WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal cluster-rare gas

  1. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2016-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses the issues of sensitivity, concentration, and temperature dependency as well as the response and recovery times crucial for sensors. He also presents techniques for synthesizing different metal oxides, particularly those with nanodimensional structures. The text goes on to highlight the gas sensing properties of many nanostructured metal oxides, from aluminum and cerium to iron and titanium to zinc and zirconium. The final...

  2. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5Fs) are presented. The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations to the measurements shows quantitative agreement with both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content

  3. Nanopowder Metal Oxide for Photoluminescent Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyrovetsky, V. M.; Popovych, D. I.; Savka, S. S.; Serednytski, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO, TiO2, WO3, SnO2) with average diameters of 40-60 nm were analyzed by room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of gas environment (O2, N2, H2, CO, CO2) on the emission intensity was investigated for metal oxide nanopowders with surface doped by impurities (Pt, Ag, Au, Sn, Ni or Cu). Established physicochemical regularities of modification of surface electronic states of initial and doped nanopowders during gas adsorption. The nature of metal oxide nanopowder gas-sensing properties (adsorption capacity, sensitivity, selectivity) has been established and the design and optimal materials for the construction of the multi-component sensing matrix have been selected.

  4. Nanopowder Metal Oxide for Photoluminescent Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Zhyrovetsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO, TiO2, WO3, SnO2 with average diameters of 40–60 nm were analyzed by room-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of gas environment (O2, N2, H2, CO, CO2 on the emission intensity was investigated for metal oxide nanopowders with surface doped by impurities (Pt, Ag, Au, Sn, Ni or Cu. Established physicochemical regularities of modification of surface electronic states of initial and doped nanopowders during gas adsorption. The nature of metal oxide nanopowder gas-sensing properties (adsorption capacity, sensitivity, selectivity has been established and the design and optimal materials for the construction of the multi-component sensing matrix have been selected.

  5. Detection of gas entrainment into liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, T., E-mail: t.vogt@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Boden, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Andruszkiewicz, A. [Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Eckert, K. [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We present liquid metal experiments dedicated to gas entrainment on the free surface. • Ultrasonic and X-ray attenuation techniques have been used to study the mechanisms of gas entrainment. • A comparison between bubbly flow in water and GaInSn showed substantial differences. • Our results emphasize the importance of liquid metal experiments which are able to provide a suitable data base for numerical code validation. - Abstract: Entrainment of cover gas into the liquid metal coolant is one of the principal safety issues in the design of innovative liquid metal-cooled fast reactors. We present generic experimental studies of this phenomenon in low-melting metals. Ultrasonic and X-ray diagnostic tools were considered for a visualization of gas entrainment at the free surface of the melt. Laboratory experiments were conducted using the eutectic alloy GaInSn, which is liquid at room temperature. Vortex-activated entrainment of air at the free surface of a rotating flow was revealed by ultrasonic techniques. X-ray radioscopy was used to visualize the behavior of argon bubbles inside a slit geometry. The measurements reveal distinct differences between water and GaInSn, especially with respect to the process of bubble formation and the coalescence and breakup of bubbles. Our results emphasize the importance of liquid metal experiments which are able to provide a suitable data base for numerical code validation.

  6. Resolving Gas-Phase Metallicity In Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, David

    2017-06-01

    Chapter 2: As part of the Bluedisk survey we analyse the radial gas-phase metallicity profiles of 50 late-type galaxies. We compare the metallicity profiles of a sample of HI-rich galaxies against a control sample of HI-'normal' galaxies. We find the metallicity gradient of a galaxy to be strongly correlated with its HI mass fraction {M}{HI}) / {M}_{\\ast}). We note that some galaxies exhibit a steeper metallicity profile in the outer disc than in the inner disc. These galaxies are found in both the HI-rich and control samples. This contradicts a previous indication that these outer drops are exclusive to HI-rich galaxies. These effects are not driven by bars, although we do find some indication that barred galaxies have flatter metallicity profiles. By applying a simple analytical model we are able to account for the variety of metallicity profiles that the two samples present. The success of this model implies that the metallicity in these isolated galaxies may be in a local equilibrium, regulated by star formation. This insight could provide an explanation of the observed local mass-metallicity relation. Chapter 3 We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies

  7. Metal oxide membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Webster, Elizabeth T.; Xu, Qunyin

    1994-01-01

    A method for permformation of a microporous ceramic membrane onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane having mean pore sizes less than 30 Angstroms and useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or gas separation.

  8. Nature of the interaction between rare gas atoms and transition metal doped silicon clusters: the role of shielding effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Vu Thi; Janssens, Ewald; Claes, Pieterjan; Fielicke, André; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Lievens, Peter

    2015-07-21

    Mass spectrometry experiments show an exceptionally weak bonding between Si7Mn(+) and rare gas atoms as compared to other exohedrally transition metal (TM) doped silicon clusters and other SinMn(+) (n = 5-10) sizes. The Si7Mn(+) cluster does not form Ar complexes and the observed fraction of Xe complexes is low. The interaction of two cluster series, SinMn(+) (n = 6-10) and Si7TM(+) (TM = Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn), with Ar and Xe is investigated by density functional theory calculations. The cluster-rare gas binding is for all clusters, except Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+), predominantly driven by short-range interaction between the TM dopant and the rare gas atoms. A high s-character electron density on the metal atoms in Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+) shields the polarization toward the rare gas atoms and thereby hinders formation of short-range complexes. Overall, both Ar and Xe complexes are similar except that the larger polarizability of Xe leads to larger binding energies.

  9. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  11. Accretion of low-metallicity gas by the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; Howk, JC; Savage, BD; van Woerden, H; Tufte, SL; Schwarz, UJ; Benjamin, R; Reynolds, RJ; Peletier, RF; Kalberla, PMW

    1999-01-01

    Models of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way suggest that: the observed abundances of elements heavier than helium ('metals') require a continuous infall of gas with metallicity (metal abundance) about 0.1 times the solar value. An infall rate integrated over the entire disk of the Milky Way of

  12. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas sensor applications are introduced. The advantages of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides are also presented, taking into account the crystallinity and ordered/disordered porous structures. Second, the synthesis methods of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides including the soft-template, hard-template, and temple-free methods are introduced, in which the advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are figured out. Third, the applications of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides as gas sensors are presented. The gas nanosensors are designed based on meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for effective detection of toxic gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the meso-/nanoporous gas nanosensors are also discussed. Finally, some conclusions and an outlook are presented.

  13. Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Richard R [Cary, IL; Low, John J. , Faheem, Syed A.; Benin, Annabelle I [Oak Forest, IL; Snurr, Randall Q [Evanston, IL; Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur [Evanston, IL

    2012-07-24

    The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

  14. effects of metal inert gas welding parameters on some mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECTS OF METAL INERT GAS WELDING PARAMETERS ON SOME MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN ACIDIC ... Design Expert Software, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Rockwell Hardness Test, Monsanto Tensometer and Izod Impact Test were used to determine the ...

  15. Gas inflow and metallicity drops in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Muñoz Tuñón, Casiana; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Primack, Joel

    2016-04-01

    Gas inflow feeds galaxies with low-metallicity gas from the cosmic web, sustaining star formation across the Hubble time. We make a connection between these inflows and metallicity inhomogeneities in star-forming galaxies, by using synthetic narrow-band images of the Hα emission line from zoom-in AMR cosmological simulations of galaxies with stellar masses of M* ≃ 109 M⊙ at redshifts z = 2-7. In ˜50 per cent of the cases at redshifts lower than 4, the gas inflow gives rise to star-forming, Hα-bright, off-centre clumps. Most of these clumps have gas metallicities, weighted by Hα luminosity, lower than the metallicity in the surrounding interstellar medium by ˜0.3 dex, consistent with observations of chemical inhomogeneities at high and low redshifts. Due to metal mixing by shear and turbulence, these metallicity drops are dissolved in a few disc dynamical times. Therefore, they can be considered as evidence for rapid gas accretion coming from cosmological inflow of pristine gas.

  16. Metal-core@metal oxide-shell nanomaterials for gas-sensing applications: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, A.; Janghorban, K.; Hashemi, B.; Neri, G.

    2015-01-01

    With an ever-increasing number of applications in many advanced fields, gas sensors are becoming indispensable devices in our daily life. Among different types of gas sensors, conductometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors are found to be the most appealing for advanced applications in the automotive, biomedical, environmental, and safety sectors because of the their high sensitivity, reduced size, and low cost. To improve their sensing characteristics, new metal oxide-based nanostructures have thus been proposed in recent years as sensing materials. In this review, we extensively review gas-sensing properties of core@ shell nanocomposites in which metals as the core and metal oxides as the shell structure, both of nanometer sizes, are assembled into a single metal@metal oxide core–shell. These nanostructures not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Up-dated achievements in the synthesis and characterization of metal@metal oxide core–shell nanostructures as well as their use in MOS sensors are here reported with the main objective of providing an overview about their gas-sensing properties

  17. Metal-core@metal oxide-shell nanomaterials for gas-sensing applications: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, A.; Janghorban, K.; Hashemi, B.; Neri, G.

    2015-09-01

    With an ever-increasing number of applications in many advanced fields, gas sensors are becoming indispensable devices in our daily life. Among different types of gas sensors, conductometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors are found to be the most appealing for advanced applications in the automotive, biomedical, environmental, and safety sectors because of the their high sensitivity, reduced size, and low cost. To improve their sensing characteristics, new metal oxide-based nanostructures have thus been proposed in recent years as sensing materials. In this review, we extensively review gas-sensing properties of core@ shell nanocomposites in which metals as the core and metal oxides as the shell structure, both of nanometer sizes, are assembled into a single metal@metal oxide core-shell. These nanostructures not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Up-dated achievements in the synthesis and characterization of metal@metal oxide core-shell nanostructures as well as their use in MOS sensors are here reported with the main objective of providing an overview about their gas-sensing properties.

  18. Fiber metal acoustic material for gas turbine exhaust environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaton, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    FELTMETAL fiber metal acoustic materials function as broad band acoustic absorbers. Their acoustic energy absorbance occurs through viscous flow losses as sound waves pass through the tortuous pore structure of the material. Exhaust gas noise attenuation requirements are reviewed. Their selection process for higher performance materials is discussed. A new FELTMETAL fiber metal acoustic material has been designed for use in gas turbine auxiliary power unit exhaust environments without supplemental cooling. The physical and acoustic properties of mesh supported fiber metal acoustic medium FM 827 are discussed. Exposure testing was conducted under conditions which simulated auxiliary power unit operation. Weight gain and tensile strength data as a function of time of exposure at 650 0 C (1202 0 F) are reported. Fabrication of components with fiber metal acoustic materials is easily accomplished using standard roll forming and gas tungsten arc welding practices

  19. Metal organic frameworks for gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-06-09

    Embodiments provide a method of storing a compound using a metal organic framework (MOF). The method includes contacting one or more MOFs with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as O2 and CH4. O2 and CH4 can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF, wherein M can include aluminum, iron, gallium, indium, vanadium, chromium, titanium, or scandium.

  20. A Safe Solution to Dopant Gas Desorption from Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanoya, Tsutomu; Egami, Maki

    2006-11-01

    TOXICAPTURE™ is used to further minimize trace toxic dopant gas inside cylinder valve outlets, which, over time, may desorb from metal surfaces. When outlet caps or connections to ion source gas cylinders are disconnected in order to perform installations or bottle changes, there always is some risk that toxic fumes resulting from desorption of the metal surface in contact with dopant gas are released in air and inhaled by the operator. TOXICAPTURE™ is a simple and easy solution to reduce this risk that may damage human health or may pollute clean room environment. TOXICAPTURE™ will react with the poison gas vapor to form nontoxic and solid material through irreversible chemical reactions. TOXICAPTURE™ prevents contamination and corrosion on gas contact surfaces of gas pipings, pressure regulators, pneumatic valves, mass flow controllers, and other parts in a gas box. TOXICAPTURE™ is highly effective in shortening the time to achieve high vacuum and in extending the lifetime of devices in the gas box. In this paper, we introduce the structure, functions, reactivity, applications, and effectivity of TOXICAPTURE™.

  1. Cleanable sintered metal filters in hot off-gas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Filters with sintered metal elements, arranged as tube bundles with backflush air cleaning, are the equivalent of bag filters for high-temperature, harsh environments. They are virtually the only alternative for high-temperature off-gas systems where a renewable, highly efficient particle trap is required. Tests were conducted which show that the sintered metal elements installed in a filter system provide effective powder collection in high-temperature atmospheres over thousands of cleaning cycles. Such a sintered metal filter system is now installed on the experimental defense waste calciner at the Savannah River Laboratory. The experimental results included in this paper were used as the basis for its design

  2. Distribution of heavy metals from flue gas in algal bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napan, Katerine

    Flue gas from coal-fired power plants is a major source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Microalgae can use this enriched form of CO2 as carbon source and in turn the biomass can be used to produce food, feed, fertilizer and biofuels. However, along with CO2, coal-based flue gas will inevitably introduce heavy metals, which have a high affinity to bind algal cells, could be toxic to the organisms and if transferred to the products could limit their uses. This study seeks to address the distribution and impact of heavy metals present in flue gas on microalgae production systems. To comprehend its effects, algae Scenedesmus obliquus was grown in batch reactors in a multimetal system. Ten heavy metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Pb, As, Se, Cr, Hg, Ni and Cd) were selected and were evaluated at four concentrations (1X, 2X, 5X and 10X). Results show that most heavy metals accumulated mainly in biomass and were found in very low concentrations in media. Hg was shown to be lost from the culture, with low amounts present in the biomass. An upper limit for As uptake was observed, suggesting its likelihood to build-up in the system during medium recycle. The As limited bioaccumulation was overcome by addition of sulfur to the algal medium. Heavy metal at 2X, 5X and 10X inhibited both growth and lipid production, while at the reference concentration both biomass and lipids yields were increased. Heavy metal concentrations in the medium and biomass were time dependent, and at the end of the cultivation most heavy metals in the supernatant solution complied with the recommendations for irrigation water, while biomass was below limits for cattle and poultry feed, fertilizer, plastic and paper. This research shows that bioremediation of CO2 and heavy metals in combination with energy production can be integrated, which is an environmentally friendly form of biotechnology.

  3. effects of metal inert gas welding parameters on some mechanical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Surface corrosion deposit composition was analyzed with the SEM paired with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to ascertain microstructural behavior of the material. Keywords- MIG, Mechanical Destructive tests, Current, Speed, ASS, SEM, HCl. 1. INTRODUCTION. Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding is a process that has ...

  4. Fission gas retention and axial expansion of irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1986-05-01

    Out-of-reactor experiments utilizing direct electrical heating and infrared heating techniques were performed on irradiated metallic fuel. The results indicate accelerated expansion can occur during thermal transients and that the accelerated expansion is driven by retained fission gases. The results also demonstrate gas retention and, hence, expansion behavior is a function of axial position within the pin

  5. High pressure gas driven liquid metal MHD homopolar generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yasuyuki

    1988-01-01

    A liquid metal MHD homopolar generator is proposed to be used as a high repetition rate pulsed power supply. In the generator, the thermal energy stored in a high pressure gas (He) reservoir is rapidly converted into kinetic energy of a rotating liquid metal (NaK) cylinder which is contracted by a gas driven annular free piston. The rotational kinetic energy is converted into electrical energy by making use of the homopolar generator principle. The conversion efficiency is calculated to be 47% in generating electrical energy of 20 kJ/pulse (1.7 MW peak power) at a repetition rate of 7 Hz. From the viewpoint of energy storage, the high pressure gas reservoir with a charging pressure of 15 MPa is considered to ''electrically'' store the energy at a density of 10 MJ/m 3 . (author)

  6. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  7. Energy Exchange between Weakly Ionized Gas and a Metal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, A. Ph.; Polikarpov, Ph. J.; Borisov, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    An attempt to describe heat exchange of low ionized gas with a metal surface has been made with the use of DSMC approach and kinetic Monte-Carlo method. Modeling is adhered to concrete experimental conditions at which thin tungsten wire is placed in plasma and dependence of a heat flow on wire surface temperature, gas pressure, gas nature and a degree of ionization is investigated. As a result of simulation temperature profiles near the wire surface for nitrogen and argon as well as dependence of relative heat flow in a gas/surface system on temperature and degree of ionization with consideration of energy accommodation have been obtained. In the case of nitrogen the chemical charge-transfer reaction is taken into account.

  8. Repetitively pulsed gas-jet laser cutting of metals in an oxygen-containing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makashev, N K; Asmolov, E S; Buzykin, O G

    2000-01-01

    A model of the repetitively pulsed gas-jet laser cutting of thick metals in an oxidising gas is developed. It is shown that the optimal choice of the time-dependent (radiation) and beam-focusing parameters will make it possible to increase the average cutting rate by a factor of 1.5 - 1.8. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  9. Gas chromatographic method fr determination of carbon in metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikol'skij, V.A.; Markov, V.K.; Evseeva, T.I.; Cherstvenkova, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Gas chromatographic device to determine carbon in metal uranium is developed. Burnout unite, permitting to load in the burnout tube simultaneously quite a few (up to 20) weight amounts of materials to be burned is a characteristic feature of the device. As a result amendments for control experiment and determination limit are decreased. The time of a single determination is also reduced. Conditions of carbon burn out from metal uranium are studied and temperature and time of complete extraction of carbon in the form of dioxide from weight amount into gaseous phase are established

  10. Gas porosity in metals and alloys irradiated by helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Korshunov, S.N.; Chernov, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of the development of gas porosity in metals and alloys during irradiation with helium ions up to high doses and during post-irradiation annealings, are reviewed. The main theoretical problems of the mechanisms of bubble formation and growth, the regularities and peculiarities of bubble development in a thin near-the surface layer during the introduction of helium with the energy of tens of kiloelectron volt, are considered

  11. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Leilei Wang; Jiaxiang Xue

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW), a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The e...

  12. The origin of the hot metal-poor gas in NGC 1291 - Testing the hypothesis of gas dynamics as the cause of the gas heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, [No Value; Freeman, K

    In this paper we test the idea that the low-metallicity hot gas in the centre of NGC 1291 is heated via a dynamical process. In this scenario, the gas from the outer gas-rich ring loses energy through bar-driven shocks and falls to the centre. Heating of the gas to X-ray temperatures comes from the

  13. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  14. Small metal particles and the ideal Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barma, Mustanpir

    1991-01-01

    Kubo's theoretical model of a small metal particle consists of a number of noninteraction electrons (an ideal Fermi gas) confined to a finite volume. By 'small' it meant that the size of the particle is intermediate between that of a few atoms cluster and the bulk solid, the radius of the particle being 5 to 50 Angstroms. The model is discussed and size dependence of various energy scales is studied. For a fermi gas confined in a sphere or a cube, two size-dependent energy scales are important. The inner scale δ is the mean spacing between successive energy levels. It governs the very low temperature behaviour. The outer scale Δ is associated with the shell structure when δ ≤T<Δ, thermodynamic properties show an oscillatory fluctuations around a smooth background as the size or energy is varied. (M.G.B.) 23 refs

  15. The removal of alkali metals from hot gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orjala, M.; Haukka, P. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Polttoaine- ja Polttotekniikan Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    In investigations in progress at the Fuel and Combustion Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland, we have been studying in co-operation with A. Ahlstrom Boiler Works, the removal of alkali metals from flue gases of ash-rich fuel with a dense suspension particle cooler. The applications of the particle cooler can be found in combined cycles and in industrial gas cleaning and heat recovery. We have also developed a general mathematical model of heat and mass transfer as well as chemical and physical reactions in multiphase systems.

  16. Narrow groove gas metal-arc welding of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The Gas Metal-Arc (GMA) welding process is explained and the equipment used described with an analysis of power supply function and the action of the arc, followed by discussion of general applications and problems. GMA braze welding of beryllium is then described, as is the development of a special high purity filler wire and a narrow deep groove joint design for improved weld strength in beryllium. This joint design and the special wire are applied in making high strength welds in high strength aluminum for special applications. High speed motion pictures of the welding operation are shown to illustrate the talk. (auth)

  17. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  18. SDSS-IV MaNGA: modelling the metallicity gradients of gas and stars - radially dependent metal outflow versus IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Parikh, Taniya; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Rong, Yu; Tang, Baitian; Yan, Renbin

    2018-05-01

    In our previous work, we found that only two scenarios are capable of reproducing the observed integrated mass-metallicity relations for the gas and stellar components of local star-forming galaxies simultaneously. One scenario invokes a time-dependent metal outflow loading factor with stronger outflows at early times. The other scenario uses a time-dependent initial mass function (IMF) slope with a steeper IMF at early times. In this work, we extend our study to investigate the radial profile of gas and stellar metallicity in local star-forming galaxies using spatially resolved spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. We find that most galaxies show negative gradients in both gas and stellar metallicity with steeper gradients in stellar metallicity. The stellar metallicity gradients tend to be mass dependent with steeper gradients in more massive galaxies while no clear mass dependence is found for the gas metallicity gradient. Then we compare the observations with the predictions from a chemical evolution model of the radial profiles of gas and stellar metallicities. We confirm that the two scenarios proposed in our previous work are also required to explain the metallicity gradients. Based on these two scenarios, we successfully reproduce the radial profiles of gas metallicity, stellar metallicity, stellar mass surface density, and star formation rate surface density simultaneously. The origin of the negative gradient in stellar metallicity turns out to be driven by either radially dependent metal outflow or IMF slope. In contrast, the radial dependence of the gas metallicity is less constrained because of the degeneracy in model parameters.

  19. Liquid metal-to-gas leak-detection instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlin, E.; Witherspoon, J.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable for liquid-metal-cooled reactors that small liquid metal-to-gas leaks be reliably detected. Testing has been performed on a number of detection systems to evaluate their sensitivity, response time, and performance characteristics. This testing has been scheduled in three phases. The first phase was aimed at screening out the least suitable detectors and optimizing the performance of the most promising. In the second phase, candidates were tested in a 1500 ft 3 walk-in type enclosure in which leaks were simulated on 24-in. and 3-in. piping. In the third phase of testing, selected type detectors were tested in the 1500-ft 3 enclosure with Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) pipe insulation configurations and detector tubing configuration with cell gas recirculation simulated. Endurance testing of detection equipment was also performed as part of this effort. Test results have been shown that aerosol-type detectors will reliably detect leaks as small as a few grams per hour when sampling pipe insulation annuli

  20. Modelling of gas-metal arc welding taking into account metal vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnick, M; Fuessel, U; Hertel, M; Haessler, M [Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Spille-Kohoff, A [CFX Berlin Software GmbH, Karl-Marx-Allee 90, 10243 Berlin (Germany); Murphy, A B [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2010-11-03

    The most advanced numerical models of gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) neglect vaporization of metal, and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as is also common practice for models of gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW). These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to GTAW arcs. However, spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to measurements of GTAW arcs, they have shown the presence of a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. This paper presents a GMAW model that takes into account metal vapour and that is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial distributions of temperature and electric current density. The influence of different values for the net radiative emission coefficient of iron vapour, which vary by up to a factor of hundred, is examined. It is shown that these net emission coefficients cause differences in the magnitudes, but not in the overall trends, of the radial distribution of temperature and current density. Further, the influence of the metal vaporization rate is investigated. We present evidence that, for higher vaporization rates, the central flow velocity inside the arc is decreased and can even change direction so that it is directed from the workpiece towards the wire, although the outer plasma flow is still directed towards the workpiece. In support of this thesis, we have attempted to reproduce the measurements of Zielinska et al for spray-transfer mode GMAW numerically, and have obtained reasonable agreement.

  1. Fatal chlorine gas exposure at a metal recycling facility: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Robert R; Boylstein, Randy; McCullough, Joel; Shumate, Alice; Yeoman, Kristin; Bailey, Rachel L; Cummings, Kristin J

    2018-04-12

    At least four workers at a metal recycling facility were hospitalized and one died after exposure to chlorine gas when it was accidentally released from an intact, closed-valved cylinder being processed for scrap metal. This unintentional chlorine gas release marks at least the third such incident at a metal recycling facility in the United States since 2010. We describe the fatal case of the worker whose clinical course was consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following exposure to high concentrations of chlorine gas. This case report emphasizes the potential risk of chlorine gas exposure to metal recycling workers by accepting and processing intact, closed-valved containers. The metal recycling industry should take steps to increase awareness of this established risk to prevent future chlorine gas releases. Additionally, public health practitioners and clinicians should be aware that metal recycling workers are at risk for chlorine gas exposure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Flue-gas-influenced heavy metal bioaccumulation by the indigenous microalgae Desmodesmus communis LUCC 002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisami, Swaminathan; Lee, Keesoo; Balakrishnan, Baskar; Nam, Paul Ki-souk

    2015-01-01

    Desmodesmus communis LUCC 002 was cultivated using flue gas originating from a coal-fired power plant as a carbon dioxide (CO2) source. The flue gas contains various heavy metals. For investigating the fate of flue-gas-introduced metals on the cultivation system, bioaccumulation was measured in the microalgal biomass and milieu. The accumulated biomass was found to contain eight heavy metals: arsenic, chromium, barium, lead, selenium, silver, cadmium, and mercury. High heavy metal accumulations were also found in the control group of algae grown without the addition of flue gas at the same location. Further testing revealed that some of the heavy metals originated from well water used in the cultivation. The flue-gas-influenced bioaccumulation pattern of different heavy metals was observed. The responses of individual heavy metals and the influence of well water microbial flora on the algal growth were investigated, this study showed that hormesis was developed by the D. communis LUCC 002.

  3. Metallicity inhomogeneities in local star-forming galaxies as a sign of recent metal-poor gas accretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    We measure the oxygen metallicity of the ionized gas along the major axis of seven dwarf star-forming galaxies. Two of them, SDSSJ1647+21 and SDSSJ2238+14, show ≅0.5 dex metallicity decrements in inner regions with enhanced star formation activity. This behavior is similar to the metallicity drop observed in a number of local tadpole galaxies by Sánchez Almeida et al., and was interpreted as showing early stages of assembling in disk galaxies, with the star formation sustained by external metal-poor gas accretion. The agreement with tadpoles has several implications. (1) It proves that galaxies other than the local tadpoles present the same unusual metallicity pattern. (2) Our metallicity inhomogeneities were inferred using the direct method, thus discarding systematic errors usually attributed to other methods. (3) Taken together with the tadpole data, our findings suggest a threshold around one-tenth the solar value for the metallicity drops to show up. Although galaxies with clear metallicity drops are rare, the physical mechanism responsible for them may sustain a significant part of the star formation activity in the local universe. We argue that the star formation dependence of the mass-metallicity relationship, as well as other general properties followed by most local disk galaxies, is naturally interpreted as side effects of pristine gas infall. Alternatives to the metal-poor gas accretion are examined as well.

  4. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto J. Gregory

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Temperatures of hot section components in today’s gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today’s engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire thermocouples.

  5. Perspective on Double Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy welding suffers from problems such as solidification cracking and hydrogen-induced porosity, which are sufficiently severe to limit its potential applications. Because mitigated porosity incidence and solidification cracking are observed in aluminum welds using double pulsed gas metal arc welding (DP-GMAW, a comprehensive review of the mechanism is necessary, but absent from the literature. The oscillation of arc force and droplet pressure causes a weld pool stir effect. The expansion and shrinkage of the weld pool cause unusual remelting and resolidification of the previously solidified metal. DP-GMAW has an increased solidification growth rate and cooling rate, compared with conventional pulsed welding at same heat input. Both numerical and experimental results reveal the remarkable concept that refined microstructure in the fusion zone is obtained by using DP-GMAW. The mechanism of microstructural refinement is revealed as a weld pool stir effect and increased cooling rate. Hydrogen bubbles easily float out and then release from the weld pool originated from the weld pool stir effect. Reduced solidification cracking is achieved due to the refined solidification structure that originated from the increased cooling rate. The advantages, evolution process, and future trend of DP-GMAW are discussed.

  6. Liquid-metal-gas heat exchanger for HTGR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werth, G.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of a liquid metal heat exchanger (HE) for a helium-cooled high temperature reactor. A tube-type heat exchanger is considered as well as two direct exchangers: a bubble-type heat exchanger and a heat exchanger according to the spray principle. Experiments are made in order to determine the gas content of bubble-type heat exchangers, the dependence of the droplet diameter on the nozzle diameter, the falling speed of the droplets, the velocity of the liquid jet, and the temperature variation of liquid jets. The computer codes developed for HE calculation are structured so that they may be used for gas/liquid HE, too. Each type of HE that is dealt with is designed by accousting for a technical and an economic assessment. The liquid-lead jet spray is preferred to all other types because of its small space occupied and its simple design. It shall be used in near future in the HTR by the name of lead/helium HE. (GL) [de

  7. Photoluminescent properties of complex metal oxide nanopowders for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovhyra, R. V.; Mudry, S. I.; Popovych, D. I.; Savka, S. S.; Serednytski, A. S.; Venhryn, Yu. I.

    2018-03-01

    This work carried out research on the features of photoluminescence of the mixed and complex metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO/TiO2, ZnO/SnO2, Zn2SiO4) in vacuum and gaseous ambient. The nanopowders were obtained using pulsed laser reactive technology. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis for their sizes, shapes and collocation. The influence of gas environment on the photoluminescence intensity was investigated. A change of ambient gas composition leads to a rather significant change in the intensity of the photoluminescence spectrum and its deformation. The most significant changes in the photoluminescent spectrum were observed for mixed ZnO/TiO2 nanopowders. This obviously is the result of a redistribution of existing centers of luminescence and the appearance of new adsorption centers of luminescence on the surface of nanopowders. The investigated nanopowders can be effectively used as sensing materials for the construction of the multi-component photoluminescent sensing matrix.

  8. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  9. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  10. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  11. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Amorín, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Ascasibar, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: jos@iac.es [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  12. Gauging Metallicity of Diffuse Gas under an Uncertain Ionizing Radiation Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Zahedy, Fakhri S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Johnson, Sean D. [Department of Astrophysics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Rauch, Michael; Mulchaey, John S., E-mail: hchen@oddjob.uchicago.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Gas metallicity is a key quantity used to determine the physical conditions of gaseous clouds in a wide range of astronomical environments, including interstellar and intergalactic space. In particular, considerable effort in circumgalactic medium (CGM) studies focuses on metallicity measurements because gas metallicity serves as a critical discriminator for whether the observed heavy ions in the CGM originate in chemically enriched outflows or in more chemically pristine gas accreted from the intergalactic medium. However, because the gas is ionized, a necessary first step in determining CGM metallicity is to constrain the ionization state of the gas which, in addition to gas density, depends on the ultraviolet background radiation field (UVB). While it is generally acknowledged that both the intensity and spectral slope of the UVB are uncertain, the impact of an uncertain spectral slope has not been properly addressed in the literature. This Letter shows that adopting a different spectral slope can result in an order of magnitude difference in the inferred CGM metallicity. Specifically, a harder UVB spectrum leads to a higher estimated gas metallicity for a given set of observed ionic column densities. Therefore, such systematic uncertainties must be folded into the error budget for metallicity estimates of ionized gas. An initial study shows that empirical diagnostics are available for discriminating between hard and soft ionizing spectra. Applying these diagnostics helps reduce the systematic uncertainties in CGM metallicity estimates.

  13. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both

  14. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  15. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  16. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-11-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding ( P size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000-18,000 and 560-320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace exposure to nanoparticles.

  17. Volcanic gas composition, metal dispersion and deposition during explosive volcanic eruptions on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renggli, C. J.; King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Norman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    The transport of metals in volcanic gases on the Moon differs greatly from their transport on the Earth because metal speciation depends largely on gas composition, temperature, pressure and oxidation state. We present a new thermochemical model for the major and trace element composition of lunar volcanic gas during pyroclastic eruptions of picritic magmas calculated at 200-1500 °C and over 10-9-103 bar. Using published volatile component concentrations in picritic lunar glasses, we have calculated the speciation of major elements (H, O, C, Cl, S and F) in the coexisting volcanic gas as the eruption proceeds. The most abundant gases are CO, H2, H2S, COS and S2, with a transition from predominantly triatomic gases to diatomic gases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures. Hydrogen occurs as H2, H2S, H2S2, HCl, and HF, with H2 making up 0.5-0.8 mol fractions of the total H. Water (H2O) concentrations are at trace levels, which implies that H-species other than H2O need to be considered in lunar melts and estimates of the bulk lunar composition. The Cl and S contents of the gas control metal chloride gas species, and sulfide gas and precipitated solid species. We calculate the speciation of trace metals (Zn, Ga, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe) in the gas phase, and also the pressure and temperature conditions at which solids form from the gas. During initial stages of the eruption, elemental gases are the dominant metal species. As the gas loses heat, chloride and sulfide species become more abundant. Our chemical speciation model is applied to a lunar pyroclastic eruption model with isentropic gas decompression. The relative abundances of the deposited metal-bearing solids with distance from the vent are predicted for slow cooling rates (gas speciation model is compared with the speciation of a H2O-, CO2- and Cl-rich volcanic gas from Erta Ale volcano (Ethiopia) as an analogy for more oxidized planetary eruptions. In the terrestrial Cl-rich gas the metals are

  18. Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding of API X80 Steel Linepipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding process with high welding production efficiency was used to join the girth weld seam of API X80 steel linepipe of 18.4 mm wall thickness and 1422 mm diameter. The macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, and electrochemical corrosion behavior of welded joints were studied. Effects of temperature and Cl− concentration on the corrosion behavior of base metal and weld metal were investigated. Results show that the welded joint has good morphology, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of both the base metal and the weld metal decreases with increasing temperature or Cl− concentration. In the solution with high Cl− concentration, the base metal and weld metal are more susceptible to pitting. The corrosion resistance of the weld metal is slightly lower than that of the base metal.

  19. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  20. Development of indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer for producing metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.K.; Qasim, A.M.; Ahmed, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gas atomization is one of the methods for production of clean metal powders at relatively moderate cost. A laboratory scale gas atomizer was designed and fabricated indigenously to produce metal powders with a batch capacity of 500 g of copper (Cu). The design includes several features regarding fabrication and operation to provide optimum conditions for atomization. The inner diameter of atomizing chamber is 440 mm and its height is 1200 mm. The atomizing nozzle is of annular confined convergent type with an angle of 25 degree. Argon gas at desired pressure has been used for atomizing the metals to produce relatively clean powders. A provision has also been made to view the atomization process. The indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer was used to produce tin (Sn) and copper (Cu) powders with different atomizing gas pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. The particle size of different powders produced ranges from 40 to 400 im. (author)

  1. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS AISI 1005, finite-element...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  2. Support effects and catalytic trends for water gas shift activity of transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Astrid; Janssens, T.V.W.; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    Water gas shift activity measurements for 12 transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Ir, Pt, Au) supported on inert MgAl2O4 and Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 are presented, to elucidate the influence of the active metal and the support. The activity is related to the adsorption energy of molecular...

  3. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    ARL-TR-7515 ● NOV 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum by John F...Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum by John F Chinella Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL Nick Kapustka and...

  4. Microbial aspects of synthesis gas fed bioreactors treating sulfate and metal rich wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van B.H.G.W.

    2006-01-01

    The use of synthesis gas fed sulfate-reducing bioreactors to simultaneously remove both oxidized sulfur compounds and metals shows great potential to treat wastewaters generated as a result of flue gas scrubbing, mining activities and galvanic processes. Detailed information about the phylogenetic

  5. Metallicity inhomogeneities in local star-forming galaxies as sign of recent metal-poor gas accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, J. Sanchez; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Mendez-Abreu, J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was partly funded by the Spanish Ministry for Science, project AYA 2010-21887-C04-04. J.M.A. acknowledges support from the European Research Council Starting Grant (SEDmorph; P.I. V. Wild). We measure the oxygen metallicity of the ionized gas along the major axis of seven dwarf star-forming galaxies. Two of them, SDSSJ1647+21 and SDSSJ2238+14, show ≃0.5 dex metallicity decrements in inner regions with enhanced star formation activity. This behavior is similar to the metallicity d...

  6. Steady-state fission gas behavior in uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.G.; Wazzan, A.R.; Okrent, D.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of fission gas release and induced swelling in steady state irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels is developed and computer coded. The code is used to simulate, with fair success, some gas release and induced swelling data obtained under the IFR program. It is determined that fuel microstructural changes resulting from zirconium migration, anisotropic swelling, and thermal variations are major factors affecting swelling and gas release behavior. (orig.)

  7. HOT CELL SYSTEM FOR DETERMINING FISSION GAS RETENTION IN METALLIC FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sell, D. A.; Baily, C. E.; Malewitz, T. J.; Medvedev, P. G.; Porter, D. L.; Hilton, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    A system has been developed to perform measurements on irradiated, sodium bonded-metallic fuel elements to determine the amount of fission gas retained in the fuel material after release of the gas to the element plenum. During irradiation of metallic fuel elements, most of the fission gas developed is released from the fuel and captured in the gas plenums of the fuel elements. A significant amount of fission gas, however, remains captured in closed porosities which develop in the fuel during irradiation. Additionally, some gas is trapped in open porosity but sealed off from the plenum by frozen bond sodium after the element has cooled in the hot cell. The Retained fission Gas (RFG) system has been designed, tested and implemented to capture and measure the quantity of retained fission gas in characterized cut pieces of sodium bonded metallic fuel. Fuel pieces are loaded into the apparatus along with a prescribed amount of iron powder, which is used to create a relatively low melting, eutectic composition as the iron diffuses into the fuel. The apparatus is sealed, evacuated, and then heated to temperatures in excess of the eutectic melting point. Retained fission gas release is monitored by pressure transducers during the heating phase, thus monitoring for release of fission gas as first the bond sodium melts and then the fuel. A separate hot cell system is used to sample the gas in the apparatus and also characterize the volume of the apparatus thus permitting the calculation of the total fission gas release from the fuel element samples along with analysis of the gas composition.

  8. Alkylamine functionalized metal-organic frameworks for composite gas separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; McDonald, Thomas M.; D' Alessandro, Deanna M.

    2018-01-09

    Functionalized metal-organic framework adsorbents with ligands containing basic nitrogen groups such as alkylamines and alkyldiamines appended to the metal centers and method of isolating carbon dioxide from a stream of combined gases and carbon dioxide partial pressures below approximately 1 and 1000 mbar. The adsorption material has an isosteric heat of carbon dioxide adsorption of greater than -60 kJ/mol at zero coverage using a dual-site Langmuir model.

  9. Suppression of globular cluster formation in metal-poor gas clouds by Lyman α radiation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makito; Yajima, Hidenobu

    2018-03-01

    We study the impact of Ly α radiation feedback on globular cluster (GC) formation. In this Letter, we analytically derive the relation between star formation efficiency (SFE) and metallicity in spherical clouds with the Ly α radiation feedback. Our models show that the SFE becomes small as the metallicity decreases. In metal-poor gas clouds, Ly α photons are trapped for a long time and exert strong radiation force to the gas, resulting in the suppression of star formation. We find that bound star clusters (SFE ≳ 0.5) form only for the metallicity higher than ˜ 10- 2.5 Z⊙ in the case with the initial cloud mass 105 M⊙ and the radius 5 pc. Our models successfully reproduce the lower bound of observed metallicity of GCs. Thus, we suggest that the Ly α radiation feedback can be essential in understanding the formation of GCs.

  10. DOE mixed waste metals partition in a rotary kiln wet off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.B.; Looper, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    In 1996, the Savannah River Site plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. Test burns were conducted using surrogate CIF wastes spiked with hazardous metals and organics. The partition of metals between the kiln bottom ash, scrubber blowdown solution, and stack gas was measured as a function of kiln temperature, waste chloride content, and waste form (liquid or solid). Three waste simulants were used in these tests, a high and low chloride solid waste mix (paper, plastic, latex, PVC), and a liquid waste mix (benzene and chlorobenzene). An aqueous solution containing: antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, and thallium was added to the waste to determine metals fate under various combustion conditions. Test results were used to divide the metals into three general groups, volatile, semi-volatile, and nonvolatile metals. Mercury was the only volatile metal. No mercury remained in the kiln bottom ash under any incineration condition. Lead, cadmium, thallium, and silver exhibited semi-volatile behavior. The partition between the kiln ash, blowdown, and stack gas depended on incineration conditions. Chromium, nickel, barium, antimony, and arsenic exhibited nonvolatile behavior, with greater than 90 wt % of the metal remaining in the kiln bottom ash. Incineration temperature had a significant effect on the partition of volatile and semi-volatile metals, and no effect on nonvolatile metal partition. As incineration temperatures were increased, the fraction of metal leaving the kiln increased. Three metals, lead, cadmium, and mercury showed a relationship between chloride concentration in the waste and metals partition. Increasing the concentration of chlorides in the waste or burning liquid waste versus solid waste resulted in a larger fraction of metal exiting the kiln

  11. Method for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas, device for removing heavy metal and nitrogen oxides from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hann-Sheng; Livengood, Charles David

    1997-12-01

    A method for the simultaneous removal of oxides and heavy metals from a fluid is provided comprising combining the fluid with compounds containing alkali and sulfur to create a mixture; spray drying the mixture to create a vapor phase and a solid phase; and isolating the vapor phase from the solid phase. A device is also provided comprising a means for spray-drying flue gas with alkali-sulfide containing liquor at a temperature sufficient to cause the flue gas to react with the compounds so as to create a gaseous fraction and a solid fraction and a means for directing the gaseous fraction to a fabric filter.

  12. Thermal stress analysis of a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed to enable improved engine performance is studied. Flexible numerical analysis schemes suitable for the determination of transient temperature profiles and thermal stress distributions in the seal are outlined. An estimation of the stresses to which a test seal is subjected during simulated engine deceleration from sea level takeoff to idle conditions is made. Experimental evidence has indicated that the surface layer of the seal is probably subjected to excessive tensile stresses during cyclic temperature loading. This assertion is supported by the analytical results presented. Brief consideration is given to means of mitigating this adverse stressing.

  13. Gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Yun, Hyeonsang; Kim, Dongcheol; Kang, Munjin; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-01-01

    The gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic (MART) steel was evaluated using both inverter direct current (DC) and DC pulse power type welders, under conditions of different welding currents, welding speeds, and shielding gasses. By investigating the bead appearance, tensile strength, and arc stability, it was determined that DC pulse power is better than inverter DC power for arc welding of 1.3 mm thick 1.5 GPa grade MART steel. Further, from the results of the weldability for various shielding gases, it was determined that mixed shielding gas is more effective for welding 1.5 GPa grade MART steel than is pure inert gas (Ar) or active (CO2) gas. In the case of pure shielding gas, no sound bead was formed under any conditions. However, when the mixed shielding gas was used, sound and fine beads were obtained.

  14. Determination of nitrogen and oxygen in uranium metal by inert-gas fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carden, W.F.

    1979-12-01

    An improved analytical method has been developed using inert-gas fusion for determining the nitrogen and the oxygen contents of uranium metal. The analytical method is applicable to concentrations of nitrogen and oxygen ranging from 1 microgram per gram to 1000 micrograms per gram for each gas. In uranium metal, the limit of error for a single determination at the 95%-confidence level, at the 12-micrograms-per-gram-nitrogen level, is +-3 micrograms per gram nitrogen and, at the 20-micrograms-per-gram-oxygen level, is +-3 micrograms per gram oxygen. Nitrogen and oxygen concentrations are determined by using a nitrogen-oxygen determinator

  15. Method and apparatus for selective capture of gas phase analytes using metal .beta.-diketonate polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Scott D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-06-21

    A process and sensor device are disclosed that employ metal .beta.-diketonate polymers to selectively capture gas-phase explosives and weaponized chemical agents in a sampling area or volume. The metal .beta.-diketonate polymers can be applied to surfaces in various analytical formats for detection of: improvised explosive devices, unexploded ordinance, munitions hidden in cargo holds, explosives, and chemical weapons in public areas.

  16. Theory meets experiment: Gas-phase chemistry of coinage metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, J.; Schröder, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 253, 5/6 (2009), s. 666-677 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550704; GA ČR GA203/08/1487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : catalysis * coinage metals * copper * gold * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.225, year: 2009

  17. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [ALCOA Specialty Metals Division, 100 Technical Drive, Alcoa Center, PA 15069 (United States)]. E-mail: jason.ting@alcoa.com; Connor, Jeffery [Material Science Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Ridder, Stephen [Metallurgical Processing Group, NIST, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8556, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2005-01-15

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images.

  18. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Jason; Connor, Jeffery; Ridder, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images

  19. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H 2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 o C at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  20. Influence of Ambient Gas on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Uranium Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dacheng; Ma Xinwen; Wang Shulong; Zhu Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is regarded as a suitable method for the remote analysis of materials in any phase, even in an environment with high radiation levels. In the present work we used the third harmonic pulse of a Nd:YAG laser for ablation of uranium metal and measured the plasma emission with a fiber-optic spectrometer. The LIBS spectra of uranium metal and their features in different ambient gases (i.e., argon, neon, oxygen, and nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure were studied. Strong continuum spectrum and several hundreds of emission lines from UI and UII were observed. It is found that the continuum spectrum observed in uranium not only comes from bremsstrahlung emission but is also due to the complex spectrum of uranium. The influence of ambient gas and the gas flow rate for ablation of uranium metal was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the uranium lines was enhanced in argon and nitrogen. However, the intensity of uranium lines was decreased in oxygen due to the generation of UO and other oxides. The results also showed that the highest intensity of uranium lines were obtained in argon gas with a gas flow rate above 2.5 L/min. The enhanced mechanism in ambient gas and the influence of the gas flow rate were analyzed in this work. (paper)

  1. Determinants of occupational exposure to metals by gas metal arc welding and risk management measures: a biomonitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoons, Renaud; Arnoux, Damien; Monssu, Théodora; Culié, Olivier; Roche, Gaëlle; Duffaud, Béatrice; Chalaye, Denis; Maitre, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Welding fumes contain various toxic metals including chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and manganese (Mn). An assessment of the risk to health of local and systemic exposure to welding fumes requires the assessment of both external and internal doses. The aims of this study were to test the relevance in small and medium sized enterprises of a biomonitoring strategy based on urine spot-samples, to characterize the factors influencing the internal doses of metals in gas metal arc welders and to recommend effective risk management measures. 137 welders were recruited and urinary levels of metals were measured by ICP-MS on post-shift samples collected at the end of the working week. Cr, Ni and Mn mean concentrations (respectively 0.43, 1.69 and 0.27 μg/g creatinine) were well below occupational health guidance values, but still higher than background levels observed in the general population, confirming the absorption of metals generated in welding fumes. Both welding parameters (nature of base metal, welding technique) and working conditions (confinement, welding and grinding durations, mechanical ventilation and welding experience) were predictive of occupational exposure. Our results confirm the interest of biomonitoring for assessing health risks and recommending risk management measures for welders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  3. "Dark galaxies" and local very metal-poor gas-rich galaxies: possible interrelations

    OpenAIRE

    Pustilnik, Simon A.

