ = 6100K. The laboratory measurements of pressure shifts for the Ca II lines casts some doubt on the interpretation of recent radial velocity determinations for van Maanen 2. (U.S.)

  9. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  10. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  11. On the nature of low temperature anomalies of metallic glass inelastic properties

    Spivak, L.V.; Khonik, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Low-temperature (30 60 Nb 40 metallic glass (MG) exposed to the preliminary cold deformation via rolling, to high-temperature homogeneous deformation or to electrolytic hydrogen absorption were investigated. Conclusion is made that the published low-temperature peaks of the internal friction in quick-hardened cold-deformed or hydrogen absorbed MGs are of the common dislocation-like nature. Effect of 2 MeV electron irradiation on the temperature dependence of the internal friction and on the elasticity module of hydrogenated specimens was investigated, as well [ru

  12. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  13. Low Temperature Metal Coating Method Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1155-95

    Kang, Sang-Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gabel, Howard [Innovative Technology, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    A new metal coating method, cidled KEM (kinetic energy metal.lization), demonstrated in the laboratory by lnovati, utilized fast-moving solid particIes entrained in a gas that are caused to fiow through a nozzIe to effect particle deposition on metal surfaces at room temperature conditions. This method (US Patent 5,795,626) was an attractive and viabIe alternative to the currentIy available high-temperature coating methods avaiIabIe. Since it differs significantly from existing metal coating technologies, a brief description of the method is incIuded here. The proposed method, KEM, achieves cohesive and adhesive metallurgical bonding through the high-speed coUision of powder with a substrate and the subsequent discharge of electrical charge at the substrate. Such coating is effected by entraining metal powder in a gas and accelerating this mixture through a supersonic nozzle. The gas/powder is directed towards the substrate to be coated. Collisions occur, initiaIly between the powder and the substrate, and, as the first Iayer of the coating forms, between the powder and the coating. During these collisions the powder is rapidly deformed, causing the exposure of fresh (oxide free) active metal surface. When these’active surfaces contact one another, they agglomerate and form true metaIIurgicaI bonds. The resultant coating has Iow porosity and high adhesive and cohesive strength. The formation of metaIIurgicaI bonds is potentiated by the discharge of electrical energy. This electrical energy is the result of triboeIectric charging of the particIes during acceleration and transit to the nozzIe. An advantage of the method is that it does not raise the temperature of the powder being appLiedor that of the substrate. Consequently, materials sensitive to high temperature may be applied without changing Me properties of the materkd or substrate.

  14. Low temperature incineration of mixed wastes using bulk metal oxide catalysts

    Gordon, M.J.; Gaur, S.; Kelkar, S.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Volume reduction of low-level mixed wastes from former nuclear weapons facilities is a significant environmental problem. Processing of these materials presents unique scientific and engineering problems due to the presence of minute quantities of radionuclides which must be contained and concentrated for later safe disposal. Low-temperature catalytic incineration is one option that has been utilized at the Rocky Flats facility for this purpose. This paper presents results of research regarding evaluation of bulk metal oxides as catalysts for low-temperature incineration of carbonaceous residues which are typical by-products of fluidized bed combustion of mixed wastes under oxygen-lean conditions. A series of 14 metal oxides were screened in a thermogravimetric analyzer, using on-line mass spectrometry for speciation of reaction product gases. Catalyst evaluation criteria focused on the thermal-redox activity of the metals using both carbon black and PVC char as surrogate waste materials. Results indicated that metal oxides which were P-type semiconductor materials were suitable as catalysts for this application. Oxides of cobalt, molybdenum, vanadium, and manganese were found to be particularly stable and active catalysts under conditions specific to this process (T<650C, low oxygen partial pressures). Bench-scale evaluation of these metal oxides with respect to stability to chlorine (HCl) attack was carried out at 550C using a TG/MS system. Cobalt oxide was found to be resistant to metal loss in a HCl/He gaseous environment while metal loss from Mo, Mn, and V-based catalysts was moderate to severe. XRD and SEM/EDX analysis of spent Co catalysts indicated the formation of non-stoichiometric cobalt chlorides. Regeneration of chlorinated cobalt was found to successfully restore the low-temperature combustion activity to that of the fresh metal oxide

  15. Low temperature irradiation effects on plastic deformation in BCC metals

    Aono, Yasuhisa

    1984-01-01

    Low temperature electron beam experiment was carried out on high purity iron and molybdenum single crystals, and its effect on the plastic deformation was examined. As the characteristics of the irradiated iron below 77 K, remarkable softening occurred in all orientations. This phenomenon is based on the interaction of self interstitial atoms and screw dislocations, and the other features such as the absorption of interstitial atoms into screw dislocations and the slip on maximum shearing stress planes were shown. On the other hand, the aggregate of interstitial atoms formed by annealing showed the different plastic characteristics from those of interstitial atoms, and gave the results corresponding to respective stages of the electric resistance recovery curves. Regarding molybdenum, the transfer of its self interstitial atoms is near 40 K, therefore at 77 K, cluster is formed, and it largely affects abnormal slip, which is one of the features of the plasticity of molybdenum. The peculiar dependence of the yield stress on the crystalline orientation was shown. The property of the interaction of the aggregate of interstitial atoms formed and grown by the annealing from 77 K to 500 K with dislocations corresponded to the information of defects obtained by the X-ray research of Maeta, and the similarity to the aggregate of iron was observed. (Kako, I.)

  16. State of the Art in Life Assessment for High Temperature Components Using Replication Method

    Kim, Duck Hee; Choi, Hyun Sun

    2010-01-01

    The power generation and chemical industry have been subjected to further material degradation with long term operations and need to predict the remaining service life of components, such as reformer tube and turbine rotor, that have operated at elevated temperatures. As a non-destructive technique, replication method with reliable metallurgical life and microstructural soundness assessment has been recognized with strongly useful method until now. Developments of this method have variously accomplished by new quantitative approach, such as carbide analysis, with A-parameter and grain deformation method. An overview of replication, some new techniques for material degradation and life assessment were introduced in this paper. Also, on-site applications and its reasonableness were described. As a result of having analyzed microstructure by replication method, carbide approach was quantitatively useful to life assessment

  17. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  18. Low temperature formation of electrode having electrically conductive metal oxide surface

    Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Brown, Ian G.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Kong, Fanping

    1998-01-01

    A low temperature process is disclosed for forming metal suboxides on substrates by cathodic arc deposition by either controlling the pressure of the oxygen present in the deposition chamber, or by controlling the density of the metal flux, or by a combination of such adjustments, to thereby control the ratio of oxide to metal in the deposited metal suboxide coating. The density of the metal flux may, in turn, be adjusted by controlling the discharge current of the arc, by adjusting the pulse length (duration of on cycle) of the arc, and by adjusting the frequency of the arc, or any combination of these parameters. In a preferred embodiment, a low temperature process is disclosed for forming an electrically conductive metal suboxide, such as, for example, an electrically conductive suboxide of titanium, on an electrode surface, such as the surface of a nickel oxide electrode, by such cathodic arc deposition and control of the deposition parameters. In the preferred embodiment, the process results in a titanium suboxide-coated nickel oxide electrode exhibiting reduced parasitic evolution of oxygen during charging of a cell made using such an electrode as the positive electrode, as well as exhibiting high oxygen overpotential, resulting in suppression of oxygen evolution at the electrode at full charge of the cell.

  19. Transient temperature response of in-vessel components due to pulsed operation in tokamak fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    Minato, Akio; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1985-12-01

    A transient temperature response of the in-vessel components (first wall, blanket, divertor/limiter and shielding) surrounding plasma in Tokamak Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) has been analysed. Transient heat load during start up/shut down and pulsed operation cycles causes the transient temperature response in those components. The fatigue lifetime of those components significantly depends upon the resulting cyclic thermal stress. The burn time affects the temperature control in the solid breeder (Li 2 O) and also affects the thermo-mechanical design of the blanket and shielding which are constructed with thick structure. In this report, results of the transient temperature response obtained by the heat transfer and conduction analyses for various pulsed operation scenarios (start up, shut down, burn and dwell times) have been investigated in view of thermo-mechanical design of the in-vessel components. (author)

  20. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  1. Aging and temperature effects on DOC and elemental release from a metal contaminated soil

    Martinez, C.E.; Jacobson, A.R.; McBride, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    Increased aging and temperatures may affect DOC element complexes and their release. - The combined effect of time and temperature on elemental release and speciation from a metal contaminated soil (Master Old Site, MOS) was investigated. The soil was equilibrated at 10, 28, 45, 70 and 90 deg. C for 2 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months in the laboratory. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total soluble elements (by ICP), and labile metals (by DPASV) were determined in the filtered (0.22 μm) supernatants. For the samples equilibrated at 90 deg. C, DOC fractions were size fractionated by filtration and centrifugation; a subsample was only centrifuged while another was also filtered through a 0.45 μm filter. Analyses of the supernatants (ICP, DPASV, DOC) were performed on all size fraction subsamples. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased both with temperature and incubation time; however, metal behavior was not as uniform. In general, total soluble metal release (ICP) paralleled the behavior of DOC, increasing with both time and temperature, and confirming the importance of soil organic matter (SOM) in metal retention. Voltammetric analysis (dpasv) of Cu and Zn showed that very little of these metals remains labile in solution due, presumably, to complexation with dissolved organic matter. Labile concentrations of Cd, on the other hand, constituted a significant portion (50%) of total soluble Cd. Copper and Al increased in solution with time (up to 2 months) and temperature up to 70 deg. C; however, at 90 deg. C the soluble concentration declined sharply. The same behavior was observed after equilibration for longer periods of time (550 days) at lower temperatures (23 and 70 deg. C). While concentrations of labile Cu and total soluble Cu and Al increased in the unfiltered samples, the trend remained the same. DPASV analysis showing shifts in labile Cu complexes with temperature and time, together with the results from the unfiltered samples, lead to the hypothesis that Cu

  2. Assessment of New Components to be integrated in the LHC Room Temperature Vacuum System

    Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    Integration of new equipment in the long straight sections (LSS) of the LHC must be compatible with the TiZrV non-evaporable getter thin film that coats most of the 6-km-long room-temperature beam pipes. This paper focus on two innovative accelerator devices to be installed in the LSS during the long shutdown 1 (LS1): the beam gas vertex (BGV) and a beam bending experiment using a crystal collimator (LUA9). The BGV necessitates a dedicated pressure bump, generated by local gas injection, in order to create the required rate of inelastic beam-gas interactions. The LAU9 experiments aims at improving beam cleaning efficiency with the use of a crystal collimator. New materials like fibre optics, piezoelectric components, and glues are proposed in the original design of the two devices. The integration feasibility of these set-ups in the LSS is presented. In particular outgassing tests of special components, X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of NEG coating behaviour in presence of glues during bake-out, a...

  3. Flaw assessment guide for high-temperature reactor components subject to creep-fatigue loading

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Takahashi, Y.

    1990-10-01

    A high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This procedure is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack-growth laws can be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. 25 refs., 1 fig

  4. Ratcheting study in pressurized piping components under cyclic loading at room temperature

    Ravi Kiran, A.; Agrawal, M.K.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-07-01

    The nuclear power plant piping components and systems are often subjected to reversing cyclic loading conditions due to various process transients, seismic and other events. Earlier the design of piping subjected to seismic excitation was based on the principle of plastic collapse. It is believed that during such events, fatigue-ratcheting is likely mode of failure of piping components. The 1995 ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code, Section-III, has incorporated the reverse dynamic loading and ratcheting into the code. Experimental and analytical studies are carried out to understand this failure mechanism. The biaxial ratcheting characteristics of SA 333, Gr. 6 steel and SS 304 stainless steel at room temperature are investigated in the present work. Experiments are carried out on straight pipes subjected to internal pressure and cyclic bending load applied in a three point and four point bend test configurations. A shake table test is also carried out on a pressurized elbow by applying sinusoidal base excitation. Analytical simulation of ratcheting in the piping elements is carried out. Chaboche nonlinear kinematic hardening model is used for ratcheting simulation. (author)

  5. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    Khonik, VA; Spivak, LV

    Low temperature (30 metallic glass Ni60Nb40 subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar

  6. Anomalous temperature dependence of the current in a metal-oxide-polymer resistive switching diode

    Gomes, H.L.; Rocha, P.R.F.; Kiazadeh, A.; Leeuw, de D.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Metal-oxide polymer diodes exhibit non-volatile resistive switching. The current–voltage characteristics have been studied as a function of temperature. The low-conductance state follows a thermally activated behaviour. The high-conductance state shows a multistep-like behaviour and below 300 K an

  7. Evaluation of the Effect of Temperature on the Stability of Metal ...

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The thermal behaviour of metal soaps of Trichosanthes cucumerina seed oil at 433, 453 and 473K was investigated and the thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition process determined. The kinetics of the decomposition was studied thermogravimetrically at various temperatures. The rates of the first ...

  8. Assessment of methane production from shredder waste in landfills: The influence of temperature, moisture and metals

    Fathi Aghdam, Ehsan; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    different temperatures (20-25°C, 37°C, and 55°C), moisture contents (35% and 75% w/w) and amounts of inoculum (5% and 30% of the samples wet weight). The biochemical methane potential (BMP) from different types of SW (fresh, old and sieved) was determined and compared. The ability of metals (iron, aluminum...

  9. Thermal crackling: study of the mechanical effects of quick temperature fluctuations on metallic surfaces

    Pradel, P.

    1984-05-01

    After a brief overview of the thermohydraulical conditions of liquid sodium leading to important temperature fluctuations near the metallic surfaces, the author examines the transfer modes of these fluctuations in the structure thickness and the long term mechanical effects. Dimensioning models based on thermal and metallurgical properties are under study for structures subject to such sodium loads [fr

  10. The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on ...

    The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on thermal history of an arch - welded steel plate by numerical methods. SM Adedayo. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol. 1(1) 2001: 1-16. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  11. Trends in low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity on transition metals

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Boisen, Astrid; Dahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity trends on transition metals were investigated with the use of a microkinetic model based on a redox mechanism. It is established that the adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen can describe to a large extent changes in the remaining activation...

  12. Effects of a metallic front gate on the temperature-dependent electronic property of pentacene films

    Lin, Yow-Jon, E-mail: rzr2390@yahoo.com.tw [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Hou-Yen [Institute of Photonics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Liu, Day-Shan [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 632, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-14

    The effect of a metallic front gate on the temperature-dependent electronic property of pentacene films was investigated in this study. The carrier mobility exhibits strong temperature dependence, implying the dominance of tunneling (hopping) at low (high) temperatures. The room-temperature mobility was drastically increased by capping an In (Au) layer on the pentacene front surface. However, the carrier concentration is not affected. An increase in the phonon energy occurs for In-capped or Au-capped pentacene samples, which corresponds to the abrupt transition to the nonlocal electron–phonon coupling. The enhanced mobility by capping a metal layer is attributed to a change in the electron–phonon coupling. - Highlights: • For the metal-capped and uncapped pentacene films, the mobility was researched. • The mobility was dramatically increased by capping an In (Au) layer. • The induced strain by capping a metal layer is found. • The strain may lead to the electron–phonon coupling variation. • The enhanced mobility is attributed to the weakened electron–phonon coupling.

  13. Butterfly valve with metal seals controls flow of hydrogen from cryogenic through high temperatures

    Johnson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Butterfly valve with metal seals operates over a temperature range of minus 423 degrees to plus 440 degrees F with hydrogen as a medium and in a radiation environment. Media flow is controlled by an internal butterfly disk which is rotated by an actuation shaft.

  14. EXTRACTION OF COPPER FROM LEACH LIQUOR OF METALLIC COMPONENT IN DISCARDED CELL PHONE BY CYANEX® 272

    ALAFARA A. BABA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Discarded cell phones contribute significantly to the amount of electronic waste generation whilst some of its components are toxic and recoverable. Also, due to the increasing demand for Cu(II in building/construction, electrical and as chemical tool in freshwater, it is imperative to develop low cost and ecofriendly technique as a substitute for the conventional treatments such as reduction-roasting route at elevated temperatures. In the present study, the hydrometallurgical operations involving leaching, solvent extraction and precipitation for the recovery of Cu(II by Cyanex® 272 in kerosene was examined. Various parameters affecting the extraction of Cu(II such as pH, extractant concentration and phase ratio were optimized. At optimal conditions, about 96.3 % Cu(II was extracted into the organic phase by 0.2 mol/L Cyanex® 272 at equilibrium pH 5.0 and aqueous to organic phase ratio 1:1. The stripping of the loaded organic was carried out by 0.1 mol/L HCl solution and stripping efficiency of 98 % was obtained. By McCabe Thiele diagram, four stages are required for complete extraction of Cu(II.

