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Sample records for metal cladding composition

  1. Laser cladding of wear resistant metal matrix composite coatings

    Yakovlev, A.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coatings with wear-resistant properties as well as with a low friction coefficient are produced by laser cladding. The structure of these coatings is determined by required performance and realized as metal matrix composite (MMC), where solid lubricant serves as a ductile matrix (e.g. CuSn), reinforced by appropriate ceramic phase (e.g. WC/Co). One of the engineered coating with functionally graded material (FGM) structure has a dry friction coefficient 0.12. Coatings were produced by coaxial injection of powder blend into the zone of laser beam action. Metallographic and tribological examinations were carried out confirming the advanced performance of engineered coatings

  2. Microstructures and tribological properties of laser cladded Ti-based metallic glass composite coatings

    Lan, Xiaodong; Wu, Hong; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Ruidi; Chen, Shiqi; Zai, Xiongfei; Hu, Te

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass composite coatings Ti 45 Cu 41 Ni 9 Zr 5 and Ti 45 Cu 41 Ni 6 Zr 5 Sn 3 (at.%) on a Ti-30Nb-5Ta-7Zr (wt.%) (TNTZ) alloy were prepared by laser cladding. The microstructures of the coatings were characterized by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDXA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicated that the coatings have an amorphous structure embedded with a few nanocrystalline phases and dendrites. A partial substitution of Ni by Sn can improve the glass forming ability of Ti-base metallic glass system, and induce the formation of nano-sized Ni 2 SnTi phase during the cyclic laser heating. The tribological behavior of both the substrate and the coatings was investigated in detail. A significant improvement in both the hardness and the wear resistance of the coatings was achieved with the addition of Sn. The relationship between the wear resistance and the microstructures of the coatings was discussed. - Highlights: •Ti-based metallic glass composite coatings were prepared by laser cladding. •The wear resistance is greatly improved by laser cladding of composite coatings. •Substitution of Ni by Sn increases GFA and wear resistance of the coatings. •A good balance of crystalline/amorphous phases improves the wear resistance. •Adhesive wear serves as the dominant wear mechanism of the composite coatings.

  3. MAX Phase Modified SiC Composites for Ceramic-Metal Hybrid Cladding Tubes

    Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Sun-Han; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube, and an outer SiC fiber-matrix SiC ceramic composite with surface coating as shown in Fig. 1 (left-hand side). The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. In addition, the outermost layer prevents the dissolution of SiC during normal operation. On the other hand, a ceramic-metal hybrid cladding consists of an outer zirconium tube, and an inner SiC ceramic composite as shown in Fig. 1 (right-hand side). The outer zirconium protects the fuel rod from a corrosion during reactor operation, as in the present fuel claddings. The inner SiC composite, additionally, is designed to resist the severe oxidation under a postulated accident condition of a high-temperature steam environment. Reaction-bonded SiC was fabricated by modifying the matrix as the MAX phase. The formation of Ti 3 SiC 2 was investigated depending on the compositions of the preform and melt. In most cases, TiSi 2 was the preferential phase because of its lowest melting point in the Ti-Si-C system. The evidence of Ti 3 SiC 2 was the connection with the pressurizing

  4. Microstructures and tribological properties of laser cladded Ti-based metallic glass composite coatings

    Lan, Xiaodong; Wu, Hong, E-mail: wuhong927@126.com; Liu, Yong, E-mail: yonliu@csu.edu.cn; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Ruidi; Chen, Shiqi; Zai, Xiongfei; Hu, Te

    2016-10-15

    Metallic glass composite coatings Ti{sub 45}Cu{sub 41}Ni{sub 9}Zr{sub 5} and Ti{sub 45}Cu{sub 41}Ni{sub 6}Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3} (at.%) on a Ti-30Nb-5Ta-7Zr (wt.%) (TNTZ) alloy were prepared by laser cladding. The microstructures of the coatings were characterized by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDXA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicated that the coatings have an amorphous structure embedded with a few nanocrystalline phases and dendrites. A partial substitution of Ni by Sn can improve the glass forming ability of Ti-base metallic glass system, and induce the formation of nano-sized Ni{sub 2}SnTi phase during the cyclic laser heating. The tribological behavior of both the substrate and the coatings was investigated in detail. A significant improvement in both the hardness and the wear resistance of the coatings was achieved with the addition of Sn. The relationship between the wear resistance and the microstructures of the coatings was discussed. - Highlights: •Ti-based metallic glass composite coatings were prepared by laser cladding. •The wear resistance is greatly improved by laser cladding of composite coatings. •Substitution of Ni by Sn increases GFA and wear resistance of the coatings. •A good balance of crystalline/amorphous phases improves the wear resistance. •Adhesive wear serves as the dominant wear mechanism of the composite coatings.

  5. Development of a metal-clad advanced composite shear web design concept

    Laakso, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced composite web concept was developed for potential application to the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust structure. The program consisted of design synthesis, analysis, detail design, element testing, and large scale component testing. A concept was sought that offered significant weight saving by the use of Boron/Epoxy (B/E) reinforced titanium plate structure. The desired concept was one that was practical and that utilized metal to efficiently improve structural reliability. The resulting development of a unique titanium-clad B/E shear web design concept is described. Three large scale components were fabricated and tested to demonstrate the performance of the concept: a titanium-clad plus or minus 45 deg B/E web laminate stiffened with vertical B/E reinforced aluminum stiffeners.

  6. Microstructures and properties of ceramic particle-reinforced metal matrix composite layers produced by laser cladding

    Zhang, Qingmao; He, Jingjiang; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2005-01-01

    Different weight ratio of titanium, zirconium, WC and Fe-based alloy powders were mixed, and cladded onto a medium carbon steel substrate using a 3kW continuous wave CO2 laser, aiming at producing Ceramic particles- reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) layers. The microstructures of the layers are typical hypoeutectic, and the major phases are Ni3Si2, TiSi2, Fe3C, FeNi, MC, Fe7Mo3, Fe3B, γ(residual austenite) and M(martensite). The microstructure morphologies of MMCs layers are dendrites/cells. The MC-type reinforcements are in situ synthesis Carbides which main compositions consist of transition elements Zr, Ti, W. The MC-type particles distributed within dendrite and interdendritic regions with different volume fractions for single and overlapping clad layers. The MMCs layers are dense and free of cracks with a good metallurgical bonding between the layer and substrate. The addition ratio of WC in the mixtures has the remarkable effect on the microhardness of clad layers.

  7. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  8. Microstructure and property of WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings by laser surface cladding

    Zeng Xiaoyan; Zhu Beidi; Tao Zengyi; Yang Shuguo; Cui Kun

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic-metal is widely used as a kind of good hardfacing material. The coarse WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings with WC density of 67% it weight and the thickness of 1.6-2.0 mm have been cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel surface by a 2kw CO 2 laser. The sintered WC particles with the size of 600-1,000 μm are chosen as the main strengthening phase, Ni-base self-flux alloy as the binder in the composite coatings. The microstructure and micro-hardness of both WC particles and binder are analyzed. The rigid ball indention with acoustic emission technique is used to evaluate the brittleness of the coating. Finally, the abrasive wear resistance of the coatings are tested, Besides, the coatings with the same ratio and size of WC particles within low carbon steel tube were cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel by atomic hydrogen welding technique and analyzed by the same ways their result are compared

  9. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  10. Investigation on microstructural characterization of in situ TiB/Al metal matrix composite by laser cladding

    Xu Jiang; Li Zhengyang; Zhu Wenhui; Liu Zili; Liu Wenjin

    2007-01-01

    The aluminum matrix composite (AMC) coating reinforced with TiB was prepared utilizing in situ synthesized technique by laser cladding. Microstructural characterization and dry sliding wear behavior of in situ TiB/Al metal matrix composite were studied by SEM, XRD, TEM and Pin-on-disc friction and wear tester. The phase structure of the composite coating consists of α-Al, TiB, Al 3 Ti and Al 3 Fe. It has been found that the shape of in situ synthesized TiB is mainly taken on micro-magnitude lump and nano-magnitude whisker. Owing to B27 structure of TiB, the TiB has an anisotropy axis of growth, which results in the TiB strip and whisker preferring grown along [0 1 0] direction. It is worth to notice that the novel microstructure inside of TiB is particle and strip Al 5 Fe 2 phase and definite crystallographic relationship between the Al 5 Fe 2 phase and TiB has been determined by selected area diffraction pattern. The wear tests results show that the composite coatings can only improve wear resistance at the lower applied load (below 26.7 N), but at higher applied load (26.7-35.6 N) the wear resistance behavior of the coating is worsened due to the fracture and pullout of reinforcement phase

  11. Investigation on microstructural characterization of in situ TiB/Al metal matrix composite by laser cladding

    Xu Jiang [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Nanjing 210016 (China)]. E-mail: xujiang73@nuaa.edu.cn; Li Zhengyang [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Manufacturing Processing, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhu Wenhui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Nanjing 210016 (China); Liu Zili [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Nanjing 210016 (China); Liu Wenjin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Manufacturing Processing, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2007-02-25

    The aluminum matrix composite (AMC) coating reinforced with TiB was prepared utilizing in situ synthesized technique by laser cladding. Microstructural characterization and dry sliding wear behavior of in situ TiB/Al metal matrix composite were studied by SEM, XRD, TEM and Pin-on-disc friction and wear tester. The phase structure of the composite coating consists of {alpha}-Al, TiB, Al{sub 3}Ti and Al{sub 3}Fe. It has been found that the shape of in situ synthesized TiB is mainly taken on micro-magnitude lump and nano-magnitude whisker. Owing to B27 structure of TiB, the TiB has an anisotropy axis of growth, which results in the TiB strip and whisker preferring grown along [0 1 0] direction. It is worth to notice that the novel microstructure inside of TiB is particle and strip Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2} phase and definite crystallographic relationship between the Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2} phase and TiB has been determined by selected area diffraction pattern. The wear tests results show that the composite coatings can only improve wear resistance at the lower applied load (below 26.7 N), but at higher applied load (26.7-35.6 N) the wear resistance behavior of the coating is worsened due to the fracture and pullout of reinforcement phase.

  12. Effect of laser power on clad metal in laser-TIG combined metal cladding

    Utsumi, Akihiro; Hino, Takanori; Matsuda, Jun; Tasoda, Takashi; Yoneda, Masafumi; Katsumura, Munehide; Yano, Tetsuo; Araki, Takao

    2003-03-01

    TIG arc welding has been used to date as a method for clad welding of white metal as bearing material. We propose a new clad welding process that combines a CO2 laser and a TIG arc, as a method for cladding at high speed. We hypothesized that this method would permit appropriate control of the melted quantity of base metal by varying the laser power. We carried out cladding while varying the laser power, and investigated the structure near the boundary between the clad layer and the base metal. Using the laser-TIG combined cladding, we found we were able to control appropriately the degree of dilution with the base metal. By applying this result to subsequent cladding, we were able to obtain a clad layer of high quality, which was slightly diluted with the base metal.

  13. Research Progress on Laser Cladding Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrates

    CHEN Ming-hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and property of amorphous alloy as well as the limitations of the traditional manufacturing methods for the bulk amorphous alloy were briefly introduced in this paper.Combined with characteristics of the laser cladding technique,the research status of the laser cladding Fe-based,Zr-based,Ni-based,Cu-based and Al-based amorphous coatings on the metal substrates were mainly summarized.The effects of factors such as laser processing parameter,micro-alloying element type and content and reinforcing phase on the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also involved.Finally,the main problems and the future research directions of the composition design and control of the laser-cladded amorphous coating,the design and optimization of the laser cladding process,and the basic theory of the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also put forward finally.

  14. Metal-clad waveguide sensors

    Skivesen, Nina

    This work concerns planar optical waveguide sensors for biosensing applications, with the focus on deep-probe sensing for micron-scale biological objects like bacteria and whole cells. In the last two decades planar metal-clad waveguides have been brieflyintroduced in the literature applied...... for various biosensing applications, however a thorough study of the sensor configurations has not been presented, but is the main subject of this thesis. Optical sensors are generally well suited for bio-sensing asthey show high sensitivity and give an immediate response for minute changes in the refractive...... index of a sample, due to the high sensitivity of optical bio-sensors detection of non-labeled biological objects can be performed. The majority of opticalsensors presented in the literature and commercially available optical sensors are based on evanescent wave sensing, however most of these sensors...

  15. Optimization of metal-clad waveguide sensors

    Skivesen, N.; Horvath, R.; Pedersen, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with the optimization of metal-clad waveguides for sensor applications to achieve high sensitivity for adlayer and refractive index measurements. By using the Fresnel reflection coefficients both the angular shift and the width of the resonances in the sensorgrams are taken...... into account. Our optimization shows that it is possible for metal-clad waveguides to achieve a sensitivity improvement of 600% compared to surface-plasmon-resonance sensors....

  16. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  17. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  18. Clad buffer rod sensors for liquid metals

    Jen, C.-K.; Ihara, I.

    1999-01-01

    Clad buffer rods, consisting of a core and a cladding, have been developed for ultrasonic monitoring of liquid metal processing. The cores of these rods are made of low ultrasonic-loss materials and the claddings are fabricated by thermal spray techniques. The clad geometry ensures proper ultrasonic guidance. The lengths of these rods ranges from tens of centimeters to 1m. On-line ultrasonic level measurements in liquid metals such as magnesium at 700 deg C and aluminum at 960 deg C are presented to demonstrate their operation at high temperature and their high ultrasonic performance. A spherical concave lens is machined at the rod end for improving the spatial resolution. High quality ultrasonic images have been obtained in the liquid zinc at 600 deg C. High spatial resolution is needed for the detection of inclusions in liquid metals during processing. We also show that the elastic properties such as density, longitudinal and shear wave velocities of liquid metals can be measured using a transducer which generates and receives both longitudinal and shear waves and is mounted at the end of a clad buffer rod. (author)

  19. Prevention of microcracking by REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal in laser clad welds

    Okauchi, Hironori; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Effect of REM addition to alloy 690 filler metal on microcracking prevention was verified in laser clad welding. Laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal or type 316L stainless steel was conducted using the five different filler metals of alloy 690 varying the La content. Ductility-dip crack occurred in laser clad welding when La-free alloy 690 filler metal was applied. Solidification and liquation cracks occurred contrarily in the laser cladding weld metal when the 0.07mass%La containing filler metal was applied. In case of laser clad welding on alloy 132 weld metal and type 316L stainless steel, the ductility-dip cracking susceptibility decreased, and solidification/liquation cracking susceptibilities increased with increasing the La content in the weld metal. The relation among the microcracking susceptibility, the (P+S) and La contents in every weld pass of the laser clad welding was investigated. Ductility-dip cracks occurred in the compositional range (atomic ratio) of La/(P+S) 0.99(on alloy 132 weld metal), >0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel), while any cracks did not occur at La/(P+S) being between 0.21-0.99 (on alloy 132 weld metal) 0.10-0.90 (on type 316L stainless steel). Laser clad welding test on type 316L stainless steel using alloy 690 filler metal containing the optimum La content verified that any microcracks did not occurred in the laser clad welding metal. (author)

  20. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal-clad...... waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Development of metallic fuel fabrication - A study on the interdiffusion behavior between ternary metallic fuel and cladding materials

    Lee, Byung Soo; Seol, Kyung Won; Shon, In Jin [Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    To study a new ternary metallic fuel for liquid metal reactor, various U-Zr-X alloys have been made by induction melting. The specimens were prepared for thermal stability tests at 630 deg. C upto 5000 hours in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure. Interdiffusion studies were carried out at 700 deg. C for 200 hours for the diffusion couples assembled with U-Zr-X ternary fuel versus austenitic stainless steel D9 and martensitic stainless steel HT9, respectively, to investigate the fuel-cladding compatibility. The ternary alloy, especially U-Zr-Mo and U-Zr-Nb alloys showed relatively good thermal stability as long as 5000hrs at 630 deg. C. From the composition profiles of the interdiffusion study, Fe penetrated deeper to the fuel side than other cladding elements such as Ni and Cr, whereas U did to the cladding side of fuel elements in the fuel/D9 couples. On the contrary, the reaction layers of Fuel/HT9 couple were thinner than that of Fuel/D9 couples and were less affected by cladding element, which was believed to be due to Zr rich layer between the fuel-cladding interface. HT9 is considered to be superior to D9 and a favorable choice as a cladding material in terms of fuel-cladding compatibility. 21 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  2. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  3. Performance of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperature

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Hayes, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state testing of HT9 clad metallic fuel at high temperatures was initiated in EBR-II in November of 1987. At that time U-10 wt. % Zr fuel clad with the low-swelling ferritic/martensitic alloy HT9 was being considered as driver fuel options for both EBR-II and FFTF. The objective of the X447 test described here was to determine the lifetime of HT9 cladding when operated with metallic fuel at beginning of life inside wall temperatures approaching ∼660 degree C. Though stress-temperature design limits for HT9 preclude its use for high burnup applications under these conditions due to excessive thermal creep, the X447 test was carried out to obtain data on high temperature breach phenomena involving metallic fuel since little data existed in that area

  4. Irradiation experience with HT9-clad metallic fuel

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The safe and reliable performance of metallic fuel is currently under study and demonstration in the Integral Fast Reactor program. In-reactor tests of HT9-clad metallic fuel have now reached maturity and have all shown good performance characteristics to burnups exceeding 17.5 at. % in the lead assembly. Because this low-swelling tempered martensitic alloy is the cladding of choice for high fluence applications, the experimental observations and performance modelling efforts reported in this paper play an important role in demonstrating reliability

  5. Study and Behaviour of Prefabricated Composite Cladding

    Sai Avinash, P.; Thiagarajan, N.; Santhi, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The incessant population rise entailed for an expeditious construction at competitive prices that steered the customary path to the light weight structural components. This lead to construction of structural components using ferrocement. The load bearing structural cladding, sizing 3200x900x100 mm, is chosen for the study, which, is analyzed using the software ABAQUS 6.14 in accordance with the IS:875-87 Part1, IS:875-87 Part2, ACI 549R-97, ACI 318R-08 and NZS:3101-06 Part1 standards. The Ferrocement claddings (FCs) are fabricated to a scaled dimension of 400x115x38 mm. The light weight-high strength phenomena are corroborated by incorporating Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates (GFRPL) of thickness 6mm, engineered with the aid of hand layup (wet layup) technique wielding epoxy resin, followed by curing under room temperature. The epoxy resin is employed for fastening ferrocement cladding with the Glass fiber reinforced polymer laminate, with the contemporary methodology. The compressive load carrying capacity of the amalgamated assembly, both in presence and absence of Glass Fibre Reinforced polymer laminates (GFRPL) on either side of Ferrocement cladding, has been experimented.

  6. Metal Matrix Composite Material by Direct Metal Deposition

    Novichenko, D.; Marants, A.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, P. H.; Smurov, I.

    Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) is a laser cladding process for producing a protective coating on the surface of a metallic part or manufacturing layer-by-layer parts in a single-step process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the possibility to create carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite objects. Powders of steel 16NCD13 with different volume contents of titanium carbide are tested. On the base of statistical analysis, a laser cladding processing map is constructed. Relationships between the different content of titanium carbide in a powder mixture and the material microstructure are found. Mechanism of formation of various precipitated titanium carbides is investigated.

  7. Robust cladding light stripper for high-power fiber lasers using soft metals.

    Babazadeh, Amin; Nasirabad, Reza Rezaei; Norouzey, Ahmad; Hejaz, Kamran; Poozesh, Reza; Heidariazar, Amir; Golshan, Ali Hamedani; Roohforouz, Ali; Jafari, S Naser Tabatabaei; Lafouti, Majid

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we present a novel method to reliably strip the unwanted cladding light in high-power fiber lasers. Soft metals are utilized to fabricate a high-power cladding light stripper (CLS). The capability of indium (In), aluminum (Al), tin (Sn), and gold (Au) in extracting unwanted cladding light is examined. The experiments show that these metals have the right features for stripping the unwanted light out of the cladding. We also find that the metal-cladding contact area is of great importance because it determines the attenuation and the thermal load on the CLS. These metals are examined in different forms to optimize the contact area to have the highest possible attenuation and avoid localized heating. The results show that sheets of indium are very effective in stripping unwanted cladding light.

  8. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  9. Optimization of Ni-Based WC/Co/Cr Composite Coatings Produced by Multilayer Laser Cladding

    Andrea Angelastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a surface coating technique, laser cladding (LC has been developed for improving wear, corrosion, and fatigue properties of mechanical components. The main advantage of this process is the capability of introducing hard particles such as SiC, TiC, and WC as reinforcements in the metallic matrix such as Ni-based alloy, Co-based alloy, and Fe-based alloy to form ceramic-metal composite coatings, which have very high hardness and good wear resistance. In this paper, Ni-based alloy (Colmonoy 227-F and Tungsten Carbides/Cobalt/Chromium (WC/Co/Cr composite coatings were fabricated by the multilayer laser cladding technique (MLC. An optimization procedure was implemented to obtain the combination of process parameters that minimizes the porosity and produces good adhesion to a stainless steel substrate. The optimization procedure was worked out with a mathematical model that was supported by an experimental analysis, which studied the shape of the clad track generated by melting coaxially fed powders with a laser. Microstructural and microhardness analysis completed the set of test performed on the coatings.

  10. Amorphous metal composites

    Byrne, M.A.; Lupinski, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This patent discloses an improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite

  11. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  12. Cladding failure margins for metallic fuel in the integral fast reactor

    Bauer, T.H.; Fenske, G.R.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The reference fuel for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy with a low swelling austenitic or ferritic stainless steel cladding. It is known that low melting point eutectics may form in such metallic fuel-cladding systems which could contribute to cladding failure under accident conditions. This paper will present recent measurements of cladding eutectic penetration rates for the ternary IFR alloy and will compare these results with earlier eutectic penetration data for other fuel and cladding materials. A method for calculating failure of metallic fuel pins is developed by combining cladding deformation equations with a large strain analysis where the hoop stress is calculated using the instantaneous wall thickness as determined from correlations of the eutectic penetration-rate data. This method is applied to analyze the results of in-reactor and out-of-reactor fuel pin failure tests on uranium-fissium alloy EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel

  13. Residual stress and crack initiation in laser clad composite layer with Co-based alloy and WC + NiCr

    Lee, Changmin; Park, Hyungkwon; Yoo, Jaehong; Lee, Changhee; Woo, WanChuck; Park, Sunhong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Major problem, clad cracking in laser cladding process, was researched. • Residual stress measurements were performed quantitatively by neutron diffraction method along the surface of specimens. • Relationship between the residual stress and crack initiation was showed clearly. • Ceramic particle effect in the metal matrix was showed from the results of residual stress measurements. • Initiation sites of generating clad cracks were specifically studied in MMC coatings. - Abstract: Although laser cladding process has been widely used to improve the wear and corrosion resistance, there are unwanted cracking issues during and/or after laser cladding. This study investigates the tendency of Co-based WC + NiCr composite layers to cracking during the laser cladding process. Residual stress distributions of the specimen are measured using neutron diffraction and elucidate the correlation between the residual stress and the cracking in three types of cylindrical specimens; (i) no cladding substrate only, (ii) cladding with 100% stellite#6, and (iii) cladding with 55% stellite#6 and 45% technolase40s. The microstructure of the clad layer was composed of Co-based dendrite and brittle eutectic phases at the dendritic boundaries. And WC particles were distributed on the matrix forming intermediate composition region by partial melting of the surface of particles. The overlaid specimen exhibited tensile residual stress, which was accumulated through the beads due to contraction of the coating layer generated by rapid solidification, while the non-clad specimen showed compressive. Also, the specimen overlaid with 55 wt% stellite#6 and 45 wt% technolase40s showed a tensile stress higher than the specimen overlaid with 100% stellite#6 possibly, due to the difference between thermal expansion coefficients of the matrix and WC particles. Such tensile stresses can be potential driving force to provide an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures

  14. Residual stress and crack initiation in laser clad composite layer with Co-based alloy and WC + NiCr

    Lee, Changmin; Park, Hyungkwon; Yoo, Jaehong [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changhee, E-mail: chlee@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, WanChuck [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhong [Research Institute of Industrial Science & Technology, Hyo-ja-dong, Po-Hang, Kyoung-buk, San 32 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Major problem, clad cracking in laser cladding process, was researched. • Residual stress measurements were performed quantitatively by neutron diffraction method along the surface of specimens. • Relationship between the residual stress and crack initiation was showed clearly. • Ceramic particle effect in the metal matrix was showed from the results of residual stress measurements. • Initiation sites of generating clad cracks were specifically studied in MMC coatings. - Abstract: Although laser cladding process has been widely used to improve the wear and corrosion resistance, there are unwanted cracking issues during and/or after laser cladding. This study investigates the tendency of Co-based WC + NiCr composite layers to cracking during the laser cladding process. Residual stress distributions of the specimen are measured using neutron diffraction and elucidate the correlation between the residual stress and the cracking in three types of cylindrical specimens; (i) no cladding substrate only, (ii) cladding with 100% stellite#6, and (iii) cladding with 55% stellite#6 and 45% technolase40s. The microstructure of the clad layer was composed of Co-based dendrite and brittle eutectic phases at the dendritic boundaries. And WC particles were distributed on the matrix forming intermediate composition region by partial melting of the surface of particles. The overlaid specimen exhibited tensile residual stress, which was accumulated through the beads due to contraction of the coating layer generated by rapid solidification, while the non-clad specimen showed compressive. Also, the specimen overlaid with 55 wt% stellite#6 and 45 wt% technolase40s showed a tensile stress higher than the specimen overlaid with 100% stellite#6 possibly, due to the difference between thermal expansion coefficients of the matrix and WC particles. Such tensile stresses can be potential driving force to provide an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures

  15. Surface enhanced 316L/SiC nano-composite coatings via laser cladding and following cold-swaging process

    Li, Yuhang; Gao, Shiyou

    2017-10-01

    Cold-swaging is one of a cold deformation processes, and ceramic-reinforcement nano-composite coatings can effectively improve the performance of metal matrix surface. Therefore, the two processes are innovatively combined to further improve the surface properties of the metal matrix in this paper. The microstructure and surface properties of the laser cladding 316L + 10 wt% SiC nano-composite coatings were examined through designed experiments after cold-swaging by self-developed hydraulic machine. Furthermore, the coatings were compared with those without cold-swaging coatings at the same time. The result shows that the cold-swaging process can further enhance the tensile strength, micro-hardness and the wear resistance of the composite coating. This study can be used as a reference for further strengthening of laser cladding nano-composite coatings in future research.

  16. Metallic composite materials

    Frommeyer, G.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and properties of metallic composite materials and composite materials with metallic matrix are considered. In agreement with the morphology of constituent phases the following types of composite materials are described: dispersion-strengthened composite materials; particle-reinforced composite materials; fibrous composite materials; laminar composite materials. Data on strength and electric properties of the above-mentioned materials, as well as effect of the amount, location and geometric shape of the second phase on them, are presented

  17. Research on Microstructure and Property of TiC-Co Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of 2Cr13 steel was made. Titanium carbide (TiC) powder and Co-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were tested. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The structure of cladding was supersaturated solid solution with dispersed titanium carbide. The average hardness of cladding zone was 660HV0.2. 2Cr13 steel was widely used in the field of turbine blades. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the useful life of turbine blades.

  18. Electrophoretic Deposition for the Fabrication of High-Performance Metal-Ceramic Hybrid Cladding

    Park, Junghwan; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Kim, Hyungil; Park, Jeongyong; Koo, Yanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consisting of a Zr liner and SiC f /SiC composite is one of the candidate systems. To achieve a high-performance metal-ceramic hybrid cladding, it is important to synthesize the SiC f /SiC composites with high flexural strength. The most common interphases, such as pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and boron nitride (BN) coating, have been applied on the surface of SiC fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). In addition, the SiC matrix phase for SiC f /SiC composites has been commonly formed by CVI and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), which are very costly and complicated processes. For this reason, the fabrication process of SiC f /SiC composites that is low-cost and simple has been strongly needed. In this study, weak phase coating using a commercial colloidal carbon black suspension was performed on SiC fibers through electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites were fabricated by EPD. The mechanical properties at room temperature were evaluated to investigate the effect of the carbon interfacial layer on the mechanical properties of carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites. In this study, it was concluded that the EPD method is effective for homogeneous carbon black coating on SiC fibers, and that the carbon coating layer on SiC fibers plays an important role in optimizing the interface between fibers and the matrix, and enhances the toughness of carbon-coated SiC f /SiC composites during fracture

  19. Electrophoretic Deposition for the Fabrication of High-Performance Metal-Ceramic Hybrid Cladding

    Park, Junghwan; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Kim, Hyungil; Park, Jeongyong; Koo, Yanghyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consisting of a Zr liner and SiC{sub f}/SiC composite is one of the candidate systems. To achieve a high-performance metal-ceramic hybrid cladding, it is important to synthesize the SiC{sub f}/SiC composites with high flexural strength. The most common interphases, such as pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and boron nitride (BN) coating, have been applied on the surface of SiC fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). In addition, the SiC matrix phase for SiC{sub f}/SiC composites has been commonly formed by CVI and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), which are very costly and complicated processes. For this reason, the fabrication process of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites that is low-cost and simple has been strongly needed. In this study, weak phase coating using a commercial colloidal carbon black suspension was performed on SiC fibers through electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites were fabricated by EPD. The mechanical properties at room temperature were evaluated to investigate the effect of the carbon interfacial layer on the mechanical properties of carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites. In this study, it was concluded that the EPD method is effective for homogeneous carbon black coating on SiC fibers, and that the carbon coating layer on SiC fibers plays an important role in optimizing the interface between fibers and the matrix, and enhances the toughness of carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites during fracture.

  20. Laser stereolithography by multilayer cladding of metal powders

    Jendrzejewski, Rafal; Rabczuk, Grazyna T.; Zaremba, R.; Sliwinski, Gerard

    1998-07-01

    3D-structures obtained by means of laser cladding of the metal alloy powders: bronze B10 and stellite 6 and the process parameters are studied experimentally. The structures are made trace-on-trace by remelting of the metal powder injected into the focusing region of the 1.2 kW CO2 laser beam. For the powder and sample feeding rates of 8-22 g/min and 0.4-1.2 m/min, respectively, and the applied beam intensities not exceeding 2 X 105 W cm-2 the process is stable and regular traces connected via fusion zones are produced for each material. The thickness of these zones does not exceed several per cent of the layer height. The process results in the efficient formation of multilayer structures. From their geometry the effect of energy coupling and interaction parameters are deduced. Moreover, the microanalysis by means of SEM- and optical photographs of samples produced under different experimental conditions confirms the expected mechanical properties, low porosity and highly homogenous structure of the multilayers. In addition to the known material stellite 6 the bronze B10 is originally proposed for a rapid prototyping.

  1. Laser Cladding of Composite Bioceramic Coatings on Titanium Alloy

    Xu, Xiang; Han, Jiege; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Anguo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP) composite bioceramic coatings were fabricated on a Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy using Nd:YAG pulsed laser, CO2 CW laser, and Semiconductor CW laser. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological behavior were carefully investigated. These investigations were conducted employing scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and other methodologies. The results showed that both Si3N4 and Si3N4/TCP composite coatings were able to form a compact bonding interface between the coating and the substrate by using appropriate laser parameters. The coating layers were dense, demonstrating a good surface appearance. The bioceramic coatings produced by laser cladding have good mechanical properties. Compared with that of the bulk material, microhardness of composite ceramic coatings on the surface significantly increased. In addition, good biological activity could be obtained by adding TCP into the composite coating.

  2. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  3. Characterization of SiC–SiC composites for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Deck, C.P., E-mail: Christian.Deck@ga.com; Jacobsen, G.M.; Sheeder, J.; Gutierrez, O.; Zhang, J.; Stone, J.; Khalifa, H.E.; Back, C.A.

    2015-11-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being investigated for accident tolerant fuel cladding applications due to its high temperature strength, exceptional stability under irradiation, and reduced oxidation compared to Zircaloy under accident conditions. An engineered cladding design combining monolithic SiC and SiC–SiC composite layers could offer a tough, hermetic structure to provide improved performance and safety, with a failure rate comparable to current Zircaloy cladding. Modeling and design efforts require a thorough understanding of the properties and structure of SiC-based cladding. Furthermore, both fabrication and characterization of long, thin-walled SiC–SiC tubes to meet application requirements are challenging. In this work, mechanical and thermal properties of unirradiated, as-fabricated SiC-based cladding structures were measured, and permeability and dimensional control were assessed. In order to account for the tubular geometry of the cladding designs, development and modification of several characterization methods were required.

  4. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  5. Soldering of copper-clad niobium--titanium superconductor composite

    Moorhead, A.J.; Woodhouse, J.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1977-04-01

    When superconductivity is applied to various electrical devices, the joining of the superconducting material and the performance of the joints are generally crucial to the successful operation of the system. Although many techniques are being considered for joining composite superconductors, soldering is the most common. We determined the wetting and flow behavior of various solder and flux combinations on a copper-clad Nb-Ti composite, developed equipment and techniques for soldering and inspection of lap joints, and determined the shear strength of joints at temperatures down to -269 0 C (4 0 K). We studied 15 solders and 17 commercial and experimental fluxes in the wettability and flow tests. A resistance unit was built for soldering test specimens. A series of samples soldered with 80 Pb-20 Sn, 83 Pb-15 Sn-2 Sb, 97.5 Pb-1.5 Ag-1 Sn, 80 In-15 Pb-5 Ag, or 25 In-37.5 Pb-37.5 Sn (wt percent) was inspected by three nondestructive techniques. Through-transmission ultrasound gave the best correlation with nonbond areas revealed in peel tests. Single-lap shear specimens soldered with 97.5 Pb-1.5 Ag-1 Sn had the highest strength (10.44 ksi, 72 MPa) and total elongation (0.074 in., 1.88 mm) at -269 0 C (4 0 K) of four solders tested

  6. Laser cladding: repairing and manufacturing metal parts and tools

    Sexton, Leo

    2003-03-01

    Laser cladding is presently used to repair high volume aerospace, automotive, marine, rail or general engineering components where excessive wear has occurred. It can also be used if a one-off high value component is either required or has been accidentally over-machined. The ultimate application of laser cladding is to build components up from nothing, using a laser cladding system and a 3D CAD drawing of the component. It is thus emerging that laser cladding can be classified as a special case of Rapid Prototyping (RP). Up to this point in time RP was seen, and is still seen, as in intermediately step between the design stage of a component and a finished working product. This can now be extended so that laser cladding makes RP a one-stop shop and the finished component is made from tool-steel or some alloy-base material. The marriage of laser cladding with RP is an interesting one and offers an alternative to traditional tool builders, re-manufacturers and injection mould design/repair industries. The aim of this paper is to discuss the emergence of this new technology, along with the transference of the process out of the laboratory and into the industrial workplace and show it is finding its rightful place in the manufacturing/repair sector. It will be shown that it can be used as a cost cutting, strategic material saver and consequently a green technology.