    2007-01-01

    There are only a few ``dark galaxy'' candidates discovered to date in the local Universe. One of the most prominent of them is the SW component of a merging system HI 1225+01. On the other hand, the number of known very metal-poor gas-rich dwarfs similar to IZw18 and SBS 0335-052 E,W has grown drastically during the last decade, from a dozen and a half to about five dozen. Many of them are very gas-rich, having from ~90 to 99% of all baryons in gas. For some of such objects that have the deep...

  4. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  5. Trends in low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity on transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Boisen, Astrid; Dahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity trends on transition metals were investigated with the use of a microkinetic model based on a redox mechanism. It is established that the adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen can describe to a large extent changes in the remaining activation...

  6. Gas Sensors Based on One Dimensional Nanostructured Metal-Oxides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. M. A. Haseeb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently one dimensional (1-D nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, In2O3, WOx, AgVO3, CdO, MoO3, CuO, TeO2 and Fe2O3. Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research.

  7. Binding of noble metal clusters with rare gas atoms: theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Zahra; Far, Maryam Fakhraei; Maghari, Ali

    2012-12-27

    Binding of noble metal clusters (M(n), M = Cu, Ag, and Au; n = 2-4) with rare gas atoms (Rg = Kr, Xe, and Rn) has been investigated at the density functional (CAM-B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2) levels of theory. The calculation shows significant affinity of neutral metal clusters for interaction with rare gas atoms. The binding energies indicate that gold clusters have the highest and silver clusters have the lowest affinity for interaction with rare gas atoms, and for the same metal clusters, there is a continuous increase in E(b) from Kr to Rn. The M-Rg bonding mechanism have been interpreted by means of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO), and energy decomposition analysis (EDA). According to these theories, the M-Rg bonds are found to be partially electrostatic and partially covalent. EDA results identify that these bonds have less than 40% covalent character and more than 60% electrostatic, and also NBO calculations predict the amount of charge transfer from the lone pair of rare gas to σ* and n*orbitals of metal clusters.

  8. Removal of chlorine gas by an amine functionalized metal-organic framework via electrophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, Jared B; Browe, Matthew A; Wagner, George W; Rossin, Joseph A; Peterson, Gregory W

    2015-08-11

    Here we report the removal of chlorine gas from air via a reaction with an amine functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF). It is found that UiO-66-NH2 has the ability to remove 1.24 g of Cl2 per g of MOF via an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction producing HCl, which is subsequently neutralized by the MOF.

  9. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    These instructional materials are designed to improve instruction in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW). The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and…

  10. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  11. Environmental security control of resource utilization of shale gas' drilling cuttings containing heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Qiang; Lin, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Chun; Mei, Xu-Dong

    2017-09-01

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate the heavy metals environmental security control of resource utilization of shale gas' drilling cuttings. To achieve this objective, we got through theoretical calculation and testing, ultimately and preliminarily determine the content of heavy metals pollutants, and compared with related standards at domestically and abroad. The results indicated that using the second Fike's law, the theoretical model of the release amount of heavy metal can be made, and the groundwater environmental risk as main point compared with soil. This study can play a role of standard guidance on environmental security control of drilling cuttings resource utilization by the exploration and development of shale gas in our country.

  12. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek, Mohd Zaidi; Kamarudin, Muhammad Syahidan

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m 2 K. (paper)

  13. Development and Creating of Gas-Sensor System Based on Low Dimensional Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovhyra, R.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of photoluminescent properties of metal oxide nanopowders (ZnO, TiO2, SnO2, WO3 including laser-modified and surface doped by impurities (Au, Ag, Pt, Ni, Cu, Sn, in gases (О2, N2, H2, CO, CO2 were studied. Nature of sensor properties of the metal oxide nanopowders (adsorption capacity, speed, sensitivity, selectivity were established; the best structure and materials for the development of a multicomponent recording matrix were selected. The efficiency of the constructed sensor system for the gases’ and their mixtures detection and analysis was found. The developed gas sensor system allows detecting not only separate gas components, but their mixture with high sensitivity and selectivity, providing the possibility to reach the modern level of the formation of gas sensor systems with improved performance.

  14. High temperature metallic materials for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The Specialists' Meeting was organized in conjunction with an earlier meeting on this topic held in Vienna, Austria, 1981, which provided for a comprehensive review of the status of materials development and testing at that time and for a description of test facilities. This meeting provided an opportunity (1) to review and discuss the progress made since 1981 in the development, testing and qualification of high temperature metallic materials, (2) to critically assess results achieved, and (3) to give directions for future research and development programmes. In particular, the meeting provided a form for a close interaction between component designers and materials specialists. The meeting was attended by 48 participants from France, People's Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Poland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USSR and USA presenting 22 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Components Design and Testing - Implications for Materials (4 papers); Microstructure and Environmental Compatibility (4 papers); Mechanical Properties (9 papers); New Alloys and Developments (6 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. This volume contains all papers presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Gas and dust from solar metallicity AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, P.; Karakas, A.; Dell'Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.

    2018-04-01

    We study the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution of stars with masses between 1 M⊙and8.5 M⊙. We focus on stars with a solar chemical composition, which allows us to interpret evolved stars in the Galaxy. We present a detailed comparison with models of the same chemistry, calculated with a different evolution code and based on a different set of physical assumptions. We find that stars of mass ≥3.5 M⊙ experience hot bottom burning at the base of the envelope. They have AGB lifetimes shorter than ˜3 × 105 yr and eject into their surroundings gas contaminated by proton-capture nucleosynthesis, at an extent sensitive to the treatment of convection. Low-mass stars with 1.5 M⊙ ≤ M ≤ 3 M⊙ become carbon stars. During the final phases, the C/O ratio grows to ˜3. We find a remarkable agreement between the two codes for the low-mass models and conclude that predictions for the physical and chemical properties of these stars, and the AGB lifetime, are not that sensitive to the modelling of the AGB phase. The dust produced is also dependent on the mass: low-mass stars produce mainly solid carbon and silicon carbide dust, whereas higher mass stars produce silicates and alumina dust. Possible future observations potentially able to add more robustness to the present results are also discussed.

  16. Gas phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of arginine and arginine dipeptides complexed with alkali metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Laura A; Marzluff, Elaine M

    2011-08-25

    The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated and alkali-metal cationized Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg peptides with D(2)O in the gas phase was studied using electrospray ionization quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry. The Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg alkali metal complexes exchange significantly more hydrogens than protonated Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg. We propose a mechanism where the peptide shifts between a zwitterionic salt bridge and nonzwitterionic charge solvated conformations. The increased rate of H/D exchange of the alkali metal complexes is attributed to the peptide metal complexes' small energy difference between the salt-bridge conformation and the nonzwitterionic charge-solvated conformation. Implications for the applicability of this mechanism to other zwitterionic systems are discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Investigation on cold fusion phenomena using gas-metal loading experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Bertolini, G.; Vocino, V.; Parnisari, E.; Ronsecco, C.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that tritium is produced in deuterated titanium. The data obtained are highly scattered and non reproducible. In order to try to define better the phenomenon a series of tests have been performed using various metals and alloys and different deuterating conditions. Sheets and shavings of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr 5O% alloy have been tested. The tritium production is obtained as a difference of the tritium content in the deuterated metal and the initial content of tritium in the deuterium gas. The amount of tritium produced is low and reproducibility is rather poor. A statistical analysis shows that significant differences are obtained varying the type of metal used. In general the tritium production increases with the atomic number of the metal. Moreover significantly higher productions of tritium have been obtained using materials of technical purity as tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr alloy

  18. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  19. Conductometric gas sensors based on metal oxides modified with gold nanoparticles: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotcenkov, Ghenadii; Cho, Beong K.; Brinzari, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This review (with 170 refs.) discusses approaches towards surface functionalizaton of metal oxides by gold nanoparticles, and the application of the resulting nanomaterials in resistive gas sensors. The articles is subdivided into sections on (a) methods for modification of metal oxides with gold nanoparticles; (b) the response of gold nanoparticle-modified metal oxide sensors to gaseous species, (c) a discussion of the limitations of such sensors, and (d) a discussion on future tasks and trends along with an outlook. It is shown that, in order to achieve significant improvements in sensor parameters, it is necessary to warrant a good control the size and density of gold nanoparticles on the surface of metal oxide crystallites, the state of gold in the cluster, and the properties of the metal oxide support. Current challenges include an improved reproducibility of sensor preparation, better long-term stabilities, and a better resistance to sintering and poisoning of gold clusters during operation. Additional research focused on better understanding the role of gold clusters and nanoparticles in gas-sensing effects is also required. (author)

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yao; Wang Wenjing; Xie Jijia; Sun Shouguang; Wang Liang; Qian Ye; Meng Yuan; Wei Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. ► GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. ► GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  1. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  2. Carbon Formation and Metal Dusting in Hot-Gas Cleanup Systems of Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, Peter F.; Judkins, Roddie R.; DeVan, Jackson H.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-12-31

    There are several possible materials/systems degradation modes that result from gasification environments with appreciable carbon activities. These processes, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, include carbon deposition, carburization, metal dusting, and CO disintegration of refractories. Carbon formation on solid surfaces occurs by deposition from gases in which the carbon activity (a sub C) exceeds unity. The presence of a carbon layer CO can directly affect gasifier performance by restricting gas flow, particularly in the hot gas filter, creating debris (that may be deposited elsewhere in the system or that may cause erosive damage of downstream components), and/or changing the catalytic activity of surfaces.

  3. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  4. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: yasu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  5. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R rapid 〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R rapid 〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  6. Metal Oxides Doped PPY-PVA Blend Thin Films Based Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. DUPARE

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of metal oxides doped polypyrrole–polyvinyl alcohol blend thin films by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization, using microwave oven on glass substrate for development of Ammonia and Trimethyl ammine hazardous gas sensor. The all experimental process carried out at room temperature(304 K. These polymer materials were characterized by Chemical analyses, spectral studies (UV-visible and IR and conductivity measurement by four –probe technique. The surface morphology as observed in the SEM image was observed to be uniformly covering the entire substrate surface. The sensor was used for different concentration (ppm of TMA and Ammonia gas investigation at room temperature (304 k. This study found to possess improved electrical, mechanical and environmental stability metal oxides doped PPY-PVA films.

  7. Modeling nanoscale gas sensors under realistic conditions: Computational screening of metal-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Mowbray, Duncan; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    We use computational screening to systematically investigate the use of transition-metal-doped carbon nanotubes for chemical-gas sensing. For a set of relevant target molecules (CO, NH3, and H2S) and the main components of air (N2, O2, and H2O), we calculate the binding energy and change in condu......We use computational screening to systematically investigate the use of transition-metal-doped carbon nanotubes for chemical-gas sensing. For a set of relevant target molecules (CO, NH3, and H2S) and the main components of air (N2, O2, and H2O), we calculate the binding energy and change...... the change in the nanotube resistance per doping site as a function of the target molecule concentration assuming charge transport in the diffusive regime. Our analysis points to Ni-doped nanotubes as candidates for CO sensors working under typical atmospheric conditions....

  8. The mass-metallicity relations for gas and stars in star-forming galaxies: strong outflow versus variable IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jianhui; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Ventura, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the mass-metallicity relations for the gaseous (MZRgas) and stellar components (MZRstar) of local star-forming galaxies based on a representative sample from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. The mass-weighted average stellar metallicities are systematically lower than the gas metallicities. This difference in metallicity increases towards galaxies with lower masses and reaches 0.4-0.8 dex at 109 M⊙ (depending on the gas metallicity calibration). As a result, the MZRstar is much steeper than the MZRgas. The much lower metallicities in stars compared to the gas in low-mass galaxies imply dramatic metallicity evolution with suppressed metal enrichment at early times. The aim of this paper is to explain the observed large difference in gas and stellar metallicity and to infer the origin of the mass-metallicity relations. To this end we develop a galactic chemical evolution model accounting for star formation, gas inflow and outflow. By combining the observed mass-metallicity relation for both gas and stellar components to constrain the models, we find that only two scenarios are able to reproduce the observations. Either strong metal outflow or a steep initial mass function (IMF) slope at early epochs of galaxy evolution is needed. Based on these two scenarios, for the first time we successfully reproduce the observed MZRgas and MZRstar simultaneously, together with other independent observational constraints in the local Universe. Our model also naturally reproduces the flattening of the MZRgas at the high-mass end leaving the MZRstar intact, as seen in observational data.

  9. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline metal oxide powders produced by thermal decomposition and mechanochemical processing

    OpenAIRE

    Kersen, Ülo

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research, was the synthesis of LaFeO3 and SnO2 fine powders for the subsequent preparation of thick film gas sensors. On producing fine metal oxide powders, often it is not possible to ensure separation of the particles during the synthesis, resulting in the formation of highly agglomerated material. In addition, there are often high synthetic costs associated with the powders obtained by these methods. Thermal decomposition and mechanochemical processing methods wer...

  10. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shie...

  11. Galactocentric variation of the gas-to-dust ratio and its relation with metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetti, A.; Leurini, S.; König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Pillai, T.; Brand, J.; Kauffmann, J.; Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The assumption of a gas-to-dust mass ratio γ is a common approach to estimate the basic properties of molecular clouds, such as total mass and column density of molecular hydrogen, from (sub)mm continuum observations of the dust. In the Milky Way a single value is used at all galactocentric radii, independently of the observed metallicity gradients. Both models and extragalactic observations suggest that this quantity increases for decreasing metallicity Z, typical of the outer regions in disks, where fewer heavy elements are available to form dust grains. Aims: We aim to investigate the variation of the gas-to-dust ratio as a function of galactocentric radius and metallicity, to allow a more accurate characterisation of the quantity of molecular gas across the galactic disk, as derived from observations of the dust. Methods: Observations of the optically thin C18O (2-1) transition were obtained with the APEX telescope for a sample of 23 massive and dense star-forming regions in the far outer Galaxy (galactocentric distance greater than 14 kpc). From the modelling of this line and of the spectral energy distribution of the selected clumps we computed the gas-to-dust ratio and compared it to that of well-studied sources from the ATLASGAL TOP100 sample in the inner galactic disk. Results: The gradient in γ is found to be 0.087+0.047-0.025 dex kpc-1 (or equivalently γ ∝ Z-1.4+0.3-1.0). The dust-to-metal ratio, decreases with galactocentric radius, which is the most common situation also for external late-type galaxies. This suggests that grain growth dominates over destruction. The predicted γ is in excellent agreement with the estimates in Magellanic clouds, for the appropriate value of Z.

  12. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the + grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  13. Metal-oxide-semiconductor based gas sensors: screening, preparation, and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Ziyu; Zeng, Dawen; Xie, Changsheng

    2017-03-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) based gas sensors have been considered a promising candidate for gas detection over the past few years. However, the sensing properties of MOS-based gas sensors also need to be further enhanced to satisfy the higher requirements for specific applications, such as medical diagnosis based on human breath, gas detection in harsh environments, etc. In these fields, excellent selectivity, low power consumption, a fast response/recovery rate, low humidity dependence and a low limit of detection concentration should be fulfilled simultaneously, which pose great challenges to the MOS-based gas sensors. Recently, in order to improve the sensing performances of MOS-based gas sensors, more and more researchers have carried out extensive research from theory to practice. For a similar purpose, on the basis of the whole fabrication process of gas sensors, this review gives a presentation of the important role of screening and the recent developments in high throughput screening. Subsequently, together with the sensing mechanism, the factors influencing the sensing properties of MOSs involved in material preparation processes were also discussed in detail. It was concluded that the sensing properties of MOSs not only depend on the morphological structure (particle size, morphology, pore size, etc.), but also rely on the defect structure and heterointerface structure (grain boundaries, heterointerfaces, defect concentrations, etc.). Therefore, the material-sensor integration was also introduced to maintain the structural stability in the sensor fabrication process, ensuring the sensing stability of MOS-based gas sensors. Finally, the perspectives of the MOS-based gas sensors in the aspects of fundamental research and the improvements in the sensing properties are pointed out.

  14. Microfabricated gas sensor systems with sensitive nanocrystalline metal-oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, M.; Gurlo, A.; Barsan, N.; Weimar, U.; Hierlemann, A.

    2006-01-01

    This article gives an overview on recent developments in metal-oxide-based gas sensor systems, in particular on nanocrystalline oxide materials deposited on modern, state-of-the-art sensor platforms fabricated in microtechnology. First, metal-oxide-based gas sensors are introduced, and the underlying principles and fundamentals of the gas sensing process are laid out. In the second part, the different deposition methods, such as evaporation, sputtering, sol-gel techniques, aerosol methods, and screen-printing, and their applicability to micro-scale substrates are discussed in terms of their deposition precision, the achievable layer thickness, as well as with regard to the possibility to use pre-processed materials. In the third part, microsensor platforms and, in particular, semiconductor- and microelectronics-based sensor platforms, which have been fabricated in, e.g., standard CMOS-technology (CMOS: complementary metal-oxide semiconductor), are briefly reviewed. The use of such microfabricated sensor platforms inevitably imposes constraints, such as temperature limits, on the applied nanomaterial processing and deposition methods. These limitations are discussed and work-arounds are described. Additionally, monolithic sensor systems are presented that combine microtransducers or microhotplates, which are coated with nanomaterials, with the necessary control and driving electronics on a single chip. The most advanced of such systems are standalone units that can be directly connected to a computer via a digital interface

  15. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, M Cihan; Çalışkan, Deniz; Bütün, Bayram; Özbay, Ekmel

    2016-09-29

    Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption-dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  16. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cihan Çakır

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  17. On-chip growth of semiconductor metal oxide nanowires for gas sensors: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Manh Hung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor metal oxide nanowires (SMO-NWs show great potential for novel gas sensor applications because of their distinct properties, such as a high surface area to volume aspect ratio, high crystallinity and perfect pathway for electron transfer (length of NW. SMO-NW sensors can be configured as resistors or field-effect transistors for gas detection and different configurations, such as a single NW, multiple NWs, and networked NW films, have been established. Surface-functionalizing NWs with catalyst elements and self-heating NWs provide additional advantages for highly selective and low-power consumption gas sensors. However, an appropriate design of SMO-NWs is of practical importance in enhancing the gas-sensing performance of SMO-NW sensors. The on-chip growth of SMO-NWs possesses many advantages which can thus be effectively used for the large-scale fabrication of SMO-NW sensors with improved gas response and stability. This review aims to provide up-to-date information on the on-chip fabrication of SnO2, ZnO, WO3, CuO, and other SMO-NW sensors. It also discusses a variety of promising approaches that help advance the on-chip fabrication of SMO-NW-based gas sensors and other NW-based devices.

  18. WITNESSING GAS MIXING IN THE METAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HICKSON COMPACT GROUP HCG 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Alfaro-Cuello, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200, La Serena (Chile); De Oliveira, C. Mendes [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas da Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amram, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Carrasco, E. R. [Gemini Observatory/AURA, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); De Mello, D. F., E-mail: storres@dfuls.cl [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Investigation of heavy metal partitioning influenced by flue gas moisture and chlorine content during waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghai; Meng, Aihong; Jia, Jinyan; Zhang, Yanguo

    2010-01-01

    The impact of moisture on the partitioning of the heavy metals including Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in municipal solid waste (MSW) was studied in a laboratory tubular furnace. A thermodynamic investigation using CHEMKIN software was performed to compare the experimental results. Simulated waste, representative of typical MSW with and without chlorine compounds, was burned at the background temperature of 700 and 950 degrees C, respectively. In the absence of chlorine, the moisture content has no evident effect on the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu at either 700 or 950 degrees C, however, as flue gas moisture increasing the Cd distribution in the bottom ash increased at 700 degrees C and reduced at 950 degrees C, respectively. In the presence of chlorine, the flue gas moisture reduced the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu due to the transformation of the more volatile metal chlorides into less volatile metal oxides, and the reduction became significant as chlorine content increase. For Cd, the chlorine promotes its volatility through the formation of more volatile CdCl2. As a result, the increased moisture content increases the Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd concentrations in the bottom ash, which limits the utilization of the bottom ash as a construction material. Therefore, in order to accumulate heavy metals into the fly ash, MSW should be dried before incineration.

  20. Application of metal foam heat exchangers for a high-performance liquefied natural gas regasification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yeon; Sung, Tae Hong; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate fluid vaporizer has wide applications in the regasification of LNG (liquefied natural gas). The heat exchanger performance is one of the main contributors to the thermodynamic and cost effectiveness of the entire LNG regasification system. Within the paper, the authors discuss a new concept for a compact heat exchanger with a micro-cellular structure medium to minimize volume and mass and to increase thermal efficiency. Numerical calculations have been conducted to design a metal-foam filled plate heat exchanger and a shell-and-tube heat exchanger using published experimental correlations. The geometry of both heat exchangers was optimized using the conditions of thermolators in LNG regasification systems. The heat transfer and pressure drop performance was predicted to compare the heat exchangers. The results show that the metal-foam plate heat exchanger has the best performance at different channel heights and mass flow rates of fluid. In the optimized configurations, the metal-foam plate heat exchanger has a higher heat transfer rate and lower pressure drop than the shell-and-tube heat exchanger as the mass flow rate of natural gas is increased. - Highlights: • A metal foam heat exchanger is proposed for LNG regasification system. • Comparison was made with a shell and tube heat exchanger. • Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics were estimated. • The geometry of both heat exchangers is optimized for thermolators. • It can be used as a compact and high performance thermolators.

  1. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10-20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%.

  2. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sillerud, Colin Halliday [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  3. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2015-10-20

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.

  4. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  5. Investigation of a ceramic vane with a metal disk thermal and mechanical contact in a gas turbine impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnick S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Promising directions of a new generation gas turbine engines development include using in gas turbines ceramic materials blades with high strength, thermal and chemical stability. One of the serious problems in developing such motors is insufficient knowledge of contact phenomena occurring in ceramic and metal details connection nodes. This work presents the numerical modeling results of thermal processes on ceramic and metal details rough boundaries. The investigation results are used in conducting experimental researches in conditions reproducing operating.

  6. Nanosized metal deposits on titanium dioxide for augmenting gas-phase toluene photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sooi Li; Scott, Jason; Chiang, Ken; Amal, Rose

    2009-01-01

    The build-up of intermediate species on the surface of TiO2 during gas-phase toluene (C7H8) photodegradation has been observed to deactivate the photocatalyst. Nanosized metallic deposits on the TiO2 surface may enhance the photocatalytic process and improve photocatalyst performance. In this study, noble (Ag, Au) and platinum group (Pt, Pd, Rh) metals, at a nominal loading of 0.5 at.%, were deposited onto Degussa P25 TiO2 to enhance photocatalyst performance and inhibit deactivation. Pd, Rh and Au deposits delayed photocatalyst deactivation by a factor of 2, while Pt deposits delayed photocatalyst deactivation by a factor of 20, when compared with neat TiO2. Ag deposits did not improve photocatalyst activity. Metal deposit performance was related to the work function of each metal, however, the Pt finding suggested that these effects are not governed solely by this aspect, but factors such as deposit characteristics and/or thermal catalytic properties of the metals may be influential.

  7. Local anti-correlation between star-formation rate and gas-phase metallicity in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Caon, N.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M.; Cerviño, M.

    2018-02-01

    Using a representative sample of 14 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the local Universe, we show the existence of a spaxel-to-spaxel anti-correlation between the index N2 ≡ log ([NII]λ6583/Hα) and the Hα flux. These two quantities are commonly employed as proxies for gas-phase metallicity and star formation rate (SFR), respectively. Thus, the observed N2 to Hα relation may reflect the existence of an anti-correlation between the metallicity of the gas forming stars and the SFR it induces. Such an anti-correlation is to be expected if variable external metal-poor gas fuels the star-formation process. Alternatively, it can result from the contamination of the star-forming gas by stellar winds and SNe, provided that intense outflows drive most of the metals out of the star-forming regions. We also explore the possibility that the observed anti-correlation is due to variations in the physical conditions of the emitting gas, other than metallicity. Using alternative methods to compute metallicity, as well as previous observations of HII regions and photoionization models, we conclude that this possibility is unlikely. The radial gradient of metallicity characterizing disk galaxies does not produce the correlation either.

  8. DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH COMPANION TO THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY DDO 68

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; Alfvin, Erik D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Johnson, Megan; Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, NSW 1710, Epping (Australia); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bailin, Jeremy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Ford, H. Alyson [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hirschauer, Alec S.; Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.; Van Sistine, Angela [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Elson, E. C. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Rosenberg, Jessica L. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Venkatesan, Aparna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Warren, Steven R., E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Bldg., Rm. 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present H I spectral-line imaging of the extremely metal-poor galaxy DDO 68. This system has a nebular oxygen abundance of only ∼3% Z {sub ☉}, making it one of the most metal-deficient galaxies known in the local volume. Surprisingly, DDO 68 is a relatively massive and luminous galaxy for its metal content, making it a significant outlier in the mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity relationships. The origin of such a low oxygen abundance in DDO 68 presents a challenge for models of the chemical evolution of galaxies. One possible solution to this problem is the infall of pristine neutral gas, potentially initiated during a gravitational interaction. Using archival H I spectral-line imaging obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we have discovered a previously unknown companion of DDO 68. This low-mass (M{sub H} {sub I} = 2.8 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}), recently star-forming (SFR{sub FUV} = 1.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, SFR{sub Hα} < 7 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) companion has the same systemic velocity as DDO 68 (V {sub sys} = 506 km s{sup –1}; D = 12.74 ± 0.27 Mpc) and is located at a projected distance of ∼42 kpc. New H I maps obtained with the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope provide evidence that DDO 68 and this companion are gravitationally interacting at the present time. Low surface brightness H I gas forms a bridge between these objects.

  9. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  10. Metal organic framework absorbent platforms for removal of co2 and h2s from natural gas

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-10-13

    Provided herein are metal organic frameworks comprising metal nodes and N-donor organic ligands which have high selectivity and stability in the present of gases and vapors including H2S, H2O, and CO2. Methods include capturing one or more of H2S, H2O, and CO2 from fluid compositions, such as natural gas.

  11. Effect of carrier gas composition on transferred arc metal nanoparticle synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Matthias; Kiesler, Dennis; Kruis, Frank Einar

    2013-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles are used in a great number of applications; an effective and economical production scaling-up is hence desirable. A simple and cost-effective transferred arc process is developed, which produces pure metal (Zn, Cu, and Ag) nanoparticles with high production rates, while allowing fast optimization based on energy efficiency. Different carrier gas compositions, as well as the electrode arrangements and the power input are investigated to improve the production and its efficiency and to understand the arc production behavior. The production rates are determined by a novel process monitoring method, which combines an online microbalance method with a scanning mobility particle sizer for fast production rate and size distribution measurement. Particle characterization is performed via scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction measurements. It is found that the carrier gas composition has the largest impact on the particle production rate and can increase it with orders of magnitude. This appears to be not only a result of the increased heat flux and melt temperature but also of the formation of tiny nitrogen (hydrogen) bubbles in the molten feedstock, which impacts feedstock evaporation significantly in bi-atomic gases. A production rate of sub 200 nm particles from 20 up to 2,500 mg/h has been realized for the different metals. In this production range, specific power consumptions as low as 0.08 kWh/g have been reached.

  12. Gas Sensors Based on Locally Heated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Savu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the design and fabrication of microreactors and sensors based on metal nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes. Titanium adhesion layers and gold films were sputtered onto Si/SiO2 substrates for obtaining the electrical contacts. The gold layers were electrochemically thickened until 1 μm and the electrodes were patterned using photolithography and wet chemical etching. Before the dielectrophoretic deposition of the nanotubes, a gap 1 μm wide and 5 μm deep was milled in the middle of the metallic line by focused ion beam, allowing the fabrication of sensors based on suspended nanotubes bridging the electrodes. Subsequently, the sputtering technique was used for decorating the nanotubes with metallic nanoparticles. In order to test the as-obtained sensors, microreactors (100 μL volume were machined from a single Kovar piece, being equipped with electrical connections and 1/4′′ Swagelok-compatible gas inlet and outlets for controlling the atmosphere in the testing chamber. The sensors, electrically connected to the contact pins by wire-bonding, were tested in the 10−5 to 10−2 W working power interval using oxygen as target gas. The small chamber volume allowed the measurement of fast characteristic times (response/recovery, with the sensors showing good sensitivity.

  13. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  14. Metal Nanoparticles Protected with Monolayers: Applications for Chemical Vapor Sensing and Gas Chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Nelson, David A.; Skaggs, Rhonda L.; Synovec, Robert E.; Gross, Gwen M.

    2004-03-31

    Nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based materials are of considerable interest for their unique properties and their potential for use in a variety of applications. Metal nanoparticles, in which each particle’s surface is coated with a protective organic monolayer, are of particular interest because the surface monolayer stabilizes them relative to aggregation and they can be taken up into solutions.(1-4) As a result they can be processed into thin films for device applications. We will refer to these materials as monolayer-protected nanoparticles, or MPNs. Typically the metal is gold, the organic layer is a self-assembled thiol layer, and this composition will be assumed throughout the remainder of this chapter. A diversity of materials and properties is readily accessible by straightforward synthetic procedures, either by the structures of the monolayer-forming thiols used in the synthesis or by post-synthetic modifications of the monolayers. A particularly promising application for these materials is as selective layers on chemical vapor sensors. In this role, the thin film of MPNs on the device surface serves to collect and concentrate gas molecules at the sensor’s surface. Their sorptive properties also lend them to use as new nanostructured gas chromatographic stationary phases. This chapter will focus on the sorptive properties of MPNs as they relate to chemical sensors and gas chromatography.

  15. Computer simulation of void formation in residual gas atom free metals by dual beam irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Nishiguchi, R.; La Rubia, T.D. de; Guinan, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent experiments (1), we found that voids nucleate at vacancy clusters which trap gas atoms such as hydrogen and helium in ion- and neutron-irradiated copper. A molecular dynamics computer simulation, which implements an empirical embedded atom method to calculate forces that act on atoms in metals, suggests that a void nucleation occurs in pure copper at six and seven vacancy clusters. The structure of six and seven vacancy clusters in copper fluctuates between a stacking fault tetrahedron and a void. When a hydrogen is trapped at voids of six and seven vacancy, a void can keep their structure for appreciably long time; that is, the void do not relax to a stacking fault tetrahedron and grows to a large void. In order to explore the detailed atomics of void formation, it is emphasized that dual-beam irradiation experiments that utilize beams of gas atoms and self-ions should be carried out with residual gas atom free metal specimens. (author)

  16. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing", evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  17. Reversed thermo-switchable molecular sieving membranes composed of two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Zhang, Kang; Qian, Yuhong; Gupta, Krishna M; Kang, Zixi; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2017-02-16

    It is highly desirable to reduce the membrane thickness in order to maximize the throughput and break the trade-off limitation for membrane-based gas separation. Two-dimensional membranes composed of atomic-thick graphene or graphene oxide nanosheets have gas transport pathways that are at least three orders of magnitude higher than the membrane thickness, leading to reduced gas permeation flux and impaired separation throughput. Here we present nm-thick molecular sieving membranes composed of porous two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets. These membranes possess pore openings parallel to gas concentration gradient allowing high gas permeation flux and high selectivity, which are proven by both experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the gas transport pathways of these membranes exhibit a reversed thermo-switchable feature, which is attributed to the molecular flexibility of the building metal-organic nanosheets.

  18. Reversed thermo-switchable molecular sieving membranes composed of two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Zhang, Kang; Qian, Yuhong; Gupta, Krishna M.; Kang, Zixi; Jiang, Jianwen; Zhao, Dan

    2017-02-01

    It is highly desirable to reduce the membrane thickness in order to maximize the throughput and break the trade-off limitation for membrane-based gas separation. Two-dimensional membranes composed of atomic-thick graphene or graphene oxide nanosheets have gas transport pathways that are at least three orders of magnitude higher than the membrane thickness, leading to reduced gas permeation flux and impaired separation throughput. Here we present nm-thick molecular sieving membranes composed of porous two-dimensional metal-organic nanosheets. These membranes possess pore openings parallel to gas concentration gradient allowing high gas permeation flux and high selectivity, which are proven by both experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. Furthermore, the gas transport pathways of these membranes exhibit a reversed thermo-switchable feature, which is attributed to the molecular flexibility of the building metal-organic nanosheets.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Quaternary Metal Chalcogenide Aerogels for Gas Separation and Volatile Hydrocarbon Adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Edhaim, Fatimah A.

    2017-11-01

    In this dissertation, the metathesis route of metal chalcogenide aerogel synthesis was expanded by conducting systematic studies between polysulfide building blocks and the 1st-row transition metal linkers. Resulting materials were screened as sorbents for selective gas separation and volatile organic compounds adsorption. They showed preferential adsorption of polarizable gases (CO2) and organic compounds (toluene). Ion exchange and heavy metal remediation properties have also been demonstrated. The effect of the presence of different counter-ion within chalcogel frameworks on the adsorption capacity of the chalcogels was studied on AFe3Zn3S17 (A= K, Na, and Rb) chalcogels. The highest adsorption capacity toward hydrocarbons and gases was observed on Rb based chalcogels. Adopting a new building block [BiTe3]3- with the 1st-row transition metal ions results in the formation of three high BET surface area chalcogels, KCrBiTe3, KZnBiTe3, and KFeBiTe3. The resulting chalcogels showed preferential adsorption of toluene vapor, and remarkable selectivity of CO2, indicating the potential future use of chalcogels in adsorption-based gas or hydrocarbon separation processes. The synthesis and characterization of the rare earth chalcogels NaYSnS4, NaGdSnS4, and NaTbSnS4 are also reported. Rare earth metal ions react with the thiostannate clusters in formamide solution forming extended polymeric networks by gelation. Obtained chalcogels have high BET surface areas, and showed notable adsorption capacity toward CO2 and toluene vapor. These chalcogels have also been engaged in the absorption of different organic molecules. The results reveal the ability of the chalcogels to distinguish among organic molecules on their electronic structures; hence, they could be used as sensors. Furthermore, the synthesis of metal chalcogenide aerogels Co0.5Sb0.33MoS4 and Co0.5Y0.33MoS4 by the sol-gel method is reported. In this system, the building blocks [MoS4]2- chelated with Co2+ and (Sb3

  20. Influence of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Amendments on Heavy Metal Distribution in Reclaimed Sodic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Wang, Shujuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Zhuo, Yuqun; Chen, Changhe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum has become an effective soil amendment for sodic soil reclamation, it carries extra heavy metal contamination into the soil environment. The fate of heavy metals introduced by FGD gypsum in sodic or saline–alkali soils is still unclear. This work aims to investigate the effects of FGD gypsum addition on the heavy metal distributions in a sodic soil. Original soil samples were collected from typical sodic land in north China. Soil column leaching tests were conducted to investigate the influence of FGD gypsum addition on the soil properties, especially on distribution profiles of the heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, As, and Hg) in the soil layers. Results showed that pH, electrical conductivity, and exchangeable sodium percentage in amended soils were significantly reduced from 10.2 to 8.46, 1.8 to 0.2 dS/m, and 18.14% to 1.28%, respectively. As and Hg concentrations in the soils were found to be positively correlated with FGD gypsum added. The amount of Hg in the leachate was positively correlated with FGD gypsum application ratio, whereas a negative correlation was observed between the Pb concentration in the leachate and the FGD gypsum ratio. Results revealed that heavy metal concentrations in soils complied well with Environmental Quality Standard for Soils in China (GB15618-1995). This work helps to understand the fate of FGD gypsum-introduced heavy metals in sodic soils and provides a baseline for further environmental risk assessment associated with applying FGD gypsum for sodic soil remediation. PMID:26064038

  1. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musket, R. G.

    1989-04-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation, and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are (a) uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, (b) hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, (c) hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, (d) tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and (e) hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals.

  2. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are 1. uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, 2. hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, 3. hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, 4. tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and 5. hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals. (orig.)

  3. Emission spectra of alkali-metal (K,Na,Li)-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed emission spectra of excimers and exciplexes composed of a light alkali-metal atom in the first excited state and 4 He atoms [K*He n (n=1-6), Na * He n (n=1-4), and Li * He n (n=1,2)] in cryogenic He gas (the temperature 2 K -1 . Differently from exciplexes with heavier alkali-metal atoms, the spectra for the different number of He atoms were well separated, so that their assignment could be made experimentally. Comparing with the spectra of K * He n , we found that the infrared emission spectrum of the K atom excited in liquid He was from K*He 6 . To confirm the assignment, we have also carried out ab initio calculation of adiabatic potential curves and peak positions of the emission spectra of the exciplexes

  4. Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1995-11-01

    The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of Carboniferous materials in a gasifier is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials can occur. The objective of this task was to establish the potential risks of carbon deposition and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes by examining the current state of knowledge regarding these phenomena, making appropriate thermochemical calculations for representative coal gasifiers, and addressing possible mitigation methods. The paper discusses carbon activities, iron-based phase stabilities, steam injection, conditions that influence kinetics of carbon deposition, and influence of system operating parameters on carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  5. Selective Gas-Phase Capture of Explosives on Metal Beta-diketonate Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2008-05-30

    A variety of metal beta-diketonate polymers were assessed for gas-phase selective retention of nitro aromatic, nitrate ester, and peroxide explosives. La(dihed) showed 13-42 times the retention for the nitro aromatics compared to a control column (identical column but lacking the 5% loading of the metal beta-diketonate polymer). Nitrate esters, the peroxide explosive TATP, and the taggant DMDNB were too strongly retained to elute from the La(dihed) column; however, these compounds could be eluted from the less retentive Cu(dihed) or Zn(dihed) columns. A Kovats index of 2124 for TNT the on the La(dihed) column compared to 1662 on the control illustrates the excellent discrimination against non-polar hydrocarbons, the principal matrix interference expected in air samples. A proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated analysis of an extrapolated 47 part-per trillion(v/v) of TNT in an air extract concentrate.

  6. Release to the gas phase of metals, S and Cl during combustion of dedicated waste fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    The release to the gas phase of inorganic elements such as alkali metals. Cl, S, and heavy metals in Waste-to-Energy (WtE) boilers is a challenge. Besides the risk of harmful emissions to the environment, inorganic elements released from the grate may cause severe ash deposition and corrosion...... wood, shoes, automotive shredder waste and PVC (poly-vinyl-chloride). The waste fractions were characterized by use of wet chemical analysis, and, based on the chemical composition of the initial fuel sample and the ash residue after the experiments; the release of inorganic elements was quantified....... The lab-scale release results were then compared with results from a related, full-scale partitioning study, in which test runs with the addition of similar, dedicated waste fractions to a base-load waste had been performed in a grate-fired WtE boiler. In general, the elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Si...

  7. Inferring gas-phase metallicity gradients of galaxies at the seeing limit: a forward modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, David; Brinchmann, Jarle; Shirazi, Maryam; Contini, Thierry; Epinat, Benoît; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Marino, Raffaella A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Richard, Johan; Patrício, Vera

    2017-06-01

    We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission-line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept, we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing, we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies with sizes approximately equal to the half width at half-maximum of the point spread function. However, we also find that the presence of star-forming clumps can significantly complicate the interpretation of metallicity gradients in moderately resolved high-redshift galaxies. Therefore, we emphasize that care should be taken when comparing nearby well-resolved observations to high-redshift observations of partially resolved galaxies.

  8. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungjin Cho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO2 gas molecules (>1.2 ppm as well as NH3 (>10 ppm. Metal nanoparticles (NPs could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS2 device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS2, electronically sensitizing NH3 gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO2 sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS2 flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms.

  9. Metal Decoration Effects on the Gas-Sensing Properties of 2D Hybrid-Structures on Flexible Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byungjin; Yoon, Jongwon; Lim, Sung Kwan; Kim, Ah Ra; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Dong-Ho; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Ko, Heung Cho; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2015-09-25

    We have investigated the effects of metal decoration on the gas-sensing properties of a device with two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) flake channels and graphene electrodes. The 2D hybrid-structure device sensitively detected NO₂ gas molecules (>1.2 ppm) as well as NH₃ (>10 ppm). Metal nanoparticles (NPs) could tune the electronic properties of the 2D graphene/MoS₂ device, increasing sensitivity to a specific gas molecule. For instance, palladium NPs accumulate hole carriers of graphene/MoS₂, electronically sensitizing NH₃ gas molecules. Contrarily, aluminum NPs deplete hole carriers, enhancing NO₂ sensitivity. The synergistic combination of metal NPs and 2D hybrid layers could be also applied to a flexible gas sensor. There was no serious degradation in the sensing performance of metal-decorated MoS₂ flexible devices before/after 5000 bending cycles. Thus, highly sensitive and endurable gas sensor could be achieved through the metal-decorated 2D hybrid-structure, offering a useful route to wearable electronic sensing platforms.

  10. Sensitive resonant gas sensor operating in air with metal organic frameworks coating

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar

    2017-08-09

    We report a practical resonant gas sensor that is uniformly coated with metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and excited near the higher order modes for a higher attained sensitivity. The resonator is based on an electrostatically excited clamped-clamped microbeam. The microbeam is fabricated from a polyimide layer coated from the top with Cr/Au and from the bottom with Cr/Au/Cr layer. The geometry of the resonator is optimized to reduce the effect of the squeeze film damping, thereby allowing operation under atmospheric pressure. The electrostatic force electrode is designed to enhance the excitation of the second mode of vibration with the minimum power required. Significant frequency shift (kHz) is demonstrated for the first time upon water vapor, acetone, and ethanol exposure due to the MOFs functionalization and the higher order modes excitation. Also, the adsorption dynamics and MOF selectivity is investigated by studying the decaying time constants of the response upon gas exposure.

  11. Medium-induced change of the optical response of metal clusters in rare-gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Fengyuan; Guet, Claude

    2017-10-01

    Interaction with the surrounding medium modifies the optical response of embedded metal clusters. For clusters from about ten to a few hundreds of silver atoms, embedded in rare-gas matrices, we study the environment effect within the matrix random phase approximation with exact exchange (RPAE) quantum approach, which has proved successful for free silver clusters. The polarizable surrounding medium screens the residual two-body RPAE interaction, adds a polarization term to the one-body potential, and shifts the vacuum energy of the active delocalized valence electrons. Within this model, we calculate the dipole oscillator strength distribution for Ag clusters embedded in helium droplets, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon matrices. The main contribution to the dipole surface plasmon red shift originates from the rare-gas polarization screening of the two-body interaction. The large size limit of the dipole surface plasmon agrees well with the classical prediction.

  12. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usov, E V; Lobanov, P D; Pribaturin, N A; Mosunova, N A; Chuhno, V I; Kutlimetov, A E

    2016-01-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results. (paper)

  13. Metal halide-group III halide gas complexes with emphasis on aluminum chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeye, H.A.; Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the presently known gas complexation reactions between metal halides and group III halides are treated in a self-consistent manner. By focusing on aluminum chloride as a complexing agent, certain systematic trends are revealed. The partial pressures of the gaseous complexes display shallow minima near 800 0 K whenever the complex molecules involve more than one molecule of AlCl 3 . Increasing the aluminum chloride pressure from 1 atm. to 10 3 atm. decreases somewhat the differences in the partial pressures among the various gaseous complexes which span two to three orders of magnitude. The methods developed for characterizing the complexes, and their structures as well as some applications of gas complexation are discussed

  14. Adjusting the electronic properties and gas reactivity of epitaxial graphene by thin surface metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Jens, E-mail: jenser@ifm.liu.se; Puglisi, Donatella; Kang, Yu Hsuan; Yakimova, Rositza; Lloyd Spetz, Anita

    2014-04-15

    Graphene-based chemical gas sensors normally show ultra-high sensitivity to certain gas molecules but at the same time suffer from poor selectivity and slow response and recovery times. Several approaches based on functionalization or modification of the graphene surface have been demonstrated as means to improve these issues, but most such measures result in poor reproducibility. In this study we investigate reproducible graphene surface modifications by sputter deposition of thin nanostructured Au or Pt layers. It is demonstrated that under the right metallization conditions the electronic properties of the surface remain those of graphene, while the surface chemistry is modified to improve sensitivity, selectivity and speed of response to nitrogen dioxide.

  15. Synthesis methods, microscopy characterization and device integration of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors for gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Berger, Gordon M; Kulis, Michael J; Hunter, Gary W; Xu, Jennifer C; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO(2), ZnO, and TiO(2) single-crystal nanowires and SnO(2) polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H(2), are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  16. Integrating Metal-Oxide-Decorated CNT Networks with a CMOS Readout in a Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhwan Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented a tin-oxide-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT network gas sensor system on a single die. We have also demonstrated the deposition of metallic tin on the CNT network, its subsequent oxidation in air, and the improvement of the lifetime of the sensors. The fabricated array of CNT sensors contains 128 sensor cells for added redundancy and increased accuracy. The read-out integrated circuit (ROIC was combined with coarse and fine time-to-digital converters to extend its resolution in a power-efficient way. The ROIC is fabricated using a 0.35 µm CMOS process, and the whole sensor system consumes 30 mA at 5 V. The sensor system was successfully tested in the detection of ammonia gas at elevated temperatures.