  15. Heavy metal pollution in immobile and mobile components of lentic ecosystems-a review.

    Meena, Ramakrishnan Anu Alias; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ameen, Fuad; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd; Gu, Feng Long

    2018-02-01

    With growing population and urbanization, there is an increasing exploitation of natural resources, and this often results to environmental pollution. In this review, the levels of heavy metal in lentic compartments (water, sediment, fishes, and aquatic plants) over the past two decades (1997-2017) have been summarized to evaluate the current pollution status of this ecosystem. In all the compartments, the heavy metals dominated are zinc followed by iron. The major reason could be area mineralogy and lithogenic sources. Enormous quantity of metals like iron in estuarine sediment is a very natural incident due to the permanently reducing condition of organic substances. Contamination of cadmium, lead, and chromium was closely associated with anthropogenic origin. In addition, surrounding land use and atmospheric deposition could have been responsible for substantial pollution. The accumulation of heavy metals in fishes and aquatic plants is the result of time-dependent deposition in lentic ecosystems. Moreover, various potential risk assessment methods for heavy metals were discussed. This review concludes that natural phenomena dominate the accumulation of essential heavy metals in lentic ecosystems compared to anthropogenic sources. Amongst other recent reviews on heavy metals from other parts of the world, the present review is executed in such a way that it explains the presence of heavy metals not only in water environment, but also in the whole of the lentic system comprising sediment, fishes, and aquatic plants.

  16. The Elastic Constants Measurement of Metal Alloy by Using Ultrasonic Nondestructive Method at Different Temperature

    Eryi Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasonic nondestructive method is introduced into the elastic constants measurement of metal material. The extraction principle of Poisson’s ratio, elastic modulus, and shear modulus is deduced from the ultrasonic propagating equations with two kinds of vibration model of the elastic medium named ultrasonic longitudinal wave and transverse wave, respectively. The ultrasonic propagating velocity is measured by using the digital correlation technique between the ultrasonic original signal and the echo signal from the bottom surface, and then the elastic constants of the metal material are calculated. The feasibility of the correlation algorithm is verified by a simulation procedure. Finally, in order to obtain the stability of the elastic properties of different metal materials in a variable engineering application environment, the elastic constants of two kinds of metal materials in different temperature environment are measured by the proposed ultrasonic method.

  17. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  18. SYNTHESIS AND FABRICATION OF MO-W COMPONENTS FOR NEUTRON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    BINGERT, S.; DESCH, P.; TRUJILLO, E.

    1999-01-01

    A Molybdenum-- 182 Tungsten (Mo- 182 W) alloy was specified for an application that would ultimately result in the measurement of temperature and particle velocity during the steady state time following the shock loading of various materials. The 182 W isotope provides a tag for the analysis of neutron resonance line shape from which the temperature may be calculated. The material was specified to have 1.8 atom percent W, with W-rich regions no larger than 1 microm in size. Both the composition and W distribution were critical to the experiment. Another challenge to the processing was the very small quantity of 182 W material available for the synthesis of the alloy. Therefore, limited fabrication routes were available for evaluation. Several synthesis and processing routes were explored to fabricate the required alloy components. First, precipitation of W onto Mo powder using ammonium metatungstate was investigated for powder synthesis followed by uniaxial hot pressing. Second, mechanical alloying (MA) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and warm forging was attempted. Finally, arc-melting techniques followed by either hot rolling or crushing the alloyed button into powder and consolidation were pursued. The results of the processing routes and characterization of the materials produced will be discussed

  19. PLA and single component silicone rubber blends for sub-zero temperature blown film packaging applications

    Meekum, Utai; Khiansanoi, Apichart

    2018-06-01

    The poly(lactic acid) (PLA) blend with single component silicone rubber in the presence of reactive amino silane coupling agent and polyester polyols plasticizer were studied. The manufacturing of film packaging for sub-zero temperature applications from the PLA blend was the main objective. The mechanical properties, especially the impact strengths, of PLA/silicone blends were significantly depended on the silicone loading. The outstanding impact strengths, tested at sub-zero temperature, of the blend having silicone content of 8.0 phr was achieved. It was chosen as the best candidate for the processability improvement. Adding the talc filler into the PLA/silicone blend to enhance the rheological properties was investigated. The ductility of the talc filled blends were decreased with increasing the filler contents. However, the shear viscosity of the blend was raised with talc loading. The blend loaded with 40 phr of talc filler was justified as the optimal formula for the blown film process testing and it was successfully performed with a few difficulties. The obtained blown film showed relative good flexibility in comparison with LDPE but it has low transparency.

  20. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  1. The Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Deuterium Retention in Solid and Liquid Lithium Films on Molybdenum Plasma-Facing Components

    Capece, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) enable in-situ renewal of the surface, thereby offering a solution to neutron damage, erosion, and thermal fatigue experienced by solid PFCs. Lithium in particular has a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, which has resulted in reduced recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices including TFTR, T11-M, FTU, CDX-U, LTX, TJ-II, and NSTX. A key component to the improvement in plasma performance is deuterium retention in Li; however, this process is not well understood in the complex tokamak environment. Recent surface science experiments conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have used electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption to understand the mechanisms for D retention in Li coatings on Mo substrates. The experiments were designed to give monolayer-control of Li films and were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum under controlled environments. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma source was used to deliver a beam of deuterium ions to the surface over a range of ion energies. Our work shows that D is retained as LiD in metallic Li films. However, when oxygen is present in the film, either by diffusion from the subsurface at high temperature or as a contaminant during the deposition process, Li oxides are formed that retain D as LiOD. Experiments indicate that LiD is more thermally stable than LiOD, which decomposes to liberate D2 gas and D2O at temperatures 100 K lower than the LiD decomposition temperature. Other experiments show how D retention varies with substrate temperature to provide insight into the differences between solid and liquid lithium films. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment

    Postma, P.R.; Pataro, G.; Capitoli, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Olivieri, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65°C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11kWhkgDW -1) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from

  3. HEAVY METALS AS UNWANTED COMPONENTS OF BACKWASH WATER DERIVED FROM GROUNDWATER TREATMENT

    Robert Nowak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some aspects of the problem of heavy metals presence in wastewater and sewage sludge from water treatment. In the first part, issues on quality of wastewaters and sludge produced during water treatment along with actions aimed at the neutralization of such wastes, were discussed. Subsequent parts of the work present the example of 12 groundwater treatment stations in a particular municipality, and the problem of backwash water quality, in particular, heavy metals contents. The analysis covered a period of three years: 2013, 2014, and 2015. The authors, using the discussed examples, have shown that besides hydrated iron and manganese oxides, also other toxic contaminants can be present in backwash water from groundwater treatment. In particular, the qualitative analysis of the backwash water revealed the presence of heavy metals, mainly zinc. The test results for backwash water were compared with those of filtrate qualitative assessment, wherein the heavy metals were not found. This fact indicated the metal retention in the filter bed and their unsustainable immobilization resulting in penetration of heavy metals from deposit to the backwash water along with other impurities, mainly iron and manganese oxides. The main conclusion from the study is to demonstrate the need for constant monitoring of the backwash water quality, including the presence of toxic heavy metals. This is also important because of the requirement to minimize the negative environmental impact of wastes generated during the water treatment process.

  4. A new technique for precise measurement of thermal conductivity of metals at normal and high temperatures

    Binkele, L.

    1990-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on a new measuring technique are described; a technique similar to the well known Kohlrausch measuring technique, which is characterized by direct electrical sample heating. Subject of the investigations is a cylindrical metallic sample, 5 mm thick and 200 mm in length, which is positioned vertically between water-cooled clamps in a vacuum container. The sample can be heated using two simultaneously operating current sources, a 50 Hz-source for axial flow (main heating) as well as a 200 kHz-induction source for generating eddy currents in two short regions above and below the sample centre (additional heating). By using two heating sources different symmetrical temperature profiles in a central eddy-current-free area of about ± 10mm can be produced for any given central sample temperature. The last chapter contains thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity measuring curves for Pt, W, Fe, Ni, Ag, Al, Mg, Ir, Ru, Re, Ho and Y in the temperature range 273 to 1500 K representative of all the metals and alloys investigated. In cases where comparisons with published precise conductivity data, established by other measuring techniques in restricted temperature ranges, were posible, the new measuring method is greatly supported (in the case of Pt, W, Ni, Ag, Al). For the Metals Ir, Ru, Re, Ho and Y high temperature thermal conductivity data are given for the first time. (orig./MM) [de

  5. Mechanism of high-temperature background of internal friction in metals

    Shapoval, B.I.; Arzhavitin, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Data of theoretical and experimental studies on energy dissipation in vibrating metal at small amplitudes and elevated temperatures (high temperature background of internal friction) are generalized and systematized. Evolution of knowledge of the background as a phenomenon influenced mainly by crystal structure defects - their form, quantity, mobility and interaction is followed. Considered is a wide range of investigated metal states and measurement conditions, and interrelations with other characteristics, for instance, strength ones. On the basis of the data obtained by authors and other investigations a concept of an additional third stage of the background increase with the temperature - the stage of deviation from exponential dependence at premelting point, is introduced. 107 refs.; 32 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    Khonik, V.A. [State Pedagogical Univ., Voronezh (Russian Federation); Spivak, L.V. [State Univ., Perm (Russian Federation)

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature (30 < T < 300 K) internal friction in a metallic glass Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar internal friction peaks and hysteresis damping. Homogeneous deformation has no influence on low temperature internal friction. The phenomenon of microplastic deformation during hydrogenation of weakly stressed samples is revealed. It is argued that microplastic deformation of metallic glasses during hydrogenation without external stress takes place too. Plastic flow both on cold rolling and hydrogenation occurs via formation and motion of dislocation-like defects which are the reason of the observed anelastic anomalies. It is concluded that low temperature internal friction peaks described in the literature for as-cast, cold deformed and hydrogenated samples have common dislocation-like origin.

  7. Metal release behavior of surface oxidized stainless steels into flowing high temperature pure water

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Nakayama, Takenori; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Fujita, Norihiko; Ono, Shoichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of oxidation treatment of Type 304 SS on the inhibition of metal release into high temperature pure water, metal release rate of individual alloying element into flowing deionized water containing 50 ppb dissolved oxygen was measured as the function of exposure time on representative specimens oxidized in air and steam. The behavior of metal release was also discussed in relation to the structure of surface films. Among the alloying elements the amount of Fe ion, Cr ion and Fe crud in high temperature pure water tended to saturate with the exposure time and that of Ni ion and Co ion tended to increase monotonously with the exposure time for all specimens tested. And the treatment of steam-oxidation was the most effective to decrease the metal release of alloying elements and the treatment by air-oxidation also decreased the metal release. These tendencies were confirmed to correlate well with the structure of the surface films as it was in the results in the static autoclave test. (author)

  8. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CLV/CEV Composite and Metallic Structural Components, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CLV/CEV composite and metallic structures. This developed...

  9. Thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses for precision robotics components, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demand for novel manufacturing methods for space systems brings unique properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) into the spotlight. In addition to superior...

  10. Transformation of atmospheric components near a spark discharge at the anode polarization of a metallic electrode hanging over a solution

    Orlov, A. M.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Bodnarskii, D. S.

    2013-03-01

    The variation of the pressure of a gas phase activated by spark discharges between an aqueous electrolyte solution (liquid cathode) and a metallic electrode (anode) hanging over the solution is studied. A mathematical model of the proceeding reaction kinetics is constructed, and the variation of the partial pressures of all initial and produced components in the gas phase is calculated. Both the Faraday and non-Faraday mechanisms of gas component production from water are confirmed. It is found that a large overhanging drop responsible for additional supply of simultaneously produced H2 and O2 molecules forms rapidly at the end face of the anodically polarized electrode.

  11. Stresses evolution at high temperature (200°C on the interface of thin films in magnetic components

    Doumit Nicole

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of electronics, the increase of operating temperatures is a major industrial and scientific challenge because it allows reducing mass and volume of components especially in the aeronautic domain. So minimizing our components reduce masses and the use of cooling systems. For that, the behaviours and interface stresses of our components (in particular magnetic inductors and transformers that are constituted of one magnetic layer (YIG or an alumina substrate (Al2O3 representing the substrate and a thin copper film are studied at high temperature (200°C. COMSOL Multiphysics is used to simulate our work and to validate our measurements results. In this paper, we will present stresses results according to the geometrical copper parameters necessary for the component fabrication. Results show that stresses increase with temperature and copper’s thickness while remaining always lower than 200MPa which is the rupture stress value.

  12. Low temperature thermocompression bonding between aligned carbon nanotubes and metallized substrate

    Chen, M X; Gan, Z Y; Liu, S [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Song, X H, E-mail: chimish@163.com [Division of MOEMS, Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-08-26

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) turf is proposed for use as an electrical and thermal contact material. For these applications, one route for circumventing the high temperatures required for VACNT growth using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow firstly VACNTs on one substrate and then transfer them to other substrates. In this work, a nano thermocompression bonding technique between VACNTs and a metallized substrate is developed to allow dry mechanical transfer of the VACNTs. Unlike the diffusion bonding between two bulk materials, nano metal clusters have a high surface energy and the atoms are very active to form alloy with the contacted bulk metal material even at much lower temperatures, so nano thermocompression bonding can decrease the bonding temperature (150 deg. C) and pressure (1 MPa) and greatly shorten the bonding time from hours to 20 min. A debonding experiment shows that the bonding strength between VACNTs and the metallized layer is so high that a break is less likely to occur at the bonding interface.

  13. Fracture toughness evaluation of elastic-plastic J-integral for high temperature components of gas turbine in power plants

    Chung, Nam Yong; Kim, Moon Young; Kim, Jong Woo

    1999-01-01

    In the study, the analysis of elastic-plastic J-integral was performed in high temperature components for gas turbine based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. It had been operated on the range of about 700 deg C and degraded by high temperature. It was tested for material properties of used component because of material properties changing at high temperature condition. The elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter, J is obtained with finite element method. A method is suggested which determines J Ic applying analysis of elastic-plastic finite element method and results of experimental load-displacements with CT specimen. It is also investigated that J-integral is applied for the elastic-plastic analysis in high temperature components. The elastic-plastic fracture toughness. J Ic determined by finite element was obtained with high accuracy using the experimental method.=20

  14. Gaia reveals a metal-rich in-situ component of the local stellar halo

    Bonaca, Ana; Conroy, Charlie; Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip; Keres, Dusan

    2018-01-01

    We use the first Gaia data release, combined with RAVE and APOGEE spectroscopic surveys, to investigate the origin of halo stars within ~3 kpc from the Sun. We identify halo stars kinematically, as moving with a relative speed of at least 220 km/s with respect to the local standard of rest. These stars are in general more metal-poor than the disk, but surprisingly, half of our halo sample is comprised of stars with [Fe/H]>-1. The orbital directions of these metal-rich halo stars are preferentially aligned with the disk rotation, in sharp contrast with the isotropic orbital distribution of the more metal-poor halo stars. We find similar properties in the Latte cosmological zoom-in simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy from the FIRE project. In Latte, metal-rich halo stars formed primarily inside of the solar circle, while lower-metallicity halo stars preferentially formed at larger distances (extending beyond the virial radius). This suggests that metal-rich halo stars in the Solar neighborhood in fact formed in situ within the Galactic disk rather than having been accreted from satellite systems. These stars, currently on halo-like orbits, therefore have likely undergone substantial radial migration/heating.

  15. Gaia Reveals a Metal-rich, in situ Component of the Local Stellar Halo

    Bonaca, Ana; Conroy, Charlie; Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan

    2017-08-01

    We use the first Gaia data release, combined with the RAVE and APOGEE spectroscopic surveys, to investigate the origin of halo stars within ≲ 3 kpc from the Sun. We identify halo stars kinematically as moving at a relative speed of at least 220 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest. These stars are generally less metal-rich than the disk, but surprisingly, half of our halo sample is comprised of stars with [{Fe}/{{H}}]> -1. The orbital directions of these metal-rich halo stars are preferentially aligned with the disk rotation, in sharp contrast with the intrinsically isotropic orbital distribution of the metal-poor halo stars. We find similar properties in the Latte cosmological zoom-in simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy from the FIRE project. In Latte, metal-rich halo stars formed primarily inside of the solar circle, whereas lower-metallicity halo stars preferentially formed at larger distances (extending beyond the virial radius). This suggests that metal-rich halo stars in the solar neighborhood actually formed in situ within the Galactic disk, rather than having been accreted from satellite systems. These stars, currently on halo-like orbits, therefore have likely undergone substantial radial migration/heating.