  7. Finite element simulation of a novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel

    Tian, Lida; Wang, Dongyan

    2018-04-01

    A novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel with matched connection detailing is developed. Numerical simulation on the experiment is conducted by ABAQUS. The accuracy and rationality of the finite element model is verified by comparison between the simulation and the experiment results. It is also indicated that the novel composite cladding panel is of desirable bearing capacity, stiffness and deformability under out-of-plane load.

  8. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  9. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  10. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800 0 C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800 0 C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800 0 C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (Δanti G 02 congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800 0 C

  11. Laser cladding in-situ carbide particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings with rare earth oxide addition

    吴朝锋; 马明星; 刘文今; 钟敏霖; 张红军; 张伟明

    2009-01-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composite(PR-MMC) has excellent properties such as good wear resistance,corrosion resistance and high temperature properties.Laser cladding is usually used to form PR-MMC on metal surface with various volume fractions of ceramic particles.Recent literatures showed that laser melting of powder mixture containing carbon and carbide-forming elements,was favorable for the formation of in-situ synthesized carbide particles.In this paper,rare earth oxide(RE2O3) was added into t...

  12. FABRICATION AND MATERIAL ISSUES FOR THE APPLICATION OF SiC COMPOSITES TO LWR FUEL CLADDING

    WEON-JU KIM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication methods and requirements of the fiber, interphase, and matrix of nuclear grade SiCf/SiC composites are briefly reviewed. A CVI-processed SiCf/SiC composite with a PyC or (PyC-SiCn interphase utilizing Hi-Nicalon Type S or Tyranno SA3 fiber is currently the best combination in terms of the irradiation performance. We also describe important material issues for the application of SiC composites to LWR fuel cladding. The kinetics of the SiC corrosion under LWR conditions needs to be clarified to confirm the possibility of a burn-up extension and the cost-benefit effect of the SiC composite cladding. In addition, the development of end-plug joining technology and fission products retention capability of the ceramic composite tube would be key challenges for the successful application of SiC composite cladding.

  13. THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE LASER CLAD COATINGS WITH Ni BASED MATRIX WITH WC PARTICLES

    Zita Iždinská

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of the processing conditions on the microstructure and abrasive wear behavior of composite laser clad coatings with Ni based matrix reinforced with 50% WC particles is analyzed. Composite powder was applied in the form of coatings onto a mild steel substrate (Fe–0.17% C by different laser powers and cladding speeds. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tribological properties of coatings were evaluated by pin-on-disc wear test. It appeared that the hardness of the matrix of composite coatings decreases with increasing cladding speed. However, wear resistance of composite coatings with decreasing hardness of Ni based matrix increases. Significantly enhanced wear resistance of WC composite coatings in comparison with Ni based coatings is attributed to the hard phase structures in composite coatings.

  14. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  15. Composite polymer/glass edge claddings for new Nova laser disks

    Powell, H.T.; Campbell, J.H.; Edwards, G.

    1987-01-01

    Large Nd:glass laser disks like those used in Nova require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 μm. This cladding prevents Fresnel reflections from the edges from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise reduce the gain. The original Nova disks had a Cu/sup 2+/-doped phosphate glass cladding which was cast at high temperature around the circumference of the disk. Although the performance of this cladding is excellent, it was expensive to produce. Consequently, in parallel with their efforts to develop Pt inclusion-free laser glass, the authors developed a composite polymer/glass edge cladding that can be applied at greatly reduced cost. Laser disks constructed with the new cladding design show identical performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without degradation. The new cladding consists of absorbing glass strips which are bonded to the edges of polygonal-rather that elliptical-shaped disks. The bond is made by an --25-μm thick clear epoxy adhesive whose index of refraction matches both the laser and absorbing glass. By blending aromatic and aliphatic epoxy constituents, they achieved an index-of-refraction match within approximately +-0.003 between the epoxy and glass. The epoxy was also chosen based on its damage resistance to flashlamp light and its adhesive strength to glass. The present cladding is a major improvement over a previous experimental cladding utilizing silicone rubber as a coupling agent. Early prototypes constructed without using the presented techniques exhibited failures from both mechanisms. Delamination failures occurred which clearly showed both surface and bulk-mode parasitic oscillation. Requirements on the polymer, disk size, and Nd doping to prevent these problems are presented

  16. Theoretical investigations of the meltoff and resolidification process of fuel claddings during accidents in liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    Angerer, G.

    1978-08-01

    During loss-of-coolant-flow accidents in liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors with failure to scram the fuel claddings will melt after boiling and evaporation of the coolant. The CMOT model presented here describes the subsequent process of relocation and resolidification of the molten claddings. The basic thermohydrodynamics equations of the two-phase flow of cladding material and sodium vapor are solved numerically by differential approximations in a Eulerian reference net. The results calculated by the model improved the insight into the dynamics of the cladding relocation process. Here are the main results: - Shortly after the onset of cladding relocation large waves of molten cladding material are generated. The motion of these waves contributes considerably to the material transport. - The dynamics of cladding relocation exhibits strong local incoherences. - The formation of cladding blockages observed at the ends of the fuel region is confirmed by the calculations. - In case of incoherent cladding meltoff less cladding material is transported upwards. - Cladding relocation strongly depends on the axial pressure drop and the underlying friction factor correlations. Recalculation of the R5 loss-of-coolant-flow experiment performed in the U.S. TREAT test reactor is in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig./HP) 891 HP [de

  17. Progress in Understanding of Fuel-Cladding Chemical interaction in Metal Fuel

    Inagaki, Okenta; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Representative phases formed in FCCI were identified: • The reaction between lanthanide elements and cladding; • The reaction between U-PU-Zr and cladding (Fe). Characteristics of the wastage layer were clarified: • Time and temperature dependency of the growth ratio of the wastage layer formed by lanthanide elements; • Threshold temperature of the liquid phase formation in the reaction between U-Pu-Zr and Fe. These results are used: - as a basis for the FCCI modeling; - as a reference data in post-irradiation examination of irradiated metallic fuels

  18. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  19. Development of composite polymer-glass edge claddings for Nova Laser Disks

    Campbell, J.H.; Edwards, G.; Frick, F.A.; Gemmell, D.S.; Gim, B.M.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Jessop, E.S.; Kong, M.K.; Lyon, R.E.; Murray, J.E.; Patton, H.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Powell, H.T.; Riley, M.O.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wolfe, C.R.; Woods, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Large Nd:glass laser disks for disk amplifiers require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 μ m. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations that would otherwise deplete the gain. The authors have developed a composite polymer-glass edge cladding that consists of absorbing glass strips bonded to the edges of laser glass disks using an epoxy adhesive. The edge cladding must survive a fluence of approximately 20 J/cm 2 in a 0.5-ms pulse. Failure can occur either by decomposition of the polymer or by mechanical failure from thermal stresses which leads to bond delamination. An epoxy has been developed that gives the required damage resistance, refractive index match and processing characteristics. A slight tilt of the disk edges greatly reduces the threat from parasitic oscillations and a glass surface treatment is used to promote bond adhesion. Laser disks fabricated with this new cladding show identical gain performance to disks using conventional fused-glass cladding and have been tested for over 2000 shots (equivalent to about a 4-year lifetime on Nova) with out degradation

  20. Laser cladding of Al-Si/SiC composite coatings : Microstructure and abrasive wear behavior

    Anandkumar, R.; Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings of an Al-Si-SiC composite were produced on UNS A03560 cast Al-alloy substrates by laser cladding using a mixture of powders of Al-12 wt.% Si alloy and SiC. The microstructure of the coatings depends considerably on the processing parameters. For a specific energy of 26 MJ/m2 the

  1. Direct Laser Cladding of Cobalt on Ti-6Al-4V with a Compositionally Graded Interface

    Jyotsna Dutta Majumdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct laser cladding of cobalt on Ti-6Al-4V with and without a graded interface has been attempted using a continuous wave CO2 laser. Graded interface is developed by depositing a thin copper layer on Ti-6Al-4V substrate prior to multiple laser cladding of cobalt on it. Presence of copper interlayer was found to suppress the formation of brittle intermetallics of Ti and Co. The effect of process parameters on the microstructures, compositions, and phases of the interface was studied in details. Finally, the mechanical and electrochemical properties of the interface processed under optimum process parameters are reported.

  2. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2010-08-31

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  3. Investigation on fuel-cladding chemical interaction in metal fuel for FBR. Reaction of rare earth elements with Fe-Cr alloy

    Inagaki, Kenta; Ogata, Takanari

    2010-01-01

    Rare-earth fission product (FP) elements generated in the metal fuel interact with cladding alloy and result in the wastage of the cladding (Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)). To evaluate FCCI quantitatively, several influential factors must be considered. They are temperature, temperature gradient, time, composition of the cladding and the behavior of rare-earth FP. In this research, the temperature and time dependencies are investigated with tests in the simplified system. Fe-12wt%Cr was used as stimulant material of cladding and rare-earth alloy 13La -24Ce -12Pr -39Nd -12Sm (RE) as a rare-earth FP. A diffusion couple Fe-Cr/RE was made and annealed at 923K, 853K, 773K or 693K. The structures of reaction layers were analyzed with Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and the details of the structures were clarified. The width of the reaction layer in the Fe-Cr alloy grew in proportion to the square root of time. The reaction rate constants K=(square of the width of reaction layer / time) were evaluated. It was confirmed that the relation between K and the inverse of the temperature showed linearity above 773 K. (author)

  4. Surface protection of light metals by one-step laser cladding with oxide ceramics

    Nowotny, S.; Richter, A.; Tangermann, K.

    1999-06-01

    Today, intricate problems of surface treatment can be solved through precision cladding using advanced laser technology. Metallic and carbide coatings have been produced with high-power lasers for years, and current investigations show that laser cladding is also a promising technique for the production of dense and precisely localized ceramic layers. In the present work, powders based on Al2O3 and ZrO2 were used to clad aluminum and titanium light alloys. The compact layers are up to 1 mm thick and show a nonporous cast structure as well as a homogeneous network of vertical cracks. The high adhesive strength is due to several chemical and mechanical bonding mechanisms and can exceed that of plasmasprayed coatings. Compared to thermal spray techniques, the material deposition is strictly focused onto small functional areas of the workpiece. Thus, being a precision technique, laser cladding is not recommended for large-area coatings. Examples of applications are turbine components and filigree parts of pump casings.

  5. Investigation on fuel-cladding chemical interaction in metal fuel for FBR

    Inagaki, Kenta; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari; Uwaba, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    During steady-state irradiation of metallic fuel in fast reactors, rare-earth fission products can react with stainless steel cladding at the fuel-cladding interface. The authors conducted isothermal annealing tests with some diffusion couples to investigate the structure of the wastage layer formed at the interface. Candidate cladding alloys, ferritic-martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) and oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel were assembled with rare-earth alloys, RE5 : La-Ce-Pr-Nd-Sm, which simulate the fission yield of rare-earth fission products. The diffusion couples were isothermally annealed in the temperature range of 500-650°C for up to 170 h. In both RE5/ODS-steel and RE5/PNC-FMS couples, the wastage layer of the two-phase region of the (Fe, Cr) 17 RE 2 matrix phase with the precipitation of the (Fe, RE, Cr) phase was formed. The structure was similar to that formed in RE5/Fe-12Cr and RE5/HT9 couples, which implies that the reaction between REs and steel is not significantly influenced by the minor alloying elements within the candidate cladding materials. It was also clarified that the increase in the wastage layer thickness was diffusion-controlled. The temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants were formulated, which can be the basis for the quantification of the wastage layer growth. (author)

  6. Sustainability of Metal Structures via Spray-Clad Remanufacturing

    Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-04-01

    Structural reclamation and remanufacturing is an important future design consideration to allow sustainable recovery of degraded structural metals. Heavy machinery and infrastructure components subjected to extended use and/or environment induced degradation require costly and time-consuming replacement. If these parts can be remanufactured to original tolerances, and returned to service with "as good or better" performance, significant reductions in materials, cost, and environmental impact can be achieved. Localized additive restoration via thermal or cold spray methods is a promising approach in recovering and restoring original design strength of degraded metals. The advent of high velocity spray deposition technologies has allowed deposition of near full density materials. In this review, the fundamental scientific and technological elements of such local additive restoration is contemplated including materials, processes, and methodologies to assess the capabilities of such remanufactured systems. This points to sustainable material reclamation, as well as a route toward resource and process sustainability.

  7. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  8. Cladding failure margins for metallic fuel in the integral fast reactor

    Bauer, T.H.; Fenske, G.R.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory has prompted a renewed interest in uranium-based metal alloys as a fuel for sodium-cooled fast reactors. In this paper we will present recent measurements of cladding eutectic penetration rates for the ternary IFR alloy and will compare these results with earlier eutectic penetration data for other fuel and cladding materials. A method for calculating failure of metallic fuel pins is developed by combining cladding deformation equations with a large strain analysis where the hoop stress is calculated using the instantaneous wall thickness as determined from correlations of the eutectic penetration-rate data. This method is applied to analyze the results of in-reactor and out-of-reactor fuel pin failure tests on uranium-fissium alloy EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel. In the final section of this paper we extend the calculations to consider the failure of IFR ternary fuel under reactor accident conditions. (orig./GL)

  9. Friction and wear behavior of laser cladding Ni/hBN self-lubricating composite coating

    Zhang Shitang; Zhou Jiansong; Guo Baogang; Zhou Huidi; Pu Yuping; Chen Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Ni/hBN coating was successfully prepared on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate by means of laser cladding. The microhardness profile of the composite coating along the depth direction was measured, while its cross-sectional microstructures and phase compositions were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si 3 N 4 from ambient to 800 deg. C was evaluated using a ball-on-disc friction and wear tester, and the worn surface morphologies of the composite coatings and counterpart ceramic balls were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At the same time, the worn surfaces of the ceramic balls were also analyzed using a 3D non-contact surface mapping profiler as well. It was found that the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating on the stainless steel substrate had high microhardness and good friction-reducing and antiwear abilities at elevated temperatures up to 800 deg. C. The composite coating registered slightly increased friction coefficient and wear rate as the temperature rose from ambient to 100 deg. C; then the friction coefficient and wear rate decreased with increasing temperature up to 800 deg. C (with the slight increase in the wear rate at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C to be an exception). The laser cladding Ni/hBN coating was dominated by mixed adhesion and abrasive wear as it slid against the ceramic ball below 300 deg. C. With further increase in the test temperature up to 400 deg. C and above, it was characterized by mild adhesion wear and plastic deformation. Since the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating registered an increased wear rate at temperatures of 600 deg. C and above, it was not suggested to be used for wear prevention and protection of the stainless steel at elevated temperature above 800 deg. C

  10. Friction and wear behavior of laser cladding Ni/hBN self-lubricating composite coating

    Zhang Shitang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Jiansong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo Baogang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Huidi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Pu Yuping [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Jianmin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: chenjm@lzb.ac.cn

    2008-09-15

    Ni/hBN coating was successfully prepared on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate by means of laser cladding. The microhardness profile of the composite coating along the depth direction was measured, while its cross-sectional microstructures and phase compositions were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} from ambient to 800 deg. C was evaluated using a ball-on-disc friction and wear tester, and the worn surface morphologies of the composite coatings and counterpart ceramic balls were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At the same time, the worn surfaces of the ceramic balls were also analyzed using a 3D non-contact surface mapping profiler as well. It was found that the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating on the stainless steel substrate had high microhardness and good friction-reducing and antiwear abilities at elevated temperatures up to 800 deg. C. The composite coating registered slightly increased friction coefficient and wear rate as the temperature rose from ambient to 100 deg. C; then the friction coefficient and wear rate decreased with increasing temperature up to 800 deg. C (with the slight increase in the wear rate at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C to be an exception). The laser cladding Ni/hBN coating was dominated by mixed adhesion and abrasive wear as it slid against the ceramic ball below 300 deg. C. With further increase in the test temperature up to 400 deg. C and above, it was characterized by mild adhesion wear and plastic deformation. Since the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating registered an increased wear rate at temperatures of 600 deg. C and above, it was not suggested to be used for wear prevention and protection of the stainless steel at elevated temperature above 800 deg. C.

  11. Development and fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned clad tubes for metallic uranium fuel rods for research reactor

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Jayachandran, N.K.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium metal or its alloy is used as fuel in nuclear reactors. Usually fuel is clad with compatible material to prevent its direct contact with coolant which prevents spread of activity. One of the methods of producing fuel for nuclear reactor is by co-drawing finished uranium rods with aluminum clad tube to develop intimate contact for effective heat removal during reactor operation. Presently seam welded Aluminium tubes are used as clad for Research Reactor fuel. The paper will highlight entire fabrication process followed for the fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned tubes along with relevant characterisation results

  12. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  14. Influence of Zircaloy cladding composition on hydride formation during aqueous hydrogen charging

    Rajasekhara, S. [Intel Corporation, 2501 NW 229th Av., Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Kotula, P.G.; Enos, D.G.; Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); Clark, B.G., E-mail: blyclar@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Although hydrogen uptake in Zirconium (Zr) based claddings has been a topic of many studies, hydrogen uptake as a function of alloy composition has received little attention. In this work, commercial Zr-based cladding alloys (Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™), differing in composition but with similar initial textures, grain sizes, and surface roughness, were aqueously charged with hydrogen for 100, 300, and 1000 s at nominally 90 °C to produce hydride layers of varying thicknesses. Transmission electron microscope characterization following aqueous charging showed hydride phase and orientation relationship were identical in all three alloys. However, elastic recoil detection measurements confirmed that surface hydride layers in Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were an order of magnitude thicker relative to ZIRLO™. - Highlights: •Aqueous charging was performed to produce a layer of zirconium hydride for three different Zr-alloy claddings. •Hydride thicknesses were analyzed by elastic recoil detection and transmission electron microscopy. •Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 formed thicker hydride layers than ZIRLO™ for the same charging durations.

  15. Microstructure and property of Fe–Co–B–Si–C–Nb amorphous composite coating fabricated by laser cladding process

    Zhu, Y.Y.; Li, Z.G.; Li, R.F.; Li, M.; Daze, X.L.; Feng, K.; Wu, Y.X.

    2013-01-01

    Laser cladding of Fe 34 Co 34 B 20 Si 5 C 3 Nb 4 on a low carbon steel substrate was conducted using coaxial powder feeding method. Microstructure, phase and microhardness were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro-analysis and microhardness tester. Amorphous coating with NbC particles embedded in the matrix was formed. Differential scanning calorimetry curve showed that the glass transition temperature (T g ) and the onset crystallization temperature (T x ) were 799 K and 850 K, respectively. The supercooled liquid region (ΔT x = T x − T g ) was as large as 51 K, which implied the high thermal stability of the supercooled liquid against crystallization. Due to the NbC particles embedded in the amorphous matrix, the mean value of the microhardness of the coating prepared by laser cladding was higher than that of the bulk metallic glass formed by the copper mold casting method. The contribution of NbC particles to the total microhardness was theoretically estimated. The estimated hardness of the composite coating agreed well with the tested value.

  16. A study of Ni-based WC composite coatings by laser induction hybrid rapid cladding with elliptical spot

    Zhou Shengfeng; Huang Yongjun; Zeng Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Ni-based WC composite coatings by laser induction hybrid rapid cladding (LIHRC) with elliptical spot were investigated. Results indicate that the efficiency using the elliptical spot of 6 mm x 4 mm (the major and minor axis of laser beam are 6 mm and 4 mm, respectively, the major axis is parallel to the direction of laser scanning) is higher than that using the elliptical spot of 4 mm x 6 mm (the major axis is perpendicular to the direction of laser scanning). The precipitated carbides with the blocky and bar-like shape indicate that WC particles suffer from the heat damage of 'the disintegration pattern + the growth pattern', whichever elliptical spot is used at low laser scanning speed. However, at high laser scanning speed, the blocky carbides are only formed if the elliptical spot of 6 mm x 4 mm is adopted, showing that WC particles present the heat damage of 'the disintegration pattern', whereas the fine carbides are precipitated when the elliptical spot of 4 mm x 6 mm is used, showing that WC particles take on the heat damage of 'the radiation pattern'. Especially, the efficiency of LIHRC is increased much four times higher than that of the general laser cladding and crack-free ceramic-metal coatings can be obtained

  17. Investigation of the microstructure of Ni and B4C ceramic-metal mixtures obtained by cold spray coating and followed by laser cladding

    Filippov, A. A.; Fomin, V. M.; Orishich, A. M.; Malikov, A. G.; Ryashin, N. S.; Golyshev, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, a combined method is considered for the production of a metal-matrix composite coating based on Ni and B4C. The coating is created by consistently applied methods: cold spray and laser cladding. Main focus of this work aimed to microstructure of coatings, element content and morphology of laser tracks. At this stage, the authors focused on the interaction of the laser unit with the substance without affecting the layer-growing technology products. It is shown that coating has deformed particles of nickel and the significantly decreased content of ceramic particles B4C after cold spray. After laser cladding there are no boundaries between nickel and dramatically changes in ceramic particles.

  18. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  19. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm INIZIATIVE INDUSTRIALI SRL (IT), the lowest bidder, for the provision of minor metalwork, metal fittings, cladding and roofing at CERN for three years for a total amount not exceeding 1 467 895 euros (2 258 301 Swiss francs), not subject to revision for two years. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  20. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  1. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  2. Thermal load histories for North American roof assembles using various cladding materials including wood-thermoplastic composite shingles

    J. E. Winandy

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, thermal load histories for various roof cladding types have been monitored in outdoor attic structures that simulate classic North American light-framed construction. In this paper, the 2005 thermal loads for wood-based composite roof sheathing, wood rafters, and attics under wood-plastic composite shingles are compared to common North American roof...

  3. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  4. Temperature and composition profile during double-track laser cladding of H13 tool steel

    He, X.; Yu, G.; Mazumder, J.

    2010-01-01

    Multi-track laser cladding is now applied commercially in a range of industries such as automotive, mining and aerospace due to its diversified potential for material processing. The knowledge of temperature, velocity and composition distribution history is essential for a better understanding of the process and subsequent microstructure evolution and properties. Numerical simulation not only helps to understand the complex physical phenomena and underlying principles involved in this process, but it can also be used in the process prediction and system control. The double-track coaxial laser cladding with H13 tool steel powder injection is simulated using a comprehensive three-dimensional model, based on the mass, momentum, energy conservation and solute transport equation. Some important physical phenomena, such as heat transfer, phase changes, mass addition and fluid flow, are taken into account in the calculation. The physical properties for a mixture of solid and liquid phase are defined by treating it as a continuum media. The velocity of the laser beam during the transition between two tracks is considered. The evolution of temperature and composition of different monitoring locations is simulated.

  5. Effects of Ti and TiC ceramic powder on laser-cladded Ti–6Al–4V in situ intermetallic composite

    Ochonogor, O.F.; Meacock, C.; Abdulwahab, M.; Pityana, S.; Popoola, A.P.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The wear resistance of the laser clad surfaces was enhanced significantly with fifteen-folds wear rate reduction. ► Micro-hardness of the clad zones indicated a significant improvement of over two-folds greater than the substrate. ► Microstructures showed fine crystal grains distribution of ceramic particles that formed interstitial carbides in the titanium matrix composites. - Abstract: Titanium metal matrix composite (MMCs) was developed on titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V) substrate with the aim of improving the hardness and wear properties by laser cladding technique using a Rofin Sinar 4 kW Nd: YAG laser. Wear investigations were carried out with the aid of three body abrasion tester. The resultant microstructure show homogeneous distribution of TiC particles free from cracks and pores. Multiple track deposited systems with 50% overlap revealed micro-hardness increase from 357.3 HV 0.1 for the substrate reaching a peak as high as 922.2 HV 0.1 for 60%Ti + 40%TiC and the least 665.3 HV 0.1 for 80%Ti + 20%TiC MMCs. The wear resistance of the materials improved significantly, indicating a fifteen-fold wear rate reduction due to the proper distribution of ceramic particles thereby forming interstitial carbides as revealed by the X-ray diffraction spectrum.

  6. Effects of Ti and TiC ceramic powder on laser-cladded Ti-6Al-4V in situ intermetallic composite

    Ochonogor, O.F. [Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, X680 0001 (South Africa); Meacock, C. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, National Laser Centre, Pretoria (South Africa); Abdulwahab, M. [Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, X680 0001 (South Africa); Pityana, S. [Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, X680 0001 (South Africa); Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, National Laser Centre, Pretoria (South Africa); Popoola, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, X680 0001 (South Africa)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The wear resistance of the laser clad surfaces was enhanced significantly with fifteen-folds wear rate reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-hardness of the clad zones indicated a significant improvement of over two-folds greater than the substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures showed fine crystal grains distribution of ceramic particles that formed interstitial carbides in the titanium matrix composites. - Abstract: Titanium metal matrix composite (MMCs) was developed on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) substrate with the aim of improving the hardness and wear properties by laser cladding technique using a Rofin Sinar 4 kW Nd: YAG laser. Wear investigations were carried out with the aid of three body abrasion tester. The resultant microstructure show homogeneous distribution of TiC particles free from cracks and pores. Multiple track deposited systems with 50% overlap revealed micro-hardness increase from 357.3 HV{sub 0.1}for the substrate reaching a peak as high as 922.2 HV{sub 0.1} for 60%Ti + 40%TiC and the least 665.3 HV{sub 0.1} for 80%Ti + 20%TiC MMCs. The wear resistance of the materials improved significantly, indicating a fifteen-fold wear rate reduction due to the proper distribution of ceramic particles thereby forming interstitial carbides as revealed by the X-ray diffraction spectrum.

  7. Enhanced Raman scattering assisted by ultrahigh order modes of the double metal cladding waveguide

    Xu, Tian; Huang, Liming; Jin, Yonglong; Fang, Jinghuai, E-mail: cyin.phys@gmail.com, E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Nantong University, No. 9, Seyuan Road, Nantong, Jiangsu 226007 (China); Yin, Cheng, E-mail: cyin.phys@gmail.com, E-mail: fjhuai@ntu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Power Transmission and Distribution Equipment Technology, Hohai University, Changzhou 213022 (China); Huang, Meizhen [Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, No. 800, DongChuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-10-20

    Distinguished from the usual strategy to enhance the Raman scattering such as creating hot spots in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering, this paper takes a quite different approach based on the double metal cladding waveguide. The target analyte is located in the guiding layer of sub-millimeter scale, where several ultrahigh order modes with high intensity are simultaneously excited via a focused laser beam. The experimental setup is simple, and both simulation and experimental results confirm the enhancement mechanism of these oscillating modes. Other appealing features include the large detection area and the ability to excite guided modes via both polarizations. This scheme can be applied to large molecules detection and readily integrated with other Raman enhancement techniques.

  8. Sliding wear resistance of metal matrix composite layers prepared by high power laser

    Ocelik, Vaclav; Matthews, D; de Hosson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Two laser surface engineering techniques, Laser Cladding and Laser Melt Injection (LMI), were used to prepare three different metal matrix composite layers with a thickness of about 1 mm and approximately 25-30% volume fraction of ceramic particles. SiC/Al-8Si, WC/Ti-6Al-4V and TiB2/Ti-6Al-4V layers

  9. Microstructure and wear resistance of a laser clad TiC reinforced nickel aluminides matrix composite coating

    Chen, Y.; Wang, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Wear resistant TiC/(NiAl-Ni 3 Al) composite coating was fabricated on a substrate of electrolyzed nickel by laser cladding using Ni-Al-Ti-C alloy powders. The laser clad coating is metallurgically bonded to the substrate and has a homogenous fine microstructure consisting of the flower-like equiaxed TiC dendrite and the dual phase matrix of NiAl and Ni 3 Al. The intermetallic matrix composite coating exhibits excellent wear resistance under both room- and high-temperature sliding wear test conditions due to the high hardness of TiC coupled with the strong atomic bonds of intermetallic matrix

  10. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  11. Effect of chemical composition on corrosion resistance of Zircaloy fuel cladding tube for BWR

    Inagaki, Masahisa; Akahori, Kimihiko; Kuniya, Jirou; Masaoka, Isao; Suwa, Masateru; Maru, Akira; Yasuda, Teturou; Maki, Hideo.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of Fe and Ni contents on nodular corrosion susceptibility and hydrogen pick-up of Zircaloy were investigated. Total number of 31 Zr alloys having different chemical compositions; five Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloys, eight Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni alloys and eighteen Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, were melted and processed to thin plates for the corrosion tests in the environments of a high temperature (510degC) steam and a high temperature (288degC) water. In addition, four 450 kg ingots of Zr-Sn-Fe-Ni-Cr alloys were industrially melted and BWR fuel cladding tubes were manufactured through a current material processing sequence to study their producibility, tensile properties and corrosion resistance. Nodular corrosion susceptibility decreased with increasing Fe and Ni contents of Zircaloys. It was seen that the improved Zircaloys having Fe and Ni contents in the range of 0.30 [Ni]+0.15[Fe]≥0.045 (w%) showed no susceptibility to nodular corrosion. An increase of Fe content resulted in a decrease of hydrogen pick-up fraction in both steam and water environments. An increase of Fe and Ni content of Zircaloys in the range of Fe≤0.25 w% and Ni≤0.1 w% did not cause the changes in tensile properties and fabricabilities of fuel cladding tube. The fuel cladding tube of improved Zircaloy, containing more amount of Fe and Ni than the upper limit of Zircaloy-2 specification showed no susceptibility to nodular corrosion even in the 530degC steam test. (author)

  12. Cr13Ni5Si2-Based Composite Coating on Copper Deposited Using Pulse Laser Induction Cladding.

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Hailin; Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao

    2017-02-10

    A Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating was successfully deposited on copper by pulse laser induction hybrid cladding (PLIC), and its high-temperature wear behavior was investigated. Temperature evolutions associated with crack behaviors in PLIC were analyzed and compared with pulse laser cladding (PLC) using the finite element method. The microstructure and present phases were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared with continuous laser induction cladding, the higher peak power offered by PLIC ensures metallurgical bonding between highly reflective copper substrate and coating. Compared with a wear test at room temperature, at 500 °C the wear volume of the Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating increased by 21%, and increased by 225% for a NiCr/Cr3C2 coating deposited by plasma spray. This novel technology has good prospects for application with respect to the extended service life of copper mold plates for slab continuous casting.

  13. Growth mechanism, distribution characteristics and reinforcing behavior of (Ti, Nb)C particle in laser cladded Fe-based composite coating

    Li, Qingtang; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reinforced (Ti, Nb)Cp can be synthesized in the molten pool during laser cladding. • Formation mechanism of (Ti, Nb)Cp are impacted by Ti/Nb atomic ratio. • Appropriate Ti element can improve the precipitation of carbide particle. • Excess Ti weakens this effect above-mentioned. • The wear resistance of the coating was improved when Ti/Nb = 1. - Abstract: Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated much interest in laser cladded metal matrix composite coatings for its good wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and high temperature properties. In this paper, in-situ (Ti, Nb)C particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings were produced by laser cladding. The effects of Ti/Nb(atomic ratio) in the cladding powder on the formation mechanism and distribution characteristics of multiple particle were investigated. The results showed that when Ti/Nb > 1, Ti had a stronger ability to bond with C compared with Nb. (Ti, Nb)C multiple particles with TiC core formed in the molten pool. With the decrease of Ti/Nb, core-shell structure disappeared, the structure of particle got close to that of NbC gradually. It is found that the amount, area ratio and distribution of the reinforced particle in the coating containing Ti and Nb elements were improved, compared with these in the coating containing equal Nb element. When Ti/Nb = 1, the effects above-mentioned is most prominent, and the wear resistance of the coating is promoted obviously

  14. Growth mechanism, distribution characteristics and reinforcing behavior of (Ti, Nb)C particle in laser cladded Fe-based composite coating

    Li, Qingtang, E-mail: liqingtang123@126.com; Lei, Yongping, E-mail: yplei@bjut.edu.cn; Fu, Hanguang

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Reinforced (Ti, Nb)Cp can be synthesized in the molten pool during laser cladding. • Formation mechanism of (Ti, Nb)Cp are impacted by Ti/Nb atomic ratio. • Appropriate Ti element can improve the precipitation of carbide particle. • Excess Ti weakens this effect above-mentioned. • The wear resistance of the coating was improved when Ti/Nb = 1. - Abstract: Over the past decade, researchers have demonstrated much interest in laser cladded metal matrix composite coatings for its good wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and high temperature properties. In this paper, in-situ (Ti, Nb)C particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings were produced by laser cladding. The effects of Ti/Nb(atomic ratio) in the cladding powder on the formation mechanism and distribution characteristics of multiple particle were investigated. The results showed that when Ti/Nb > 1, Ti had a stronger ability to bond with C compared with Nb. (Ti, Nb)C multiple particles with TiC core formed in the molten pool. With the decrease of Ti/Nb, core-shell structure disappeared, the structure of particle got close to that of NbC gradually. It is found that the amount, area ratio and distribution of the reinforced particle in the coating containing Ti and Nb elements were improved, compared with these in the coating containing equal Nb element. When Ti/Nb = 1, the effects above-mentioned is most prominent, and the wear resistance of the coating is promoted obviously.

  15. Laser cladding of in situ TiB2/Fe composite coating on steel

    Du Baoshuai; Zou Zengda; Wang Xinhong; Qu Shiyao

    2008-01-01

    To enhance the wear resistance of mechanical components, laser cladding has been applied to deposit in situ TiB 2 /Fe composite coating on steel using ferrotitanium and ferroboron as the coating precursor. The phase constituents and microstructure of the composite coating were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Microhardness tester and block-on-ring wear tester were employed to measure the microhardness and dry-sliding wear resistance of the composite coating. Results show that defect-free composite coating with metallurgical joint to the steel substrate can be obtained. Phases presented in the coating consist of TiB 2 and α-Fe. TiB 2 particles which are formed in situ via nucleation-growth mechanism are distributed uniformly in the α-Fe matrix with blocky morphology. The microhardness and wear properties of the composite coating improved significantly in comparison to the as-received steel substrate due to the presence of the hard reinforcement TiB 2

  16. Laser cladding of in situ TiB{sub 2}/Fe composite coating on steel

    Du Baoshuai; Zou Zengda [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Xinhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: xinhongwang@sdu.edu.cn; Qu Shiyao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2008-08-15

    To enhance the wear resistance of mechanical components, laser cladding has been applied to deposit in situ TiB{sub 2}/Fe composite coating on steel using ferrotitanium and ferroboron as the coating precursor. The phase constituents and microstructure of the composite coating were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrograph (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Microhardness tester and block-on-ring wear tester were employed to measure the microhardness and dry-sliding wear resistance of the composite coating. Results show that defect-free composite coating with metallurgical joint to the steel substrate can be obtained. Phases presented in the coating consist of TiB{sub 2} and {alpha}-Fe. TiB{sub 2} particles which are formed in situ via nucleation-growth mechanism are distributed uniformly in the {alpha}-Fe matrix with blocky morphology. The microhardness and wear properties of the composite coating improved significantly in comparison to the as-received steel substrate due to the presence of the hard reinforcement TiB{sub 2}.