  17. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available to the requirements of ASTM standards G31 [24] and G46 [25]. The 3.5% NaCl simulated sea water was prepared by dissolving 3.5 ? 0.1 parts by weight of Corrosion Fatigue Behaviour of Aluminium 5083-H111 Welded Using Gas Metal Arc Welding Method 193 NaCl in 96..., dissolve in some chemical solutions, such as strong acids or alkaline solutions. Damage to this passive layer in chloride-containing environments (such as sea water or NaCl solutions), may result in localised corrosive attack such as pitting corrosion...

  18. Trends in low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity on transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Boisen, Astrid; Dahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity trends on transition metals were investigated with the use of a microkinetic model based on a redox mechanism. It is established that the adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen can describe to a large extent changes in the remaining activation...... that the redox mechanism dominates and to the neglect of adsorbate interactions, which play an important role at high coverages. The model predicts that the activity of copper can be improved by increasing the strengths with which carbon monoxide and oxygen are bonded to the surface, thus suggesting possible...

  19. Monitoring and Control of the Hybrid Laser-Gas Metal-Arc Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.; Nichol, C. I.; Clark, D.; Todorov, E.; Couch, R. D.; Yu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  20. Gas metal arc welding of butt joint with varying gap width based on neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full...... penetration, when the gap width is varying during the welding process. The process modeling to facilitate the mapping from joint geometry and reference weld quality to significant welding parameters, has been based on a multi-layer feed-forward network. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for non-linear least...

  1. Liquid metal versus gas cooled reactor concepts for a turbo electric powered space vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Proust, E.; Schwartz, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Recent CNES/CEA prospective studies of an orbit transfer vehicule to be launched by ARIANE V, emphasize the advantage of the Brayton cycle over the thermionics and thermoelectricity, in minimizing the total mass of 100 to 300 kWsub(e) power systems under the constraint specific to ARIANE of a radiator area limited to 95 m 2 . The review of candidate reactor concepts for this application, finally recommends both liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, for their satisfactory adaptation to a reference Brayton cycle and for the available experience from the terrestrial operation of comparable systems

  2. Chlorine gas exposure at a metal recycling facility--California, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    On June 8, 2010, chlorine gas was released from a ruptured, 1-ton, low-pressure tank being recycled at a California metal recycling facility. A total of 23 persons, including employees, customers, and workers at nearby businesses, were treated for the effects of the fumes at seven area hospitals. Chlorine is a corrosive, greenish-yellow gas that is heavier than air and can cause severe respiratory damage; it is used widely in water purification, sewage treatment, and disinfectant washes for foods. Following the incident, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and CDC collaborated with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) on an Assessment of Chemical Exposures (ACE) to determine 1) the circumstances surrounding those exposed during the chlorine gas release, 2) health effects associated with exposures, and 3) recommendations for preventing recurrences. This report describes the chlorine gas release in California and summarizes the results of the ACE investigation. Of 29 persons potentially exposed to chlorine gas, 27 were interviewed to collect information regarding their exposures. In addition, information regarding acute health effects and symptoms was abstracted from medical records. At the time of the chlorine gas release, 15 persons were outdoors, and 13 were exposed for >30 minutes before they were decontaminated. Twenty-three persons reported experiencing one or more upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms within 24 hours of exposure; six persons were hospitalized for 1-11 days. Based on these findings, CDPH issued a statewide alert to all recycling facilities on how to handle containers with potential hazardous waste.

  3. Witnessing Gas Mixing in the Metal Distribution of the Hickson Compact Group HCG 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Alfaro-Cuello, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; de Mello, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time direct evidence that in a merger of disk galaxies, the pre-existing central metallicities will mix as a result of gas being transported in the merger interface region along the line that joins the two coalescing nuclei. This is shown using detailed two-dimensional kinematics as well as metallicity measurements for the nearby ongoing merger in the center of the compact group HCG 31. We focus on the emission line gas, which is extensive in the system. The two coalescing cores display similar oxygen abundances. While in between the two nuclei, the metallicity changes smoothly from one nucleus to the other indicating a mix of metals in this region, which is confirmed by the high-resolution Hα kinematics (R = 45,900). This nearby system is especially important because it involves the merging of two fairly low-mass and clumpy galaxies (LMC-like galaxies), making it an important system for comparison with high-redshift galaxies. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina) - Observing run: GS-2012B-Q-60.

  4. Modeling macro-and microstructures of Gas-Metal-Arc Welded HSLA-100 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Debroy, T.

    1999-06-01

    Fluid flow and heat transfer during gas-metal-arc welding (GMAW) of HSLA-100 steel were studied using a transient, three-dimensional, turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow model. The temperature and velocity fields, cooling rates, and shape and size of the fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs) were calculated. A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was computed to aid in the understanding of the observed weld metal microstructure. The computed results demonstrate that the dissipation of heat and momentum in the weld pool is significantly aided by turbulence, thus suggesting that previous modeling results based on laminar flow need to be re-examined. A comparison of the calculated fusion and HAZ geometries with their corresponding measured values showed good agreement. Furthermore, “finger” penetration, a unique geometric characteristic of gas-metal-arc weld pools, could be satisfactorily predicted from the model. The ability to predict these geometric variables and the agreement between the calculated and the measured cooling rates indicate the appropriateness of using a turbulence model for accurate calculations. The microstructure of the weld metal consisted mainly of acicular ferrite with small amounts of bainite. At high heat inputs, small amounts of allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite were also observed. The observed microstructures are consistent with those expected from the computed CCT diagram and the cooling rates. The results presented here demonstrate significant promise for understanding both macro-and microstructures of steel welds from the combination of the fundamental principles from both transport phenomena and phase transformation theory.

  5. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Mishima, K.; Tobita, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron radiography and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) techniques were applied to measurements of velocity field in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow. Visualization and measurements of two-phase flow were conducted using molten lead bismuth and nitrogen gas as working fluids and particles made of gold-cadmium (AuCd 3 ) inter-metallic alloy were employed as the tracer. Discrimination method between bubble and tracer images in two-phase flow was developed based on the σ-scaling method. Time-averaged liquid velocity fields, gas velocity fields and void profile were calculated from discriminated images, respectively. From these measurements, the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. (author)

  6. THE COMPLEXITY THAT THE FIRST STARS BROUGHT TO THE UNIVERSE: FRAGILITY OF METAL-ENRICHED GAS IN A RADIATION FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykutalp, A.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    The initial mass function (IMF) of the first (Population III) stars and Population II (Pop II) stars is poorly known due to a lack of observations of the period between recombination and reionization. In simulations of the formation of the first stars, it has been shown that, due to the limited ability of metal-free primordial gas to cool, the IMF of the first stars is a few orders of magnitude more massive than the current IMF. The transition from a high-mass IMF of the first stars to a lower-mass current IMF is thus important to understand. To study the underlying physics of this transition, we performed several simulations using the cosmological hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo for metallicities of 10 -4 , 10 -3 , 10 -2 , and 10 -1 Z sun . In our simulations, we include a star formation prescription that is derived from a metallicity-dependent multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM) structure, an external UV radiation field, and a mechanical feedback algorithm. We also implement cosmic ray heating, photoelectric heating, and gas-dust heating/cooling, and follow the metal enrichment of the ISM. It is found that the interplay between metallicity and UV radiation leads to the coexistence of Pop III and Pop II star formation in non-zero-metallicity (Z/Z sun ≥ 10 -2 ) gas. A cold (T 10 -22 g cm -3 ) gas phase is fragile to ambient UV radiation. In a metal-poor (Z/Z sun ≤ 10 -3 ) gas, the cold and dense gas phase does not form in the presence of a radiation field of F 0 ∼ 10 -5 -10 -4 erg cm -2 s -1 . Therefore, metallicity by itself is not a good indicator of the Pop III-Pop II transition. Metal-rich (Z/Z sun ≥ 10 -2 ) gas dynamically evolves two to three orders of magnitude faster than metal-poor gas (Z/Z sun ≤ 10 -3 ). The simulations including supernova explosions show that pre-enrichment of the halo does not affect the mixing of metals.

  7. SDSS-IV MaNGA: the impact of diffuse ionized gas on emission-line ratios, interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas metallicity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew; Haffner, L. Matthew; Walterbos, René; Maiolino, Roberto; Tremonti, Christy; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Belfiore, Francesco; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nitschelm, Christian; Andrews, Brett; Brinkmann, Jon; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cheung, Edmond; Li, Cheng; Law, David R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Storchi Bergmann, Thaisa; Simmons, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse ionized gas (DIG) is prevalent in star-forming galaxies. Using a sample of 365 nearly face-on star-forming galaxies observed by Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO, we demonstrate how DIG in star-forming galaxies impacts the measurements of emission-line ratios, hence the interpretation of diagnostic diagrams and gas-phase metallicity measurements. At fixed metallicity, DIG-dominated low ΣHα regions display enhanced [S II]/Hα, [N II]/Hα, [O II]/Hβ and [O I]/Hα. The gradients in these line ratios are determined by metallicity gradients and ΣHα. In line ratio diagnostic diagrams, contamination by DIG moves H II regions towards composite or low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LI(N)ER)-like regions. A harder ionizing spectrum is needed to explain DIG line ratios. Leaky H II region models can only shift line ratios slightly relative to H II region models, and thus fail to explain the composite/LI(N)ER line ratios displayed by DIG. Our result favours ionization by evolved stars as a major ionization source for DIG with LI(N)ER-like emission. DIG can significantly bias the measurement of gas metallicity and metallicity gradients derived using strong-line methods. Metallicities derived using N2O2 are optimal because they exhibit the smallest bias and error. Using O3N2, R23, N2 = [N II]/Hα and N2S2Hα to derive metallicities introduces bias in the derived metallicity gradients as large as the gradient itself. The strong-line method of Blanc et al. (IZI hereafter) cannot be applied to DIG to get an accurate metallicity because it currently contains only H II region models that fail to describe the DIG.

  8. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO 2 , carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO 2 instead of pure CO 2 . The CO 2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO 2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO 2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO 2 . The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO 2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  10. Metal Microporous Aromatic Polymers with Improved Performance for Small Gas Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian; Zhang, Yindong; Gu, Shuai; Zhu, Yunlong; Yu, Guipeng; Pan, Chunyue; Wang, Zhonggang; Hu, Yuehua

    2015-09-14

    A novel metal-doping strategy was developed for the construction of iron-decorated microporous aromatic polymers with high small-gas-uptake capacities. Cost-effective ferrocene-functionalized microporous aromatic polymers (FMAPs) were constructed by a one-step Friedel-Crafts reaction of ferrocene and s-triazine monomers. The introduction of ferrocene endows the microporous polymers with a regular and homogenous dispersion of iron, which avoids the slow reunion that is usually encountered in previously reported metal-doping procedures, permitting a strong interaction between the porous solid and guest gases. Compared to ferrocene-free analogues, FMAP-1, which has a moderate BET surface area, shows good gas-adsorption capabilities for H2 (1.75 wt % at 77 K/1.0 bar), CH4 (5.5 wt % at 298 K/25.0 bar), and CO2 (16.9 wt % at 273 K/1.0 bar), as well as a remarkably high ideal adsorbed solution theory CO2 /N2 selectivity (107 v/v at 273 K/(0-1.0) bar), and high isosteric heats of adsorption of H2 (16.9 kJ mol(-1) ) and CO2 (41.6 kJ mol(-1) ). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Development of metal oxide gas sensors for very low concentration (ppb) of BTEX vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favard, A.; Aguir, K.; Contaret, T.; Caris, L.; Bendahan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The control and analysis of air quality have become a major preoccupation of the last twenty years. In 2008, the European Union has introduced a Directive (2008/50/EC) to impose measurement obligations and thresholds to not exceed for some pollutants, including BTEX gases, in view of their adverse effects on the health. In this paper, we show the ability to detect very low concentrations of BTEX using a gas microsensor based on metal oxide thin-film. A test bench able to generate very low vapors concentrations has been achieved and fully automated. Thin metal oxides layers have been realized by reactive magnetron sputtering. The sensitive layers are functionalized with gold nanoparticles by thermal evaporation technique. Our sensors have been tested on a wide range of concentrations of BTEX (5 - 500 ppb) and have been able to detect concentrations of a few ppb for operating temperatures below 593 K. These results are very promising for detection of very low BTEX concentration for indoor as well as outdoor application. We showed that the addition of gold nanoparticles on the sensitive layers decreases the sensors operating temperature and increases the response to BTEX gas. The best results are obtained with a sensitive layer based on ZnO.

  12. Test results from a helium gas-cooled porous metal heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, M.T.; Rosenfeld, J.H.; Youchison, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A helium-cooled porous metal heat exchanger was built and tested, which successfully absorbed heat fluxes exceeding all previously tested gas-cooled designs. Helium-cooled plasma-facing components are being evaluated for fusion applications. Helium is a favorable coolant for fusion devices because it is not a plasma contaminant, it is not easily activated, and it is easily removed from the device in the event of a leak. The main drawback of gas coolants is their relatively poor thermal transport properties. This limitation can be removed through use of a highly efficient heat exchanger design. A low flow resistance porous metal heat exchanger design was developed, based on the requirements for the Faraday shield for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device. High heat flux tests were conducted on two representative test articles at the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories. Absorbed heat fluxes as high as 40 MW/m 2 were successfully removed during these tests without failure of the devices. Commercial applications for electronics cooling and other high heat flux applications are being identified

  13. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valensi, F; Pellerin, S; Castillon, Q; Zielinska, S; Boutaghane, A; Dzierzega, K; Pellerin, N; Briand, F

    2013-01-01

    The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition of the shielding gas. In particular, addition of CO 2 increases the threshold current for the transition from unstable globular to more stable spray transfer mode. We report on the diagnostics—using optical emission spectroscopy—of a GMAW plasma in pure argon and in mixtures of argon, CO 2 and N 2 while operated in spray and globular transfer modes. The spatially resolved plasma parameters are obtained by applying the Abel transformation to laterally integrated emission data. The Stark widths of some iron lines are used to determine both electron density and temperature, and line intensities yield relative contents of neutral and ionized iron to argon. Our experimental results indicate a temperature drop on the arc axis in the case of spray arc transfer. This drop reduces with addition of N 2 and disappears in globular transfer mode when CO 2 is added. Despite the temperature increase, the electron density decreases with CO 2 concentration. The highest concentration of iron is observed in the plasma column upper part (close to the anode) and for GMAW with CO 2 . Our results are compared with recently published works where the effect of non-homogeneous metal vapour concentration has been taken into account. (paper)

  14. Metal enrichment of the neutral gas of blue compact dwarf galaxies: the compelling case of Pox 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebouteiller, V.; Kunth, D.; Thuan, T. X.; Désert, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    Context: Evidence has grown over the past few years that the neutral phase of blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies may be metal-deficient as compared to the ionized gas of their H ii regions. These results have strong implications for our understanding of the chemical evolution of galaxies, and it is essential to strengthen the method, as well as to find possible explanations. Aims: We present the analysis of the interstellar spectrum of Pox 36 with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Pox 36 was selected because of the relatively low foreground gas content that makes it possible to detect absorption-lines weak enough that unseen components should not be saturated. Methods: Interstellar lines of H i, N i, O i, Si ii, P ii, Ar i, and Fe ii are detected. Column densities are derived directly from the observed line profiles except for H i, whose lines are contaminated by stellar absorption, thus needing the stellar continuum to be removed. We used the TLUSTY models to remove the stellar continuum and isolate the interstellar component. The best fit indicates that the dominant stellar population is B0. The observed far-UV flux agrees with an equivalent number of ~300 B0 stars. The fit of the interstellar H i line gives a column density of 1020.3±0.4 cm-2. Chemical abundances were then computed from the column densities using the dominant ionization stage in the neutral gas. Our abundances are compared to those measured from emission-line spectra in the optical, probing the ionized gas of the H ii regions. Results: Our results suggest that the neutral gas of Pox 36 is metal-deficient by a factor ~7 as compared to the ionized gas, and they agree with a metallicity of ≈1/35 Z_⊙. Elemental depletion is not problematic because of the low dust content along the selected lines of sight. In contrast, the ionized gas shows a clear depletion pattern, with iron being strongly depleted. Conclusions: The abundance discontinuity between the neutral and ionized phases

  15. [Gas exchange features of Ambrosia artemisiifolia leaves and fruits and their correlations with soil heavy metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Yuangang; Wang, Wenjie; Chen, Huafeng; Yang, Fengjian; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2006-12-01

    Ambrosia artemisiifolia can survive well in the habitats of heavy human disturbance and partial soil pollution. Weather its photosynthetic features benefit their survival is worthwhile to concern. With a refuse dump in Changchun City (43 degrees 50'N, 125 degrees 23'E) as study site, this paper analyzed the contents of soil Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cd, As, Sb and Hg at ten plots, and measured in situ the gas exchange in A. artemisiifolia leaves and young fruits. The results showed that the study site was slightly contaminated by Ni, but the contents of other soil heavy metals were approached to or substantially lower than their threshold values. The net photosynthetic rate of leaves ranged from 1.88 to 9.41 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), while that of young fruits could be up to 2. 81 micromol x m(-2) s(-1). Averagely, the respiration rate, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, and water utilization efficiency of leaves were 1.81 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), 75.7 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1), 6.05 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), and 4.72 micromol CO2 x mmol(-1) H2O, being 5.26, 0.64, 1.31 and 1.69 times as much as those of young fruits, respectively, indicating that the respiratory and photosynthetic capacities and water use efficiency of A. artemisiifolia young fruits were equivalent to or higher than those of its leaves. Many test heavy metals, such as Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Sb and Hg, had no significant effects on the gas exchange features of leaves and fruits, but there were significant correlations of Ni and Cr with the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency of leaves and young fruits, Cr with the gross photosynthesis of leaves, and As with the stomatal conductance of young fruits, suggesting that a majority of test soil heavy metals had no direct effects on the gas exchange in A. artemisiifolia leaves and fruits, but soil Ni, Cr and As with the contents approached to or substantially lower than the threshold values could affect the gas exchange features of A

  16. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  17. Relation between biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate and internal exposure to metals from gas metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Weiss, Tobias; Lehnert, Martin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Kendzia, Benjamin; Harth, Volker; Henry, Jana; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Concerning possible harmful components of welding fumes, besides gases and quantitative aspects of the respirable welding fumes, particle-inherent metal toxicity has to be considered.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect markers leukotriene B4 (LTB4),prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane (8-Iso PGF2α) as well as the acid–base balance(pH) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 43 full-time gas metal arc welders (20 smokers) in relation to welding fume exposure. We observed different patterns of iron, chromium and nickel in respirable welding fumes and EBC. Welders with undetectable chromium in EBC(group A, n = 24) presented high iron and nickel concentrations. In this group, higher 8-isoPGF2α and LTB4 concentrations could be revealed compared to welders with detectable chromium and low levels of both iron and nickel in EBC (group B): 8-iso PGF2α443.3 pg mL−1 versus 247.2 pg mL−1; p = 0.001 and LTB4 30.5 pg mL−1 versus 17.3 pgmL−1; p = 0.016. EBC-pH was more acid in samples of group B (6.52 versus 6.82; p = 0.011).Overall, effect markers in welders were associated with iron concentrations in EBC according to smoking habits--non-smokers/smokers: LTB4 (rs = 0.48; p = 0.02/rs = 0.21; p = 0.37),PGE2 (rs = 0.15; p = 0.59/rs = 0.47; p = 0.07), 8-iso PGF2α (rs = 0.18; p = 0.54/rs = 0.59;p = 0.06). Sampling of EBC in occupational research provides a matrix for the simultaneous monitoring of metal exposure and effects on target level. Our results suggest irritative effects in the airways of healthy welders. Further studies are necessary to assess whether these individual results might be used to identify welders at elevated risk for developing a respiratory disease.

  18. A New Model for Simulating Gas Metal Arc Welding based on Phase Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongyue; Li, Li; Zhao, Zhijiang

    2017-11-01

    Lots of physical process, such as metal melting, multiphase fluids flow, heat and mass transfer and thermocapillary effect (Marangoni) and so on, will occur in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which should be considered as a mixture system. In this paper, based on the previous work, we propose a new model to simulate GMAW including Navier-Stokes equation, the phase field model and energy equation. Unlike most previous work, we take the thermocapillary effect into the phase field model considering mixture energy which is different of volume of fluid method (VOF) widely used in GMAW before. We also consider gravity, electromagnetic force, surface tension, buoyancy effect and arc pressure in momentum equation. The spray transfer especially the projected transfer in GMAW is computed as numerical examples with a continuous finite element method and a modified midpoint scheme. Pulse current is set as welding current as the numerical example to show the numerical simulation of metal transfer which fits the theory of GMAW well. From the result compared with the data of high-speed photography and VOF model, the accuracy and stability of the model and scheme are easily validated and also the new model has the higher precieion.

  19. Interaction of coal-derived synthesis gas impurities with solid oxide fuel cell metallic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Cramer, Carolyn N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pederson, Larry R. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Oxidation-resistant alloys find use as interconnect materials, heat exchangers, and gas supply tubing in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, especially when operated at temperatures below {proportional_to}800 C. If fueled with synthesis gas derived from coal or biomass, such metallic components could be exposed to impurities contained in those fuel sources. In this study, coupons of ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and SS 441, austenitic nickel-chromium superalloy Inconel 600, and an alumina-forming high nickel alloy alumel were exposed to synthesis gas containing {<=}2 ppm phosphorus, arsenic and antimony, and reaction products were tested. Crofer 22 APU coupons coated with a (Mn,Co){sub 3}O{sub 4} protective layer were also evaluated. Phosphorus was found to be the most reactive. On Crofer 22 APU, the (Mn,Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} passivation layer reacted to form an Mn-P-O product, predicted to be manganese phosphate from thermochemical calculations, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On SS 441, reaction of phosphorus with (Mn,Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} led to the formation of manganese phosphate as well as an Fe-P product, predicted from thermochemical calculations to be Fe{sub 3}P. Minimal interactions with antimony or arsenic in synthesis gas were limited to Fe-Sb and Fe-As solid solution formation. Though not intended for use on the anode side, a (Mn,Co){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel coating on Crofer 22 APU reacted with phosphorus in synthesis gas to produce products consistent with Mn{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Co{sub 2}P. A thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation layer on Inconel 600 did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides and arsenides and of iron phosphides and arsenides, though no reaction with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was apparent. On alumel, an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation layer rich in Ni did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides, arsenides, and antimonides, though no reaction with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred. This work shows that unprotected metallic components of

  20. Contribution to the study of the fission-gas release in metallic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.

    1969-10-01

    In order to study the effect of an external pressure on the limitation of swelling due to fission-gas precipitation, some irradiations have been carried out at burn-ups of about 35.000 MWd/ton, and at average sample temperatures of 575 Celsius degrees, of non-alloyed uranium and uranium 8 per cent molybdenum gained in a thick stainless steel can. A cylindrical central hole allows a fuel swelling from 20 to 33 per cent according to the experiment. After irradiation, the uranium samples showed two types of can rupture: one is due to the fuel swelling, and the other, to the pressure of the fission gases, released through a network of microcracks. The cans of the uranium-molybdenum samples are all undamaged and it is shown that the gas release occurs by interconnection of the bubbles for swelling values higher than those obtained in the case of uranium. For each type of fuel, a swelling-fission gas release relationship is established. The results suggest that good performances with a metallic fuel intended for use in fast reactor conditions can be obtained. (author) [fr

  1. Microstructural damage and residual mechanical properties in helium-bearing gas metal Arc weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, S. H.; Yang, N. Y. C.

    1992-03-01

    The influence of entrapped helium on microstructural damage and residual mechanical properties subsequent to applying low-penetration gas metal arc (GMA) weld overlays was examined for an AISI Type 304 stainless steel. Two helium levels were examined: 22.5 and 85.0 atomic parts per million (appm) He. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The crack surfaces exhibited a dimple structure that was characteristic of a gas bubble embrittled material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the size and spacing of the grain boundary helium gas bubbles remained virtually unchanged (relative to that established by the charging and aging procedure) at distances greater than 1 mm from the fusion line. Within this first millimeter, the diameter of the bubbles increased rapidly, and the bubble spacing increased to the characteristic spacing of the dimples that decorated weld-induced cracks. Mechanical testing revealed a loss in strain-to-fracture and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at the higher helium level. While the majority of the fracture occurred in a transgranular, ductile manner, some deformation-induced intergranular cracking was observed. This cracking occurred over a very narrow region localized to the HAZ of the weldment. At the lower helium level, ductility and strength were unaffected compared to helium-free specimens.

  2. Infrared multiple photon dissociation action spectroscopy of alkali metal cation-cyclen complexes: Effects of alkali metal cation size on gas-phase conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austin, C.A.; Chen, Y.; Kaczan, C.M.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cationized complexes of cyclen (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) are examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and electronic structure theory calculations. The measured IRMPD action spectra of four M+(cyclen) complexes are

  3. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  4. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, M.; Salas, F.; Carcel, F.J.; Perales, M.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal. (Author). 12 refs.

  5. Process simulation and experimental validation of Hot Metal Gas Forming with new press hardening steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.; Reuther, F.; Neumann, S.; Albert, A.; Landgrebe, D.

    2017-09-01

    One field in the work of the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in Chemnitz is industry applied research in Hot Metal Gas Forming, combined with press hardening in one process step. In this paper the results of investigations on new press hardening steels from SSAB AB (Docol®1800 Bor and Docol®2000 Bor) are presented. Hot tensile tests recorded by the project partner (University of West Bohemia, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering) were used to create a material model for thermo-mechanical forming simulations. For this purpose the provided raw data were converted into flow curve approximations of the real stress-real strain-curves for both materials and afterwards integrated in a LS-DYNA simulation model of Hot Metal Gas Forming with all relevant boundary conditions and sub-stages. Preliminary experimental tests were carried out using a tool at room temperature to permit evaluation of the forming behaviour of Docol 1800 Bor and Docol 2000 Bor tubes as well as validation of the simulation model. Using this demonstrator geometry (outer diameter 57 mm, tube length 300 mm, wall thickness 1.5 mm), the intention was to perform a series of tests with different furnace temperatures (from 870 °C to 1035 °C), maximum internal pressures (up to 67 MPa) and pressure build-up rates (up to 40 MPa/s) to evaluate the formability of Docol 1800 Bor and Docol 2000 Bor. Selected demonstrator parts produced in that way were subsequently analysed by wall thickness and hardness measurements. The tests were carried out using the completely modernized Dunkes/AP&T HS3-1500 hydroforming press at the Fraunhofer IWU. In summary, creating a consistent simulation model with all relevant sub-stages was successfully established in LS-DYNA. The computation results show a high correlation with the experimental data regarding the thinning behaviour. The Hot Metal Gas Forming of the demonstrator geometry was successfully established as well. Different hardness values

  6. Impact of Heavy Metal Contamination From Coal Flue Gas on Microalgae Biofuel and Biogas Production Through Multiple Conversation Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Derek E.

    2016-01-01

    Large scale biofuel production from microalgae is expected to be integrated with point source CO2 sources, such as coal fired power plants. Flue gas (CO2) integration represents a required nutrient source for accelerated growth while concurrently providing an environmental service. Heavy metals inherent in coal will ultimately be introduced into the culture system. The introduced heavy metals have the potential to bind to microalgae cells, impact growth due to toxicity, and negatively impact ...

  7. Gas storage in porous metal-organic frameworks for clean energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengqian; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-01-07

    Depletion of fossil oil deposits and the escalating threat of global warming have put clean energy research, which includes the search for clean energy carriers such as hydrogen and methane as well as the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions, on the urgent agenda. A significant technical challenge has been recognized as the development of a viable method to efficiently trap hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gas molecules in a confined space for various applications. This issue can be addressed by employing highly porous materials as storage media, and porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) which have exceptionally high surface areas as well as chemically-tunable structures are playing an unusual role in this respect. In this feature article we provide an overview of the current status of clean energy applications of porous MOFs, including hydrogen storage, methane storage and carbon dioxide capture.

  8. Deodorant Characteristics of Breath Odor Occurred from Favorite Foods Using Metal Oxide Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Shuichi; Oyabu, Takashi; Cai, Kuiqian; Katsube, Teruaki

    Three types of metal oxide gas sensors were adopted to detect the degree of breath odor. Various sorts of information are included in the odor. Each sensor has different sensitivities to gaseous chemical substances and the sensitivities also differ according to human behaviors, for example taking a meal, teeth-brushing and drinking something. There is also a possibility that the sensor can detect degrees of daily fatigue. Sensor sensitivities were low for the expiration of the elderly when the subject drank green tea. In this study, it is thought that the odor system can be incorporated into a healing robot. The robot can communicate with the elderly using several words and also connect to Internet. As for the results, the robot can identify basic human behaviors and recognize the living conditions of the resident. Moreover, it can also execute a kind of information retrieval through the Internet. Therefore, it has healing capability for the aged, and can also receive and transmit information.

  9. Stability evaluation of short-circuiting gas metal arc welding based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Zhilan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jimi

    2017-03-01

    The arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) contains abundant information about its stability and droplet transition, which can be effectively characterized by extracting the arc electrical signals. In this study, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to evaluate the stability of electrical current signals. The welding electrical signals were first decomposed by EEMD, and then transformed to a Hilbert-Huang spectrum and a marginal spectrum. The marginal spectrum is an approximate distribution of amplitude with frequency of signals, and can be described by a marginal index. Analysis of various welding process parameters showed that the marginal index of current signals increased when the welding process was more stable, and vice versa. Thus EEMD combined with the marginal index can effectively uncover the stability and droplet transition of GMAW.

  10. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  11. Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonates for the isolation and gas-chromatographic determination of trace metals. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.H.; Mirzai, H.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of the extraction of metal cations [Sc(III), Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Y(III), Ag(I), Cd(II), La(IIII), Ce(III), Eu(III), Yb(III), Hg(II), Pb(II), Th(IV), U(IV, VI) and Am(III)] in the form of mixed-ligand complexes with hexafluoroacetylacetone and neutral donators with nitrogen atoms or P=O-groups is described. The thermal and gas-chromatographic characteristics of the extracted volatile compounds are reported. Optimal results were achieved using tri-n-butyl-phosphine oxide as donator. (orig.) [de

  12. Liquid- and Gas-Phase Diffusion of Ferrocene in Thin Films of Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencai Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mass transfer of the guest molecules in nanoporous host materials, in particular in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, is among the crucial features of their applications. By using thin surface-mounted MOF films in combination with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, the diffusion of ferrocene vapor and of ethanolic and hexanic ferrocene solution in HKUST-1 was investigated. For the first time, liquid- and gas-phase diffusion in MOFs was compared directly in the identical sample. The diffusion coefficients are in the same order of magnitude (~10−16 m2·s−1, whereas the diffusion coefficient of ferrocene in the empty framework is roughly 3-times smaller than in the MOF which is filled with ethanol or n-hexane.

  13. Feedback Linearization Based Arc Length Control for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feedback linearization based arc length controller for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is described. A nonlinear model describing the dynamic arc length is transformed into a system where nonlinearities can be cancelled by a nonlinear state feedback control part, and thus, leaving only...... a linear system to be controlled by linear state feedback control. The advantage of using a nonlinear approach as feedback linearization is the ability of this method to cope with nonlinearities and different operating points. However, the model describing the GMAW process is not exact, and therefore......, the cancellation of nonlinear terms might give rise to problems with respect to robustness. Robustness of the closed loop system is therefore nvestigated by simulation....

  14. Fabrication of metallic Cd multifarious prismatic microcrystals (CMPMCs) under NH{sub 3} gas ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Waheed S. [Research Centre of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Cao, Chuanbao, E-mail: cbcao@bit.edu.cn [Research Centre of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Butt, Faheem K.; Ali, Zulfiqar [Research Centre of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Baig, Anisullah [Department of Engineering-Applied Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ain, Qurrat ul; Iqbal, M. Zubair [Department of Physics, School of Physics and Mathematics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Sadaf, Asma [Advance Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Shah, Sajjad H. [Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: > Cd prismatic microcrystals are prepared by thermal reduction of CdO under NH{sub 3} gas. > Vapour-solid (VS) process based growth mechanism governs the formation of CMPMCs. > PL spectrum for CMPMCs exhibits UV band at 365 nm and visible emission at 404 nm. > This study shows the potential of CMPMCs for applications in optical devices. - Abstract: We report here highly dense and pure metallic cadmium (Cd) multifarious prismatic microcrystals (CMPMCs) fabricated by thermal decomposition of cadmium oxide (CdO) powder at 700 deg. C for 60 min under NH{sub 3} gas ambient inside horizontal tube furnace. CMPMCs were observed to be 1-1.5 {mu}m in size with interesting morphologies of various cross sections such as triangular, trapezoidal, pentagonal and hexagonal etc. having solid, hollow/semi-hollow appearances. The as-synthesized CMPMCS were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum for Cd metal microcrystals exhibited a prominent emission band at 365 along with a shoulder peak at 404 nm. The UV main emission band is ascribed to radiative recombination of the electrons in the s, p conduction band near the Fermi surface and holes in the d bands generated under xenon light excitation whereas shoulder peak may be owing to surface oxidation effects or induced defects. This study shows the potential of CMPMCs for applications in optical devices. Based on vapour-solid (VS) process, growth mechanism for the formation of CMPMCs is also proposed and discussed briefly.

  15. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-09-30

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO 2 and 100% CO 2 . The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm 2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO 2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO 2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous.

  16. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  17. Experimental Investigation on Acoustic Control Droplet Transfer in Ultrasonic-Wave-Assisted Gas Metal Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weifeng, Xie; Chenglei, Fan; Chunli, Yang; Sanbao, Lin

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasonic-wave-assisted gas metal arc welding (U-GMAW) is a new, advanced arc welding method that uses an ultrasonic wave emitted from an ultrasonic radiator above the arc. However, it remains unclear how the ultrasonic wave affects the metal droplet, hindering further application of U-GMAW. In this paper, an improved U-GMAW system was used and its superiority was experimentally demonstrated. Then a series of experiments were designed and performed to study how the ultrasonic wave affects droplet transfer, including droplet size, velocity, and motion trajectory. The behavior of droplet transfer was observed in high-speed images. The droplet transfer is closely related to the distribution of the acoustic field, determined by the ultrasonic current. Moreover, by analyzing the variably accelerated motion of the droplet, the acoustic control of the droplet transfer was intuitively demonstrated. Finally, U-GMAW was successfully used in vertical-up and overhead welding experiments, showing that U-GMAW is promising for use in welding in all positions.

  18. Structural Stability and Performance of Noble Metal-Free SnO2-Based Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Tricoli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural stability of pure SnO2 nanoparticles and highly sensitive SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites (0–15 SiO2 wt% has been investigated for conditions relevant to their utilization as chemoresistive gas sensors. Thermal stabilization by SiO2 co-synthesis has been investigated at up to 600 °C determining regimes of crystal size stability as a function of SiO2-content. For operation up to 400 °C, thermally stable crystal sizes of ca. 24 and 11 nm were identified for SnO2 nanoparticles and 1.4 wt% SnO2-SiO2 nanocomposites, respectively. The effect of crystal growth during operation (TO = 320 °C on the sensor response to ethanol has been reported, revealing possible long-term destabilization mechanisms. In particular, crystal growth and sintering-neck formation were discussed with respect to their potential to change the sensor response and calibration. Furthermore, the effect of SiO2 cosynthesis on the cross-sensitivity to humidity of these noble metal-free SnO2-based gas sensors was assessed.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of graded impedance impactors for gas gun experiments from tape cast metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L. Peter; Orlikowski, Daniel; Nguyen, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile and impactor planarity in gas gun experiments

  20. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  1. Density functional theory for adsorption of gas mixtures in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying; Jiang, Jianwen

    2010-03-04

    In this work, a recently developed density functional theory in three-dimensional space was extended to the adsorption of gas mixtures. Weighted density approximations to the excess free energy with different weighting functions were adopted for both repulsive and attractive contributions. An equation of state for hard-sphere mixtures and a modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation for Lennard-Jones mixtures were used to estimate the excess free energy of a uniform fluid. The theory was applied to the adsorption of CO(2)/CH(4) and CO(2)/N(2) mixtures in two metal-organic frameworks: ZIF-8 and Zn(2)(BDC)(2)(ted). To validate the theoretical predictions, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were also conducted. The predicted adsorption and selectivity from DFT were found to agree well with the simulation results. CO(2) has stronger adsorption than CH(4) and N(2), particularly in Zn(2)(BDC)(2)(ted). The selectivity of CO(2) over CH(4) or N(2) increases with increasing pressure as attributed to the cooperative interactions of adsorbed CO(2) molecules. The composition of the gas mixture exhibits a significant effect on adsorption but not on selectivity.

  2. Toward high value sensing: monolayer-protected metal nanoparticles in multivariable gas and vapor sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A

    2017-08-29

    For detection of gases and vapors in complex backgrounds, "classic" analytical instruments are an unavoidable alternative to existing sensors. Recently a new generation of sensors, known as multivariable sensors, emerged with a fundamentally different perspective for sensing to eliminate limitations of existing sensors. In multivariable sensors, a sensing material is designed to have diverse responses to different gases and vapors and is coupled to a multivariable transducer that provides independent outputs to recognize these diverse responses. Data analytics tools provide rejection of interferences and multi-analyte quantitation. This review critically analyses advances of multivariable sensors based on ligand-functionalized metal nanoparticles also known as monolayer-protected nanoparticles (MPNs). These MPN sensing materials distinctively stand out from other sensing materials for multivariable sensors due to their diversity of gas- and vapor-response mechanisms as provided by organic and biological ligands, applicability of these sensing materials for broad classes of gas-phase compounds such as condensable vapors and non-condensable gases, and for several principles of signal transduction in multivariable sensors that result in non-resonant and resonant electrical sensors as well as material- and structure-based photonic sensors. Such features should allow MPN multivariable sensors to be an attractive high value addition to existing analytical instrumentation.

  3. Smart Resonant Gas Sensor and Switch Operating in Air With Metal-Organic Frameworks Coating

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar

    2017-11-03

    We report a resonant gas sensor, uniformly coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), and excited it near the higher order modes for a higher attained sensitivity. Also, switching upon exceeding a threshold value is demonstrated by operating the resonator near the bifurcation point and the dynamic pull-in instabilities. The resonator is based on an electrostatically excited clamped-clamped microbeam. The microbeam is fabricated from a polyimide layer coated from the top with Cr/Au and from the bottom with Cr/Au/Cr layer. The geometry of the resonator is optimized to reduce the effect of squeeze film damping, thereby allowing operation under atmospheric pressure. The electrostatic electrode is designed to enhance the excitation of the second mode of vibration with the minimum power required. Significant frequency shift (kHz) is demonstrated for the first time upon water vapor, acetone, and ethanol exposure due to the MOF functionalization and the higher order modes excitation. Also, the adsorption dynamics and MOF selectivity is investigated by studying the decaying time constants of the response upon gas exposure.

  4. Agricultural Construction Volume II. Oxy-Gas and Other Cutting/Welding Processes. Woodworking, Metals, Finishing. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, Myron; Maricle, Gary

    This guide contains instructor's materials for teaching a secondary agricultural construction course consisting of instructional units on oxy-gas and other cutting and welding processes (10 lessons), woodworking (6 lessons), metals (10 lessons), and finishing (4 lessons). The materials for each unit include student objectives, a list of…

  5. Occurence of methanogenesis during start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed reactor treating sulfate and metal-rich wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van B.H.G.W.; Roest, C.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Dijkman, H.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The start-up of a full-scale synthesis gas-fed gas-lift reactor treating metal and sulfate-rich wastewater was investigated. Sludge from a pilot-scale reactor was used to seed the full-scale reactor. The main difference in design between the pilot- and full-scale reactor was that metal precipitation

  6. The Lack of Influence of Metallicity on Cooling and Collapse of Ionized Gas in Small Protogalactic Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappsen, A.-K.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2005-12-01

    We study the influence of low levels of metal enrichment on the cooling and collapse of ionized gas in small protogalactic halos. We use three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, run with the publicly available parallel code GADGET (Springel et al. 2001). We implement a sink particle algorithm. This allows us to safely represent gas that has collapsed beyond the resolution limit without causing numerical errors within the resolved regions of the simulation. We also include the necessary framework for following the non-equilibrium chemistry of H2 in the protogalactic gas, and a treatment of radiative heating and cooling. Our initial conditions represent protogalaxies forming within a fossil H ii region---a previously ionized H ii region that has not yet had time to cool and recombine. Prior to cosmological reionization, such regions should be relatively common, since the characteristic lifetimes of the likely ionizing sources are significantly shorter than a Hubble time. We show that in these regions, H2 is the dominant and most effective coolant, even in the presence of small amounts of metals. It is the amount of H2 which forms that controls whether or not the gas can collapse and form stars. For metallicities Z ≤ 10-3 Z⊙, we find that metal line cooling alters the density and temperature evolution of the gas by less than 1% compared to the metal-free case at densities below 1 cm-3 and temperatures above 2000 K. However, at higher densities and lower temperatures, metal line cooling does become rather more important, and will affect the ability of the gas to fragment. We also show that an external ultraviolet background delays or suppresses the cooling and collapse of the gas regardless of whether or not it is metal-enriched. RSK and A-KJ acknowledge support from the Emmy Noether Program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (grant no. KL1358/1). M-MML acknowledges support from NSF grants AST99-85392 and AST03-07854, and NASA grant NAG5

  7. EVALUATION OF A METHOD USING COLLOIDAL GAS APHRONS TO REMEDIATE METALS-CONTAMINATED MINE DRAINAGE WATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Williams Grimes

    2002-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in which three selected metals-contaminated mine drainage water samples were treated by chemical precipitation followed by flotation using colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs) to concentrate the precipitates. Drainage water samples used in the experiments were collected from an abandoned turn-of-the-century copper mine in south-central Wyoming, an inactive gold mine in Colorado's historic Clear Creek mining district, and a relatively modern gold mine near Rapid City, South Dakota. The copper mine drainage sample was nearly neutral (pH 6.5) while the two gold mine samples were quite acidic (pH {approx}2.5). Metals concentrations ranged from a few mg/L for the copper mine drainage to several thousand mg/L for the sample from South Dakota. CGAs are emulsions of micrometer-sized soap bubbles generated in a surfactant solution. In flotation processes the CGA microbubbles provide a huge interfacial surface area and cause minimal turbulence as they rise through the liquid. CGA flotation can provide an inexpensive alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). The CGA bubbles are similar in size to the bubbles typical of DAF. However, CGAs are generated at ambient pressure, eliminating the need for compressors and thus reducing energy, capital, and maintenance costs associated with DAF systems. The experiments involved precipitation of dissolved metals as either hydroxides or sulfides followed by flotation. The CGAs were prepared using a number of different surfactants. Chemical precipitation followed by CGA flotation reduced contaminant metals concentrations by more than 90% for the copper mine drainage and the Colorado gold mine drainage. Contaminant metals were concentrated into a filterable sludge, representing less than 10% of the original volume. CGA flotation of the highly contaminated drainage sample from South Dakota was ineffective. All of the various surfactants used in this study generated a large sludge volume and none provided a

  8. Photon Doppler Velocimeter to Measure Entrained Additive Manufactured Bulk Metal Powders in Hot Subsonic and Supersonic Oxygen Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Parts produced by additive manufacturing, particularly selective laser melting (SLM), have been shown to silt metal particulate even after undergoing stringent precision aerospace cleaning processes (Lowrey 2016). As printed parts are used in oxygen systems with increased pressures, temperatures, and gas velocity, the risk of ignition by particle impact, the most common direct ignition source of metals in oxygen, substantially increases. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), desires to test the ignitability of SLM metals by particle impact in heated oxygen. The existing test systems rely on gas velocity calculations to infer particle velocity in both subsonic and supersonic particle impact systems. Until now, it was not possible to directly measure particle velocity. To increase the fidelity of planned SLM ignition studies, it is necessary to validate that the Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) test system can accurately measure particle velocity.

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  10. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  11. Metal-organic frameworks in mixed-matrix membranes for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanh Jeazet, Harold B; Staudt, Claudia; Janiak, Christoph

    2012-12-14

    Mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as additives (fillers) exhibit enhanced gas permeabilities and possibly also selectivities when compared to the pure polymer. Polyimides (Matrimid®) and polysulfones are popular polymer matrices for MOF fillers. Presently investigated MOFs for MMMs include [Cu(SiF(6))(4,4'-BIPY)(2)], [Cu(3)(BTC)(2)(H(2)O)(3)] (HKUST-1, Cu-BTC), [Cu(BDC)(DMF)], [Zn(4)O(BDC)(3)] (MOF-5), [Zn(2-methylimidazolate)(2)] (ZIF-8), [Zn(purinate)(2)] (ZIF-20), [Zn(2-carboxyaldehyde imidazolate)(2)] (ZIF-90), Mn(HCOO)(2), [Al(BDC)(μ-OH)] (MIL-53(Al)), [Al(NH(2)-BDC)(μ-OH)] (NH(2)-MIL-53(Al)) and [Cr(3)O(BDC)(3)(F,OH)(H(2)O)(2)] (MIL-101) (4,4'-BIPY = 4,4'-bipyridine, BTC = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate, BDC = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate, terephthalate). MOF particle adhesion to polyimide and polysulfone organic polymers does not represent a problem. MOF-polymer MMMs are investigated for the permeability of the single gases H(2), N(2), O(2), CH(4), CO(2) and of the gas mixtures O(2)/N(2), H(2)/CH(4), CO(2)/CH(4), H(2)/CO(2), CH(4)/N(2) and CO(2)/N(2) (preferentially permeating gas named first). Permeability increases can be traced to the MOF porosity. Since the porosity of MOFs can be tuned very precisely, which is not possible with polymeric material, MMMs offer the opportunity of significantly increasing the selectivity compared to the pure polymeric matrix. Additionally in most of the cases the permeability is increased for MMM membranes compared to the pure polymer. Addition of MOFs to polymers in MMMs easily yields performances similar to the best polymer membranes and gives higher selectivities than those reported to date for any pure MOF membrane for the same gas separation. MOF-polymer MMMs allow for easier synthesis and handability compared to pure MOF membranes.