  16. Enrichment of the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards by a mechanical separation process using a stamp mill

    Yoo, Jae-Min; Jeong, Jinki; Yoo, Kyoungkeun; Lee, Jae-chun; Kim, Wonbaek

    2009-01-01

    Printed circuit boards incorporated in most electrical and electronic equipment contain valuable metals such as Cu, Ni, Au, Ag, Pd, Fe, Sn, and Pb. In order to employ a hydrometallurgical route for the recycling of valuable metals from printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment step is needed. In this study, the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards have been enriched using a mechanical separation process. Waste printed circuit boards shredded to 5.0 mm. The fractions of milled printed circuit boards of size 5.0 mm fraction and the heavy fraction were subjected to two-step magnetic separation. Through the first magnetic separation at 700 Gauss, 83% of the nickel and iron, based on the whole printed circuit boards, was recovered in the magnetic fraction, and 92% of the copper was recovered in the non-magnetic fraction. The cumulative recovery of nickel-iron concentrate was increased by a second magnetic separation at 3000 Gauss, but the grade of the concentrate decreased remarkably from 76% to 56%. The cumulative recovery of copper concentrate decreased, but the grade increased slightly from 71.6% to 75.4%. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of the mechanical separation process consisting of milling/size classification/gravity separation/two-step magnetic separation for enriching metallic components such as Cu, Ni, Al, and Fe from waste printed circuit boards

  17. Study of heat fluxes on plasma facing components in a tokamak from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography

    Daviot, R.

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is the development of a method of computation of those heat loads from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography. The research was conducted on three issues arising in current tokamaks but also future ones like ITER: the measurement of temperature on reflecting walls, the determination of thermal properties for deposits observed on the surface of tokamak components and the development of a three-dimensional, non-linear computation of heat loads. A comparison of several means of pyrometry, monochromatic, bi-chromatic and photothermal, is performed on an experiment of temperature measurement. We show that this measurement is sensitive to temperature gradients on the observed area. Layers resulting from carbon deposition by the plasma on the surface of components are modeled through a field of equivalent thermal resistance, without thermal inertia. The field of this resistance is determined, for each measurement points, from a comparison of surface temperature from infrared thermographs with the result of a simulation, which is based on a mono-dimensional linear model of components. The spatial distribution of the deposit on the component surface is obtained. Finally, a three-dimensional and non-linear computation of fields of heat fluxes, based on a finite element method, is developed here. Exact geometries of the component are used. The sensitivity of the computed heat fluxes is discussed regarding the accuracy of the temperature measurements. This computation is applied to two-dimensional temperature measurements of the JET tokamak. Several components of this tokamak are modeled, such as tiles of the divertor, upper limiter and inner and outer poloidal limiters. The distribution of heat fluxes on the surface of these components is computed and studied along the two main tokamak directions, poloidal and toroidal. Toroidal symmetry of the heat loads from one tile to another is shown. The influence of measurements spatial resolution

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic high-temperature materials. Research report

    Mughrabi, H.; Gottstein, G.; Mecking, H.; Riedel, H.; Toboloski, J.

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains 38 lectures of research studies performed in the course of the Priority Programme 'Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Metallic High-Temperature Materials' supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) over a period of six years from 1991 to 1997. The four materials selected were: 1. light metal PM-aluminium and titanium base alloys; 2. ferritic chromium and austenitic alloy 800 steels; 3. (monocrystalline) nickel-base superalloys; and 4. nickel- and iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened superalloys. All papers have been abstracted separately for the ENERGY database

  19. Local coordination and medium range order in molten trivalent metal chlorides: The role of screening by the chlorine component

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    Earlier work has identified the metal ion size R M as a relevant parameter in determining the evolution of the liquid structure of trivalent metal chlorides across the series from LaCl 3 (R M approx. 1.4 A) to AlCl 3 (R M approx. 0.8 A). Here we highlight the structural role of the chlorines by contrasting the structure of fully equilibrated melts with that of disordered systems obtained by quenching the chlorine component. Main attention is given to how the suppression of screening of the polyvalent ions by the chlorines changes trends in the local liquid structure (first neighbour coordination and partial radial distribution functions) and in the intermediate range order (first sharp diffraction peak in the partial structure factors). The main microscopic consequences of structural quenching of the chlorine component are a reduction in short range order and an enhancement of intermediate range order in the metal ion component, as well as the suppression of a tendency to molecular-type states at the lower end of the range of R M . (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  20. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  1. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  2. Effects of annealing temperature in a metal alloy nano-dot memory

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Gae Hun; Song, Yun Heub; Bea, Ji Cheol; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2011-01-01

    The annealing temperature dependence of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic has been studied in a metal-oxide semiconductor structure containing FePt nano-dots. Several in-situ annealing temperatures from 400 to ∼700 .deg. C in a high vacuum ambience (under 1 x 10 -5 Pa) were evaluated in view of the cell's characteristics and its reliability. Here, we demonstrate that the annealing temperature is significant for memory performance in an alloy metal nano-dot structure. A higher in-situ temperature provides better retention and a more reliable memory window. In the sample with an in-situ annealing condition of 700 .deg. C for 30 min, a memory window of 9.2 V at the initial stage was obtained, and a memory window of 6.2 V after 10 years was estimated, which is reliable for a non-volatile memory. From these results, the annealing condition for an alloy metal nano-dot memory is one of the critical parameters for the memory characteristics, and should be optimized for better memory performance.

  3. Metal viscoplasticity with two-temperature thermodynamics and two dislocation densities

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Kar, Gurudas; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.

    2018-03-01

    Posed within the two-temperature theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we propose a model for thermoviscoplastic deformation in metals. We incorporate the dynamics of dislocation densities-mobile and forest—that play the role of internal state variables in the formulation. The description based on two temperatures appears naturally when one recognizes that the thermodynamic system undergoing viscoplastic deformation is composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic-vibrational subsystem of the vibrating atomic lattices and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom relating to defect motion, each with its own temperature. Starting with a basic model that involves only homogeneous deformation, a three-dimensional model for inhomogeneous viscoplasticity applicable to finite deformation is charted out in an overstress driven viscoplastic deformation framework. The model shows how the coupled evolutions of mobile and forest dislocation densities, which are critically influenced by the dynamics of configurational temperature, govern the strength and ductility of the metal. Unlike most contemporary models, the current proposal also affords a prediction of certain finer details as observed in the experimental data on stress-strain behaviour of metals and this in turn enhances the understanding of the evolving and interacting dislocation densities.

  4. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K. [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  5. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.

    2001-01-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  6. Temperature variation in metal ceramic technology analyzed using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of dental prostheses is essential in providing good quality medical services. The metal ceramic technology applied in dentistry implies ceramic sintering inside the dental oven. Every ceramic material requires a special sintering chart which is recommended by the producer. For a regular dental technician it is very difficult to evaluate if the temperature inside the oven remains the same as it is programmed on the sintering chart. Also, maintaining the calibration in time is an issue for the practitioners. Metal ceramic crowns develop a very accurate pattern for the ceramic layers depending on the temperature variation inside the oven where they are processed. Different patterns were identified in the present study for the samples processed with a variation in temperature of +30 °C to +50 °C, respectively - 30 0°C to -50 °C. The OCT imagistic evaluations performed for the normal samples present a uniform spread of the ceramic granulation inside the ceramic materials. For the samples sintered at a higher temperature an alternation between white and darker areas between the enamel and opaque layers appear. For the samples sintered at a lower temperature a decrease in the ceramic granulation from the enamel towards the opaque layer is concluded. The TD-OCT methods can therefore be used efficiently for the detection of the temperature variation due to the ceramic sintering inside the ceramic oven.

  7. Molecular dynamics for near melting temperatures simulations of metals using modified embedded-atom method

    Etesami, S. Alireza; Asadi, Ebrahim

    2018-01-01

    Availability of a reliable interatomic potential is one of the major challenges in utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) for simulations of metals at near the melting temperatures and melting point (MP). Here, we propose a novel approach to address this challenge in the concept of modified-embedded-atom (MEAM) interatomic potential; also, we apply the approach on iron, nickel, copper, and aluminum as case studies. We propose adding experimentally available high temperature elastic constants and MP of the element to the list of typical low temperature properties used for the development of MD interatomic potential parameters. We show that the proposed approach results in a reasonable agreement between the MD calculations of melting properties such as latent heat, expansion in melting, liquid structure factor, and solid-liquid interface stiffness and their experimental/computational counterparts. Then, we present the physical properties of mentioned elements near melting temperatures using the new MEAM parameters. We observe that the behavior of elastic constants, heat capacity and thermal linear expansion coefficient at room temperature compared to MP follows an empirical linear relation (α±β × MP) for transition metals. Furthermore, a linear relation between the tetragonal shear modulus and the enthalpy change from room temperature to MP is observed for face-centered cubic materials.

  8. Temperature Modulation with Specified Detection Point on Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors for E-Nose Application

    Arief SUDARMAJI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature modulation technique, some called dynamic measurement mode, on Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS/MOX gas sensor has been widely observed and employed in many fields. We present its development, a Specified Detection Point (SDP on modulated sensing element of MOS sensor is applied which associated to its temperature modulation, temperature modulation-SDP so-named. We configured the rectangular modulation signal for MOS gas sensors (TGSs and FISs using PSOC CY8C28445-24PVXI (Programmable System on Chip which also functioned as acquisition unit and interface to a computer. Initial responses and selectivity evaluations were performed using statistical tool and Principal Component Analysis (PCA to differ sample gases (Toluene, Ethanol and Ammonia on dynamic chamber measurement under various frequencies (0.25 Hz, 1 Hz, 4 Hz and duty-cycles (25 %, 50 %, 75 %. We found that at lower frequency the response waveform of the sensors becomes more sloping and distinct, and selected modulations successfully increased the selectivity either on singular or array sensors rather than static temperature measurement.

  9. A perspective on the design of high-temperature boiler components

    Perrin, I.J.; Fishburn, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Boiler pressure parts are designed to formalize codes such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. These codes employ a 'design-by-rule' approach, which is based on a combination of sound structural mechanics and boiler design and operating experience. These codes have served the industry well, but the need for a number of enhancements has been highlighted by the widespread use of creep strength-enhanced steels, the advent of ultrasupercritical boilers constructed from nickel-based alloys, and the cyclic duty required for some plants. The need for these enhancements is discussed to explain their origin and key challenges that must be tackled to provide robust design methods for the future. In particular, the use of reference stress concepts and design-by-analysis are discussed to highlight some practical issues. Weldments are identified as a particular concern because they are often a life-limiting feature, and since existing code rules do not adequately consider the high-temperature creep failure modes that can arise as a function of geometry, loading and material combination. Associated with the behavior of welds, multiaxial creep rupture is also identified as a topic that requires further study. The discussion illustrates the multidisciplinary nature of design and need for the materials and structural mechanics communities to work together. This should optimize the use of advanced, expensive alloys and reduce component wall thickness, facilitating pressure part manufacture and enhancing operational flexibility without compromising safety

  10. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Abdil Kus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  11. Thermocouple and infrared sensor-based measurement of temperature distribution in metal cutting.

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-12

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining.

  12. Thermocouple and Infrared Sensor-Based Measurement of Temperature Distribution in Metal Cutting

    Kus, Abdil; Isik, Yahya; Cakir, M. Cemal; Coşkun, Salih; Özdemir, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In metal cutting, the magnitude of the temperature at the tool-chip interface is a function of the cutting parameters. This temperature directly affects production; therefore, increased research on the role of cutting temperatures can lead to improved machining operations. In this study, tool temperature was estimated by simultaneous temperature measurement employing both a K-type thermocouple and an infrared radiation (IR) pyrometer to measure the tool-chip interface temperature. Due to the complexity of the machining processes, the integration of different measuring techniques was necessary in order to obtain consistent temperature data. The thermal analysis results were compared via the ANSYS finite element method. Experiments were carried out in dry machining using workpiece material of AISI 4140 alloy steel that was heat treated by an induction process to a hardness of 50 HRC. A PVD TiAlN-TiN-coated WNVG 080404-IC907 carbide insert was used during the turning process. The results showed that with increasing cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, the tool temperature increased; the cutting speed was found to be the most effective parameter in assessing the temperature rise. The heat distribution of the cutting tool, tool-chip interface and workpiece provided effective and useful data for the optimization of selected cutting parameters during orthogonal machining. PMID:25587976

  13. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan; Wang, Haitao; Li, Chenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10 22 n cm −2 (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected as the

  14. Changes in Trace Metal Species and Other Components of the Rhizosphere During Growth of Radish

    Hamon, R. E.; Lorenz, S. E.; Holm, Peter Engelund

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the properties of soil solution in the rhizosphere of developing radish plants were investigated. Variations in these properties were expected to affect the distribution and speciation of metals in the soil and soil solution. Applications of essential nutrients were linked to plant...... transpiration rates and prevented excess addition of nutrient ions, so that subtle changes in soil solution composition would not be obscured. Soil solution pH, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the concentrations of major and trace elements in solution were found to vary over time. Strict...... existing in the uncomplexed state. Changes in the concentrations of uncomplexed Cd and Zn with time gave the best correlations with changes in plant uptake of these metals over time, supporting the hypothesis that plants mainly absorb the free metal ion from soil solution....

  15. Thermodynamic properties of bcc crystals at high temperatures: The transition metals

    MacDonald, R.A.; Shukla, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The second-neighbor central-force model of a bcc crystal, previously used in lowest-order anharmonic perturbation theory to calculate the thermodynamic properties of the alkali metals, is here applied to the transition metals V, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W. The limitations of the model are apparent in the thermal-expansion results, which fall away from the experimental trend above about 1800 K. The specific heat similarly fails to exhibit the sharp rise that is observed at higher temperatures. A static treatment of vacancies cannot account for the difference between theory and experiment. The electrons have been taken into account by using a model that specifically includes d-band effects in the electron ground-state energy. The results thus obtained for the bulk moduli are quite satisfactory. In the light of these results, we discuss the prerequisites for a better treatment of metals when the electrons play an important role in determining the thermodynamic properties

  16. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites meters in depth) within the northern component of the San Francisco Bay/Delta (herein referred to as North Bay). The work was performed to better understand sources of biologically reactive solutes (namely, dissolved macronutrients and trace metals) that may affect the base of the food web in this part of the estuary. A nonmetallic pore-water profiler was used to obtain the first centimeter-scale estimates of the vertical solute-concentration gradients for diffusive-flux determinations. This study, performed in collaboration with scientists from San Francisco State University?s Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, provides information to assist in developing and refining management strategies for the Bay/Delta system and supports efforts to monitor changes in food-web structure associated with regional habitat modifications directed by the California Bay-Delta Authority. On July 7, 2008, and August 5, 2008, pore-water profilers were successfully deployed at six North Bay sites per trip to measure the concentration gradient of dissolved macronutrients and trace metals near the sediment-water interface. Only two of the sites (433 and SSB009 within Honker Bay) were sampled in both series of profiler deployments. At each sampling site, profilers were deployed in triplicate, while discrete samples and dataloggers were used to collect ancillary data from both the water column and benthos to help interpret diffusive-flux measurements. Benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) inorganic phosphate (that is, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)) ranged from negligible levels (-0.003?0.005 millimole per square meter per day (mmole m-2d-1) at Site 4.1 outside Honker Bay) to 0.060?0.006 mmole m-2d-1 near the northern coast of Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns

  17. Nuclear methods applied for studies of contact phenomena in metal-fluid media and between metallic components in relative motion

    Racolta, P.M.; Popa-Simil, L.; Voiculescu, Dana; Muntele, C. I.

    1997-01-01

    The two main goals of this research project were: establishing of an activation methodology for metallic structures using accelerated beams obtained at our cyclotron and adapting the spectrometric analysis methods of the gamma radiations for corrosion level determinations. The developed methods, including the calibration (relations between the radioactivity level and the thickness of removed layer due to corrosion), were based on the remnant radioactivity measuring method. The experiments were focused on a proper selection of the nuclear reaction to be utilised for measurements, depending on the type of metallic alloys investigated. This study also consisted of optimizing the irradiation (particle, energy and dose) and cooling time so as to obtain a measuring sensitivity of 0.1-1μm for Fe, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Mo based alloys. A portable two-channel γ-spectrometric installation was adapted to a customer's corrosion testing stand. Corrosion levels of a Romanian-made injection pump working with different types of Diesel oils and Diesel oil + special additives + water mixtures were determined. The nuclear reactions used were 56 Fe (p,n) 56 Co and 56 Fe (d,n) 57 Co. A selected area of the pump's piston was activated up to 30 μm. The testing programme was made for 300 h working times on the test stand; corrosion levels of approx. 0.3 μm were observed. In cooperation with a group from Tribology Laboratory from the Bucharest Technical University, Ti-coated pallets of a water pump were tested in their near real working environment - salty and sandy water. The 48 Ti (p,n) 48 V nuclear reaction was used for labelling a Ti thickness up to 50 μm. In this experiment, the main interest was to determine the minimum detectable corroded thickness by this radiotracer - based method. Our measurements showed that sensitivities of 0.05 - 1 μm can be achieved. In 1996, in cooperation with the National Institute for Thermal Engines, the wear of the piston ring - cylinder jacket friction

  18. Abrasive blasting, a technique for the industrial decontamination of metal components and concrete blocks from decommissioning to unconditional release levels

    Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R.