  17. Application of Copper Cladding Aluminum Composites in UHV Portable Earthing and Short-circuiting Wires

    Zhu Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the heavy weight and inconvenience when carrying and installing copper earthing wires on the UHV transmission lines, in this paper, we present the use of copper clad aluminum(CCA composite materials as a lightweight method for UHV earthing wire conductor. Theoretical calculations and tests of the fusing current in a short time for copper and CCA material are conducted. The results show that the theoretical value of the earthing wire conductor's fusing current corresponds with the test value on condition of the conductor cross section greater than 4mm2 as well as fusing time less than 1.5s. The CCA-10 earthing wires get 36.2% weight reduction compared with copper wires.

  18. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  19. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  20. Metal hydride compositions and lithium ion batteries

    Young, Kwo; Nei, Jean

    2018-04-24

    Heterogeneous metal hydride (MH) compositions comprising a main region comprising a first metal hydride and a secondary region comprising one or more additional components selected from the group consisting of second metal hydrides, metals, metal alloys and further metal compounds are suitable as anode materials for lithium ion cells. The first metal hydride is for example MgH.sub.2. Methods for preparing the composition include coating, mechanical grinding, sintering, heat treatment and quenching techniques.

  1. Thermal Shock Properties of Cladding with SiC{sub f}/SiC Composite Protective Films

    Lee, Donghee; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Weonju; Park, Jiyeon; Kim, Daejong; Lee, Hyeon Geun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In general, Zr-4 alloy is used for such nuclear fuel cladding. Zr-4 possesses a very small thermal neutron absorption cross-section and has superior corrosion resistance in the normal operating conditions of a nuclear reactor. However, in the case of a critical accident such as a LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) in the Fukushima disaster, the risk of hydrogen explosion becomes serious. That is, in the case of coolant leakage, a dramatic reaction between the nuclear fuel cladding and steam can cause a heating reaction accompanied by rapid high-temperature oxidation, while creating a huge amount of hydrogen. Hence, the search for an alternative material for nuclear fuel cladding is being actively undertaken. Ceramic-based nuclear fuel cladding is receiving much attention as a means of improving safety. SiC has excellent properties of resistance to high temperature and high exposure and superior mechanical properties, as well as a very small thermal neutron absorption cross-section (0.09 barns), which causes almost no decrease in mechanical strength or volume change following exposure. This experiment examined the thermal shock properties and microstructure of cladding that has SiCf/SiC composite protective film, using polycarbosilane preceramic polymer.

  2. Thick metallic coatings produced by coaxial and side laser cladding : Processing and properties

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt and iron-based, defect-free coatings with thicknesses from 1 to 3.3. mm were created by a laser cladding process on different steel substrates. Extensive laser cladding experiments with a gradual change of laser power were used to study relations between main processing parameters and

  3. TiC Reinforcement Composite Coating Produced Using Graphite of the Cast Iron by Laser Cladding

    Yanhui Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a TiC-reinforced composite coating was produced to improve the wear resistance of a pearlite matrix grey iron using a pre-placed Ti powder by laser cladding. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS confirmed that the coating was composed of TiC particles and two kinds of α-Fe phase. The fine TiC particles were only a few microns in size and uniformly distributed on the matrix phase in the composite coating. The microstructure characteristic of the composite coating resulted in the microhardness rising to about 1000 HV0.3 (China GB/T 4342-1991 and the wear resistance significantly increased relative to the substrate. In addition, the fine and homogeneous solidification microstructure without graphite phase in the transition zone led to a good metallurgical bonding and transition between the coating and the substrate. It was of great significance for the cast iron to modify the surface and repair surface defects or surface damage.

  4. TiC Reinforcement Composite Coating Produced Using Graphite of the Cast Iron by Laser Cladding.

    Liu, Yanhui; Qu, Weicheng; Su, Yu

    2016-09-30

    In this study, a TiC-reinforced composite coating was produced to improve the wear resistance of a pearlite matrix grey iron using a pre-placed Ti powder by laser cladding. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed that the coating was composed of TiC particles and two kinds of α -Fe phase. The fine TiC particles were only a few microns in size and uniformly distributed on the matrix phase in the composite coating. The microstructure characteristic of the composite coating resulted in the microhardness rising to about 1000 HV0.3 (China GB/T 4342-1991) and the wear resistance significantly increased relative to the substrate. In addition, the fine and homogeneous solidification microstructure without graphite phase in the transition zone led to a good metallurgical bonding and transition between the coating and the substrate. It was of great significance for the cast iron to modify the surface and repair surface defects or surface damage.

  5. Microstructure characteristics and properties of in-situ formed TiC/Ni based alloy composite coating by laser cladding

    Yang, Sen; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2003-03-01

    Different weight ratio of nickel based alloy, titanium and graphite powders were mixed and then laser cladded onto carbon steel substrate to produce a surface metal matrix composite layer. The experimental results showed that the coating was uniform, continuous and free of cracks. An excellent bonding between the coating and the carbon steel substrate was ensured by the strong metallurgical interface. The microstructures of the coating were mainly composed of γ-Ni dendrite, M23C6, a small amount of CrB, and dispersed TiC particles, and the in-situ generated TiCp/matrix interfaces were clean and free from deleterious surface reaction. The morphologies of TiC particles changed from the global, cluster to flower-like shape, the volume fraction of TiCp and the microhardness gradually increased from the bottom to the top of the coating layer, and the maximum microhardness of the coating was about HV0.2850, 3 times larger than that of steel substrate. The volume fraction of TiC particles increased with increasing of volume fraction of Ti and C too.

  6. The wetting of cladding materials and other metals and alloys by sodium

    Hodkin, E.N.; Nicholas, M.G.

    1976-05-01

    The sessile drop technique has been used to investigate the wetting behaviour between sodium and various metals and alloys including FV548, 316L, M316 and PE16. Unoxidised smooth surfaces of these alloys were not wetted by sodium containing 20 ppm of oxygen at temperatures below 300 0 C but were well wetted with advancing contact angles of 20 0 or less at temperatures of 550 0 to 600 0 C. Cold working and surface roughness had little effect on wetting behaviour but other factors exercised significant influences. Chemically or electrolytically polished M316 and PE16 surfaces were less readily wetted than those which had been prepared by mechanical polishing. In general, preoxidation of the alloy surfaces and increased oxygen contamination of the sodium had detrimental effects on wetting behaviour. On the other hand, increasing the chromium content of the alloys, decreasing the oxygen content of the sodium or ion bombarding the alloy sample surfaces had beneficial effects. Auger spectroscopy studies revealed a correlation between the chromium/oxygen ratio of PE16 surfaces and their wettability. The implications of this and other factors on fast reactor coolant/clad wetting behaviour is discussed. (author)

  7. Development of laser surface cladding through energy transmission over optical fiber

    Hirano, Kenji; Morishige, Norio; Irisawa, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    Much attention has recently been paid to laser cladding techniques as an approach in controlling the composition and structure of the metal surface. If YAG laser is used as the cladding method, the flexibility of laser cladding process increases extremely because YAG laser beam is transmitted through an optical fiber, and enabling cladding on pipes installed in actual plants. So experiments on YAG laser cladding through energy transmission over an optical fiber were performed to prevent stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel pipes. In order to build a cladding layer, mixed metal powder were pre-placed on the inner surface of the pipe using organic binder and the pre-placed powder beds were melted with YAG laser beam transmitted using an optical fiber. This paper introduces the method of building a cladding layer on pipes in actual nuclear plants. (author)

  8. Laser cladding to select new glassy alloys

    Medrano, L.L.O.; Afonso, C.R.M.; Kiminami, C.S.; Gargarella, P.; Ramasco, B.

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental technique used to analyze the effect of compositional variation and cooling rate in the phase formation in a multicomponent system is the laser cladding. This work have evaluated the use of laser cladding to discover a new bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the Al-Co-Zr system. Coatings with composition variation have made by laser cladding using Al-Co-Zr alloys powders and the samples produced have been characterized by X ray diffraction, microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results did not show the composition variation as expected, because of incomplete melting during laser process. It was measured a composition variation tendency that allowed the glass forming investigation by the glass formation criterion λ+Δh 1/2 . The results have showed no glass formation in the coating samples, which prove a limited capacity of Zr-Co-Al system to form glass (author)

  9. Composite pipe to metal joint

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V.; Josephson, Marvin

    2017-06-27

    A method for making a metal to composite tube joint including selecting an elongated interior fitting constructed with an exterior barrel, reduced in exterior diameter to form a distally facing annular shoulder and then projecting still further distally to form an interior sleeve having a radially outwardly facing bonding surface. Selecting an elongated metal outer sleeve formed proximally with a collar constructed for receipt over the barrel and increased in interior diameter and projecting distally to form an exterior sleeve having a radially inwardly facing bonding surface cooperating with the first bonding surface to form an annulus receiving an extremity of a composite tube and a bond bonding the extremity of the tube to the bonding surfaces.

  10. Microstructures and Properties of Laser Cladding Al-TiC-CeO2 Composite Coatings

    Kong, Dejun; Song, Renguo

    2018-01-01

    Al-TiC-CeO2 composite coatings have been prepared by using a laser cladding technique, and the microstructure and properties of the resulting composite coatings have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a 3D microscope system, X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness testing, X-ray stress measurements, friction and wear testing, and an electrochemical workstation. The results showed that an Al-Fe phase appears in the coatings under different applied laser powers and shows good metallurgical bonding with the matrix. The dilution rate of the coating first decreases and then increases with increasing laser power. The coating was transformed from massive and short rod-like structures into a fine granular structure, and the effect of fine grain strengthening is significant. The microhardness of the coatings first decreases and then increases with increasing laser power, and the maximum microhardness can reach 964.3 HV0.2. In addition, the residual stress of the coating surface was tensile stress, and crack size increases with increasing stress. When the laser power was 1.6 kW, the coating showed high corrosion resistance. PMID:29373555

  11. Microstructures and Properties of Laser Cladding Al-TiC-CeO₂ Composite Coatings.

    He, Xing; Kong, Dejun; Song, Renguo

    2018-01-26

    Al-TiC-CeO₂ composite coatings have been prepared by using a laser cladding technique, and the microstructure and properties of the resulting composite coatings have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a 3D microscope system, X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-hardness testing, X-ray stress measurements, friction and wear testing, and an electrochemical workstation. The results showed that an Al-Fe phase appears in the coatings under different applied laser powers and shows good metallurgical bonding with the matrix. The dilution rate of the coating first decreases and then increases with increasing laser power. The coating was transformed from massive and short rod-like structures into a fine granular structure, and the effect of fine grain strengthening is significant. The microhardness of the coatings first decreases and then increases with increasing laser power, and the maximum microhardness can reach 964.3 HV 0.2 . In addition, the residual stress of the coating surface was tensile stress, and crack size increases with increasing stress. When the laser power was 1.6 kW, the coating showed high corrosion resistance.

  12. A Review to the Laser Cladding of Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    Quazi, M. M.; Fazal, M. A.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Yusof, Farazila; Masjuki, H. H.; Arslan, A.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid lubricants are extremely viable in reducing wear damage and friction of mating components. However, due to the relentless pressure and the recent trend towards higher operating environments in advanced automotive and aerospace turbo-machineries, these lubricants cease to perform and hence, an alternate system is required for maintaining the self-lubricating environment. From the viewpoint of tribologist, wear is related to near-surface regions and hence, surface coatings are considered suitable for improving the functioning of tribo-pairs. Wear resistant coatings can be fabricated with the addition of various solid lubricants so as to reduce friction drag. In order to protect bulk substrates, self-lubricating wear resistant composite coatings have been fabricated by employing various surface coating techniques such as electrochemical process, physical and chemical vapor depositions, thermal and plasma spraying, laser cladding etc. Studies related to laser-based surface engineering approaches have remained vibrant and are recognized in altering the near surface regions. In this work, the latest developments in laser based self-lubricating composite coatings are highlighted. Furthermore, the effect of additives, laser processing parameters and their corresponding influence on mechanical and tribological performance is briefly reviewed.

  13. Gate-last TiN/HfO2 band edge effective work functions using low-temperature anneals and selective cladding to control interface composition

    Hinkle, C. L.

    2012-04-09

    Silicon N-metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) and P-metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) band edge effective work functions and the correspondingly low threshold voltages (Vt) are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme employing low-temperature anneals and selective cladding layers. Al diffusion from the cladding to the TiN/HfO2interface during forming gas anneal together with low O concentration in the TiN enables low NMOS Vt. The use of non-migrating W cladding along with experimentally detected N-induced dipoles, produced by increased oxygen in the TiN, facilitates low PMOS Vt.

  14. Gate-last TiN/HfO2 band edge effective work functions using low-temperature anneals and selective cladding to control interface composition

    Hinkle, C. L.; Galatage, R. V.; Chapman, R. A.; Vogel, E. M.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Freeman, C.; Christensen, M.; Wimmer, E.; Niimi, H.; Li-Fatou, A.; Shaw, J. B.; Chambers, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon N-metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) and P-metal-oxide-semiconductor (PMOS) band edge effective work functions and the correspondingly low threshold voltages (Vt) are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme employing low-temperature anneals and selective cladding layers. Al diffusion from the cladding to the TiN/HfO2interface during forming gas anneal together with low O concentration in the TiN enables low NMOS Vt. The use of non-migrating W cladding along with experimentally detected N-induced dipoles, produced by increased oxygen in the TiN, facilitates low PMOS Vt.

  15. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-06-01

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the measurement of

  16. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the

  17. Thermo-mechanical assessment of full SiC/SiC composite cladding for LWR applications with sensitivity analysis

    Singh, Gyanender; Terrani, Kurt; Katoh, Yutai

    2018-02-01

    SiC/SiC composites are considered among leading candidates for accident tolerant fuel cladding in light water reactors. However, when SiC-based materials are exposed to neutron irradiation, they experience significant changes in dimensions and physical properties. Under a large heat flux application (i.e. fuel cladding), the non-uniform changes in the dimensions and physical properties will lead to build-up of stresses in the structure over the course of time. To ensure reliable and safe operation of such a structure it is important to assess its thermo-mechanical performance under in-reactor conditions of irradiation and elevated temperature. In this work, the foundation for 3D thermo-mechanical analysis of SiC/SiC cladding is put in place and a set of analyses with simplified boundary conditions has been performed. The analyses were carried out with two different codes that were benchmarked against one another and prior results in the literature. A constitutive model is constructed and solved numerically to predict the stress distribution and variation in the cladding under normal operating conditions. The dependence of dimensions and physical properties variation with irradiation and temperature has been incorporated. These robust models may now be modified to take into account the axial and circumferential variation in neutron and heat flux to fully account for 3D effects. The results from the simple analyses show the development of high tensile stresses especially in the circumferential and axial directions at the inner region of the cladding. Based on the results obtained, design guidelines are recommended. For lack of certainty in or tailor-ability for the physical and mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composite material a sensitivity analysis is conducted. The analysis results establish a precedence order of the properties based on the extent to which these properties influence the temperature and the stresses.

  18. State-of-the-art report on the development of liquid metal reactor fuel cladding materials in Japan

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kuk, Il Hiun; Ryu, Woo Seog; Jang, Jin Sung; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Kim, Dae Whan; Park, Soon Dong; Kim, Woo Gon; Chung, Man Kyo; Han, Chang Hee

    1998-01-01

    PNC 1520 and PNC-FM5 have been developed as a cladding materials for LMR in Japan. PNC 1520 has superior swelling resistance and high temperature properties to PNC 31.6. And PNC-FMS steel has shown a high rupture stress as well as good neutron irradiation performance. In addition oxide dispersed ferritic steel (PNC-ODS) and 12Cr-8Mo steel have been developed. This report will give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is going to be operable in 2010 by analysis of the characteristics of cladding materials developed in Japan. (author). 39 refs., 2 tabs., 23 figs

  19. Dynamics of Gradient Bioceramic Composite Coating on Surface of Titanium Alloy by Wide-Band Laser Cladding

    LIU Qi-bin; ZOU Long-jiang; ZHU Wei-dong; LI Hai-tao; DONG Chuang

    2004-01-01

    The gradient bioceramic coating was prepared on the surface of titanium alloy using wide-band laser cladding. The dynamics of gradient bioceramic composite coating containing hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared with mixture of CaHPO4*2H2O and CaCO3 under the condition of wide-band laser was studied theoretically. The corresponding mathematical model and its numerical solution were presented. The examination experiment showed that HA bioceramic composite coatings can be obtained by appropriately choosing wide-band laser cladding parameters. The microstructure and surface morphology of HA bioceramic coating were observed by SEM and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results showed that the bioceramic coating is composed of HA, β-TCP, CaO, CaTiO3 and TiO2. The surface of bioceramic coating takes coral-shaped structure or short-rod piled structure, which helps osteoblast grow into bioceramic and improves the biocompatibility.

  20. Metal-clad waveguide characterization for contact-based light transmission into tissue

    Chininis, Jeffrey; Whiteside, Paul; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-02-01

    As contemporary laser dermatology procedures, like tattoo removal and skin resurfacing, become more popular, the complications of their operation are also becoming more prevalent. Frequent incidences of over-exposure, ocular injury, and excessive thermal damage represent mounting concerns for those seeking such procedures; moreover, each of these problems is a direct consequence of the standard, free-space method of laser transmission predominantly used in clinical settings. Therefore, an alternative method of light transmission is needed to minimize these problems. Here, we demonstrate and characterize an alternative method that uses planar waveguides to deliver light into sample tissue via direct contact. To do this, slab substrates made from glass were clad in layers of titanium and silver, constraining the light within the waveguide along the waveguide's length. By creating active areas on the waveguide surface, the propagating light could then optically tunnel into the tissue sample, when the waveguide was brought into contact with the tissue. SEM and EDS were used to characterize the metal film thickness and deposition rates onto the glass substrates. Laser light from a Q-switched Nd:YAG source operating at 532nm was coupled into the waveguide and transmitted into samples of pig skin. The amount of light transmitted was measured using photoacoustics techniques, in conjunction with a photodiode and integrating sphere. Transmitting light into tissue in this manner effectively resolves or circumvents the complications caused by free-space propagation methods as it reduces the operating distance to 0, which prevents hazardous back-reflections and allows for the ready incorporation of contact cooling technologies.

  1. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  2. Synthesis of Fe-based amorphous composite coatings with low purity materials by laser cladding

    Zhu Qingjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)]. E-mail: sduzhu@yahoo.com.cn; Qu Shiyao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Xinhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zou Zengda [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2007-06-30

    Amorphous composite coatings Fe{sub 38}Ni{sub 30-X}Si{sub 16}B{sub 14}V{sub 2}M {sub X} (X = 0, 1, 2) (M contains Al, Ti, Mo, and C) were prepared with low purity of raw materials by laser cladding. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results show that the coating have an amorphous structure with a few crystalline phase on it. The amorphous phase is the primary phase. The glass forming ability as well as the microhardness of the Fe-based alloy made from low purity raw materials can be much enhanced by adding small amount of multi-components. However, the elements addition has its optimal quantity. When X is equal to 1, the microstructure of the coating contains 97.93% amorphous phase and 2.07% crystalline phase on it. As a result, the microhardness of the coating reaches maximum. With further increasing of the additions, the amorphous phase in the coating lessens instead of augment and the crystalline phase begins to accumulate, which result in the decrease of the microhardness.

  3. Cr13Ni5Si2-Based Composite Coating on Copper Deposited Using Pulse Laser Induction Cladding

    Ke Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating was successfully deposited on copper by pulse laser induction hybrid cladding (PLIC, and its high-temperature wear behavior was investigated. Temperature evolutions associated with crack behaviors in PLIC were analyzed and compared with pulse laser cladding (PLC using the finite element method. The microstructure and present phases were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared with continuous laser induction cladding, the higher peak power offered by PLIC ensures metallurgical bonding between highly reflective copper substrate and coating. Compared with a wear test at room temperature, at 500 °C the wear volume of the Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating increased by 21%, and increased by 225% for a NiCr/Cr3C2 coating deposited by plasma spray. This novel technology has good prospects for application with respect to the extended service life of copper mold plates for slab continuous casting.

  4. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  5. Structural cladding /clad structures

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  6. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  7. [The effect of technological parameters of wide-band laser cladding on microstructure and sinterability of gradient bioceramics composite coating].

    Liu, Qibin; Zhu, Weidong; Zou, Longjiang; Zheng, Min; Dong, Chuang

    2005-12-01

    The gradient bioceramics coating was prepared on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloy by using wide-band laser cladding. And the effect of technological parameters of wide-band laser cladding on microstructure and sinterability of gradient bioceramics composite coating was studied. The experimental results indicated that in the circumstances of size of laser doze D and scanning velocity V being fixed, with the increasement of power P, the density of microstructure in bioceramics coating gradually degraded; with the increasement of power P, the pore rate of bioceramics gradually became high. While P = 2.3 KW, the bioceramics coating with dense structure and lower pore rate (5.11%) was obtained; while P = 2.9 KW, the bioceramics coating with disappointing density was formed and its pore rate was up to 21.32%. The microhardness of bioceramics coating demonstrated that while P = 2.3 KW, the largest value of microhardness of bioceramics coating was 1100 HV. Under the condition of our research work, the optimum technological parameters for preparing gradient bioceramics coating by wide-band laser cladding are: P = 2.3 KW, V = 145 mm/min, D = 16 mm x 2 mm.

  8. Microstructure and wear behavior of γ/Al4C3/TiC/CaF2 composite coating on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy prepared by Nd:YAG laser cladding

    Liu Xiubo; Shi Shihong; Guo Jian; Fu Geyan; Wang Mingdi

    2009-01-01

    As a further step in obtaining high performance elevated temperature self-lubrication anti-wear composite coatings on TiAl alloy, a novel Ni-P electroless plating method was adopted to encapsulate the as-received CaF 2 in the preparation of precursor NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 -CaF 2 mixed powders with an aim to decrease its mass loss and increase its compatibility with the metal matrix during a Nd:YAG laser cladding. The microstructure of the coating was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against the hardened 0.45% C steel ring was evaluated using a block-on-ring wear tester at room temperature. It was found that the coating had a unique microstructure consisting of primary dendrites TiC and block Al 4 C 3 carbides reinforcement as well as fine isolated spherical CaF 2 solid lubrication particles uniformly dispersed in the NiCrAlTi (γ) matrix. The good friction-reducing and anti-wear abilities of the laser clad composite coating was suggested to the Ni-P electroless plating and the attendant reduction of mass loss of CaF 2 and the increasing of it's wettability with the NiCrAlTi (γ) matrix during the laser cladding process

  9. Laser cladding Co-based alloy/SiCp composite coatings on IF steel

    Li Mingxi; He Yizhu; Sun Guoxiong

    2004-01-01

    Hardfacing coatings, made of Co-Cr-W-Ni-Si alloy + 20% SiCp, deposited by laser cladding on IF steel is introduced. Cross-section of such coatings has been examined to reveal their microstructure using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). MM-200 type wear tester is used to examine wear resistance of the coatings. The results showed that SiCp is dissolved completely during laser cladding process under this conditions, the primary phase γ-Co dendrite and Si 2 W, CoWSi, Cr 3 Si, CoSi 2 formed by C, Si reacting with other elements existed in the coatings. There existed some crystallization morphologies in different regions, such as planar (at the interface), followed cellular and dendrite crystallization from interface to the surface. The direction of solidification changes from one direction perpendicular to interface to multi-directions at the central and upper regions of the clad. The results also showed that the wear resistance of the clad improved by adding SiCp

  10. A Multi-Layered Ceramic Composite for Impermeable Fuel Cladding for COmmercial Wate Reactors

    Feinroth, Herbert

    2008-03-03

    A triplex nuclear fuel cladding is developed to further improve the passive safety of commercial nuclear plants, to increase the burnup and durablity of nuclear fuel, to improve the power density and economics of nuclear power, and to reduce the amount of spent fuel requiring disposal or recycle.

  11. Development of microstructure and superconductivity of silver-clad Bi(2223) composite tapes in the process of heat treatment

    Guo, Y.C.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study on the development of phase composition, microstructure and superconducting properties (critical temperature Tc and critical current density J c ) in silver-clad (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 composite tapes during the process of heat treatment has been conducted using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electrical measurements. The correlation between the tape's high Tc phase purity, microstructure and superconducting properties at different heat treatment stages has been carefully analysed and explained. The results indicate that pure high Tc phase, high degree of grain alignment, high mass density and good connection between grains are all essential for superconducting tapes to carry a large current. With the optimized process parameters, a critical current density J c up to 32665 A cm -2 (corresponding critical current, 42.3 A) at 77 K and self-magnetic field for silver-clad (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 superconducting composite tapes has been achieved. (orig.)

  12. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  13. Microstructure of bonding zones in laser-clad Ni-alloy-based composite coatings reinforced with various ceramic powders

    Pei, Y.T.; Ouyang, J.H.; Lei, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    Microstructure of the bonding zones (BZs) between laser-clad Ni-alloy-based composite coatings and steel substrates was studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. Observations indicate that for pure Ni-alloy coating the laser parameters selected for good interface fusion have no effect on the microstructure of the BZ except for its thickness. However, the addition of ceramic particles (TiN, SiC, or ZrO 2 ) to the Ni alloy varies the compositional or constitutional undercooling of the melt near the solid/liquid interface and consequently leads to the observed changes of microstructure of the BZs. For TiN/Ni-alloy coating the morphology of γ-Ni solid solution in the BZ changes from dendritic to planar form with increasing scanning speed. A colony structure of eutectic is found in the BZ of SiC/Ni-alloy coating in which complete dissolution of SiC particles takes place during laser cladding. The immiscible melting of ZrO 2 and Ni-alloy powders induces the stratification of ZrO 2 /Ni-alloy coating which consists of a pure ZrO 2 layer fin the upper region and a BZ composed mainly of γ-Ni dendrites adjacent to the substrate. All the BZs studied in this investigation have good metallurgical characteristics between the coatings and the substrates

  14. MICROSTRUCTURE AND WEAR RESISTANCE OF COMPOSITE COATING BY LASER CLADDING Al/TiN ON THE Ti–6Al–4V SUBSTRATE

    H. X. ZHANG; H. J. YU; C. Z. CHEN

    2015-01-01

    The composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding Al/TiN pre-placed powders on Ti–6Al–4V substrate for enhancing wear resistance and hardness of the substrate. The composite coatings were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The sliding wear tests were performed by MM200 wear test machine. The hardness of the coatings was tested by HV-1000 hardness tester. After laser cladding, it was found that there...

  15. A Comparative Physics Study of Commercial PWR Cores using Metallic Micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Cr (or Mo) Pellets with Cr-based Cladding Coating

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a comparative neutronic analysis of the cores using ATFs which include metallic micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Cr, UO{sub 2}-Mo pellets and Cr-based alloy coating on cladding was performed to show the effects of the ATF fuels on the core performance. In this study, the cores having different ATFs use the same initial uranium enrichments. The ATF concepts studied in this work are the metallic microcell UO{sub 2} pellets containing Cr or Mo with cladding outer coating composed of Cr-based alloy which have been suggested as the ATF concepts in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The metallic micro-cell pellets and Cr-based alloy coating can enhance thermal conductivity of fuel and reduce the production of hydrogen from the reaction of cladding with coolant, respectively. The objective of this work is to compare neutronic characteristics of commercial PWR equilibrium cores utilizing the different variations of metallic micro-cell UO{sub 2} pellets with cladding coating composed of Cr-based alloy. The results showed that the cores using UO{sub 2}-Cr and UO{sub 2}-Mo pellets with Cr-based alloy coating on cladding have reduced cycle lengths by 60 and 106 EFPDs, respectively, in comparison with the reference UO{sub 2} fueled core due to the reduced heavy metal inventories and large thermal absorption cross section but they do not have any significant differences in the core performances parameters. However, it is notable that the core fueled the micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Mo pellet and Cr-based alloy coating has considerably more negative MTC and slightly more negative FTC than the other cases. These characteristics of the core using micro-cell UO{sub 2}-Mo pellet and Cr-based alloy coating is due to the hard neutron spectrum and large capture resonance cross section of Mo isotopes.

  16. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The composite of metals and alloys used in the fabrication of 238 Pu cardiac pacemaker fuel capsules resists the effects of high temperatures, high mechanical forces, and chemical corrosives and provides more than adequate protection to the fuel pellet even from deliberate attempts to dissolve the cladding in inorganic acids. This does not imply that opening a pacemaker fuel capsule by inorganic acids is impossible but that it would not be a wise choice

  17. Plasma spheroidization and cladding of powders

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    With reference to experimental results for nickel and chromium alloys, it is shown that complex alloy powders can be spheroidized in plasma discharges using an argon plasma with hydrogen. The spheroidizing process is accompanied by the reduction of surface oxides, with uniform element distribution within the particles; the granulometric composition of the particles is preserved. It is also shown that plasma technology can be used for producing metal-clad oxide and carbide powders, which improve the performance of cermets and coatings.

  18. Effect of powders refinement on the tribological behavior of Ni-based composite coatings by laser cladding

    Wang Lingqian; Zhou Jiansong; Yu Youjun; Guo Chun; Chen Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    NiCr + Cr 3 C 2 + Ag + BaF 2 /CaF 2 composite coatings were produced on stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9Ti) substrates by laser cladding. Corresponding powders were prepared by high-energy ball milling technique. The friction and wear behavior at room temperature was investigated through sliding against the Si 3 N 4 ball. The morphologies of the wear debris, worn surfaces of both samples and the Si 3 N 4 ball were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and three dimensional non-contact surface mapping. Results showed that milling time had a great effect on the size, morphology, uniformity of the powders as well as the microstructure and properties of laser cladding coatings. The wear mechanism of the coatings is dominated by abrasive wear, plastic deformation and slight adhesive wear. The consecutive evolution trend of friction coefficient, wear rate as well as microhardness of the serials of coatings produced with powders of different sizes was presented.

  19. Effect of powders refinement on the tribological behavior of Ni-based composite coatings by laser cladding

    Wang, Lingqian; Zhou, Jiansong; Yu, Youjun; Guo, Chun; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-06-01

    NiCr + Cr3C2 + Ag + BaF2/CaF2 composite coatings were produced on stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9Ti) substrates by laser cladding. Corresponding powders were prepared by high-energy ball milling technique. The friction and wear behavior at room temperature was investigated through sliding against the Si3N4 ball. The morphologies of the wear debris, worn surfaces of both samples and the Si3N4 ball were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and three dimensional non-contact surface mapping. Results showed that milling time had a great effect on the size, morphology, uniformity of the powders as well as the microstructure and properties of laser cladding coatings. The wear mechanism of the coatings is dominated by abrasive wear, plastic deformation and slight adhesive wear. The consecutive evolution trend of friction coefficient, wear rate as well as microhardness of the serials of coatings produced with powders of different sizes was presented.

  20. Effect of powders refinement on the tribological behavior of Ni-based composite coatings by laser cladding

    Wang Lingqian [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Jiansong, E-mail: jszhou@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu Youjun; Guo Chun [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen Jianmin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-06-15

    NiCr + Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} + Ag + BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} composite coatings were produced on stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9Ti) substrates by laser cladding. Corresponding powders were prepared by high-energy ball milling technique. The friction and wear behavior at room temperature was investigated through sliding against the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ball. The morphologies of the wear debris, worn surfaces of both samples and the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ball were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and three dimensional non-contact surface mapping. Results showed that milling time had a great effect on the size, morphology, uniformity of the powders as well as the microstructure and properties of laser cladding coatings. The wear mechanism of the coatings is dominated by abrasive wear, plastic deformation and slight adhesive wear. The consecutive evolution trend of friction coefficient, wear rate as well as microhardness of the serials of coatings produced with powders of different sizes was presented.

  1. Fuel assembly and fuel cladding tube

    Tsutsumi, Shinro; Ito, Ken-ichi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube is a zirconium liner tube formed by lining a pure zirconium layer on the inner side of a zirconium alloy tube. The fuel cladding tube is formed by extrusion molding of a composite billet formed by inserting a pure zirconium billet into a zirconium alloy billet. Accordingly, the pure zirconium layer and the zirconium alloy tube are strongly joined by metal bond. The fuel cladding tube has an external oxide film on the outer surface of the zirconium alloy tube and an internal oxide film on the inner side of the pure zirconium layer. The external oxide film has a thickness preferably of about 1μm. The internal oxide film has a thickness of not more than 10μm, preferably, from 1 to 5μm. With such a constitution, flaws to be formed on both inner and outer surfaces of the cladding tube upon assembling a fuel assembly can be reduced thereby enabling to reduce the amount of hydrogen absorbed to the cladding tube. (I.N.)

  2. Surface improvement for inside surface of small diameter pipes by laser cladding technique

    Irisawa, Toshio; Morishige, Norio; Umemoto, Tadahiro; Ono, Kazumichi; Hamaoka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    A laser cladding technique has been used for surface improvement in controlling the composition of a metal surface. Recent high power YAG laser development gives an opportunity to use this laser cladding technique for various applications. A YAG laser beam can be transmitted through an optical fiber for a long distance and through narrow spaces. YAG laser cladding was studied for developing alloy steel to prevent stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel piping. In order to make a cladding layer, mixed metal powder was on the inside surface of the piping using an organic binder. Subsequently the powder beds were melted with a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber. This paper introduces the Laser cladding technique for surface improvement for the inside surface of a small diameter pipe. (author)

  3. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  4. Microstructure and Properties of (TiB2 + NiTi)/Ti Composite Coating Fabricated by Laser Cladding

    Lin, Yinghua; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang; Lin, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Agglomerated TiB2 particle and network-like structure-reinforced titanium matrix composite coatings were prepared by laser cladding of the Ni + TiB2 + Ti preplaced powders on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The network-like structure mainly consisted of NiTi and Ni3Ti. Through the experiment, it was found that the size of agglomerated particle gradually decreased with the increase of Ti content, but the number of the network-like structure first increased and then disappeared. In-situ reaction competition mechanism and the formation of network-like structure were discussed. The average micro-hardness gradually decreased with the increase of Ti content, but the average fracture toughness gradually increased. Meanwhile, the wear resistance of the coatings is higher than that of the substrate, but the wear loss of the coatings is gradually increased with the increase of Ti content.

  5. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  6. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  7. CARBON-CONTAINING COMPOSITES BASED ON METALS

    VAGANOV V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement Among the developed technologies metal-composites production,a special place takes powder metallurgy, having fundamental differences from conventionally used foundry technologies. The main advantages of this technology are: the possibility of sensitive control, the structure and phase composition of the starting components, and ultimately the possibility of obtaining of bulk material in nanostructured state with a minimum of processing steps. The potential reinforcers metals include micro and nano-sized oxides, carbides, nitrides, whiskers. The special position is occupied with carbon nanostructures (CNS: С60 fullerenes, single-layer and multi-layer nanotubes, onions (spherical "bulbs", nano-diamonds and graphite,their properties are being intensively studied in recent years. These objects have a high thermal and electrical conductivity values, superelasticity, and have a strength approximate to the theoretical value, which can provide an obtaining composite nanomaterial with a unique set of physical and mechanical properties. In creation of a metal matrix composite nanomaterials (CM, reinforced by various CNS, a special attention should be given to mechanical activation processes (MA already at the stage of preparation of the starting components affecting the structure, phase composition and properties of aluminum-matrix composites. Purpose. To investigate the influence of mechanical activation on the structure and phase composition of aluminum-matrix composites. Conclusion. The results of the study of the structure and phase composition of the initial and mechanically activated powders and bulk-modified metal-composites are shown, depending on the type and concentration of modifying varieties CNS, regimes of MA and parameters of compaction. The study is conducted of tribological properties of Al-CNS OF nanostructured materials.