  12. Biases in Metallicity Measurements from Global Galaxy Spectra: The Effects of Flux Weighting and Diffuse Ionized Gas Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Zhang, Kai; Yan, Renbin

    2017-12-01

    Galaxy metallicity scaling relations provide a powerful tool for understanding galaxy evolution, but obtaining unbiased global galaxy gas-phase oxygen abundances requires proper treatment of the various line-emitting sources within spectroscopic apertures. We present a model framework that treats galaxies as ensembles of H II and diffuse ionized gas (DIG) regions of varying metallicities. These models are based upon empirical relations between line ratios and electron temperature for H II regions, and DIG strong-line ratio relations from SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU data. Flux-weighting effects and DIG contamination can significantly affect properties inferred from global galaxy spectra, biasing metallicity estimates by more than 0.3 dex in some cases. We use observationally motivated inputs to construct a model matched to typical local star-forming galaxies, and quantify the biases in strong-line ratios, electron temperatures, and direct-method metallicities as inferred from global galaxy spectra relative to the median values of the H II region distributions in each galaxy. We also provide a generalized set of models that can be applied to individual galaxies or galaxy samples in atypical regions of parameter space. We use these models to correct for the effects of flux-weighting and DIG contamination in the local direct-method mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relations, and in the mass-metallicity relation based on strong-line metallicities. Future photoionization models of galaxy line emission need to include DIG emission and represent galaxies as ensembles of emitting regions with varying metallicity, instead of as single H II regions with effective properties, in order to obtain unbiased estimates of key underlying physical properties.

  13. Hydrogen gas generation from metal aluminum-water interaction in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiya, Arumugam; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    In the present research, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) residues from three incinerators (N, K, and R) in Japan were collected for hydrogen gas generation purpose. The samples were split into four particle size fractions: (1) d≤0.6, (2) 0.6≤d≤1.0, (3) 1.0≤d≤2.0, and (4) 2.0≤d≤4.75mm for the characterization of metal aluminum, the relationship between the present metal aluminum and hydrogen gas production, and the influence of external metal aluminum on the enhancement of hydrogen gas. The batch experiments were performed for each BA fraction under agitated (200rpm) and non-agitated conditions at 40°C for 20days. The highest amount of hydrogen gas (cumulative) was collected under agitation condition that was 39.4, 10.0, and 8.4 L/kg of dry ash for N2, R2, and K2 (all fraction 2), respectively. To take the benefit of the BA high alkalinity (with initial pH over 12), 0.1 and 1g of household aluminum foil were added to the fractions 2 and 3. A Significantly larger amount of hydrogen gas was collected from each test. For 0.1g of aluminum foil, the cumulative amount of gas was in the range of 62 to 78 L/kg of dry ash and for 1g of aluminum foil the cumulative amount of hydrogen was in the range of 119-126 L/kg of dry ash. This indicated that the hydrogen gas yield was significantly a function of supplementary aluminum and the intrinsic alkaline environment of the BA residues rather than ash source or particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs

  15. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimle, Timothy [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  16. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (welding process. Mn generation rates for the fractions were tabulated, and the influence of ozone is discussed. The conclusions are that exposures to welding fumes include multiple Mn species, both

  17. Role of arc mode in laser-metal active gas arc hybrid welding of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Geng; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed arc is more effective to improve the stability of laser-arc hybrid welding. • LCHW has the highest fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries. • Grain refinement depends on effective current of the arc. • LSHW has the most apparent vestige of texture components. • The microstructure and microtexture formation mechanisms were summarized. - Abstract: Arc mode plays an important role in joint characterizations of arc welding, but it has been seldom considered in laser-arc hybrid welding. This paper investigated the role of arc mode on laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding of mild steel. Three arc modes were employed, which were cold metal transfer (CMT), pulsed spray arc and standard short circuiting arc. Microtexture of the joints were observed and measured via electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) system to reveal the effect of arc mode on microstructure. Mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by tensile and Charpy V-notch impact tests. It was found that both the stability and mechanical properties of laser-CMT hybrid welding (LCHW) is the best, while those of laser-standard short circuiting arc welding (LSHW) is the worst. OM and EBSD results showed that the fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries in fusion zone decreases gradually in the sequence of LCHW, laser-pulsed spray arc welding and LSHW, while the mean grain size increases gradually. Finally, the microstructure formation mechanisms and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties were summarized by the loss of alloying element and the stirring effect in molten pool

  18. Low Power Operation of Temperature-Modulated Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgués, Javier; Marco, Santiago

    2018-01-25

    Mobile applications based on gas sensing present new opportunities for low-cost air quality monitoring, safety, and healthcare. Metal oxide semiconductor (MOX) gas sensors represent the most prominent technology for integration into portable devices, such as smartphones and wearables. Traditionally, MOX sensors have been continuously powered to increase the stability of the sensing layer. However, continuous power is not feasible in many battery-operated applications due to power consumption limitations or the intended intermittent device operation. This work benchmarks two low-power, duty-cycling, and on-demand modes against the continuous power one. The duty-cycling mode periodically turns the sensors on and off and represents a trade-off between power consumption and stability. On-demand operation achieves the lowest power consumption by powering the sensors only while taking a measurement. Twelve thermally modulated SB-500-12 (FIS Inc. Jacksonville, FL, USA) sensors were exposed to low concentrations of carbon monoxide (0-9 ppm) with environmental conditions, such as ambient humidity (15-75% relative humidity) and temperature (21-27 °C), varying within the indicated ranges. Partial Least Squares (PLS) models were built using calibration data, and the prediction error in external validation samples was evaluated during the two weeks following calibration. We found that on-demand operation produced a deformation of the sensor conductance patterns, which led to an increase in the prediction error by almost a factor of 5 as compared to continuous operation (2.2 versus 0.45 ppm). Applying a 10% duty-cycling operation of 10-min periods reduced this prediction error to a factor of 2 (0.9 versus 0.45 ppm). The proposed duty-cycling powering scheme saved up to 90% energy as compared to the continuous operating mode. This low-power mode may be advantageous for applications that do not require continuous and periodic measurements, and which can tolerate slightly higher

  19. Gas phase emitter effect of thulium within ceramic metal halide lamps in dependence on frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Depta, M.; Bergner, A.; Hoebing, T.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P. [Ruhr University Bochum, Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Denissen, C.; Suijker, J. [Philips Lighting, Category Prof. Lamps, PO Box 80020, NL-5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    The gas phase emitter effect within ceramic metal halide (CMH) lamps reduces the effective work function of the electrode material and, therewith, the electrode temperature. An investigation of the gas phase emitter effect of thulium (Tm) within CMH lamps seeded with Tm iodide (TmI3) is carried out. For this purpose, phase resolved images of the arc attachment and measurements of the electrode temperature, Tm atom and ion densities are performed in dependence on operating frequency by pyrometry and optical emission spectroscopy. Additionally, the influence of a sodium iodide (NaI) admixture is studied. The emitter effect is generated by means of a monolayer of Tm atoms on the electrode surface generated by a Tm ion current within the cathodic phase. It overlaps onto the anodic phase at higher frequencies of some hundreds of hertz. The reason is the finite life time of the monolayer, which is determined by the adsorption energy of Tm on the tungsten surface. Due to the low electric field strength in front of the anode and the mass inertia, the emitter ions and atoms remain in front of the anode. They retard the decay of the monolayer and with it the increase of the work function. Moreover, a comparison of a lamp seeded with TmI3 and sodium iodide (NaI) with a lamp seeded only with TmI3 illustrates a slight reduction of the electrode tip temperature caused by a higher Tm saturation vapour pressure and a higher Tm amount within the lamp filling. The influence of Na appears to be quite low. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)

  1. Spraying of metallic powders by hybrid gas/water torch and the effects of inert gas shrouding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavka, Tetyana; Matějíček, Jiří; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-4 (2012), s. 695-705 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA MPO FR-TI2/561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : copper * tungsten * hybrid water-gas torch * plasma facing materials * plasma spraying * gas shroud Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/j07t3222hnv87882/fulltext.pdf

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  3. Remarkably enhanced gas separation by partial self-conversion of a laminated membrane to metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Pan, Jia Hong; Wang, Nanyi; Steinbach, Frank; Liu, Xinlei; Caro, Jürgen

    2015-03-02

    Separation methods based on 2D interlayer galleries are currently gaining widespread attention. The potential of such galleries as high-performance gas-separation membranes is however still rarely explored. Besides, it is well recognized that gas permeance and separation factor are often inversely correlated in membrane-based gas separation. Therefore, breaking this trade-off becomes highly desirable. Here, the gas-separation performance of a 2D laminated membrane was improved by its partial self-conversion to metal-organic frameworks. A ZIF-8-ZnAl-NO3 layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite membrane was thus successfully prepared in one step by partial conversion of the ZnAl-NO3 LDH membrane, ultimately leading to a remarkably enhanced H2 /CH4 separation factor and H2 permeance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  5. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G.; Breckenridge, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H − (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M IIa H − (M IIa = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H − and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH − and MgH − species, the other M IIa H − species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns 2 ) and H − (1s 2 ). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M IIa H − species than for RG–H − . Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M IIa H − species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M IIa atom to move away from the incoming H −

  6. Attraction induced frictionless sliding of rare gas monolayer on metallic surfaces: an efficient strategy for superlubricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junhui; Zhang, Yanning; Lu, Zhibin; Xue, Qunji; Wang, Liping

    2017-05-10

    Friction on a nanoscale revealed rich load-dependent behavior, which departs strongly from the long-standing Amonton's law. Whilst electrostatic repulsion-induced friction collapse for rare gas sliding over metallic surfaces in a high-load regime was reported by Righi et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 99, 176101), the significant role of attraction on frictional properties has not been reported to date. In this study, the frictional motion of Xe/Cu(111), Xe/Pd(111) and Ar/Cu(111) was studied using van der Waals corrected density functional calculations. An attraction-induced zero friction, which is a signal of superlubricity, was found for the sliding systems. The superlubric state results from the disappearance of the potential corrugation along the favored sliding path as a consequence of the potential crossing in the attractive regime when the interfacial pressure approaches a critical-value. The finding of an attraction-driven friction drop, together with the repulsion-induced collapse in the high-load regime, which breaks down the classic Amonton's law, provides a distinct approach for the realization of inherent superlubricity in some adsorbate/substrate interfaces.

  7. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Manship, Daniel R; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H(-) (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH(-) (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H(-) and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH(-) and MgH(-) species, the other MIIaH(-) species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns(2)) and H(-)(1s(2)). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH(-) species than for RG-H(-). Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH(-) species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H(-).

  8. Two-Dimensional Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets for Membrane-Based Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuan; Li, Yanshuo; Ban, Yujie; Yang, Weishen

    2017-08-07

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) nanosheets could serve as ideal building blocks of molecular sieve membranes owing to their structural diversity and minimized mass-transfer barrier. To date, discovery of appropriate MOF nanosheets and facile fabrication of high performance MOF nanosheet-based membranes remain as great challenges. A modified soft-physical exfoliation method was used to disintegrate a lamellar amphiprotic MOF into nanosheets with a high aspect ratio. Consequently sub-10 nm-thick ultrathin membranes were successfully prepared, and these demonstrated a remarkable H 2 /CO 2 separation performance, with a separation factor of up to 166 and H 2 permeance of up to 8×10 -7  mol m -2  s -1  Pa -1 at elevated testing temperatures owing to a well-defined size-exclusion effect. This nanosheet-based membrane holds great promise as the next generation of ultrapermeable gas separation membrane. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A Review on Breathing Behaviors of Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs for Gas Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mays Alhamami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs are a new class of microporous materials that possess framework flexibility, large surface areas, “tailor-made” framework functionalities, and tunable pore sizes. These features empower MOFs superior performances and broader application spectra than those of zeolites and phosphine-based molecular sieves. In parallel with designing new structures and new chemistry of MOFs, the observation of unique breathing behaviors upon adsorption of gases or solvents stimulates their potential applications as host materials in gas storage for renewable energy. This has attracted intense research energy to understand the causes at the atomic level, using in situ X-ray diffraction, calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. This article is developed in the following order: first to introduce the definition of MOFs and the observation of their framework flexibility. Second, synthesis routes of MOFs are summarized with the emphasis on the hydrothermal synthesis, owing to the environmental-benign and economically availability of water. Third, MOFs exhibiting breathing behaviors are summarized, followed by rationales from thermodynamic viewpoint. Subsequently, effects of various functionalities on breathing behaviors are appraised, including using post-synthetic modification routes. Finally, possible framework spatial requirements of MOFs for yielding breathing behaviors are highlighted as the design strategies for new syntheses.

  10. TIG AISI-316 welds using an inert gas welding chamber and different filler metals: Changes in mechanical properties and microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This report analyses the influence of the use of an inert gas welding chamber with a totally inert atmosphere on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel TIG welds, using AISI ER316L, AISI 308L and Inconel 625 as filler metals. When compared with the typical TIG process, the use of the inert gas chamber induced changes in the microstructure, mainly an increase in the presence of vermicular ferrite and ferrite stringers, what resulted in higher yield strengths and lower values of hardness. Its effect on other characteristics of the joins, such as tensile strength, depended on the filler metal. The best combination of mechanical characteristics was obtained when welding in the inert gas chamber using Inconel 625 as filler metal.

    En este estudio se analiza la influencia que el uso de una cámara de soldadura de gas inerte tiene sobre la microestructura y las propiedades mecánicas de las soldaduras TIG en el acero inoxidable austenítico AISI-316L cuando se emplean AISI ER316L, AISI 308L e Inconel 625 como materiales de aporte. Cuando se compara con el típico proceso de TIG, el uso de una cámara de gas inerte induce cambios en la microestructura, incrementando la presencia de ferrita vermicular y de laminillas de ferrita, resultando en un aumento del límite elástico y una pérdida de dureza. Su influencia sobre otras características de las soldaduras como la carga de rotura depende de la composición del material de aporte. La mejor combinación de propiedades mecánicas se obtuvo usando el Inconel 625 como material de aporte y soldando en la cámara de gas inerte.

  11. First Results from the Herschel and ALMA Spectroscopic Surveys of the SMC: The Relationship between [C II]-bright Gas and CO-bright Gas at Low Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Katherine E.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wolfire, Mark; Warren, Steven R.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Croxall, Kevin; Pellegrini, Eric; Smith, John-David; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Muller, Erik; Verdugo, Celia; Zinnecker, Hans; Okada, Yoko

    2018-02-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides the only laboratory to study the structure of molecular gas at high resolution and low metallicity. We present results from the Herschel Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (HS3), which mapped the key far-IR cooling lines [C II], [O I], [N II], and [O III] in five star-forming regions, and new ALMA 7 m array maps of {}12{CO} and {}13{CO} (2-1) with coverage overlapping four of the five HS3 regions. We detect [C II] and [O I] throughout all of the regions mapped. The data allow us to compare the structure of the molecular clouds and surrounding photodissociation regions using {}13{CO}, {}12{CO}, [C II], and [O I] emission at ≲ 10\\prime\\prime (value at high {A}V in the centers of the clouds and fall to ∼ 1/5{--}1/10× the Milky Way value in the outskirts, indicating the presence of translucent molecular gas not traced by bright {}12{CO} emission. We estimate the amount of molecular gas traced by bright [C II] emission at low {A}V and bright {}12{CO} emission at high {A}V. We find that most of the molecular gas is at low {A}V and traced by bright [C II] emission, but that faint {}12{CO} emission appears to extend to where we estimate that the {{{H}}}2-to-H I transition occurs. By converting our {{{H}}}2 gas estimates to a CO-to-{{{H}}}2 conversion factor (X CO), we show that X CO is primarily a function of {A}V, consistent with simulations and models of low-metallicity molecular clouds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Electronic Stopping of Slow Protons in Transition and Rare Earth Metals: Breakdown of the Free Electron Gas Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D; Bruckner, B; Moro, M V; Gruber, S; Goebl, D; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M; Steinberger, R; Duchoslav, J; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P

    2017-03-10

    The electronic stopping cross sections (SCS) of Ta and Gd for slow protons have been investigated experimentally. The data are compared to the results for Pt and Au to learn how electronic stopping in transition and rare earth metals correlates with features of the electronic band structures. The extraordinarily high SCS observed for protons in Ta and Gd cannot be understood in terms of a free electron gas model, but are related to the high densities of both occupied and unoccupied electronic states in these metals.

  13. Electro-physical properties of thin films based on metal-containing polyacrylonitrile for application in low temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenistaya, T. V.; Ivanenko, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The metal-containing (Cu, Co, Ag, Cr) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) thin films were fabricated using IR-pyrolysis under low vacuum conditions in different temperature and time modes. The thickness of the fabricated films was between 0.01÷0.68 μm. The metal-containing PAN films had the resistance values in the range from 2.9·102 to 5.1·1011 Ohm. It has been investigated that the film thickness, resistance and gas sensitivity of the samples depends on the composition of the initial solution and on the process parameters of the film material’s fabrication. It has been studied that the samples demonstrate gas-sensing properties to CO, NO2, Cl2 and gasoline vapours at room temperature.

  14. Filtration of chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas by engineered UiO-66-NH2metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browe, Matthew A; Napolitano, Amedeo; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W

    2017-06-15

    Chlorine (Cl 2 ) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) are heavily utilized industrial chemicals that present significant respiratory health risks. The metal-organic framework UiO-66-NH 2 has shown an unprecedented ability in powder form to remove chlorine gas. Here, we engineered UiO-66-NH 2 into 20×40 mesh granules and evaluated their ability to remove chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas challenges. The exposed materials were characterized with nitrogen isotherms, powder X-ray diffraction, and attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Breakthrough results revealed that UiO-66-NH 2 sorption of chlorine and hydrogen chloride met or exceeded sorption of state-of-the-art metal-impregnated activated carbon materials on a mass and volume basis in engineered form. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. In Situ Apparatus to Study Gas-Metal Reactions and Wettability at High Temperatures for Hot-Dip Galvanizing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltsov, A.; Cornu, M.-J.; Scheid, J.

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of gas-metal reactions and related surface wettability at high temperatures is often limited due to the lack of in situ surface characterization. Ex situ transfers at low temperature between annealing furnace, wettability device, and analytical tools induce noticeable changes of surface composition distinct from the reality of the phenomena.Therefore, a high temperature wettability device was designed in order to allow in situ sample surface characterization by x-rays photoelectron spectroscopy after gas/metal and liquid metal/solid metal surface reactions. Such airless characterization rules out any contamination and oxidation of surfaces and reveals their real composition after heat treatment and chemical reaction. The device consists of two connected reactors, respectively, dedicated to annealing treatments and wettability measurements. Heat treatments are performed in an infrared lamp furnace in a well-controlled atmosphere conditions designed to reproduce gas-metal reactions occurring during the industrial recrystallization annealing of steels. Wetting experiments are carried out in dispensed drop configuration with the precise control of the deposited droplets kinetic energies. The spreading of drops is followed by a high-speed CCD video camera at 500-2000 frames/s in order to reach information at very low contact time. First trials have started to simulate phenomena occurring during recrystallization annealing and hot-dip galvanizing on polished pure Fe and FeAl8 wt.% samples. The results demonstrate real surface chemistry of steel samples after annealing when they are put in contact with liquid zinc alloy bath during hot-dip galvanizing. The wetting results are compared to literature data and coupled with the characterization of interfacial layers by FEG-Auger. It is fair to conclude that the results show the real interest of such in situ experimental setup for interfacial chemistry studies.

  16. Metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Jian-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this research was to use metal catalysts supported on activated carbon fibers (ACFs) to remove 16 species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incineration flue gas. We tested three different metal loadings (0.11 wt%, 0.29 wt%, and 0.34 wt%) and metals (Pt, Pd, and Cu), and two different pretreatment solutions (HNO(3) and NaOH). The results demonstrated that the ACF-supported metal catalysts removed the PAHs through adsorption and catalysis. Among the three metals, Pt was most easily adsorbed on the ACFs and was the most active in oxidation of PAHs. The mesopore volumes and density of new functional groups increased significantly after the ACFs were pretreated with either solutions, and this increased the measured metal loading in HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. These data confirm that improved PAH removal can be achieved with HNO(3)-0.48% Pd/ACFs and NaOH-0.52% Pd/ACFs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. First Results from the $Herschel$ and ALMA Spectroscopic Surveys of the SMC: The Relationship Between [CII]-bright Gas and CO-bright Gas at Low Metallicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, Katherine E.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wolfire, Mark; Warren, Steven R.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Croxall, Kevin; Pellegrini, Eric; Smith, John-David; Rubio, Monica; Indebetouw, Remy; Israel, Frank P.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Muller, Erik

    2018-01-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides the only laboratory to study the structure of molecular gas at high resolution and low metallicity. We present results from the Herschel Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (HS$^{3}$), which mapped the key far-IR cooling lines [CII], [OI], [NII], and [OIII] in five star-forming regions, and new ALMA 7m-array maps of $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO $(2-1)$ with coverage overlapping four of the five HS$^{3}$ regions. We detect [CII] and [OI] throughout all of the r...

  18. A Customized Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Based Gas Sensor Array for Onion Quality Evaluation: System Development and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduru, Tharun; Rains, Glen C.; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    A gas sensor array, consisting of seven Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) sensors that are sensitive to a wide range of organic volatile compounds was developed to detect rotten onions during storage. These MOS sensors were enclosed in a specially designed Teflon chamber equipped with a gas delivery system to pump volatiles from the onion samples into the chamber. The electronic circuit mainly comprised a microcontroller, non-volatile memory chip, and trickle-charge real time clock chip, serial communication chip, and parallel LCD panel. User preferences are communicated with the on-board microcontroller through a graphical user interface developed using LabVIEW. The developed gas sensor array was characterized and the discrimination potential was tested by exposing it to three different concentrations of acetone (ketone), acetonitrile (nitrile), ethyl acetate (ester), and ethanol (alcohol). The gas sensor array could differentiate the four chemicals of same concentrations and different concentrations within the chemical with significant difference. Experiment results also showed that the system was able to discriminate two concentrations (196 and 1964 ppm) of methlypropyl sulfide and two concentrations (145 and 1452 ppm) of 2-nonanone, two key volatile compounds emitted by rotten onions. As a proof of concept, the gas sensor array was able to achieve 89% correct classification of sour skin infected onions. The customized low-cost gas sensor array could be a useful tool to detect onion postharvest diseases in storage. PMID:25587975

  19. Direct Structural Identification of Gas Induced Gate-Opening Coupled with Commensurate Adsorption in a Microporous Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasis; Wang, Hao; Plonka, Anna M; Emge, Thomas J; Parise, John B; Li, Jing

    2016-08-08

    Gate-opening is a unique and interesting phenomenon commonly observed in flexible porous frameworks, where the pore characteristics and/or crystal structures change in response to external stimuli such as adding or removing guest molecules. For gate-opening that is induced by gas adsorption, the pore-opening pressure often varies for different adsorbate molecules and, thus, can be applied to selectively separate a gas mixture. The detailed understanding of this phenomenon is of fundamental importance to the design of industrially applicable gas-selective sorbents, which remains under investigated due to the lack of direct structural evidence for such systems. We report a mechanistic study of gas-induced gate-opening process of a microporous metal-organic framework, [Mn(ina)2 ] (ina=isonicotinate) associated with commensurate adsorption, by a combination of several analytical techniques including single crystal X-ray diffraction, in situ powder X-ray diffraction coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (XRD-DSC), and gas adsorption-desorption methods. Our study reveals that the pronounced and reversible gate opening/closing phenomena observed in [Mn(ina)2 ] are coupled with a structural transition that involves rotation of the organic linker molecules as a result of interaction of the framework with adsorbed gas molecules including carbon dioxide and propane. The onset pressure to open the gate correlates with the extent of such interaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A Customized Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Based Gas Sensor Array for Onion Quality Evaluation: System Development and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharun Konduru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor array, consisting of seven Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS sensors that are sensitive to a wide range of organic volatile compounds was developed to detect rotten onions during storage. These MOS sensors were enclosed in a specially designed Teflon chamber equipped with a gas delivery system to pump volatiles from the onion samples into the chamber. The electronic circuit mainly comprised a microcontroller, non-volatile memory chip, and trickle-charge real time clock chip, serial communication chip, and parallel LCD panel. User preferences are communicated with the on-board microcontroller through a graphical user interface developed using LabVIEW. The developed gas sensor array was characterized and the discrimination potential was tested by exposing it to three different concentrations of acetone (ketone, acetonitrile (nitrile, ethyl acetate (ester, and ethanol (alcohol. The gas sensor array could differentiate the four chemicals of same concentrations and different concentrations within the chemical with significant difference. Experiment results also showed that the system was able to discriminate two concentrations (196 and 1964 ppm of methlypropyl sulfide and two concentrations (145 and 1452 ppm of 2-nonanone, two key volatile compounds emitted by rotten onions. As a proof of concept, the gas sensor array was able to achieve 89% correct classification of sour skin infected onions. The customized low-cost gas sensor array could be a useful tool to detect onion postharvest diseases in storage.

  1. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Breckenridge, W. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup −} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup −} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup −} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup −} and MgH{sup −} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup −}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species than for RG–H{sup −}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup −}.

  2. Blue-Light Hazard From Gas Metal Arc Welding of Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to quantify the blue-light hazard from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminum alloys. The exposure level is expected to depend on the welding conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the blue-light hazard under various welding conditions. We experimentally conducted GMAW of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions and measured the spectral radiance of the arcs. The effective blue-light radiance, which the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has defined to quantify the exposure level of blue light, was calculated from the measured spectral radiance. The maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s for this effective blue-light radiance was calculated. The effective blue-light radiance measured in this study was in the range of 2.9-20.0 W cm-2·sr. The corresponding maximum acceptable exposure duration per 10000 s was only 5.0-34 s, so it is hazardous to view the welding arc. The effective blue-light radiance was higher at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents, when pulsed welding currents were used rather than steady welding currents, and when magnesium was included in the welding materials. It is very hazardous to view the arcs in GMAW of aluminum alloys. Welders and their helpers should use appropriate eye protection in arc-welding operations. They should also avoid direct light exposure when starting an arc-welding operation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  3. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Konrad; Helwig, Andreas; Müller, Gerhard; Hille, Pascal; Eickhoff, Martin

    2015-09-23

    In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO₂ and NH₃, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  4. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  5. Effect of electric arc, gas oxygen torch and induction melting techniques on the marginal accuracy of cast base-metal and noble metal-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cogolludo, Pablo; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate alloy composition and melting technique by evaluating the marginal accuracy of cast metal-ceramic crowns. Seventy standardised stainless-steel abutments were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were randomly divided into four alloy groups: Group 1: palladium-gold (Pd-Au), Group 2: nickel-chromium-titanium (Ni-Cr-Ti), Group 3: nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and Group 4: titanium (Ti). Groups 1, 2 and 3 were in turn subdivided to be melted and cast using: (a) gas oxygen torch and centrifugal casting machine (TC) or (b) induction and centrifugal casting machine (IC). Group 4 was melted and cast using electric arc and vacuum/pressure machine (EV). All of the metal-ceramic crowns were luted with glass-ionomer cement. The marginal fit was measured under an optical microscope before and after cementation using image analysis software. All data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Duncan's multiple range test was run for post-hoc comparisons. The Student's t-test was used to investigate the influence of cementation (α=0.05). Uncemented Pd-Au/TC samples achieved the best marginal adaptation, while the worst fit corresponded to the luted Ti/EV crowns. Pd-Au/TC, Ni-Cr and Ti restorations demonstrated significantly increased misfit after cementation. The Ni-Cr-Ti alloy was the most predictable in terms of differences in misfit when either torch or induction was applied before or after cementation. Cemented titanium crowns exceeded the clinically acceptable limit of 120μm. The combination of alloy composition, melting technique, casting method and luting process influences the vertical seal of cast metal-ceramic crowns. An accurate use of the gas oxygen torch may overcome the results attained with the induction system concerning the marginal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel (3,36)-connected and self-interpenetrated metal-organic framework with high thermal stability and gas-sorption capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Bao; Zhao, Ying; Meng, Xianggao; Zhang, Tianle

    2011-07-21

    By using a ligand containing pyridyl and carboxylate groups as units, a novel (3,36)-connected and self-interpenetrated metal-organic framework was constructed, which exhibited high thermal stability and gas sorption capabilities.

  7. Initial Testing for the Recommendation of Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Procedures for HY-80 Steel Plate Butt Joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD by Veronika J...FOR THE RECOMMENDATION OF IMPROVED GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROCEDURES FOR HY-80 STEEL PLATE BUTT JOINTS AT NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...at naval shipyards. This thesis explores arc weld theory to develop ideal submarine hull butt joint designs and recommends preliminary testing to

  8. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  9. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H 2 formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO 2 and UH 3

  10. Investigating the gas sorption mechanism in an rht -metal-organic framework through computational studies

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony T.

    2014-01-09

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were performed to investigate CO2 and H2 sorption in an rht-metal-organic framework (MOF) that was synthesized with a ligand having a nitrogen-rich trigonal core through trisubstituted triazine groups and amine functional groups. This MOF was synthesized by two different groups, each reporting their own distinct gas sorption measurements and crystal structure. Electronic structure calculations demonstrated that the small differences in the atomic positions between each group\\'s crystal structure resulted in different electrostatic parameters about the Cu2+ ions for the respective unit cells. Simulations of CO2 sorption were performed with and without many-body polarization effects and using our recently developed CO2 potentials, in addition to a well-known bulk CO2 model, in both crystallographic unit cells. Simulated CO2 sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heats of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by Eddaoudi et al. for both structures using the polarizable CO2 potential. For both crystal structures, the initial site for CO2 sorption were the Cu 2+ ions that had the higher positive charge in the unit cell, although the identity of this electropositive Cu2+ ion was different in each case. Simulations of H2 sorption were performed with three different hydrogen potentials of increasing anisotropy in both crystal structures and the results, especially with the highest fidelity model, agreed well with Eddaoudi et al.\\'s experimental data. The preferred site of H 2 sorption at low loading was between two Cu2+ ions of neighboring paddlewheels. The calculation of the normalized hydrogen dipole distribution for the polarizable model in both crystal structures aided in the identification of four distinct sorption sites in the MOF, which is consistent to what was observed in the experimental inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra. Lastly, while the

  11. Performance and stability analysis of gas-injection enhanced natural circulation in heavy-liquid-metal-cooled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon-Jong

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and stability of the gas-injection enhanced natural circulation in heavy-liquid-metal-cooled systems. The target system is STAR-LM, which is a 400-MWt-class advanced lead-cooled fast reactor under development by Argonne National Laboratory and Oregon State University. The primary loop of STAR-LM relies on natural circulation to eliminate main circulation pumps for enhancement of passive safety. To significantly increase the natural circulation flow rate for the incorporation of potential future power uprates, the injection of noncondensable gas into the coolant above the core is envisioned ("gas lift pump"). Reliance upon gas-injection enhanced natural circulation raises the concern of flow instability due to the relatively high temperature change in the reactor core and the two-phase flow condition in the riser. For this study, the one-dimensional flow field equations were applied to each flow section and the mixture models of two-phase flow, i.e., both the homogeneous and drift-flux equilibrium models were used in the two-phase region of the riser. For the stability analysis, the linear perturbation technique based on the frequency-domain approach was used by employing the Nyquist stability criterion and a numerical root search method. It has been shown that the thermal power of the STAR-LM natural circulation system could be increased from 400 up to 1152 MW with gas injection under the limiting void fraction of 0.30 and limiting coolant velocity of 2.0 m/s from the steady-state performance analysis. As the result of the linear stability analysis, it has turned out that the STAR-LM natural circulation system would be stable even with gas injection. In addition, through the parametric study, it has been found that the thermal inertia effects of solid structures such as fuel rod and heat exchanger tube should be considered in the stability analysis model. The results of this study will be a part of the

  12. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    Ambitions in exploration of oil and gas fields at deeper water depth require continuous investigation and maintenance. The transportation pipelines laid in deep waters are both subjected to corrosion and buckling due to environmental phenomena. They may also often undergo branching (namely hot tapping) to redirect (or add to) the transportation paths. Mechanical joints and welding are both considered as available alternatives when sectioning and replacement of the pipes at shallow waters is necessary, yet, welding is more promising for deep waters where remote operation is central. Fusion welding on the other hand comprises several technological detractions for sound operations under high ambient pressures disregarding its low cost and flexibility. The foremost detracting phenomenon in the arc welding is called 'arc root constriction', which is defined as arc geometry shrinkage under the increased pressure. Consequently, the power delivery to the weld pool at different pressure levels is a major worry. Effects of ionization and dissociation energies of different gases and mixtures, partial pressure of environmental gases including hydrogen and oxygen, gasification and degasification of the weld metal, inclusions that affect the phase transformation, absorption and desorption kinetics, oxidation and deoxidation reactions and many more are the phenomena that can possibly be altered by the gas type and ambient pressure level. Spattering and fume generation is a problematic issue since the arc is rather unstable under high pressure. Thus, seeking the effect of different chamber gas mixtures on welding parameters, final microstructure and mechanical properties is the main objective of this work.Statistical analysis of the collected voltage and current waveforms is carried out to identify the source of arc misbehavior and instability (discussed in Paper I). The stochastic parameters is related to the electrical stability and resolved into a number of varying

  13. Detecting metal-poor gas accretion in the star-forming dwarf galaxies UM 461 and Mrk 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, P.; Scott, T. C.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Demarco, R.; Humphrey, A.; Papaderos, P.

    2018-03-01

    Using VIMOS-IFU observations, we study the interstellar medium (ISM) of two star-forming dwarf galaxies, UM 461 and Mrk 600. Our aim was to search for the existence of metallicity inhomogeneities that might arise from infall of nearly pristine gas feeding ongoing localized star-formation. The IFU data allowed us to study the impact of external gas accretion on the chemical evolution as well as the ionised gas kinematics and morphologies of these galaxies. Both systems show signs of morphological distortions, including cometary-like morphologies. We analysed the spatial variation of 12 + log(O/H) abundances within both galaxies using the direct method (Te), the widely applied HII-CHI-mistry code, as well as by employing different standard calibrations. For UM 461 our results show that the ISM is fairly well mixed, at large scales, however we find an off-centre and low-metallicity region with 12 + log(O/H) ISM in our analysed galaxies are consistent with these systems being at different evolutionary stages.

  14. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  15. Discriminating Properties of Alkali Metal Ions Towards the Constituents of Proteins and Nucleic Acids. Conclusions from Gas-Phase and Theoretical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Mary T; Armentrout, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative insight into the structures and thermodynamics of alkali metal cations interacting with biological molecules can be obtained from studies in the gas phase combined with theoretical work. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the experimental and theoretical techniques are first summarized and results for such work on complexes of alkali metal cations with amino acids, small peptides, and nucleobases are reviewed. Periodic trends in how these interactions vary as the alkali metal cations get heavier are highlighted.

  16. Sweep gas membrane distillation in a membrane contactor with metallic hollow fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, Sushumna; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Vankelecom, I.F.J.; Mericq, J.P.; Belleville, M.P.; Hengl, N.; Sanchez Marcano, Jose

    2015-01-01

    This work revolves around the use of porous metal hollow fibers in membrane distillation. Various stages are covered, starting from membrane synthesis up to the testing of a pilot scale membrane module. Mechanically stable metal hollow fibers have been synthesized by phase inversion of a stainless

  17. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  18. Transport and transformation of mercury during wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous metal smelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilou; Wang, Dongli; Peng, Bing; Chai, Liyuan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Shu; Yang, Bentao; Xiang, Kaisong; Liu, Cao

    2017-10-01

    Reducing mercury emission is hot topic for international society. The first step for controlling mercury in fuel gas is to investigate mercury distribution and during the flue gas treatment process. The mercury transport and transformation in wet flue gas cleaning process of nonferrous smelting industry was studied in the paper with critical important parameters, such as the solution temperature, Hg 0 concentration, SO 2 concentration, and Hg 2+ concentration at the laboratory scale. The mass ratio of the mercury distribution in the solution, flue gas, sludge, and acid fog from the simulated flue gas containing Hg 2+ and Hg 0 was 49.12~65.54, 18.34~35.42, 11.89~14.47, and 1.74~3.54%, respectively. The primary mercury species in the flue gas and acid fog were gaseous Hg 0 and dissolved Hg 2+ . The mercury species in the cleaning solution were dissolved Hg 2+ and colloidal mercury, which accounted for 56.56 and 7.34% of the total mercury, respectively. Various mercury compounds, including Hg 2 Cl 2 , HgS, HgCl 2 , HgSO 4 , and HgO, existed in the sludge. These results for mercury distribution and speciation are highly useful in understanding mercury transport and transformation during the wet flue gas cleaning process. This research is conducive for controlling mercury emissions from nonferrous smelting flue gas and by-products.

  19. Experience in the development of metal uranium-base nuclear fuel for heavy-water gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikhmin, V.P.; Vorob'ev, M.A.; Gusarov, M.S.; Davidenko, A.S.; Zelenskij, V.F.; Ivanov, V.E.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Stukalov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to solve the problem of making the development of radiation-resistant uranium fuel for power reactors including the heavy-water gas-cooled KS-150 reactor. Factors are considered that limit the lifetime of uranium fuel elements, and the ways of suppressing them are discussed. Possible reasons of the insufficient radiation resistance of uranium rod fuel element and the progress attained are analyzed. Some general problems on the fuel manufacture processes are discussed. The main results are presented on the operation of the developed fuel in research reactor loops and the commercial heavy-water KS-150 reactor. The results confirm an exceptionally high radiation resistance of fuel to burn-ups of 1.5-2%. The successful solution of a large number of problems associated with the development of metal uranium fuel provides for new possibilities of using metal uranium in power reactors

  20. Thermodynamics of gas-metal-slag equilibria for applications in in situ and ex situ vitrification melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Reimann, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    An equilibrium thermodynamic model for melting mixed waste was evaluated using the STEPSOL computer code. STEPSOL uses free energy minimization techniques to predict equilibrium composition from input species and user selected species in the output. The model assumes equilibrium between gas, slag, and metallic phases. Input for the model was developed using compositional data from Pit 9 of the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Thermodynamic data were primarily from compilations published by the US Government. The results of model evaluation indicate that the amount of plutonium chloride or plutonium oxyhydroxide that would be evaporated into the vapor phase would be minor. Relatively more uranium chloride and uranium oxyhydroxide would be vaporized. However, a hazards analysis was not part of the present task. Minor amounts of plutonium and uranium would be reduced to the metallic state, but these amounts should alloy with the iron-chromium-nickel metallic phase. The vast majority of the plutonium and uranium are in the slag phase as oxides. Results of the calculations show that silica and silicates dominate the products and that the system is very reducing. The major gases are carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with lesser amounts of carbon dioxide and water. High vapor pressure metals are considered but were not analyzed using STEPSOL. STEPSOL does not make predictions of distribution of species between phases

  1. Multi-metallic oxides as catalysts for light alcohols and hydrocarbons from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Miguel [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, L; Galindo, H de J; Dominguez, J. M; Salmon, Manuel [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    A series of Cu-Co-Cr oxides doped with alkaline metals (M), were prepared by the coprecipitation method with metal nitrates (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) and (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} in aqueous solution. The calcined products were used as catalysts for the Fisher-Tropsch synthesis in a stainless-steel fixed bed microreactor. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, and the specific surface area, pore size and nitrogen adsorption-desorption properties were also determined. The alkaline metals favored the methanol synthesis and prevent the dehydration reactions whereas the hydrocarbon formation is independent to these metals. [Spanish] Una serie de oxidos Cu-Co-Cr soportados con metales alcalinos (M), fueron preparados por el metodo con nitratos metalicos (Cu{sup I}I, CO{sup I}I, CR{sup I}II) y (M{sub 2})CO{sub 3} en soluciones acuosas. Los productos calcinados fueron usados como catalizadores para la sintesis de Fisher-tropsch en la superficie fija de un microreactor de acero inoxidable. El material fue caracterizado por difraccion de rayos X y el area de superficie especifica, el tamano de poro y propiedades de absorcion-desorcion de nitrogeno fueron determinadas. Los metales alcalinos favorecieron la sintesis de metanol y previnieron las reacciones de deshidratacion, mientras que la formacion de hidrocarburos es independiente de estos metales.

  2. SDSS-IV MaNGA: What Shapes the Distribution of Metals in Galaxies? Exploring the Roles of the Local Gas Fraction and Escape Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Zakamska, N. L.; Cleary, J.; Zhu, G.; Brinkmann, J.; Drory, N.; THE MaNGA TEAM

    2018-01-01

    We determine the local metallicity of the ionized gas for more than 9.2 × 105 star-forming regions (spaxels) located in 1023 nearby galaxies included in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV MaNGA integral field spectroscopy unit survey. We use the dust extinction derived from the Balmer decrement and the stellar template fitting in each spaxel to estimate the local gas and stellar mass densities, respectively. We also use the measured rotation curves to determine the local escape velocity (V esc). We then analyze the relationships between the local metallicity and both the local gas fraction (μ) and V esc. We find that metallicity decreases with both increasing μ and decreasing V esc. By examining the residuals in these relations we show that the gas fraction plays a more primary role in the local chemical enrichment than does V esc. We show that the gas-regulator model of chemical evolution provides a reasonable explanation of the metallicity on local scales. The best-fit parameters for this model are consistent with the metal loss caused by momentum-driven galactic outflows. We also argue that both the gas fraction and the local escape velocity are connected to the local stellar surface density, which in turn is a tracer of the epoch at which the dominant local stellar population formed.

  3. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine an activation energy for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  4. Genetic algorithm based optimization of the process parameters for gas metal arc welding of AISI 904 L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiya, P.; Ajith, P. M.; Soundararajan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study is focused on welding of super austenitic stainless steel sheet using gas metal arc welding process with AISI 904 L super austenitic stainless steel with solid wire of 1.2 mm diameter. Based on the Box - Behnken design technique, the experiments are carried out. The input parameters (gas flow rate, voltage, travel speed and wire feed rate) ranges are selected based on the filler wire thickness and base material thickness and the corresponding output variables such as bead width (BW), bead height (BH) and depth of penetration (DP) are measured using optical microscopy. Based on the experimental data, the mathematical models are developed as per regression analysis using Design Expert 7.1 software. An attempt is made to minimize the bead width and bead height and maximize the depth of penetration using genetic algorithm.

  5. Genetic algorithm based optimization of the process parameters for gas metal arc welding of AISI 904 L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiya, P. [National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli (India); Ajith, P. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam (India); Soundararajan, R. [Sri Krishna College of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore (India)

    2013-08-15

    The present study is focused on welding of super austenitic stainless steel sheet using gas metal arc welding process with AISI 904 L super austenitic stainless steel with solid wire of 1.2 mm diameter. Based on the Box - Behnken design technique, the experiments are carried out. The input parameters (gas flow rate, voltage, travel speed and wire feed rate) ranges are selected based on the filler wire thickness and base material thickness and the corresponding output variables such as bead width (BW), bead height (BH) and depth of penetration (DP) are measured using optical microscopy. Based on the experimental data, the mathematical models are developed as per regression analysis using Design Expert 7.1 software. An attempt is made to minimize the bead width and bead height and maximize the depth of penetration using genetic algorithm.

  6. IR Laser-Irradiation of Metals in Vacuum and Hydrocarbons: Gas Phase Deposition of Metal-Carbon Nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Markéta; Pokorná, Dana; Šubrt, Jan; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdeněk; Pola, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2012), s. 14-20 ISSN 2156-7573 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : ir laser ablation * nanocomposite * amorphous metal Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865328473&origin=resultslist&sort=plf-f& src =s&st1=journal+of+advanced+microscopy+research&sid=s_jqQK1duuevUtbSYIapAz5%3a60&sot=b&sdt=b&sl=49&s= SRC TITLE%28journal+of+advanced+microscopy+research%29&relpos=9&relpos=9&searchTerm= SRC TITLE(journal of advanced microscopy research)

  7. Metal spray apparatus with a U-shaped electric inlet gas heater and a one-piece electric heater surrounding a nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovan, Ronald J.; Tierney, John C.; McLean, Leroy L.; Johnson, Lawrence L.; Verbael, David J.

    1995-01-01

    An electrically heated metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments.