    2007-01-01

    When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantities of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area marks them as 'suspected material'. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has gone to recycling through decontamination, melting and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can considered to be a first order ecological priority in order to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes for final disposal and to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes. It will help as well to make economic use of primary material and to conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. In a demonstration programme, Belgoprocess has shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, the unit cost for decontamination being only 30 % of the global cost for radioactive waste treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal. As a result, an industrial dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. At the end of December 2006, more than 1,128 Mg of contaminated metal has been treated as well as 313 Mg of concrete blocks. The paper gives an overview of the experience relating to the decontamination of metal material and concrete blocks at the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Dessel, Belgium as well from the decontamination of concrete containers by abrasive blasting. (authors)

  19. Combined effects of temperature changes and metal contamination at different levels of biological organization in yellow perch

    Grasset, Julie; Ollivier, Élodie; Bougas, Bérénice; Yannic, Glenn; Campbell, Peter G.C.; Bernatchez, Louis; Couture, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Yellow perch were exposed to a combination of heat and metal (Cd or Ni) stress. • Kidney metal accumulation was greatly enhanced at higher temperatures. • Elevated temperatures negatively affected several indicators of condition and metabolic capacities. • Exposure to Ni stimulated gonad development. • Metal stress modified the normal response of antioxidant capacities and apoptosis to heat stress. - Abstract: In this study, we measured the effects of temperature (9 °C, 20 °C, and 28 °C), metal contamination (cadmium and nickel) and their interaction on yellow perch (Perca flavescens) using liver enzymatic and transcriptomic endpoints and biometric indices. Kidney metal concentrations increased with a rise of temperature. The biometric indices analysed (Fulton condition factor, pyloric cæca, hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices) generally decreased with an increase of temperature but not with metal contamination. At the enzymatic level, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), involved in antioxidant response, was affected by both temperature and metal contamination, whereas the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), involved in energy accumulation but also in antioxidant response, was only affected by metal exposure. The response of perch to the stressors at the transcriptional level differed from the metabolic response. In particular, the transcription level of the cco and g6pdh genes sharply decreased with increasing temperature, while the activities of the corresponding enzymes remained stable. The normal response of the transcription level of the apoptotic gene (diablo) to heat stress was also altered in metal-contaminated fish. The combination of metal and temperature stresses also modified the response of antioxidant metabolism induced by these stressors individually. This study contributes to a better understanding of the influences of natural stressors like temperature on biomarkers commonly used in

  20. Combined effects of temperature changes and metal contamination at different levels of biological organization in yellow perch

    Grasset, Julie [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Ollivier, Élodie [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bougas, Bérénice [Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Yannic, Glenn [Laboratoire d’Écologie Alpine, UMR CNRS 5553, Université de Savoie Mont Blanc, 73376 Le Bourget-du-lac (France); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bernatchez, Louis [Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Couture, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.couture@ete.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Yellow perch were exposed to a combination of heat and metal (Cd or Ni) stress. • Kidney metal accumulation was greatly enhanced at higher temperatures. • Elevated temperatures negatively affected several indicators of condition and metabolic capacities. • Exposure to Ni stimulated gonad development. • Metal stress modified the normal response of antioxidant capacities and apoptosis to heat stress. - Abstract: In this study, we measured the effects of temperature (9 °C, 20 °C, and 28 °C), metal contamination (cadmium and nickel) and their interaction on yellow perch (Perca flavescens) using liver enzymatic and transcriptomic endpoints and biometric indices. Kidney metal concentrations increased with a rise of temperature. The biometric indices analysed (Fulton condition factor, pyloric cæca, hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices) generally decreased with an increase of temperature but not with metal contamination. At the enzymatic level, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), involved in antioxidant response, was affected by both temperature and metal contamination, whereas the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), involved in energy accumulation but also in antioxidant response, was only affected by metal exposure. The response of perch to the stressors at the transcriptional level differed from the metabolic response. In particular, the transcription level of the cco and g6pdh genes sharply decreased with increasing temperature, while the activities of the corresponding enzymes remained stable. The normal response of the transcription level of the apoptotic gene (diablo) to heat stress was also altered in metal-contaminated fish. The combination of metal and temperature stresses also modified the response of antioxidant metabolism induced by these stressors individually. This study contributes to a better understanding of the influences of natural stressors like temperature on biomarkers commonly used in

  1. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-01-01

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  2. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2015-12-04

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  3. Free volume model: High-temperature deformation of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition region. Compression tests at different temperatures and strain rates have been conducted. The mechanical behavior is analyzed in the framework of the free volume model, taking into account the dependence of the flow defect concentration on deformation. The activation volume is evaluated and allows one to gather the viscosity data (for the different strain rates and temperatures) on a unique master curve. It is also shown that, due to the relation between flow defect concentration and free volume, it is not possible to deduce the equilibrium flow defect concentration directly from mechanical measurements. However, if this parameter is arbitrarily chosen, mechanical measurements give access to the other parameters of the model, these parameters for the alloy under investigation being of the same order of magnitude as those for other metallic glasses

  4. Hot metal temperature prediction and simulation by fuzzy logic in a blast furnace

    Romero, M. A.; Jimenez, J.; Mochon, J.; Formoso, A.; Bueno, F.; Menendez, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    This work describes the development and further validation of a model devoted to blast furnace hot metal temperature forecast, based on Fuzzy logic principles. The model employs as input variables, the control variables of an actual blast furnace: Blast volume, moisture, coal injection, oxygen addition, etc. and it yields as a result the hot metal temperature with a forecast horizon of forty minutes. As far as the variables used to develop the model have been obtained from data supplied by an actual blast furnaces sensors, it is necessary to properly analyse and handle such data. Especial attention was paid to data temporal correlation, fitting by interpolation the different sampling rates. In the training stage of the model the ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) and the Subtractive Clustering algorithms have been used. (Author) 9 refs

  5. Artificial crystals with 3d metal and palladium particles subjected to high-temperature heat treatment

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Nemytova, O. V.; Perov, D. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kuznetsov, E. A.

    2018-04-01

    High-temperature heat treatment has valuable impact on the structure and physical properties of artificial crystals with 3d metal and palladium particles. Artificial crystals are obtained by means of introduction of particles into the interspherical voids of opal matrices. The magnetic properties are studied at the temperatures ranging from 2 to 300 K and in fields up to 350 kOe. Microwave properties are investigated in the millimeter frequency range. The complex dielectric permittivity of several nanocomposites is measured. The influence of heat treatment up to 960 °C on the structure of artificial crystals is clarified.

  6. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    Duryat, Rahmat Saptono; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces. (paper)

  7. Pressure effect on crystallization temperature in Zr70Pd30 metallic glass

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Jeppesen, S; Saida, J.

    2004-01-01

    The pressure effect on amorphous-to-quasicrystalline-to-intermetallic phase transformations in a Zr70Pd30 metallic glass has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. It is found that the glass crystallizes in two steps: (1) amorphous...... temperature for the formation of quasicrystals has been further discussed with the nucleation theory. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Creep of crystals: High-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics and minerals

    Poirier, J. P.

    An introductory text describing high-temperature deformation processes in metals, ceramics, and minerals is presented. Among the specific topics discussed are: the mechanical aspects of crystal deformation; lattice defects; and phenomenological and thermodynamical analysis of quasi-steady-state creep. Consideration is also given to: dislocation creep models; the effect of hydrostatic pressure on deformation; creep polygonization; and dynamic recrystallization. The status of experimental techniques for the study of transformation plasticity in crystals is also discussed.

  9. Premature failure of dissimilar metal weld joint at intermediate temperature superheater tube

    Al Hajri, Mohammed; Malik, Anees U.; Meroufel, Abdelkader; Al-Muaili, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint between alloyed steel (AS) and stainless steel (SS) failed at one of intermediate temperature superheater (ITSH) tube in steam/power generation plant boiler. The premature failure was detected after a relatively short time of operation (8 years) where the crack propagated circumferentially from AS side through the ITSH tube. Apart from physical examination, microstructural studies based on optical microscopy, SEM and EDX analysis were performed. The results o...

  10. Toward Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components in KSTAR: Research on Plasma-Metal Wall Interaction

    Hong, S. H.; Kim, K. M.; Song, J. H.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, H. T.; Lee, K. S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D. C.; van den Berg, M. A.; Lee, H. H.; Kang, C. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Juhn, J. W.; Son, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G. N.; Choe, W. H.; Komm, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main missions of KSTAR is to develop long-pulse operation capability relevant to the production of fusion energy. After a full metal wall configuration was decided for ITER, a major upgrade for KSTAR was planned, to a tungsten first wall similar to the JET ITER-like wall (coatings and

  11. New antipollution processing of a used refining catalyst and complete recovery of the catalyst metallic components

    Trinh Dinh Chan; Llido, E.

    1992-05-15

    The used refining catalyst, containing metals such as vanadium, nickel and iron, is first processed by stripping; it is then calcined in critical conditions and heat processed in the presence of a melted alkaline base; the resulting solid matter is then water processed. The antipollution process can be applied to oil fraction hydroconversion or hydroprocessing catalysts.

  12. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    In this conference are presented papers dealing with swelling of metals and alloys, (and specially ferritic steels), structural evolution and stability under irradiation, modifications of mechanical properties, consequences on the behaviour of fuel elements and the optimization of materials selection, and irradiation creep [fr

  13. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jakůbek, J.; Kumpová, Ivana; Pichotka, M.

    6, Part B, November (2016), s. 47-55 ISSN 2214-6571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07210S Keywords : dual energy computed tomography * carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite * metal artefact suppression Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214657116300107

  14. Application of amorphous filler metals in production of fusion reactor high heat flux components

    Kalin, B A [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Fedotov, V T [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Grigoriev, A E [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Sevriukov, O N [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Pliushev, A N [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Skuratov, L A [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Polsky, V I [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakushin, V L [Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Virgiliev, Yu S [State Research Institute of Graphite, Electrodnaya St. 2, 115524 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, V L [TRINITI, Troitsk, 142092 Moscow District (Russian Federation); Tserevitinov, S S [TRINITI, Troitsk, 142092 Moscow District (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Amorphous ribbon-type filler metals represent a promising facility for fastening heterogeneous materials together. The advantage results from the homogeneity of element and phase compositions and the strictly specified geometrical dimensions of such fillers. Amorphous fillers Zr-Ti-Fe-Be, Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu and Ti-Zr-Ni-Cu and microcrystalline fillers Al-Si and Cu-Sn-Mn-In-Ni were produced by quenching at a rate of about 10{sup 6}Ks{sup -1}. Brazing of graphite with metals (Cu+MPG-6, Cu+RGT, Mo+MIG-1, V+MIG-1, V+RGT) was accomplished using ribbon-type fillers. Two types of metal-based samples were produced in the form of plates and rakes. The rakes were made by brazing three small graphite bars to the metal, the 2mm space between the bars being 0.25 of the bar height. The results of metallographic studies of the brazing zone and of tests on brazed structures treated by pulsed energy fluxes are discussed. (orig.).

  15. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  16. A multi-component Zr alloy with comparable strength and Higher plasticity than Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    Liang, S.X.; Yin, L.X.; Ma, M.Z.; Jing, R.; Yu, P.F.; Zhang, Y.F.; Wang, B.A.; Liu, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr)-based bulk metallic glass possesses the highest potential as a structural material among metallic glasses. Although Zr-based bulk metallic glass exhibits extremely high strength, its potential application has been restricted by a number of issues, such as fragility, small size, difficult fabrication into different shapes and poisonous beryllium content, among others. In this paper, a Zr-based crystal alloy with comparable strength and higher plasticity than Zr-based bulk metallic glass is presented. The proposed Zr-based alloy has a tensile strength greater than 1600 MPa. That value is comparable to the 1500 MPa to 2000 MPa strength of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The ductility in terms of elongation reached 6.2%; at the same time, the 1400 MPa tensile strength was retained. This phenomenon is not possible for Zr-based BMGs. XRD results show that the proposed ultrahigh-strength Zr-based crystal alloy has two-phase structures: an hcp-structured α phase and a bcc-structured β phase. The forged specimen exhibits a typical basket-weave microstructure, which is characterised by the interlaced plate α phase separated from the β phase matrix. Fine, short bar-shaped α phases precipitated along the original β grain boundary together with ultrafine dot-shaped α phases that presented inside the original β grain when the ageing temperature was between 500 °C and 525 °C. As the ageing temperature increased, the dot-shaped α phase grew into plate shapes, decreasing the material's strength and increasing its plasticity. The ultrafine dot-shaped and short bar-shaped α phases in the original β phase matrix are the main strengthening mechanisms of the ultrahigh-strength Zr-based crystal alloy.

  17. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    Nazir, Rabia [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Applied Chemistry Research Centre, Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research Laboratories Complex, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Ahmed, Sohail [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mazhar, Muhammad, E-mail: mazhar42pk@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Nawazish Ali [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Shah, Muhammad Raza [HEJ Research Institute of Chemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270 (Pakistan); Nadeem, Muhammad [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2} and [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2}, and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals.

  18. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    Nazir, Rabia; Ahmed, Sohail; Mazhar, Muhammad; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad; Khan, Nawazish Ali; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy) 3 ]Cl 2 and [Mo(bipy)Cl 4 ] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, 57 Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy) 3 ]Cl 2 , and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl 4 ], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, 57 Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals

  19. Low temperature synthesis, photoluminescence, magnetic properties of the transition metal doped wurtzite ZnS nanowires

    Cao, Jian; Han, Donglai; Wang, Bingji; Fan, Lin; Fu, Hao; Wei, Maobin; Feng, Bo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jinghai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we synthesized the transition metal ions (Mn, Cu, Fe) doped and co-doped ZnS nanowires (NWs) by a one-step hydrothermal method. The results showed that the solid solubility of the Fe 2+ ions in the ZnS NWs was about two times larger than that of the Mn 2+ or Cu 2+ ions in the ZnS NWs. There was no phase transformation from hexagonal to cubic even in a large quantity transition metal ions introduced for all the samples. The Mn 2+ /Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ related emission peaks can be observed in the Mn 2+ ,Cu 2+ and Fe 2+ doped ZnS NWs. The ferromagnetic properties of the co-doped samples were investigated at room temperature. - graphical abstract: The stable wurtzite ZnS:TM 2+ (TM=Mn, Cu, Fe) nanowires with room temperature ferromagnetism properties were obtained. The different elongation of unit cell caused by the different doped ions was observed. Highlights: ► The transition metal ions doped wurtzite ZnS nanowires were synthesized at 180 °C. ► There was no phase transformation from hexagonal to cubic even in a large quantity introduced for all the samples. ► The room temperature ferromagnetism properties of the co-doped nanowires were investigated

  20. Process Simulation of Aluminium Sheet Metal Deep Drawing at Elevated Temperatures

    Winklhofer, Johannes; Trattnig, Gernot; Lind, Christoph; Sommitsch, Christof; Feuerhuber, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    Lightweight design is essential for an economic and environmentally friendly vehicle. Aluminium sheet metal is well known for its ability to improve the strength to weight ratio of lightweight structures. One disadvantage of aluminium is that it is less formable than steel. Therefore complex part geometries can only be realized by expensive multi-step production processes. One method for overcoming this disadvantage is deep drawing at elevated temperatures. In this way the formability of aluminium sheet metal can be improved significantly, and the number of necessary production steps can thereby be reduced. This paper introduces deep drawing of aluminium sheet metal at elevated temperatures, a corresponding simulation method, a characteristic process and its optimization. The temperature and strain rate dependent material properties of a 5xxx series alloy and their modelling are discussed. A three dimensional thermomechanically coupled finite element deep drawing simulation model and its validation are presented. Based on the validated simulation model an optimised process strategy regarding formability, time and cost is introduced.

  1. Chromate removal as influenced by the structural changes of soil components upon carbonization at different temperatures

    Chen, K.Y.; Liu, J.C.; Chiang, P.N.; Wang, S.L.; Kuan, W.H.; Tzou, Y.M.; Deng, Y.; Tseng, K.J.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Surface fire could induce heat transferring into the soil, creating a carbonized environment, which may alter the chemical compositions of soil organic matters (SOM). In the study, a surface soil was carbonized at up to 600 °C with limited air to simulate soils experiencing a surface fire, and Cr(VI) removal on the carbonized soils was investigated. NMR and FTIR analyses demonstrated a remarkable change of SOM structures at 300–400 °C. TGA-MS spectra indicated that (e.g. C 2 H 4 , CH 3 OH and C 3 H 8 ) were the major components in the evolved gases from the pyrolyzed soil. A maximum amount of Cr(VI) removal (ca. 4 mg g −1 soil) occurred for the 200 °C-carbonized soils, attributed mainly to a significant increase of Cr(VI) reduction by 0.1 M KCl extractable organic carbon (EOC) with abundant carboxylic groups. Nonetheless, the formation of aromatic C upon carbonization of the soil at >400 °C may be responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. - Highlights: ► A maximum amount of Cr(VI) removal occurred for the 200 °C-carbonized soil. ► Extractable organic carbon (EOC) was increased upon carbonization of soil. ► EOC, enriched with carboxylic groups, enhances Cr(VI) reduction by the soil. ► The formation of aromatic C on a carbonized soil may be responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Reductive product of Cr(III) tends to bond on high-temperature-modified soil. - This study first addresses the importance of surface fire-induced heat transferring into the soil to the transformations of environmental pollutants, i.e. chromium.