  8. Improving the tribocorrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V surface by laser surface cladding with TiNiZrO2 composite coating

    Obadele, Babatunde Abiodun; Andrews, Anthony; Mathew, Mathew T.; Olubambi, Peter Apata; Pityana, Sisa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The tribocorrosion behaviour of TiNiZrO 2 composite is investigated. • The effect of ZrO 2 on the microstructure is discussed. • The effect of the combined action of wear and chemical process is reported. • ZrO 2 addition improved the tribocorrosion property of Ti6Al4V. - Abstract: Ti6Al4V alloy was laser cladded with titanium, nickel and zirconia powders in different ratio using a 2 kW CW ytterbium laser system (YLS). The microstructures of the cladded layers were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Corrosion and tribocorrosion tests were performed on the cladded surface in 1 M H 2 SO 4 solution. The microstructure revealed the transformation from a dense dendritic structure in TiNi coating to a flower-like structure observed in TiNiZrO 2 cladded layers. There was a significant increase in surface microindentation hardness values of the cladded layers due to the present of hard phase ZrO 2 particles. The results obtained show that addition of ZrO 2 improves the corrosion resistance property of TiNi coating but decrease the tribocorrosion resistance property. The surface hardening effect induced by ZrO 2 addition, combination of high hardness of Ti 2 Ni phase could be responsible for the mechanical degradation and chemical wear under sliding conditions

  9. Influences of precursor constitution and processing speed on microstructure and wear behavior during laser clad composite coatings on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy

    Liu Xiubo; Yu Rongli

    2009-01-01

    The effects of constitution of precursor mixed powders and scan speed on microstructure and wear properties were designed and investigated during laser clad γ/Cr 7 C 3 /TiC composite coatings on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy substrates with NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 precursor mixed powders. The results indicate that both the constitution of the precursor mixed powders and the beam scan rate have remarkable influence on microstructure and attendant hardness as well as wear resistance of the formed composite coatings. The wear mechanisms of the original TiAl alloy and laser clad composite coatings were investigated. The composite coating with an optimum compromise between constitution of NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 precursor mixed powders as well as being processed under moderate scan speed exhibits the best wear resistance under dry sliding wear test conditions

  10. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Kraus, Adam

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6σ confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  11. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kraus, Adam [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6{sigma} confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  12. Dimensional, microstructural and compositional stability of metal fuels

    Solomon, A.A.; Dayananda, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The projects undertaken were to address two areas of concern for metal-fueled fast reactors: metallurgical compatibility of fuel and its fission products with the stainless steel cladding, and effects of porosity development in the fuel on fuel/cladding interactions and on sodium penetration in fuel. The following studies are reported on extensively in appendices: hot isostatic pressing of U-10Zr by coupled boundary diffusion/power law creep cavitation, liquid Na intrusion into porous U-10Zr fuel alloy by differential capillarity, interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel and selected Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel vs selected cladding steels, and interdiffusion of Ce in Fe-base alloys with Ni or Cr

  13. The analysis of irradiated nuclear fuel and cladding materials, determination of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen/metal ratio

    Jones, I.G.

    1976-02-01

    Equipment has been developed for the determination of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen/metal ratio on irradiated fuels, of carbon in stainless steel cladding materials and in graphite rich deposits, and of hydrogen in zircaloy. Carbon is determined by combustion to carbon dioxide which is collected and measured manometrically, hydrogen by vacuum extraction followed by diffusion through a palladium thimble, and oxygen/metal ratio by CO/CO 2 equilibration. A single set of equipment was devised in order to minimise the time and work involved in changing to a different set of equipment in a separate box, for each type of analysis. For each kind of analysis, alterations to the apparatus are involved but these can be carried out with the basic set in position in a shielded cell, although to do so it is necessary to obtain access via the gloves on the fibre-glass inner glove box. This requires a removal of samples emitting radiation, by transfer to an adjoining cell. A single vacuum system is employed. This is connected through a plug in the lead wall of the shielded cell, and couplings in the glove box wall to the appropriate furnaces. Carbon may be determined, in stainless steel containing 400 to 800 ppm C, with a coefficient of variation of +- 2%. On deposits containing carbon, the coefficient of variation is better than +- 1% for 2 to 30 mg of carbon. Hydrogen, at levels between 30 and 200 ppm in titanium can be determined with a coefficient of variation of better than +- 5%. Titanium has been used in lieu of zircaloy since standardised zircaloy specimens are not available. The precision for oxygen/metal ratio is estimated to be +- 0.001 Atoms oxygen. Sample weights of 200 mg are adequate for most analyses. (author)

  14. Effects of Ti and TiC ceramic powder on laser-cladded Ti-6Al-4V in situ intermetallic composite

    Ochonogor, O. F.; Meacock, C.; Abdulwahab, M.; Pityana, S.; Popoola, A. P. I.

    2012-12-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite (MMCs) was developed on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) substrate with the aim of improving the hardness and wear properties by laser cladding technique using a Rofin Sinar 4 kW Nd: YAG laser. Wear investigations were carried out with the aid of three body abrasion tester. The resultant microstructure show homogeneous distribution of TiC particles free from cracks and pores. Multiple track deposited systems with 50% overlap revealed micro-hardness increase from 357.3 HV0.1for the substrate reaching a peak as high as 922.2 HV0.1 for 60%Ti + 40%TiC and the least 665.3 HV0.1 for 80%Ti + 20%TiC MMCs. The wear resistance of the materials improved significantly, indicating a fifteen-fold wear rate reduction due to the proper distribution of ceramic particles thereby forming interstitial carbides as revealed by the X-ray diffraction spectrum.

  15. Shielding gas effect to diffusion activities of magnesium and copper on aluminum clad

    Manurung, Charles SP; Napitupulu, Richard AM

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum is the second most metal used in many application, because of its corrosion resistance. The Aluminum will be damaged in over time if it’s not maintained in good condition. That is important to give protection to the Aluminums surface. Cladding process is one of surface protection methodes, especially for metals. Aluminum clad copper (Al/Cu) or copper clad aluminum (Cu/Al) composite metals have been widely used for many years. These mature protection method and well tested clad metal systems are used industrially in a variety application. The inherent properties and behavior of both copper and aluminum combine to provide unique performance advantages. In this paper Aluminum 2024 series will be covered with Aluminum 1100 series by hot rolling process. Observations will focus on diffusion activities of Mg and Cu that not present on Aluminum 1100 series. The differences of clad material samples is the use of shielding gas during heating before hot rolling process. The metallurgical characteristics will be examined by using optical microscopy. Transition zone from the interface cannot be observed but from Energy Dispersive Spectrometry it’s found that Mg and Cu are diffused from base metal (Al 2024) to the clad metal (Al 1100). Hardness test proved that base metals hardness to interface was decrease.

  16. Piezoelectric ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials comprising piezoelectric ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the piezoelectric ceramic particulates are subjected to strain, such as the strain experienced during vibration of the material, they generate an electrical voltage that is converted into Joule heat in the surrounding metal matrix, thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The piezoelectric ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to improve the mec...

  17. Deformation of extreme viscoelastic metals and composites

    Wang, Y.C.; Ludwigson, M.; Lakes, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    The figure of merit for structural damping and damping layer applications is the product of stiffness E and damping tan δ. For most materials, even practical polymer damping layers, E tan δ is less than 0.6 GPa. We consider several methods to achieve high values of this figure of merit: high damping metals, metal matrix composites and composites containing constituents of negative stiffness. As for high damping metals, damping of polycrystalline zinc was determined and compared with InSn studied earlier. Damping of Zn is less dependent on frequency than that of InSn, so Zn is superior at high frequency. High damping and large stiffness anomalies are possible in viscoelastic composites with inclusions of negative stiffness. Negative stiffness entails a reversal of the usual directional relationship between force and displacement in deformed objects. An isolated object with negative stiffness is unstable, but an inclusion embedded in a composite matrix can be stabilized under some circumstances. Ferroelastic domains in the vicinity of a phase transition can exhibit a region of negative stiffness. Metal matrix composites containing vanadium dioxide were prepared and studied. The concentration of embedded particles was sensitive to the processing method

  18. Microstructure and wear behavior of {gamma}/Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}/TiC/CaF{sub 2} composite coating on {gamma}-TiAl intermetallic alloy prepared by Nd:YAG laser cladding

    Liu Xiubo [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, 178 Ganjiang East Road, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China)], E-mail: liubobo0828@yahoo.com.cn; Shi Shihong [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, 178 Ganjiang East Road, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Guo Jian [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Zhongyuan Institute of Technology, 41 Zhongyuan West Road, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Fu Geyan; Wang Mingdi [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, 178 Ganjiang East Road, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China)

    2009-03-15

    As a further step in obtaining high performance elevated temperature self-lubrication anti-wear composite coatings on TiAl alloy, a novel Ni-P electroless plating method was adopted to encapsulate the as-received CaF{sub 2} in the preparation of precursor NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-CaF{sub 2} mixed powders with an aim to decrease its mass loss and increase its compatibility with the metal matrix during a Nd:YAG laser cladding. The microstructure of the coating was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against the hardened 0.45% C steel ring was evaluated using a block-on-ring wear tester at room temperature. It was found that the coating had a unique microstructure consisting of primary dendrites TiC and block Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides reinforcement as well as fine isolated spherical CaF{sub 2} solid lubrication particles uniformly dispersed in the NiCrAlTi ({gamma}) matrix. The good friction-reducing and anti-wear abilities of the laser clad composite coating was suggested to the Ni-P electroless plating and the attendant reduction of mass loss of CaF{sub 2} and the increasing of it's wettability with the NiCrAlTi ({gamma}) matrix during the laser cladding process.

  19. Metal-clad switchgear with large capacity vacuum circuit breaker in two-tier arrangement for nuclear power plants

    Yoshikawa, Isao; Watanabe, Hideo; Sugitani, Shinji

    1982-01-01

    Accompanying the increase of main machinery capacity in nuclear power stations, the short-circuit capacity for 6.9 kV in-house auxiliary machinery circuit has increased, and a 63 kA circuit breaker has become necessary. Although magnetic breakers have been used as large capacity breakers so far, vacuum breakers which are more suitable for the recent environmental conditions of power stations have become employed. Hitachi Ltd. has developed the metal-clad switchboard with vacuum breakers of 7.2 kV, 1,200 to 3,000 A, and breaking current of 63 kA in two-tier arrangement. The main features of this breaker are small size, light weight, long life, labour-saving in maintenance and inspection, simple construction, easy handling, high reliability and safety. In addition, in this paper, the construction of the breaker and switchboard, aseismic property, and test results are described. The tests include the withstand voltage test, elevated temperature test, short period current test, short-circuit test, low current breaking test, continuous on-off test, on-off surge combination test and short-circuit breaking test under the condition of vacuum failure in one phase. The aseismic property is guaranteed by analyzing the vibration characteristics and the strength using computer-aided finite element method so that the performance required is satisfied. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Reducing tool wear by partial cladding of critical zones in hot form tool by laser metal deposition

    Vollmer, Robert; Sommitsch, Christof

    2017-10-01

    This paper points out a production method to reduce tool wear in hot stamping applications. Usually tool wear can be observed at locally strongly stressed areas superimposed with gliding movement between blank and tool surface. The shown solution is based on a partial laser cladding of the tool surface with a wear resistant coating to increase the lifespan of tool inserts. Preliminary studies showed good results applying a material combination of tungsten carbide particles embedded in a metallic matrix. Different Nickel based alloys welded on hot work tool steel (1.2343) were tested mechanically in the interface zone. The material with the best bonding characteristic is chosen and reinforced with spherical tungsten carbide particles in a second laser welding step. Since the machining of tungsten carbides is very elaborate a special manufacturing strategy is developed to reduce the milling effort as much as possible. On special test specimens milling tests are carried out to proof the machinability. As outlook a tool insert of a b-pillar is coated to perform real hot forming tests.

  1. Manufacture and qualification of hot roll-clad composites with nickel base cladding material for use in flue gas desulphurization plants. Final report; Herstellung und Qualifizierung warmwalzplattierter Verbundwerkstoffe mit Nickelbasisauflagen fuer den Einsatz in Rauchgasentschwefelungsanlagen. Schlussbericht

    Kirchheiner, R.; Stenner, F.

    1992-03-16

    Flue gas desulphurization plants (FGD), which have been required by law since 1983, mainly apply wet scrubbing techniques. The chemical reactions taking place in those plants lead to extremely corrosive situations. Unprotected carbon steel surfaces or organic based anticorrosive systems are extremely affected after being in operation for only a few years. NiCrM alloys applied by the chemical industry in comparable situations have proved their efficiency for decades. When such massive components are newly built in FDGs, economic aspects require the use of those NiCrMo alloys in clad form. Within the frame of this project tests included the manufacture of hot roll-clad composites comprising cladding materials of the type NiMo16Cr15W (2.4819) and NiCr21Mo14W (2.4602) on the base steel RST 37-2. Large-sized sheets (10000 x 2000 x 10+2 mm) were made by means of an optimized cladding technique. The behaviour of the cladding material in case of uniform and local corrosion exposure was examined in standard laboratory tests. An increased susceptibility to intercrystalline corrosion was not detected, according to the excellent microstructure. Further laboratory tests under simulated FGD conditions and exposure tests in FGDs in operation permitted the transfer of those positive test results to practical work. The same applies without limitation to the joint-welded state with similar filler material of clad a comparable chemical composition. With respect to their technological behaviour the new hot roll-clad composites correspond to that of solid sheets of NiCrMo alloys; therefore they are qualified for use in flue gas desulphurization plants. (orig./BBR) With 32 refs., 13 tabs., 29 figs. [Deutsch] In den seit 1983 gesetzlich vorgeschriebenen Anlagen zur Rauchgasentschwefelung (REA) werden ueberwiegend nasse Waschverfahren eingesetzt. Die in diesen Anlagen ablaufenden chemischen Reaktionen fuehren zu extrem korrosiven Bedingungen. Ungeschuetzte C-Stahl-Oberflaechen bzw

  2. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  3. Corrosion of Graphite Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    1991-02-01

    cathodic protection of G/AI MMCs resulted in overprotection 13. Overprotection resulted from a local increase in pH near cathodic sites during...34Cathodic Overprotection of SiC/6061-T6 and G/6061- T6 Aluminum Alloy Metal Matrix Composites," Scripta Metallurgica, 22 (1988) 413-418. 14. R

  4. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  5. Characteristics of Ni-Cr-Fe laser clad layers on EA4T steel

    Chen, Wenjing; Chen, Hui; Wang, Yongjing; Li, Congchen; Wang, Xiaoli

    2017-07-01

    The Ni-Cr-Fe metal powder was deposited on EA4T steel by laser cladding technology. The microstructure and chemical composition of the cladding layer were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The bonding ability between the cladding layer and the matrix was measured. The results showed that the bonding between the cladding layer and the EA4T steel was metallurgical bonding. The microstructure of cladding layer was composed of planar crystals, columnar crystals and dendrite, which consisted of Cr2Ni3, γ phase, M23C6 and Ni3B phases. When the powder feeding speed reached 4 g/min, the upper bainite occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Moreover, the tensile strength of the joint increased, while the yield strength and the ductility decreased.

  6. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development. Final report

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-01-01

    One of the key materials challenges for Generation IV reactor technology is to improve the strength and resistance to corrosion and radiation damage in the metal cladding of the fuel pins during high-temperature operation. Various candidate Gen IV designs call for increasing core temperature to improve efficiency and facilitate hydrogen production, operation with molten lead moderator to use fast neutrons. Fuel pin lifetime against swelling and fracture is a significant limit in both respects. The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite. In the context of the mission of the SBIR program, this Phase I grant has been successful. The development of a means to attain interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic has been a pacing challenge in materials science and technology for a century. It entails matching or grading of thermal expansion across the interface and attaining a graded chemical composition so that impurities do not concentrate at the boundary to create a slip layer. To date these challenges have been solved in only a modest number of pairings of compatible materials, e.g. Kovar and glass, titanium and ceramic, and aluminum and ceramic. The latter two cases have given rise to the only presently available MMC materials, developed for aerospace applications. Those materials have been possible because the matrix metal is highly reactive at elevated temperature so that graded composition and intimate bonding happens naturally at the fiber-matrix interface. For metals that are not highly reactive at processing temperature, however, successful bonding is much more difficult. Recent success has been made with copper MMCs for cooling channels in first-wall designs for fusion

  7. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    Orvis, W.J.; Yee, J.H.; Fuess, D.

    1992-12-01

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with the good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high-efficiency, room temperature gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, the authors have procured and tested a commercial device with operating characteristics similar to those of a single layer of the composite device. They have modeled the radiation transport in a multi-layered device, to verify the initial calculations of layer thickness and composition. They have modeled the electrostatic field in different device designs to locate and remove high-field regions that can cause device breakdown. They have fabricated 14 single layer prototypes

  8. Effect of Y2O3 Content on Microstructure of Gradient Bioceramic Composite Coating Produced by Wide-Band Laser Cladding

    Liu Qibin; Zou Jianglong; Zheng Min; Dong Chuang

    2005-01-01

    To eliminate thermal stress and cracks in the process of laser cladding, a kind of bioceramic coating with gradient compositional design was prepared on the surface of Ti alloy by using wide-band laser cladding. And effect of Y2O3 content on gradient bioceramic composite coating was studied. The experimental results indicate that adding rare earth can refine grain. Different rare earth contents affect formation of HA and β-TCP in bioceramic coating. When the content of rare earth ranges from 0.4% to 0.6%, the active extent of rare earth in synthesizing HA and β-TCP is the best, which indicates that "monosodium glutamate" effect of rare earth plays a dominant role. However, when rare earth content is up to 0.8%, the amount of synthesizing HA and β-TCP in coating conversely goes down, which demonstrates that rare earth gradually losts its catalysis in manufacturing HA and β-TCP.

  9. CO2 laser cladding of VERSAlloyTM on carbon steel with powder feeding

    Kim, Jae-Do; Kweon, Jin-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Laser cladding processing with metal powder feeding has been experimented on carbon steel with VERSAlloy TM . A special device for the metal powder feeding was designed and manufactured. By adopting proper cladding parameters, good clad layers and sound metallurgical bonding with the base metal were obtained. Analysis indicates that the micro hardness of clad layer and the heat-affected zone increased with increasing of cladding speed. The experimental results showed that VERSAlloy TM cladded well with carbon steel

  10. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  11. Application of YAG laser cladding to the flange seating surface

    Nakanishi, Koki; Ninomiya, Kazuyuki; Nezaki, Koji

    1999-01-01

    Stainless cladding on carbon steel is usually conducted by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) or gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). YAG ( Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet) laser welding is superior to these methods of welding in the following respects : (1) The heat affected zone (HAZ) is narrower and there is less distortion. (2) YAG laser cladding has the required chemical compositions, even with possibly fewer welding layers under controlled dilution. (3) Greater welding speed. YAG laser cladding application to vessel flange seating surfaces was examined in this study and the results are discussed. The following objectives were carried out : (1) Determination of welding conditions for satisfactory cladding layers and (2) whether cladding would be adequately possible at a cornered section of a stair-like plate, assuming actual flange shape. (3) Measurement of welding distortion and heat affected zone in carbon steel. The welding conditions for producing no-crack deposit with low dilution in carbon steel were clarified and welding by which cladding at cornered section would be possible was achieved. welding distortion by YAG laser was found less than with GTAW and HAZ made by first layer welding could be tempered appropriately by second layer welding. (author)

  12. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    Wang, Hsing-Lin [Los Alamos, NM; Jeon, Sea Ho [Dracut, MA; Mack, Nathan H [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-08-02

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  13. Microstructure and properties of TiB2-TiB reinforced titanium matrix composite coating by laser cladding

    Lin, Yinghua; Yao, Jianhua; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang; Wang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    TiB2 particle and TiB short fiber reinforced titanium matrix composite coatings were prepared utilizing in situ synthesized technique by laser cladding on the surface of Ti6Al4V alloy. Through the experiment, it was found that the surface of the single-track coatings appeared in the depression, but it can be improved by laser track overlapping. With the increase of laser power density, the amount of TiB short fiber was increased, and the distribution of TiB2 and TiB became more uniform from the top to bottom. The micro-hardness of TiB2/TiB coating showed a gradient decreasing trend, and the average micro-hardness of the coatings was two-fold higher than that of the substrate. Due to the strengthening effect of TiB2 particle and TiB short fiber, the wear volume loss of the center of the coating was approximately 30% less than that of the Ti-6Al-4V substrate, and the wear mechanism of the coating was mild fatigue particle detachment.

  14. Microstructure of a Ni Matrix Composite Coating Reinforced by In-situ TiC Particles Using Plasma Cladding

    WUYu-ping; WANGZe-hua; LINPing-hua

    2004-01-01

    Plasma cladding process was used to prepare the TiC/Ni composite coating on the mild steel substrates. The TiC particles were synthesized in-situ. Microstructure and properties of the coating were investigated by optical microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, SEM, TEM and microhardness tester. The results show that the interface between the coating and the substrate is metallurgically bonded. The coating was uniform and almost defect-free when [Ti+C] varied from 10% to 20% after ball milling. The microstructure of the coating is mainly composed of γ-Ni dendrite, interdendritic eutectic (γ-Ni austenite, M23C6 and CrB) and TiC particles. Most of the TiC particles are spherical and a small fraction is blocky in size of 1-2μm. The TiC particles are smaller at the bottom than near the top of the coating. The coating has a gradient microstructure and a highest hardness of 1000Hv0.1.

  15. Process and a device for manufacturing a composite building panel for use in a building structure cladding system

    Tetu, B

    1991-06-11

    A process and device are disclosed for manufacturing a composite panel used for cladding a building. The panel comprises a facing layer made from a plurality of facing elements, such as brick slices, retained in a spaced-apart relationship, and magnetically attractible particulate material disposed between the facing elements to imitate mortar. A rigid backing layer is provided, spaced from the spacing layer, and the space between the facing and the backing layers is filled with an insulation/bonding layer, made of urethane foam. The device for manufacturing the panel comprises a facing element holder in the form of a structure with a plurality of recesses for receiving facing elements, also including spacers between the recesses in order to retain the facing elements in a spaced-apart relationship. Ceramic magnets are provided on the spacers for temporarily retaining the particulate material against gravity until the insulation/bonding layer is built which retains all the panel elements together. The invention enables manufacture of non-planar panels, such as those used on corners of buildings, thereby eliminating the need for a corner joint. 9 figs.

  16. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  17. Conditioning of cladding waste by press compaction and encapsulation in low-melting metal alloys

    Broothaerts, J.; Casteels, F.; Daniels, A.; De Regge, P.; Huys, D.; Leurs, A.

    1985-01-01

    The wetting of waste components by lead- and zinc-based alloys has been examined. The lead-based metals, either low or high alloyed, did not achieve acceptable wetting of fresh or oxidized zircaloy surfaces in the temperature range of 350 0 C to 550 0 C for exposure times up to 5 hours. The corrosion resistance of candidate embedment alloys on the basis of lead and zinc has been examined in two synthetic interstitial clay-waters, in direct contact with the clay, in a synthetic Asse brine solution and in contact with wet salt deposits. A unit compaction and embedment of active hulls at the scale of 50 to 100 g has been constructed and installed in a shielded cell. The compaction of irradiated hulls necessitates the use of slightly higher pressures to achieve the densification factor reached for inactive zircaloy. Batches of zircaloy and of stainless steel hulls have been compacted and embedded in lead alloys for leaching experiments using the natural water present in the Boom clay geological formation. A 3 meganewton compaction press has been installed in a mock-up shielded facility and its operation and maintenance by remote handling with telemanipulators has been studied

  18. Biomimetic Composite-Metal Hip Resurfacing Implant

    Habiba Bougherara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip resurfacing technique is a conservative arthroplasty used in the young patient in which the femoral head is reshaped to accept metal cap with small guide stem. In the present investigation, a hybrid composite-metal resurfacing implant is proposed. The cup is made of carbon fiber/polyamide 12 (CF/PA12 covered with a thin layer of cobalt chrome (Co-Cr. Finite element (FE method was applied to analyze and compare the biomechanical performances of the hybrid hip resurfacing (HHR and the conventional Birmingham (BHR. Results of the finite element analysis showed that the composite implant leads to an increase in stresses in the cancellous bone by more than 15% than BHR, indicating a lower potential for stress shielding and bone fracture and higher potential for bone apposition with the HHR.

  19. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  20. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  1. Mechanical Properties of TC4 Matrix Composites Prepared by Laser Cladding

    WANG Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the penetration performance of TC4, the direct laser deposition technology was used to prepare TC4 composite material. TA15+30% TiC powder, TA15+20%Cr3C2 powder and TA15+15%B4C powder were used as deposited materials for TC4 matrix. The micromorphology, change of hardness of the deposited coating and mechanical properties of the three composites were studied. The experimental results demonstrate that the TC4 matrix with the three kinds of materials can form a complete metallurgical bonding, and the strength of TC4-(TA15+TiC, TC4-(TA15+Cr3C2 and TC4-(TA15+B4C are higher than that of TC4 matrix materials, while the plasticity is slightly worse.

  2. Improving the tribocorrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V surface by laser surface cladding with TiNiZrO{sub 2} composite coating

    Obadele, Babatunde Abiodun, E-mail: obadele4@gmail.com [Institute for NanoEngineering Research, Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Andrews, Anthony [Institute for NanoEngineering Research, Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Materials Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi-Ghana (Ghana); Mathew, Mathew T. [Institute for NanoEngineering Research, Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Olubambi, Peter Apata [Institute for NanoEngineering Research, Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Pityana, Sisa [Institute for NanoEngineering Research, Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); National Laser Center, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • The tribocorrosion behaviour of TiNiZrO{sub 2} composite is investigated. • The effect of ZrO{sub 2} on the microstructure is discussed. • The effect of the combined action of wear and chemical process is reported. • ZrO{sub 2} addition improved the tribocorrosion property of Ti6Al4V. - Abstract: Ti6Al4V alloy was laser cladded with titanium, nickel and zirconia powders in different ratio using a 2 kW CW ytterbium laser system (YLS). The microstructures of the cladded layers were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Corrosion and tribocorrosion tests were performed on the cladded surface in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. The microstructure revealed the transformation from a dense dendritic structure in TiNi coating to a flower-like structure observed in TiNiZrO{sub 2} cladded layers. There was a significant increase in surface microindentation hardness values of the cladded layers due to the present of hard phase ZrO{sub 2} particles. The results obtained show that addition of ZrO{sub 2} improves the corrosion resistance property of TiNi coating but decrease the tribocorrosion resistance property. The surface hardening effect induced by ZrO{sub 2} addition, combination of high hardness of Ti{sub 2}Ni phase could be responsible for the mechanical degradation and chemical wear under sliding conditions.

  3. Effects of Laser Power Level on Microstructural Properties and Phase Composition of Laser-Clad Fluorapatite/Zirconia Composite Coatings on Ti6Al4V Substrates

    Chi-Sheng Chien

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA is one of the most commonly used materials for the coating of bioceramic titanium (Ti alloys. However, HA has poor mechanical properties and a low bonding strength. Accordingly, the present study replaces HA with a composite coating material consisting of fluorapatite (FA and 20 wt % yttria (3 mol % stabilized zirconia (ZrO2, 3Y-TZP. The FA/ZrO2 coatings are deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using a Nd:YAG laser cladding system with laser powers and travel speeds of 400 W/200 mm/min, 800 W/400 mm/min, and 1200 W/600 mm/min, respectively. The experimental results show that a significant inter-diffusion of the alloying elements occurs between the coating layer (CL and the transition layer (TL. Consequently, a strong metallurgical bond is formed between them. During the cladding process, the ZrO2 is completely decomposed, while the FA is partially decomposed. As a result, the CLs of all the specimens consist mainly of FA, Ca4(PO42O (TTCP, CaF2, CaZrO3, CaTiO3 and monoclinic phase ZrO2 (m-ZrO2, together with a small amount of θ-Al2O3. As the laser power is increased, CaO, CaCO3 and trace amounts of tetragonal phase ZrO2 (t-ZrO2 also appear. As the laser power increases from 400 to 800 W, the CL hardness also increases as a result of microstructural refinement and densification. However, at the highest laser power of 1200 W, the CL hardness reduces significantly due to the formation of large amounts of relatively soft CaO and CaCO3 phase.

  4. Effects of Laser Power Level on Microstructural Properties and Phase Composition of Laser-Clad Fluorapatite/Zirconia Composite Coatings on Ti6Al4V Substrates.

    Chien, Chi-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Kuo, Tsung-Yuan

    2016-05-17

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most commonly used materials for the coating of bioceramic titanium (Ti) alloys. However, HA has poor mechanical properties and a low bonding strength. Accordingly, the present study replaces HA with a composite coating material consisting of fluorapatite (FA) and 20 wt % yttria (3 mol %) stabilized zirconia (ZrO₂, 3Y-TZP). The FA/ZrO₂ coatings are deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using a Nd:YAG laser cladding system with laser powers and travel speeds of 400 W/200 mm/min, 800 W/400 mm/min, and 1200 W/600 mm/min, respectively. The experimental results show that a significant inter-diffusion of the alloying elements occurs between the coating layer (CL) and the transition layer (TL). Consequently, a strong metallurgical bond is formed between them. During the cladding process, the ZrO₂ is completely decomposed, while the FA is partially decomposed. As a result, the CLs of all the specimens consist mainly of FA, Ca₄(PO₄)₂O (TTCP), CaF₂, CaZrO₃, CaTiO₃ and monoclinic phase ZrO₂ (m-ZrO₂), together with a small amount of θ-Al₂O₃. As the laser power is increased, CaO, CaCO₃ and trace amounts of tetragonal phase ZrO₂ (t-ZrO₂) also appear. As the laser power increases from 400 to 800 W, the CL hardness also increases as a result of microstructural refinement and densification. However, at the highest laser power of 1200 W, the CL hardness reduces significantly due to the formation of large amounts of relatively soft CaO and CaCO₃ phase.

  5. Effects of Laser Power Level on Microstructural Properties and Phase Composition of Laser-Clad Fluorapatite/Zirconia Composite Coatings on Ti6Al4V Substrates

    Chien, Chi-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Kuo, Tsung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most commonly used materials for the coating of bioceramic titanium (Ti) alloys. However, HA has poor mechanical properties and a low bonding strength. Accordingly, the present study replaces HA with a composite coating material consisting of fluorapatite (FA) and 20 wt % yttria (3 mol %) stabilized zirconia (ZrO2, 3Y-TZP). The FA/ZrO2 coatings are deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using a Nd:YAG laser cladding system with laser powers and travel speeds of 400 W/200 mm/min, 800 W/400 mm/min, and 1200 W/600 mm/min, respectively. The experimental results show that a significant inter-diffusion of the alloying elements occurs between the coating layer (CL) and the transition layer (TL). Consequently, a strong metallurgical bond is formed between them. During the cladding process, the ZrO2 is completely decomposed, while the FA is partially decomposed. As a result, the CLs of all the specimens consist mainly of FA, Ca4(PO4)2O (TTCP), CaF2, CaZrO3, CaTiO3 and monoclinic phase ZrO2 (m-ZrO2), together with a small amount of θ-Al2O3. As the laser power is increased, CaO, CaCO3 and trace amounts of tetragonal phase ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) also appear. As the laser power increases from 400 to 800 W, the CL hardness also increases as a result of microstructural refinement and densification. However, at the highest laser power of 1200 W, the CL hardness reduces significantly due to the formation of large amounts of relatively soft CaO and CaCO3 phase. PMID:28773503

  6. Parametric Evaluation of SiC/SiC Composite Cladding with UO2 Fuel for LWR Applications: Fuel Rod Interactions and Impact of Nonuniform Power Profile in Fuel Rod

    Singh, G.; Sweet, R.; Brown, N. R.; Wirth, B. D.; Katoh, Y.; Terrani, K.

    2018-02-01

    SiC/SiC composites are candidates for accident tolerant fuel cladding in light water reactors. In the extreme nuclear reactor environment, SiC-based fuel cladding will be exposed to neutron damage, significant heat flux, and a corrosive environment. To ensure reliable and safe operation of accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts such as SiC-based materials, it is important to assess thermo-mechanical performance under in-reactor conditions including irradiation and realistic temperature distributions. The effect of non-uniform dimensional changes caused by neutron irradiation with spatially varying temperatures, along with the closing of the fuel-cladding gap, on the stress development in the cladding over the course of irradiation were evaluated. The effect of non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod on the mechanical performance of the cladding is also evaluated. These analyses have been performed using the BISON fuel performance modeling code and the commercial finite element analysis code Abaqus. A constitutive model is constructed and solved numerically to predict the stress distribution in the cladding under normal operating conditions. The dependence of dimensions and thermophysical properties on irradiation dose and temperature has been incorporated into the models. Initial scoping results from parametric analyses provide time varying stress distributions in the cladding as well as the interaction of fuel rod with the cladding under different conditions of initial fuel rod-cladding gap and linear heat rate. It is found that a non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod may cause significant lateral bowing in the cladding, and motivates further analysis and evaluation.

  7. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    Cass, R.B.; Ott, K.C.; Peterson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for fabricating superconducting composite wire. It comprises placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within an oxygen-porous metal tube; sealing one end of the tube; igniting the superconductive precursor admixture whereby the superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture; and cross-section reducing the tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of the superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ

  8. Reaction sintering of ceramic-metal composites

    Botta Filho, W.J.; Rodrigues, J.A.; Tomasi, R.; Pandolfelli, V.C.; Passos, J.F.S.S.; Folgueras, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction sintering experiments have been carried out in the system Al 2 O 3 -ZrAl 2 -Nb 2 O 5 with the objective of producing ceramic-metal composites of improved toughness. The sintering treatments have been done in the temperature range of 700 0 C to 1400 0 C under different conditions of vacuum and in air and argon atmospheres. The treated samples have been analysed by X-ray diffraction and analytical electron microscopy. The results are discussed in function of the degree of reaction, the development of microstructure and the densification. These results have shown that although an exchange reaction can occur to produce a composite, the control of the reaction to obtain a dense microstructure has not been possible yet. (author) [pt

  9. Multilayer cladding with hyperbolic dispersion for plasmonic waveguides

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of plasmonic waveguides with a dielectric core and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings that possess hyperbolic dispersion. The waveguides hyperbolic multilayer claddings show better performance in comparison to conventional plasmonic waveguides. © OSA 2015....