  8. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas phase deposition of oxide and metal-oxide coatings on fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patokin, A.P.; Khrebtov, V.L.; Shirokov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Production processes and properties of oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) and metal-oxide (Mo-Al 2 O 3 , Mo-ZrO 2 , W-Al 2 O 3 , W-ZrO 2 ) coatings on molybdenum substrates and uranium dioxide fuel particles were investigated. It is shown that the main factors that have an effect on the deposition rate, density, microstructure and other properties of coatings are the deposition temperature, the ratio of H 2 and CO 2 flow rates, the total reactor pressure and the ratio of partial pressures of corresponding metal chlorides during formation of metal-oxide coatings

  10. Low-power-Consumption metal oxide NO2 gas sensor based on micro-heater and screen printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S E; Lee, H K; Choi, N J; Lee, J; Yang, W S; Kim, J; Jong, J J; Yoo, D J

    2012-07-01

    An NO2 micro gas sensor was fabricated based on a micro-heater using tin oxide nano-powders for effective gas detection and monitoring system with low power consumption and high sensitivity. The processes of the fabrication were acceptable to the conventional CMOS processes for mass-production. Semiconducting SnO2 nano-powders were synthesized via the co-precipitation method; and to increase the sensitivity of the NO2 gas rare metal dopants were added. In the structure of the micro-heater, the resistances of two semi-circular Pt heaters were connected to the spreader for thermal uniformity. The resistance of each heater becomes an electrically equal Wheatstone-bridge, which was divided in half by the heat spreading structure. Based on the aforementioned design, a low-power-consumption micro-heater was fabricated using the CMOS-compatible MEMS processes. A bridge-type micro-heater based on the Si substrate was fabricated via surface micro-machining. The NO2 sensing properties of a screen-printed tin oxide thick film device were measured The micro gas sensors showed substantial sensitivity down to 0.5 ppm NO2 at a low power consumption (34.2 mW).

  11. DIRECT FORMATION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN METAL-ENRICHED GAS AT THE HEART OF HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Lucio; Fiacconi, Davide [Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology, Institute for Computational Science, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Bonoli, Silvia [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon, Plaza San Juan 1, Planta-2, E-44001, Teruel (Spain); Quinn, Thomas [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Roškar, Rok [Scientific IT Services, ETH Zürich, Weinbergstrasse 11, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Shen, Sijing [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Wadsley, James, E-mail: lmayer@physik.uzh.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    We present novel 3D multi-scale smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers between the most massive galaxies at z ∼ 8–10, designed to scrutinize the direct collapse formation scenario for massive black hole seeds proposed in Mayer et al. The simulations achieve a resolution of 0.1 pc, and include both metallicity-dependent optically thin cooling and a model for thermal balance at high optical depth. We consider different formulations of the SPH hydrodynamical equations, including thermal and metal diffusion. When the two merging galaxy cores collide, gas infall produces a compact, optically thick nuclear disk with densities exceeding 10{sup −10} g cm{sup 3}. The disk rapidly accretes higher angular momentum gas from its surroundings reaching ∼5 pc and a mass of ≳10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙} in only a few 10{sup 4} years. Outside ≳2 pc it fragments into massive clumps. Instead, supersonic turbulence prevents fragmentation in the inner parsec region, which remains warm (∼3000–6000 K) and develops strong non-axisymmetric modes that cause prominent radial gas inflows (>10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}), forming an ultra-dense massive disky core. Angular momentum transport by non-axisymmetric modes should continue below our spatial resolution limit, quickly turning the disky core into a supermassive protostar which can collapse directly into a massive black hole of mass 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙} via the relativistic radial instability. Such a “cold direct collapse” explains naturally the early emergence of high-z QSOs. Its telltale signature would be a burst of gravitational waves in the frequency range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −1} Hz, possibly detectable by the planned eLISA interferometer.

  12. Electron gas interacting in a metal, submitted to a strong magnetic field; Gas de eletrons interagentes num metal, sujeito a um campo magnetico forte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Francisco Castilho

    1977-07-01

    Using the propagator's technique in the grand ensemble developed by Montroll and Ward we investigate the magnetic properties of an interacting electron gas in a strong magnetic field. The free propagator properly constructed shows that the spin paramagnetism does not have a term with strong temperature dependence, contrary to the result of Isihara. Considering the electron density to be constant, the dHVA oscillations in the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity, considering the effects of first exchange interactions, show only one phase in agreement with experimental result, while Ichimura and Isihara obtained two phases differing by {pi}/2. The effects of first order exchange interactions in the dHVA oscillations of the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity give rise to an exponential factor in the amplitudes of oscillator (Dingle factor), being the Dingle temperature linearly dependent of the Fermi velocity. The calculations of the ring diagram contribution to the grand partition function, show that the approximation used by Isihara for this calculations is not good and the dHVA oscillations of the contributions from the ring diagrams for the grand partition function have a phase differing by {pi}/2 from that obtained by Isihara. (author)

  13. Fluorocarbon seal replaces metal piston ring in low density gas environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, W. D.; Morgan, N. E.

    1967-01-01

    Reinforced fluorocarbon cupseal, which provides an integral lip-type seal, replaces the metal piston rings in piston-cylinder configurations used in the compression of low density gases. The fluorocarbon seal may be used as cryogenic compressor piston seals.

  14. Gas phase infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ionic clusters: metal oxides and microhydrated anions

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, T.

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of the present thesis is the structural characterization of metal oxide clusters in the framework of the Dedicated Research Center “Structure, Dynamics and Reactivity of Transition Metal Oxide Aggregates” (SFB 546), funded by the German Research Foundation. The SFB 546 aimed at developing a detailed understanding of the relationships between structure and reactivity in catalytic systems. A second goal of this thesis is the characterization of the solvation behavior of anions ...

  15. Study of Metal-Humic Catalysts before and After the Gas Desulphurization Process Using Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszka, Danuta; Wieckowska, Jadwiga

    2017-12-01

    The study of metal-humic catalysts before and after the SO2 conversion has been carried out using thermal analysis. The thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis has been carried out using Perkin-Elmer TGA 7 and DTA 7 equipment in an argonic atmosphere. The heating rate of samples in the DTA was 10 °C/min., and in the TGA 40 °C/min. The following catalysts have been chosen for analysis: H-Pb2+/450 °C, H-B/450 °C, H-Sn2+/450 °C, H-Ce 4+. The study of metal-humic catalysts using thermal analysis has shown that, in the DTA curves of studied catalysts before SO2 conversion, endothermic peaks related to decomposition of metal carbonates, melting of metals or decomposition of metal-humic bonding. In the DTA curves after the SO2 conversion process, there are additional endothermic peaks related to the presence of sulphur in the metal-humic compounds and to thermal decomposition of those bonds.

  16. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  17. Cold Gas Dynamic Manufacturing - A New Approach to Near-Net Shape Metal Component Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    transformations introduce further complications in the fabrication of Functionally Graded Material ( FGM ) components or the utilisation of novel nanocrystalline...reducing the gas velocity. Finally, the jet impacts the substrate plate and is decelerated to almost zero velocity in the axial direction. Particles...around its base allow the nozzle and chamber to slide as one along a ground base plate Powder Feed Inlet Process Gas Inlet High Speed Deposition

  18. Long-range dispersion interactions. II. Alkali-metal and rare-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Zhang, J.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion coefficients for the van der Waals interactions between the rare gases Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe and the low-lying states of Li, Na, K, and Rb are estimated using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The rare-gas oscillator strength distributions for the quadrupole and octupole transitions were derived by using high-quality calculations of rare-gas polarizabilities and dispersion coefficients to tune Hartree-Fock single-particle energies and expectation values

  19. Validation of ANSYS CFX for gas and liquid metal flows with conjugate heat transfer within the European project THINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papukchiev, A., E-mail: angel.papukchiev@grs.de; Buchholz, S.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • ANSYS CFX is validated for gas and liquid metal flows. • L-STAR and TALL-3D experiments are simulated. • Complex flow and heat transfer phenomena are modelled. • Conjugate heat transfer has to be considered in CFD analyses. - Abstract: Within the FP7 European project THINS (Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems), numerical tools for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulics of next generation rector systems were developed, applied and validated for innovative coolants. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH participated in THINS with activities related to the development and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and coupled System Thermal Hydraulics (STH) – CFD codes. High quality measurements from the L-STAR and TALL-3D experiments were used to assess the numerical results. Two-equation eddy viscosity and scale resolving turbulence models were used in the validation process of ANSYS CFX for gas and liquid metal flows with conjugate heat transfer. This paper provides a brief overview on the main results achieved at GRS within the project.

  20. Nitrogen oxides reduction by carbonaceous materials and carbon dioxide separation using regenerative metal oxides from fossil fuel based flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himanshu

    The ever-growing energy demands due to rising global population and continuing lifestyle improvements has placed indispensable emphasis on fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels leads to the emission of harmful gaseous pollutants such as oxides of sulfur (SOx) and nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2), mercury, particulate matter, etc. Documented evidence has proved that this air pollution leads to adverse environmental health. This dissertation focuses on the development of technologies for the control of NOx and CO2 emissions. The first part of the thesis (Chapters 2--6) deals with the development of carbon based post combustion NOx reduction technology called CARBONOX process. High temperature combustion oxidizes both atmospheric nitrogen and organic nitrogen in coal to nitric oxide (NO). The reaction rate between graphite and NO is slow and requires high temperature (>900°C). The presence of metallic species in coal char catalyzes the reaction. The reaction temperature is lowered in the presence of oxygen to about 600--850°C. Chemical impregnation, specifically sodium compounds, further lowers the reaction temperature to 350--600°C. Activated high sodium lignite char (HSLC) provided the best performance for NO reduction. The requirement of char for NOx reduction is about 8--12 g carbon/g NO reduced in the presence of 2% oxygen in the inlet gas. The second part of this dissertation (chapter 7--8) focuses on the development of a reaction-based process for the separation of CO2 from combustion flue gas. Certain metal oxides react with CO2 forming metal carbonates under flue gas conditions. They can be calcined separately to yield CO2. Calcium oxide (CaO) has been identified as a viable metal oxide for the carbonation-calcination reaction (CCR) scheme. CaO synthesized from naturally occurring precursors (limestone and dolomite) attained 45--55% of their stoichiometric conversion due to the susceptibility of their microporous structure. High surface area

  1. Grey–Taguchi method to optimize the percent zinc coating balances edge joints for galvanized steel sheets using metal inert gas pulse brazing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasempong Songsorn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to optimize the percent zinc coating balances edge joints of galvanized steel sheets using the metal inert gas pulse brazing process. The Taguchi method and grey relational analysis were used to determine the relationship between the metal inert gas pulse brazing process parameters and percent zinc coating balances edge joints. The metal inert gas pulse brazing process parameters used in this study included wire feed speeds, arc voltages, travel speed, peak currents, and pulse frequency. The characteristics of metal inert gas pulse brazing process that were considered to find response were percent zinc coating balances edge joints on the upper edge joint (PZBEJ1, the lower edge joint (PZBEJ2, and the back sides of the edge joint (PZBEJ3. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the impact of an individual process parameter on the quality parameters. The results showed that the optimal parameters in which grey relational grade increases at the highest level were wire feed speeds at 3.25 m/min, arc voltages at 16 V, travel speeds at 0.9 m/min, peak currents at 425 A, and pulse frequency at 35 Hz. These parameters gave a 74.90% higher response value than those of the initial parameters of metal inert gas pulse brazing process.

  2. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  3. In situ/operando studies for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift on metal oxide catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, José A; Hanson, Jonathan C; Stacchiola, Dario; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2013-08-07

    In this perspective article, we show how a series of in situ techniques {X-ray diffraction (XRD), pair-distribution-function analysis (PDF), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS)} can be combined to perform detailed studies of the structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal oxide catalysts used for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). Under reaction conditions most WGS catalysts undergo chemical transformations that drastically modify their composition with respect to that obtained during the synthesis process. Experiments of time-resolved in situ XRD, XAFS, and PDF indicate that the active phase of catalysts which combine Cu, Au or Pt with oxides such as ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, CeOx/TiO2 and Fe2O3 essentially involves nanoparticles of the reduced noble metals. The oxide support undergoes partial reduction and is not a simple spectator, facilitating the dissociation of water and in some cases modifying the chemical properties of the supported metal. Therefore, to optimize the performance of these catalysts one must take into consideration the properties of the metal and oxide phases. IR and AP-XPS have been used to study the reaction mechanism for the WGS on metal oxide catalysts. Data of IR spectroscopy indicate that formate species are not necessarily involved in the main reaction path for the water-gas shift on Cu-, Au- and Pt-based catalysts. Thus, a pure redox mechanism or associative mechanisms that involve either carbonate-like (CO3, HCO3) or carboxyl (HOCO) species should be considered. In the last two decades, there have been tremendous advances in our ability to study catalytic materials under reaction conditions and we are moving towards the major goal of fully understanding how the active sites for the production of hydrogen through the WGS actually

  4. Fabrication and characterisation of ligand-functionalised ultrapure monodispersed metal nanoparticle nanoassemblies employing advanced gas deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremariam Welearegay, Tesfalem; Cindemir, Umut; Österlund, Lars; Ionescu, Radu

    2018-02-01

    Here, we report for the first time the fabrication of ligand-functionalised ultrapure monodispersed metal nanoparticles (Au, Cu, and Pt) from their pure metal precursors using the advanced gas deposition technique. The experimental conditions during nanoparticle formation were adjusted in order to obtain ultrafine isolated nanoparticles on different substrates. The morphology and surface analysis of the as-deposited metal nanoparticles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, which demonstrated the formation of highly ordered pure crystalline nanoparticles with a relatively uniform size distribution of ∼10 nm (Au), ∼4 nm (Cu) and ∼3 nm (Pt), respectively. A broad range of organic ligands containing thiol or amine functional groups were attached to the nanoparticles to form continuous networks of nanoparticle-ligand nanoassemblies, which were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrical resistance of the functional nanoassemblies deposited in the gap spacing of two microfabricated parallel Au electrodes patterned on silicon substrates ranged between tens of kΩ and tens of MΩ, which is suitable for use in many applications including (bio)chemical sensors, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and molecular electronic rectifiers.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  6. Surface-Anchored Poly(4-vinylpyridine)–Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Metal Composites for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Bora

    2016-08-05

    A platform for chemiresistive gas detectors based upon single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersions stabilized by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) covalently immobilized onto a glass substrate was developed. To fabricate these devices, a glass substrate with gold electrodes is treated with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane. The resulting alkyl bromide coating presents groups that can react with the P4VP to covalently bond (anchor) the polymer–SWCNT composite to the substrate. Residual pyridyl groups in P4VP not consumed in this quaternization reaction are available to coordinate metal nanoparticles or ions chosen to confer selectivity and sensitivity to target gas analytes. Generation of P4VP coordinated to silver nanoparticles produces an enhanced response to ammonia gas. The incorporation of soft Lewis acidic Pd2+ cations by binding PdCl2 to P4VP yields a selective and highly sensitive device that changes resistance upon exposure to vapors of thioethers. The latter materials have utility for odorized fuel leak detection, microbial activity, and breath diagnostics. A third demonstration makes use of permanganate incorporation to produce devices with large responses to vapors of volatile organic compounds that are susceptible to oxidation.

  7. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Maier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  8. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Konrad; Helwig, Andreas; Müller, Gerhard; Hille, Pascal; Eickhoff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high. PMID:28793583

  9. Metal Cation Binding to Gas-Phase Pentaalanine: Divalent Ions Restructure the Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R.C.; Steill, J.D.; Polfer, N.C.; Oomens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ion-neutral complexes of pentaalalanine with several singly- and doubly charged metal ions are examined using conformation analysis by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) computations. The infrared spectroscopy in the 1500-1800 cm(-1) region

  10. Scattering of low energy noble gas ions from a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luitjens, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Reflection of low energy (0.1-10 keV) noble gas ions can be used to analyse a solid surface. To study charge exchange processes, the ion fractions of neon and of argon, scattered from a Cu(100) surface, have been determined. (Auth.)

  11. Analysis of an all-metallic resilient pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A new type of resilient pad gas thrust bearing that does not contain any elastomers in the bearing assembly is described and analyzed. The bearing consists of sector-shaped pads mounted asymmetrically on resilient foil beams. The effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. Performance of a resilient pad bearing is compared with that of a pivoted pad bearing.

  12. Analysis of an all-metallic resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing that does not contain any elastomers in the bearing assembly is described and analyzed. The bearing consists of sector-shaped pads mounted asymmetrically on resilient foil beams. The effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. Performance of a resilient-pad bearing is compared with that of a pivoted-pad bearing.

  13. Control of welding distortion during gas metal arc welding of AH36 plates by stress engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pazooki, A.M.A.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Richardson, I.M.

    2017-01-01

    Welding residual stress and distortion are strongly linked together. One of the ways to control or reduce the welding distortions is the manipulation of the generated stresses during welding, and final residual stresses exist in the workpiece (stress engineering). In this paper, the control of gas

  14. System efficiency for two-step metal oxide solar thermochemical hydrogen production – Part 2: Impact of gas heat recuperation and separation temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Ehrhart, Brian D.

    2016-09-22

    The solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency is calculated for various operating conditions for a two-step metal oxide solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle using cerium(IV) oxide. An inert sweep gas was considered as the O2 removal method. Gas and solid heat recuperation effectiveness values were varied between 0 and 100% in order to determine the limits of the effect of these parameters. The temperature at which the inert gas is separated from oxygen for an open-loop and recycled system is varied. The hydrogen and water separation temperature was also varied and the effect on STH efficiency quantified. This study shows that gas heat recuperation is critical for high efficiency cycles, especially at conditions that require high steam and inert gas flowrates. A key area for future study is identified to be the development of ceramic heat exchangers for high temperature gas-gas heat exchange. Solid heat recuperation is more important at lower oxidation temperatures that favor temperature-swing redox processing, and the relative impact of this heat recuperation is muted if the heat can be used elsewhere in the system. A high separation temperature for the recycled inert gas has been shown to be beneficial, especially for cases of lower gas heat recuperation and increased inert gas flowrates. A higher water/hydrogen separation temperature is beneficial for most gas heat recuperation effectiveness values, though the overall impact on optimal system efficiency is relatively small for the values considered. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC.

  15. Sorption of colloids, organics, and metals onto gas-water, interfaces: Transport processes and potential remediation technology. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, J.

    1997-01-01

    'This research project has two objectives. The first is to improve basic understanding of contaminant interactions with gas-water interfaces, with emphasis on behavior of mixed contaminant systems. The second objective is to develop a sorptive microbubble fractionation remediation technique. Hypotheses supporting these objectives are: (1) contaminants and natural organics can sorb on and alter the interface hydrophobicity of the gas-water interfaces, and therefore influence sorption of colloids, metals, and radionuclides at gas-water interfaces; (2) surfactants can vastly increase sorption of colloids, metals and radionuclides selectively onto gas- water interfaces; (3) a sorptive microbubble fractionation remediation technique can be developed based on understanding of the previously mentioned processes. These hypotheses are being tested through quantification and visualization at both micro- and macro-scales.'

  16. The Performance of Chrome-Coated Copper as Metallic Catalytic Converter to Reduce Exhaust Gas Emissions from Spark-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warju; Harto, S. P.; Soenarto

    2018-01-01

    One of the automotive technologies to reduce exhaust gas emissions from the spark-ignition engine (SIE) is by using a catalytic converter. The aims of this research are firstly to conduct a metallic catalytic converter, secondly to find out to what extend chrome-coated copper plate (Cu+Cr) as a catalyst is efficient. To measure the concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) on the frame there are two conditions required. First is when the standard condition, and second is when Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter is applied using exhaust gas analyzer. Exhaust gas emissions from SIE are measured by using SNI 19-7118.1-2005. The testing of CO and HC emissions were conducted with variable speed to find the trend of exhaust gas emissions from idle speed to high speed. This experiment results in the fact that the use of Cu+Cr metallic catalytic converter can reduce the production of CO and HC of a four-stroke gasoline engine. The reduction of CO and HC emission are 95,35% and 79,28%. Using active metal catalyst in form of metallic catalytic converter, it is gained an optimum effective surface of a catalyst which finally is able to decrease the amount of CO and HC emission significantly in every spinning happened in the engine. Finally, this technology can be applied to the spark ignition engine both car and motorcycle to support blue sky program in Indonesia.

  17. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 47 (2008), s. 18114-18119 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400550704; GA ČR GA203/08/1487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bond activation * kinetic isotope effects * mass spectrometry * methane * transition metals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.380, year: 2008

  18. Development of an Ultralight Pulse Gas Metal ARC Welding System for Shipyard Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-27

    on testing involved welding angle iron, pipe, flat bar, and square tube to a vertically mounted steel plate. Six welders used the equipment and...strength predicted based on the same correlation. In both cases, weld metal Charpy V-notch impact test results far exceeded minimum specification...Technology (CNST), work was conducted to specify, build, test , and production prove a light-weight, man-portable welding system as described above. The

  19. DETERMINING THE LARGE-SCALE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF GAS-PHASE METALLICITY IN DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, Kelly A.; Vogeley, Michael S., E-mail: kelly.a.douglass@drexel.edu [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [O iii] and [S ii] transitions, provide estimates of a region’s electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [O ii] λ 3727, [O iii] λ 4363, and [O iii] λλ 4959, 5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the direct T{sub e}  method. We estimate the metallicity of 42 blue, star-forming void dwarf galaxies and 89 blue, star-forming dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as reprocessed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their chemical evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are less prevalent in voids than in the denser regions.

  20. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus models of a reference case NGCC plant with no capture and H2 storage, an NGCC plant with pre-combustion capture using gas heated - auto thermal reformer (GHR-ATR) combined with a sorption enhanced...

  1. Ethanol gas sensing performance of high-dimensional fuzz metal oxide nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibano, Kenzo; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Sugahara, Tohru; Lee, Heun Tae; Ueda, Yoshio

    2018-04-01

    Gas sensing ability of the He plasma induced fiber-like nanostructure, so-called fuzz structure, was firstly examined. A thin Mo layer deposited on a quartz surface was irradiated by He plasma to form the fuzz structure and oxidized by annealing in a quartz furnace. Electric conductivity of the fuzz Mo oxide layer was then measured through the Au electrodes deposited on the layer. Changes in electric conductivity by C2H5OH gas flow were examined as a function of temperature from 200 to 400 °C. Improved sensitivities were observed for the specimens after a fuzz nanostructure formation. However, the sensor developed in this study showed lower sensitivities than previously reported MoO3 nano-rod sensor, further optimization of oxidation is needed to improve the sensitivity.

  2. Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700 0 C, but the creep tests at 800 0 C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X

  3. Topologies of metal-organic frameworks based on pyrimidine-5-carboxylate and unexpected gas-sorption selectivity for CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jinwoo; Jin, Narae; Chun, Hyungphil

    2010-12-06

    A simple and multitopic ligand, pyrimidine-5-carboxylate (pmc), has been used to obtain a series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on Co(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+). The networks possess well-defined topologies of body-centered-cubic, rutile, and interpenetrated NbO structures, respectively. Among those, [Cu(pmc)(2)] possesses a permanent porosity resulting from straight one-dimensional channels of 5.5 Å free passages. Unexpectedly, this porous MOF displays a highly selective sorption behavior for CO(2), and the sorptions of N(2), Ar, O(2), H(2), and CH(4) at two different temperatures are found to be negligible. The results of diffraction and spectroscopic analyses exclude framework dynamics or incomplete evacuation as the origin of the gas-sorption selectivity.

  4. UTSA-74: A MOF-74 Isomer with Two Accessible Binding Sites per Metal Center for Highly Selective Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Feng

    2016-04-26

    A new metal-organic framework Zn2(H2O)-(dobdc)·0.5(H2O) (UTSA-74, H4dobdc = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid), Zn-MOF-74/CPO-27-Zn isomer, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. It has a novel four coordinated fgl topology with one-dimensional channels of about 8.0 Å. Unlike metal sites in the wellestablished MOF-74 with a rod-packing structure in which each of them is in a five coordinate square pyramidal coordination geometry, there are two different Zn2+ sites within the binuclear secondary building units in UTSA-74 in which one of them (Zn1) is in a tetrahedral while another (Zn2) in an octahedral coordination geometry. After activation, the two axial water molecules on Zn2 sites can be removed, generating UTSA-74a with two accessible gas binding sites per Zn2 ion. Accordingly, UTSA-74a takes up a moderately high and comparable amount of acetylene (145 cm3/cm3) to Zn-MOF-74. Interestingly, the accessible Zn2+ sites in UTSA-74a are bridged by carbon dioxide molecules instead of being terminally bound in Zn-MOF-74, so UTSA-74a adsorbs a much smaller amount of carbon dioxide (90 cm3/cm3) than Zn-MOF-74 (146 cm3/cm3) at room temperature and 1 bar, leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. X-ray crystal structures, gas sorption isotherms, molecular modeling, and simulated and experimental breakthroughs comprehensively support this result. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  5. Inhalation exposure of gas-metal arc stainless steel welding fume increased atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdely, Aaron; Hulderman, Tracy; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Liston, Angie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M; Simeonova, Petia P

    2011-07-04

    Epidemiological studies suggest that welding, a process which generates an aerosol of inhalable gases and metal rich particulates, increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. In this study we analyzed systemic inflammation and atherosclerotic lesions following gas metal arc-stainless steel (GMA-SS) welding fume exposure. Apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice, fed a Western diet, were exposed to GMA-SS at 40mg/m(3) for 3h/day for ten days (∼8.26μg daily alveolar deposition). Mice were sacrificed two weeks after exposure and serum chemistry, serum protein profiling and aortic lesion area were determined. There were no significant changes in serum total cholesterol, triglycerides or alanine aminotransferase. Serum levels of uric acid, a potent antioxidant, were decreased perhaps suggesting a reduced capacity to combat systemic oxidative stress. Inflammatory serum proteins interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 3 (MCP-3) were increased two weeks after GMA-SS exposure. Analysis of atherosclerotic plaques showed an increase in lesion area as the result of GMA-SS exposure. In conclusion, GMA-SS exposure showed evidence of systemic inflammation and increased plaque progression in apoE(-/-) mice. These results complement epidemiological and functional human studies that suggest welding may result in adverse cardiovascular effects. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. The Effect of Mustard Gas on Salivary Trace Metals (Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Mo, Sr, Cd, Ca, Pb, Rb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Pozveh, Elham; Seif, Ahmad; Ghalayani, Parichehr; Maleki, Abbas; Mottaghi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    We have determined and compared trace metals concentration in saliva taken from chemical warfare injures who were under the exposure of mustard gas and healthy subjects by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for the first time. The influence of preliminary operations on the accuracy of ICP-OES analysis, blood contamination, the number of restored teeth in the mouth, salivary flow rate, and daily variations in trace metals concentration in saliva were also considered. Unstimulated saliva was collected at 10:00–11:00 a.m. from 45 subjects in three equal groups. The first group was composed of 15 healthy subjects (group 1); the second group consisted of 15 subjects who, upon chemical warfare injuries, did not use Salbutamol spray, which they would have normally used on a regular basis (group 2); and the third group contained the same number of patients as the second group, but they had taken their regular medicine (Salbutamol spray; group 3). Our results showed that the concentration of Cu in saliva was significantly increased in the chemical warfare injures compared to healthy subjects, as follows: healthy subjects 15.3± 5.45(p.p.b.), patients (group 2) 45.77±13.65, and patients (Salbutamol spray; group 3) 29 ±8.51 (P ICP-OES outputs. PMID:25965704

  7. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, A.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    A conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure. To achieve two-way thermal-mechanical coupling, the work of plastic deformation resulting from potentially high thermal stresses is allowed to be dissipated in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature dependent. Heat losses from the deposited filler-metal are accounted for by considering conduction to the adjoining workpieces as well as natural convection and radiation to the surroundings. The newly constructed GMAW process model is then applied, in conjunction with the basic material physical-metallurgy, to a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel (MIL A46100). The main outcome of this procedure is the prediction of the spatial distribution of various crystalline phases within the weld and the heat-affected zone regions, as a function of the GMAW process parameters. The newly developed GMAW process model is validated by comparing its predictions with available open-literature experimental and computational data.

  8. Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    A multiphysics computational model has been developed for the conventional Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) joining process and used to analyze butt-welding of MIL A46100, a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel. The model consists of five distinct modules, each covering a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) dynamics of welding-gun behavior; (b) heat transfer from the electric arc and mass transfer from the electrode to the weld; (c) development of thermal and mechanical fields during the GMAW process; (d) the associated evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (e) the final spatial distribution of the as-welded material properties. To make the newly developed GMAW process model applicable to MIL A46100, the basic physical-metallurgy concepts and principles for this material have to be investigated and properly accounted for/modeled. The newly developed GMAW process model enables establishment of the relationship between the GMAW process parameters (e.g., open circuit voltage, welding current, electrode diameter, electrode-tip/weld distance, filler-metal feed speed, and gun travel speed), workpiece material chemistry, and the spatial distribution of as-welded material microstructure and properties. The predictions of the present GMAW model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and properties within the MIL A46100 weld region are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  9. Low-Cost Open-Source Voltage and Current Monitor for Gas Metal Arc Weld 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arduino open-source microcontrollers are well known in sensor applications for scientific equipment and for controlling RepRap 3D printers. Recently low-cost open-source gas metal arc weld (GMAW RepRap 3D printers have been developed. The entry-level welders used have minimal controls and therefore lack any real-time measurement of welder voltage or current. The preliminary work on process optimization of GMAW 3D printers requires a low-cost sensor and data logger system to measure welder current and voltage. This paper reports on the development of a low-cost open-source power measurement sensor system based on Arduino architecture. The sensor system was designed, built, and tested with two entry-level MIG welders. The full bill of materials and open source designs are provided. Voltage and current were measured while making stepwise adjustments to the manual voltage setting on the welder. Three conditions were tested while welding with steel and aluminum wire on steel substrates to assess the role of electrode material, shield gas, and welding velocity. The results showed that the open source sensor circuit performed as designed and could be constructed for <$100 in components representing a significant potential value through lateral scaling and replication in the 3D printing community.

  10. Hierarchical Nanostructures of Metal-Organic Frameworks Applied in Gas Separating ZIF-8-on-ZIF-67 Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Alexander; Wulfert-Holzmann, Paul; Friebe, Sebastian; Pavel, Janet; Strauß, Ina; Mundstock, Alexander; Steinbach, Frank; Caro, Jürgen

    2018-02-02

    Membranes from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly interesting for industrial gas separation applications. Strongly improved performances for carbon capture and H 2 purification tasks in MOF membranes are obtained by using highly reproducable and very accuratly, hierarchically grown ZIF-8-on-ZIF-67 (ZIF-8@ZIF-67) nanostructures. To forgo hardly controllable solvothermal synthesis, particles and layers are prepared by self-assembling methods. It was possible for the first time to confirm ZIF-8-on-ZIF-67 membrane growth on rough and porous ceramic supports using the layer-by-layer deposition. Additionally, hierarchical particles are made in a fast RT synthesis with high monodispersity. Characterization of the hierarchical and epitaxial grown layers and particles is performed by SEM, TEM, EDXM and gas permeation. The system ZIF-8@ZIF-67 shows a nearly doubled H 2 /CO 2 separation factor, regardless of whether neat membrane or mixed-matrix-membrane in comparison to other MOF materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Surface patterning of Zr-based metallic glass by laser irradiation induced selective thermoplastic extrusion in nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Yan, Jiwang

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical surface structures on metallic glass (MG) are useful for enhancing the material’s functions. In this paper, surface patterning of Zr-based MG was realized by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in nitrogen gas. Experimental results showed that three kinds of surface structures, namely, micro grooves, cross-shaped protrusions, and nanoparticles, were generated on the MG surface under specific laser scanning speeds and various laser power intensities and pulse overlap rates. In particular, the formation of cross-shaped protrusions has never been reported in the literature before. The formation mechanism for each kind of surface structure was investigated. In a nitrogen gas environment, cracks are easily generated and the cracked regions have higher laser absorption and localized thermal resistivity than those of the bulk material. Accordingly, the cross-shaped protrusions were ascribed to the selective thermoplastic extrusion of MG material out of the cracks and the laser pulse tracks formed by the preceding laser scans. It was found that the hierarchical surface structures significantly improved the surface hydrophobicity.

  12. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  13. Temperature Modulation with Specified Detection Point on Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors for E-Nose Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief SUDARMAJI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature modulation technique, some called dynamic measurement mode, on Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS/MOX gas sensor has been widely observed and employed in many fields. We present its development, a Specified Detection Point (SDP on modulated sensing element of MOS sensor is applied which associated to its temperature modulation, temperature modulation-SDP so-named. We configured the rectangular modulation signal for MOS gas sensors (TGSs and FISs using PSOC CY8C28445-24PVXI (Programmable System on Chip which also functioned as acquisition unit and interface to a computer. Initial responses and selectivity evaluations were performed using statistical tool and Principal Component Analysis (PCA to differ sample gases (Toluene, Ethanol and Ammonia on dynamic chamber measurement under various frequencies (0.25 Hz, 1 Hz, 4 Hz and duty-cycles (25 %, 50 %, 75 %. We found that at lower frequency the response waveform of the sensors becomes more sloping and distinct, and selected modulations successfully increased the selectivity either on singular or array sensors rather than static temperature measurement.

  14. Effect of gas flow on the selective area growth of gallium nitride via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, K. R.; Korakakis, D.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of gas flow on the selective area growth (SAG) of gallium nitride (GaN) grown via metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) has been investigated. In this study, the SAG of GaN was carried out on a silicon dioxide striped pattern along the GaN direction. SAG was initiated with the striped pattern oriented parallel and normal to the incoming gas flow in a horizontal reactor. The orientation of the pattern did not impact cross section of the structure after re-growth as both orientations resulted in similar trapezoidal structures bounded by the (0 0 0 1) and {1 1 2¯ n} facets ( n≈1.7-2.2). However, the growth rates were shown to depend on the orientation of the pattern as the normally oriented samples exhibited enhanced vertical and cross-sectional growth rates compared to the parallel oriented samples. All growths occurred under identical conditions and therefore the difference in growth rates must be attributed to a difference in mass transport of species.

  15. A carbon-enhanced metal-poor damped Lyα system: probing gas from Population III nucleosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ryan; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Jorgenson, Regina A.

    2011-04-01

    We present high-resolution observations of an extremely metal-poor damped Lyα system (DLA), at zabs= 2.340 0972 in the spectrum of the QSO J0035-0918, exhibiting an abundance pattern consistent with model predictions for the supernova yields of Population III stars. Specifically, this DLA has [Fe/H]≃-3, shows a clear ‘odd-even’ effect, and is C-rich with [C/Fe]=+1.53, a factor of ˜20 greater than reported in any other DLA. In analogy to the carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo (with [C/Fe] > +1.0), this is the first known case of a carbon-enhanced DLA. We determine an upper limit to the mass of 12C, M(12C) ≤ 200 M⊙, which depends on the unknown gas density n(H); if n(H) > 1 cm-3 (which is quite likely for this DLA given its low velocity dispersion), then M(12C) ≤ 2 M⊙, consistent with pollution by only a few prior supernovae. We speculate that DLAs such as the one discovered here may represent the ‘missing link’ between the yields of Population III stars and their later incorporation in the class of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars which show no enhancement of neutron-capture elements (CEMP-no stars). Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Surface treatment of non-ferrous metals for the purpose of gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaglia, L.; Weber, G.; Triffaux, J.; Geerts, J.; Audenhove, J. van; Pauwels, J.

    1979-01-01

    The present report is an updating of earlier reports published in 1972 and 1976. Its major improvement compared to the earlier reports is that greater importance has been devoted to quantify the parameters of mechanical shaping techniques to be used with or without subsequent chemical etching. Surface treatments have been studied and standardized for a number of non-ferrous metals. Recommendations were generally made on the basis of the following: the proposed treatment must give a minimum surface content; it must exhibit good reproducibility; it must be easy to perform with equipment normally available in analytical laboratories. The recommended treatments are presented in the form of sheets. They give full information on mechanica shaping parameters if these are important, and -if needed- the subsequent chemical etching conditions. Typical residual surface contents are given for oxygen carbon and nitrogen. They refer to samples freshly prepared. The metals or alloys concerned are: aluminium, aluminium alloyed with 3%, 7% and 13% silicon, copper, lead, nickel, titanium, TiAl 6 V 4 zirconium, tungsten and molybdenum

  17. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE MOST METAL-POOR GAS-RICH GALAXY KNOWN: AGC 198691

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L., E-mail: ash@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: krhode@indiana.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); and others

    2016-05-10

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of H i in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs project, which is a multi-wavelength study of galaxies with H i masses in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7.2} M {sub ⊙}, discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We have obtained spectra of the lone H ii region in AGC 198691 with the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Mayall 4 m, as well as with the Blue Channel spectrograph on the MMT 6.5 m telescope. These observations enable the measurement of the temperature-sensitive [O iii] λ 4363 line and hence the determination of a “direct” oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) system with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H) = 7.02 ± 0.03, making AGC 198691 the lowest-abundance star-forming galaxy known in the local universe. Two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies known have been discovered by the ALFALFA blind H i survey; this high yield of XMD galaxies represents a paradigm shift in the search for extremely metal-poor galaxies.

  18. Optimizing Location of Bulk Metallic Minerals Processing Based on Greenhouse Gas Avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. McLellan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The bulk minerals iron ore and bauxite cause significant greenhouse emissions in their processing to steel and aluminum respectively. The level of these emissions is highly dependent on the source of electrical and thermal energy. However, they also cause significant greenhouse gas emissions from their transportation across the globe for processing. This study examines these minerals from the perspective of greenhouse gas avoidance, examining the location of processing as an option for reducing transportation-based and process-based emissions. The analysis proposes a “radius of reduction” to define the potential for transporting ore to reduce emissions by offshore processing. Overall scenarios for localized steel production indicate potential for 85% reduction of transport emissions in the steel industry and 14% of overall industry emissions. Local high-carbon electricity grids and inefficient production mean that the benefit of reduced transportation is partially counteracted by increased processing emissions. The transportation of all global bauxite to Norway and other nations with low-emissions electricity for production of aluminum could result in an overall reduction of industry emissions of up to 44%.

  19. HM⁺-RG complexes (M = group 2 metal; RG = rare gas): Physical vs. chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joe P; Dodson, Hannah; Breckenridge, W H; Wright, Timothy G

    2015-04-21

    Previous work on the HM(+)-He complexes (M = Be-Ra) has been extended to the cases of the heavier rare gas atoms, HM(+)-RG (RG = Ne-Rn). Optimized geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been calculated using MP2 theory and quadruple-ζ quality basis sets. Dissociation energies for the loss of the rare gas atom have been calculated at these optimized geometries using coupled cluster with single and double excitations and perturbative triples, CCSD(T)theory, extrapolating interaction energies to the basis set limit. Comparisons are made between the present data and the previously obtained helium results, as well as to those of the bare HM(+) molecules; furthermore, comparisons are made to the related M(+)-RG and M(2+)-RG complexes. Partial atomic charge analyses have also been undertaken, and these used to test a simple charge-induced dipole model. Molecular orbital diagrams are presented together with contour plots of the natural orbitals from the quadratic configuration with single and double excitations (QCISD) density. The conclusion is that the majority of these complexes are physically bound, with very little sharing of electron density; however, for M = Be, and to a lesser extent M = Mg, some evidence for chemical effects is seen in HM(+)-RG complexes involving RG atoms with the higher atomic numbers.

  20. Thermodynamic System Studies for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plant with CO2 Capture and Hydrogen Storage with Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; Wittebrood, B.J.; Woudstra, T.; Geerlings, J.J.C.; Aravind, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility in natural gas combined cycle power plants (NGCC) with pre-combustion CO2 capture could be introduced with co-production of hydrogen and subsequent hydrogen storage with metal hydrides (MH). The current work presents a thermodynamic analysis and comparison between steady state ASPEN Plus

  1. Co-sputtered metal and polymer nanocomposite films and their electrical responses for gas sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rujisamphan, Nopporn [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Murray, Roy E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Deng, Fei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Supasai, Thidarat, E-mail: fscitrs@ku.ac.th [Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The well-controlled Ti–PTFE composite films were prepared by co-sputtering. • Ti clusters showed particle sizes varied between 10 and 30 nm in the PTFE matrix. • The swelling of polymer is the driving force to change interparticle distance and therefore a change in resistance. • The sensitivities of the Ti–PTFE devices were found to be in a range of 1.01–1.04. - Abstract: Titanium and polytetrafluoroethylene (Ti–PTFE) nanocomposite thin films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates using a combination of dc and rf magnetron sputtering. When the Ti–PTFE composites were prepared at below the percolation threshold i.e. 27% metal volume filling (F), Ti clusters with the average sizes of 7 ± 2 nm were found. As the Ti content was increased above the percolation threshold (F = 62%), the connecting regions of Ti were formed within the polymer matrix and the electrical property changed rapidly from insulator-like to metal-like properties. The Ti–PTFE composites prepared near the percolation threshold showed the electrical response to different volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The sensitivity significantly depended upon the VOCs concentrations. These composites devices showed the presence of distinct chemical bonds of C−C, C−CF, C−F and CF{sub 2} and TiF in TiO{sub 2} on the surface as investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) while the surface morphology, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) presented the root mean square (RMS) surface roughness of 13.3 nm. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the device revealed Ti clusters dispersed in PTFE matrix with particle sizes varied between 10 nm and 30 nm.

  2. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  3. Structural Contraction of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks: Membrane Application on Porous Metallic Hollow Fibers for Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho-Bailo, Fernando; Etxeberría-Benavides, Miren; David, Oana; Téllez, Carlos; Coronas, Joaquín

    2017-06-21

    Positive thermal expansion coefficients (TECs) of 52 × 10 -6 and 35 × 10 -6 K -1 were experimentally calculated in the -116 to 250 °C range for the III-phases of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) ZIF-9(Co) and ZIF-7(Zn), respectively, by means of the unit cell dimensions and volume of the materials in the monoclinic crystal system calculated from the XRD patterns. The unit cell dimensions and volume showed a significant expansion phenomenon as the temperature increased, by as much as 5.5% for ZIF-9-III in the studied range. To exploit the advantages of such thermal behavior, a new approach to the fabrication of ZIF-9-III membranes on thin, flexible, and highly porous nickel hollow fiber (Ni HF) supports by a versatile and easy-controllable microfluidic setup is herein reported. These Ni HF supports result from the sintering of 25-μm Ni particles and display very positive mechanical properties and bending resistance. As compared to the traditional polymer-based HF membranes, the ZIF metal-supported membrane exhibited good durability and robustness throughout its operation in a wide temperature range and after heating and cooling cycles. These benefits derive from (1) the pore-plugging membrane configuration resulting from the high porosity of the support and (2) the similarity between the TECs of the ZIF and the metallic support, both positive, which enhances their mutual compatibility. An increase in the H 2 /CO 2 separation selectivity at low temperatures (as high as 22.2 at -10 °C, along with 102 GPU permeance of H 2 ) was achieved, in agreement with the structural variations observed in the ZIF material.

  4. Liquid metal reactor cover gas purification and analysis in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.; Meadows, G.E.; Schuck, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Two sodium cooled reactors are currently being operated In the United States of America for the U.S. Department of Energy. These are Experimental Breeder Reactor II, EBR-ll, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF. EBR-ll is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho and the FFTF is near Rich land, Washington. These reactors are currently engaged In a wide range of testing including fuels and materials tests, and plant system performance and safety development. The U.S. DOE program also includes designs of a next generation sodium cooled power reactor. This paper discusses the efforts to develop and operate cover gas systems for the sodium cooled nuclear reactor program in the USA

  5. Liquid metal reactor cover gas purification and analysis in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.; Meadows, G.E.; Schuck, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    Two sodium cooled reactors are currently being operated in the United States of America for the US Department of Energy. These are Experimental Breeder Reactor 11, EBR-11, and the Fast Flux Test Facility, FFTF. EBR-11 is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and the FFTF is near Richland, Washington. These reactors are currently engaged in a wide range of testing including fuels and materials tests, and plant system performance and safety development. The US DOE program also includes designs of a next generation sodium cooled power reactor. The FFTF and EBR-11 communities are providing input to these designs. This paper discusses the efforts to develop and operate cover gas systems for the sodium cooled nuclear reactor program in the USA

  6. Heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire micro-sensor array for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, Dante; MacNaughton, Sam; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Xinjie; Sonkusale, Sameer; Vandervelde, Thomas E.

    2014-04-01

    Vanadium oxide, manganese oxide, tungsten oxide, and nickel oxide nanowires were investigated for their applicability as chemiresistive gas sensors. Nanowires have excellent surface-to-volume ratios which yield higher sensitivities than bulk materials. Sensing elements consisting of these materials were assembled in an array to create an electronic nose platform. Dielectrophoresis was used to position the nanomaterials onto a microfabricated array of electrodes, which was subsequently mounted onto a leadless chip carrier and printed circuit board for rapid testing. Samples were tested in an enclosed chamber with vapors of acetone, isopropanol, methanol, and aqueous ammonia. The change in resistance of each assembly was measured. Responses varied between nanowire compositions, each demonstrating unique and repeatable responses to different gases; this enabled direct detection of the gases from the ensemble response. Sensitivities were calculated based on the fractional resistance change in a saturated environment and ranged from 6 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-5%change ppm-1.

  7. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, John P. [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H2/CO2 selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO2-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H2/CO2 selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H2/CO2 selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux and selectivity at 300 °C, which is comparable to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  8. Computational Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine for Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Wi S.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Energy demands at a remote site are increased as the world energy requirement diversifies so that they should generate power on their own site. A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) becomes a viable option for these sites. Generally, the economic feasibility of a high power reactor is greater than that for SMR. As a result the supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle is being considered for a power conversion system to increase economic competitiveness of SMR. The Brayton cycle efficiency is much higher than that for the Rankine cycle. Moreover, the components of the Brayton cycle are smaller than Rankine cycle's due to high heat capacity when a supercritical fluid is adopted. A lead (Pb) cooled SMR, BORIS, and a supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle, MOBIS, are being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU). Dostal et al. have compared some advanced power cycles and proposed the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) driven Brayton cycle. According to their suggestion SCO{sub 2} is adopted as a working fluid for MOBIS. The turbo machineries are most important components for the Brayton cycle. The turbo machineries of Brayton cycle consists of a turbine to convert kinetic energy of the fluid into mechanical energy of the shaft, and a compressor to recompress and recover the driving force of the working fluid. Therefore, turbine performance is one of the pivotal factors in increasing the cycle efficiency. In MOBIS a supercritical gas turbine is designed in the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation (GATO) and analyzed in the Turbine Integrated Numerical Analysis (TINA). A three-dimensional (3D) numerical analysis is employed for more detailed design to account for the partial flow which the one-dimensional (1D) analysis cannot consider.