  2. Heat-equilibrium low-temperature plasma decay in synthesis of ammonia via transient components N2H6

    Cao Guobin; Song Youqun; Chen Qing; Zhou Qiulan; Cao Yun; Wang Chunhe

    2001-01-01

    The author introduced a new method of heat-equilibrium low-temperature plasma in ammonia synthesis and a technique of continuous real-time inlet sampling mass-spectrometry to detect the reaction channel and step of the decay of transient component N 2 H 6 into ammonia. The experimental results indicated that in the process of ammonia synthesis by discharge of N 2 and H 2 mixture, the transient component N 2 H 6 is a necessary step

  3. Effect of temperature, solvent and nature of metal cations on the potentiometric titration S of iron oxide

    Tasleem, S.; Ishrat, B.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the potentiometric titrations of iron oxide in the presence of CU/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2/ were under taken under different experimental conditions of temperature and concentration of metal ions in aqueous and aqueous/organic mixed solvent. The adsorption of both the metal ions were observed to increase with the increase in pH and temperature of the system. The adsorbent iron oxide preferentially adsorbs transition metal as compared to alkaline earth metal ion. (author)

  4. Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients at cryogenic temperatures for multi-component refrigerant mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger governs the overall performance of the mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. In these heat exchangers, the non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes boiling and condensation simultaneously at cryogenic temperature. Hence, the design of such heat exchanger is crucial. However, due to lack of empirical correlations to predict two-phase heat transfer coefficients of multi-component mixtures at low temperature, the design of such heat exchanger is difficult.

  5. Isolating lattice from electronic contributions in thermal transport measurements of metals and alloys above ambient temperature and an adiabatic model

    Criss, Everett M.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2017-06-01

    From femtosecond spectroscopy (fs-spectroscopy) of metals, electrons and phonons reequilibrate nearly independently, which contrasts with models of heat transfer at ordinary temperatures (T > 100 K). These electronic transfer models only agree with thermal conductivity (k) data at a single temperature, but do not agree with thermal diffusivity (D) data. To address the discrepancies, which are important to problems in solid state physics, we separately measured electronic (ele) and phononic (lat) components of D in many metals and alloys over ˜290-1100 K by varying measurement duration and sample length in laser-flash experiments. These mechanisms produce distinct diffusive responses in temperature versus time acquisitions because carrier speeds (u) and heat capacities (C) differ greatly. Electronic transport of heat only operates for a brief time after heat is applied because u is high. High Dele is associated with moderate T, long lengths, low electrical resistivity, and loss of ferromagnetism. Relationships of Dele and Dlat with physical properties support our assignments. Although kele reaches ˜20 × klat near 470 K, it is transient. Combining previous data on u with each D provides mean free paths and lifetimes that are consistent with ˜298 K fs-spectroscopy, and new values at high T. Our findings are consistent with nearly-free electrons absorbing and transmitting a small fraction of the incoming heat, whereas phonons absorb and transmit the majority. We model time-dependent, parallel heat transfer under adiabatic conditions which is one-dimensional in solids, as required by thermodynamic law. For noninteracting mechanisms, k≅ΣCikiΣCi/(ΣCi2). For metals, this reduces to k = klat above ˜20 K, consistent with our measurements, and shows that Meissner’s equation (k≅klat + kele) is invalid above ˜20 K. For one mechanism with multiple, interacting carriers, k≅ΣCiki/(ΣCi). Thus, certain dynamic behaviors of electrons and phonons in metals have been

  6. Thermal hydraulic considerations in liquid-metal-cooled components of tokamak fusion reactors

    Picologlou, B.F.; Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.

    1989-01-01

    The basic considerations of MHD thermal hydraulics for liquid-metal-cooled blankets and first walls of tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The liquid-metal MHD program of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) dedicated to analytical and experimental investigations of reactor relevant MHD flows and development of relevant thermal hydraulic design tools is presented. The status of the experimental program and examples of local velocity measurements are given. An account of the MHD codes developed to date at ANL is also presented as is an example of a 3-D thermal hydraulic analysis carried out with such codes. Finally, near term plans for experimental investigations and code development are outlined. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Development of Robust Metal-Supported SOFCs and Stack Components in EU METSAPP Consortium

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2017-01-01

    METSAPP project has been executed with an overall aim of developing advanced metal-supported cells and stacks based on a robust, reliable and up-scalable technology. During the project, oxidation resistant nanostructured anodes based on modified SrTiO3 were developed and integrated into MS...... and best performance and stability combination was observed with doped SrTiO3 based anode designs. Furthermore, numerical models to understand the corrosion behavior of the MS-SOFCs were developed and validated. Finally, the cost effective concept of coated metal interconnects was developed, which resulted...... in 90% reduction in Cr evaporation, three times lower Cr2O3 scale thickness and increased lifetime. The possibility of assembling these cells into two radically different stack designs was demonstrated....

  8. A flexible metallic actuator using reduced graphene oxide as a multifunctional component.

    Meng, Junxing; Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Wang, Hongzhi

    2017-09-14

    Flexible actuators are widely in demand for many real-life applications. Considering that existing actuators based on polymers, low-dimensional materials and pore-rich materials are mostly limited by slow response rate, high driving voltage and poor stability, we report here a novel metal based flexible actuator which is fabricated simply through partial oxidation and nano-function of copper foil with the assistance of reduced graphene oxide. The obtained asymmetric metallic actuator is (electric-)thermally driven and exhibits fast response rate (∼2 s) and large curvature (2.4 cm -1 ) under a low voltage (∼1 V) with a sustainable operation of up to ∼50 000 cycles. The actuator can also be triggered by infrared irradiation and direct-heating under various conditions including air, water, and vacuum.

  9. TOWARD TUNGSTEN PLASMA-FACING COMPONENTS IN KSTAR: RESEARCH ON PLASMA-METAL WALL INTERACTION

    Hong, S.-H.; Kim, K.M.; Song, J.-H.; Bang, E.-N.; Kim, H.-T.; Lee, K.-S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D.C.; Lee, H.H.; Kang, C.S.; Lee, H.-Y.; Hong, J.-H.; Bak, J.-G.; Kim, H.-S.; Juhn, J.-W.; Son, S.-H.; Kim, H.-K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G.-N.; Choe, W.-H.; Komm, Michael; van den Berg, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2015), s. 36-43 ISSN 1536-1055. [International Conference on Open Magnetic Systems for Plasma Confinement (OS 2014)/10./. Daejeon, 26.08.2014-29.08.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma-metal wall interaction * Tungsten technology Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.799, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.13182/FST14-897

  10. Development of Robust Metal-Supported SOFCs and Stack Components in EU METSAPP Consortium

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2017-01-01

    -SOFCs to enhance their robustness. In addition, the manufacturing of metal-supported cells with different geometries, scalability of the manufacturing process was demonstrated and more than 200 cells with an area of ∼150 cm2 were produced. The electrochemical performance of different cell generations was evaluated...... in 90% reduction in Cr evaporation, three times lower Cr2O3 scale thickness and increased lifetime. The possibility of assembling these cells into two radically different stack designs was demonstrated....

  11. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Smith, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel

  12. Metal compounds in zeolites as active components of chemisorption and catalysis. Quantum chemical approach

    Zhidomirov, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    A short review of possible catalitic active sites associated with various types of metal species in zoolite is presented. The structural and electronic peculiarity of aluminum ions in zeolite lattice and their distribution in the lattice are discussed on the basis of quantum chemical calculations in connection with the formation of Broensted activity of zeolites. Various molecular models of Lewis Acid Sites associated the extra-lattice oxide-hydroxide aluminum species have been investigated by means of density functional model cluster calculations using CO molecule as a probe. Probable ways of formation of the selective oxidation center in FeZSM-5 by decomposition of dinitrogen monoxide have been studied by ab-initio quantum chemical calculations. The immediate oxidizing site is reasonably represented by the binuclear iron-hydroxide cluster with peroxo-like fragment located between iron atoms. Various probable intermediates of the selective oxidation center formation resulted from interaction of a hydroperoxide molecule with a lattice titanium ion in titanium silicalite have been investigated by quantum chemical calculations. It was concluded that this reaction requires essential structural reconstruction in the vicinity of the titanium ion. Probability of this structural reconstruction is discussed. Possible reasons of an electron-deficient and electron-enriched state of metal particles entrapped in zoolite cavities are discussed. Also, various probable molecular models of such modified metal particles in zeolite are considered

  13. Direct writing of flexible electronics through room temperature liquid metal ink.

    Yunxia Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional approaches of making a flexible circuit are generally complex, environment unfriendly, time and energy consuming, and thus expensive. Here, we describe for the first time the method of using high-performance GaIn(10-based electrical ink, a significantly neglected room temperature liquid metal, as both electrical conductors and interconnects, for directly writing flexible electronics via a rather easy going and cost effective way. METHODS: The new generation electric ink was made and its wettability with various materials was modified to be easily written on a group of either soft or rigid substrates such as epoxy resin board, glass, plastic, silica gel, paper, cotton, textiles, cloth and fiber etc. Conceptual experiments were performed to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of directly writing the electrical circuits via the invented metal ink. Mechanisms involved were interpreted through a series of fundamental measurements. RESULTS: The electrical resistivity of the fluid like GaIn(10-based material was measured as 34.5 µΩ·cm at 297 K by four point probe method and increased with addition of the oxygen quantity, which indicates it as an excellent metal ink. The conductive line can be written with features that are approximately 10 µm thick. Several functional devices such as a light emitting diode (LED array showing designed lighting patterns and electrical fan were made to work by directly writing the liquid metal on the specific flexible substrates. And satisfactory performances were obtained. CONCLUSIONS: The present method opens the way to directly and quickly writing flexible electronics which can be as simple as signing a name or drawing a picture on the paper. The unique merit of the GaIn(10-based liquid metal ink lies in its low melting temperature, well controlled wettability, high electrical conductivity and good biocompability. The new electronics writing strategy and basic principle has generalized

  14. Direct writing of flexible electronics through room temperature liquid metal ink.

    Gao, Yunxia; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Conventional approaches of making a flexible circuit are generally complex, environment unfriendly, time and energy consuming, and thus expensive. Here, we describe for the first time the method of using high-performance GaIn(10)-based electrical ink, a significantly neglected room temperature liquid metal, as both electrical conductors and interconnects, for directly writing flexible electronics via a rather easy going and cost effective way. The new generation electric ink was made and its wettability with various materials was modified to be easily written on a group of either soft or rigid substrates such as epoxy resin board, glass, plastic, silica gel, paper, cotton, textiles, cloth and fiber etc. Conceptual experiments were performed to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of directly writing the electrical circuits via the invented metal ink. Mechanisms involved were interpreted through a series of fundamental measurements. The electrical resistivity of the fluid like GaIn(10)-based material was measured as 34.5 µΩ·cm at 297 K by four point probe method and increased with addition of the oxygen quantity, which indicates it as an excellent metal ink. The conductive line can be written with features that are approximately 10 µm thick. Several functional devices such as a light emitting diode (LED) array showing designed lighting patterns and electrical fan were made to work by directly writing the liquid metal on the specific flexible substrates. And satisfactory performances were obtained. The present method opens the way to directly and quickly writing flexible electronics which can be as simple as signing a name or drawing a picture on the paper. The unique merit of the GaIn(10)-based liquid metal ink lies in its low melting temperature, well controlled wettability, high electrical conductivity and good biocompability. The new electronics writing strategy and basic principle has generalized purpose and can be extended to more industrial areas, even

  15. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  16. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  17. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance.

  18. MATERIAL DEPENDENCE OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTI-LAYER MULTI-METAL COOKWARE

    MOHAMMADREZA SEDIGH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laminated structure is becoming more popular in cookware markets; however, there seems to be a lack of enough scientific studies to evaluate its pros and cons, and to show that how it functions. A numerical model using a finite element method with temperature-dependent material properties has been performed to investigate material and layer dependence of temperature distribution in multi-layer multi-metal plate exposed to irregular heating. Behavior of two parameters including mean temperature value and uniformity on the inner surface of plate under variations of thermal properties and geometrical conditions have been studied. The results indicate that conductive metals used as first layer in bi-layer plates have better thermal performance than those used in the second layer. In addition, since cookware manufacturers increasingly prefer to use all-clad aluminium plate, recently, this structure is analysed in the present study as well. The results show all-clad copper and aluminum plate possesses lower temperature gradient compared with single layer aluminum and all-clad aluminum core plates.

  19. The effect of elevated die temperature on deformation of deep drawn round metal cup

    Basril, M. A. M.; Hafsyam, Y. M.; Azuddin, M.; Choudhury, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major considerations in the current deep drawing practice is the product quality. In this research, the effect of heating temperature on the drawability of the round metal cup has been investigated. Firstly, round metal cups of aluminium and mild steel were drawn from the blank diameters of 60 mm, 65 mm and 70 mm. The experiment conducted at room temperature first, then at 50°C and 100°C. The elongation of the major and minor strains along the cup profile after the process is measured and analysed. On the other hand, the defects from the experiment output and ABAQUS/CAE simulation are compared. The result from experiment shows that the highest major elongation is 11.64 mm and it is happened to a deep drawn aluminium round cup with LDR of 1.69 at temperature of 100°C. On the other hand, for deep drawn mild steel round cup, shows highest major elongation of 12.44 mm for a cup with LDR of 1.56 at 100°C. Both of these statements indicates that the higher temperature could improve the formability of the deep drawn parts besides reducing the probability of the defect to be happened.

  20. Investigation on the minimum film boiling temperature on metallic and ceramic heaters

    Ladisch, R.

    1980-06-01

    The minimum film boiling temperature on ceramic and metallic heaters has been experimentally studied. The knowledge of this temperature boundary is important in safety considerations on all liquid cooled nuclear reactors. The experiments have been carried out by quenching a hot metal cylinder with and without ceramic coating of aluminium in water. Results show that the minimum film boiling temperature Tsub(min) increases with water subcooling and is dependend upon the thermophysical properties of the heating surface. The roughness of the heater does not affect Tsub(min). At low subcoolings the vapour film is more stable and seems to break down when the specific heatflux upon liquid solid contact is lower than a threshold value above which film boiling can be reestablished. At higher subcoolings instead the vapour film is thinner and more stable. In this case the surface temperature decreases beyond the value by which the specific heatflux upon liquid solid contact would be lower than the threshold value. As soon as the vapour film becomes unstable, it collapses. (orig.) [de

  1. Ultrafast quenching of metals to liquid-helium temperatures - investigation of the low-temperature mobility of hydrogen in niobium

    Blanz, M.; Blocher, R.; Carstanjen, H.D.; Messer, R.; Plachke, D.; Seeger, A.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique for ultrafast quenching from 300 K to 4.2 K has been developed. It employs a fast jet of liquid helium with a speed of about 10 2 m/s and allows us to quench metal samples in about 6 ms. This corresponds to a quenching rate of about 4.5x10 4 K/s, which exceeds that achievable by conventional quenching in liquid helium by more than one order of magnitude. The technique has been used for a resistometric study of the behaviour of hydrogen in niobium quenched-in from the α-phase by means of isochronal and isothermal annealing. Even in the low-temperature region below 20 K a considerable recovery of the resistivity has been found, which cannot be seen in conventional quenching experiments. (orig.)

  2. Correlation Between Microstructure and Low-Temperature Impact Toughness of Simulated Reheated Zones in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of High-Strength Steel

    Kang, Yongjoon; Park, Gitae; Jeong, Seonghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2018-01-01

    A large fraction of reheated weld metal is formed during multi-pass welding, which significantly affects the mechanical properties (especially toughness) of welded structures. In this study, the low-temperature toughness of the simulated reheated zone in multi-pass weld metal was evaluated and compared to that of the as-deposited zone using microstructural analyses. Two kinds of high-strength steel welds with different hardenabilities were produced by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and both welds were thermally cycled to peak temperatures above Ac3 using a Gleeble simulator. When the weld metals were reheated, their toughness deteriorated in response to the increase in the fraction of detrimental microstructural components, i.e., grain boundary ferrite and coalesced bainite in the weld metals with low and high hardenabilities, respectively. In addition, toughness deterioration occurred in conjunction with an increase in the effective grain size, which was attributed to the decrease in nucleation probability of acicular ferrite; the main cause for this decrease changed depending on the hardenability of the weld metal.