  10. Phase composition and tribological properties of Ti-Al coatings produced on pure Ti by laser cladding

    Guo Baogang; Zhou Jiansong; Zhang Shitang; Zhou Huidi; Pu Yuping; Chen Jianmin

    2007-01-01

    Ti-Al coatings with ∼14.7, 18.1, 25.2 and 29.7 at.% Al contents were fabricated on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding. The laser cladding Ti-Al coatings were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that with the increase of Al content, the diffraction peaks shifted gradually to higher 2θ values. The laser cladding Ti-Al coatings with 14.7 and 18.1 at.% Al were composed of α-Ti and α 2 -Ti 3 Al phases, while those with 25.2 and 29.7 at.% Al were composed of α 2 -Ti 3 Al phase. With the increase of Al content, the cross-sectional hardness increased, while the fracture toughness decreased. For the laser cladding Ti-Al coatings, when the Al content was ≤18.1 at.%, the wear mechanism was adhesive wear and abrasive wear; while when the Al content ≥25.2 at.%, the wear mechanism was adhesive wear, abrasive wear and microfracture. With the increase of Al content, the wear rate of laser cladding Ti-Al coatings decreased under 1 N normal load, while the wear rate firstly decreased and then increased under a normal load of 3 N. Due to its optimized combination of high hardness and high fracture toughness, the laser cladding Ti-Al coating with 18.1 at.% Al showed the best anti-wear properties at higher normal load

  11. Phase composition and tribological properties of Ti-Al coatings produced on pure Ti by laser cladding

    Guo Baogang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Jiansong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Shitang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Huidi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Pu Yuping [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Jianmin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: chenjm@lzb.ac.cn

    2007-10-15

    Ti-Al coatings with {approx}14.7, 18.1, 25.2 and 29.7 at.% Al contents were fabricated on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding. The laser cladding Ti-Al coatings were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that with the increase of Al content, the diffraction peaks shifted gradually to higher 2{theta} values. The laser cladding Ti-Al coatings with 14.7 and 18.1 at.% Al were composed of {alpha}-Ti and {alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al phases, while those with 25.2 and 29.7 at.% Al were composed of {alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al phase. With the increase of Al content, the cross-sectional hardness increased, while the fracture toughness decreased. For the laser cladding Ti-Al coatings, when the Al content was {<=}18.1 at.%, the wear mechanism was adhesive wear and abrasive wear; while when the Al content {>=}25.2 at.%, the wear mechanism was adhesive wear, abrasive wear and microfracture. With the increase of Al content, the wear rate of laser cladding Ti-Al coatings decreased under 1 N normal load, while the wear rate firstly decreased and then increased under a normal load of 3 N. Due to its optimized combination of high hardness and high fracture toughness, the laser cladding Ti-Al coating with 18.1 at.% Al showed the best anti-wear properties at higher normal load.

  12. Combined use of polymer composites and metals in engineering structures

    Hoa, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites have found many applications in the construction of light weight structures such as those in aircrafts, automobiles, sports equipment etc. This is because these materials possess high stiffness, high strength and low densities. In applications of polymer matrix composites in the light weight structures, the polymer composites are however, not used by themselves alone in most cases. Usually the polymer composites are used in conjunction with some metal components. The metal components are used either to provide means for joining the composite components or the composites are used to repair the cracked metal structures. The synergistic effect of both metals and composites can provide excellent performance with good economy. This paper presents a few applications where polymer composites are used in conjunction with metals in engineering structures. (author)

  13. Microstructure and wear behaviors of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-WS2 high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating

    Yang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Fan, Ji-Wei; He, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2012-02-01

    The high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 coating and wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2 coating were fabricated on 0Cr18Ni9 austenitic stainless steel by laser cladding. Phase constitutions and microstructures were investigated, and the tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc wear tester under dry sliding condition at room-temperature (17 °C), 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Results indicated that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2 coating consisted of Cr7C3 primary phase and γ-(Fe,Ni)/Cr7C3 eutectic colony, while the coating added with WS2 was mainly composed of Cr7C3 and (Cr,W)C carbides, with the lubricating WS2 and CrS sulfides as the minor phases. The wear tests showed that the friction coefficients of two coatings both decrease with the increasing temperature, while the both wear rates increase. The friction coefficient of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 is lower than the coating without WS2 whatever at room-temperature, 300 °C, 600 °C, but its wear rate is only lower at 300 °C. It is considered that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 composite coating has good combination of anti-wear and friction-reducing capabilities at room-temperature up to 300 °C.

  14. Performance ratio hardness characteristics polystyrene-metal composite materials

    Klepikov, V.F.; Prokhorenko, E.M.; Lytvynenko, V.V.; Zakharchenko, A.A.; Hazhmuradov, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The methods of measuring the hardness of layered polystyrene-metallic composite materials. It is proposed to use powder-like tungsten and powder-like steel as radiation-protective layer. A measurement of the hardness of composites of different composition, and given its dependence on the particle size and their form. The possibility of increasing the hardness of the composites reinforced with metallic additives. Radiation-protective characteristics were calculated for the studied species of composite materials. Influence of the quantitative composition of the metal components is studied on the change of the absorbed dose of gamma radiation

  15. Preparation of magnesium metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy process

    Satish, J.; Satish, K. G., Dr.

    2018-02-01

    Magnesium is the lightest metal used as the source for constructional alloys. Today Magnesium based metal matrix composites are widely used in aerospace, structural, oceanic and automobile applications for its light weight, low density(two thirds that of aluminium), good high temperature mechanical properties and good to excellent corrosion resistance. The reason of designing metal matrix composite is to put in the attractive attributes of metals and ceramics to the base metal. In this study magnesium metal matrix hybrid composite are developed by reinforcing pure magnesium with silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide by method of powder metallurgy. This method is less expensive and very efficient. The Hardness test was performed on the specimens prepared by powder metallurgy method. The results revealed that the micro hardness of composites was increased with the addition of silicon carbide and alumina particles in magnesium metal matrix composites.

  16. Heavy Metal Analyses and Nutritional Composition of Raw and ...

    PROF HORSFALL

    KEYWORDS: Nutritional composition, heavy metals, fresh water fishes, marine water fishes, lagoons. Introduction. Fish is an .... the flame and 90% passed out as waste. The flame ..... metals in surface water, sediments, fish and periwinkles of ...

  17. MICROSTRUCTURE AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE COATINGS PRODUCED BY LASER CLADDING OF Ti-6Al-4V WITH GRAPHITE AND SILICON MIXED POWDERS

    Y. S. TIAN; C. Z. CHEN; D. Y. WANG; Q. H. HUO; T. Q. LEI

    2005-01-01

    Composite coatings are fabricated by laser cladding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V with graphite and silicon mixed powders. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) indicate that the coatings mainly consist of pre-eutectic TiC and eutectic Ti5Si3 compounds. Test results show that the coatings exhibit a higher microhardness and a lower friction coefficient compared with the as-received sample. EPMA micrographs show that the compounds' morphology in the top zone of the coat...

  18. Effects of post-heat treatment on microstructure and properties of laser cladded composite coatings on titanium alloy substrate

    Li, G. J.; Li, J.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The composite coatings were produced on the Ti6Al4V alloy substrate by laser cladding. Subsequently, the coatings were heated at 500 °C for 1 h and 2 h and then cooled in air. Effects of post-heat treatment on microstructure, microhardness and fracture toughness of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), optical microscopy (OM). Wear resistance of the coatings was evaluated under the dry sliding reciprocating friction condition at room temperature. The results indicated that the coatings mainly consist of a certain amount of coarse white equiaxed WC particles surrounded by the white-bright W2C, a great deal of fine dark spherical TiC particles and the matrix composed of the α(Ti), Ti2Ni and TiNi phases. Effects of the post-heat treatment on phase constituents and microstructure of the coatings were almost negligible due to the low temperature. However, the post-heat treatment could decrease the residual stress and increase fracture toughness of the coatings, and fracture toughness of the coatings was improved from 2.77 MPa m1/2 to 3.80 MPa m1/2 and 4.43 MPa m1/2 with the heat treatment for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. The mutual role would contribute to the reduction in cracking susceptibility. Accompanied with the increase in fracture toughness, microhardness of the coatings was reduced slightly. The dominant wear mechanism for all the coatings was abrasive wear, characterized by micro-cutting or micro-plowing. The heat treatment could significantly decrease the average friction coefficient and reduce the fluctuation of the friction coefficient with the change in sliding time. The appropriate heat treatment time (approximately 1 h) had a minimal effect on wear mass loss and volume loss. Moreover, the improvement in fracture toughness will also be beneficial to wear resistance of the coatings under the long service.

  19. Dipole controlled metal gate with hybrid low resistivity cladding for gate-last CMOS with low Vt

    Hinkle, Christopher L.; Galatage, Rohit V.; Chapman, Richard A.; Vogel, Eric M.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Freeman, Clive M.; Wimmer, Erich; Niimi, Hiroaki; Li-Fatou, Andrei V.; Shaw, Judy B.; Chambers, James J.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, NMOS and PMOS band edge effective work function (EWF) and correspondingly low Vt are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme. For NMOS, the use of an Al cladding layer results in Vt = 0.08 V consistent with NMOS EWF = 4.15 eV. Migration of the Al cladding into the TiN and a relatively low oxygen concentration near the TiN/HfO2 interface are responsible for the low EWF. For PMOS, employing a W cladding layer along with a post-TiN anneal in an oxidizing ambient results in elevated oxygen concentration near the TiN/HfO2 interface and Vt = -0.20 V consistent with a PMOS EWF = 5.05 eV. First-principles calculations indicate N atoms displaced from the TiN during the oxidizing anneal form dipoles at the TiN/HfO2 interface that play a critical role in determining the PMOS EWF. © 2010 IEEE.

  20. Dipole controlled metal gate with hybrid low resistivity cladding for gate-last CMOS with low Vt

    Hinkle, Christopher L.

    2010-06-01

    In this contribution, NMOS and PMOS band edge effective work function (EWF) and correspondingly low Vt are demonstrated using standard fab materials and processes in a gate-last scheme. For NMOS, the use of an Al cladding layer results in Vt = 0.08 V consistent with NMOS EWF = 4.15 eV. Migration of the Al cladding into the TiN and a relatively low oxygen concentration near the TiN/HfO2 interface are responsible for the low EWF. For PMOS, employing a W cladding layer along with a post-TiN anneal in an oxidizing ambient results in elevated oxygen concentration near the TiN/HfO2 interface and Vt = -0.20 V consistent with a PMOS EWF = 5.05 eV. First-principles calculations indicate N atoms displaced from the TiN during the oxidizing anneal form dipoles at the TiN/HfO2 interface that play a critical role in determining the PMOS EWF. © 2010 IEEE.

  1. Effect of Mo on Microstructures and Wear Properties of In Situ Synthesized Ti(C,N)/Ni-Based Composite Coatings by Laser Cladding.

    Wu, Fan; Chen, Tao; Wang, Haojun; Liu, Defu

    2017-09-06

    Using Ni60 alloy, C, TiN and Mo mixed powders as the precursor materials, in situ synthesized Ti(C,N) particles reinforcing Ni-based composite coatings are produced on Ti6Al4V alloys by laser cladding. Phase constituents, microstructures and wear properties of the composite coatings with 0 wt % Mo, 4 wt % Mo and 8 wt % Mo additions are studied comparatively. Results indicate that Ti(C,N) is formed by the in situ metallurgical reaction, the (Ti,Mo)(C,N) rim phase surrounding the Ti(C,N) ceramic particle is synthesized with the addition of Mo, and the increase of Mo content is beneficial to improve the wear properties of the cladding coatings. Because of the effect of Mo, the grains are remarkably refined and a unique core-rim structure that is uniformly dispersed in the matrix appears; meanwhile, the composite coatings with Mo addition exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance due to the comprehensive action of dispersion strengthening, fine grain strengthening and solid solution strengthening.

  2. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Composite Coating by Laser Cladding Al/TiN on the Ti-6Al-4V Substrate

    Zhang, H. X.; Yu, H. J.; Chen, C. Z.

    2015-05-01

    The composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding Al/TiN pre-placed powders on Ti-6Al-4V substrate for enhancing wear resistance and hardness of the substrate. The composite coatings were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The sliding wear tests were performed by MM200 wear test machine. The hardness of the coatings was tested by HV-1000 hardness tester. After laser cladding, it was found that there was a good metallurgical bond between the coating and the substrate. The composite coatings were mainly composed of the matrix of β-Ti (Al) and the reinforcements of titanium nitride (TiN), Ti3Al, TiAl and Al3Ti. The hardness and wear resistance of the coatings on four samples were greatly improved, among which sample 4 exhibited the highest hardness and best wear resistance. The hardness of the coating on sample 4 was approximately 2.5 times of the Ti-6Al-4V substrate. And the wear resistance of sample 4 was four times of the substrate.

  3. Al-TiC in situ composite coating fabricated by low power pulsed laser cladding on AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Yang, Liuqing; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingqiao; Wei, Shouzheng; Liu, Fuqiang

    2018-03-01

    Al + (Ti + B4C) composite coating was cladded on AZ91D magnesium alloy by a low power pulsed Nd-YAG laser. The Ti+B4C mixed powder is with the ratio of Ti: B4C = 5:1, which was then mixed with Al powder by weight fraction of 10%, 15% and 20%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer and X-ray diffraction were used to study the microstructure, chemical composition and phase composition of the coating. Results showed that the coating had satisfied metallurgical bonding with the magnesium substrate. Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, Al3Ti and TiC were formed by in-situ reaction. The coatings have micro-hardness of 348HV, which is about 5-6 times higher than that of AZ91D. The wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the coatings are enhanced with the addition of the mixed powder.

  4. Synthesis and processing of composites by reactive metal penetration

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic-metal composites are being developed because their high stiffness-to weight ratios, good fracture toughness, and variable electrical and thermal properties give them advantages over more conventional materials. However, because ceramic-metal composite components presently are more expensive than monolithic materials, improvements in processing are required to reduce manufacturing costs. Reactive metal penetration is a promising new method for making ceramic- and metal-matrix composites that has the advantage of being inherently a net-shape process. This technique, once fully developed, will provide another capability for manufacturing the advanced ceramic composites that are needed for many light-weight structural and wear applications. The lower densities of these composites lead directly to energy savings in use. Near-net-shape fabrication of composite parts should lead to additional savings because costly and energy intensive grinding and machining operations are significantly reduced, and the waste generated from such finishing operations is minimized. The goals of this research program are: (1) to identify feasible compositional systems for making composites by reactive metal penetration; (2) to understand the mechanism(s) of composite formation by reactive metal penetration; and (3) to learn how to control and optimize reactive metal penetration for economical production of composites and composite coatings.

  5. Fracture toughness in metal matrix composites

    Perez Ipiña J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the fracture toughness in metal matrix composites (Duralcan reinforced with 15% of Al(20(3 and SiC are presented in this work. The application of Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics is discussed and the obtained values are compared with the ones obtained by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics. Results show that J IC derived K JC values are higher than the corresponding values obtained by direct application of the linear elastic methodology. The effect of a heat treatment on the material fracture toughness was also evaluated in which the analyzed approaches showed, not only different toughness values, but also opposite tendencies. A second comparison of the J IC and K JC values obtained in this work with toughness values reported in the literature is presented and discussed.

  6. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  7. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    The fabrication of fuel capsules with refractory metal and alloy clads used in nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers precludes the expedient dissolution of the clad in inorganic acid solutions. An experiment to measure penetration rates of acids on commonly used fuel pellet clads indicated that it is not impossible, but that it would be very difficult to dissolve the multiple cladding. This work was performed because of a suggestion that a 238 PuO 2 -powered pacemaker could be transformed into a terrorism weapon

  8. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  9. Statistical analysis of weld bead geometry in Ti6Al4V laser cladding. Comparison of central composite design and five step full factorial test plan

    Marko, Angelina [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Benjamin; Rethmeier, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK, Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Joining and Coating Technology

    2017-11-01

    The process of laser cladding has become more important during recent years because of its broad application for cladding, repair or additive manufacturing. In the field of mechanical engineering, one use is the repair of turbine blades. For high quality and reliability of the repaired components, it is necessary to adjust the weld bead geometry to the specific repair task. The bead geometry influences the metallurgical bonding and the degree of dilution as well as the formation of defects like pores or cracks. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of the different parameters on the welding bead. A valuable tool to meet this industrial challenge is the design of experiments (DoE). In this context, the user can choose between a huge number of test plans. Greater profit of information is expected by a larger test range. In order to confirm the acceptance, a five-step full factorial test plan is compared to a central composite design in this paper. Moreover, the limits of the experimental range are indicated and restrictions can be derived. As the results show, the essential effects are detected with a full factorial test plan as well as with a central composite design. Merely the effect strength could not always be specified unambiguously. On this account and in consideration of cost efficiency, the use of central compound design is recommended in industrial applications.

  10. Statistical analysis of weld bead geometry in Ti6Al4V laser cladding. Comparison of central composite design and five step full factorial test plan

    Marko, Angelina; Graf, Benjamin; Rethmeier, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The process of laser cladding has become more important during recent years because of its broad application for cladding, repair or additive manufacturing. In the field of mechanical engineering, one use is the repair of turbine blades. For high quality and reliability of the repaired components, it is necessary to adjust the weld bead geometry to the specific repair task. The bead geometry influences the metallurgical bonding and the degree of dilution as well as the formation of defects like pores or cracks. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of the different parameters on the welding bead. A valuable tool to meet this industrial challenge is the design of experiments (DoE). In this context, the user can choose between a huge number of test plans. Greater profit of information is expected by a larger test range. In order to confirm the acceptance, a five-step full factorial test plan is compared to a central composite design in this paper. Moreover, the limits of the experimental range are indicated and restrictions can be derived. As the results show, the essential effects are detected with a full factorial test plan as well as with a central composite design. Merely the effect strength could not always be specified unambiguously. On this account and in consideration of cost efficiency, the use of central compound design is recommended in industrial applications.

  11. Preparation and characteristics of CNT-metal composites

    Pityana, SL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The success in keeping carbon nanotubes (CNT) bonded to stainless steel provides a possible method for the preparation of CNT-metal composites. Alternative methods for the preparation of CNT-metal composites include hot pressing, sintering, etc...

  12. Laser cladding Ni-base composite coating on titanium alloy with pre-placed B4C+NiCoCrAlY

    Qingwu Meng; Lin Geng; Zhenzhu Zheng

    2005-01-01

    Using a CO 2 laser, a process of cladding Ni-base composite coating on Ti6Al4V with pre-placed B 4 C and NiCoCrAlY was studied. A good metallurgical bonding coating without cracks and pores was obtained in reasonable ratio of components and low energy laser process. Morphology and microstructure of the coating were analyzed with OM, XRD, SEM and EDS. It is certain that there was a reaction between B 4 C and Ti during in-situ producing TiB 2 and TiC. The Ni-base composite coating is strengthened with TiB 2 and TiC reinforcement phases. Vickers hardness tester measured that the average microhardness of the coating is HV1200 and it is 3.5 times of the Ti6Al4V substrate. The high hard coating containing several reinforcement phases greatly enhances wear resistance of titanium alloy. (orig.)

  13. Noble Metal/Ceramic Composites in Flame Processes

    Schultz, Heiko; Madler, Lutz; Strobel, Reto

    conditions influence the resulting noble metal particles size in those systems [1]. For every specific application the particle size and the metal/metal oxide interaction affect the performance of these nano-composite materials [2]. Recently, aerosol processes have been successfully used to produce platinum...

  14. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  15. Accident tolerant fuel cladding development: Promise, status, and challenges

    Terrani, Kurt A.

    2018-04-01

    The motivation for transitioning away from zirconium-based fuel cladding in light water reactors to significantly more oxidation-resistant materials, thereby enhancing safety margins during severe accidents, is laid out. A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding, and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite cladding, is offered. Technical challenges and data gaps for each of these cladding technologies are highlighted. Full development towards commercial deployment of these technologies is identified as a high priority for the nuclear industry.

  16. Nuclear prehistory influence on irradiated metallic iron phase composition

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    With application of different Moessbauer spectroscopy applications the phase composition of metallic iron after irradiation by both neutrons and charged particles were studied. Irradiation conditions, method of targets examination and phase composition of samples after irradiation were presented in tabular form. It is shown, that phase composition of irradiated metal is defined by nuclear prehistory. So, in a number of cases abnormals (stabilization of high- and low-temperature structural phases of iron at room temperature after irradiation end) were revealed

  17. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  18. Microstructure and wear resistance of laser cladded composite coatings prepared from pre-alloyed WC-NiCrMo powder with different laser spots

    Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Guolong; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Qunli; Liu, Rong

    2018-05-01

    The distribution of WC particles in laser cladded composite coatings can significantly affect the wear resistance of the coatings under aggressive environments. In this study, pre-alloyed WC-NiCrMo powder is deposited on SS316L via laser cladding with circular spot and wide-band spot, respectively. The microstructure and WC distribution of the coatings are investigated with optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The wear behavior of the coatings is investigated under dry sliding-wear test. The experimental results show that the partially dissolved WC particles are uniformly distributed in both coatings produced with circular spot and wide-band spot, respectively, and the microstructures consist of WC and M23C6 carbides and γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution matrix. However, due to Fe dilution, the two coatings have different microstructural characteristics, resulting in different hardness and wear resistance. The wide-band spot laser prepared coating shows better performance than the circular spot laser prepared coating.

  19. Synthesis and processing of composites by reactive metal penetration

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Achieving better performance in commercial products and processes often is dependent on availability of new and improved materials. Ceramic-metal composites have advantages over more conventional materials because of their high stiffness-to-weight ratios, good fracture toughness, and because their electrical and thermal properties can be varied through control of their compositions and microstructures. However, ceramic composites will be more widely used only when their costs are competitive with other materials and when designers have more confidence in their reliability. Over the past four years reactive metal penetration has been shown to be a promising technique for making ceramic and metal-matrix composites to near-net-shape with control of both composition and microstructure. It appears that, with sufficient development, reactive metal penetration could be an economical process for manufacturing many of the advanced ceramic composites that are needed for light-weight structural and wear applications for transportation and energy conversion devices. Near-net-shape fabrication of parts is a significant advantage because costly and energy intensive grinding and machining operations are substantially reduced, and the waste generated from such finishing operations is minimized. The most promising compositions to date consist of Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; thus, these composites should be of particular interest to the aluminum industry. The goals of this ceramic-metal composite research and development program are: (1) to identify compositions favorable for making composites by reactive metal penetration; (2) to understand the mechanism(s) by which these composites are formed; (3) to control and optimize the process so that composites and composite coatings can be made economically; and (4) to apply R&D results to problems of interest to the aluminum industry.

  20. Synthesis of Disintegrable Metal Composite for Oilfield Applications

    Zhang, Zhihui; Salinas, Bobby; Newman, Caleb; Xu, Zhiyue

    Lightweight metal composites were traditionally developed for weight-critical applications. Recently, significant efforts have been made to improve the corrosion performance. In this study we report the synthesis of a novel type of high-strength metal composites with enhanced corrosion rate for use in self-disintegratable tools in oil and gas wells. The composites were fabricated through a powder metallurgy procedure by consolidating reactive metal powders that were coated with nanoscale metallic and/or ceramic coatings. The interaction between the metal matrix and coating was studied using X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and electron microscopy. The composites exhibit simultaneous high strength (up to 460 MPa) and two orders of magnitude increase in the corrosion rate (i.e., 250 mg/cm2/hr) under saline water. The corrosion behavior and associated field applications are described.

  1. Laser cladding to select new glassy alloys; Uso do metodo de revestimento por laser na selecao de novas ligas vitreas

    Medrano, L.L.O.; Afonso, C.R.M.; Kiminami, C.S.; Gargarella, P., E-mail: eomedranos@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Lisboa (Portugal); Ramasco, B. [Whirlpool Latin America, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    A new experimental technique used to analyze the effect of compositional variation and cooling rate in the phase formation in a multicomponent system is the laser cladding. This work have evaluated the use of laser cladding to discover a new bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the Al-Co-Zr system. Coatings with composition variation have made by laser cladding using Al-Co-Zr alloys powders and the samples produced have been characterized by X ray diffraction, microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results did not show the composition variation as expected, because of incomplete melting during laser process. It was measured a composition variation tendency that allowed the glass forming investigation by the glass formation criterion λ+Δh{sup 1/2}. The results have showed no glass formation in the coating samples, which prove a limited capacity of Zr-Co-Al system to form glass (author)

  2. Graphene-Reinforced Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites

    Kasar, Ashish K.; Xiong, Guoping; Menezes, Pradeep L.

    2018-06-01

    Composites have tremendous applicability due to their excellent capabilities. The performance of composites mainly depends on the reinforcing material applied. Graphene is successful as an efficient reinforcing material due to its versatile as well as superior properties. Even at very low content, graphene can dramatically improve the properties of polymer and metal matrix composites. This article reviews the fabrication followed by mechanical and tribological properties of metal and polymer matrix composites filled with different kinds of graphene, including single-layer, multilayer, and functionalized graphene. Results reported to date in literature indicate that functionalized graphene or graphene oxide-polymer composites are promising materials offering significantly improved strength and frictional properties. A similar trend of improved properties has been observed in case of graphene-metal matrix composites. However, achieving higher graphene loading with uniform dispersion in metal matrix composites remains a challenge. Although graphene-reinforced composites face some challenges, such as understanding the graphene-matrix interaction or fabrication techniques, graphene-reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites have great potential for application in various fields due to their outstanding properties.

  3. A New Material Constitutive Model for Predicting Cladding Failure

    Rashid, Joe; Dunham, Robert [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Rashid, Mark [University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Machiels, Albert [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    An important issue in fuel performance and safety evaluations is the characterization of the effects of hydrides on cladding mechanical response and failure behavior. The hydride structure formed during power operation transforms the cladding into a complex multi-material composite, with through-thickness concentration profile that causes cladding ductility to vary by more than an order of magnitude between ID and OD. However, current practice of mechanical property testing treats the cladding as a homogeneous material characterized by a single stress-strain curve, regardless of its hydride morphology. Consequently, as irradiation conditions and hydrides evolution change, new material property testing is required, which results in a state of continuous need for valid material property data. A recently developed constitutive model, treats the cladding as a multi-material composite in which the metal and the hydride platelets are treated as separate material phases with their own elastic-plastic and fracture properties and interacting at their interfaces with appropriate constraint conditions between them to ensure strain and stress compatibility. An essential feature of the model is a multi-phase damage formulation that models the complex interaction between the hydride phases and the metal matrix and the coupled effect of radial and circumferential hydrides on cladding stress-strain response. This gives the model the capability of directly predicting cladding failure progression during the loading event and, as such, provides a unique tool for constructing failure criteria analytically where none could be developed by conventional material testing. Implementation of the model in a fuel behavior code provides the capability to predict in-reactor operational failures due to PCI or missing pellet surfaces (MPS) without having to rely on failure criteria. Even, a stronger motivation for use of the model is in the transportation accidents analysis of spent fuel

  4. A Comparative Study of the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Ni- or Fe- Based Composite Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Wan, M. Q.; Shi, J.; Lei, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, X.

    2018-04-01

    Ni- and Fe-based composite coatings were laser cladded on 40Cr steel to improve the surface mechanical property and corrosion resistance, respectively. The microstructure and phase composition were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The micro-hardness, tribological properties and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The results show that the thickness of both the coatings is around 0.7 mm, the Ni-based coating is mainly composed of γ-(Ni, Fe), FeNi3, Ni31Si12, Ni3B, CrB and Cr7C3, and the Fe-based coating is mainly composed of austenite and (Fe, Cr)7C3. Micro-hardness of the Ni-based composite coating is about 960 HV0.3, much higher than that of Fe-based coating (357.4 HV0.3) and the 40Cr substrate (251 HV0.3). Meanwhile, the Ni-based composite coating possesses better wear resistance than the Fe-based coating validated by the worn appearance and the wear loss. Electrochemical results suggested that Ni-based coating exhibited better corrosion resistance than the Fe-based coating. The 40Cr substrate could be well protected by the Ni-based coating.

  5. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Varela, J.A.; Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Mateo, M.P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G., E-mail: gines@udc.es

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical mapping and profiling by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of coatings produced by laser cladding. • Production of laser clads using tungsten carbide (WC) and nickel based matrix (NiCrBSi) powders. • Calibration by LIBS of hardfacing alloys with different WC concentrations. - Abstract: Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  6. Charge dynamics in conducting polyaniline–metal oxalate composites

    Unknown

    Polyaniline; metal oxalate composites; charge transport; mobile and fixed spins; VRH conduc- tion mechanism ... Al, Mn and Co on doping into Pani improve the poly- merization ... dopants on charge dynamics with EPR and other tech- niques.

  7. Nanoporous Polymer-Ceramic Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Metal Batteries

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Kambe, Yu; Lu, Yingying; Archer, Lynden A.

    2013-01-01

    A nanoporous composite material that offers the unique combination of high room-temperature ionic conductivity and high mechanical modulus is reported. When used as the separator/electrolyte in lithium batteries employing metallic lithium as anode

  8. Drilling of metal matrix composites: cutting forces and chip formation

    Songmene, V.; Balout, B.; Masounave, J.

    2002-01-01

    Particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs) are known for their low weight and their high wear resistance, but also for the difficulties encountered during their machining. New aluminium MMCs containing with both soft lubricating graphite particles and hard particles (silicon carbide or alumina) with improved machinability were developed. This study investigates the drilling of these composites as compared to non-reinforced aluminium. The microstructure of chip, the cutting forces, the shear angles and the friction at tool-chip interface are used to compare the machinability of these composites. It was found that, during drilling of this new family of composites, the feed rate, and the nature of reinforcing particles govern the cutting forces. The mathematical models established by previous researchers for predicting the cutting forces when drilling metals were validated for these composites. The reinforcing particles within the composite help for chip segmentation, making the composite more brittle and easy to shear during the cutting process. (author)

  9. Review on preparation techniques of particle reinforced metal matrix composites

    HAO Bin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the investigation status of the techniques for preparation of metal matrix composites and the research outcomes achieved recently. The mechanisms, characteristics, application ranges and levels of development of these preparation techniques are analyzed. The advantages and the disadvantages of each technique are synthetically evaluated. Lastly, the future directions of research and the prospects for the preparation techniques of metal matrix composites are forecasted.

  10. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  11. Compositions and methods of making and using metal-organic framework compositions

    Mohideen, Mohamed Infas Haja; Adil, Karim; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Bhatt, Prashant M.

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a metal-organic framework (MOF) composition comprising one or more metal ions, a plurality of organic ligands, and a solvent, wherein the one or more metal ions associate with the plurality of organic ligands sufficient to form a MOF with kag topology. Embodiments of the present disclosure further include a method of making a MOF composition comprising contacting one or more metal ions with a plurality of organic ligands in the presence of a solvent, sufficient to form a MOF with kag topology, wherein the solvent comprises water only. Embodiments of the present disclosure also describe a method of capturing chemical species from a fluid composition comprising contacting a MOF composition with kag topology and pore size of about 3.4Å to 4.8Å with a fluid composition comprising two or more chemical species and capturing one or more captured chemical species from the fluid composition.

  12. Compositions and methods of making and using metal-organic framework compositions

    Mohideen, Mohamed Infas Haja

    2017-05-04

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a metal-organic framework (MOF) composition comprising one or more metal ions, a plurality of organic ligands, and a solvent, wherein the one or more metal ions associate with the plurality of organic ligands sufficient to form a MOF with kag topology. Embodiments of the present disclosure further include a method of making a MOF composition comprising contacting one or more metal ions with a plurality of organic ligands in the presence of a solvent, sufficient to form a MOF with kag topology, wherein the solvent comprises water only. Embodiments of the present disclosure also describe a method of capturing chemical species from a fluid composition comprising contacting a MOF composition with kag topology and pore size of about 3.4Å to 4.8Å with a fluid composition comprising two or more chemical species and capturing one or more captured chemical species from the fluid composition.

  13. Microstructure and high-temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy surface by laser cladding

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongxi; Wang, Chuanqi; Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Yehua

    2010-11-01

    A high-temperature oxidation resistant TiN embedded in Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating was fabricated on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V surface by 6kW transverse-flow CO2 laser apparatus. The composition, morphology and microstructure of the laser clad TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). In order to evaluate the high-temperature oxidation resistance of the composite coatings and the titanium alloy substrate, isothermal oxidation test was performed in a conventional high-temperature resistance furnace at 600°C and 800°C respectively. The result shows that the laser clad intermetallic composite coating has a rapidly solidified fine microstructure consisting of TiN primary phase (granular-like, flake-like, and dendrites), and uniformly distributed in the Ti3Al matrix. It indicates that a physical and chemical reaction between the Ti powder and AlN powder occurred completely under the laser irradiation. In addition, the microhardness of the TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is 844HV0.2, 3.4 times higher than that of the titanium alloy substrate. The high-temperature oxidation resistance test reveals that TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating results in the better modification of high-temperature oxidation behavior than the titanium substrate. The excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance of the laser cladding layer is attributed to the formation of the reinforced phase TiN and Al2O3, TiO2 hybrid oxide. Therefore, the laser cladding TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic matrix composite coating is anticipated to be a promising oxidation resistance surface modification technique for Ti6Al4V alloy.

  14. Eddy-current testing of fatigue degradation upon contact fatigue loading of gas powder laser clad NiCrBSi-Cr3C2 composite coating

    Savrai, R. A.; Makarov, A. V.; Gorkunov, E. S.; Soboleva, N. N.; Kogan, L. Kh.; Malygina, I. Yu.; Osintseva, A. L.; Davydova, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The possibilities of the eddy-current method for testing the fatigue degradation under contact loading of gas powder laser clad NiCrBSi-Cr3C2 composite coating with 15 wt.% of Cr3C2 additive have been investigated. It is shown that the eddy-current testing of the fatigue degradation under contact loading of the NiCrBSi-15%Cr3C2 composite coating can be performed at high excitation frequencies 72-120 kHz of the eddy-current transducer. At that, the dependences of the eddy-current instrument readings on the number of loading cycles have both downward and upward branches, with the boundary between the branches being 3×105 cycles in the given loading conditions. This is caused, on the one hand, by cracking, and, on the other hand, by cohesive spalling and compaction of the composite coating, which affect oppositely the material resistivity and, correspondingly, the eddy-current instrument readings. The downward branch can be used to monitor the processes of crack formation and growth, the upward branch - to monitor the degree of cohesive spalling, while taking into account in the testing methodology an ambiguous character of the dependences of the eddy-current instrument readings on the number of loading cycles.