  9. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B 'possibly carcinogenic' and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s(-1)) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s(-1) The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  10. Alkali Metal Modification of Silica Gel-Based Stationary Phase in Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Yehia El-Naggar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of the precipitated silica gel was done by treatment with alkali metal (NaCl before and after calcination. The silica surfaces before and after modification were confirmed by infrared spectroscopy in order to observe the strength and abundance of the acidic surface OH group bands which play an important role in the adsorption properties of polar and nonpolar solutes. The surface-modified silica gels were tested as GC solid stationary phases in terms of the separation efficiency for various groups of non-polar and polar solutes. Also, thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS were determined using n-hexane as a probe in order to show the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction. It was observed that the non-polar solutes could be separated Independent on the reactivity and porosity of the silica surfaces. The efficiency of the surface-modified silica gels to separate the aromatic hydrocarbons seemed to be strongly influenced by the density of the surface hydroxyls.

  11. Hot gas metallicity and the history of supernova activity in elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Mathews, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of the dynamical evolution of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) in a massive elliptical galaxy are described, with a variety of past variations of the SN rate being assumed. The investigation focuses on iron enrichment in the ISM. The equivalent widths of the 6.7-keV iron line are calculated as a function of redshift and of galactic projected radius. The present-day interstellar gas in elliptical galaxies contains a fossil record of past SN activity that can be determined from measurements of iron line equivalent widths at several projected radii in the galaxy. It is proposed that the ISM iron abundance is likely to be quite inhomogeneous. The hydrogen-free ejecta of type Ia SN also result in pronounced ISM abundance inhomogeneities that probably eventually cool and move in pressure equilibrium with the local ISM flow velocity. The 6.7-keV iron line emission is greater if the iron is confined to ionized regions of pure iron. 25 refs

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of novel biochar-based and metal oxide-based catalysts for removal of model tar (toluene), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide from simulated producer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pushpak

    Gasification is a thermochemical conversion process in which carbonaceous feedstock is gasified in a controlled atmosphere to generate producer gas. The producer gas is used for production of heat, power, fuels and chemicals. Various contaminants such as tars, NH3, and H2S in producer gas possess many problems due to their corrosive nature and their ability to clog and deactivate catalysts. In this study, several catalysts were synthesized, characterized, and tested for removal of three contaminants (toluene (model tar), NH3, and H2S) from the biomass-generated producer gas. Biochar, a catalyst, was generated from gasification of switchgrass. Activated carbon and acidic surface activated carbon were synthesized using ultrasonication method from biochar. Acidic surface was synthesized by coating activated carbon with dilute acid. Mixed metal oxide catalysts were synthesized from hydrotalcite precursors using novel synthesis technique using microwave and ultrasonication. Surface area of activated carbon (˜900 m2/g) was significantly higher than that of its precursor biochar (˜60 m2/g). Surface area of metal oxide catalyst was approximately 180 m2/g after calcination. Biochar, activated carbon, and acidic surface activated carbon showed toluene removal efficiencies of approximately 78, 88, and 88 %, respectively, when the catalysts were tested individually with toluene in the presence of producer gas at 800 °C. The toluene removal efficiencies increased to 86, 91, and 97 % using biochar, activated carbon and acidic surface activated carbon, respectively in the presence of NH3 and H2S in the producer gas. Increase in toluene removal efficiencies in presence of NH3 and H2S indicates that NH3 and H 2S play a role in toluene reforming reactions during simultaneous removal of contaminants. Toluene removal efficiency for mixed metal oxide was approximately 83%. Ammonia adsorption capacities were 0.008 g NH3/g catalyst for biochar and 0.03g NH3/g catalyst for activated

  13. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  14. The effect of mustard gas on salivary trace metals (Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Mo, Sr, Cd, Ca, Pb, Rb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zamani Pozveh

    Full Text Available We have determined and compared trace metals concentration in saliva taken from chemical warfare injures who were under the exposure of mustard gas and healthy subjects by means of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES for the first time. The influence of preliminary operations on the accuracy of ICP-OES analysis, blood contamination, the number of restored teeth in the mouth, salivary flow rate, and daily variations in trace metals concentration in saliva were also considered. Unstimulated saliva was collected at 10:00-11:00 a.m. from 45 subjects in three equal groups. The first group was composed of 15 healthy subjects (group 1; the second group consisted of 15 subjects who, upon chemical warfare injuries, did not use Salbutamol spray, which they would have normally used on a regular basis (group 2; and the third group contained the same number of patients as the second group, but they had taken their regular medicine (Salbutamol spray; group 3. Our results showed that the concentration of Cu in saliva was significantly increased in the chemical warfare injures compared to healthy subjects, as follows: healthy subjects 15.3± 5.45 (p.p.b., patients (group 2 45.77±13.65, and patients (Salbutamol spray; group 3 29 ±8.51 (P <0.02. In contrast, zinc was significantly decreased in the patients, as follows: healthy subjects 37 ± 9.03 (p.p.b., patients (group 2 12.2 ± 3.56, and patients (Salbutamol spray; group 3 20.6 ±10.01 (P < 0.01. It is important to note that direct dilution of saliva samples with ultrapure nitric acid showed the optimum ICP-OES outputs.

  15. Inhalation of gas metal arc-stainless steel welding fume promotes lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Lauryn M; Erdely, Aaron; Meighan, Terence G; Battelli, Lori A; Salmen, Rebecca; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Andrews, Ronnee N; Kashon, Michael; Antonini, James M; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C

    2017-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer with exposure to welding fumes, but controlled animal studies are needed to support this association. Oropharyngeal aspiration of collected "aged" gas metal arc-stainless steel (GMA-SS) welding fume has been shown by our laboratory to promote lung tumor formation in vivo using a two-stage initiation-promotion model. Our objective in this study was to determine whether inhalation of freshly generated GMA-SS welding fume also acts as a lung tumor promoter in lung tumor-susceptible mice. Male A/J mice received intraperitoneal (IP) injections of corn oil or the chemical initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA; 10 µg/g) and 1 week later were exposed by whole-body inhalation to air or GMA-SS welding aerosols for 4 h/d × 4 d/w × 9 w at a target concentration of 40 mg/m 3 . Lung nodules were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. GMA-SS fume significantly promoted lung tumor multiplicity in A/J mice initiated with MCA (16.11 ± 1.18) compared to MCA/air-exposed mice (7.93 ± 0.82). Histopathological analysis found that the increased number of lung nodules in the MCA/GMA-SS group were hyperplasias and adenomas, which was consistent with developing lung tumorigenesis. Metal deposition analysis in the lung revealed a lower deposited dose, approximately fivefold compared to our previous aspiration study, still elicited a significant lung tumorigenic response. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that inhaling GMA-SS welding fume promotes lung tumorigenesis in vivo which is consistent with the epidemiologic studies that show welders may be at an increased risk for lung cancer.

  16. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Galgalikar, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process was introduced. The model is of a modular type and comprises five modules, each designed to handle a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e.: (i) electro-dynamics of the welding-gun; (ii) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric-arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler-metal consumable electrode to the weld; (iii) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (iv) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (v) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties. In the present work, the GMAW process model has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the spatial distribution of the mechanical properties controlling the ballistic-limit (i.e., penetration-resistance) of the weld. The model is upgraded through the introduction of the sixth module in the present work in recognition of the fact that in thick steel GMAW weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor may become controlled by the (often inferior) ballistic limits of its weld (fusion and heat-affected) zones. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic-limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are found to be consistent with prior observations and general expectations.

  17. Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H(sub 2)-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO+ H(sub 2)O(rightleftharpoons) CO(sub 2)+ H(sub 2), is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO(sub 2). Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H(sub 2) for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H(sub 2)) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from

  18. Transition Metal Ion Implantation into Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings: Development of a Base Material for Gas Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Markwitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre thick diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings produced by direct ion deposition were implanted with 30 keV Ar+ and transition metal ions in the lower percentage (<10 at.% range. Theoretical calculations showed that the ions are implanted just beneath the surface, which was confirmed with RBS measurements. Atomic force microscope scans revealed that the surface roughness increases when implanted with Ar+ and Cu+ ions, whereas a smoothing of the surface from 5.2 to 2.7 nm and a grain size reduction from 175 to 93 nm are measured for Ag+ implanted coatings with a fluence of 1.24×1016 at. cm−2. Calculated hydrogen and carbon depth profiles showed surprisingly significant changes in concentrations in the near-surface region of the DLC coatings, particularly when implanted with Ag+ ions. Hydrogen accumulates up to 32 at.% and the minimum of the carbon distribution is shifted towards the surface which may be the cause of the surface smoothing effect. The ion implantations caused an increase in electrical conductivity of the DLC coatings, which is important for the development of solid-state gas sensors based on DLC coatings.

  19. Gas/vapour separation using ultra-microporous metal-organic frameworks: insights into the structure/separation relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Pillai, Renjith S; Cadiau, Amandine; Bhatt, Prashant M; Assen, Ayalew H; Maurin, Guillaume; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-06-06

    The separation of related molecules with similar physical/chemical properties is of prime industrial importance and practically entails a substantial energy penalty, typically necessitating the operation of energy-demanding low temperature fractional distillation techniques. Certainly research efforts, in academia and industry alike, are ongoing with the main aim to develop advanced functional porous materials to be adopted as adsorbents for the effective and energy-efficient separation of various important commodities. Of special interest is the subclass of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with pore aperture sizes below 5-7 Å, namely ultra-microporous MOFs, which in contrast to conventional zeolites and activated carbons show great prospects for addressing key challenges in separations pertaining to energy and environmental sustainability, specifically materials for carbon capture and separation of olefin/paraffin, acetylene/ethylene, linear/branched alkanes, xenon/krypton, etc. In this tutorial review we discuss the latest developments in ultra-microporous MOF adsorbents and their use as separating agents via thermodynamics and/or kinetics and molecular sieving. Appreciably, we provide insights into the distinct microscopic mechanisms governing the resultant separation performances, and suggest a plausible correlation between the inherent structural features/topology of MOFs and the associated gas/vapour separation performance.

  20. Analysis of residual stress in metal-inert-gas-welded Al-2024 using neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Stelmukh, V.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure and map the full three-dimensional state of residual stress across the cross-section in coupon samples of metal-inert-gas (MIG)-welded 2024 aluminium alloy. Samples were analysed both as-welded and following a post-welding skim which served to remove the weld flash and reduce the plate thickness. The profile of the residual stress and its evolution following skimming has been accurately characterized. The longitudinal direction shows the highest residual stress, approaching 300 MPa in tension. The skimming treatment did not change the peak stress, but the overall profile of stress was altered: this is slightly unexpected as machining away stressed material would generally be expected to reduce the peak residual stress. The results are discussed in terms of the generation of stress during welding and its evolution during skimming. Finally a comparison is made with the stress generated in the as-welded and skimmed conditions of a variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA)-welded specimen of similar dimensions, to show the effects of different weld processes on the residual stress generated. The stress measurement in the VPPA sample was carried out under near identical experimental conditions

  1. Investigation of preheating method on joint strength of aluminium-stainless steel dissimilar welding using metal inert gas (MIG) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, M. R.; Shah, L. H.; Ishak, M.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates AA6O61-O and SUS304 dissimilar welding with preheating of stainless steel SUS304 prior to welding process. The welding method used was metal inert gas (MIG) with butt joint type weld. The mechanical strength was investigated using tensile test. Meanwhile, the macrostructure and microstructure of the specimens were analyzed using optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The tensile tests indicate that the preheated specimen with 90 °C have the maximum ultimate tensile strength of 111 MPa. In addition to that, the intermetallic compound (IMC) of the all the specimen was observed to be in the range of 1.59 μm to 10.8 μm. Fracture failures occur at the IMC interfaces on all specimen, where a thicker IMC layer consequently yields a lower tensile value. It can be concluded that the optimum parameters for AA6061-0 to SUS304 welding can be achieved at 90 °C with 17.5 V welding voltage and 110 A welding current.

  2. Gas Metal Arc Welding Parameters Effect on Properties of Tailored Orbital Weld of SS304 and BS1387

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayof, M. N.; Hussein, N. I. S.; Noh, M. Z. Mohd

    2017-09-01

    Dissimilar material pipes in a power plant boiler water piping system are used to transmit water at various temperatures, either in extremely high temperature water or room temperature water. In this study, tailored orbital welding of dissimilar material of Stainless Steel (SS) 304 and British Steel (BS) 1387 were performed by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) with automated fixed nozzle-rotational jig. This study focused on GMAW parameters variation effects on mechanical properties of SS304 and BS1387 dissimilar material tailored orbital welding. The weldment quality was tested by performing non-destructive dye penetrant test. The tensile strength and microhardness were studied to verify the influence of welding parameters variations. Design of Experiment (DOE) was employed to generate process parameter using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) method. Welding parameters that were arc current, arc voltage and travel speed as input response, whilst, tensile strength and microhardness as output response. Results from non-destructive test showed no major defect occurred. The tensile strength and microhardness increased when arc current and voltage increased and travel speed decreased. Microhardness at weldment was higher than base material.

  3. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples

  4. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  5. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  6. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  7. Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Multi-Physics Process Model and Its Application to MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel Butt-welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    irreversible strain-hardening factor ; (3) a reversible strain-rate hardening factor ; and (4) a reversible thermal-softening factor . 185 Gas metal arc welding...strength falls to zero at temperatures in excess of the material solidus temperature. However, this loss of strength is reversible, and the material...thermo-mechanical GMAW process module utilizes an implicit solution algorithm built-in ABAQUS /Standard, a general- purpose finite element solver

  8. Generation, detection and characterization of gas-phase transition metal aggregates and compounds. Final technical report, September 15, 1991--July 14, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steimle, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research project has been to identify and characterize small gas-phase metal containing molecules and relate these properties to proposed reaction mechanisms. Of particular emphasis has been the elucidation of the mechanism for activation of C-H, N-H, S-H, and C-C bonds in CH 4 , HCCH, H 2 S and NH 3 by platinum, titanium, molybdenum, and niobium

  9. Effect of Amine-Functionalized MIL-53 Metal Organic Frameworks on the Performance of Poly(4-methyl-1-pentyne Membrane in CO2/CH4 Separation Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abedini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of NH2-MIL 53 metal organic framework (MOF on gas transport properties of poly(4-methyl-1-pentyne (PMP was investigated. Various characterization methods such as FTIR, DSC, SEM and gas adsorption test as well as a series of CO2/CH4 gas separation tests (i.e., pure and mixed gas test were conducted in order to determine the effect of ligand functionalization (–NH2 on the properties of the prepared mixed matrix membranes and their gas transport characteristics. The results of DSC showed that glass transition temperature (Tg increased by increasing NH2-MIL 53 loading. The SEM images also demonstrated that the NH2-MIL 53 particles were dispersed well in the PMP matrix with no noticeable agglomeration. The gas adsorption test of NH2-MIL 53 particles revealed there was a selective adsorption behavior with respect to CO2. It was also found that, incorporation of NH2-MIL 53 into the PMP resulted in an increase in gas permeability (especially towards CO2 and a higher CO2/CH4 selectivity. Adding 30 wt% NH2-MIL 53 into the polymer matrix increased CO2 permeability and CO2/CH4 selectivity of the mixed gas from 83.35 to 210.21 barrer and 7.61 to 19.88, respectively. Rising the temperature from 30 to 60°C led to the permeability increment of both CO2 and CH4 in the mixed gas test, while the CO2/CH4 selectivity decreased. Moreover, the results showed that amino groups required no regeneration and their performance did not decline during 120 h of permeation test. A comparison between the permeation data and those calculated from permeation models revealed that the Bruggeman model could fit the CO2 permeability data better than the Maxwell and Lewis models.

  10. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi5 for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB5 alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi5 substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 μm) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB5 alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB5 alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB5 alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB5 alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB5 production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle

  11. Use of Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying of bi-metallic powder mixtures as alternative to classic powder metallurgy route for producing intermetallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents cold gas dynamic spraying (or Cold Spray as a novel surface treatment technology capable not only of surface modifications but also being used as bulk creating technology. This is demonstrated on numerous samples where bi-metallic powder feedstock is deposited into bulk, self-standing pieces of material that does not need the support of substrate. Mixtures from the group of Fe, Al, Ti, Ni, Cu were used for the initial bi-metallic mixtures. The deposited samples were then subjected to annealing at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1100°C in protective atmosphere and resulting morphologies and microstructures were analysed. Generally materials with high proportion of intermetallic phase content were obtained. These are discussed as potential scaffolds for metal or polymer matrix composites or as hi temperature resistive supports for catalysts with filter functions.

  12. Transient compounds of high alkaline earth metals with custom-made organic ligands as potential precursors for the gas phase separator of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this work was the representation of new transient custom-made metal/organic compounds of the high alkaline earth metals Ca, Sr and Ba as potential precursors for the gas phase separation (chemical vapour deposition, CVD) of high temperature ceramic superconductors. There is a report on the synthesis and comprehensive characterisation of representatives of the class of compounds of substituted metallocenes and the B diketone compounds of these metals. Some selected compounds were examined as regards their suitability for CVD. The main task was the examination of the effect of structural and electronic parameters of ligands on the properties of the compounds, where the volatility was to the fore. (orig./MM) [de

  13. Practical Use of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors for Measuring Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone in Urban Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Philip J D; Aujla, Amrita; Grant, Kirsty H; Brundle, Alex G; Thompson, Martin R; Vande Hey, Josh; Leigh, Roland J

    2017-07-19

    The potential of inexpensive Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors to be used for urban air quality monitoring has been the topic of increasing interest in the last decade. This paper discusses some of the lessons of three years of experience working with such sensors on a novel instrument platform (Small Open General purpose Sensor (SOGS)) in the measurement of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations. Analytic methods for increasing long-term accuracy of measurements are discussed, which permit nitrogen dioxide measurements with 95% confidence intervals of 20.0 μ g m - 3 and ozone precision of 26.8 μ g m - 3 , for measurements over a period one month away from calibration, averaged over 18 months of such calibrations. Beyond four months from calibration, sensor drift becomes significant, and accuracy is significantly reduced. Successful calibration schemes are discussed with the use of controlled artificial atmospheres complementing deployment on a reference weather station exposed to the elements. Manufacturing variation in the attributes of individual sensors are examined, an experiment possible due to the instrument being equipped with pairs of sensors of the same kind. Good repeatability (better than 0.7 correlation) between individual sensor elements is shown. The results from sensors that used fans to push air past an internal sensor element are compared with mounting the sensors on the outside of the enclosure, the latter design increasing effective integration time to more than a day. Finally, possible paths forward are suggested for improving the reliability of this promising sensor technology for measuring pollution in an urban environment.

  14. Practical Use of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors for Measuring Nitrogen Dioxide and Ozone in Urban Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. D. Peterson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential of inexpensive Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS gas sensors to be used for urban air quality monitoring has been the topic of increasing interest in the last decade. This paper discusses some of the lessons of three years of experience working with such sensors on a novel instrument platform (Small Open General purpose Sensor (SOGS in the measurement of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations. Analytic methods for increasing long-term accuracy of measurements are discussed, which permit nitrogen dioxide measurements with 95% confidence intervals of 20.0 μ g m − 3 and ozone precision of 26.8 μ g m − 3 , for measurements over a period one month away from calibration, averaged over 18 months of such calibrations. Beyond four months from calibration, sensor drift becomes significant, and accuracy is significantly reduced. Successful calibration schemes are discussed with the use of controlled artificial atmospheres complementing deployment on a reference weather station exposed to the elements. Manufacturing variation in the attributes of individual sensors are examined, an experiment possible due to the instrument being equipped with pairs of sensors of the same kind. Good repeatability (better than 0.7 correlation between individual sensor elements is shown. The results from sensors that used fans to push air past an internal sensor element are compared with mounting the sensors on the outside of the enclosure, the latter design increasing effective integration time to more than a day. Finally, possible paths forward are suggested for improving the reliability of this promising sensor technology for measuring pollution in an urban environment.

  15. Enhanced NH3 gas sensing performance based on electrospun alkaline-earth metals composited SnO2 nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuang; Kan, Kan; Yang, Ying; Jiang, Chao; Gao, Jun; Jing, Liqiang; Shen, Peikang; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The small-sized SnO 2 (5–7 nm) were obtained by adding the alkaline-earth. • Sr-composited SnO 2 nanofibers showed uniform nanotubes structure (Sr/SnO 2 ). • Sr/SnO 2 showed an excellent sensing performance to NH 3 at room temperature. - Abstract: One-dimensional alkaline-earth metals composited SnO 2 (Ae/SnO 2 ) nanofibres were fabricated via electrospinning technique, followed by thermal treatment at 600 °C for 5 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed that the nanoparticles size of Ae/SnO 2 was 5–7 nm, which was smaller than the pristine SnO 2 nanorods attached by 20 nm nanoparticles. Moreover, Sr/SnO 2 nanocomposites showed uniform nanotubes structure with the wall thickness of about 30 nm, in which all the nanoparticles were connected to their neighbors by necks. The Sr/SnO 2 nanotubes exhibited an excellent sensing response toward NH 3 gas at room temperature, lower detection limit (10 ppm), faster response time (6 s towards 2000 ppm∼16 s towards 10 ppm) and better reversibility compared to the pristine SnO 2 nanorods. The enhanced sensor performances were attributed to the higher conductivity of the Sr/SnO 2 . Mott–Schottky plots (M–S) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements indicated that the carrier density of Sr/SnO 2 nanotubes was 3 fold of that pristine SnO 2

  16. Tuning Gas Adsorption Properties of Zeolite-like Supramolecular Assemblies with gis Topology via Functionalization of Isoreticular Metal-Organic Squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy J; Li, Guanghua; Huo, Qisheng; Liu, Yunling; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-10-04

    A strategy based on metal-ligand directed assembly of metal-organic squares (MOSs), built-up from four-membered ring (4MR) secondary building units (SBUs), has been employed for the design and construction of isoreticular zeolite-like supramolecular assemblies (ZSAs). Four porous Co-based ZSAs having the same underlying gis topology, but differing only with respect to the capping and bridging linkers, were successfully isolated and fully characterized. In this series, each MOS in ZSA-3-ZSA-6 possess an ideal square geometry and is connected to four neighboring MOS via a total of 16 hydrogen bonds to give a 3-periodic porous network.To systematically assess the effect of the pore system (size and functionality) on the gas adsorption properties, we evaluated the MOSs for their affinity for different probe molecules such as CO 2 and light hydrocarbons. ZSA-3-ZSA-6 showed high thermal stability (up to 300 °C) and was proven highly porous as evidenced by gas adsorption studies. Notably, alkyl-functionalized MOSs were found to offer potential for selective separation of CO 2 , C 3 H 6 , and C 3 H 8 from CH 4 and H 2 containing gas stream, such as natural gas and refinery-off gases.

  17. Concentration of heavy metal As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Sn, Zn, Cr, Fe and radon gas in bottom sediment from abandoned tin mines in the Phuket Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suteerasak, T.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at analyzing the heavy metals: As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Sn, Zn, Cr, Fe, and radon gas emission in bottom sediment from six abandoned tin mines in Phuket Province. Fe, Mn, and Sn were found in higher concentrations (but non-polluting than Cr and Ni. As, Pb, and Zn were polluting at lower levels. The concentration ranges for As, Pb, and Zn were 75.3-169, 98.6-547.5, and 120.4-323.3 mg/kg respectively. The activity of radon gas emission from bottom sediment from an abandoned tin mine in Amphur Muang was in the range of 162-212 Bq/kg., in the Amphur Katoo mine the range was 122-266 Bq/kg. and in the Amphur Talang mine the range was 180-263 Bq/kg. All these sites have higher concentrations of radon gas emissions than other similar sites. The heavy metals and radon gas come from geochemical materials such as soil and granite rock, found around the abandoned tin mines.

  18. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Hibiki, T.; Mishima, K.; Nishihara, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Kanda, K.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1998-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor there is a possibility of boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the recriticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large density difference is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although the large density difference may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with large density difference has not been performed well. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography. The effect of the large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified. (author)

  19. From non-disposable to disposable, treatment of pyrophoric or gas forming waste forms for disposal - Thermal treatment of pyrophoric or gas-forming metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, Carl; Lindberg, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In order to dispose of waste in either a deep geological disposal or in a shallower repository there are several demands that the waste and its package must fulfil, one is that it is not to react with oxygen or the waste package or backfill in the repository, i.e. concrete or grout. The waste forms that do not fulfil this particular criterion must be treated in some way to render the waste non-reactive. One of these waste are metallic uranium. Metallic uranium is not only an issue originating from the nuclear industry, as old types of fuel, it is also present in, for example, transport flasks and as samples used in schools, which all has to be disposed of sooner or later. Another waste that arise is magnesium doped with thorium, originating from the aviation, aerospace and missile industry. These alloys are now being replaced with others without thorium so they are in need of handling and possibly treatment before disposal. Magnesium metal is also pyrophoric, in particular in molten or powder form. In order to evaluate thermally treating these metals in a very controlled environment, such as a pyrolysis vessel, experimental work has been performed. The aim of the thermal treatment is to oxidise the metals and obtain an oxide with low leachability. Inactive trials were performed, first using small amount of magnesium tape followed by using Cerium instead of uranium, to check the ability of controlling the process. After the process had been deemed safe the next step was to test the process first with metallic uranium and thereafter with magnesium thorium alloy. The first results show that the oxidation process can be totally controlled and safe. The results show that the metals are oxidised and no longer reactive and can in principle be disposed of. The test will continue and further results will be reported. (authors)

  20. Study on the effect of ambient gas on nanostructure formation on metal surfaces during femtosecond laser ablation for fabrication of low-reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smausz, Tomi, E-mail: tomi@physx.u-szeged.hu [MTA-SZTE Research Group on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Csizmadia, Tamás [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Attosecond Light Pulse Source, ELI-Hu Nkft, H-6720 Szeged, Dugonics ter 13 (Hungary); Tápai, Csaba; Kopniczky, Judit [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Oszkó, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Aradi vértanuk tere 1 (Hungary); Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus; Prager, Andrea [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e.V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hopp, Béla [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Metal surfaces were irradiated with femtosecond laser in different gas environments. • The reflectivity, morphology and chemical composition of the surfaces were studied. • Darkening was influenced by chemical and physical interaction of the plume and gas. • Molecular mass of the applied gas had an impact on the nanostructure formation. • For some of the used metals the oxide formation affected the reflective properties. - Abstract: Nanostructure formation on bulk metals (silver, gold, copper and titanium) by femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser irradiation (775 nm, 150 fs) is studied aiming the production of low-reflectivity surfaces and the better understanding of the development process. The experiments were performed in nitrogen, air, oxygen and helium environments at atmospheric pressure. The samples were irradiated with fluences in the 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2} range and an average pulse number of 100 falling over a given area. The reflectivity of the treated surfaces was determined by a microspectrometer in the 450–800 nm range and their morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The gas ambience influenced the results via two effects: formation processes and the chemically-induced modifications of the nanostructures. In case of He the nanoparticle aggregates–otherwise generally present–are predominantly missing, which leads to a lower darkening efficiency. The presence of oxygen enhances the darkening effect for copper mostly at lower fluences, while causes a slow increase in reflectivity in the case of titanium (in case of pure oxygen) in the high fluence range. The surface morphology in case of nitrogen and air were quite similar probably due to their close molecular mass values.

  1. Properties and reactions of manganese methylene complexes in the gas phase. The importance of strong metal: carbene bonds for effective olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1979-10-10

    In this communication the formation, properties and reactions of the gas phase carbenes MnCH/sub 2//sup +/, (CO)/sub 5/MnCH/sub 2//sup +/, and (CO)/sub 4/MnCH/sub 2//sup +/ are described. Reported results include observation of metathesis and abstraction reactions of the methylene ligand with olefins and the first experimental determination of metal-carbene bond dissociation energies. Important points are that: (a) metal-methylene bond energies are extremely strong; and (b) the Mn/sup +/-methylene bond energy is decreased substantially on addition of five carbonyls to the metal center. If the metal-carbene bond energy exceeds 100 kcal/mol, then transfer of the carbene to an olefin to give a cyclopropane or new olefin will be endothermic and thus will not compete with the metathesis reaction. In order to avoid low turnover numbers resulting from consumption of carbene intermediates, strong metal-carbene bonds are a desirable feature of practical metathesis catalysts. (DP)

  2. Method for detection of trace metal and metalloid contaminants in coal-generated fuel gas using gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Erik C; Granite, Evan J; Stanko, Dennis C

    2010-07-15

    There exists an increasing need to develop a reliable method to detect trace contaminants in fuel gas derived from coal gasification. While Hg is subject to current and future regulations, As, Se, and P emissions may eventually be regulated. Sorbents are the most promising technology for the removal of contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas, and it will be important to develop a rapid analytical detection method to ensure complete removal and determine the ideal time for sorbent replacement/regeneration in order to reduce costs. This technical note explores the use of a commercial gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry system for the detection of four gaseous trace contaminants in a simulated fuel gas. Quantitative, repeatable detection with limits at ppbv to ppmv levels were obtained for arsine (AsH(3)), phosphine (PH(3)), and hydrogen selenide (H(2)Se), while qualitative detection was observed for mercury. Decreased accuracy and response caused by the primary components of fuel gas were observed.

  3. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishihara, H.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor, there is a possibility of boiling of the fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the possibility of re-criticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although it is anticipated that the large density ratio may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography and image processing techniques. Then, the effect of large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified

  4. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rentería, M.A., E-mail: crazyfim@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); López-Morelos, V.H., E-mail: vhlopez@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); García-Hernández, R., E-mail: rgarcia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib-Pérez, L., E-mail: luirdzib@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); García-Ochoa, E.M., E-mail: emgarcia@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); González-Sánchez, J., E-mail: jagonzal@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic interaction in welding improved localised corrosion resistance. • Electromagnetic interaction in welding enhanced γ/δ phase balance of DuplexSS. • Welding under Electromagnetic interaction repress formation and growth of detrimental phases. • Welds made with gas protection (2% O{sub 2} + 98% Ar) have better microstructural evolution during welding. - Abstract: The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O{sub 2} (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N{sub 2} (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  5. Experimental and computational study of the effect of 1 atm background gas on nanoparticle generation in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Wu, Chengping; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2018-03-01

    Laser ablation of metal targets is actively used for generation of chemically clean nanoparticles for a broad range of practical applications. The processes involved in the nanoparticle formation at all relevant spatial and temporal scales are still not fully understood, making the precise control of the size and shape of the nanoparticles challenging. In this paper, a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experiments is applied to investigate femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum targets in vacuum and in 1 atm argon background gas. The results of the simulations reveal a strong effect of the background gas environment on the initial plume expansion and evolution of the nanoparticle size distribution. The suppression of the generation of small/medium-size Al clusters and formation of a dense layer at the front of the expanding ablation plume, observed during the first nanosecond of the plume expansion in a simulation performed in the gas environment, have important implications on the characteristics of the nanoparticles deposited on a substrate and characterized in the experiments. The nanoparticles deposited in the gas environment are found to be more round-shaped and less flattened as compared to those deposited in vacuum. The nanoparticle size distributions exhibit power-law dependences with similar values of exponents obtained from fitting experimental and simulated data. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the gas environment may be effectively used to control size and shape of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation.

  6. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  7. Exploring Manganese Fractionation Using a Sequential Extraction Method to Evaluate Welders' Gas Metal Arc Welding Exposures during Heavy Equipment Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kevin W; Andrews, Ronnee; Bertke, Steven; Ashley, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted an occupational exposure assessment study of manganese (Mn) in welding fume at three factories where heavy equipment was manufactured. The objective of this study was to evaluate exposures to different Mn fractions using a sequential extraction procedure. One hundred nine worker-days were monitored for either total or respirable Mn during gas metal arc welding. The samples were analyzed using an experimental method to separate different Mn fractions based on selective chemical solubility. The full-shift total particle size Mn time-weighted average (TWA) breathing zone concentrations ranged 0.38-26 for soluble Mn in a mild ammonium acetate solution; 3.2-170 for Mn0,2+ in acetic acid; 3.1-290 for Mn3+,4+ in hydroxylamine-hydrochloride; and non-detectable (ND)-130 µg m-3 for insoluble Mn fractions in hydrochloric and nitric acid. The summation of all the total particulate Mn TWA fractions yielded results that ranged from 6.9 to 610 µg m-3. The range of respirable size Mn TWA concentrations were 0.33-21 for soluble Mn; 15-140 for Mn0,2+; 14-170 for Mn3+,4+; 5.3-230 for insoluble Mn; and 36-530 µg m-3 for Mn (sum of fractions). Total particulate TWA GM concentrations of the Mn (sum) were 53 (GSD = 2.5), 150 (GSD = 1.7), and 120 (GSD = 1.8) µg m-3 for the three separate factories. Although all of the workers' exposures were measured below the OSHA regulatory permissible exposure limit and NIOSH recommended exposure limit for Mn, 70 welders' exposures exceeded the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values® for total Mn (100 µg m-3) and 29 exceeded the recently adopted respirable Mn TLV (20 µg m-3). This study shows that a welding fume exposure control and management program is warranted for Mn, which includes improved exhaust ventilation and may necessitate the use of respiratory protection, especially for welding parts that impede air circulation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  8. Shielding Gas and Heat Input Effects on the Mechanical and Metallurgical Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding of Super Martensitic Stainless Steel (12Cr5Ni2Mo) Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, T.; Prabhakar, M.; Sathiya, P.

    This paper deals with the effects of shielding gas mixtures (100% CO2, 100% Ar and 80 % Ar + 20% CO2) and heat input (3.00, 3.65 and 4.33kJ/mm) on the mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of AISI 410S (American Iron and Steel Institute) super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) by gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. AISI 410S SMSS with 1.2mm diameter of a 410 filler wire was used in this study. A detailed microstructural analysis of the weld region as well as the mechanical properties (impact, microhardness and tensile tests at room temperature and 800∘C) was carried out. The tensile and impact fracture surfaces were further analyzed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). 100% Ar shielded welds have a higher amount of δ ferrite content and due to this fact the tensile strength of the joints is superior to the other two shielded welds.

  9. Measuring the Evolution of Stellar Populations And Gas Metallicity in Galaxies with Far-Infrared Space Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Gordon

    We propose a study of the evolution of stellar populations and gas metallicities in about 80 nearby star forming galaxies based on mining the NASA data archives for observations of the [NIII] 57 µm, [OIII] 52 µm and/or 88 µm, [NII] 122 and [CII] 158 µm far-infrared (FIR) fine- structure lines and other archives for thermal radio continuum. These lines are powerful probes of both stellar populations and gas properties and our primary science derives from these tracers. For sources that show both signs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation, we will take advantage of the readily available NASA Spitzer IRS data base that includes mid-IR [NeII] 12.8 µm, [NeIII] 15.6 µm and [NeV] 14.3 µm, [OIV] 25.9 µm and PAH observations. These complementary data reveal the relative fractions of the FIR line emission that might arise from star formation and the narrow line regions (NLR) associated with an AGN, thereby providing a robust set of observations to compare with star formation models. Subsets of the FIR lines have been detected from hundreds of nearby galaxies. From both theoretical studies and the results of these pioneering observations we know that these lines can be powerful probes of stellar populations and star formation in galaxies. Here we plan to use various combinations of the lines to constrain (1) the age of the stellar populations (through lines that trace the hardness of the stellar radiation fields, hence stellar spectral type), (2) the degree of processing of the interstellar medium (through lines that trace growth of secondary to primary element abundances for example, the N/O ratio), (3) the efficiency of star formation (through growth in absolute abundances of N and O, the N/H and O/H ratios), and (4) the current day mass function of upper main sequence stars. Surprisingly, there has been no systematic study of the large sample of these line detections made with PACS on Herschel in order to truly assess and calibrate their diagnostic

  10. UV-laser-light-controlled photoluminescence of metal oxide nanoparticles in different gas atmospheres: BaTiO3, SrTiO3 and HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Shosuke; Saito, Takashi; Yoshida, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement has been studied at room temperature using various specimen atmospheres (O 2 gas, CO 2 gas, CO 2 -H 2 mixture gas, Ar-H 2 mixture gas and vacuum) under 325 nm laser light irradiation on various metal oxides. Of them, the results obtained for BaTiO 3 nanocrystals, SrTiO 3 ones and HfO 2 powder crystal are given in the present paper. Their PL were considerably increased in intensity by irradiation of 325 nm laser light in CO 2 gas and CO 2 -H 2 mixture gas. The cause of the PL intensity enhancements is discussed in the light of the exciton theory, the defect chemistry and the photocatalytic theory. The results may be applied for the utilization of greenhouse gas (CO 2 ) and the optical sensor for CO 2 gas.

  11. Partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas in a dual catalyst bed system combining irreducible oxide and metallic catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, J.J.; Mujeebur Rahuman, M.S.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    Operation of partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) at very high temperatures (¿900°C) slightly improves the selectivity to synthesis gas, which is caused by some activity of YSZ for steam and dry reforming of methane. LaCoO3 perovskite is not active in

  12. Hot Gas Particulate Cleaning Technology Applied for PFBC/IGFC -The Ceramic Tube Filter (CTF) and Metal Filter-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasatsu, H; Misawa, N; Kobori, K; Iritani, J

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a fossil fuel abundant and widespread all over world. It is a vital resource for energy security, because the supply is stable. However, its CO2 emission per unit calorific value is greater than that of other fossil fuels. It is necessary to develop more efficient coal utilization technologies to expand the coal utilization that meets the social demand for better environment. The Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle has become a subject of world attention in terms of better plant operation, improved plant efficiency, lower flue gas emission and fuel flexibility. The gas turbine, one of the most important components in the PFBC, is eager for a hot gas (approximately 650-850C) cleaning system in order to eliminate the severe erosion problem with the less thermal loss. The cyclone is most popular system for a hot gas cleaning, however, the severe damage for gas turbine blades by highly concentrated fine fly ash from PFBC boiler is reported.

  13. Friction and wear of selected metals and alloys in sliding contact with AISI 440 C stainless steel in liquid methane and in liquid natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisander, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Aluminum, titanium, beryllium, nickel, iron, copper, and several copper alloys were run in sliding contact with AISI 440C in liquid methane and natural gas. All of the metals run except copper and the copper alloys of tin and tin-lead showed severely galled wear scars. Friction coefficients varied from 0.2 to 1.0, the lowest being for copper, copper-17 wt. % tin, and copper-8 wt. % tin-22 wt. % lead. The wear rate for copper was two orders of magnitude lower than that of the other metals run. An additional order of magnitude of wear reduction was achieved by the addition of tin and/or lead to copper.

  14. A Bayesian approach shows no correlation between transit-depth and stellar metallicity for confirmed and candidates Kepler gas giants planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmé, C; Sarkis, P

    2017-01-01

    Previous study to investigate the correlation between the transit depth and the stellar metallicity of Kepler’s (Q1-Q12) gas giant planets (radii of 5-20R ⊙ ) has led to a weakly significant negative correlation. We use the cumulative catalog of planets detected by the NASA Kepler mission Q1-Q17 catalog, as of April 2015, to perform a solid statistical analysis of this correlation. In the present work, we revise this correlation, within a Bayesian framework, for two large samples: sample A confirmed planets and sample B (confirmed + candidates). We expand a hierarchical method to account for false positives in the studied samples. Our statistical analysis reveals no correlation between the transit depth and the stellar metallicity. This has implications for planet formation theory and interior structure of giant planets. (paper)

  15. Comparison of welding behavior of SUS316L steel by gas tungsten and gas metal arc processes in high pressure nitrogen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, O.; Kikuchi, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels of SUS316L were welded by GTA and GMA methods in high pressure nitrogen atmosphere and have investigated the welding condition, nitrogen absorption and microstructure. In the case of GTA welding could not be started arc over 2.1 MPa of nitrogen atmosphere, because the tungsten electrode was remarkably consumed in high-pressure nitrogen. However, in case of GMA welding, welding could be performed up to 6.1 MPa of nitrogen atmosphere at constant welding current of 200 A and the arc length of 7 mm. Arc voltage increased with increase in pressure of nitrogen atmosphere. Nitrogen content of GMA solidified metal increased from 0.2 to 0.65 mass% with increase in pressure from 0.1 to 6.1 MPa. Bending test indicated formation of a few micro cracks in solidified metal that included more than 0.5% nitrogen content. (orig.)

  16. A first-principles study on the interaction of biogas with noble metal (Rh, Pt, Pd) decorated nitrogen doped graphene as a gas sensor: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Huarui

    2018-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations are carried out to investigate the adsorption characteristics of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen (H2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), nitrogen (N2), and oxygen (O2) on the surface of pyridine-like nitrogen doped graphene (PNG) as well as noble metal (Rh, Pt, Pd) decorated PNG to elaborate their potentials as gas sensors. The adsorption intensities of biogas on noble metal (Rh, Pt, Pd) decorated PNG are in the order of O2> H2S> N2> CH4> CO2> H2, which are corresponded to the order of their sensitivity on surface. Compared with biogas adsorption on pristine PNG, there exist higher adsorption ability, higher charge transfer and higher orbital hybridization upon adsorption on noble metal (Rh, Pt, Pd) decorated PNG. Consequently, the noble metal (Rh, Pt, Pd) decorated PNG can transform the existence of CH4, CO2, H2, H2S, N2, and O2 molecules into electrical signal and they could potentially be used as ideal sensors for detection of biogas in ambient situation.

  17. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part I. the absorption of hydrogen sulfide in metal sulfate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The desulfurization of gas streams using aqueous iron(II)sulfate (Fe(II)SO4), zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) and copper sulfate (CuSO4) solutions as washing liquor is studied theoretically and experimentally. The desulfurization is accomplished by a precipitation reaction that occurs when sulfide ions and

  18. Experimental exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process--part II: biomonitoring of chromium and nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gube, Monika; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Bertram, Jens; Gerards, Kerstin; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the external exposure dose of chromium and nickel caused by a metal active gas welding process with a solid high-alloyed steel welding wire and inner exposure of subjects. In order to perform welding fume exposure under controlled and standardized conditions, the investigations were conducted in the "Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory". To perform biological monitoring of chromium and nickel, blood and urine samples of 12 healthy male non-smokers who never worked as welders were collected before and after a 6-h exposure to ambient air (0 mg/m(3)) and to welding fumes of a metal active gas welding process once with a concentration of the welding fume of 1 mg/m(3) and once with a concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3). Although the internal exposure to chromium and nickel in this study was comparatively low, the subjects showed significantly increased concentrations of these metals in urine after exposure to welding fume compared to the values at baseline. Moreover, the observed increase was significantly dose dependent for both of the substances. For the biological monitoring of chromium and nickel in urine of subjects exposed to welding fumes, a dependency on exposure dose was seen under standardized conditions after a single exposure over a period of 6 h. Thus, this study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between ambient and biological exposures from welding fumes and provides a good basis for evaluating future biological threshold values for these metals in welding occupation.

  19. Device design and experimental tests in a artificial intermittent gas lifting unit with metallic plunger for using in petroleum well exploration; Diseno de dispositivos y pruebas experimentales en una instalacion de levantamiento artificial por gas intermitente con piston metalico para uso en la explotacion de pozos petroleros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Efrain; Hernandez, Ali [Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Caracas (Venezuela). INTEVEP. Dept. de Levantamiento Artificial; Belmonte, Carmen Adela [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela). Dept. de Conversion y Transporte de Energia

    1995-07-01

    This work deals with the study and prediction of the fallback losses in Intermittent Gas Lift with metallic plunger. Influences of many reservoir heads configurations were determined, and the experimental results indicate that reservoir with more than one discharge pipe line permit larger final velocities of metallic plungers, let consequences of better efficiencies in the Artificial Lift Method. (author)

  20. Temperature Gradient Effect on Gas Discrimination Power of a Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Sensor Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Goschnick

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The paper presents results concerning the effect of spatial inhomogeneous operating temperature on the gas discrimination power of a gas-sensor microarray, with the latter based on a thin SnO2 film employed in the KAMINA electronic nose. Three different temperature distributions over the substrate are discussed: a nearly homogeneous one and two temperature gradients, equal to approx. 3.3 oC/mm and 6.7 oC/mm, applied across the sensor elements (segments of the array. The gas discrimination power of the microarray is judged by using the Mahalanobis distance in the LDA (Linear Discrimination Analysis coordinate system between the data clusters obtained by the response of the microarray to four target vapors: ethanol, acetone, propanol and ammonia. It is shown that the application of a temperature gradient increases the gas discrimination power of the microarray by up to 35 %.

  1. Multiplexed gas sensor based on heterogeneous metal oxide nanomaterial array enabled by localized liquid-phase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daejong; Fuadi, M Kasyful; Kang, Kyungnam; Kim, Donghwan; Li, Zhiyong; Park, Inkyu

    2015-05-20

    A novel method for the selective and localized synthesis of nanomaterials and their in situ integration based on serial combination of localized liquid-phase reaction has been developed for the fabrication of heterogeneous nanomaterial array. This method provides simple, fast and cost-effective fabrication process by using well-controlled thermal energy and therefore solves the challenging problems of assembly and integration of heterogeneous nanomaterial array in functional microelectronic devices. We have fabricated a parallel array of TiO2 nanotubes, CuO nanospikes, and ZnO nanowires, which exhibited adequate gas sensing response. Furthermore, we could approximately determine individual gas concentrations in a mixture gas consisting of 0-2 ppm of NO2 and 0-800 ppm of CO gas species by analyzing multiple data from an array of heterogeneous sensing nanomaterials.