  3. On the nature of low temperature internal friction peaks in metallic glasses

    Khonik, V.A.; Spivak, L.V.

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature (30 60 Nb 40 subjected to preliminary inhomogeneous deformation by cold rolling, homogeneous tensile deformation or electrolytic charging with hydrogen is investigated. Cold rolling or hydrogenation result in appearance of similar internal friction peaks and hysteresis damping. Homogeneous deformation has no influence on low temperature internal friction. The phenomenon of microplastic deformation during hydrogenation of weakly stressed samples is revealed. It is argued that microplastic deformation of metallic glasses during hydrogenation without external stress takes place too. Plastic flow both on cold rolling and hydrogenation occurs via formation and motion of dislocation-like defects which are the reason of the observed anelastic anomalies. It is concluded that low temperature internal friction peaks described in the literature for as-cast, cold deformed and hydrogenated samples have common dislocation-like origin

  4. Utilizing Rice Husk Briquettes in Firing Crucible Furnace for Low Temperature Melting Metals in Nigeria

    N. A. Musa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative fuels for firing crucible furnace for low temperature melting metals has become mandatory, as a result of the pollution problem associated with the use of fossil fuels, the expense of electricity and also deforestation as a result of the use of charcoal. An agricultural waste, rice husk, in briquette form was used as an alternative fuel to fire crucible furnace to melt lead, zinc and aluminium. Results showed that lead and zinc melted and reached their pouring temperatures of 3840C and 5300C in 70 minutes and 75 minutes respectively. Aluminium was raised to a maximum temperature of 5200C in 75 and 100 minutes.The average concentration of the pollutants (CO, SO2and NOX were found to be below the tolerance limit and that of TSP (Total Suspended Particulates was found to be within the tolerance limit stipulated by Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA in Nigeria.

  5. Temperature effects in contacts between a metal and a semiconductor nanowire near the degenerate doping

    Sun, Zhuting; Burgess, Tim; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, Chennupati; Kogan, Andrei

    2018-04-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear conductance in diffusion-doped Si:GaAs nanowires contacted by patterned metal films in a wide range of temperatures T. The wire resistance R W and the zero bias resistance R C, dominated by the contacts, exhibit very different responses to temperature changes. While R W shows almost no dependence on T, R C varies by several orders of magnitude as the devices are cooled from room temperature to T = 5 K. We develop a model that employs a sharp donor level very low in the GaAs conduction band and show that our observations are consistent with the model predictions. We then demonstrate that such measurements can be used to estimate carrier properties in nanostructured semiconductors and obtain an estimate for N D, the doping density in our samples. We also discuss the effects of surface states and dielectric confinement on carrier density in semiconductor nanowires.

  6. Specific-heat measurement of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature

    Pradere, C.; Goyheneche, J.M.; Batsale, J.C.; Dilhaire, S.; Pailler, R.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to present a method for measuring the specific heat of single metallic, carbon, and ceramic fibers at very high temperature. The difficulty of the measurement is due to the microscale of the fiber (≅10 μm) and the important range of temperature (700-2700 K). An experimental device, a modelization of the thermal behavior, and an analytic model have been developed. A discussion on the measurement accuracy yields a global uncertainty lower than 10%. The characterization of a tungsten filament with thermal properties identical to those of the bulk allows the validation of the device and the thermal estimation method. Finally, measurements on carbon and ceramic fibers have been done at very high temperature

  7. Investigation of size-temperature effects in thin f;.lms of transition metals

    Loboda, V.B.; Protsenko, I.E.; Smolin, M.D.; Yaremenko, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature and size dependences are studied for specific rho and temperature coeficients of resistance of transition metal films obtained and annealed in the 10 -6 - 5x10 -7 Pa vacuum. The size dependence of lambda sub(g)(1-p), rho sub(db), R, r and rhosub(db)sup(v) parameters was calculated using the Tellier, Tosser and Pichard theory. The temperature dependence of the conductivity was investigated in the 80-700 K range. A conclusion is made that all differences between dependences rho(T) for thin and bulk samples may be explained by effects specific for films but presenting no class of new physical effects. The size dependence of the electron-phonon interaction near T>THETAsub(D) and proportionality factors in the approximating equation rho approximately Asub(1.2)xTsup(2) is obtained for Ni films

  8. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Reddy, N. Narayana, E-mail: nagireddynarayana@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Healthcare, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia@CRIB, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ravindra, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Reddy, N. Madhava [Department of Environmental Science, Gates Institute of Technology, NH-7, Gooty, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rajinikanth, V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Raju, K. Mohana [Synthetic Polymer Laboratory, Department of Polymer Science & Technology, S.K. University, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel.

  9. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Reddy, N. Narayana; Ravindra, S.; Reddy, N. Madhava; Rajinikanth, V.; Raju, K. Mohana; Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel

  10. Room temperature Zinc-metallation of cationic porphyrin at graphene surface and enhanced photoelectrocatalytic activity

    Zeng, Rongjin; Chen, Guoliang; Xiong, Chungang; Li, Gengxian; Zheng, Yinzhi; Chen, Jian; Long, Yunfei; Chen, Shu

    2018-03-01

    A stable zincporphyrin functionalized graphene nanocomposite was prepared by using positively charged cationic porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetra(4-propyl pyridinio) porphyrin, TPPyP) and successive reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with tuned negative charge. The nanocomposite preparation was accompanied first by distinct electrostatic interactions and π-π stacking between TPPyP and rGO, and followed by fast Zinc-metallation at room temperature. In contrast to free TPPyP with Zn2+, the incorporation reaction is very slow at room temperature and heating or reflux conditions are required to increase the metallation rate. While at the surface of rGO nanosheet, the Zinc-metallation of TPPyP was greatly accelerated to 30 min at 25 °C in aqueous solution. The interaction process and composites formation were fully revealed by significant variations in UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) measurements, atomic force microscope (AFM) images, and fluorescence spectra. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical activity of resultant rGO/TPPyP-Zn nanocomposites was evaluated under visible-light irradiation, and enhancement of the photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 was achieved.

  11. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  12. On the spherical nanoindentation creep of metallic glassy thin films at room temperature

    Zhang, T.H.; Ye, J.H. [Institution of Micro/Nano-Mechanical Testing Technology & Application, College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Feng, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics (LNM), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ma, Y., E-mail: may@zjut.edu.cn [Institution of Micro/Nano-Mechanical Testing Technology & Application, College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2017-02-08

    Metallic glassy thin films with eight kind of compositions were successfully prepared on Si substrate by magnetron sputtering. The room-temperature creep tests were performed at plastic regions for each sample relying on spherical nanoindetation. The creep deformations were studied by recording the total creep displacement and strain after 2000 s holding. More pronounced creep deformation was observed in the sample with lower glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). Strain rate sensitivity (SRS) was then calculated from the steady-state creep and exhibited a negative correlation with increasing T{sub g}. It is suggested that creep mechanism of the nano-sized metallic glass was T{sub g}-dependent, according to the demarcation of SRS values. Based on the obtained SRS, shear transformation zone (STZ) size in each sample could be estimated. The results indicated that an STZ involves about 25–60 atoms for the employed eight samples and is strongly tied to T{sub g}. The characteristic of STZ size in metallic glassy thin films was discussed in terms of applied method and deformation modes.

  13. Thermochemistry of some binary lead and transition metal compounds by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry

    Meschel, S.V., E-mail: meschel@jfi.uchicago.edu [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Gordon Center for Integrated Science, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Nash, P. [Illinois Institute of Technology,Thermal Processing Technology Center, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615 (United States); Chen, X.Q.; Wei, P. [Materials processing Modeling Division, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metals Research, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang City (China)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Studied binary lead-transition metal alloys by high temperature calorimetry. • Determined the enthalpies of formation of 8 alloys. • Compared the measurements with predictions by the model of Miedema and by the ab initio method. - Abstract: The standard enthalpies of formation of some binary lead and transition metal compounds have been measured by high temperature direct synthesis calorimetry. The reported results are: Pb{sub 3}Sc{sub 5}(−61.3 ± 2.9); PbTi{sub 4}(−16.6 ± 2.4); Pb{sub 3}Y{sub 5}(−64.8 ± 3.6); Pb{sub 3}Zr{sub 5}(−50.6 ± 3.1); PbNb{sub 3}(−10.4 ± 3.4); PbRh(−16.5 ± 3.3); PbPd{sub 3}(−29.6 ± 3.1); PbPt(−34.7 ± 3.3) kJ/mole of atoms. We will compare our results with previously published measurements. We will also compare the experimental measurements with enthalpies of formation of transition metal compounds with elements in the same vertical column in the periodic table. We will compare our measurements with predicted values on the basis of the semi empirical model of Miedema and coworkers and with ab initio values when available.

  14. Very low temperature studies of hyperfine effects in metals. [Progress report

    Weyhmann, W.

    1985-01-01

    We are using nuclei through the hyperfine coupling as a probe of magnetic interactions in metallic systems, emphasizing the role conduction electrons play. Three types of systems are of interest to us: nuclear singlet ground state intermetallic compounds, very dilute magnetic impurities in non-magnetic metals, and itinerant ferromagnets. The nuclear ordering in singlet ground state alloys of praseodymium appears to be analogous to electronic ordering in rare earth metals, with the RKKY interaction moderating the indirect exchange in both cases. We are measuring the static and dynamic properties of these materials both to study rare earth ordering, since only first order effects should play a role in the nuclear case, and to develop the sub-millikelvin refrigeration capabilities of these materials. Using this cooling power, we propose studying the local moment of Mn based Kondo systems at millikelvin and sub-millikelvin temperatures. Kondo systems with a Kondo temperature below 0.1 K have the advantage that magnetic saturation can be achieved with available magnets. We propose studying both the local magnetization as measured with nuclear orientation and the macroscopic magnetization measured with SQUID magnetometry. We also propose searching for electron polarization effects in itinerant ferromagnets using nuclear orientation. Induced hyperfine fields of less than 1 k0e can be detected at 1 mK

  15. Problems of the Starting and Operating of Hydraulic Components and Systems in Low Ambient Temperature (Part IV

    Jasiński Ryszard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Designers of hydraulically driven machines and devices are obliged to ensure during design process their high service life with taking into account their operational conditions. Some of the machines may be started in low ambient temperature and even in thermal shock conditions (due to delivering hot working medium to cold components. In order to put such devices into operation appropriate investigations, including experimental ones - usually very expensive and time-consuming, are carried out. For this reason numerical calculations can be used to determine serviceability of a hydraulic component or system operating in thermal shock conditions. Application of numerical calculation methods is much less expensive in comparison to experimental ones. This paper presents a numerical calculation method which makes it possible to solve issues of heat exchange in elements of investigated hydraulic components by using finite elements method. For performing the simulations the following data are necessary: ambient temperature, oil temperature, heat transfer coefficient between oil and surfaces of elements, as well as areas of surfaces being in contact with oil. By means of computer simulation method values of clearance between cooperating elements as well as ranges of parameters of correct and incorrect operation of hydraulic components have been determined. In this paper results of computer simulation of some experimentally tested hydraulic components such as axial piston pump and proportional spool valve, are presented. The computer simulation results were compared with the experimental ones and high conformity was obtained.

  16. Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-11-01

    This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

  17. Effects of atmospheric ageing under different temperatures on surface properties of sludge-derived biochar and metal/metalloid stabilization.

    Wang, Hong; Feng, Mingyu; Zhou, Fengsa; Huang, Xinchen; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-10-01

    Ageing is a common phenomenon during biochar storage and its soil application. In this study, we exposed sludge-derived biochar (SDBC) in the air under 4 °C, 22 °C, and 45 °C for 30-120 d to imitate the ageing process after SDBC production. The aged SDBC was characterized and its sorption capacities for Pb(II), Cr(V) and As(III) were compared with the fresh ones in batch sorption experiments. The results showed an increase in acidity, cation exchange capacity, and carboxyl groups of SDBC surface, but a decrease in alkalinity and Fe(III) species during ageing, indicating the oxidation. In addition, ageing for more than 30 d was found to favor the Pb(II) and As(III) sorption, because of higher density of available oxygen-containing groups. The Cr(VI) sorption was found to be compromised by the ageing, because some reducing agents for Cr(VI) reduction was consumed there. Higher temperatures accelerated the above-mentioned ageing effect. Yet, when the SDBC was applied in the heavy-metal contaminated soil, its performance would be affected by both ageing of SDBC itself as well as long-term interactions among soil components, such as colloids and solution, heavy metals, and SDBC, which require further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High-temperature helium embrittlement (T>=0,45Tsub(M)) of metals

    Batfalsky, P.

    1984-06-01

    High temperature helium embrittlement, swelling and irradiation creep are the main technical problem of fusion reactor materials. The expected helium production will be very high. The helium produced by (n,α)-processes precipitates into helium bubbles because its solubility in solid metals is very low. Under continuous helium production at high temperature and stress the helium bubbles grow and lead to intergranular early failure. Solution annealed foil specimens of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 were implanted with α-particles: 1. during creep tests at 1023 K (''in-beam'' test) 2. before the creep tests at high temperature (1023 K). The creep tests have been performed within large ranges of test parameter, e.g. applied stress, temperature, helium implantation rate and helium concentration. After the creep tests the microstructure was investigated using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. All the helium implanted specimens showed high temperature helium embrittlement, i.e. reduction of rupture time tsub(R) and ductility epsilonsub(R) and evidence of intergranular brittle fracture. The ''in-beam'' creep tests showed greater reduction of rupture time tsub(R) and ductility than the preimplanted creep tests. The comparison of this experimentally obtained data with various theoretical models of high temperature helium embrittlement showed that within the investigated parameter ranges the mechanism controlling the life time of the samples is probably the gas driven stable growth of the helium bubbles within the grain boundaries. (orig.)

  19. Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metal coolants: Calibration and assessment of the minimum reading temperature

    Bassini, S., E-mail: serena.bassini@enea.it; Antonelli, A.; Di Piazza, I.; Tarantino, M.

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metals (HLMs) such as lead and LBE (lead-bismuth eutectic) will be essential devices in future Lead Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Potentiometric sensors based on solid electrolytes were developed in recent years to this purpose. Internal reference electrodes such as Pt-air and Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} liquid metal/metal-oxide are among the most used but they both have a weak point: Pt-air sensor has a high minimum reading temperature around 400 °C whereas Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} suffers from internal stresses induced by Bi volume variations with temperature, which may lead to the sensor failure in the long-term. The present work describes the performance of standard Pt-air and Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensors and compares them with recent Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensor. Sensors with Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) electrolyte were calibrated in oxygen-saturated HLM between 160 and 550 °C and the electric potential compared to the theoretical one to define the accuracy and the minimum reading temperature. Standard Pt-air sensor were also tested using Yttria Totally Stabilized Zirconia (YTSZ) to assess the effect of a different electrolyte on the minimum reading temperature. The performance of Pt-air and Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensors with YPSZ electrolyte were then tested together in low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C. The results showed that Pt-air, Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensors with YPSZ measured oxygen in HLMs down to 400 °C, 290 °C and 200 °C respectively. When the YTSZ electrolyte was used in place of the YPSZ, the Pt-air sensor measured correctly down to at least 350 °C thanks to the superior ionic conductivity of the YTSZ. When Cu/Cu{sub 2}O and Pt-air sensors were tested together in the same low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C, Cu/Cu{sub 2}O sensor worked predictably in the whole temperature range whereas Pt-air sensor exhibited a correct output only above 400 °C. - Highlights:

  20. Mechanical properties of sheet metal components with local reinforcement produced by additive manufacturing

    Ünsal, Ismail; Hama-Saleh, R.; Sviridov, Alexander; Bambach, Markus; Weisheit, A.; Schleifenbaum, J. H.

    2018-05-01

    New technological challenges like electro-mobility pose an increasing demand for cost-efficient processes for the production of product variants. This demand opens the possibility to combine established die-based manufacturing methods and innovative, dieless technologies like additive manufacturing [1, 2]. In this context, additive manufacturing technologies allow for the weight-efficient local reinforcement of parts before and after forming, enabling manufacturers to produce product variants from series parts [3]. Previous work by the authors shows that the optimal shape of the reinforcing structure can be determined using sizing optimization. Sheet metal parts can then be reinforced using laser metal deposition. The material used is a pearlite-reduced, micro-alloyed steel (ZE 630). The aim of this paper is to determine the effect of the additive manufacturing process on the material behavior and the mechanical properties of the base material and the resulting composite material. The parameters of the AM process are optimized to reach similar material properties in the base material and the build-up volume. A metallographic analysis of the parts is presented, where the additive layers, the base material and also the bonding between the additive layers and the base material are analyzed. The paper shows the feasibility of the approach and details the resulting mechanical properties and performance.

  1. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  2. Three exciting areas of experimental physical sciences : high temperature superconductors, metal clusters and super molecules of carbon

    Rao, C.N.