  15. Metal-composite adhesion based on diazonium chemistry.

    Oweis, Yara; Alageel, Omar; Kozak, Paige; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-11-01

    Composite resins do not adhere well to dental alloys. This weak bond can result in failure at the composite-metal interface in fixed dental prostheses and orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to develop a new adhesive, based on diazonium chemistry, to facilitate chemical bonding between dental alloys and composite resin. Samples of two types of dental alloys, stainless steel and cobalt chromium were primed with a diazonium layer in order to create a surface coating favorable for composite adhesion. Untreated metal samples served as controls. The surface chemical composition of the treated and untreated samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the tensile strength of the bond with composite resin was measured. The diazonium adhesive was also tested for shear bond strength between stainless steel orthodontic brackets and teeth. XPS confirmed the presence of a diazonium coating on the treated metals. The coating significantly increased the tensile and shear bond strengths by three and four folds respectively between the treated alloys and composite resin. diazonium chemistry can be used to develop composite adhesives for dental alloys. Diazonium adhesion can effectively achieve a strong chemical bond between dental alloys and composite resin. This technology can be used for composite repair of fractured crowns, for crown cementation with resin based cements, and for bracket bonding. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  17. Zinc Cadmium Selenide Cladded Quantum Dot Based Electroluminescent and Nonvolatile Memory Devices

    Al-Amody, Fuad H.

    This dissertation presents electroluminescent (EL) and nonvolatile memory devices fabricated using pseudomorphic ZnCdSe-based cladded quantum dots (QDs). These dots were grown using our own in-school built novel reactor. The EL device was fabricated on a substrate of ITO (indium tin oxide) coated glass with the quantum dots sandwiched between anode and cathode contacts with a small barrier layer on top of the QDs. The importance of these cladded dots is to increase the quantum yield of device. This device is unique as they utilize quantum dots that are pseudomorphic (nearly lattice-matched core and the shell of the dot). In the case of floating quantum dot gate nonvolatile memory, cladded ZnCdSe quantum dots are deposited on single crystalline gate insulator (ZnMgS/ZnMgSe), which is grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The control gate dielectric layer of the nonvolatile memory is Si3N4 or SiO2 and is grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The cladded dots are grown using an improved methodology of photo-assisted microwave plasma metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PMP-MOCVD) enhanced reactor. The cladding composition of the core and shell of the dots was engineered by the help of ultraviolet light which changed the incorporation of zinc (and hence composition of ZnCdSe). This makes ZnxCd1--xSe-ZnyCd1--y Se QDs to have a low composition of zinc in the core than the cladding (x

  18. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  19. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    the oxide layers are chemically bonded to graphene (Zhang ... sists of three glass chambers, one to contain the metal halide. (TiCl4, SiCl4 ... In this step, the metal halide reacts with the oxygen function- ... 1·0 g of FeCl3 were vigorously stirred in 30 ml of ethylene ... Reaction with water vapour results in hydrolysis of the un-.

  20. Hybrid Composite Structures : Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    Ahmed, T.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers

  1. Metal Matrix Composites Reinforced by Nano-Particles—A Review

    Riccardo Casati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites reinforced by nano-particles are very promising materials, suitable for a large number of applications. These composites consist of a metal matrix filled with nano-particles featuring physical and mechanical properties very different from those of the matrix. The nano-particles can improve the base material in terms of wear resistance, damping properties and mechanical strength. Different kinds of metals, predominantly Al, Mg and Cu, have been employed for the production of composites reinforced by nano-ceramic particles such as carbides, nitrides, oxides as well as carbon nanotubes. The main issue of concern for the synthesis of these materials consists in the low wettability of the reinforcement phase by the molten metal, which does not allow the synthesis by conventional casting methods. Several alternative routes have been presented in literature for the production of nano-composites. This work is aimed at reviewing the most important manufacturing techniques used for the synthesis of bulk metal matrix nanocomposites. Moreover, the strengthening mechanisms responsible for the improvement of mechanical properties of nano-reinforced metal matrix composites have been reviewed and the main potential applications of this new class of materials are envisaged.

  2. Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    Batte, G.L.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. New transparent conductive metal based on polymer composite

    Keshavarz Hedayati, Mehdi; Jamali, Mohammad [Nanochemistry and Nanoengineering, Institute for Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel (Germany); Strunkus, Thomas; Zaporochentko, Vladimir; Faupel, Franz [Multicomponent Materials, Institute for Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel (Germany); Elbahri, Mady [Nanochemistry and Nanoengineering, Institute for Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Institute of Polymer Research, Nanochemistry and Nanoengineering (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Currently great efforts are made to develop new kind of transparent conductors (TCs) to replace ITO. In this regard different materials and composites have been proposed and studied including conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), metal grids, and random networks of metallic nanowires. But so far none of them could be used as a replacing material, since either they are either fragile and brittle or their electrical conductivity is below the typical ITO. Thin metallic films due to their high electrical conductivity could be one of the best replacing materials for ITO, however their poor transparency makes their application as TCs limited. Here we design and fabricate a new polymeric composite coating which enhances the transparency of the thin metal film up to 100% relative to the initial value while having a high electrical conductivity of typical metals. Therefore our proposed device has a great potential to be used as new transparent conductor.

  4. Laser clad Ni-base alloy added nano- and micron-size CeO 2 composites

    Zhang, Shi Hong; Li, Ming Xi; Cho, Tong Yul; Yoon, Jae Hong; Lee, Chan Gyu; He, Yi Zhu

    2008-07-01

    Micron-size Ni-base alloy (NBA) powders are mixed with both 1.5 wt% (%) micron-CeO 2 (m-CeO 2) and also 1.0-3.0% nano-CeO 2 (n-CeO 2) powders. These mixtures are coated on low carbon steel (Q235) by 2.0 kW CO 2 laser cladding. The effects on microstructures, microhardness and wear resistance of the coating by the addition of m- and n-CeO 2 powders to NBA (m- and n-CeO 2/NBA) have been investigated. Addition to the primary phases of γ-Ni, Cr 23C 6 and Ni 3B of NBA coating, CeNi 3 shows up both in m- and n-CeO 2/NBA coatings and CeNi 5 appears only in n-CeO 2/NBA coating. Directional dendrite and coarse equiaxed dendrite are grown in m-CeO 2/NBA coating from interface to central zone, whereas multi-oriented dendrite and fine equiaxed dendrite growth by addition of n-CeO 2. The microhardness and wear resistance of coatings are greatly improved by CeO 2 powder addition, and compared to the addition of 1.0% and 3.0%, 1.5% n-CeO 2/NBA is the best. Hardness and wear resistance of the coating improves with decreasing CeO 2 size from micron to nano.

  5. Metal-semiconductor, composite radiation detectors

    Orvis, W.J.; Yee, J.H.; Fuess, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    In 1989, Naruse and Hatayama of Toshiba published a design for an increased efficiency x-ray detector. The design increased the efficiency of a semiconductor detector by interspersing layers of high-z metal within it. Semiconductors such as silicon make good, high-resolution radiation detectors, but they have low efficiency because they are low-z materials (z = 14). High-z metals, on the other hand, are good absorbers of high-energy photons. By interspersing high-z metal layers with semiconductor layers, Naruse and Hatayama combined the high absorption efficiency of the high-z metals with good detection capabilities of a semiconductor. This project is an attempt to use the same design to produce a high- efficiency gamma ray detector. By their nature, gamma rays require thicker metal layers to efficiently absorb them. These thicker layers change the behavior of the detector by reducing the resolution, compared to a solid state detector, and shifting the photopeak by a predictable amount. During the last year, we have modeled parts of the detector and have nearly completed a prototype device. 2 refs

  6. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs

  7. Plasma spheroidizing and cladding of powders

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    Arc and high-frequency plasmatrons are used for spheroidizing nickel and chromium-base alloy particles. Different plasma-forming medium compositions are used in the arc variant and the effect of these media on the plasma treatment product is demonstrated. For a high-frequency plasmatron, a long time of plasma contact with the powder leads to the transfer of the part of the material from the treated particles into vaporous state with subsequent condensation at the outlet from the discharge zone. Results of investigations into the formation of metal coatings on oxide and carbide particles during plasma-arc action are also presented. Representative data on the output of particles with coating are obtained and factors, providing for the optimal particle cladding conditions, are indicated

  8. Characterization of the Nonlinear Viscoelastic and Adhesive Properties of Polyurea and Characterization of Polyurea-Clad Metallic Structures

    2009-10-14

    abrasive resistance, insensitivity to solvents, and low or zero volatile organic compounds) ( Takas , 2004). These features are superior to most, if...of a glass/epoxy interface. Journal of Applied Mechanics 65(1), 25-29. Takas . T.P., 2004. 100% solids aliphatic polyurea coatings for direct-metal

  9. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  10. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  11. Phase transformation and tribological properties of Ag-MoO3 contained NiCrAlY based composite coatings fabricated by laser cladding

    Wang, Lingqian; Zhou, Jiansong; Xin, Benbin; Yu, Youjun; Ren, Shufang; Li, Zhen

    2017-08-01

    Ag-MoO3 contained NiCrAlY based composite coating was successfully prepared on GH4169 stainless steel substrate by high energy ball milling and laser cladding. The microstructure and phase transformation were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD). The tribological behavior and mechanism from room temperature to 800 °C were investigated. Results showed that MoO3 in the composite powders transformed to Mo2C reinforcement under the high energy density of laser, and a series of opposite transformation occurred during friction process. The coating showed the lowest friction coefficient and low wear rate at 600 °C and 800 °C due to the generation of Ag2MoO4 during tribo-chemical reactions and the formation of lubrication glaze on the worn surface. Ag made effective lubrication when the temperature rose up to 200 °C. The coating displayed a relatively high friction coefficient (about 0.51) at 400 °C, because though MoO3 (oxidation products of Mo2C) and Ag2MoO4 were detected on the worn surface, they could not realize effective lubrication at this temperature. Abrasive wear, adhesive wear and plastic deformation contributed to the increased friction and wear.

  12. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 1 summary report: Shear web design development

    Laakso, J. H.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept was developed for the Space Shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The boron-epoxy laminate contributes to the strength and stiffness efficiency of the basic web section. The titanium-cladding functions to protect the polymeric laminate parts from damaging environments and is chem-milled to provide reinforcement in selected areas. Detailed design drawings are presented for both boron/epoxy reinforced and all-metal shear webs. The weight saving offered is 24% relative to all-metal construction at an attractive cost per pound of weight saved, based on the detailed designs. Small scale element tests substantiate the boron/epoxy reinforced design details in critical areas. The results show that the titanium-cladding reliably reinforces the web laminate in critical edge load transfer and stiffener fastener hole areas.

  13. Composite hub/metal blade compressor rotor

    Yao, S.

    1978-01-01

    A low cost compressor rotor was designed and fabricated for a small jet engine. The rotor hub and blade keepers were compression molded with graphite epoxy. Each pair of metallic blades was held in the hub by a keeper. All keepers were locked in the hub with circumferential windings. Feasibility of fabrication was demonstrated in this program.

  14. Development and characterization of laser clad high temperature self-lubricating wear resistant composite coatings on Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    Liu, Xiu-Bo; Meng, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua; Sun, Cheng-Feng; Wang, Ming-Di; Qi, Long-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel high temperature self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating was fabricated. • Reinforced carbides as well as self-lubricating sulfides were in situ synthesized. • Microhardness of the Ti–6Al–4V substrate was significantly improved. • Friction coefficient and wear rate of the composite coating were greatly reduced. - Abstract: To enhance the wear resistance and friction-reducing capability of titanium alloy, a process of laser cladding γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC + TiWC 2 /CrS + Ti 2 CS coatings on Ti–6Al–4V alloy substrate with preplaced NiCr/Cr 3 C 2 –WS 2 mixed powders was studied. A novel coating without cracks and few pores was obtained in a proper laser processing. The composition and microstructure of the fabricated coating were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques, and tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry sliding wear test conditions at 20 °C (room-temperature), 300 °C, 600 °C, respectively. The results show that the coating has unique microstructure consisting of α-Ti, TiC, TiWC 2 , γ-NiCrAlTi, Ti 2 CS and CrS phases. Average microhardness of the composite coating is 1005 HV 0.2 , which is about 3-factor higher than that of Ti–6Al–4V substrate (360 HV 0.2 ). The friction coefficient and wear rate of the coating are greatly decreased due to the combined effects of the dominating anti-wear capabilities of reinforced TiC and TiWC 2 carbides and the CrS and Ti 2 CS sulfides which have excellent self-lubricating property

  15. Stone cladding engineering

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  16. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  17. Development of advanced claddings for suppressing the hydrogen emission in accident conditions. Development of advanced claddings for suppressing the hydrogen emission in the accident condition

    Park, Jeong-Yong; KIM, Hyun-Gil; JUNG, Yang-Il; PARK, Dong-Jun; KOO, Yang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The development of accident-tolerant fuels can be a breakthrough to help solve the challenge facing nuclear fuels. One of the goals to be reached with accident-tolerant fuels is to reduce the hydrogen emission in the accident condition by improving the high-temperature oxidation resistance of claddings. KAERI launched a new project to develop the accident-tolerant fuel claddings with the primary objective to suppress the hydrogen emission even in severe accident conditions. Two concepts are now being considered as hydrogen-suppressed cladding. In concept 1, the surface modification technique was used to improve the oxidation resistance of Zr claddings. Like in concept 2, the metal-ceramic hybrid cladding which has a ceramic composite layer between the Zr inner layer and the outer surface coating is being developed. The high-temperature steam oxidation behaviour was investigated for several candidate materials for the surface modification of Zr claddings. From the oxidation tests carried out in 1 200 deg. C steam, it was found that the high-temperature steam oxidation resistance of Cr and Si was much higher than that of zircaloy-4. Al 3 Ti-based alloys also showed extremely low-oxidation rate compared to zircaloy-4. One important part in the surface modification is to develop the surface coating technology where the optimum process needs to be established depending on the surface layer materials. Several candidate materials were coated on the Zr alloy specimens by a laser beam scanning (LBS), a plasma spray (PS) and a PS followed by LBS and subject to the high-temperature steam oxidation test. It was found that Cr and Si coating layers were effective in protecting Zr-alloys from the oxidation. The corrosion behaviour of the candidate materials in normal reactor operation condition such as 360 deg. C water will be investigated after the screening test in the high-temperature steam. The metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consisted of three major parts; a Zr liner, a

  18. Studies on the optimization of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites

    Ellis, Tim W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-01-04

    A methodology for the production of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites from hyper-eutectic copper-chromium alloys was developed. This methodology was derived from a basic study of the precipitation phenomena in these alloys encompassing evaluation of microstructural, electrical, and mechanical properties. The methodology developed produces material with a superior combination of electrical and mechanical properties compared to those presently available in commercial alloys. New and novel alloying procedures were investigated to extend the range of production methods available for these material. These studies focused on the use of High Pressure Gas Atomization and the development of new containment technologies for the liquid alloy. This allowed the production of alloys with a much more refined starting microstructure and lower contamination than available by other methods. The knowledge gained in the previous studies was used to develop two completely new families of deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. These composites are based on immissible alloys with yttrium and magnesium matrices and refractory metal reinforcement. This work extends the physical property range available in deformation processed metal metal matrix composites. Additionally, it also represents new ways to apply these metals in engineering applications.

  19. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  20. 激光熔覆TiC/FeAl原位复合涂层%In-situ TiC/FeAl Composite Coating Fabricated by Laser Cladding

    赵龙志; 杨海超; 赵明娟; 谢玉江

    2017-01-01

    用激光熔覆法制备了TiC/FeAl原位复合涂层,使用光学显微镜(OM)和扫描电镜(SEM)观察了熔覆层的微观结构,使用能谱分析仪(EDS)和X射线衍射仪(XRD)分析了涂层的化学成分和物相,研究了熔覆层的显微硬度和耐磨性.结果表明:沿着熔池深度的方向从熔池底部到熔池顶部,FeAl基体从粗大的树枝晶渐渐转变为细小的等轴晶.原位TiC越过熔池界面进入基板表层,大部分TiC颗粒存在FeA1晶粒内部,熔池顶部的TiC颗粒含量较多.沿着熔池深度的方向从涂层项部到基板,涂层的硬度呈阶梯形分布,熔池顶部涂层的硬度最高,涂层的硬度和耐磨性分别比基板高6倍和52倍.涂层的磨损机理为典型的磨粒磨损.%The in-situ TiC/FeAl composite coating was fabricated by laser cladding technology in this paper.The microstructure of the coating was characterized by metallographic microscope (OM),scanning electron microscopy(SEM).The phases in the coating were examined by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD),microhardness and wear resistance of the coating were also investigated.The results show that from the bottom to the surface of the melt pool along the depth the coarse dendrite grain is changed into fine quiaxed rosette grain.Some TiC particles going across the interface exist in the surface layer of the substrate.Most of TiC particles existing in the grains are nucleation centers during FeAl matrix solidification.The content of TiC particles in the top of the coating is much higher than that in other zone of the coating.Meanwhile,the microhardness and wear resistance of in-situ laser cladding are 5 times and 52 higher than those of substrate,respectively.And the wear mechanism of the composite coating is abrasive wear.

  1. Development of high performance cladding

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  2. Metal Oxide/Graphene Composites for Supercapacitive Electrode Materials.

    Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Baek, Seungmin; Lee, Seungyeol; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2016-04-05

    Graphene composites with metal or metal oxide nanoparticles have been extensively investigated owing to their potential applications in the fields of fuel cells, batteries, sensing, solar cells, and catalysis. Among them, much research has focused on supercapacitor applications and have come close to realization. Composites include monometal oxides of cobalt, nickel, manganese, and iron, as well as their binary and ternary oxides. In addition, their morphological control and hybrid systems of carbon nanotubes have also been investigated. This review presents the current trends in research on metal oxide/graphene composites for supercapacitors. Furthermore, methods are suggested to improve the properties of electrochemical capacitor electrodes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...... of transversely staggered fibres is here modelled by using an axisymmetric cell model analysis. First the critical stress level is determined for a cavitation instability in an infinite solid made of the Al matrix material. By studying composites with different distributions and aspect ratios of the fibres...

  4. Improvement technique of sensitized HAZ by GTAW cladding applied to a BWR power plant

    Tujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasumasa; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Kurosawa, Kouichi; Chiba, Isao; Nomura, Keiichi.

    1995-01-01

    A SCC(Stress Corrosion Cracking)-resistant technique, in which the sleeve installed by expansion is melted by GTAW process without filler metal with outside water cooling, was developed. The technique was applied to ICM (In-Core Monitor) housings of a BWR power plant in 1993. The ICM housings of which materials are type 304 Stainless Steels are sensitized with high tensile residual stresses by welding to the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel). As the result, ICM housings have potential of SCC initiation. Therefore, the improvement technique resistant to SCC was needed. The technique can improve chemical composition of the housing inside and residual stresses of the housing outside at the same time. Sensitization of the housing inner surface area is eliminated by replacing low-carbon with proper-ferrite microstructure clad. High tensile residual stresses of housing outside surface area is improved into compressive side. Compressive stresses of outside surface are induced by thermal stresses which are caused by inside cladding with outside water cooling. The clad is required to be low-carbon metal with proper ferrite and not to have the new sensitized HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) on the surface by cladding. The effect of the technique was qualified by SCC test, chemical composition check, ferrite content measurement and residual stresses measurement etc. All equipment for remote application were developed and qualified, too. The technique was successfully applied to a BWR plant after sufficient training

  5. Microstructure and wear properties of laser cladding Ti-Al-Fe-B coatings on AA2024 aluminum alloy

    Xu Jiang; Liu Wenjin; Kan Yide; Zhong Minlin

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve wear resistance of aluminum alloy, the in situ synthesized TiB 2 and Ti 3 B 4 peritectic composite particulate reinforced metal matrix composite formed on the 2024 aluminum alloy by laser cladding with a powder mixture of Fe coated Boron, Ti and Al was successfully achieved using 3 kW CW CO 2 laser. The laser cladding coating present excellent bonding with aluminum alloy substrate. The chemical composition, microstructure and phase structure of the composite clad coating were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), SEM and XRD. The typical microstructure of composite coating is composed of TiB 2 , Ti 3 B 4 , Al 3 Ti, Al 3 Fe and α-Al. The surface hardness of cladding coating is increased with the amount of added Fe coated B and Ti powder which determines the amount of TiB 2 and Ti 3 B 4 peritectic composite particulate, and obviously higher than that of substrate. The wear tests were carried out using a FALEX-6 type pin-on-disc machine. The test results show that the composite coatings with the in situ synthesized TiB 2 and Ti 3 B 4 peritectic improve wear resistance when compared with the as-received Al substrate

  6. Microstructure and wear properties of laser cladding Ti-Al-Fe-B coatings on AA2024 aluminum alloy

    Xu Jiang [Laser Processing Research Center, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)]. E-mail: xujiang73@sina.com.cn; Liu Wenjin [Laser Processing Research Center, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China); Kan Yide [Laser Processing Research Center, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhong Minlin [Laser Processing Research Center, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2006-07-01

    In order to improve wear resistance of aluminum alloy, the in situ synthesized TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4} peritectic composite particulate reinforced metal matrix composite formed on the 2024 aluminum alloy by laser cladding with a powder mixture of Fe coated Boron, Ti and Al was successfully achieved using 3 kW CW CO{sub 2} laser. The laser cladding coating present excellent bonding with aluminum alloy substrate. The chemical composition, microstructure and phase structure of the composite clad coating were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), SEM and XRD. The typical microstructure of composite coating is composed of TiB{sub 2}, Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4}, Al{sub 3}Ti, Al{sub 3}Fe and {alpha}-Al. The surface hardness of cladding coating is increased with the amount of added Fe coated B and Ti powder which determines the amount of TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4} peritectic composite particulate, and obviously higher than that of substrate. The wear tests were carried out using a FALEX-6 type pin-on-disc machine. The test results show that the composite coatings with the in situ synthesized TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4} peritectic improve wear resistance when compared with the as-received Al substrate.

  7. Characteristics of laser clad α-Ti/TiC+(Ti,W)C1-x/Ti2SC+TiS composite coatings on TA2 titanium alloy

    Zhai, Yong-Jie; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Lu, Xiao-Long; Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Yao; Ying, Li-Xia

    2017-03-01

    TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite coating with Ti2SC/TiS lubricant phases in-situ synthesized were prepared on TA2 titanium alloy by laser cladding with different powder mixtures: 40%Ti-19.5%TiC-40.5%WS2, 40%Ti-25.2%TiC-34.8%WS2, 40%Ti-29.4%TiC-30.6%WS2 (wt%). The phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness and tribological behaviors and wear mechanisms of coatings were investigated systematically. Results indicate that the main phase compositions of three coatings are all continuous matrix α-Ti, reinforced phases of (Ti,W)C1-x and TiC, lubricant phases of Ti2SC and TiS. The microhardness of the three different coatings are 927.1 HV0.5, 1007.5 HV0.5 and 1052.3 HV0.5, respectively. Compared with the TA2 titanium alloy (approximately 180 HV0.5), the microhardness of coatings have been improved dramatically. The coefficients of friction and the wear rates of those coatings are 0.41 and 30.98×10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1, 0.30 and 18.92×10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1, 0.34 and 15.98×10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively. Comparatively speaking, the coating fabricated with the powder mixtures of 40%Ti-25.2%TiC-34.8%WS2 presents superior friction reduction and anti-wear properties and the main wear mechanisms of that are slight plastic deformation and adhesive wear.

  8. Composite risers for deep-water offshore technology: Problems and prospects. 1. Metal-composite riser

    Beyle, A. I.; Gustafson, C. G.; Kulakov, V. L.; Tarnopol'skii, Yu. M.

    1997-09-01

    Prospects for the application of advanced composites in the offshore technology of oil production are considered. The use of composites in vertical pipelines-risers seems to be the most efficient. The operating loads are studied and the attendant problems are formulated. A comparative analysis of the characteristics of metal, composite, and metal-composite deep-water risers is presented. A technique is developed for designing multilayered risers, taking into account the action of internal and external pressures, gravity, and the axial tensile force created by tensioners, as well as the residual technological stresses due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion, physical-chemical shrinkage, and force winding. Numerical estimations are given for a two-layered riser with an inner metal layer of steel, titanium, or aluminum alloys and a composite layer of glass- or carbon-fiber plastics formed by circumferential winding. It is shown that the technological stresses substantially affect the characteristics of the riser.

  9. Conductive polymer/metal composites for interconnect of flexible devices

    Kawakita, Jin; Hashimoto Shinoda, Yasuo; Shuto, Takanori; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2015-06-01

    An interconnect of flexible and foldable devices based on advanced electronics requires high electrical conductivity, flexibility, adhesiveness on a plastic substrate, and efficient productivity. In this study, we investigated the applicability of a conductive polymer/metal composite to the interconnect of flexible devices. By combining an inkjet process and a photochemical reaction, micropatterns of a polypyrrole/silver composite were formed on flexible plastic substrates with an average linewidth of approximately 70 µm within 10 min. The conductivity of the composite was improved to 6.0 × 102 Ω-1·cm-1. From these results, it is expected that the conducting polymer/metal composite can be applied to the microwiring of flexible electronic devices.

  10. Cathode Composition in a Saltwater Metal-Air Battery

    William Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-air batteries consist of a solid metal anode and an oxygen cathode of ambient air, typically separated by an aqueous electrolyte. Here, simple saltwater-based models of aluminum-air and zinc-air cells are used to determine the differences between theoretical cell electric potentials and experimental electric potentials. A substantial difference is observed. It is also found that the metal cathode material is crucial to cell electric potential, despite the cathode not participating in the net reaction. Finally, the material composition of the cathode appears to have a more significant impact on cell potential than the submerged surface area of the cathode.

  11. Heavy Metal Removal by Chitosan and Chitosan Composite

    Abdel-Mohdy, F.A.; El-Sawy, S.; Ibrahim, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation grafting of diethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) on chitosan to impart ion exchange properties and to be used for the separation of metal ions from waste water, was carried out. The effect of experimental conditions such as monomer concentration and the radiation dose on grafting were studied. On using chitosan, grafted chitosan and some chitosan composites in metal ion removal they show high up-take capacity for Cu 2+ and lower uptake capacities for the other divalent metal ions used (Zn and Co). Competitive study, performed with solutions containing mixture of metal salts, showed high selectivity for Cu 2+ than the other metal ion. Limited grafting of DEAEMA polymer -containing specific functional groups-onto the chitosan backbone improves the sorption performance

  12. Metallic-fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite

    Prevost, F.; Schnedecker, G.; Boncoeur, M.

    1994-01-01

    A refractory metal wire cloth is embedded in an oxide ceramic matrix, using a plasma spraying technology, in order to elaborate composite plates. When mechanically tested, the composite fails with a pseudo-ductile fracture mode whereas the ceramic alone is originally brittle. It exhibits a higher fracture strength, and remains in the form of a single piece even when straining is important. No further heat treatment is needed after the original processing to reach these characteristics. (authors). 2 figs., 2 refs

  13. Morphological evolution of primary TiC carbide in laser clad TiC reinforced FeAl intermetallic composite coating

    陈瑶; 王华明

    2003-01-01

    The novel rapidly solidified TiC/FeAl composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding on the substrate of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel, particular emphasis has been placed on the growth morphologies of TiC carbide and its growth mechanism under a constant solidification conditions. Results show that the growth morphology of TiC carbide strongly depends upon the nucleation process and mass transportation process of TiC forming elements in laser melt pool. With increasing amount of titanium and carbon in melt pool, the growth morphology of TiC carbide changes from block-like to star-like and well-developed dendrite. As the amount of titanium and carbon increases further, TiC carbide particles are found to be irregular polyhedral block. Although the growth morphologies of TiC are various,their advancing fronts are all faceted, illustrating that TiC carbide grows by the mechanism of lateral ledge growth.

  14. Effect of heat treatment on residual stress and wear behaviors of the TiNi/Ti2Ni based laser cladding composite coatings

    Tao, Yang-Feng; Li, Jun; Lv, Ying-Hao; Hu, Lie-Feng

    2017-12-01

    The TiNi/Ti2Ni based composite coatings reinforced by TiC and TiB2 were prepared on Ti6Al4V at different circumstance temperatures (25 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, and 800 °C) by laser cladding, then were preserved for 3 h. Macromorphologies and microstructures of the coatings were examined through an optical microscope (OM), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Residual stresses along the depth direction of the coatings were measured by the nanoindentation method, and wear behaviors of the coatings were also investigated using an ultra-functional wear testing machine. Results showed that the coatings were mainly composed of TiNi/Ti2Ni as the matrix and TiC/TiB2 as the reinforcement. A small amount of Cr2Ti was formed in the coatings prepared at 400 °C and 600 °C. Besides that, Ti3Al was also observed in the coating prepared at 800 °C. The tensile stress existed in the coatings prepared at 25 °C, 400 °C and 600 °C when the coating prepared at 800 °C was regarded as the stress-free reference. The average residual stress in the surface of coating prepared at 25 °C reached the largest value of about 2.79 GPa and presented a decreasing tendency with increasing the circumstance temperature (1.03 GPa at 400 °C, 0.52 GPa at 600 °C, and 0 GPa at 800 °C). It revealed that the rise in circumstance temperature contributed to the reduction in cracking susceptibility in the laser cladding coating. However, the wear volumes of the coatings were increased with increasing the circumstance temperature (0.1912 mm3 at 25 °C, 0.2828 mm3 at 400 °C, 0.3732 mm3 at 600 °C, and 0.6073 mm3 at 800 °C) due to the weakening in strain-hardening effect and the reduction in reinforcement density. The wear mechanism of the coatings was transformed from the single brittle-debonding into the combination of micro-cutting and brittle-debonding when the circumstance temperature was changed from room temperature to

  15. Investigation on the parameter optimization and performance of laser cladding a gradient composite coating by a mixed powder of Co50 and Ni/WC on 20CrMnTi low carbon alloy steel

    Shi, Yan; Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Jia; Yuan, Zhenyu

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a gradient composite coating was manufactured on 20CrMnTi alloy steel by laser cladding. The laser power, cladding scan velocity and powder flow rate were selected as influencing factors of the orthogonal cladding experiments. The influencing factors were optimized by the comprehensive analysis of Taguchi OA and TOPSIS method. The high significant parameters and the predicted results were confirmed by the ANOVA method. The macromorphology and microstructures are characterized by using laser microscope, SEM, XRD and microhardness tester. Comparison tests of wear resistance of gradient composite coating, 20CrMnTi cemented quenching sample and the 20CrMnTi sample were conducted on the friction-wear tester. The results show that the phases are γ-Co solid solution, Co3B, M23C6 and etc. The interlayers and wear-resisting layer also contain new hard phases as WC, W2C. The microhardness of the gradient coating was increased to 3 times as compared with that of the 20CrMnTi substrate. The wear resistance of the gradient composite coating and 20CrMnTi cemented quenching sample was enhanced to 36.4 and 15.9 times as compared with that of the 20CrMnTi.

  16. Technology readiness level (TRL) assessment of cladding alloys for advanced nuclear fuels

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reliable fuel claddings are essential for the safe, sustainable and economic operation of nuclear stations. This paper presents a worldwide TRL assessment of advanced claddings for Gen III and IV reactors following an extensive literature review. Claddings include austenitic, ferritic/martensitic (F/M), reduced activation (RA) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as well as advanced iron-based alloys (Kanthal alloys). Also assessed are alloys of zirconium, nickel (including Hastelloy R ), titanium, chromium, vanadium and refractory metals (Nb, Mo, Ta and W). Comparison is made with Cf/C and SiCf/SiC composites, MAX phase ceramics, cermets and TRISO fuel particle coatings. The results show in general that the higher the maximum operating temperature of the cladding, the lower the TRL. Advanced claddings were found to have lower TRLs than the corresponding fuel materials, and therefore may be the limiting factor in the deployment of advanced fuels and even possibly the entire reactor in the case of Gen IV. (authors)

  17. Bulk metallic glass matrix composite for good biocompatibility

    Hadjoub, F; Metiri, W; Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement volume fraction effects on acoustical parameters of Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 matrix composites reinforced by Mg, Ag and Cd metals have been studied via a simulation program based on acoustic microscopy technique. Moreover, acoustical parameters of human bone were compared to those of BMGs in both monolithic and reinforced case. It was found that elastic behavior of BMGs matrix composites in high reinforcement volume fraction is similar of that of human bone. This behavior leads to high biocompatibility and good transfer of stress between composite material and human system.

  18. Metal matrix composites: History, status, factors and future

    Cyriac, Ajith James

    The history, status, and future of metal matrix composites are presented by evaluating the progression of available literature through time. The trends that existed and issues that still prevail are discussed and a prediction of the future for MMCs is presented. The factors that govern the performance of metal matrix composites are also discussed. In many developed countries and in several developing countries there exists continued interest in MMCs. Researchers tried numerous combinations of matrices and reinforcements since work strictly on MMCs began in the 1950s. This led to developments for aerospace and defense applications, but resultant commercial applications were limited. The introduction of ceramic whiskers as reinforcement and the development of 'in-situ' eutectics in the 1960s aided high temperature applications in aircraft engines. In the late 1970s the automobile industries started to take MMCs seriously. In the last 20 years, MMCs evolved from laboratories to a class of materials with numerous applications and commercial markets. After the collapse of the Berlin Wall, prevailing order in the world changed drastically. This effect was evident in the progression of metal matrix composites. The internet connected the world like never before and tremendous information was available for researchers around the world. Globalization and the internet resulted in the transformation of the world to a more level playing field, and this effect is evident in the nature and source of research on metal matrix composites happening around the world.

  19. Trace Metals and Mineral Composition of Harmattan Dust Haze in ...

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... ABSTRACT: Trace metals and mineralogical composition of harmattan dust haze was carried out on samples collected at Ilorin (80 32'N, ... Sahara desert which transports the dust by wind. Junge (1979) reported that on the .... Schwela et al 2002, it was observed that road transport emission sources ...

  20. Metal matrix composites. Part 1. Types, properties, applications

    Edil da Costa, C.; Velasco Lopez, F.; Torralba Castello, M.

    2000-01-01

    An overview on the state of the art of metal matrix composites used in the automotive and aerospace industries is made. These materials usually are based on light alloys (Al, Ti and Mg) and reinforced with fibres or particles. In this review, it is presented a general scope on the different MMCs families, about their properties and their main applications. (Author) 61 refs

  1. Heavy metal and proximate composition associated with the ...

    Changes in the heavy metal content and proximate composition during the 28 day composting of cassava peels used in the cultivation of the oyster mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus strain EM-1 was studied. Significant dry weight variations of cellulose, hemicellulose and fat contents were observed from day 0 to 12.

  2. Variations in the mineral composition and heavy metals content of ...

    Babayemi

    The parts of Moringa oleifera were assessed for mineral composition and some heavy metal ... cadmium from aqueous system (Sharma et al., 2006). ... Crude extracts and essential oil from M. oleifera possess ... into some probable chemical interactions between the .... processing methods that may lead to detoxification and.

  3. Studies of heavy metal contents and microbial composition of ...

    This study investigated the heavy metal content and microbial composition of rhizosphere of Panicum maximum obtained from some auto mechanic workshops in Benin City, Nigeria. The grass was uprooted and soil sample was taken from its rhizosphere. The sample were labeled appropriately and immediately transported ...