  2. Tin oxide thin films prepared by laser-assisted metal-organic CVD: Structural and gas sensing properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lančok, Ján; Santoni, A.; Penza, M.; Loreti, S.; Menicucci, I.; Minarini, C.; Jelínek, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 200, - (2005), s. 1057-1060 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP106/01/D017; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : tin dioxide * laser-assisted MOCVD * XPS * gas sensor Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2005

  3. Development and characterization of a metallic substrat for nanostructured membranes in the separation of gas mixtures; Entwicklung und Charakterisierung eines metallischen Substrats fuer nanostrukturierte Gastrennmembranen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, Katharina

    2010-07-01

    In order to minimize the further increase of CO{sub 2}-content in the atmosphere, efforts are made to separate and store CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases of fossil power plants. Beside well-established separation techniques like chemical scrubber, the application of membrane technology is intensively investigated. One focus of this thesis is the development of metal supported substrates for microporous ceramic gas separation membranes, which are expected to have a higher mechanical stability than ceramic supported substrates. Starting with commercial porous steel substrates, interlayers are applied by wet powder spraying. For the interlayers the materials 1.4404-stainless steel and TiO{sub 2} or 1.4845-stainless steel and yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) are chosen. The interlayers have to be defect-free, as minimal defects can deteriorate the membrane performance. By a subsequent mechanical treatment and an adjustment of the viscosity of the 8YSZ-suspension, the surface quality is considerably increased. At the same time the limits of the wet powder spraying process become obvious, as sporadic agglomerates, which are formed during the spraying process, cannot be totally avoided. The metal supported substrates are characterized regarding to the interaction between steel and ceramic, the roughness of the layers compared to polished ceramic substrates, the mechanical properties and the flow through the substrates. Furthermore microporous ceramic gas separation membranes are deposited on wet powder sprayed and dip coated substrates. The selectivity of these membranes is above Knudsen selectivity. The other focus of the thesis is the exposure of substrates and membranes to real flue gas conditions. Beside microporous ceramic membranes polymer membranes are analysed as a reference, which show a higher state of development compared to microporous ceramic membranes. For this purpose a test bed is built up in the EnBW ''Rheinhafendampfkraftwerk RDK 7&apos

  4. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  5. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate's beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ∼60 C, 80 C, and 95 C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  6. Deposition of very thin uniform indium sulfide layers over metallic nano-rods by the Spray-Ion Layer Gas Reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genduso, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Institut for Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Inguanta, R.; Sunseri, C.; Piazza, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Kelch, C.; Sáez-Araoz, R. [Institut for Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Zykov, A. [Institut for Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); present address: Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15,12489 Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Ch.-H., E-mail: fischer@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institut for Heterogeneous Material Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); second affiliation: Free University Berlin, Chemistry Institute, Takustr. 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-02

    Very thin and uniform layers of indium sulfide were deposited on nickel nano-rods using the sequential and cyclical Spray-ILGAR® (Ion Layer Gas Reaction) technique. Substrates were fabricated by electrodeposition of Ni within the pores of polycarbonate membranes and subsequent chemical dissolution of the template. With respect to the depositions on flat substrates, experimental conditions were modified and optimized for the present geometry. Our results show that nano-rods up to a length of 10 μm were covered uniformly along their full length and with an almost constant film growth rate, thus allowing a good control of the coating thickness; the effect of the deposition temperature was also investigated. However, for high numbers of process steps, i.e. thickness, the films became uneven and crusty, especially at higher temperature, mainly owing to the simultaneous side reaction of the metallic Ni forming nickel sulfide at the surface of the rods. However, such a problem occurs only in the case of reactive nano-rod materials, such as less noble metals. It could be strongly reduced by doubling the spray step duration and thereby sealing the metallic surface before the process step of the sulfurization. Thus, quite smooth, about 100 nm thick coatings could be obtained. - Highlights: • Ni nano-rod substrates were grown within polycarbonate membranes. • We can coat nano-rods uniformly by the Ion Layer Gas Reaction method. • As a model we deposited up to about 100 nm In{sub 2}S{sub 3} on Ni nanorods (250 nm × 10 μm). • Element mapping at insulated rods showed homogenous coating over the full length. • Parameter optimization reduced effectively the Ni sulfide formation.

  7. CO-dark molecular gas at high redshift: very large H2 content and high pressure in a low-metallicity damped Lyman alpha system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashev, S. A.; Noterdaeme, P.; Rahmani, H.; Klimenko, V. V.; Ledoux, C.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of an H2-rich, extremely strong intervening damped Ly α absorption system (DLA) at zabs = 2.786 towards the quasar J 0843+0221, observed with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The total column density of molecular (resp. atomic) hydrogen is log N(H2) = 21.21 ± 0.02 (resp. log N(H I) = 21.82 ± 0.11), making it to be the first case in quasar absorption line studies with H2 column density as high as what is seen in 13CO-selected clouds in the Milky Way. We find that this system has one of the lowest metallicity detected among H2-bearing DLAs, with [Zn/H] = -1.52^{+0.08}_{-0.10}. This can be the reason for the marked differences compared to systems with similar H2 column densities in the local Universe: (I) the kinetic temperature, T ˜ 120 K, derived from the J = 0, 1 H2 rotational levels is at least twice higher than expected; (II) there is little dust extinction with AV 2 × 1023 cm-2/(km s-1 K), in the very low metallicity gas. Low CO and high H2 contents indicate that this system represents 'CO-dark/faint' gas. We investigate the physical conditions in the H2-bearing gas using the fine-structure levels of C I, C II, Si II and the rotational levels of HD and H2. We find the number density to be about n ˜ 260-380 cm-3, implying a high thermal pressure of 3-5 × 104 cm-3 K. We further identify a trend of increasing pressure with increasing total hydrogen column density. This independently supports the suggestion that extremely strong DLAs (with log N(H) ˜22) probe high-z galaxies at low impact parameters.

  8. Integrated Voltage—Current Monitoring and Control of Gas Metal Arc Weld Magnetic Ball-Jointed Open Source 3-D Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuenyong Nilsiam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To provide process optimization of metal fabricating self-replicating rapid prototyper (RepRap 3-D printers requires a low-cost sensor and data logger system to measure current (I and voltage (V of the gas metal arc welders (GMAW. This paper builds on previous open-source hardware development to provide a real-time measurement of welder I-V where the measuring circuit is connected to two analog inputs of the Arduino that is used to control the 3-D printer itself. Franklin firmware accessed through a web interface that is used to control the printer allows storing the measured values and downloading those stored readings to the user’s computer. To test this custom current and voltage monitoring device this study reports on its use on an upgraded all metal RepRap during the printing of aluminum alloy (ER1100, ER4043, ER4943, ER4047, and ER5356. The voltage and current data were analyzed on a per alloy basis and also layer-by-layer in order to evaluate the device’s efficacy as a monitoring device for 3-D printing and the results of the integrated design are discussed.

  9. Effects of particulates, heavy metals and acid gas on the removals of NO and PAHs by V2O5-WO3 catalysts in waste incineration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yim; Chen, Jyh-Cherng; Wey, Ming-Yen; Tsai, Shih-An

    2009-10-15

    This study investigated the activities of prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts for simultaneous removals of NO and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the influences of particulates, heavy metals, SO(2), and HCl on the performances of catalysts. The experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale waste incineration system equipped with a catalyst reactor. The DREs of PAHs by prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts were 64% and 72%, respectively. Increasing the particulate concentrations in flue gas suppressed the DRE of PAHs, but increasing the carbon content on surface of catalysts promotes the NO conversions. The DRE of PAHs by the catalysts was significantly decreased by the increased concentrations of heavy metal Cd, but was promoted by high concentration of Pb. The influence level of SO(2) was higher than HCl on the performances of V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts for PAHs removal, but was lower than HCl for NO removal. Prepared and commercial V(2)O(5)-WO(3) catalysts have similar trends on the effects of particulates, heavy metals, SO(2), and HCl. The results of ESCA analysis reveal that the presence of these pollutants on the surface of catalysts did not change the chemical state of V and W.

  10. A self-consistent three-dimensional model of the arc, electrode and weld pool in gas-metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Anthony B

    2011-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional computational model of gas-metal arc welding is described. The wire electrode, arc plasma and weld pool are included in the computational domain self-consistently. The model takes into account the motion of the electrode, flow in the weld pool, deformation of the weld-pool surface and the influence of metal droplet transfer. Results are presented for welding of an aluminium alloy. The current density distribution at the interface between the arc and the weld pool is strongly dependent on the surface profile of the weld pool. This in turn affects the temperature distribution in the weld pool. The momentum transferred by the droplet affects the direction of flow in the weld pool, and together with the energy transfer, increases the weld-pool depth. The results demonstrate the importance of including the arc plasma in the computational domain. Fair agreement is found between a measured weld profile and the predictions of the model. Inclusion of the influence of metal vapour in the model is expected to improve the agreement.

  11. Properties of NiO nanostructured growth using thermal dry oxidation of nickel metal thin film for hydrogen gas sensing at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Dauda; Ahmed, Naser M.; Mahmud, Shahrom; Algadri, Natheer A.

    2017-07-01

    A highly qualitative NiO nanostructure was synthesized using thermal dry oxidation of metallic Ni thin films on ITO/glass using the RF sputtering technique. The deposited nickel thin films were oxidized in air ambient at 550 °C inside a furnace. The structural and surface morphologies, and the electrical and gas sensing properties of the NiO nanostructure were examined. An x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the NiO nanostructure has a cubic structure with orientation of the most intense peak at (2 0 0), and shows good crystalline quality. Finite-element scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results revealed O and Ni present in the treated samples, indicating a pure NiO nanostructure composition obtained with high porosity. The electrical properties of the oxidize Ni thin films showed a p-type NiO thin film semiconductor. A hydrogen gas sensing measurement was made at different operating temperatures and different gas concentrations with a detection limit of 30 ppm concentration. The sensor device shows great sensing properties with an excellent sensitivity (310%) at room temperature, which decreases with an increase in the operating temperature. Superfast response and recovery times of 6 and 0.5 s, respectively, were observed with the device at 150 °C operating temperature.

  12. Gas phase oxidation as a tool to introduce oxygen containing groups on metal-loaded carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326164081; van den Berg, R.; Xia, B.; Muhler, M.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen containing groups were introduced, onto carbon nanofibers (CNFs) that were previously loaded with palladium, using HNO3 vapor. Using traditional liquid-phase oxidations this is not possible due to severe metal leaching. For the samples oxidized using HNO3 vapor temperature programmed

  13. Screening metal-organic frameworks by analysis of transient breakthrough of gas mixtures in a fixed bed adsorber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; Long, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer considerable potential for separating a variety of mixtures that are important in applications such as CO2 capture and H2 purification. In view of the vast number of MOFs that have been synthesized, there is a need for a reliable procedure for comparing

  14. De novo synthesis of a metal-organic framework material featuring ultrahigh surface area and gas storage capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farha, Omar K; Yazaydın, A Özgür; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Malliakas, Christos D; Hauser, Brad G; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T

    2010-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks--a class of porous hybrid materials built from metal ions and organic bridges--have recently shown great promise for a wide variety of applications. The large choice of building blocks means that the structures and pore characteristics of the metal-organic frameworks can be tuned relatively easily. However, despite much research, it remains challenging to prepare frameworks specifically tailored for particular applications. Here, we have used computational modelling to design and predictively characterize a metal-organic framework (NU-100) with a particularly high surface area. Subsequent experimental synthesis yielded a material, matching the calculated structure, with a high BET surface area (6,143 m(2) g(-1)). Furthermore, sorption measurements revealed that the material had high storage capacities for hydrogen (164 mg g(-1)) and carbon dioxide (2,315 mg g(-1))--gases of high importance in the contexts of clean energy and climate alteration, respectively--in excellent agreement with predictions from modelling.

  15. Ammonia Gas Sensing Properties of Nanocrystalline Zn1-xCuxFe2O4 Doped with Noble Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. JAGTAP

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The sensors are required basically for monitoring of trace gases in environment. In order to detect, measure and control these gases; one should know the amount and type of gases present in the environment. Among the most toxic and hazardous gases, it is necessary to detect and monitor the ammonia gas because this is enhance in the agricultural sector by the addition of large amounts of NH3 to cultivated farmland in the form of fertilizers. Nanocrystalline spinel type Zn1-xCuxFe2O4 (x=0, 0.2, 0.4 0.6 & 0.8 has been synthesized by sol-gel citrate method. The synthesized powders were characterized by XRD and SEM. The results revealed that the particle size is in the range of 40–45 nm for Cu–Zn ferrite with good crystallinity. The gas sensing properties were studied towards reducing gases like CO, LPG, NH3 and H2S and it is observed that Cu–Zn ferrite shows high response to ammonia gas at relatively lower operating temperature. The Zn0.6Cu0.4Fe2O4 nanomaterial shows better sensitivity towards NH3 gas at an operating temperature 300 0C. Incorporation of Pd improved the sensitivity, selectivity, response time and reduced the operating temperature from 300 0C to 250 0C for NH3 sensor.

  16. Gas flow rate and powder flow rate effect on properties of laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available . The powder flow rate and the gas flow rate were varied to study their effect on the physical, metallurgical and mechanical properties of the deposits. The physical properties studied are: the track width, the track height and the deposit weight...

  17. Research on the internal pressure behavior of metal gas distribution pipelines with different types of tubing defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Stefan Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to approach an important subject related to natural gas distribution networks which, depending on the expansion of the localities, are composed of intercommunicating pipes, pressure reducing stations and branch connections fittings. The urban networks are the most complex ones and the rural areas networks are the simplest. However, irrespective of their installation, they must meet the safety operating requirements as much as possible. According to standards, all these components must be tight and pressure resistant. In this regard, we intend to approach a very important issue related to the behavior of the tubular steel material showing corrosion and/or material defects, and to the internal stress caused by the gas pressure on the walls of the tubing material.

  18. Calculation and Designing of Up-to-Date Gas-Flame Plants for Metal Heating and Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Тimoshpolsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of development trends in the CIS machine-building industry and current status of the heating and heat treatment furnaces of main machine-building enterprises of the Republic of Belarus as of the 1st quarter of 2008 is given in the paper.The paper presents the most efficient engineering solutions from technological and economic point of view that concern calculation and designing of up-to-date gas-flame plants which are to be applied for modernization of the current heating and heat treatment furnaces of the machine-building enterprises in the Republic of Belarus.A thermo-technical calculation of main indices of the up-to-date gas-flame plant has been carried out in the paper.

  19. Structural variability in transition metal oxide clusters: gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of V3O6-8+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmis, K. R.; Wende, T.; Brummer, M.; Gause, O.; Santambrogio, G.; Stanca-Kaposta, E. C.; Dobler, J.; Niedziela, A.; Sauer, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present gas phase vibrational spectra of the trinuclear vanadium oxide cations V3O6+[middle dot]He1-4{,} V3O7+[middle dot]Ar0{,}1{,} and V3O8+[middle dot]Ar0{,}2 between 350 and 1200 cm-1. Cluster structures are assigned based on a comparison of the experimental and simulated IR spectra. The

  20. Cowdung gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A basic guide for the design and construction of a small biogas plant is presented. The gas holder consists of a battery of seven used oil drums bound together with interconnected via plastic piping. Most other components, with the exception of metal valves and joints, are made of wood, stone or cement.

  1. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance

  2. Spin beam splitter based on Goos-Haenchen shifts in two-dimensional electron gas modulated by ferromagnetic and Schottky metal stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Mao-Wang; Huang, Xin-Hong; Zhang, Gui-Lin; Chen, Sai-Yan [College of Science, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2012-11-15

    We present a theoretical study on the spin-dependent Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect in a two-dimensional electron gas modulated by ferromagnetic and Schottky metal (SM) stripes. The GH shifts for spin electron beams across this device are calculated with the help of the stationary phase method. It is shown that the GH shift of spin-up beam is significantly different from that of spin-down beam, i.e., this device shows up a considerable spin polarization effect in GH shifts of electron beams. It also is shown that both magnitude and sign of spin polarization of GH shifts are closely related to the stripe width, the magnetic strength and the gated voltage under SM stripe. These interesting properties not only provide an effective method of spin injection for spintronics application, but also give rise to a tunable spin beam splitter. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. P-Channel InGaN/GaN heterostructure metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor based on polarization-induced two-dimensional hole gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kexiong; Sumiya, Masatomo; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sang, Liwen

    2016-03-29

    The concept of p-channel InGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistor (FET) using a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) induced by polarization effect is demonstrated. The existence of 2DHG near the lower interface of InGaN/GaN heterostructure is verified by theoretical simulation and capacitance-voltage profiling. The metal-oxide-semiconductor FET (MOSFET) with Al2O3 gate dielectric shows a drain-source current density of 0.51 mA/mm at the gate voltage of -2 V and drain bias of -15 V, an ON/OFF ratio of two orders of magnitude and effective hole mobility of 10 cm(2)/Vs at room temperature. The normal operation of MOSFET without freeze-out at 8 K further proves that the p-channel behavior is originated from the polarization-induced 2DHG.

  4. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Aziz, Ferhat; Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

  5. Size Distribution and Estimated Respiratory Deposition of Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, Manganese, and Nickel in Gas Metal Arc Welding Fume Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Chisholm, William P.; Keane, Michael J.; Cumpston, Amy; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the mass of total Cr, Cr(VI), Mn, and Ni in 15 size fractions for mild and stainless steel gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes. Samples were collected using a nano multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) with polyvinyl chloride filters on each stage. The filters were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were experimentally calculated and percent recoveries were measured from spiked metals in solution and dry, certified welding-fume reference material. The fraction of Cr(VI) in total Cr was estimated by calculating the ratio of Cr(VI) to total Cr mass for each particle size range. Expected, regional deposition of each metal was estimated according to respiratory-deposition models. The weight percent (standard deviation) of Mn in mild steel fumes was 9.2% (6.8%). For stainless steel fumes, the weight percentages were 8.4% (5.4%) for total Cr, 12.2% (6.5%) for Mn, 2.1% (1.5%) for Ni and 0.5% (0.4%) for Cr(VI). All metals presented a fraction between 0.04 and 0.6 μm. Total Cr and Ni presented an additional fraction <0.03 μm. On average 6% of the Cr was found in the Cr(VI) valence state. There was no statistical difference between the smallest and largest mean Cr(VI) to total Cr mass ratio (p-value D 0.19), hence our analysis does not show that particle size affects the contribution of Cr(VI) to total Cr. The predicted total respiratory deposition for the metal particles was ∼25%. The sites of principal deposition were the head airways (7–10%) and the alveolar region (11–14%). Estimated Cr(VI) deposition was highest in the alveolar region (14%). PMID:26848207

  6. Non-Isothermal Gas-Based Direct Reduction Behavior of High Chromium Vanadium-Titanium Magnetite Pellets and the Melting Separation of Metallized Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Tang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-isothermal reduction behavior of high chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite (HCVTM pellets by gas mixtures was investigated using different heating rates (4, 8, and 12 K/min and varied gas compositions (H2/CO = 2/5, H2/CO = 1/1, and H2/CO = 5/2 volume ratios; the pellets were then used for melting separation. It was observed that the temperature corresponding to the maximum reduction ratio increased with the increasing heating rate. The HCVTM pellets reached the same final reduction ratio under a given reducing gas composition, although the heating rates were different. Under the same heating rate, the gas mixture with more H2 was conducive for obtaining a higher reduction ratio. The phase transformations during the non-isothermal reduction were ordered as follows: Fe2O3 → Fe3O4 → FeO → Fe; Fe9TiO15 + Fe2Ti3O9 → Fe2.75Ti0.25O4 → FeTiO3 → TiO2; V1.7Cr0.3O3 → V2O3 → Fe2VO4; Fe1.2Cr0.8O3 → Cr2O3 → FeCr2O4. The non-isothermal reduction kinetic model was established based on the unreacted core model with multiple reaction interfaces. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.99, revealing that this kinetic model could properly describe the non-isothermal reduction of the HCVTM pellets by gas mixtures. Iron containing V and Cr along with the Ti-rich slag was obtained through the melting separation of the metallized HCVTM pellets. The mass fractions and recovery rates of Fe, V, and Cr in the iron were 93.87% and 99.45%, 0.91% and 98.83%, and 0.72% and 95.02%, respectively. The mass fraction and recovery rate of TiO2 in the slag were 38.12% and 95.08%, respectively.

  7. Fine Tuning and Specific Binding Sites with a Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Metal-Complex Framework for Gas Selective Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zongbi; Xie, Danyan; Chang, Ganggang; Wu, Hui; Li, Liangying; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xing, Huabin; Yang, Qiwei; Zaworotko, Michael J; Ren, Qilong; Chen, Banglin

    2018-04-04

    Research on hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) has been developed for quite a long time; however, those with both established permanent porosities and functional properties are extremely rare due to weak hydrogen-bonding interactions among molecular organic linkers, which are much more fragile and difficult to stabilize. Herein, through judiciously combining the superiority of both the moderately stable coordination bonds in metal-organic frameworks and hydrogen bonds, we have realized a microporous hydrogen-bonded metal-complex or metallotecton framework HOF-21, which not only shows permanent porosity, but also exhibits highly selective separation performance of C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 at room temperature. The outstanding separation performance can be ascribed to sieving effect confined by the fine-tuning pores and the superimposed hydrogen-bonding interaction between C 2 H 2 and SiF 6 2- on both ends as validated by both modeling and neutron powder diffraction experiments. More importantly, the collapsed HOF-21 can be restored by simply immersing it into water or salt solution. To the best of our knowledge, such extraordinary water stability and restorability of HOF-21 were observed for the first time in HOFs, underlying the bright perspective of such new HOF materials for their industrial usage.

  8. Acid Gas Adsorption on Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets as a Model of an "All-Surface" Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Joshua D; Liu, Yang; Flores, Luis; Dixon, David A; Sholl, David S

    2017-03-14

    To establish a model of metal-organic framework (MOF) surfaces and build an understanding of surface-specific ligand adsorption phenomena in MOFs, we present a computational study exploring multiple models of a series of MOF-2 nanosheet materials, "M-BDCs", with M = Zn, Cu, and Co and BDC = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate. We study and assess the appropriateness of a series of models ranging from small clusters (18 atoms) to fully periodic sheet models. We additionally study the interactions of these models with acid gases and energy-relevant small molecules (CO, CO 2 , H 2 O, SO 2 , NO 2 , and H 2 S). We employ computational methods ranging from DFT with various exchange-correlation functionals to perturbative and coupled-cluster methods. For these systems, we present binding energies and enthalpies with the various ligands studied as well as IR frequency shifts for the normal modes of these ligands upon complexation with the open-metal sites of these materials. Our calculations lead to an understanding of phenomena unique to MOF surfaces and the importance of the periodicity in these materials in capturing surface-specific adsorption behaviors.

  9. The effect of lattice and grain boundary diffusion on the redistribution of Xe in metallic nuclear fuels: Implications for the use of ion implantation to study fission-gas-bubble nucleation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Tumey, Scott J.; Rest, Jeffrey; Gilmer, George H.

    2011-01-01

    A multi-atom gas bubble-nucleation mechanism has been proposed as part of a predictive fission-gas release model for metallic nuclear fuels. Validation of this mechanism requires experimental measurement of fission-gas bubble-size distributions at well-controlled gas concentrations and temperatures. There are advantages to carrying out such a study using ion implantation as the source of gas atoms compared with neutron irradiations. In spite of previous successes using ion implantation to study fission-gas behavior in oxide fuels, there is significant uncertainty about the efficacy of using ion beams for metallic fuel studies. To address the question of the applicability of ion beams in experiments designed to study fission-gas behavior in metallic fuels, we developed and applied an exact model for the redistribution of implanted ions under annealing conditions. The conclusion is that, given the assumptions, the results from implantations at 1 MeV or less may be overwhelmed by the surface effects at all relevant temperatures. Implanting at 10 or 80 MeV can significantly diminish the influence of the surfaces and the steep concentration gradients. At 80 MeV, the location of the peak concentration profile remains stable with annealing time. Thus, it appears that ion implantation can be an appropriate tool to study the size distribution of Xe bubbles in metallic fuels. Of the conditions investigated, the best for the study are to implant at 80 MeV and carry out anneals at 773 K, 873 K, and 973 K for times less than 10,000 s.

  10. Exploring reverse shape selectivity and molecular sieving effect of metal-organic framework UIO-66 coated capillary column for gas chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Na; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2012-09-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) which offer a variety of topologies, porous networks and high surface areas are promising and have potential for the applications of specific adsorption, isomerization, catalysis and separation. UIO-66 is the first MOF that has been observed to have reverse shape selectivity. However, such reverse shape selectivity of MOFs has never been explored for capillary gas chromatographic separation. Here we report the fabrication of MOF UIO-66 coated capillary column and exploration of the reverse shape selectivity and molecular sieving effect of such column for capillary gas chromatographic separation of alkane isomers and benzene homologues with excellent selectivity and precision. The adsorption enthalpies and entropies on the interaction between hydrocarbons and UIO-66 were measured to illustrate the energy effect on the separation of alkane isomers and benzene homologues on the UIO-66 coated capillary column. UIO-66 coated capillary column gave preferential retention of branched alkane isomers over their linear isomer, showing reverse shape selectivity, making UIO-66 coated capillary column attractive for capillary gas chromatographic separation of alkane isomers. iso-Propylbenzene (branched) eluted after n-propylbenzene on the UIO-66 coated capillary column again shows reverse shape selectivity. However, much bulkier 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene eluted earlier than n-propylbenzene and iso-propylbenzene on the UIO-66 coated capillary column, exhibiting molecular sieving effect. The combination of reverse shape selectivity with molecular sieving effect makes the UIO-66 coated capillary column promising for the separation of structural isomers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Thin-film transistors with a channel composed of semiconducting metal oxide nanoparticles deposited from the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, C.; Schierning, G.; Theissmann, R.; Nedic, A.; Kruis, F. E.; Schmechel, R.

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of semiconducting functional layers using low-temperature processes is of high interest for flexible printable electronics applications. Here, the one-step deposition of semiconducting nanoparticles from the gas phase for an active layer within a thin-film transistor is described. Layers of semiconducting nanoparticles with a particle size between 10 and 25 nm were prepared by the use of a simple aerosol deposition system, excluding potentially unwanted technological procedures like substrate heating or the use of solvents. The nanoparticles were deposited directly onto standard thin-film transistor test devices, using thermally grown silicon oxide as gate dielectric. Proof-of-principle experiments were done deploying two different wide-band gap semiconducting oxides, tin oxide, SnO x , and indium oxide, In 2 O 3 . The tin oxide spots prepared from the gas phase were too conducting to be used as channel material in thin-film transistors, most probably due to a high concentration of oxygen defects. Using indium oxide nanoparticles, thin-film transistor devices with significant field effect were obtained. Even though the electron mobility of the investigated devices was only in the range of 10 −6 cm 2V−1s−1 , the operability of this method for the fabrication of transistors was demonstrated. With respect to the possibilities to control the particle size and layer morphology in situ during deposition, improvements are expected.

  12. Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semancik, S.; Cavicchi, R. E.; DeVoe, D. L.; McAvoy, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    This Final Report describes efforts and results for a 3-year DoE/OST-EMSP project centered at NIST. The multidisciplinary project investigated scientific and technical concepts critical for developing tunable, MEMS-based, gas and vapor microsensors that could be applied for monitoring the types of multiple analytes (and differing backgrounds) encountered at DoE waste sites. Micromachined ''microhotplate'' arrays were used as platforms for fabricating conductometric sensor prototypes, and as microscale research tools. Efficient microarray techniques were developed for locally depositing and then performance evaluating thin oxide films, in order to correlate gas sensing characteristics with properties including composition, microstructure, thickness and surface modification. This approach produced temperature-dependent databases on the sensitivities of sensing materials to varied analytes (in air) which enable application-specific tuning of microsensor arrays. Mechanistic studies on adsorb ate transient phenomena were conducted to better understand the ways in which rapid temperature programming schedules can be used to produce unique response signatures and increase information density in microsensor signals. Chemometric and neural network analyses were also employed in our studies for recognition and quantification of target analytes

  13. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  14. Phase interaction in the metal-oxide melts-gas system the modeling of structure, properties and processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boronenkov, V; Leontiev, L

    2012-01-01

    This monograph describes mathematical models that enable prediction of phase compositions for various technological processes, as developed on the base of a complex physico-chemical analysis of reaction. It studies thermodynamics and kinetics of specific stages of complex pyrometallurgical processes involving boron, carbon, sulfur, tungsten, phosphorus, and many more, as well as their exposure to all sorts of factors. First and foremost, this enables to optimize processes and technologies at the stage of design, while traditional empirical means of development of new technologies are basically incapable of providing an optimal solution. Simulation results of metals and alloys production, welding and coating technologies allow obtaining materials with pre-given composition, structure and properties in a cost-saving and conscious manner. Moreover, a so-called "inverse problem", i.e., selecting source materials which would ensure the required results, cannot be solved by any other means.

  15. Computational and Experimental Studies of Microstructure-Scale Porosity in Metallic Fuels for Improved Gas Swelling Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mllett, Paul [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States); McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Deo, Chaitanya [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Mariani, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This proposal will investigate the stability of bimodal pore size distributions in metallic uranium and uranium-zirconium alloys during sintering and re-sintering annealing treatments. The project will utilize both computational and experimental approaches. The computational approach includes both Molecular Dynamics simulations to determine the self-diffusion coefficients in pure U and U-Zr alloys in single crystals, grain boundaries, and free surfaces, as well as calculations of grain boundary and free surface interfacial energies. Phase-field simulations using MOOSE will be conducted to study pore and grain structure evolution in microstructures with bimodal pore size distributions. Experiments will also be performed to validate the simulations, and measure the time-dependent densification of bimodal porous compacts.

  16. Steady-state nonequilibrium temperature gradients in hydrogen gas-metal systems: challenging the second law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, D. P.; Garamella, J. T.; Mallin, D. J.; Sheehan, W. F.

    2012-11-01

    Differences in gas reaction rates between disparate surfaces have been proposed as a means to achieve steady-state pressure and temperature gradients within a single blackbody cavity, thereby challenging the second law of thermodynamics (Sheehan 1998 Phys. Rev. E 57 6660; Sheehan 2001 Phys. Lett. A 280 185; Capek and Sheehan 2005 Challenges to the Second Law of Thermodynamics (Theory and Experiment) (Fundamental Theories of Physics Series vol 146) (Dordrecht: Springer)). This paper reports on laboratory tests of this hypothesis; specifically, molecular hydrogen is found to dissociate preferentially on rhenium surfaces versus tungsten at identical elevated temperatures and reduced pressures (T ⩽ 2100 K {\\cal P} \\leqslant 30\\,{ {Torr}} ). Steady-state nonequilibrium H/H2 ratios over the surfaces suggest that temperature gradients could be maintained under blackbody cavity conditions. Preliminary results from bimetallic blackbody cavity experiments are discussed.

  17. Baikal test stand modifications for liquid metal and gas fill operations for TOPAZ II space power acceptance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrieber, Christopher A.; Peterson, Earl; Sinkevich, Valery G.; Vdovin, Boris

    1995-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) facility, part of the TOPAZ International Program, in Albuquerque is currently testing Russian TOPAZ II space power systems (Wold 1993). The TOPAZ International Program has received six TOPAZ II Space Nuclear Power Reactors. Two of these reactors (Eh-43 and Eh-44) are considered ``flight quality.'' A considerable transfer of technology has occurred during the preparations for acceptance testing of the Eh-43 and Eh-44 TOPAZ II reactors. Eh-43 and Eh-44 are new systems that require the coolant loop and gas cavities to be filled and have not undergone any testing. In comparison to the tests performed on the V-71 and Ya-21u systems, the future operations with the flight units Eh-43 and Eh-44 will require expansion of the Baikal Test Stand's capabilities.

  18. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-10-01

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases.Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO2) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO2 films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H2 and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible

  19. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SK, Mostakim [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, 781039 Assam (India); Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk [Institute of Physics, Chair of Solid State Science, Augsburg University, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Biswas, Shyam, E-mail: sbiswas@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, 781039 Assam (India)

    2015-12-15

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(DMTDC){sub 6}]·4.8DMF·10H{sub 2}O (1) (H{sub 2}DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl{sub 4}, H{sub 2}DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl{sub 4}/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (S{sub BET}=1236 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}; CO{sub 2} uptake=3.5 mmol g{sup −1} at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu{sup 2+} over Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. - Graphical abstract: Selective transition-metal cation adsorption by a thienothiophene based zirconium metal–organic framework material. - Highlights: • The modulated synthesis of a thienothiophene based Zr(IV) MOF has been described. • Effect of metal salt/modulator ratio on the crystallinity was thoroughly studied. • The compound showed high thermal and physiochemical stability. • N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} sorption experiments

  20. Unique properties of ceria nanoparticles supported on metals: novel inverse ceria/copper catalysts for CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, Jose A

    2013-08-20

    a standard catalyst for reactions such as CO oxidation and the water-gas shift (WGS). This metal serves as an ideal replacement for other noble metals that are neither abundant nor cost effective. To prepare the inverse system we deposited nanoparticles (2-20 nm) of cerium oxide onto the Cu(111) surface. During this process, the Cu(111) surface grows an oxide layer that is characteristic of Cu₂O (Cu¹⁺). This oxide can influence the growth of ceria nanoparticles. Evidence suggests triangular-shaped CeO₂(111) grows on Cu₂O(111) surfaces while rectangular CeO₂(100) grows on Cu₄O₃(111) surfaces. We used the CeOx/Cu₂O/Cu(111) inverse system to study two catalytic processes: the WGS (CO + H₂O → CO₂ + H₂) and CO oxidation (2CO + O₂ → 2CO₂). We discovered that the addition of small amounts of ceria nanoparticles can activate the Cu(111) surface and achieve remarkable enhancement of catalytic activity in the investigated reactions. In the case of the WGS, the CeOx nanoparticle facilitated this process by acting at the interface with Cu to dissociate water. In the CO oxidation case, an enhancement in the dissociation of O₂ by the nanoparticles was a key factor. The strong interaction between CeOx nanoparticles and Cu(111) when preoxidized and reduced in CO resulted in a massive surface reconstruction of the copper substrate with the introduction of microterraces that covered 25-35% of the surface. This constitutes a new mechanism for surface reconstruction not observed before. These microterraces helped to facilitate a further enhancement of activity towards the WGS by opening an additional channel for the dissociation of water. In summary, inverse catalysts of CeOx/Cu(111) and CeO₂/Cu₂O/Cu(111) demonstrate the versatility of a model system to obtain insightful knowledge of catalytic processes. These systems will continue to offer a unique opportunity to probe key catalytic components and elucidate the relationship between structure and

  1. Correlation of Chemisorption and Electronic Effects for Metal Oxide Interfaces: Transducing Principles for Temperature Programmed Gas Microsensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semancik, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of chemical monitoring problems faced by the Department of Energy at its hazardous waste sites is formidable. It is likely that a variety of existing types of instrumentation will be applied in the years ahead, with varying degrees of practicality and success. A tremendous impact could be realized, however, if instrumental methods could be supplemented by a low-cost, reliable sensing technology for continuous monitoring of a range of species, including, for example, volatile organics, chlorinated hydrocarbons, ammonia, and hydrogen. To meed the diverse gas and vapor monitoring needs at ODE hazardous waste sites, the sensing system must offer, inherently, and adaptability to match the wide variety of analytes and environmental conditions that well be encountered (in tank vapor spaces, and at locations with contaminated soil or groundwater.) The purpose of this project was to investigate scientific and technical concepts that could enable a MEMS-based chemical sensing technology (developed in its foundational form at NIST during early and mid 1990's) to be made tunable for multiple target analytes in differing types of backgrounds relevant to DOE waste storage and remediation

  2. Simulation of the Mechanism of Gas Sorption in a Metal–Organic Framework with Open Metal Sites: Molecular Hydrogen in PCN-61

    KAUST Repository

    Forrest, Katherine A.

    2012-07-26

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were performed to investigate hydrogen sorption in an rht-type metal-organic framework (MOF), PCN-61. The MOF was shown to have a large hydrogen uptake, and this was studied using three different hydrogen potentials, effective for bulk hydrogen, but of varying sophistication: a model that includes only repulsion/dispersion parameters, one augmented with charge-quadrupole interactions, and one supplemented with many-body polarization interactions. Calculated hydrogen uptake isotherms and isosteric heats of adsorption, Q st, were in quantitative agreement with experiment only for the model with explicit polarization. This success in reproducing empirical measurements suggests that modeling MOFs that have open metal sites is feasible, though it is often not considered to be well described via a classical potential function; here it is shown that such systems may be accurately described by explicitly including polarization effects in an otherwise traditional empirical potential. Decomposition of energy terms for the models revealed deviations between the electrostatic and polarizable results that are unexpected due to just the augmentation of the potential surface by the addition of induction. Charge-quadrupole and induction energetics were shown to have a synergistic interaction, with inclusion of the latter resulting in a significant increase in the former. Induction interactions strongly influence the structure of the sorbed hydrogen compared to the models lacking polarizability; sorbed hydrogen is a dipolar dense fluid in the MOF. This study demonstrates that many-body polarization makes a critical contribution to gas sorption structure and must be accounted for in modeling MOFs with polar interaction sites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Enhanced alcohol titre and ratio in carbon monoxide-rich off-gas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans through combination of trace metals optimization with variable-temperature cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shaohuang; Gu, Yang; Chai, Changsheng; Jiang, Weihong; Zhuang, Yingping; Wang, Yonghong

    2017-09-01

    Bioconversion of C1 gases to produce chemicals has good application prospects. Here, the combination of trace metals optimization using a statistical method with variable-temperature cultivation was used to enhance alcohol synthesis during CO-rich off-gas fermentation by Clostridium carboxidivorans P7. Based on ATCC medium 1754, the optimum concentration of the trace metals was found to be 5-fold Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , SeO 4 2+ , and WO 4 2+ ; 3.48-fold Cu 2+ ; 0.55-fold MoO 4 2+ ; 0.5-fold Zn 2+ and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ·FeSO 4 ·6H 2 O; and additional 44.32μM FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O. The production of alcohol and organic acid changed to 4.40g/L and 0.50g/L from 2.16g/L and 2.37g/L, respectively, yielding an increase of alcohol-to-product ratio from 47.7% to 89.8%. By fermenting with the optimized medium and timed control of the incubation temperature (37°C [0-24h]-25°C [24-144h]), the alcohol titre further increased to 6.97g/L with 1.67g/L butanol and 1.33g/L hexanol, exceeding those previously reported for strain P7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  5. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)-Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeazet, Harold B Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model.

  6. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  7. Noncovalent functionalization of pristine CVD single-walled carbon nanotubes with 3d metal(II) phthalocyanines by adsorption from the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Flores-Sánchez, Laura J.; Meza-Laguna, Victor; Flores-Flores, José Ocotlán; Bucio-Galindo, Lauro; Puente-Lee, Iván; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2018-04-01

    Noncovalent hybrids of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with phthalocyanines (Pcs) is a subject of growing research effort focused on the development of new efficient organic photovoltaic cells, heterogeneous catalysts, lithium batteries, gas sensors, field effect transistors, among other possible applications. The main advantage of using unsubstituted Pcs is their very moderate cost and easy commercial availability. Unfortunately, the deposition of unsubstituted Pcs onto CNT sidewalls via the traditional liquid-phase strategy proves to be very problematic due to an extremely poor solubility of Pcs. At the same time, unsubstituted free-base H2Pc ligand and many of its transition metal complexes exhibit high thermal stability and volatility under reduced pressure, which allows for their physical vapor deposition onto solid surfaces. In the present work, we demonstrated the possibility of simple, fast, efficient and environmentally friendly noncovalent functionalization of single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) with a series of 3d metal(II) phthalocyanines Me(II)Pc, where Me = Co, Ni, Cu and Zn. The functionalization can be performed at 400-500 °C under moderate vacuum, and takes about 2-3 h only. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of Fourier-transform infrared, Raman, UV-vis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy. TGA suggested that Pc weight content is 30%, 17% and 35% for NiPc, CuPc and ZnPc, respectively (CoPc exhibited anomalous behavior), which is close to the estimates from EDS spectra of 24-39%, 27-36% and 27-44% for CoPc, CuPc and ZnPc, respectively. A strong increase in intensity of D band in the Raman spectra of SWNT‒Pc hybrids, as compared to that of pristine nanotubes, was interpreted as very strong interactions between Pc molecules and SWNT sidewalls. Very high absolute values of binding energies of 32.46-37.12 kcal/mol and the patterns of HOMO and LUMO distribution

  8. The Existence of Heavy Metals such as Pb, Cd, Fe, and Cu in Hair Samples from Gas Station Worker at Yogyakarta Special District

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supriyanto, C.; Zainul Kamal; Samin

    2002-01-01

    The monitoring of heavy metals existence such as Pb, Cd, Fe, and Cu in hair samples from gas station worker has been carried out with atomic absorption spectrometry method. The initial preparation of sample were done by immersing them in alcohol over night, after they were dried then they were digested using the teflon bomb digester at the temperature at 150 o C for 3 hours. The content of Pb, Cd, Fe, and Cu in were determined with calibration standard curve method. The content of Pb obtained at hair samples in the range of time at 20 years tend to increase. If it was correlated to the worker who has been working, there was no significant different from the worker who has been working for 20 years there was no significant different. While the content of Cu in sample at range time 20 years showed the significant different if it was correlated to the worker who has been working. The validity of method was tested with CRM Human Hair GBW 07601 from IAEA showed that the content of Fe and Cu were in the certified range of CRM. (author)

  9. Transformation and Precipitation Reactions by Metal Active Gas Pulsed Welded Joints from X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion-Dragos Utu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The high alloying degree of Duplex stainless steels makes them susceptible to the formation of intermetallic phases during their exposure to high temperatures. Precipitation of these phases can lead to a decreasing of the corrosion resistance and sometimes of the toughness. Starting from the advantages of the synergic Metal Active Gas (MAG pulsed welding process, this paper analyses the structure formation particularities of homogeneous welded joints from Duplex stainless steel. The effect of linear welding energy on the structure morphology of the welded joints was revealed by macro- and micrographic examinations, X-ray energy dispersion analyses, measurements of ferrite proportion and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained showed that the transformation of ferrite into austenite is associated with the chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen distribution between these two phases and their redistribution degree is closely linked to the overall heat cycle of the welding process. The adequate control of the energy inserted in the welded components provides an optimal balance between the two microstructural constituents (Austenite and Ferrite and avoids the formation of undesirable intermetallic phases.

  10. Comparative study of energy of particles ejected from coulomb explosion of rare gas and metallic clusters irradiated by intense femtosecond laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucerredj, N.; Beggas, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our study of high intensity femtosecond laser field interaction with large cluster of Kr and Na (contained 2.103 to 2.107 atoms). When laser intensity is above a critical value, it blows off all of electrons from the cluster and forms a non neutral ion cloud. The irradiation of these clusters by the intense laser field leads to highly excitation energy which can be the source of energetic electrons, electronic emission, highly charge, energetic ions and fragmentation process. During the Coulomb explosion of the resulting highly ionized, high temperature nanoplasma, ions acquire again their energy. It is shown that ultra fast ions are produced. The goal of our study is to investigate in detail a comparative study of the expansion and explosion then the ion energy of metallic and rare gas clusters irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser field. We have found that ions have a kinetic energy up to 105 eV and the Coulomb pressure is little than the hydrodynamic pressure. The Coulomb explosion of a cluster may provide a new high energy ion source.

  11. Photocatalytic H2 Production Using Pt-TiO2 in the Presence of Oxalic Acid: Influence of the Noble Metal Size and the Carrier Gas Flow Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmetykó, Ákos; Mogyorósi, Károly; Gerse, Viktória; Kónya, Zoltán; Pusztai, Péter; Dombi, András; Hernádi, Klára

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of the experiments was to investigate the differences in the photocatalytic performance when commercially available Aeroxide P25 TiO2 photocatalyst was deposited with differently sized Pt nanoparticles with identical platinum content (1 wt%). The noble metal deposition onto the TiO2 surface was achieved by in situ chemical reduction (CRIS) or by mixing chemically reduced Pt nanoparticle containing sols to the aqueous suspensions of the photocatalysts (sol-impregnated samples, CRSIM). Fine and low-scale control of the size of resulting Pt nanoparticles was obtained through variation of the trisodium citrate concentration during the syntheses. The reducing reagent was NaBH4. Photocatalytic activity of the samples and the reaction mechanism were examined during UV irradiation (λmax = 365 nm) in the presence of oxalic acid (50 mM) as a sacrificial hole scavenger component. The H2 evolution rates proved to be strongly dependent on the Pt particle size, as well as the irradiation time. A significant change of H2 formation rate during the oxalic acid transformation was observed which is unusual. It is probably regulated both by the decomposition rate of accumulated oxalic acid and the H+/H2 redox potential on the surface of the catalyst. The later potential is influenced by the concentration of the dissolved H2 gas in the reaction mixture. PMID:28788229

  12. Photocatalytic H2 Production Using Pt-TiO2 in the Presence of Oxalic Acid: Influence of the Noble Metal Size and the Carrier Gas Flow Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Kmetykó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the experiments was to investigate the differences in the photocatalytic performance when commercially available Aeroxide P25 TiO2 photocatalyst was deposited with differently sized Pt nanoparticles with identical platinum content (1 wt%. The noble metal deposition onto the TiO2 surface was achieved by in situ chemical reduction (CRIS or by mixing chemically reduced Pt nanoparticle containing sols to the aqueous suspensions of the photocatalysts (sol-impregnated samples, CRSIM. Fine and low-scale control of the size of resulting Pt nanoparticles was obtained through variation of the trisodium citrate concentration during the syntheses. The reducing reagent was NaBH4. Photocatalytic activity of the samples and the reaction mechanism were examined during UV irradiation (λmax = 365 nm in the presence of oxalic acid (50 mM as a sacrificial hole scavenger component. The H2 evolution rates proved to be strongly dependent on the Pt particle size, as well as the irradiation time. A significant change of H2 formation rate during the oxalic acid transformation was observed which is unusual. It is probably regulated both by the decomposition rate of accumulated oxalic acid and the H+/H2 redox potential on the surface of the catalyst. The later potential is influenced by the concentration of the dissolved H2 gas in the reaction mixture.