    1992-01-01

    The author has narrated his experience in carrying out research in three exciting areas of physical sciences. These areas are : high temperature superconductors, metal clusters and super molecules of carbon. (M.G.B.)

  3. Determination of Optimal Temperature for Biosorption of Heavy Metal Mixture from Aqueous Solution by Pretreated Biomass of Aspergillus niger

    Javad Yousefi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption is a novel technology that uses dead and inactive biomass for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution. Some parameters such as temperature, contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration, biosorbent dose and also agitating speed of solution and biosorbent mixing can affect the amount of metal sorption by biosorbent. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different treatments of temperatures (25, 35, 45 and 55oC on biosorption of metals mixture in order to determine optimal temperature for more metals removal from aqueous solution. This study uses dead and pretreated biomass of Aspergillus niger with 0.5N NaOH for removal of Zn(II, Co(II and Cd(II. In all temperature treatments and in the case of all of heavy metals, maximum amount of metal sorption and concentration decrease was occurred in first 5 minutes and achieved to equilibrium after 20 minute. The percent of metals sorption show growth trend with temperature increase. Between 4 experimental treatments, 55oC treatment was shown maximum sorption and 25oC was shown minimum sorption amount. The percent of Cr(II sorption was increase from 28.5% in 25oC to 44.7% in 55oC. Also, this increase was from 40% to 58% for Cd(II and from 37.7% to 65.6% for Zn(II. About 60% of increase in sorption by A. niger was due to increase in temperature. Therefore the amount of metals sorption can be increase, only with temperature increase and without any biomass addition.

  4. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... starts with synthesis and investigation of three rare earth metal phosphate hydrates, which is first presented in Chapter 5. Structural and surface water as well as its stability has been investigated using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses combined with structural modeling calculations...

  5. Calculation of forces acting on an impurity in a metal subjected to a temperature gradient

    Gerl, M.

    1966-01-01

    In a metal subject to a temperature gradient, an impurity is submitted to both an electrostatic force due to the thermoelectric field and a force due to the scattering of electrons and phonons by this point defect. The scattering of the electrons is treated using a semi-classical approach and a quantum mechanical method. The numerical computation for several impurities in Cu, Ag, and Au requires the knowledge of the resistivity cross-section. and of the thermoelectric power of the impurity in the metal. A tentative estimation of the force due to the phonon-scattering is given for the self-diffusion in Cu. However, the approximations of this calculation do not allow a good comparison with the force due to the electrons. (author) [fr

  6. Combining Raman Microprobe and XPS to Study High Temperature Oxidation of Metals

    Windisch, Charles F.; Henager, Charles H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2011-01-01

    Raman microprobe spectroscopy was applied in studies of high-temperature air oxidation of a ferritic alloy (HT-9) in the absence and presence of zirconia coatings with the objective of evaluating the technique as a way to quickly screen candidate cladding materials and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures for advanced nuclear reactors. When oxidation was relatively uniform, Raman spectra collected using microscope optics with low spatial resolution were found to be similar to those collected with conventional Raman spectroscopy. These spectra could be used to identify major oxide corrosion products and follow changes in the composition of the oxides due to heating. However, when the oxidation films were comprised of multiple layers of varying composition, or with layers containing metallic phases, techniques with higher depth resolution and sensitivity to zero-valence metals were necessary. The requirements were met by combining Raman microprobe using different optical configurations and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Evaluation of Package Stress during Temperature Cycling using Metal Deformation Measurement and FEM Simulation

    Hoeglauer, J.; Bohm, C.; Otremba, R.; Maerz, J.; Nelle, P.; Stecher, M.; Alpern, P.

    2006-01-01

    Plastic encapsulated devices that are exposed to Temperature Cycling (TC) tests undergo an excessive mechanical stress due to different Coefficients of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of the various materials used in the system. Especially in the corners of the die, passivation cracks and shifted metal lines can be observed, which demonstrates an increasing mechanical stress from chip center to the corners of the die. This effect has been known for a long time. This paper presents a simple measurement technique to quantify the mechanical shear stress at the chip-Mold Compound (MC) interface by measuring the deformation of a periodical metal structure. Based on this deformation measurement, we evaluated the stress distribution within the package, and the influence of different parameters such as number of cycles and chip size. Furthermore, these experimental results were compared with FEM simulation, and showed good agreement but could not account in all cases for the total amount of observed shift

  8. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    Matsuda, K., E-mail: kazuhiro-matsuda@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Tamura, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Katoh, M. [A.L.M.T. Corp., Iwasekoshi-Machi 2, Toyama 931-8543 (Japan); Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M. [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  9. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    Malushin, N N; Valuev, D V; Valueva, A V; Serikbol, A; Borovikov, I F

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66). (paper)

  10. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    Malushin, N. N.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich; Valueva, Anna Vladimirovna; Serikbol, A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66).

  11. Metal ion induced room temperature phase transformation and stimulated infrared spectroscopy on TiO{sub 2}-based surfaces

    Gole, James L. [Schools of Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (United States)], E-mail: jim.gole@physics.gatech.edu; Prokes, S.M. [Code 6876, NRL, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)], E-mail: prokes@estd.nrl.navy.mil; White, Mark G. [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, James Worth Bagley College of Engineering, Box 959, MS 39762 (United States)], E-mail: white@che.msstate.edu

    2008-11-30

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy are used to demonstrate (1) the high spin metal ion induced room temperature transformation of anatase to rutile TiO{sub 2} and (2) the phenomena of stimulated IR spectroscopy induced by simultaneous nitrogen doping and high spin metal ion seeding of a TiO{sub 2} nanocolloid lattice.

  12. Metal ion induced room temperature phase transformation and stimulated infrared spectroscopy on TiO2-based surfaces

    Gole, James L.; Prokes, S.M.; White, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy are used to demonstrate (1) the high spin metal ion induced room temperature transformation of anatase to rutile TiO 2 and (2) the phenomena of stimulated IR spectroscopy induced by simultaneous nitrogen doping and high spin metal ion seeding of a TiO 2 nanocolloid lattice

  13. Tracing low-temperature aqueous metal migration in mineralized watersheds with Cu isotope fractionation

    Mathur, R.; Munk, L.A.; Townley, B.; Gou, K.Y.; Gómez Miguélez, N.; Titley, S.; Chen, G.G.; Song, S.; Reich, M.; Tornos, F.; Ruiz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu isotope fractionation of ores and waters identifies copper sulfide weathering. • Redox reactions cause isotopic shift measured in areas of sulfide weathering. • Consistent isotope signature in different deposit, climate, or concentration. - Abstract: Copper isotope signatures in waters emanating from mineralized watersheds provide evidence for the source aqueous copper in solution. Low-temperature aqueous oxidation of Cu sulfide minerals produces significant copper isotopic fractionation between solutions and residues. Abiotic experimental data of fractionation (defined as Δ liquid–solid ‰ = δ 65 Cu liquid − δ 65 Cu solid ) are on the order of 1–3‰ and are unique for copper rich-sulfide minerals. Data presented here from ores and waters within defined boundaries of porphyry copper, massive sulfide, skarn, and epithermal ore deposits mimic abiotic experiments. Thus, the oxidation of sulfide minerals appears to cause the signatures in the waters although significant biological, temperature, and pH variations exist in the fluids. Regardless of the deposit type, water type, concentration of Cu in solution, or location, the data provide a means to trace sources of metals in solutions. This relationship allows for tracking sources and degree of metal migration in low temperature aqueous systems and has direct application to exploration geology and environmental geochemistry

  14. Development of program for evaluating the temperature of Zr-U metallic fuel rod

    Chun, J. S.; Lee, B. H.; Ku, Y. H.; Oh, J. Y.; Im, J. S.; Sohn, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    A code for evaluating the temperature of Zr-U metallic rod has been developed. Finite element (FE) method is adopted for the developed code sharing the user subroutines which has been prepared for the ABAQUS commercial FE code. The developed program for the Zr-U metallic fuel rod corresponds to a nonlinear transient heat transfer problem, and uses a sparse matrix solver for FE equations during iterations at every time step. The verifications of the developed program were conducted using the ABAQUS code. Steady state and transient problems were analyzed for 1/8 rod model due to the symmetry of the fuel rod and full model. From the evaluation of temperature for the 1/8 rod model at steady state, maximal error of 0.18 % was present relative to the ABAQUS result. Analysis for the transient problem using the fuel rod model resulted in the same as the variation of centerline temperature from the ABAQUS code during a hypothetical power transient. The distribution of heat flux for the entire cross section and surface was almost identical for the two codes

  15. High temperature oxidation of metals: vacancy injection and consequences on the mechanical properties

    Perusin, S.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this work is to account for the effects of the high temperature oxidation of metals on their microstructure and their mechanical properties. 'Model' materials like pure nickel, pure iron and the Ni-20Cr alloy are studied. Nickel foils have been oxidised at 1000 C on one side only in laboratory air, the other side being protected from oxidation by a reducing atmosphere. After the oxidation treatment, the unoxidized face was carefully examined by using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Grain boundaries grooves were characterised and their depth were compared to the ones obtained on the same sample heat treated in the reducing atmosphere during the same time. They are found to be much deeper in the case of the single side oxidised samples. It is shown that this additional grooving is directly linked to the growth of the oxide scale on the opposite side and that it can be explained by the diffusion of the vacancies produced at the oxide scale - metal interface, across the entire sample through grain boundaries. Moreover, the comparison between single side oxidised samples and samples oxidised on both sides points out that voids in grain boundaries are only observed in this latter case proving the vacancies condensation in the metal when the two faces are oxidised. The role of the carbon content and the sample's geometry on this phenomenon is examined in detail. The diffusion of vacancies is coupled with the transport of oxygen so that a mechanism of oxygen transport by vacancies is suggested. The tensile tests realised at room temperature on nickel foils (bamboo microstructure) show that the oxide scale can constitute a barrier to the emergence of dislocations at the metal surface. Finally, the Ni-20Cr alloy is tested in tensile and creep tests between 25 and 825 C in oxidising or reducing atmospheres. (author)

  16. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel; Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois

    2014-01-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C 4 H 10 + H 2 + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  17. Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Multi-Component Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts FINAL Report

    Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    The focus of the project was on developing an atomic-level understanding of how transition metal oxide catalysts function. Over the course of several renewals the specific emphases shifted from understanding how local structure and oxidation state affect how molecules adsorb and react on the surfaces of binary oxide crystals to more complex systems where interactions between different transition metal oxide cations in an oxide catalyst can affect reactivity, and finally to the impact of cluster size on oxide stability and reactivity. Hallmarks of the work were the use of epitaxial growth methods to create surfaces relevant to catalysis yet tractable for fundamental surface science approaches, and the use of scanning tunneling microscopy to follow structural changes induced by reactions and to pinpoint adsorption sites. Key early findings included the identification of oxidation and reduction mechanisms on a tungsten oxide catalyst surface that determine the sites available for reaction, identification of C-O bond cleavage as the rate limiting step in alcohol dehydration reactions on the tungsten oxide surface, and demonstration that reduction does not change the favored reaction pathway but rather eases C-O bond cleavage and thus reduces the reaction barrier. Subsequently, a new reconstruction on the anatase phase of TiO2 relevant to catalysis was discovered and shown to create sites with distinct reactivity compared to other TiO2 surfaces. Building on this work on anatase, the mechanism by which TiO2 enhances the reactivity of vanadium oxide layers was characterized and it was found that the TiO2 substrate can force thin vanadia layers to adopt structures they would not ordinarily form in the bulk which in turn creates differences in reactivity between supported layers and bulk samples. From there, the work progressed to studying well-defined ternary oxides where synergistic effects between the two cations can induce

  18. Influence of non-metallic second phases on fatigue behaviour of high strength steel components

    Gonzalez, L.; Elvira, R.; Garcia de Andoin, A.; Pizarro, R.; Bertrand, C.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the real effect of the inclusion type on fatigue life of ultra clean high strength steels mechanical components made of 100Cr6 steel were fatigue tested and fracture surfaces analysed to determine the origin of fatigue cracks.Two heats proceedings from different steelmaking routes were taken for the tests. The material were forged into ring shape components which were fatigue tested under compression-compression loads. Failures were analysed by SFEM (Scanning field Emission Microscopy), proving that most of failures at high loads were originated by manganese sulphides of small size (10-70 micros), while less than 40% of all fatigue cracks due to inclusions were caused by titanium carbonitrides and hard oxides. It has been demonstrated that once number and size of hard inclusions have been reduced, the hazardous effect of oxides and carbonitrides on the fatigue life decreases also. However, softer inclusions as manganese sulphides, currently considered as less hazardous, play a more relevant role as direct cause of fatigue failure and they should be taken into account in a deeper way in order to balance both machinability and fatigue life requirements in high strength steel components. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Effect of linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of thermoelectric properties on the energy conversion efficiency

    Yamashita, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The new thermal rate equations were built up by taking the linear and non-linear components in the temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficient α, the electrical resistivity ρ and thermal conductivity κ of a thermoelectric (TE) material into the thermal rate equations on the assumption that their temperature dependences are expressed by a quadratic function of temperature T. The energy conversion efficiency η for a single TE element was formulated using the new thermal rate ones proposed here. By applying it to the high-performance half-Heusler compound, the non-linear component in the temperature dependence of α among those of the TE properties has the greatest effect on η, so that η/η 0 was increased by 11% under the condition of T = 510 K and ΔT = 440 K, where η 0 is a well-known conventional energy conversion efficiency. It was thus found that the temperature dependences of TE properties have a significant influence on η. When one evaluates the accurate achievement rate of η exp obtained experimentally for a TE generator, therefore, η exp should be compared with η the estimated from the theoretical expression proposed here, not with η 0 , particularly when there is a strong non-linearity in the temperature dependence of TE properties.

  20. Effect of ion irradiation on tensile ductility, strength and fictive temperature in metallic glass nanowires

    Magagnosc, D.J.; Kumar, G.; Schroers, J.; Felfer, P.; Cairney, J.M.; Gianola, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion irradiation of thermoplastically molded Pt 57.5 Cu 14.3 Ni 5.7 P 22.5 metallic glass nanowires is used to study the relationship between glass structure and tensile behavior across a wide range of structural states. Starting with the as-molded state of the glass, ion fluence and irradiated volume fraction are systematically varied to rejuvenate the glass, and the resulting plastic behavior of the metallic glass nanowires probed by in situ mechanical testing in a scanning electron microscope. Whereas the as-molded nanowires exhibit high strength, brittle-like fracture and negligible inelastic deformation, ion-irradiated nanowires show tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic deformation. Signatures of changes to the glass structure owing to ion irradiation as obtained from electron diffraction are subtle, despite relatively large yield strength reductions of hundreds of megapascals relative to the as-molded condition. To reconcile changes in mechanical behavior with glass properties, we adapt previous models equating the released strain energy during shear banding to a transit through the glass transition temperature by incorporating the excess enthalpy associated with distinct structural states. Our model suggests that ion irradiation increases the fictive temperature of our glass by tens of degrees – the equivalent of many orders of magnitude change in cooling rate. We further show our analytical description of yield strength to quantitatively describe literature results showing a correlation between severe plastic deformation and hardness in a single glass system. Our results highlight not only the capacity for room temperature ductile plastic flow in nanoscaled metallic glasses, but also processing strategies capable of glass rejuvenation outside of the realm of traditional thermal treatments

  1. Energy and exergy analyses of medium temperature latent heat thermal storage with high porosity metal matrix

    Kumar, Ashish; Saha, Sandip K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: I. Metal matrix is used as the thermal conductivity enhancers (TCE) in PCM-based TES. II. Time evolution second law analysis is evaluated for different porosities and pore diameters. III. Reduction in fluctuation in HTF temperature is significantly affected by the change in porosity (ε) shown in figure. IV. Maximum energy and exergy efficiencies are obtained for porosity of 0.85. V. Effect of pore diameter on first law and second law efficiencies is found to be marginal. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage system in a concentrating solar plant (CSP) reduces the gap between energy demand and supply caused by the intermittent behaviour of solar radiation. In this paper, detailed exergy and energy analyses of shell and tube type latent heat thermal storage system (LHTES) for medium temperature solar thermal power plant (∼200 °C) are performed to estimate the net useful energy during the charging and discharging period in a cycle. A commercial-grade organic phase change material (PCM) is stored inside the annular space of the shell and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) flows through the tubes. Thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE) in the form of metal matrix is embedded in PCM to augment heat transfer. A numerical model is developed to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics using the momentum equation and the two-temperature non-equilibrium energy equation coupled with the enthalpy method to account for phase change in PCM. The effects of storage material, porosity and pore-diameter on the net useful energy that can be stored and released during a cycle, are studied. It is found that the first law efficiency of sensible heat storage system is less compared to LHTES. With the decrease in porosity, the first law and second law efficiencies of LHTES increase for both the charging and discharging period. There is no significant variation in energy and exergy efficiencies with the change in pore-diameter of the metal matrix.