  4. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  5. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  6. Reinforced magnesium composites by metallic particles for biomedical applications

    Vahid, Alireza; Hodgson, Peter [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Li, Yuncang, E-mail: yuncang.li@rmit.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2017-02-08

    Pure magnesium (Mg) implants have unsatisfactory mechanical properties, particularly in loadbearing applications. Particulate-reinforced Mg composites are known as promising materials to provide higher strength implants compared to unreinforced metals. In the current work biocompatible niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) particles are selected as reinforcement, and Mg-Nb and Mg-Ta composites fabricated via a powder metallurgy process associated with the ball milling technique. The effect of Nb and Ta contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg matrix was investigated. There was a uniform distribution of reinforcements in the Mg matrix with reasonable integrity and no intermetallic formation. The compressive mechanical properties of composites vary with reinforcement contents. The optimal parameters to fabricate biocompatible Mg composites and the optimal composition with appropriate strength, hardness and ductility are recommended.

  7. Method of processing spent fuel cladding tubes

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ouchi, Atsuhiro; Imahashi, Hiromichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the residual activity of spent fuel cladding tubes in a short period of time and enable safety storage with simple storage equipments. Constitution: Spent fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys discharged from a nuclear fuel reprocessing step are exposed to a grain boundary embrittling atmosphere to cause grain boundary destruction. This causes grain boundary fractures to the zirconium crystal grains as the matrix of nuclear fuels and then precipitation products precipitated to the grain boundary fractures are removed. The zirconium constituting the nuclear fuel cladding tube and other ingredient elements contained in the precipitation products are separated in this removing step and they are separately stored respectively. As a result, zirconium constituting most part of the composition of the spent nuclear fuel cladding tubes can be stored safely at a low activity level. (Takahashi, M.)

  8. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Zhang, Zhe [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); Yu, Ting [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Kovacevic, Radovan, E-mail: kovacevi@smu.edu [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V{sub 8}C{sub 7}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content

  9. Rapid, Selective Heavy Metal Removal from Water by a Metal-Organic Framework/Polydopamine Composite.

    Sun, Daniel T; Peng, Li; Reeder, Washington S; Moosavi, Seyed Mohamad; Tiana, Davide; Britt, David K; Oveisi, Emad; Queen, Wendy L

    2018-03-28

    Drinking water contamination with heavy metals, particularly lead, is a persistent problem worldwide with grave public health consequences. Existing purification methods often cannot address this problem quickly and economically. Here we report a cheap, water stable metal-organic framework/polymer composite, Fe-BTC/PDA, that exhibits rapid, selective removal of large quantities of heavy metals, such as Pb 2+ and Hg 2+ , from real world water samples. In this work, Fe-BTC is treated with dopamine, which undergoes a spontaneous polymerization to polydopamine (PDA) within its pores via the Fe 3+ open metal sites. The PDA, pinned on the internal MOF surface, gains extrinsic porosity, resulting in a composite that binds up to 1634 mg of Hg 2+ and 394 mg of Pb 2+ per gram of composite and removes more than 99.8% of these ions from a 1 ppm solution, yielding drinkable levels in seconds. Further, the composite properties are well-maintained in river and seawater samples spiked with only trace amounts of lead, illustrating unprecedented selectivity. Remarkably, no significant uptake of competing metal ions is observed even when interferents, such as Na + , are present at concentrations up to 14 000 times that of Pb 2+ . The material is further shown to be resistant to fouling when tested in high concentrations of common organic interferents, like humic acid, and is fully regenerable over many cycles.

  10. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  11. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  12. Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Aluminum Laminated Metal Composites During High Temperature Deformation

    Grishber, R

    1997-01-01

    A constitutive model for deformation of a novel laminated metal composite (LMC) which is comprised of 21 alternating layers of Al 5182 alloy and Al 6090/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC) has been proposed...

  13. An investigation into the effect of equal channel angular extrusion process on mechanical and microstructural properties of middle layer in copper clad aluminum composite

    Tolaminejad, B.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Arabi, H.; Shahmiri, M.

    2009-01-01

    Equal channel angular extrusion is a promising technique for production of ultra fine-grain materials of few hundred nanometers size. In this research, the grain refinement of aluminium strip is accelerated by sandwiching it between two copper strips and then subjecting the three strips to Equal channel angular extrusion process simultaneously. The loosely packed copper-aluminium-copper laminated billet was passed through Equal channel angular extrusion die up to 8 passes using the Bc route. Then, tensile properties and some microstructural characteristics of the aluminium layer were evaluated. The scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the microstructure. The results show that the yield stress of middle layer (Al) is increased significantly by about four times after application of Equal channel angular extrusion throughout the four consecutive passes and then it is slightly decreased when more Equal channel angular extrusion passes are applied. An ultra fine grain within the range of 500 to 600 nm was obtained in the Al layer by increasing the thickness of the copper layers. lt was observed that the reduction of grain size in the aluminium layer is nearly 55% more than that of a equal channel angular-extruded single layer aluminium billet, i.e. extruding a single aluminium strip or a billet without any clad for the same amount of deformation. This behaviour was attributed to the higher rates of dislocations interaction and cell formation and texture development during the Equal channel angular extrusion of the laminated composite compared to those of a single billet.

  14. Effects of La2O3 on microstructure and wear properties of laser clad γ/Cr7C3/TiC composite coatings on TiAl intermatallic alloy

    Liu Xiubo; Yu Rongli

    2007-01-01

    The effects of La 2 O 3 addition on the microstructure and wear properties of laser clad γ/Cr 7 C 3 /TiC composite coatings on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy substrates with NiCr-Cr 3 C 2 precursor mixed powders have been investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and block-on-ring wear tests. The responding wear mechanisms are discussed in detail. The results are compared with that for composite coating without La 2 O 3 . The comparison indicates that no evident new crystallographic phases are formed except a rapidly solidified microstructure consisting of the primary hard Cr 7 C 3 and TiC carbides and the γ/Cr 7 C 3 eutectics distributed in the tough γ nickel solid solution matrix. Good finishing coatings can be achieved under a proper amount of La 2 O 3 -addition and a suitable laser processing parameters. The additions of rare-earth oxide La 2 O 3 can refine and purify the microstructure of coatings, relatively decrease the volume fraction of primary blocky Cr 7 C 3 to Cr 7 C 3 /γ eutectics, reduce the dilution of clad material from base alloy and increase the microhardness of the coatings. When the addition of La 2 O 3 is approximately 4 wt.%, the laser clad composite coating possesses the highest hardness and toughness. The composite coating with 4 wt.%La 2 O 3 addition can result the best enhancement of wear resistance of about 30%. However, too less or excessive addition amount of La 2 O 3 have no better influence on wear resistance of the composite coating

  15. Enzyme-MOF (metal-organic framework) composites.

    Lian, Xizhen; Fang, Yu; Joseph, Elizabeth; Wang, Qi; Li, Jialuo; Banerjee, Sayan; Lollar, Christina; Wang, Xuan; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2017-06-06

    The ex vivo application of enzymes in various processes, especially via enzyme immobilization techniques, has been extensively studied in recent years in order to enhance the recyclability of enzymes, to minimize enzyme contamination in the product, and to explore novel horizons for enzymes in biomedical applications. Possessing remarkable amenability in structural design of the frameworks as well as almost unparalelled surface tunability, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have been gaining popularity as candidates for enzyme immobilization platforms. Many MOF-enzyme composites have achieved unprecedented results, far outperforming free enzymes in many aspects. This review summarizes recent developments of MOF-enzyme composites with special emphasis on preparative techniques and the synergistic effects of enzymes and MOFs. The applications of MOF-enzyme composites, primarily in transferation, catalysis and sensing, are presented as well. The enhancement of enzymatic activity of the composites over free enzymes in biologically incompatible conditions is emphasized in many cases.

  16. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material

  17. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  18. Phosphate-core silica-clad Er/Yb-doped optical fiber and cladding pumped laser.

    Egorova, O N; Semjonov, S L; Velmiskin, V V; Yatsenko, Yu P; Sverchkov, S E; Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Dianov, E M

    2014-04-07

    We present a composite optical fiber with a Er/Yb co-doped phosphate-glass core in a silica glass cladding as well as cladding pumped laser. The fabrication process, optical properties, and lasing parameters are described. The slope efficiency under 980 nm cladding pumping reached 39% with respect to the absorbed pump power and 28% with respect to the coupled pump power. Due to high doping level of the phosphate core optimal length was several times shorter than that of silica core fibers.

  19. Laser cladding technology to small diameter pipes

    Fujimagari, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Kojima, T.

    2000-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resistant material coating layers (cladding) on the austenitic stainless steel (type 304 SS) pipe inner surface was developed to prevent SCC (stress corrosion cracking) occurrence. This technology is applicable to a narrow and long distance area from operators, because of the good accessibility of the YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser beam that can be transmitted through an optical fiber. In this method a mixed paste metallic powder and heating-resistive organic solvent are firstly placed on the inner surface of a small pipe, and then a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber irradiates to the pasted area. A mixed paste will be melted and form a cladding layer subsequently. A cladding layer shows as excellent corrosion resistance property. This laser cladding (LC) method had already applied to several domestic nuclear power plants and had obtained a good reputation. This report introduces the outline of laser cladding technology, the developed equipment for practical application in the field, and the circumstance in actual plant application. (orig.)

  20. Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions using miniature specimens

    Windisch, C.F.; Henager, C.H.; Engelhard, M.H.; Bennett, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of laser Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied in a study of fuel-cladding chemical interactions on miniature oxide-coated HT-9 disks at elevated temperature. The experiments were intended as a preliminary step toward the development of a quick-screening technique for candidate alloys for cladding materials and actinide-based mixed oxide fuel mixtures. The results indicated that laser Raman spectroscopy was capable of determining the major oxides on HT-9 and how they changed in composition due to heating. However, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was necessary to identify the role of the metallic phases and provide depth resolution. Using the two techniques the kinetics of chromia growth were shown to be affected by the presence of an applied oxide coating. A single replacement reaction involving residual reduced metal within the coating was also identified

  1. Laser cladding with powder

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  2. Fabrication of metal matrix composites by powder metallurgy: A review

    Manohar, Guttikonda; Dey, Abhijit; Pandey, K. M.; Maity, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    Now a day's metal matrix components are used in may industries and it finds the applications in many fields so, to make it as better performable materials. So, the need to increase the mechanical properties of the composites is there. As seen from previous studies major problem faced by the MMC's are wetting, interface bonding between reinforcement and matrix material while they are prepared by conventional methods like stir casting, squeeze casting and other techniques which uses liquid molten metals. So many researchers adopt PM to eliminate these defects and to increase the mechanical properties of the composites. Powder metallurgy is one of the better ways to prepare composites and Nano composites. And the major problem faced by the conventional methods are uniform distribution of the reinforcement particles in the matrix alloy, many researchers tried to homogeneously dispersion of reinforcements in matrix but they find it difficult through conventional methods, among all they find ultrasonic dispersion is efficient. This review article is mainly concentrated on importance of powder metallurgy in homogeneous distribution of reinforcement in matrix by ball milling or mechanical milling and how powder metallurgy improves the mechanical properties of the composites.

  3. Improving the tribocorrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V surface by laser surface cladding with TiNiZrO2 composite coating

    Obadele, Babatunde Abiodun; Andrews, Anthony; Mathew, Mathew T.; Olubambi, Peter Apata; Pityana, Sisa

    2015-08-01

    Ti6Al4V alloy was laser cladded with titanium, nickel and zirconia powders in different ratio using a 2 kW CW ytterbium laser system (YLS). The microstructures of the cladded layers were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Corrosion and tribocorrosion tests were performed on the cladded surface in 1 M H2SO4 solution. The microstructure revealed the transformation from a dense dendritic structure in TiNi coating to a flower-like structure observed in TiNiZrO2 cladded layers. There was a significant increase in surface microindentation hardness values of the cladded layers due to the present of hard phase ZrO2 particles. The results obtained show that addition of ZrO2 improves the corrosion resistance property of TiNi coating but decrease the tribocorrosion resistance property. The surface hardening effect induced by ZrO2 addition, combination of high hardness of Ti2Ni phase could be responsible for the mechanical degradation and chemical wear under sliding conditions.

  4. Standard recommended practice for examination of fuel element cladding including the determination of the mechanical properties

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for the post-irradiation examination of fuel cladding and to achieve better correlation and interpretation of the data in the field of radiation effects. The recommended practice is applicable to metal cladding of all types of fuel elements. The tests cited are suitable for determining mechanical properties of the fuel elements cladding. Various ASTM standards and test methods are cited

  5. Method of making a composite tube to metal joint

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V.; Josephson, Marvin

    2017-11-07

    A method for making a metal to composite tube joint including selecting an elongated interior fitting constructed with an exterior barrel, reduced in exterior diameter to form a distally facing annular shoulder and then projecting still further distally to form an interior sleeve having a radially outwardly facing bonding surface. Selecting an elongated metal outer sleeve formed proximally with a collar constructed for receipt over the barrel and increased in interior diameter and projecting distally to form an exterior sleeve having a radially inwardly facing bonding surface cooperating with the first bonding surface to form an annulus receiving an extremity of a composite tube and a bond bonding the extremity of the tube to the bonding surfaces.

  6. Potential assisted fabrication of metal-ceramic composite coatings

    Knote, A.; Schindler, U.; Krueger, H.G.; Kern, H.

    2003-01-01

    A possibility to produce uniform metal-ceramic composite coatings with a high content of ceramic particles up to 60 vol.% will be presented in this study. This method includes a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electrolytic deposition by several steps. A yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (Tosoh TZ-8Y) was first electrophoretically deposited on a ferritic steel plate and then sintered by 1100 C to an open porous layer. In the next step nickel was electrodeposited into the pores of the layer. By a final annealing step it was possible to improve the bonding of the composit coating on the substrate by diffusion of the metal components. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  7. Investigation of the Mechanical Behaviour of Metal Diamond Composites

    Peroni, L; Bertarelli, A; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Bizzaro, S

    2012-01-01

    Metal-Diamond Composites (Me-CD) are a novel class of materials which has typical applications in the field of thermal management. Usually, due to the high volume fraction of diamonds inside the matrix, the mechanical behavior of such materials is quite brittle with low level of fracture stress and strain. However, with advanced innovations in the sintering processes, it is possible to obtain composite materials with a good level of strength and toughness. The great advantage of these materials is the possibility to combine the high thermal and electrical conductivity of diamonds with the strength of metals. Aim of this work is the investigation of the mechanical behavior of Me-CD from quasi-static to high strain-rate loading conditions. The temperature influence on mechanical properties is also evaluated.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3500 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi... § 888.3500 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3490 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non... § 888.3490 Knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/composite non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device...

  10. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  11. Nanoporous Polymer-Ceramic Composite Electrolytes for Lithium Metal Batteries

    Tu, Zhengyuan

    2013-09-16

    A nanoporous composite material that offers the unique combination of high room-temperature ionic conductivity and high mechanical modulus is reported. When used as the separator/electrolyte in lithium batteries employing metallic lithium as anode, the material displays unprecedented cycling stability and excellent ability to prevent premature cell failure by dendrite-induced short circuits © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Method of making sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes

    Way, J Douglas [Boulder, CO; Lusk, Mark [Golden, CO; Thoen, Paul [Littleton, CO

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports. Also disclosed are methods of making these membranes via sequential electroless plating techniques, wherein the method of making the membrane includes decomposing any organic ligands present on the substrate, reducing the palladium crystallites on the substrate to reduced palladium crystallites, depositing a film of palladium metal on the substrate and then depositing a second, gold film on the palladium film. These two metal films are then annealed at a temperature between about 200.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C. to form a sulfur-resistant, composite PdAu alloy membrane.

  13. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  14. A Study of Metal-Cement Composites with Additives

    Mironov Victor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of small-sized metal fillers (SMF provides a combination of high bulk density, increased durability and ferromagnetic properties of composite materials on the cement basis. However, the total strength of the composite can be compromised by poor adhesion of metal particles with the cement matrix. The use of versatile additives like microsilica and metakaolin is able to improve the structural integrity and mechanical properties of heavy concretes. The paper considers the results of a study using specimens of heavy concretes with SMF aiming to estimate its strength, structural features and ultrasonic parameters. It was found that the contact of SMF particles with the cement was not perfect, since the voids appeared between them and the cement matrix during the cement hydration process (exothermal reaction. Due to the border porosity, the specimens with the metal fillers have lower compressive strength, lower ultrasound velocity and increased frequency slope of attenuation. Microsilica and metakaolin additives facilitate better contact zone between the cement matrix and metal fillers.

  15. Preparation, microstructural evolution and properties of Ni–Zr intermetallic/Zr–Si ceramic reinforced composite coatings on zirconium alloy by laser cladding

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan; Ma, Qunshuang; Li, Jishuai; Li, Xinyue

    2015-10-25

    NiZr{sub 2}–ZrSi–Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}-ZrC intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coatings were in situ synthesized by laser cladding the pre-placed Ni–Cr–B–Si powder on zirconium substrate. Microstructure and phase constituents were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Microhardness tester and block-on-ring wear tester were employed to measure the hardness distribution and wear resistance of the intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coating. Results indicated that the multiphase of reinforcements includes Ni–Zr intermetallic compounds (e.g., NiZr and NiZr{sub 2}) and Zr–Si(C) ceramic phases (e.g., ZiSi, Zr{sub 5}Si{sub 4} and ZrC). Ni–Si clusters transforming to Zr–Si–Ni clusters at high temperature facilitated the forming of Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4} and during the growth of Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}, the consumption of Zr atoms at the lateral interface of liquid/Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4} resulted into developing Zr-poor zone near Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}. The microhardness and wear resistance of the coating were significantly improved by various reinforced phases in comparison to zirconium substrate. - Highlights: • NiZr{sub 2}–ZrSi–Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}-ZrC compostie coating was in-situ synthesized. • Ni–Si clusters transforming resulted into developing Zr-poor zone near Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}. • Reinforced phases significantly improve wear resistance of the coating.

  16. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current US innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery

  17. Cladding failure probability modeling for risk evaluations of fast reactors

    Mueller, C.J.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops the methodology to incorporate cladding failure data and associated modeling into risk evaluations of liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMRs). Current U.S. innovative designs for metal-fueled pool-type LMRs take advantage of inherent reactivity feedback mechanisms to limit reactor temperature increases in response to classic anticipated-transient-without-scram (ATWS) initiators. Final shutdown without reliance on engineered safety features can then be accomplished if sufficient time is available for operator intervention to terminate fission power production and/or provide auxiliary cooling prior to significant core disruption. Coherent cladding failure under the sustained elevated temperatures of ATWS events serves as one indicator of core disruption. In this paper we combine uncertainties in cladding failure data with uncertainties in calculations of ATWS cladding temperature conditions to calculate probabilities of cladding failure as a function of the time for accident recovery. (orig.)

  18. Effects of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coatings on 304 stainless steel by laser cladding

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Zhai, Yong-Jie; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Yao

    2015-11-01

    Laser clad Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating on 304 stainless steel were heat treated at 600 °C (stress relief annealing) for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Effects of the phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness, nano-indentation and tribological properties of the composite coatings with and without heat treatment had been investigated systemically. Results indicated that three coatings mainly consist of the matrix γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution, the CrB ceramic phases and the h-BN lubricating phases. The maximum microhardness of the coatings was first increased from 667.7 HV0.5 to 765.0 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 1 h, and then decreased to 698.3 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 2 h. The hardness of γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution without heat treatment and after heat treatment 1 h and 2 h were 5.09 GPa, 7.20 GPa and 3.77 GPa, respectively. Compared with the coating without heat treatment, the friction coefficients of the coating after heat treatment were decreased obviously. Effects of the heat treatment time on friction coefficient were negligible, but were significant on wear volume loss. Comparatively speaking, the laser clad self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating after heat treatment for 1 h presented the best anti-wear and friction reduction properties.

  19. Nature and morphology of the joints of metal matrix composites to metals

    Pietrzak, K.

    1997-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with short ceramic fibres (e.g. carbon or Al 2 O 3 fibres) or with other metals (such as e.g., tungsten) show numerous advantages since their properties can be programmed by modifying appropriately their composition and technology. A point of considerable importance is the possibility of joining the composites with metals or their alloys. The major problem here is to choose the appropriate joining technique, such that ensures the formation of a high quality joint resistant to the service conditions, avoids the degradation of the composite microstructure, in particular of the interface layer between the matrix and the reinforcement, and still, is not expensive (1). The paper presents the results of experiments on joining the following composites: 6061Al-based materials containing 15 vol.% of δ-alumina fibres, CuCrl-based materials containing 20 vol.% of carbon fibres (C f ), CuZrl-based materials containing 20 vol.% of C f and Cu-based materials with 10 vol.% of dispersed tungsten powder. The CuCrI-C f and CuZrl-C f composites were joined with austenitic steel, the 6061Al-Al 2 O 3 composite - with the 6061Al alloy and the CuW composite - with copper of 99.99 % purity. The material pairs were chosen so as to take into account their possible application. Several different joining techniques were examined. This paper discusses the results obtained when using diffusion bonding, vacuum brazing and gluing. The morphology and the nature of the interface layer after bonding process between the matrix and the reinforcement and between the MMCs and metal were examined by analysing the distributions of the elements, by SEM and by X-ray techniques. The degree of the degradation of the MMCs structure was taken to be described by the coefficient of the relative content of the reinforcing material RCRM = X/B, where X is the percent content of the reinforcing phase in the composite after the joining process, and B is the percent content of

  20. Soft Multifunctional Composites and Emulsions with Liquid Metals.

    Kazem, Navid; Hellebrekers, Tess; Majidi, Carmel

    2017-07-01

    Binary mixtures of liquid metal (LM) or low-melting-point alloy (LMPA) in an elastomeric or fluidic carrier medium can exhibit unique combinations of electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This emerging class of soft multifunctional composites have potential applications in wearable computing, bio-inspired robotics, and shape-programmable architectures. The dispersion phase can range from dilute droplets to connected networks that support electrical conductivity. In contrast to deterministically patterned LM microfluidics, LMPA- and LM-embedded elastomer (LMEE) composites are statistically homogenous and exhibit effective bulk properties. Eutectic Ga-In (EGaIn) and Ga-In-Sn (Galinstan) alloys are typically used due to their high conductivity, low viscosity, negligible nontoxicity, and ability to wet to nonmetallic materials. Because they are liquid-phase, these alloys can alter the electrical and thermal properties of the composite while preserving the mechanics of the surrounding medium. For composites with LMPA inclusions (e.g., Field's metal, Pb-based solder), mechanical rigidity can be actively tuned with external heating or electrical activation. This progress report, reviews recent experimental and theoretical studies of this emerging class of soft material architectures and identifies current technical challenges and opportunities for further advancement. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Method for decontaminating stainless cladding tubes

    Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To form an oxide film over the surface of stainless cladding tubes and to efficiently remove radioactive materials from the steel surface together with the oxide layer by the use of an acid water solution. Method: After the removal of water from cladding tubes that have passed through the re-processing process, an oxide film is formed on the surface of the cladding tubes by heating over 400 deg C in an oxidizing atmosphere and thereafter washed again in an acid water solution. When the cladding tubes are thus oxidized once, the stainless base metal itself is oxidized, an oxide layer of several 10 μm or more being formed thereon. In consequence, since the oxide layer is far inferior in corrosion resistance to stainless metals, a pickling liquid easily penetrates into the stainless metal through the oxide layer, thereby remarkably promoting the peeling of the layer from the base metal surface and also improving the residual radioactive material removing efficiency together. (Takahashi, M.)

  2. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Kim, C.P. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States); Brown, D.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendc second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite.

  3. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.Y.; Ustuendag, E.; Kim, C.P.; Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendritic second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite

  4. Fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites using ultrasonic consolidation process

    Kong, C.Y.; Soar, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic consolidation (UC) has been used to embed thermally sensitive and damage intolerant fibres within aluminium matrix structures using high frequency, low amplitude, mechanical vibrations. The UC process can induce plastic flow in the metal foils being bonded, to allow the embedding of fibres at typically 25% of the melting temperature of the base metal and at a fraction of the clamping force when compared to fusion processes. To date, the UC process has successfully embedded Sigma silicon carbide (SiC) fibres, shape memory alloy wires and optical fibres, which are presented in this paper. The eventual aim of this research is targeted at the fabrication of adaptive composite structures having the ability to measure external stimuli and respond by adapting their structure accordingly, through the action of embedded active and passive functional fibres within a freeform fabricated metal-matrix structure. This paper presents the fundamental studies of this research to identify embedding methods and working range for the fabrication of adaptive composite structures. The methods considered have produced embedded fibre specimens in which large amounts of plastic flow have been observed, within the matrix, as it is deformed around the fibres, resulting in fully consolidated specimens without damage to the fibres. The microscopic observation techniques and macroscopic functionality tests confirms that the UC process could be applied to the fabrication of metal-matrix composites and adaptive composites, where fusion techniques are not feasible and where a 'cold' process is necessary

  5. Assembly and Delivery of Rabbit Capsules for Irradiation of Silicon Carbide Cladding Tube Specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    heat flux configurations have been assembled, welded, evaluated, and delivered to the HFIR along with a complete quality assurance fabrication package. These rabbits contain a wide variety of specimens including monolith tubes, SiC fiber SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites, duplex specimens (inner composite, outer monolith), and specimens with a variety of metallic or ceramic coatings on the outer surface. The rabbits are targeted for insertion during HFIR cycle 475, which is scheduled for September 2017.

  6. Metal matrix composites synthesis, wear characteristics, machinability study of MMC brake drum

    Natarajan, Nanjappan; Davim, J Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This book is dedicated to composite materials, presenting different synthesis processes, composite properties and their machining behaviour. The book describes also the problems on manufacturing of metal matrix composite components. Among others, it provides procedures for manufacturing of metal matrix composites and case studies.

  7. Nondestructive characterization of metal-matrix-composites by ultrasonic technique

    Lee, Joon Hyun

    1992-01-01

    Nondestructive characterizations using ultrasonic technique were conducted systematically on Al 2 O 3 short fiber reinforced pure Al and AC8A aluminium metal-matrix composites. In order to determine the elastic moduli of metal-matrix composites(MMCs), Al 2 O 3 /AC8A composites with volume fraction of Al 2 O 3 short fiber varying up to 30% were fabricated by squeeze casting technique. Pure Al and AC8A reinforced with Al 2 O 3 short fiber were also fabricated by changing the fabrication parameters such as the applied pressure, the volume fraction of fiber. The Influences of texture change associated with change of fabrication parameters were investigated using the sophisticated LFB acoustic microscope with the frequency of 225 MHz. Ultrasonic velocities of longitudinal, shear and Rayleigh waves of the composites were measured by pulse-echo method and line-focus-beam(LBF) acoustic microscope. Ultrasonic velocities of the longitudinal, the shear and Rayleigh waves were found to correlate primarily with the volume fraction of Al 2 O 3 . The elastic constants of composites including Young's Modulus, Shear Modulus, Bulk Modulus and Poisson's ratio were determined on the basis of the longitudinal and the shear wave velocities measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo method. The Young's Modulus of the composites obtained by ultrasonic technique were slightly lower than those measured by 4-point-bend test and also showed relatively good agreements with the calculated results derived from the equal stress condition. The applicability of LFB acoustic microscope on material characterization of the MMCs was discussed on the basis of the relationships between Rayleigh wave velocity as a function of rotated angle of specimen and fabrication parameters of the MMCs.

  8. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  9. Cumulative damage fraction design approach for LMFBR metallic fuel elements

    Johnson, D.L.; Einziger, R.E.; Huchman, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    The cumulative damage fraction (CDF) analytical technique is currently being used to analyze the performance of metallic fuel elements for proliferation-resistant LMFBRs. In this technique, the fraction of the total time to rupture of the cladding is calculated as a function of the thermal, stress, and neutronic history. Cladding breach or rupture is implied by CDF = 1. Cladding wastage, caused by interactions with both the fuel and sodium coolant, is assumed to uniformly thin the cladding wall. The irradiation experience of the EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel with solution-annealed Type 316 stainless steel cladding provides an excellent data base for testing the applicability of the CDF technique to metallic fuel. The advanced metal fuels being considered for use in LMFBRs are U-15-Pu-10Zr, Th-20Pu and Th-2OU (compositions are given in weight percent). The two cladding alloys being considered are Type 316 stainless steel and a titanium-stabilized Type 316 stainless steel. Both are in the cold-worked condition. The CDF technique was applied to these fuels and claddings under the assumed steady-state operating conditions

  10. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any homogeniz......Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any...

  11. Laser cladding of Zr on Mg for improved corrosion properties

    Subramanian, R.; Sircar, S.; Mazumder, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of laser cladding of Mg-2wt%Zr, and Mg-5wt%Zr powder mixture onto magnesium. The microstructure of the laser clad was studied. From the microstructural study, the epitaxial regrowth of the clad region on the underlying substrate was observed. Martensite plates of different size were observed in transmission electron microscope for MG-2wt%Zr and Mg-5wt%Zr laser clad. The corrosion properties of the laser clad were evaluated in sea water (3.5% NaCl). The position of the laser claddings in the galvanic series of metals in sea water, the anodic polarization characteristics of the laser claddings and the protective nature and the stability of the passivating film formed have been determined. The formation of pits on the surface of the laser clad subjected to corrosion is reported. The corrosion properties of the laser claddings are compared with that of the commercially used magnesium alloy AZ91B

  12. Preparation and characterization of aluminium-silica metal matrix composite

    Mallikarjuna, G. B.; Basavaraj, E.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum alloys are widely used in aerospace and automobile industries due to their low density and good mechanical properties, better corrosion resistance and wear, low thermal coefficient of expansion as compared to conventional metals and alloys. The excellent properties of these materials and relatively low production cost make them a very attractive for a variety of applications. In this present work, Al alloy LM13-SiO2 composites were produced by stir casting method. The reinforcement SiO2 particle size used for preparation of composites are 106 µm, 150 µm, 250 µm and 355 µm with varying amount of 3 to 12 wt% in steps of 3. The prepared composite specimens were machined as per test standards. Effects of weight percentage of SiO2 particles on wear, tensile strength of Al alloy LM13-SiO2 composites have been investigated. The microstructures of the composites were studied to know the dispersion of the SiO2 particles in matrix. Experimental results shows that there is enhanced mechanical properties, when silica weighing 9% was added to the base aluminium alloy and also similar trend exists in all four different micron size of silica and also it has been observed that addition of SiO2 particles significantly improves wear resistance properties as compared with that of unreinforced matrix.

  13. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  14. Generation of metal composition gradients by means of bipolar electrodeposition

    Tisserant, Gwendoline; Fattah, Zahra; Ayela, Cédric; Roche, Jérome; Plano, Bernard; Zigah, Dodzi; Goudeau, Bertrand; Kuhn, Alexander; Bouffier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A bipolar electrochemistry approach for the preparation of surface gradients is reported. • Several metals are simultaneously deposited on a bipolar electrode. • The elemental composition and thickness of the deposit varies alongside the bipolar electrode. • The deposit affects the surface properties and exhibits a barcode feature. - Abstract: Bipolar electrochemistry is an unconventional technique that currently encounters a renewal of interest due to modern applications in the fields of analytical chemistry or materials science. The approach is particularly relevant for the preparation of asymmetric objects or surfaces such as Janus particles for example. Bipolar electrochemistry allows spatially controlled deposition of various layers from electroactive precursors, selectively at one side of a bipolar electrode. We report here the concomitant cathodic deposition of up to three different metals at the same time in a single experiment. The deposits were characterized by optical and electron microscopy imaging as well as profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. As a result, the deposited layer is composed of several areas exhibiting both a composition and a thickness gradient. Such a variation directly modifies the optical and electronic properties alongside the surface and gives access to the design of composite surfaces exhibiting a visual gradient feature.

  15. Carbon composites with metal nanoparticles for Alcohol fuel cells

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Siddhardha, R. S.; Podilla, Ramakrishna; Muthukumar, V. S.; Creager, Stephen; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-03-01

    Graphene due to its high surface area and superior conductivity has attracted wide attention from both industrial and scientific communities. We chose graphene as a substrate for metal nanoparticle deposition for fuel cell applications. There are many chemical routes for fabrication of metal-graphene composites, but they have an inherent disadvantage of low performance due to the usage of surfactants, that adsorb on their surface. Here we present a design for one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles and simultaneous deposition on graphene with laser ablation of gold strip and functionalized graphene. In this process there are two natural advantages, the nanoparticles are synthesized without any surfactants, therefore they are pristine and subsequent impregnation on graphene is linker free. These materials are well characterized with electron microscopy to find their morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis. for functionality. This gold nanoparticle decorated graphene composite has been tested for its electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols for alkaline fuel cell applications. An electrode made of this composite showed good stability for more than 200 cycles of operation and reported a low onset potential of 100 mV more negative, an important factor for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  16. Stone cladding engineering

    Camposinhos, Rui de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    .... Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements...

  17. Cladding creepdown under compression

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  18. Composite elements with superconducting ceramic materials and preparation process

    Drifford, M.; Lambard, J.

    1990-01-01

    Supraconducting ceramic powder is introduced in a ductile metal with an open porosity, then the tube is sealed at both ends and necked to form a composite element which is sintered and the ceramic becomes superconductive by gaseous diffusion. Then the composite element can be placed into a gasproof cladding [fr

  19. Mesoporous metal oxide microsphere electrode compositions and their methods of making

    Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Bi, Zhonghe; Bridges, Craig A.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2017-04-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for treated mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The compositions include microspheres with an average diameter between about 200 nanometers and about 10 micrometers and mesopores on the surface and interior of the microspheres. The methods of making include forming a mesoporous metal oxide microsphere composition and treating the mesoporous metal oxide microspheres by at least annealing in a reducing atmosphere, doping with an aliovalent element, and coating with a coating composition.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Composite Ampacity and Metallic CNT Buckypaper Conductivity

    De Groh, Henry C., III

    2016-01-01

    NASA is currently working on developing motors for hybrid electric propulsion applications in aviation. To make electric power more feasible in airplanes higher power to weight ratios are sought for electric motors. One facet to these efforts is to improve (increase) the conductivity and (lower) density of the magnet wire used in motors. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and composites containing CNT are being explored as a possible way to increase wire conductivity and lower density. Presented here are measurements of the current carrying capacity (ampacity) of a composite made from CNT and copper. The ability of CNT to improve the conductivity of such composites is hindered by the presence of semiconductive CNT (s-CNT) that exist in CNT supplies naturally, and currently, unavoidably. To solve this problem, and avoid s-CNT, various preferential growth and sorting methods are being explored. A supply of sorted 95 metallic CNT (m-CNT) was acquired in the form of thick film Buckypaper (BP) as part of this work and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, resistivity, and density measurements. The ampacity (Acm2) of the Cu-5volCNT composite was 3.8 lower than the same gauge pure Cu wire similarly tested. The lower ampacity in the composite wire is believed to be due to the presence of s-CNT in the composite and the relatively low (proper) level of longitudinal cooling employed in the test method. Although Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize CNT, a strong relation between the ratios of the primary peaks GGand the relative amounts of m-CNT and s-CNT was not observed. The average effective conductivity of the CNT in the sorted, 95 m-CNT BP was 2.5 times higher than the CNT in the similar but un-sorted BP. This is an indication that improvements in the conductivity of CNT composites can be made by the use of sorted, highly conductive m-CNT.