  13. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-narrow gap laser and gas-metal-arc welded S960 high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Dong, Shiyun; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties, including micro-hardness, tensile properties, three-point bending properties and Charpy impact toughness at different test temperatures of 8 mm thick S960 high strength steel plates were investigated following their joining by multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. It was found that the microstructure in the fusion zone (FZ) for the ultra-NGLW joint was predominantly martensite mixed with some tempered martensite, while the FZ for the GMAW joint was mainly consisted of ferrite with some martensite. The strength of the ultra-NGLW specimens was comparable to that of the base material (BM), with all welded specimens failed in the BM in the tensile tests. The tensile strength of the GMAW specimens was reduced approximately by 100 MPa when compared with the base material by a broad and soft heat affected zone (HAZ) with failure located in the soft HAZ. Both the ultra-NGLW and GMAW specimens performed well in three-point bending tests. The GMAW joints exhibited better impact toughness than the ultra-NGLW joints.

  14. Exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process: part 3--biological effect markers and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, P; Bischof, K; Siry, L; Bertram, J; Schettgen, T; Reisgen, U; Kraus, T; Gube, M

    2013-01-01

    Metal active gas welding (MAG) is a widely-used welding technique resulting in high emissions of welding fume particles. This study investigated whether short-term exposure to these fume particles results in changes in lung function and early stages of inflammatory reactions. Twelve healthy, young male subjects were exposed to MAG fumes for 6 h with three different exposure concentrations in a three-fold cross-over study design. Exposure was performed in the "Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory" under controlled conditions with constant fume concentration. Fume concentrations were 0, 1, and 2.5 mg m(-3) in randomized order. Before and after each exposure, spirometry, and impulse oscillometry were performed and breath condensate samples were collected in order to quantify inflammatory markers like Nitrate, Nitrite, Nitrotyrosine, Hydroxyprolin and Malondialdehyde. A significant dependency on the exposure concentration could not be established for any of the endpoint parameters. In healthy, young subjects neither changes in spirometry nor changes in inflammatory markers measured in exhaled breath condensate could be detected after short-term exposure.

  15. Effects of the use of a flat wire electrode in gas metal arc welding and fuzzy logic model for the prediction of weldment shape profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuthapandi, Sripriyan; Thyla, P. R. [PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Ramu, Murugan [Amrita University, Ettimadai (India)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes the relationships between the macrostructural characteristics of weld beads and the welding parameters in Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a flat wire electrode. Bead-on-plate welds were produced with a flat wire electrode and different combinations of input parameters (i.e., welding current, welding speed, and flat wire electrode orientation). The macrostructural characteristics of the weld beads, namely, deposition, bead width, total bead width, reinforcement height, penetration depth, and depth of HAZ were investigated. A mapping technique was employed to measure these characteristics in various segments of the weldment zones. Results show that the use of a flat wire electrode improves the depth-to-width (D/W) ratio by 16.5 % on average compared with the D/W ratio when a regular electrode is used in GMAW. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic model was established to predict the effects of the use of a flat electrode on the weldment shape profile with varying input parameters. The predictions of the model were compared with the experimental results.

  16. Pillar-Layered Metal-Organic Framework with Sieving Effect and Pore Space Partition for Effective Separation of Mixed Gas C2H2/C2H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xu-Jia; Wei, Qin; Cai, Yue-Peng; Wu, Bing-Bing; Feng, Hai-Xing; Yu, Ying; Dong, Ren-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The removal of acetylene from the industrial feed gas to purify the ethylene is an important and challenging issue. The adsorption-based separation is a more environmentally friendly and cost-effective method compared to the current removal approaches such as partial hydrogenation and solvent extraction, while facing the challenge of developing materials with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity and C 2 H 2 capacity. Herein, by expanding mixed-metal organic frameworks (M'MOFs) structure with high C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity, we report a pillar-layered MOF, {[Cd 5 (MPCZ) 2 (BDC) 3 (NO 3 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 ]·G} n (MECS-5), which not only inherits the sieving effects of M'MOF series but also develops its own characteristic-the 2D layer with expanding space and the plane pore-partition group to "cover" it. MECS-5 shows higher ideal adsorption solution theory C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 selectivity than the most reported MOFs, especially more than 5 times higher than MOF-74 series while displaying great enhancement in the C 2 H 2 capacity, more than 2 times higher compared to the M'MOF. The column breakthrough experiment further proves the possibility of MECS-5a for real industrial ethylene purification.

  17. Effect of filler metals on the mechanical properties of Inconel 625 and AISI 904L dissimilar weldments using gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthur Prabu, S.; Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In the present research work, dissimilar welding between Inconel 625 super alloy and AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel using manual multi-pass continuous current gas tungsten arc (CCGTA) welding process employed with ERNiCrMo-4 and ERNiCrCoMo-1 fillers were performed to determine the mechanical properties and weldability. Tensile test results corroborated that the fracture had occurred at the parent metal of AISI 904L irrespective of filler used for all the trials. The presence of the macro and micro void coalescence in the fibrous matrix characterised for ductile mode of fracture. The hardness values at the weld interface of Inconel 625 side were observed to be higher for ERNiCrMo-4 filler due to the presence of strengthening elements such as W, Mo, Ni and Cr. The impact test accentuated that the weldments using ERNiCrMo-4 filler offered better impact toughness (41J) at room temperature. Bend test results showed that the weldments using these fillers exhibited good ductility without cracks.

  18. Relationship between welding fume concentration and systemic inflammation after controlled exposure of human subjects with welding fumes from metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Bauer, Marcus; Gube, Monika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Spiegel-Ciobanu, Vilia Elena; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that exposure of subjects to emissions from a metal inert gas (MIG) brazing process of zinc-coated material led to an increase of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the blood. In this study, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for such emissions was assessed. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed for 6 hours to different concentrations of MIG brazing fumes under controlled conditions. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured in the blood. For welding fumes containing 1.20 and 1.50 mg m zinc, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was increased the day after exposure. For 0.90 mg m zinc, no increase was detected. These data indicate that the no-observed-effect level for emissions from a MIG brazing process of zinc-coated material in respect to systemic inflammation is found for welding fumes with zinc concentrations between 0.90 and 1.20 mg m.

  19. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basol, Mit; Kielb, John F.; MuHooly, John F.; Smit, Kobus

    2007-01-01

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  20. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  1. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  2. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  3. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to produce gas. Often, relatively simple changes in eating habits can lessen bothersome gas. Certain digestive system disorders, ... such as soda and beer, increase stomach gas. Eating habits, such as eating too quickly, drinking through a ...

  4. New rht-Type Metal-Organic Frameworks Decorated with Acylamide Groups for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture and Chemical Fixation from Raw Power Plant Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyang; Zhou, Zhen; Chen, Cong; Bai, Junfeng; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2016-11-23

    The combination of carbon dioxide capture and chemical fixation in a one-pot process is attractive for both chemists and governments. The cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides to produce cyclic carbonates is an atomic economical reaction without any side products. By incorporating acylamide to enhance the binding affinity toward CO 2 , new rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with (3, 28) and (3, 24) connected units were constructed. Zn-NTTA with two types of dinuclear paddlewheel building blocks-{Zn 2 (OOC - ) 4 } and {Zn 2 (OOC - ) 3 }. The high uptake of CO 2 (115.6 cm 3 ·g -1 ) and selectivity over N 2 (30:1) at 273 K indicated that these MOFs are excellent candidates for postcombustion CO 2 isolation and capture. The MOFs feature high catalytic activity, rapid dynamics of transformation and excellent stability with turnover number (TON) values up to 110 000 per paddlewheel unit after 5 × 6 rounds of recyclability, demonstrating that they are promising heterogeneous catalysts for CO 2 cyclo-addition to value-added cyclic carbonates. The cycloaddition of epoxides with wet gases demonstrated that the catalyst activity was not affected by moisture, and the indices of the PXRD patterns of the bulk samples filtered from the catalytic reaction revealed that the crystallinities were maintained. The combination of the selective capture and catalytic transformation in one-pot enables the use of a negative-cost feedstock-raw power plant flue gas without any separation and purification-revealing the broad prospects of such MOFs for practical CO 2 fixation in industry.

  5. Fabrication of aluminum-alumina metal matrix composites via cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure followed by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, K.J.; Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 7th Floor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); McDonald, A.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, 4-9 Mechanical Engineering Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: agerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-10-30

    Cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure (1 MPa gage or 150 psig) was used to fabricate Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings onto 6061 Al alloy. The powder contained Al powder admixed with -10 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fractions up to 90 wt.%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Vickers microhardness testing, and image analysis were conducted to determine the microstructure, properties, and volume fraction of reinforcing particles in the coatings. The coatings were then friction-stir processed (FSP) at tool rotation speeds of 894 or 1723 RPM using a flat cylindrical tool. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and hardness of the final MMC coatings increased with increasing fractions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the feedstock powder, resulting in a maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of 48 wt.% and a hardness of 85 HV of the as-sprayed coating when 90 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the feed powder blend. After FSP, the hardness of the MMC increased to a maximum of 137 HV. The as-sprayed coatings contained Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles that were segregated between the Al particles, and FSP was effective in dispersing these Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and decreasing their mean free path. It was suggested that this re-distribution and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size refinement during FSP improved the hardness of the MMC coatings.

  6. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Human biomonitoring of aluminium after a single, controlled manual metal arc inert gas welding process of an aluminium-containing worksheet in nonwelders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Hartmann, Laura; Schettgen, Thomas; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Several existing field studies evaluate aluminium welding works but no thoroughly controlled exposure scenario for welding fume has been described yet. This study provides information about the uptake and elimination of aluminium from welding fumes under controlled conditions. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory, we are able to generate welding fumes of a defined particle mass concentration. We exposed 12, until then occupationally unexposed participants with aluminium-containing welding fumes of a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process of a total dust mass concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3) for 6 h. Room air filter samples were collected, and the aluminium concentration in air derived. Urine and plasma samples were collected directly before and after the 6-h lasting exposure, as well as after 1 and 7 days. Human biomonitoring methods were used to determine the aluminium content of the samples with high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary aluminium concentrations showed significant changes after exposure compared to preexposure levels (mean t(1) (0 h) 13.5 µg/L; mean t(2) (6 h) 23.5 µg/L). Plasma results showed the same pattern but pre-post comparison did not reach significance. We were able to detect a significant increase of the internal aluminium burden of a single MIG aluminium welding process in urine, while plasma failed significance. Biphasic elimination kinetic can be observed. The German BAT of 60 µg/g creatinine was not exceeded, and urinary aluminium returned nearly to baseline concentrations after 7 days.

  8. Ceria-based model catalysts: fundamental studies on the importance of the metal-ceria interface in CO oxidation, the water-gas shift, CO2hydrogenation, and methane and alcohol reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, José A; Grinter, David C; Liu, Zongyuan; Palomino, Robert M; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2017-04-03

    Model metal/ceria and ceria/metal catalysts have been shown to be excellent systems for studying fundamental phenomena linked to the operation of technical catalysts. In the last fifteen years, many combinations of well-defined systems involving different kinds of metals and ceria have been prepared and characterized using the modern techniques of surface science. So far most of the catalytic studies have been centered on a few reactions: CO oxidation, the hydrogenation of CO 2 , and the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction and the reforming of methane or alcohols. Using model catalysts it has been possible to examine in detail correlations between the structural, electronic and catalytic properties of ceria-metal interfaces. In situ techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy) have been combined to study the morphological changes under reaction conditions and investigate the evolution of active phases involved in the cleavage of C-O, C-H and C-C bonds. Several studies with model ceria catalysts have shown the importance of strong metal-support interactions. In general, a substantial body of knowledge has been acquired and concepts have been developed for a more rational approach to the design of novel technical catalysts containing ceria.

  9. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  10. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH TRANSITION METAL CONTENT AND FLUE GAS HCL/SO2 RATIO ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN WASTE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2):HCI ratio on heterogeneous Hg0 oxidation. The addition of SO2 to moist flue gas at high SO2:HCI ratios (4:1 to 10:1) caused a decrease in oxidation of Hg0 relative to flur gas without SO2. This is attrib...

  12. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gas and gas pains Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  13. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  14. Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

    2009-01-07

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most

  15. Mixed-Matrix Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musselman, Inga; Balkus, Kenneth Jr.; Ferraris, John

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid(reg s ign) and MOP-18/Matrimid(reg s ign) membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid(reg s ign) and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid(reg s ign) membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H 2 /CO 2 separation properties of MOF/Matrimid(reg s ign) mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid(reg s ign) mixed-matrix membranes, the H 2 /CO 2 selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H 2 permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid(reg s ign) mixed-matrix membranes, the H 2 /CO 2 selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H 2 permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid(reg s ign) mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H 2 /CO 2 selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H 2 increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H 2 /CO 2 selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid(reg s ign) membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H 2 . Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H 2 and CO 2 ), however, the membranes were most selective for CO 2 due to the strong interaction of the zeolites with

  16. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  17. Gas-Phase Reactions of Hydrated Alkaline Earth Metal Ions, M2+ (H2O)n (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and n = 4–7), With Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Gas-phase reactions of hydrated divalent alkaline earth metal ions and benzene were investigated by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Rate constants for solvent-exchange reactions were determined as a function of hydration extent for Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ clusters containing four to seven water molecules each. All of the strontium and barium clusters react quickly with benzene. Barium reacts slightly faster than the corresponding strontium cluster with the same number of water molecules attached. For calcium, clusters with four and five water molecules react quickly, whereas those with six and seven water molecules do not. Magnesium with four water molecules reacts quickly, but not when five through seven water molecules are attached. The slow reactivity observed for some of these clusters indicates that the cation–π interaction between the metal ion and benzene is partially screened by the surrounding water molecules. The reactivity of magnesium with seven water molecules is intermediate that of the hexa- and pentahydrate and the tetrahydrate. This result is consistent with the seventh water molecule being in the outer shell and much more weakly bound. The unusual trend in reactivity observed for magnesium may be due to the presence of mixed shell structures observed previously. These results are the first to provide information about the relative importance of cation–π interactions in divalent metal ions as a function of metal hydration extent. Such studies should also provide a model and some insight into the relative binding affinities of divalent metal ions to aromatic residues on peptides and proteins. PMID:11281600

  18. Gas-phase reactions of hydrated alkaline earth metal ions, M2+ (H2O)n (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and n = 4-7), with benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cruz, S E; Williams, E R

    2001-03-01

    Gas-phase reactions of hydrated divalent alkaline earth metal ions and benzene were investigated by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Rate constants for solvent-exchange reactions were determined as a function of hydration extent for Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ clusters containing four to seven water molecules each. All of the strontium and barium clusters react quickly with benzene. Barium reacts slightly faster than the corresponding strontium cluster with the same number of water molecules attached. For calcium, clusters with four and five water molecules react quickly, whereas those with six and seven water molecules do not. Magnesium with four water molecules reacts quickly, but not when five through seven water molecules are attached. The slow reactivity observed for some of these clusters indicates that the cation-pi interaction between the metal ion and benzene is partially screened by the surrounding water molecules. The reactivity of magnesium with seven water molecules is intermediate that of the hexa- and pentahydrate and the tetrahydrate. This result is consistent with the seventh water molecule being in the outer shell and much more weakly bound. The unusual trend in reactivity observed for magnesium may be due to the presence of mixed shell structures observed previously. These results are the first to provide information about the relative importance of cation-pi interactions in divalent metal ions as a function of metal hydration extent. Such studies should also provide a model and some insight into the relative binding affinities of divalent metal ions to aromatic residues on peptides and proteins.

  19. Cu-TDPAT, an rht -type dual-functional metal-organic framework offering significant potential for use in H 2 and natural gas purification processes operating at high pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Haohan

    2012-08-09

    The separations of CO 2/CO/CH 4/H 2, CO 2/H 2, CH 4/H 2, and CO 2/CH 4 mixtures at pressures ranging to 7 MPa are important in a variety of contexts, including H 2 production, natural gas purification, and fuel-gas processing. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the selective adsorption potential of an rht-type metal-organic framework [Cu 3(TDPAT)(H 2O) 3]·10H 2O·5DMA (Cu-TDPAT), possessing a high density of both open metal sites and Lewis basic sites. Experimental high pressure pure component isotherm data for CO 2, CO, CH 4, and H 2 are combined with the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST) for estimation of mixture adsorption equilibrium. The separation performance of Cu-TDPAT is compared with four other microporous materials, specifically chosen in order to span a wide range of physicochemical characteristics: MgMOF-74, MIL-101, LTA-5A, and NaX. For all mixtures investigated, the capacity of Cu-TDPAT to produce the desired product, H 2 or CH 4, satisfying stringent purity requirements, in a fixed bed operating at pressures exceeding about 4 MPa, is either comparable to, or exceeds, that of other materials. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Sorption of colloids, organics, and metals onto gas-water interfaces: Transport mechanisms and potential remediation technology. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.

    1998-01-01

    'Although contaminant sorption at mineral surfaces has received much recognition as a major mechanism controlling contaminant behavior in subsurface environments, virtually no attention has been given to the possibility of contaminant sorption at gas-water interfaces. Moreover, no effort has yet been advanced to optimize such interactions for the purpose of facilitating in-situ remediation. Gas-water interfaces, unlike water-solid interfaces, are mobile. Therefore, associations of contaminants with gas-water interfaces can be very important not only in subsurface contaminant distributions, but also in contaminant transport, and potentially in remediation. The first objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of interactions between contaminants and gas-water interfaces. The anticipated results will provide insights into the poorly understood phenomenon of contaminant interactions with the gas-water interface, and improve the current conceptual models of contaminant behavior in subsurface environments. The second purpose of this research is to explore the possibility of using surfactant stabilized microbubbles for in-situ remediation. Both pump-and-treat, and air sparging remediation methods are ineffective at displacing contaminants in zones which are advectively inaccessible. Stable microbubbles can migrate beyond preferential flow pathways and enter lower permeability zones by buoyant rise. The microbubbles can deliver oxygen and nutrients for promoting aerobic degradation of organic contaminants, and also deliver surfactants for emulsifying NAPLs.'

  1. State-to-state dynamics at the gas-liquid metal interface: rotationally and electronically inelastic scattering of NO[2Π(1/2)(0.5)] from molten gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Roscioli, Joseph R; Nesbitt, David J

    2011-06-21

    Jet cooled NO molecules are scattered at 45° with respect to the surface normal from a liquid gallium surface at E(inc) from 1.0(3) to 20(6) kcal/mol to probe rotationally and electronically inelastic scattering from a gas-molten metal interface (numbers in parenthesis represent 1σ uncertainty in the corresponding final digits). Scattered populations are detected at 45° by confocal laser induced fluorescence (LIF) on the γ(0-0) and γ(1-1) A(2)Σ ← X(2)Π(Ω) bands, yielding rotational, spin-orbit, and λ-doublet population distributions. Scattering of low speed NO molecules results in Boltzmann distributions with effective temperatures considerably lower than that of the surface, in respectable agreement with the Bowman-Gossage rotational cooling model [J. M. Bowman and J. L. Gossage, Chem. Phys. Lett. 96, 481 (1983)] for desorption from a restricted surface rotor state. Increasing collision energy results in a stronger increase in scattered NO rotational energy than spin-orbit excitation, with an opposite trend noted for changes in surface temperature. The difference between electronic and rotational dynamics is discussed in terms of the possible influence of electron hole pair excitations in the conducting metal. While such electronically non-adiabatic processes can also influence vibrational dynamics, the γ(1-1) band indicates rotational energy transfer is compared from a hard cube model perspective with previous studies of NO scattering from single crystal solid surfaces. Despite a lighter atomic mass (70 amu), the liquid Ga surface is found to promote translational to rotational excitation more efficiently than Ag(111) (108 amu) and nearly as effectively as Au(111) (197 amu). The enhanced propensity for Ga(l) to transform incident translational energy into rotation is discussed in terms of temperature-dependent capillary wave excitation of the gas-liquid metal interface. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Lightweight, Room-Temperature CO2Gas Sensor Based on Rare-Earth Metal-Free Composites-An Impedance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, Christoph; Schmid, Alexander; Briand, Danick; Yuan, Jiayin; Koziej, Dorota

    2017-08-02

    We report a light, flexible, and low-power poly(ionic liquid)/alumina composite CO 2 sensor. We monitor the direct-current resistance changes as a function of CO 2 concentration and relative humidity and demonstrate fast and reversible sensing kinetics. Moreover, on the basis of the alternating-current impedance measurements we propose a sensing mechanism related to proton conduction and gas diffusion. The findings presented herein will promote the development of organic/inorganic composite CO 2 gas sensors. In the future, such sensors will be useful for numerous practical applications ranging from indoor air quality control to the monitoring of manufacturing processes.

  3. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  4. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  5. Bridging the gap between ionic liquids and molten salts: group 1 metal salts of the bistriflamide anion in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, João P; da Piedade, Manuel E Minas; Canongia Lopes, José N; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Esperança, José M S S; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Seddon, Kenneth R

    2009-03-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments showed that liquid Group 1 metal salts of the bistriflamide anion undergoing reduced-pressure distillation exhibit a remarkable behavior that is in transition between that of the vapor-liquid equilibrium characteristics of aprotic ionic liquids and that of the Group 1 metal halides: the unperturbed vapors resemble those of aprotic ionic liquids, in the sense that they are essentially composed of discrete ion pairs. However, the formation of large aggregates through a succession of ion-molecule reactions is closer to what might be expected for Group 1 metal halides. Similar experiments were also carried out with bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}amine to investigate the effect of H(+), which despite being the smallest Group 1 cation, is generally regarded as a nonmetal species. In this case, instead of the complex ion-molecule reaction pattern found for the vapors of Group 1 metal salts, an equilibrium similar to those observed for aprotic ionic liquids was observed.

  6. Metal-free reduction of the greenhouse gas sulfur hexafluoride, formation of SF5 containing ion pairs and the application in fluorinations

    KAUST Repository

    Rueping, Magnus

    2017-05-04

    A protocol for the fast and selective two-electron reduction of the potent greenhouse gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) by organic electron donors at ambient temperature has been developed. The reaction yields solid ion pairs consisting of donor dications and SF5-anions which can be effectively used in fluorination reactions.

  7. The role of tetragonal-metal-organic framework-5 loadings with extra ZnO molecule on the gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjmandi, Mehrzad; Pakizeh, Majid; Pirouzram, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The effect of more ZnO molecule in tetragonal structure of MOF-5 than cubic structure on the gas permeation properties of T-MOF-5/polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes was investigated. T-MOF-5 was first successfully synthesized and carefully characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM and N 2 adsorption technique at 77 K. Novel T-MOF-5/PEI MMMs were prepared using solution casting method and characterized by FTIR and SEM. The SEM pictures of the MMMs showed that T-MOF-5 nanocrystals changed the morphology of PEI and exhibited acceptable contacts between the filler particles and the polymer chains. Gas permeation properties of these membranes with different T-MOF-5 contents were studied for pure H 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 gases. Permeation measurement showed that the all gases' permeability, diffusivity and solubility were increased with T-MOF-5 loading. H 2 permeability and the ideal selectivity of H 2 /CO 2 and H 2 /CH 4 in MMM with 25 wt% loading of T-MOF-5 nanocrystals were increased. This behavior was attributed to more ZnO molecule in T-MOF-5 structure. The experimental gas permeations through T-MOF-5/PEI nanocomposite with different filler loadings were fitted on Higuchi model. Good agreement between the experimental data and the predicted gas permeability was obtained

  8. The role of tetragonal-metal-organic framework-5 loadings with extra ZnO molecule on the gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjmandi, Mehrzad; Pakizeh, Majid [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pirouzram, Omid [Kurdistan University, Kurdistan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The effect of more ZnO molecule in tetragonal structure of MOF-5 than cubic structure on the gas permeation properties of T-MOF-5/polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes was investigated. T-MOF-5 was first successfully synthesized and carefully characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM and N{sub 2} adsorption technique at 77 K. Novel T-MOF-5/PEI MMMs were prepared using solution casting method and characterized by FTIR and SEM. The SEM pictures of the MMMs showed that T-MOF-5 nanocrystals changed the morphology of PEI and exhibited acceptable contacts between the filler particles and the polymer chains. Gas permeation properties of these membranes with different T-MOF-5 contents were studied for pure H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases. Permeation measurement showed that the all gases' permeability, diffusivity and solubility were increased with T-MOF-5 loading. H{sub 2} permeability and the ideal selectivity of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in MMM with 25 wt% loading of T-MOF-5 nanocrystals were increased. This behavior was attributed to more ZnO molecule in T-MOF-5 structure. The experimental gas permeations through T-MOF-5/PEI nanocomposite with different filler loadings were fitted on Higuchi model. Good agreement between the experimental data and the predicted gas permeability was obtained.

  9. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  10. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  11. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  12. The effect of shielding gas composition on the toughness and crack growth parameters of AlMg4,5Mn weld metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić-Cvetković R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment have been performed using samples of welded joints of the three components aluminium alloy AlMg4,5Mn. The welding was performed with GTAW in the shielded atmosphere of Ar+0,015N2, mixture of the inert gases Ar+50%He+0,015N2 and Ar+70%He+0,015N2. After welding has been completed, the metallographic tests, the tensile test and the tests of the hardness were performed. Also, the weld metal toughness was estimated, using the instrumental Charpy impact testing system, followed by estimating the crack initiation energy, crack growth energy and the fracture mechanics parameters. The goal was to establish the effects of shielding atmosphere composition on the mechanical properties and fracture mechanics parameters of weld metal.

  13. Inflow of atomic gas fuelling star formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation in these ga......Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation...... in these galaxies may be fuelled by recent inflow of metal-poor atomic gas. While this process is debated, it can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because gas cooling (necessary for star formation) is faster than the Hi-to-H2 conversion....

  14. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  15. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T [Northfield, IL; Mulfort, Karen L [Chicago, IL; Snurr, Randall Q [Evanston, IL; Bae, Youn-Sang [Evanston, IL

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  16. Interactions of hydrated divalent metal cations with nucleic acid bases. How to relate the gas phase data to solution situation and binding selectivity in nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponer, Judit E.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Hobza, Pavel; Šponer, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 10 (2004), s. 2772-2780 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A016; GA MŠk LN00A032 Grant - others:Wellcome Trust(GB) GR067507MF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : nucleic acids * gas phase * guanine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.076, year: 2004

  17. Influencia de la cantidad de O2 adicionado al CO2 en el gas de protección sobre la microestructura del metal depositado en uniones soldadas de bordes rectos en aceros de bajo contenido de carbono con el proceso GMAW Influence of O2 content, added to CO2 in the shielding gas, on the microstructure of deposited metal in butt welded joint with straight edges, in low carbon steels using GMAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Díaz-Cedré

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La presencia de ferrita acicular (FA en la microestructura del cordón de soldadura, dentro de determinado rango de valores, eleva considerablemente la tenacidad de las uniones soldadas. Es por ello, que el presente trabajo trata sobre un estudio que relaciona la cantidad de ferrita acicular en el cordón en función del contenido de oxígeno presente en la mezcla activa CO2+O2, durante la realización de uniones soldadas de bordes rectos en aceros de bajo carbono con el proceso con electrodo fusible y protección gaseosa (GMAW en condiciones invariables de parámetros de proceso (corriente de soldadura, voltaje de arco, velocidad de soldadura, longitud libre y flujo de gas protector. Como resultado del trabajo se estableció la relación gráfica existente entre la ferrita acicular y el contenido de oxígeno en la mezcla.The presence of acicular ferrite (AF in the microstructure of weld bead, in a specified range of values, increase considerably the toughness of welded joints. The present paper, for that reason, study the relationship between the acicular ferrite quantity in the deposited metal and the oxygen present in the active gas mixture of CO2+O2, during the execution of butt welded joints with straight edges, in low carbon steels with consumable electrode and gas protection (GMAW in invariable conditions of process parameters (welding current, arc voltage, welding speed, electrode extension, and gas flow. The graphic relation between the acicular ferrite and the oxygen content was established, as result of the research work.

  18. The geostatistics of the metal concentrations in sediments from the eastern Brazilian continental shelf in areas of gas and oil production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Jose Edvar; de Lacerda, Luiz Drude; Miguens, Flavio Costa; Marins, Rozane Valente

    2014-04-01

    Geostatistical techniques were used to evaluate the differences in the geochemistry of metals in the marine sediments along the Eastern Brazilian continental margin along the states of Ceará and Rio Grande do Norte (Northeastern sector) and Espírito Santo (Southeastern sector). The concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn, Ba, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, V, Hg, and Zn were obtained from acid digestion and quantified using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The metals showed a similar order of concentration: Al > Fe > Ba > Mn > V > Ni > Pb > Cr > Zn > Cu, in both the Ceará; and Rio Grande do Norte shelf regions but different in the Espírito Santo shelf (Fe > Al > Mn > Ba > Zn > V > Cr > Ni > Pb > Cu. The concentrations of Hg and Cd were below the detection limit in all areas. A multivariate analysis revealed that the metals of siliciclastic origin on the continental shelf of Ceará are carried by Al. In addition, a large portion of metal deposits is connected to the iron and manganese oxides on the continental margin of Rio Grande do Norte. The metals from the continental supply on the coast of Espírito Santo (Cu, Ni, Ba, and Mn) are associated with Al; whereas Cr, Pb, V, and Zn are associated with iron in this southern area. Geochemical evaluations are needed to distinguish the origin and mineralogical differences of marine sediments within the regions. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) applied to the sediments from the coast of Ceará showed the morphological diversity of sediment grains: biological fragments, multifaceted particles, aggregates, and crystals occurred in the three regions analyzed. Among these grains, calcite, Mg-calcite, and aragonite were predominant in the northeastern sector, whereas silicates and other minerals were predominant the southeastern sector. Mg, K, Ti, and Zr as well as the

  19. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth species on metals in various gas atmospheres. Pt. I. Adsorption of volatile polonium and bismuth on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Joerg; Dressler, Rugard; Piguet, David; Voegele, Alexander; Schumann, Dorothea [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Eichler, Robert [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Radiochemistry; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. for Chemistry and Biochemistry; Rijpstra, Kim [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Cottenier, Stefaan [Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM); Ghent Univ., Zwijnaarde (Belgium). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Polonium isotopes are considered the most hazardous radionuclides produced during the operation of accelerator driven systems (ADS) when lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is used as the reactor coolant and as the spallation target material. In this work the use of gold surfaces for capturing polonium from the cover gas of the ADS reactor was studied by thermochromatography. The results show that gaseous monoatomic polonium, formed in dry hydrogen, is adsorbed on gold at 1058 K. Its adsorption enthalpy was calculated as -250±7 kJ mol{sup -1}, using a Monte Carlo simulation code. Highly volatile polonium species that were observed in similar experiments in fused silica columns in the presence of moisture in both inert and reducing gas were not detected in the experiments studying adsorption on gold surfaces. PoO{sub 2} is formed in both dry and moist oxygen, and its interaction with gold is characterized by transport reactions. The interaction of bismuth, present in large amounts in the atmosphere of the ADS, with gold was also evaluated. It was found that bismuth has a higher affinity for gold, compared to polonium, in an inert, reducing, and oxidizing atmosphere. This fact must be considered when using gold as a material for filtering polonium in the cover gas of ADS.

  20. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  1. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  2. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, De-Li [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Mandeltort, Lynn [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Saidi, Wissam A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Yates, John T. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Cole, Milton W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept of Physics; Johnson, J. Karl [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  3. Self-assembly of metal-organic coordination polymers constructed from a bent dicarboxylate ligand: diversity of coordination modes, structures, and gas adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenbin; Lin, Xiang; Blake, Alexander J; Wilson, Claire; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin

    2009-12-07

    We have synthesized five new metal-organic coordination polymers incorporating the bent ligand H(2)hfipbb [4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)bis(benzoic acid)] with different transition metal ions and co-ligands via solvothermal reactions to give [Zn(2)(hfipbb)(2)(py)(2)] x DMF (1), [Zn(2)(hfipbb)(2)(4,4'-bipy)(H(2)O)] (2), [Zn(2)(hfipbb)(2)(bpdab)].2DMF (3), [Cd(2)(hfipbb)(2)(DMF)(2)] x 2 DMF (4), and [Co(hfipbb)(dpp)] x MeOH (5) (py = pyridine, 4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine, bpdab = 1,4-bis(4-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene, dpp = 1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane). Compound 1 displays a 2-fold 2D-->2D parallel interpenetrated layer network with one-dimensional (1D) helical channels, while 3 exhibits a three-dimensional pillared helical-layer open framework of alpha-Po topology based upon binuclear paddlewheel units. In compounds 2 and 5, binuclear motifs with double carboxylate bridges are linked by hfipbb(2-) ligands into a 1D ribbon, which are further assembled into two-dimensional non-interpenetrated (4,4) layers via bipyridyl co-ligands. However, the different bridging modes of hfipbb(2-) ligands and the different disposition of the coordinated co-ligands around metal ions result in subtle differences in the final architecture. Thus, 2 is based on a binuclear cluster node, double-stranded hfipbb(2-) linkers, and single-stranded 4,4'-bipy linkers, while 5 is based on a binuclear cluster node and hfipbb(2-) and dpp linkers which are both double-stranded. Among these compounds, the Cd(II) complex 4 is possibly the most interesting because it represents a rare example in which metal centers are linked by carboxylate groups into infinite chains further joined together by hfipbb(2-) spacers to form a 2D network with tubular helical channels. All these coordination polymers exhibit low solvent-accessible volumes. Both 3 and 4 retain structural integrity and permanent microporosity upon evacuation of guest molecules, with hydrogen uptakes of 0.57 and 0.78 wt %, respectively, at

  4. Gas recombination assembly for electrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Isaac; Charkey, Allen

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for recombining gases generated in electrochemical cells wherein a catalyst strip is enveloped within a hydrophobic, gas-porous film which, in turn, is encased between gas-porous, metallic layers. The sandwich construction of metallic layers and film is formed into a spiral with a tab for connection to the cell.

  5. Controlled Confinement of Half-metallic 2D Electron Gas in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 Heterostructures: A First-principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh; Paramekanti, Arun

    Using density functional theory calculations, we establish that the half-metallicity of bulk Ba2FeReO6 survives down i to 1 nm thickness in BaTiO3/Ba2FeReO6/BaTiO3 heterostructures grown along the (001) and (111) directions. The confinement of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in this quantum well structure arises from the suppressed hybridization between Re/Fe d states and unoccupied Ti d states, and it is further strengthened by polar fields for the (111) direction. This mechanism, distinct from the polar catastrophe, leads to an order of magnitude stronger confinement of the 2D electron gas than that at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. We further show low-energy bands of (111) heterostructure display nontrivial topological character. Our work opens up the possibility of realizing ultra-thin spintronic devices. Journal Ref: Phys. Rev. B 92, 161106(R) (2015) S.B. and T.S.D thank Department of Science and Technology, India for the support through Thematic Unit of Excellence. AP was supported by NSERC (Canada).

  6. Towards point of care testing for C. difficile infection by volatile profiling, using the combination of a short multi-capillary gas chromatography column with metal oxide sensor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, N D; Ewen, R J; De Lacy Costello, B; Garner, C E; Vaughan, K; Ratcliffe, N M; Probert, C S J

    2014-01-01

    Rapid volatile profiling of stool sample headspace was achieved using a combination of short multi-capillary chromatography column (SMCC), highly sensitive heated metal oxide semiconductor sensor and artificial neural network software. For direct analysis of biological samples this prototype offers alternatives to conventional gas chromatography (GC) detectors and electronic nose technology. The performance was compared to an identical instrument incorporating a long single capillary column (LSCC). The ability of the prototypes to separate complex mixtures was assessed using gas standards and homogenized in house ‘standard’ stool samples, with both capable of detecting more than 24 peaks per sample. The elution time was considerably faster with the SMCC resulting in a run time of 10 min compared to 30 min for the LSCC. The diagnostic potential of the prototypes was assessed using 50 C. difficile positive and 50 negative samples. The prototypes demonstrated similar capability of discriminating between positive and negative samples with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 80% respectively. C. difficile is an important cause of hospital acquired diarrhoea, with significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A device capable of rapidly diagnosing the disease at the point of care would reduce cases, deaths and financial burden. (paper)

  7. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  8. A novel nickel metal-organic framework with fluorite-like structure: gas adsorption properties and catalytic activity in Knoevenagel condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almáši, Miroslav; Zeleňák, Vladimír; Opanasenko, Maksym; Cejka, Jíří

    2014-03-07

    A new non-interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework {[Ni4(μ6-MTB)2(μ2-H2O)4(H2O)4]·10DMF·11H2O}n (DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide) built from nickel(ii) ions as connectors and methanetetrabenzoate ligands (MTB(4-)) as linkers has been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal X-ray diffraction showed that complex exhibits CaF2-like fluorite structure topology and four types of 3D channels with sizes about 12.6 × 9.4 Å(2), 9.4 × 8.0 Å(2), 12.6 × 11.7 Å(2) and 14.9 × 14.9 Å(2), which are filled with guest molecules. Conditions of the activation of the compound have been studied and optimized by powder X-ray diffraction during in situ heating, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Nitrogen and carbon dioxide adsorption showed that the activated sample exhibits a BET specific surface area of 700 m(2) g(-1) and a carbon dioxide uptake of 12.36 wt% at 0 °C, which are the highest values reported for the compounds of the MTB(4-) series. The complex was tested in Knoevenagel condensation of aldehydes and active methylene compounds. Straightforward dependence of the substrate conversion on the size of used aldehyde was established. A possible mechanism of Knoevenagel condensation over a MTB(4-) containing a metal-organic framework was proposed.

  9. Insights into an intriguing gas sorption mechanism in a polar metal–organic framework with open-metal sites and narrow channels

    KAUST Repository

    Forrest, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of H2 and CO2 sorption were performed in the metal-organic framework (MOF), [Cu(Me-4py-trz-ia)]. This MOF was recently shown experimentally to exhibit high uptake for H2 and CO2 sorption and this was reproduced and elucidated through the simulations performed herein. Consistent with experiment, the theoretical isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were nearly constant across all loadings for both sorbates. The simulations revealed that sorption directly onto the open-metal sites was not observed in this MOF, ostensibly a consequence of the low partial positive charges of the Cu2+ ions as determined through electronic structure calculations. Sorption was primarily observed between adjacent carboxylate oxygen atoms (site 1) and between nearby methyl groups (site 2) of the organic linkers. In addition, saturation of the most energetically favorable sites (site 1) is possible only after filling a nearby site (site 2) first due to the MOF topology. This suggests that the lack of dependence on loading for the Qst is due to the concurrent filling of sites 1 and 2, leading to an observed average Qst value. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  10. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  11. A Gas Chromatographic System for the Detection of Ethylene Gas Using Ambient Air as a Carrier Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nayyer Abbas; Tahir, Muhammad Waseem; Vellekoop, Michael J; Lang, Walter

    2017-10-07

    Ethylene gas is a naturally occurring gas that has an influence on the shelf life of fruit during their transportation in cargo ships. An unintentional exposure of ethylene gas during transportation results in a loss of fruit. A gas chromatographic system is presented here for the detection of ethylene gas. The gas chromatographic system was assembled using a preconcentrator, a printed 3D printed gas chromatographic column, a humidity sensor, solenoid valves, and an electrochemical ethylene gas sensor. Ambient air was used as a carrier gas in the gas chromatographic system. The flow rate was fixed to 10 sccm. It was generated through a mini-pump connected in series with a mass flow controller. The metal oxide gas sensor is discussed with its limitation in ambient air. The results show the chromatogram obtained from metal oxide gas sensor has low stability, drifts, and has uncertain peaks, while the chromatogram from the electrochemical sensor is stable and precise. Furthermore, ethylene gas measurements at higher ppb concentration and at lower ppb concentration were demonstrated with the electrochemical ethylene gas sensor. The system separates ethylene gas and humidity. The chromatograms obtained from the system are stable, and the results are 1.2% repeatable in five similar measurements. The statistical calculation of the gas chromatographic system shows that a concentration of 2.3 ppb of ethylene gas can be detected through this system.

  12. Solvent-Controlled Assembly of ionic Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Indium and Tetracarboxylate Ligand: Topology Variety and Gas Sorption Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bing

    2016-07-15

    Four Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based on Indium and tetracarboxylate ligand have been synthesized through regulation of the solvent conditions, the resulted compounds not only exhibited rich structural topologies (pts, soc and unique topologies), but also interesting charge reversal framework features. By regulating the solvent, different building units (indium monomer, trimer) have been generated in situ, and they are connected with the ligand to form ionic frameworks 1-4, respectively. Among the synthesized four ionic frameworks, compounds 3 and 4 could keep their crystallinity upon heating temperature up to 300oC after fully removal of solvent guest molecules, they also exhibit the charge reversal framework features (3 adopts an overall cationic framework, while 4 has an anionic framework). Both compounds 3 and 4 exhibit significant uptake capacity for CO2 and H2, besides that, compounds 3 and 4 also present excellent selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and CH4.

  13. Can there be a multi-bond between noble gas and metal? A theoretical study of F2XeMoF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2017-04-05

    A new noble gas compound containing a Xe-Mo double bond, F 2 XeMoF 2 , was theoretically constructed and studied based on DFT and ab initio calculations. The CCSD(T)-calculated Xe-Mo bond length of 2.518 Å was comparable to the standard value of 2.56 Å. The bonding energy (32.3 kcal mol -1 ) was even higher than that of the Xe-Au bond in the well-known XeAuF complex (24.1 kcal mol -1 ). The result of natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates that there is a σ-bond and a π-bond between the Xe and Mo atoms in F 2 XeMoF 2 . The properties of the Xe-Mo double bond were also analyzed with the atoms in molecules (AIM) approach and natural resonance theory (NRT).

  14. Studies in semiconducting metal oxides in conjunction with silicon for solid state gas sensors. Progress report for April 1, 1977--March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, A.G.

    1978-04-01

    ZnO films have been reproducibly grown using chemical deposition and radio-frequency sputtering techniques. These films are polycrystalline or amorphous, but are stable, uniform and lend themselves to material characterization by Auger and x-ray analysis techniques, and electrical measurements. SnO 2 films have been reproducibly grown by chemical vapor deposition, vacuum deposition and radio-frequency sputtering techniques. These films are also polycrystalline or amorphous, and lend themselves to material characterization and measurements. By vacuum deposition techniques, Si-SnO 2 heterojunctions have been grown, which exhibit good rectification properties. An original thermodynamic analysis of the growth of SnO 2 by a chemical vapor deposition technique based on the reaction between SnCl 4 and H 2 O has been developed and submitted for publication. Pd-SiO 2 -Si Schottky barrier diodes exhibiting excellent rectification properties have been successfully fabricated. A formalism has been established for the analysis of the behavior of these devices in the presence of H 2 , H 2 S and CO. The ZnO films grown by chemical deposition have proven to be sensitive to CO and CH 4 . Sputtered ZnO films are sensitive to O 2 and H 2 . SnO 2 films grown by chemical vapor deposition are not very sensitive to gases. Sputtered films, however, are very sensitive to H 2 and H 2 S. The Pd-SiO 2 -Si diodes are extremely sensitive to H 2 , H 2 S and NH 3 , and, under certain conditions, to CO. A microprocessor data processing system has been developed incorporating gas sensors in the presence of a variety of gases and gas mixtures

  15. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  16. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  17. Gas breakdown in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Pogutse, O.P.; Yurchenko, Eh.I.

    1975-01-01

    The initial stage of the charge development in a tokomak is considered theoretically. It is supposed that all electrons produced in neutral gas ionisation process are in the regime of an almost continuous acceleration. The production time of a given electron density is calculated as a function of the neutral gas density and of parameters of the vortex electric field. The mechanism of plasma escape on walls is considered. It is shown that the escaping time is defined by a specific inertial flow of plasma and depends on whether chamber walls are metal or dielectric. The criterion of the gas breakdown in a toroidal system is formulated. The developed theory is shown to explain a strong dependence of the breakdown on the gas initial density [ru

  18. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  19. Machine for dismantling metal parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopov, O.I.; Loginovskiy, V.I.; Yagudin, S.Z.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to reduce the outlays of time for dismantling metal parts under conditions of eliminating open gas and oil gushers in operational drilling. This goal is achieved because the machine for dismantling the metal parts is equipped with a set of clamping elements arranged on the chassis, where each of them has a drive.

  20. High-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with nitrogen as nucleation layer carrier gas grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, high-resistivity unintentionally carbon-doped GaN layers with sheet resistivity greater than 106 Ω/□ have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD. We have observed that the growth of GaN nucleation layers (NLs under N2 ambient leads to a large full width at half maximum (FWHM of (102 X-ray diffraction (XRD line in the rocking curve about 1576 arc sec. Unintentional carbon incorporation can be observed in the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS measurements. The results demonstrate the self-compensation mechanism is attributed to the increased density of edge-type threading dislocations and carbon impurities. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT grown on the high-resistivity GaN template has also been fabricated, exhibiting a maximum drain current of 478 mA/mm, a peak transconductance of 60.0 mS/mm, an ON/OFF ratio of 0.96×108 and a breakdown voltage of 621 V.