  2. Three techniques for the fabrication of high precision, mm-sized metal components based on two-photon lithography, applied for manufacturing horn antennas for THz transceivers

    Standaert, Alexander; Brancato, Luigi; Lips, Bram; Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert; Reynaert, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel packaging solution which integrates micro-machined 3D horn antennas with millimeter-wave and THz tranceivers. This packaging solution is shown to be a valid competitor to existing technologies like metallic split-block waveguides and low temperature cofired ceramics. Three different fabrication methods based on two-photon lithography are presented to form the horn antennas. The first uses two-photon lithography to form the bulk of the antenna. This structure is then metalised through physical vapor deposition (PVD) and copper plating. The second fabrication method makes use of a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to easily replicate structures and the third method forms the horn antenna through electroforming. A prototype is accurately positioned on top of a 400 GHz 28 nm CMOS transmitter and glued in place with epoxy, thus providing a fully packaged solution. Measurement results show a 12 dB increase in the antenna gain when using the packaged solution. The fabrication processes are not limited to horn antennas alone and can be used to form a wide range of mm-sized metal components.

  3. High temperature structural design and R and Ds for heat transport system components of FBR 'Monju'

    Sumikawa, Masaharu; Nakagawa, Yukio; Fukuda, Yoshio; Sukegawa, Masayuki; Ishizaki, Tairo.

    1980-01-01

    The machines and equipments of cooling system for the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'' are operated in creep temperature region, and the upper limit temperature to apply the domestic structural design standard for nuclear machines and equipment is exceeded, therefore the guideline for high temperature structural design is being drawn up, reflecting the results of recent research and development, by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. and others. In order to obtain the basic data for the purpose, the tests on the high temperature characteristics of main structural members and structural elements were carried out, and eight kinds of the inelastic structural analysis program ''HI-EPIC'' series were developed, thus the fundamental technologies of structural desigh in non-linear region were established. Also in the non-linear region, enormous physical quantities must be evaluated, and in the design method based on real elastic analysis, many design diagrams must be employed, therefore for the purpose of improving the reliability of evaluation, the automatic evaluation program ''HI-TEP'' was developed, and preparation has been made for the design of actual machines. The high temperature structural design in ''Monju'', the development of inelastic structural analysis program and high temperature structural analysis evaluation program, and the development of high temperature structures and materials are described. (Kako, I.)

  4. Polymorphic crystallization of metal-metalloid-glasses above the glass transition temperature

    Koster, U.; Schunemann, U.; Stephenson, G.B.; Brauer, S.; Sutton, M.

    1992-01-01

    Crystallization of metal-metalloid glasses is known to proceed by nucleation and growth processes. Using crystallization statistics in partially crystallized glasses, at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, time-dependent heterogeneous nucleation has been found to occur at a number of quenched-in nucleation sites. Close to the glass transition temperature crystallization proceeds so rapidly that partially crystallized microstructures could not be obtained. Initial results form fully crystallized glasses exhibit evidence for a transient homogeneous nucleation process at higher temperatures. These conclusions are derived post mortem. At there may be some change of the microstructure after crystallization is finished or during he subsequent quenching, it is desirable to directly obtain information during the early stages of crystallization. Recently reported work by Sutton et al. showed that structural changes can be observed in situ during crystallization by time-resolved x-ray diffraction on time scales as short as milliseconds. The aim o the paper is to present the authors study of the crystallization behavior at temperatures near the glass transition by in-situ x-ray diffraction studies and by microstructural analysis after rapid heating experiments. The results are compared to those derived from a computer model of the crystallization process

  5. Bioleaching of heavy metal polluted sediment: influence of temperature and oxygen. Pt. 1

    Loeser, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Lebensmittel- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Bergstrasse 120, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Zehnsdorf, A. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Umwelt- und Biotechnologisches Zentrum, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Goersch, K.; Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    A remediation process for heavy metal polluted sediment has previously been developed in which the heavy metals are removed from the sediment by solid-bed bioleaching using elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}): the added S{sup 0} is oxidized by the indigenous microbes to sulfuric acid that dissolves the heavy metals which are finally extracted by percolating water. In this process, the temperature is a factor crucially affecting the rate of S{sup 0} oxidation and metal solubilization. Here, the effect of temperature on the kinetics of S{sup 0} oxidation has been studied: oxidized Weisse Elster River sediment (dredged near Leipzig, Germany) was mixed with 2 % S{sup 0}, suspended in water and then leached at various temperatures. The higher the temperature was, the faster the S{sup 0} oxidized, and the more rapid the pH decreased. But temperatures above 35 C slowed down S{sup 0} oxidation, and temperatures above 45 C let the process - after a short period of acidification to pH 4.5 - stagnate. The latter may be explained by the presence of both neutrophilic to less acidophilic thermotolerant bacteria and acidophilic thermosensitive bacteria. Within 42 days, nearly complete S{sup 0} oxidation and maximum heavy metal solubilization only occurred at 30 to 45 C. The measured pH(t) courses were used to model the rate of S{sup 0} oxidation depending on the temperature using an extended Arrhenius equation. Since molecular oxygen is another factor highly influencing the activity of S{sup 0}-oxidizing bacteria, the effect of dissolved O{sub 2} (controlled by the O{sub 2} content in the gas supplied) on S{sup 0} oxidation was studied in suspension: the indigenous S{sup 0}-oxidizing bacteria reacted quite tolerant to low O{sub 2} concentrations; the rate of S{sup 0} oxidation - measured as the specific O{sub 2} consumption - was not affected until the O{sub 2} content of the suspension was below 0.05 mg/L, i.e., the S{sup 0}-oxidizing bacteria showed a high affinity to O{sub 2} with a

  6. Ti-based bulk metallic glass with high cold workability at room temperature

    Park, J.M.; Park, J.S.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, M.H.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    The cold workability of Ti-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been investigated. Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG with a large compressive plastic strain of 4.7% shows a high cold workability, i.e. total reduction ratio of 50% by cold rolling at room temperature. The multiple shear bands formed during rolling are effective in enhancing the plasticity. The cold rolled Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG (reduction ratio: 30%) exhibits a large plastic strain of ∝14%. (orig.)

  7. Supercapacitors Based on Metal Electrodes Prepared from Nanoparticle Mixtures at Room Temperature

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Grzybowski, Bartosz A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Films comprising Au and Ag nanoparticles are transformed into porous metal electrodes by desorption of weak organic ligands followed by wet chemical etching of silver. Thus prepared electrodes provide the basis for supercapacitors whose specific capacitances approach 70 F/g. Cyclic voltammetry measurement yield “rectangular” I-V curves even at high scan rates, indicating that the supercapacitors have low internal resistance. Owing to this property, the supercapacitors have a high power density ~12 kW/kg, comparable with that of the state-of-the-art carbon-based devices. The entire assembly protocol does not require high-temperature processing or the use of organic binders.

  8. High-temperature MEMS Heater Platforms: Long-term Performance of Metal and Semiconductor Heater Materials

    Theodor Doll

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Micromachined thermal heater platforms offer low electrical power consumptionand high modulation speed, i.e. properties which are advantageous for realizing non-dispersive infrared (NDIR gas- and liquid monitoring systems. In this paper, we report oninvestigations on silicon-on-insulator (SOI based infrared (IR emitter devices heated byemploying different kinds of metallic and semiconductor heater materials. Our resultsclearly reveal the superior high-temperature performance of semiconductor over metallicheater materials. Long-term stable emitter operation in the vicinity of 1300 K could beattained using heavily antimony-doped tin dioxide (SnO2:Sb heater elements.

  9. Mechanical Behavior of A Metal Composite Vessels Under Pressure At Cryogenic Temperatures

    Tsaplin, A. I.; Bochkarev, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into the deformation and destruction of a metal composite vessel with a cryogenic gas are presented. Its structure is based on basalt, carbon, and organic fibers. The vessel proved to be serviceable at cryogenic temperatures up to a burst pressure of 45 MPa, and its destruction was without fragmentation. A mathematical model adequately describing the rise of pressure in the cryogenic vessel due to the formation of a gaseous phase upon boiling of the liquefied natural gas during its storage without drainage at the initial stage is proposed.

  10. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD.

  11. Radiation Hard Wide Temperature Range Mixed-Signal Components, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low temperature survivability, high performance and radiation tolerance of electronics in combination is required for NASA's surface missions. Modern sub-micron CMOS...

  12. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment.

    Postma, P R; Pataro, G; Capitoli, M; Barbosa, M J; Wijffels, R H; Eppink, M H M; Olivieri, G; Ferrari, G

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65 °C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11 kWh kgDW(-1)) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 25 to 55 °C resulted in a conductivity increase of 75% as a result of cell membrane permeabilization. In this range of temperatures, 25-39% carbohydrates and 3-5% proteins release occurred and only for carbohydrate release a synergistic effect was observed at 55 °C. Above 55 °C spontaneous cell lysis occurred without PEF. Combined PEF-temperature treatment does not sufficiently disintegrate the algal cells to release both carbohydrates and proteins at yields comparable to the benchmark bead milling (40-45% protein, 48-58% carbohydrates). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamics of trapped two-component Fermi gas: Temperature dependence of the transition from collisionless to collisional regime

    Toschi, F.; Vignolo, P.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, S.

    2003-01-01

    We develop a numerical method to study the dynamics of a two-component atomic Fermi gas trapped inside a harmonic potential at temperature T well below the Fermi temperature T F . We examine the transition from the collisionless to the collisional regime down to T=0.2 T F and find a good qualitative agreement with the experiments of B. DeMarco and D.S. Jin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 040405 (2002)]. We demonstrate a twofold role of temperature on the collision rate and on the efficiency of collisions. In particular, we observe a hitherto unreported effect, namely, the transition to hydrodynamic behavior is shifted towards lower collision rates as temperature decreases

  14. Trace Metal Bioremediation: Assessment of Model Components from Laboratory and Field Studies to Identify Critical Variables

    Peter Jaffe; Herschel Rabitz

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project was to gain an insight into the modeling support needed for the understanding, design, and operation of trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation. To achieve this objective, a workshop was convened to discuss the elements such a model should contain. A ''protomodel'' was developed, based on the recommendations of the workshop, and was used to perform sensitivity analysis as well as some preliminary simulations in support for bioremediation test experiments at UMTRA sites. To simulate the numerous biogeochemical processes that will occur during the bioremediation of uranium contaminated aquifers, a time-dependent one-dimensional reactive transport model has been developed. The model consists of a set of coupled, steady state mass balance equations, accounting for advection, diffusion, dispersion, and a kinetic formulation of the transformations affecting an organic substrate, electron acceptors, corresponding reduced species, and uranium. This set of equations is solved numerically, using a finite element scheme. The redox conditions of the domain are characterized by estimating the pE, based on the concentrations of the dominant terminal electron acceptor and its corresponding reduced specie. This pE and the concentrations of relevant species are passed to a modified version of MINTEQA2, which calculates the speciation and solubilities of the species of interest. Kinetics of abiotic reactions are described as being proportional to the difference between the actual and equilibrium concentration. A global uncertainty assessment, determined by Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR), was performed to attain a phenomenological understanding of the origins of output variability and to suggest input parameter refinements as well as to provide guidance for field experiments to improve the quality of the model predictions. Results indicated that for the usually high nitrate contents found ate many DOE sites, overall

  15. An investigation on the effects of phase change material on material components used for high temperature thermal energy storage system

    Kim, Taeil; Singh, Dileep; Zhao, Weihuan; Yua, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants with advanced power cycle require high temperature phase change materials (PCMs), Graphite foams with high thermal conductivity to enhance the poor thermal conductivity of PCMs. Brazing of the graphite foams to the structural metals of the LHTES system could be a method to assemble the system and a method to protect the structural metals from the molten salts. In the present study, the LHTES prototype capsules using MgCl2-graphite foam composites were assembled by brazing and welding, and tested to investigate the corrosion attack of the PCM salt on the BNi-4 braze. The microstructural analysis showed that the BNi-4 braze alloy can be used not only for the joining of structure alloy to graphite foams but also for the protecting of structure alloy from the corrosion by PCM.

  16. Fabrication of Metallic Glass Powder for Brazing Paste for High-Temperature Thermoelectric Modules

    Seo, Seung-Ho; Kim, Suk Jun; Lee, Soonil; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok

    2018-06-01

    Metallic glass (MG) offers the advantage of outstanding oxidation resistance, since it has disordered atomic-scale structure without grain boundaries. We fabricated Al-based MG ribbons (Al84.5Y10Ni5.5) by a melt spinning process. We evaluated the adhesion strength of interfaces between the Al-based MG and a Ni-coated Cu electrode formed under various conditions at high temperature. In addition, we attempted to optimize the process conditions for pulverizing MG ribbons to high-energy ball milling and planetary milling. We confirmed that the electrical resistivity of the Al-based MG ribbon was substantially reduced after annealing at high temperature (over 300°C) due to crystallization.

  17. Influence of crystallite size and temperature on the antiferromagnetic helices of terbium and holmium metal

    Bick, Jens-Peter; Michels, Andreas [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Ferdinand, Adrian; Birringer, Rainer [Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Baller, Joerg; Sanctuary, Roland [University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Philippi, Stefan [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Lott, Dieter [GKSS Research Center, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Balog, Sandor [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rotenberg, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California 94720 (United States); Kaindl, Guenter [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Doebrich, Kristian M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We report on the results of grain-size and temperature-dependent magnetization, specific-heat, neutron-scattering, and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments on the heavy rare-earth metals terbium and holmium, with particular emphasis on the temperature regions where the helical antiferromagnetic phases exist. In contrast to Ho, we find that the helical structure in Tb is relative strongly affected by microstructural disorder, specifically, it can no longer be detected for the smallest studied grain size of D=18 nm. Moreover, in coarse-grained Tb a helical structure persists even in the ferromagnetic regime, down to about T=215 K, in agreement with the ARPES data, which reveal a nesting feature of the Fermi surface at the L point of the Brillouin zone at T=210 K.

  18. High-pressure, ambient temperature hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks and porous carbon

    Beckner, Matthew; Dailly, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We investigated hydrogen storage in micro-porous adsorbents at ambient temperature and pressures up to 320 bar. We measured three benchmark adsorbents: two metal-organic frameworks, Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2 [Cu3(btc)2; HKUST-1] and Zn4O(1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate)2 [Zn4O(btb)2; MOF-177], and the activated carbon MSC-30. In this talk, we focus on adsorption enthalpy calculations using a single adsorption isotherm. We use the differential form of the Claussius-Clapeyron equation applied to the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption model to calculate adsorption enthalpies. Calculation of the adsorption enthalpy in this way gives a temperature independent enthalpy of 5-7 kJ/mol at the lowest coverage for the three materials investigated. Additionally, we discuss the assumptions and corrections that must be made when calculating adsorption isotherms at high-pressure and adsorption enthalpies.

  19. Analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of metals at high temperature

    Takamoto, S; Izumi, S; Nakata, T; Sakai, S; Oinuma, S; Nakatani, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of metals at high-temperature ranges. Although the conventional method based on quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) shows good results at low temperatures, anharmonic effects caused by large-amplitude thermal vibrations reduces its accuracy at high temperatures. Molecular dynamics (MD) naturally includes the anharmonic effect. However, since the computational cost of MD is relatively high, in order to make an interatomic potential capable of reproducing TEC, an analytical method is essential. In our method, analytical formulation of the radial distribution function (RDF) at finite temperature realizes the estimation of the TEC. Each peak of the RDF is approximated by the Gaussian distribution. The average and variance of the Gaussian distribution are formulated by decomposing the fluctuation of interatomic distance into independent elastic waves. We incorporated two significant anharmonic effects into the method. One is the increase in the averaged interatomic distance caused by large amplitude vibration. The second is the variation in the frequency of elastic waves. As a result, the TECs of fcc and bcc crystals estimated by our method show good agreement with those of MD. Our method enables us to make an interatomic potential that reproduces the TEC at high temperature. We developed the GEAM potential for nickel. The TEC of the fitted potential showed good agreement with experimental data from room temperature to 1000 K. As compared with the original potential, it was found that the third derivative of the wide-range curve was modified, while the zeroth, first and second derivatives were unchanged. This result supports the conventional theory of solid state physics. We believe our analytical method and developed interatomic potential will contribute to future high-temperature material development. (paper)

  20. Pressure vessel design codes: A review of their applicability to HTGR components at temperatures above 800 deg C

    Hughes, P.T.; Over, H.H.; Bieniussa, K.

    1984-01-01

    The governments of USA and Federal Republic of Germany have approved of cooperation between the two countries in an endeavour to establish structural design code for gas reactor components intended to operate at temperatures exceeding 800 deg C. The basis of existing codes and their applicability to gas reactor component design are reviewed in this paper. This review has raised a number of important questions as to the direct applicability of the present codes. The status of US and FRG cooperative efforts to obtain answers to these questions are presented