  1. Development of Cr Electroplated Cladding Tube for preventing Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Woo, Je Woong; Kim, Sung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuel has been selected as a candidate fuel in the SFR because of its superior thermal conductivity as well as enhanced proliferation resistance in connection with the pyroprocessing. However, metal fuel suffers eutectic reaction (Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction, FCCI) with the fuel cladding made of stainless steel at reactor operating temperature so that cladding thickness gradually reduces to endanger reactor safety. In order to mitigate FCCI, barrier concept has been proposed between the fuel and the cladding in designing fuel rod. Regarding this, KAERI has initiated barrier cladding development to prevent interdiffusion process as well as enhance the SFR fuel performance. Previous study revealed that Cr electroplating has been selected as one of the most promising options because of its technical and economic viability. This paper describes the development status of the Cr electroplating technology for the usage of fuel rod in SFR. This paper summarizes the status of Cr electroplating technology to prevent FCCI in metal fuel rod. It has been selected for the ease of practical application at the tube inner surface. Technical scoping, performance evaluation and optimization have been carried out. Application to the tube inner surface and in-pile test were conducted which revealed as effective.

  2. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  3. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, CEDENNA, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Duin, Adri C. T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  4. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel; Duin, Adri C. T. van; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  5. Tunable Optical Properties of Metal Nanoparticle Sol-Gel Composites

    Smith, David D.; Snow, Lanee A.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that the linear and non-linear optical properties of sol-gels containing metal nanoparticles are highly tunable with porosity. Moreover, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous hosts, such as aerogels, and determine rigorous bounds for the average fractional composition of each component, i.e., the porosity of the aerogel, or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Sol-gels containing noble metal nanoparticles were fabricated and a significant blue-shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was observed upon formation of an aerogel, as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping and aggregation this blue-shift does not strictly obey standard effective medium theories. Mitigation of these complications is achieved by avoiding the use of alcohol and by annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere.

  6. Characterization of hard coatings produced by laser cladding using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Varela, J. A.; Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2015-05-01

    Protective coatings with a high abrasive wear resistance can be obtained from powders by laser cladding technique, in order to extend the service life of some industrial components. In this work, laser clad layers of self-fluxing NiCrBSi alloy powder mixed with WC powder have been produced on stainless steel substrates of austenitic type (AISI 304) in a first step and then chemically characterized by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. With the suitable laser processing parameters (mainly output power, beam scan speed and flow rate) and powders mixture proportions between WC ceramics and NiCrBSi alloys, dense pore free layers have been obtained on single tracks and on large areas with overlapped tracks. The results achieved by LIBS technique and applied for the first time to the analysis of laser clads provided the chemical composition of the tungsten carbides in metal alloy matrix. Different measurement modes (multiple point analyses, depth profiles and chemical maps) have been employed, demonstrating the usefulness of LIBS technique for the characterization of laser clads based on hardfacing alloys. The behavior of hardness can be explained by LIBS maps which evidenced the partial dilution of some WC spheres in the coating.

  7. Internal friction in a new kind of metal matrix composites

    San Juan, J.; No, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new kind of metal matrix composites, based on powders of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys (SMAs) surrounded by an indium matrix, specifically designed to exhibit high mechanical damping. The damping properties have been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature between 150 and 400 K, frequency between 3 x 10 -3 and 3 Hz, and strain amplitude between 5 x 10 -6 and 10 -4 . The material exhibits, in some range of temperature, internal friction as high as 0.54. The extremely high damping is discussed in the light of the microstructure of the material, which has been characterized in parallel

  8. Tridimensional ionic polymer metal composites: optimization of the manufacturing techniques

    Bonomo, C; Brunetto, P; Fortuna, L; Graziani, S; Bottino, M; Di Pasquale, G; Pollicino, A

    2010-01-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) belong to electroactive polymers (EAPs) and have been suggested for various applications due to their light weight and to the fact that they react mechanically when stimulated by an electrical signal and vice versa. Thick IPMCs (3D-IPMCs) have been fabricated by hot pressing several Nafion ® 117 films. Additional post-processes (more cycles of Pt electroless plating and dispersing agents) have been applied to improve the 3D-IPMC performance. The electromechanical response of 3D-IPMCs has been examined by applying electrical signals and measuring the displacement and blocking force produced

  9. Baseplates in metallic matrix composites for power and microwave applications

    Massiot, P.

    1997-01-01

    Baseplates for microelectronic devices in fields where transform environments are encountered, such as automotive or airborne must have some fundamental characteristics such as: high thermal conductivity, low density, good mechanical properties and a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nearly equal to the microelectronic substrates and the components installed on the baseplates. Metallic matrix composites are very good candidates because they perfectly answer to those requirements. In this presentation, with some examples of electronic devices in power and microwave applications we will show the big interest to use this kind of material. (author)

  10. Metal matrix composite fabrication processes for high performance aerospace structures

    Ponzi, C.

    A survey is conducted of extant methods of metal matrix composite (MMC) production in order to serve as a basis for prospective MMC users' selection of a matrix/reinforcement combination, cost-effective primary fabrication methods, and secondary fabrication techniques for the achievement of desired performance levels. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of structural fittings, control-surface connecting rods, hypersonic aircraft air inlet ramps, helicopter swash plates, and turbine rotor disks. Methods for technical and cost analysis modeling useful in process optimization are noted.

  11. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings.

  12. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings

  13. Ionic polymer metal composites with polypyrrole-silver electrodes

    Cellini, F.; Grillo, A.; Porfiri, M.

    2015-03-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a class of soft active materials that are finding increasing application in robotics, environmental sensing, and energy harvesting. In this letter, we demonstrate the fabrication of IPMCs via in-situ photoinduced polymerization of polypyrrole-silver electrodes on an ionomeric membrane. The composition, morphology, and sheet resistance of the electrodes are extensively characterized through a range of experimental techniques. We experimentally investigate IPMC electrochemistry through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and we propose a modified Randle's model to interpret the impedance spectrum. Finally, we demonstrate in-air dynamic actuation and sensing and assess IPMC performance against more established fabrication methods. Given the simplicity of the process and the short time required for the formation of the electrodes, we envision the application of our technique in the development of a rapid prototyping technology for IPMCs.

  14. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    Stephens, J.R.; Petrasek, D.W.; Titran, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other United States missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the space shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conversion system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide base line information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Basic research on the tensile and creep properties of fibers, matrices, and composites will be discussed

  15. Development of a metal-based composite actuator

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Ishii, Toshio; Kurihara, Haruki; Ohira, Junichiro; Hakoda, Genji

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes a basic concept and elemental developments to realize a metal based composite actuator to be used for smart structures. In this study, CFRP prepreg was laminated on aluminum plate to develop an actuator and this laminate could perform unidirectional actuation. SiC continuous fiber/Al composite thin plate could also be used for form a modified type of actuator instead of using CFRP. As sensors to be embedded in this actuator, the following ones wee developed. (1) A pre-notched optical fiber filament could be embedded in aluminum matrix without fracture by the interphase forming/bonding method with copper insert and could be fractured in it at the notch, which enabled forming of an optical interference type strain sensor. (2) Nickel wire could be uniformly oxidized and embedded in aluminum matrix without fracture, which could successfully work as a temperature sensor and a strain sensor.

  16. Load transfer in short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites

    Garces, Gerardo; Bruno, Giovanni; Wanner, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The internal load transfer and the deformation behaviour of aluminium-matrix composites reinforced with 2D-random alumina (Saffil) short fibres was studied for different loading modes. The evolution of stress in the metallic matrix was measured by neutron diffraction during in situ uniaxial deformation tests. Tensile and compressive tests were performed with loading axis parallel or perpendicular to the 2D-reinforcement plane. The fibre stresses were computed based on force equilibrium considerations. The results are discussed in light of a model recently established by the co-authors for composites with visco-plastic matrix behaviour and extended to the case of plastic deformation in the present study. Based on that model, the evolution of internal stresses and the macroscopic stress-strain were simulated. Comparison between the experimental and computational results shows a qualitative agreement in all relevant aspects

  17. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of metal matrix composites

    Persson, Christer.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in coefficient of thermal expansion of the matrix and particles in a metal matrix composite will introduce residual stresses during cooling from process temperature. These stresses are locally very high, and are known to influence the mechanical behaviour of the material. Changes in the stress state will occur during heat treatments and when the material is loaded due to different elastic, plastic, and creep properties of the constituents. The change of residual stresses in an Al-SiC particulate composite after different degree of plastic straining has been studied. The effect of plastic straining was modelled by an Eshelby model. The model and the measurements both show that the stress in the loading direction decreases for a tensile plastic strain and increases for a compressive plastic strain. By x-ray diffraction the stress response in the matrix and particles can be measured independently. This has been used to determine the stress state under and after heat treatments and under mechanical loading in two Al 15% SiC metal matrix composites. By analysing the line width from x-ray experiment the changes in the microstrains in the material were studied. A finite element model was used to model the generation of thermal residual stresses, stress relaxation during heat treatments, and load sharing during the first load cycle. Calculated stresses and microstrains were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. The elastic behaviour of the composite can be understood largely in terms of elastic load transfer between matrix and particles. However, at higher loads when the matrix becomes plastic residual stresses also become important. 21 refs

  18. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal... hip joint. The device limits translation and rotation in one or more planes via the geometry of its...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of interpenetrating phase ceramic metal composites

    Kanwal, T.

    2011-01-01

    Alumina powder was sintered in MW furnace under vacuum, without vacuum and conventional sintering furnace at different temperatures followed by characterization to observe the effect of sintering mode. Zirconia-Nickel and Alumina-Nickel systems were selected to study the effect of metallic phase interconnectivity on the electrical and thermal behavior in interpenetrating phase composites (IPCs). In order to obtain the homogenous mixture of Alumina and Nick powders, a detailed investigation was performed on the de-agglomeration and prop mixing of powders. Sintering parameters were optimized for the homogenization o Alumina with Nickel in planetary ball mill without sticking of powders with jar.- Homogenization of Zirconia-Nickel and Alumina-Nickel powders was perform using planetary ball mill as well as pestle mortar. Compaction of composites was performed uniaxially and sintering was carried in microwave furnace, tubular furnace with Argon environment and in vacuum sintering furnace. Electrical and thermal behavior of microwave as well as conventionally sintered ZrO/sub 2/-Ni and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Ni IPCs was also observed. Electrical behavior of Composites was characterized b determining the impedance of the composites. To find the percolation limit for both Alumina-Nickel and Zirconia-Nickel composite systems the real part of impedance was used. On the basis of electrical characterization, samples were selected for SEM, BET surface area and CTE analysis. SEM of selected samples was performed t observe the connectivity of Nickel in composites. Finally, the effect of percolation limit on thermal behavior of IPCs was investigated with the help of CTE. (author)

  20. Efecto de los metales sobre microcrustáceos de agua dulce. Avances metodológicos y potencialidad de cladóceros y copépodos como organismos test

    María Florencia Gutierrez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El incremento de los metales en los cuerpos de agua dulce a causa de las actividades antropogénicas genera importantes alteraciones sobre la biota. Esta revisión analiza los efectos adversos de varios metales de relevancia ecotoxicológica sobre los microcrustáceos zooplanctónicos (cladóceros y copépodos, los avances experimentales en esta línea y las ventajas de cada grupo como organismos test. En general, la necesidad de obtener indicadores más sensibles y representativos que los tradicionales, promovió lineamientos hacia estudios subcrónicos, interspecíficos y multigeneracionales. Por otra parte, la tendencia actual hacia el estudio de mezclas de sustancias y los efectos indirectos permite adquirir una visión más integral del problema. El impacto sobre las poblaciones es muy variable, dependiendo de la naturaleza del metal, las características del medio, el tiempo de exposición, las condiciones de cultivo y aspectos genéticos. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los trabajos se centran en pocas especies, dejando vacancias en el conocimiento de las representantes de cada región particular. Si bien algunos atributos de los cladóceros y copépodos como el tamaño, la morfología y el rol ecológico los tornan buenos indicadores, las diferencias en el desarrollo, reproducción y estrategias de perpetuación confieren ventajas a un grupo sobre otro.

  1. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  2. Codeformation processing of mechanically-dissimilar metal/intermetallic composites

    Marte, Judson Sloan

    A systematic and scientific approach has been applied to the study of codeformation processing. A series of composites having mechanically-dissimilar phases were developed in which the high temperature flow behavior of the reinforcement material could be varied independent of the matrix. This was accomplished through the use of a series of intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) as discontinuous reinforcements in an otherwise conventional metal matrix composite. The IMCs are produced using an in-situ reaction synthesis technique, called the XD(TM) process. The temperature of the exothermic synthesis reaction, called the adiabatic temperature, has been calculated and shown to increase with increasing volume percentage of TiB2 reinforcement. Further, this temperature has been shown to effect the size and spacing of the TiB2, microstructural features which are often used in discontinuous composite strength models. Study of the high temperature flow behavior of the components of the metal/IMC composite is critical to the development of an understanding of codeformation. A series of compression tests performed at 1000° to 1200°C and strain-rates of 10-3 and 10-4 sec-1. Peak flow stresses were used to evaluate the influence of material properties and process conditions. These data were incorporated into phenomenologically-based constitutive equations that have been used to predict the flow behavior. It has been determined that plastic deformation of the IMCs occurs readily, and is largely TiB2 independent, at temperatures approaching the melting point of the intermetallic matrices. Ti-6Al-4V/IMC powder blends were extruded at high temperatures to achieve commensurately deformed microstructures. The results of codeformation processing were analyzed in terms of the plastic strain of the IMC particulates. IMC particle deformation was shown to increase with increasing IMC particle size, volume percentage of IMC, extrusion temperature, homologous temperature, extrusion

  3. Initial Cladding Condition

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  4. Effect of SiC Content on Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Laser Cladding SiC/Ni60A Composite Coating

    ZHAO Long-zhi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The SiC reinforced Ni60A alloy laser cladding coating on the 45 steel substrate was fabricated with the LDM2500-60 semiconductor laser equipment. The effect of SiC content on microstructure, dilution rate, wear resistance, friction coefficient and microhardness was investigated systematically.The results show that with the increase of SiC content, the microstructure of upper coating is refined obviously, the dilution rate, wear resistance, friction coefficient and microhardness increase firstly and then decrease;when the mass fraction of SiC is 20%, the wear resistance of the cladding coating is the best one, in which the wear loss of coating is only 0.0012g and is 1/36.3 of the matrix;the minimum friction coefficient is 0.464, the friction process is the most stable;the highest microhardness of the cladding coating is 1039.9HV0.2, which is 3.5 times of the substrate;but when the mass fraction of SiC is 25%, the microhardness and wear resistance of coating decrease.

  5. CEA studies on advanced nuclear fuel claddings for enhanced accident tolerant LWRs fuel (LOCA and beyond LOCA conditions)

    Brachet, J.C.; Lorrette, C.; Michaux, A.; Sauder, C.; Idarraga-Trujillo, I.; Le Saux, M.; Le Flem, M.; Schuster, F.; Billard, A.; Monsifrot, E.; Torres, E.; Rebillat, F.; Bischoff, J.; Ambard, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of CEA studies on advanced nuclear fuel claddings for enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuel in collaboration with industrial partners AREVA and EDF. Two potential solutions were investigated: chromium coated zirconium based claddings and SiC/SiC composite claddings with a metallic liner. Concerning the first solution, the optimization of chromium coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrate has been performed. Thus, it has been demonstrated that, due in particular to their slower oxidation rate, a significant additional 'grace period( can be obtained on high temperature oxidized coated claddings in comparison to the conventional uncoated ones, regarding their residual PQ (Post-Quench) ductility and their ability to survive to the final water quenching in LOCA and, to some extent, beyond LOCA conditions. Concerning the second solution, the innovative 'sandwich' SiC/SiC cladding concept is introduced. Initially designed for the next generation of nuclear reactors, it can be adapted to obtain high safety performance for LWRs in LOCA conditions. The key findings of this work highlight the low sensitivity of SiC/SiC composites under the explored steam oxidation conditions. No signification degradation of the mechanical properties of CVI-HNI SiC/SiC specimen is particularly acknowledged for relatively long duration (beyond 100 h at 1200 Celsius degrees). Despite these very positive preliminary results, significant studies and developments are still necessary to close the technology gap. Qualification for nuclear application requires substantial irradiation testing, additional characterization and the definition of design rules applicable to such a structure. The use of a SiC-based fuel cladding shows promise for the highest temperature accident conditions but remains a long term perspective

  6. Optimization of laser cladding of cold spray coatings with B4C and Ni powders

    Fomin, V. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Filippov, A. A.; Ryashin, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, a combined method is considered for the production of a metal-matrix composite coating based on Ni and B4C. The coating is created by consistently applied methods: cold spray and laser cladding. The conditions of obtaining cermet layers are investigated depending on the parameters of laser cladding and cold spray. It is shown that the laser track structure significantly changes in accordance to the size of ceramic particles ranging 3-75 µm and its concentration. It is shown that the most perspective layers for additive manufacturing could be obtain from cold spray coatings with ceramic concentrations more than 50% by weight treated in the heat-conductivity laser mode.

  7. Effects of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on microstructure and wear properties of laser clad {gamma}/Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}/TiC composite coatings on TiAl intermatallic alloy

    Liu Xiubo [Laboratory for Laser Intelligent Manufacturing, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Beisihuanxi Road, Beijing 100080 (China) and School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Zhongyuan Institute of Technology, 41 Zhongyuan Western Road, Zhengzhou 450007, Henan Province (China)]. E-mail: liubobo0828@yahoo.com.cn; Yu Rongli [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-02-15

    The effects of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition on the microstructure and wear properties of laser clad {gamma}/Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}/TiC composite coatings on {gamma}-TiAl intermetallic alloy substrates with NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} precursor mixed powders have been investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and block-on-ring wear tests. The responding wear mechanisms are discussed in detail. The results are compared with that for composite coating without La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The comparison indicates that no evident new crystallographic phases are formed except a rapidly solidified microstructure consisting of the primary hard Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} and TiC carbides and the {gamma}/Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} eutectics distributed in the tough {gamma} nickel solid solution matrix. Good finishing coatings can be achieved under a proper amount of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-addition and a suitable laser processing parameters. The additions of rare-earth oxide La{sub 2}O{sub 3} can refine and purify the microstructure of coatings, relatively decrease the volume fraction of primary blocky Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} to Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}/{gamma} eutectics, reduce the dilution of clad material from base alloy and increase the microhardness of the coatings. When the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} is approximately 4 wt.%, the laser clad composite coating possesses the highest hardness and toughness. The composite coating with 4 wt.%La{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition can result the best enhancement of wear resistance of about 30%. However, too less or excessive addition amount of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} have no better influence on wear resistance of the composite coating.

  8. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    Zbib, Hussein M. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Bahr, David F. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  9. Diffusion in cladding materials

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Development and application of preventive maintenance technique for pipes using laser cladding method

    Hatakenaka, Hiroaki; Yamadera, Masao; Shiraiwa, Takanori.

    1995-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resisting coating (cladding) on the surface of the material was developed for the purpose of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the austenitic stainless steel (Type 304). In this method, metallic powder paste is applied on the inner surface of pipes, and then a YAG laser beam is irradiated to the paste, which melts and forms a clad with excellent corrosion resistance. Recently, the laser cladding method was practically and successfully applied to the actual nuclear power plant in Japan. This report describes this laser cladding technique, the equipment, and actual works in the field. (author)

  11. Electra-Clad

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study relates to the use of building-integrated photovoltaics. The Electra-Clad project sought to use steel-based cladding as a substrate for direct fabrication of a fully integrated solar panel of a design similar to the ICP standard glass-based panel. The five interrelated phases of the project are described. The study successfully demonstrated that the principles of the panel design are achievable and sound. But, despite intensive trials, a commercially realistic solar performance has not been achieved: the main failing was the poor solar conversion efficiency as the active area of the panel was increased in size. The problem lies with the coating used on the steel cladding substrates and it was concluded that a new type of coating will be required. ICP Solar Technologies UK carried out the work under contract to the DTI.

  12. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  13. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Metallurical Characteristics of a Metallic Chromium and Magnesium Oxide Composite

    Manning, Charles

    1963-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made to evaluate an uncoated thin composite sheet material containing metallic chromium and magnesium oxide for aerospace applications in the temperature range...

  14. Multifunctional Metal/Polymer Composite Fiber for Space Applications, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Program, Syscom Technology, Inc. (STI) will fabricate a metallized multifunctional composite fiber from a...

  15. Influence of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite

    DijuSamuel, G.; Raja Dhas, J. Edwin

    2017-10-01

    This paper focus on impact of tool pin in friction stir welding on activated carbon reinforced aluminium metal matrix composite. For fabrication of metal matrix composite AA6061 is used as matrix and activated carbon is used as reinforcement and it is casted using modified stir casting technique. After casting metal matrix composite has undergone various microstructure tests like SEM,EDAX and XRD. FSW is carried out in this metal matrix composite by choosing various tool pin profile like square,round,Threaded round, hexagon and taper. The quality of welded plates is measured in terms of ultimate tensile strength and hardness.

  16. Microstructure and high temperature oxidation resistance of in-situ synthesized TiN/Ti_3Al intermetallic composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy by laser cladding process

    Liu, Hongxi; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yehua; Zhou, Rong

    2016-01-01

    High temperature anti-oxidation TiN/Ti_3Al intermetallic composite coatings were fabricated with the powder and AlN powder on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface by 6 kW transverse-flow CO_2 laser apparatus. The chemical composition, morphology and microstructure of the TiN/Ti_3Al composite coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). In order to evaluate the high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti_3Al coating, the isothermal oxidation test was performed in a high temperature resistance furnace at 600 °C and 800 °C, respectively. The result shows that the composite coating has a rapidly solidified fine microstructure consisting of TiN primary phase (granular-like, flake-like or dendrites), with an even distribution in Ti_3Al matrix. It indicates that a physical and chemical reaction between Ti powder and AlN powder has completely occurred under the laser irradiation condition. In addition, the microhardness of the TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic composite coating is 3.4 times higher than that of the Ti6Al4V alloy substrate and reaches 844 HV_0_._2. The high temperature oxidation behavior test reveals that the high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti_3Al composite coating is much better than that of titanium alloy substrate. The excellent high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti_3Al intermetallic composite coating is attributed to the formation of reinforced phases TiN, Al_2O_3 and TiO_2. The laser cladding TiN/Ti_3Al intermetallic composite coating is anticipated to be a promising high temperature oxidation resistance coating for Ti6Al4V alloy. - Highlights: • In-situ TiN/Ti_3Al composite coating was synthesized on Ti6Al4V alloy by laser cladding. • The influence of Ti and AlN molar ratio on the microstructure of the coating was studied. • The TiN/Ti_3Al intermetallic coating is mainly composed of α-Ti, TiN and Ti_3Al phases. • The

  17. A resonant force sensor based on ionic polymer metal composites

    Bonomo, Claudia; Fortuna, Luigi; Giannone, Pietro; Graziani, Salvatore; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a novel force sensor, based on ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs), is presented. The system has DC sensing capabilities and is able to work in the range of a few millinewtons. IPMCs are emerging materials used to realize motion actuators and sensors. An IPMC strip is activated in a beam fixed/simply-supported configuration. The beam is tightened at the simply-supported end by a force. This influences the natural resonant frequency of the beam; the value of the resonant frequency is used in the proposed system to estimate the force applied in the axial direction. The performance of the system based on the IPMC material has proved to be comparable with that of sensors based on other sensing mechanisms. This suggests the possibility of using this class of polymeric devices to realize PMEMS (plastic micro electrical mechanical systems) sensors

  18. A model for ionic polymer metal composites as sensors

    Bonomo, C.; Fortuna, L.; Giannone, P.; Graziani, S.; Strazzeri, S.

    2006-06-01

    This paper introduces a comprehensive model of sensors based on ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) working in air. Significant quantities ruling the sensing properties of IPMC-based sensors are taken into account and the dynamics of the sensors are modelled. A large amount of experimental evidence is given for the excellent agreement between estimations obtained using the proposed model and the observed signals. Furthermore, the effect of sensor scaling is investigated, giving interesting support to the activities involved in the design of sensing devices based on these novel materials. We observed that the need for a wet environment is not a key issue for IPMC-based sensors to work well. This fact allows us to put IPMC-based sensors in a totally different light to the corresponding actuators, showing that sensors do not suffer from the same drawbacks.

  19. A resonant force sensor based on ionic polymer metal composites

    Bonomo, Claudia; Fortuna, Luigi; Giannone, Pietro; Graziani, Salvatore; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2008-02-01

    In this paper a novel force sensor, based on ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs), is presented. The system has DC sensing capabilities and is able to work in the range of a few millinewtons. IPMCs are emerging materials used to realize motion actuators and sensors. An IPMC strip is activated in a beam fixed/simply-supported configuration. The beam is tightened at the simply-supported end by a force. This influences the natural resonant frequency of the beam; the value of the resonant frequency is used in the proposed system to estimate the force applied in the axial direction. The performance of the system based on the IPMC material has proved to be comparable with that of sensors based on other sensing mechanisms. This suggests the possibility of using this class of polymeric devices to realize PMEMS (plastic micro electrical mechanical systems) sensors.

  20. Manufacturing and Machining Challenges of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matix Composites

    Baburaja, Kammuluri; Sainadh Teja, S.; Karthik Sri, D.; Kuldeep, J.; Gowtham, V.

    2017-08-01

    Manufacturing which involves material removal processes or material addition processes or material transformation processes. One or all the processes to obtain the final desired properties for a material with desired shape which meets the required precision and accuracy values for the expected service life of a material in working conditions. Researchers found the utility of aluminium to be the second largest after steel. Aluminium and its metal matrix composite possess wide applications in various applications in aerospace industry, automobile industry, Constructions and even in kitchen utensils. Hybrid Al-MMCconsist of two different materials, and one will be from organic origin along with the base material. In this paper an attempt is made to bring out the importance of utilization of aluminium and the challenges concerned in manufacturing and machining of hybrid aluminium MMC.

  1. Electromechanical modelling of tapered ionic polymer metal composites transducers

    Rakesha Chandra Dash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs are relatively new smart materials that exhibit a bidirectional electromechanical coupling. IPMCs have large number of important engineering applications such as micro robotics, biomedical devices, biomimetic robotics etc. This paper presents a comparison between tapered and uniform cantilevered Nafion based IPMCs transducer. Electromechanical modelling is done for the tapered beam. Thickness can be varied according to the requirement of force and deflection. Numerical results pertaining to the force and deflection characteristics of both type IPMCs transducer are obtained. It is shown that the desired amount of force and deflections for tapered IPMCs can be achieved for a given voltage. Different fixed end (t0 and free end (t1 thickness values have been taken to justify the results using MATLAB.

  2. New Joining Technology for Optimized Metal/Composite Assemblies

    Holger Seidlitz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a new joining technology, which is used to manufacture high strength hybrid constructions with thermoplastic composites (FRP and metals, is introduced. Similar to natural regulation effects at trees, fibers around the FRP joint become aligned along the lines of force and will not be destroyed by the joining process. This is achieved by the local utilization of the specific plastic flow properties of the FRT and metal component. Compared with usual joining methods—such as flow drill screws, blind and self-piercing rivets—noticeably higher tensile properties can be realized through the novel process management. The load-bearing capability increasing effect could be proved on hybrid joints with hot-dip galvanized steel HX420LAD and orthotropic glass—as well as carbon—fiber reinforced plastics. The results, which were determined in tensile-shear and cross-shear tests according to DIN EN ISO 14273 and DIN EN ISO 14272, are compared with holding loads of established joining techniques with similar joining point diameter and material combinations.

  3. The composition and character of oxycarbide phase in uranium metal

    Liu Kezhao; Lai Xinchun; Yu Yong; Ni Ranfu

    1999-08-01

    The oxide layer of uranium metal formed by vacuum heating were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). XPS results indicated that the air-exposed surface of the oxide layer were mainly consisted of UO 2 and free carbon. After the air-exposed surface were removed by low energy argon ion sputtering, C1s spectra shifted from 284.8 eV to 281.8 eV, indicating the existence of carbide phase. AES results of C(KVV) Auger transitions confirmed this result. Resolved and fitted using a combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian peak shape, U4f 7/2 spectra showed that three uranium chemical states existed in the layer, there were uranium dioxide, uranium carbide (or oxycarbide, UC x O 1-x ) and uranium metal phase. Calculated the AES data by relatively sensitive factor, the composition of oxycarbide was given as UC 0.41+-0.04 O 0.62+-0.01

  4. Method for hydrogen production and metal winning, and a catalyst/cocatalyst composition useful therefor

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1987-10-13

    A catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition of matter is useful in electrolytically producing hydrogen or electrowinning metals. Use of the catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition causes the anode potential and the energy required for the reaction to decrease. An electrolyte, including the catalyst/cocatalyst composition, and a reaction medium composition further including organic material are also described.

  5. Machinability study of Al-TiC metal matrix composite

    Siddappa P. N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites have emerged as an advanced class of structural materials have a combination of different, superior properties compared to an unreinforced matrix, which can result in a number of service benefits such as increased strength, higher elastic moduli, higher service temperature, low CTE, improved wear resistance, high toughness, etc. The excellent mechanical properties of these materials together with weight saving makes them very attractive for a variety of engineering applications in aerospace, automotive, electronic industries, etc. Hence, these materials provide as alternative substitutes for conventional engineering materials when specific mechanical properties necessary for required applications. In this work an attempt is made to study the machining parameters of Al6061/TiC MMC. The composite is developed by reinforcing TiC particles in varying proportions of 3, 6, 9 and 12 % weight fractions to the Al6061 matric alloy through stir casting technique. Cutting forces were measured by varying cutting speed and feed rate with constant depth of cut for different % weight fractions. The results showed that the cutting force increases with the increase of feed rate and decreases with the increase of cutting speed for all the weight fractions. Cutting parameters were optimized using Taguchi technique.

  6. Weibull modeling of particle cracking in metal matrix composites

    Lewis, C.A.; Withers, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation into the occurrence of reinforcement cracking within a particulate ZrO 2 /2618 Al alloy metal matrix composite under tensile plastic straining has been carried out, special attention being paid to the dependence of fracture on particle size and shape. The probability of particle cracking has been modeled using a Weibull approach, giving good agreement with the experimental data. Values for the Weibull modulus and the stress required to crack the particles were found to be within the range expected for the cracking of ceramic particles. Additional information regarding the fracture behavior of the particles was provided by in-situ neutron diffraction monitoring of the internal strains, measurement of the variation in the composite Young's modulus with straining and by direct observation of the cracked particles. The values of the particle stress required for the initiation of particle cracking deduced from these supplementary experiments were found to be in good agreement with each other and with the results from the Weibull analysis. Further, it is shown that while both the current experiments, as well as the previous work of others, can be well described by the Weibull approach, the exact values of the Weibull parameters do deduced are very sensitive to the approximations and the assumptions made in constructing the model

  7. Wear Characterization of Aluminium/Basalt Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites - A Novel Material

    P. Amuthakkannan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy based metal matrix composite participate have a wider applications in wear resistance applications. Attempt made in current study is that, basalt fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite have been prepared using stir casting method. Different weight percentage of basalt fiber reinforced with Al (6061 metal matrix composites are used to study the wear resistance of the composites. For wear study, percentage of reinforcement, normal load and sliding velocity are the considered as important parameters. To study the effect of basalt fiber reinforcement on the dry sliding wear of Al6061 alloy composites the Pin On wear tester is used. Initially hardness of the composites was tested, it was found that increasing reinforcement in the composite hardness value of the composites also increased. Based on the Grey relation analysis (GRA the effects of wear resistance of the composites were studied.

  8. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  9. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of its...

  10. Some metal-graphite and metal-ceramic composites for use as high energy brake lining materials

    Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Materials were studied as candidates for development as potential new aircraft brake lining materials. These families were (1) copper-graphite composites; (2) nickel-graphite composites; (3) copper - rare-earth-oxide (gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) or lanthanum oxide (La2O3)) composites and copper - rare-earth-oxide (La2O3) - rare-earth-fluoride (lanthanum fluoride (LaF3)) composites; (4) nickel - rare-earth-oxide composites and nickel - rare-earth-oxide - rare-earth-fluoride composites. For comparison purposes, a currently used metal-ceramic composite was also studied. Results showed that the nickel-Gd2O3 and nickel-La2O3-LaF3 composites were comparable or superior in friction and wear performance to the currently used composite and therefore deserve to be considered for further development.

  11. Contribution of trace metals in structuring in situ macroinvertebrate community composition along a salinity gradient

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates were studied along a salinity gradient in the North Sea Canal, The Netherlands, to quantify the effect of trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc) on community composition. In addition, two methods for assessing metal bioavailability (normalizing metal concentrations on organic

  12. Second phase precipitation in irradiated Type 316 stainless steel cladding

    Hales, J.W.

    1978-05-01

    Differences in the phase composition of FFTF fuel cans following irradiation in the General Electric Test Reactor compared to HEDL fuel cans prompted laboratory studies to be conducted using cladding from the same lots of material used to fabricate the fuel pins and on cladding sections removed from the plenum area of the irradiated fuel pins to help establish the cause of the observed differences

  13. Investigations on dry sliding of laser cladded aluminum bronze

    Freiße Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the tribological behaviour of laser cladded aluminum bronze tool surfaces for dry metal forming. In a first part of this work a process window for cladding aluminum bronze on steel substrate was investigated to ensure a low dilution. Therefore, the cladding speed, the powder feed rate, the laser power and the distance between the process head and the substrate were varied. The target of the second part was to investigate the influence of different process parameters on the tribological behaviour of the cladded tracks. The laser claddings were carried out on both aluminum bronze and cold work tool steel as substrate materials. Two different particle sizes of the cladding powder material were used. The cladding speed was varied and a post-processing laser remelting treatment was applied. It is shown that the tribological behaviour of the surface in a dry oscillating ball-on-plate test is highly dependent on the substrate material. In the third part a deep drawing tool was additively manufactured by direct laser deposition. Furthermore, the tool was applied to form circular cups with and without lubrication.

  14. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  15. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  16. Method of quantitative analysis of superconducting metal-conducting composite materials

    Bogomolov, V.N.; Zhuravlev, V.V.; Petranovskij, V.P.; Pimenov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for quantitative analysis of superconducting metal-containing composite materials, SnO 2 -InSn, WO 3 -InW, Zn)-InZn in particular, has been developed. The method of determining metal content in a composite is based on the dependence of superconducting transition temperature on alloy composition. Sensitivity of temperature determination - 0.02K, error of analysis for InSn system - 0.5%

  17. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  18. Method and device for weld deposit cladding

    Barger, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to get weld beads of good quality, uniform thickness and faultless transition regions between neighboring beads in weld deposit cladding of metallic workpoeces, it is proposed to use a device in which the electromagnets are arranged adjacent to th zone of molten welding powder and molten metal besides having got suitable supplies for applying the welding powder, the polarity of the magnets being chosen in such a way that the lines of flux between the poles are counteracting the lines of flux surrounding the electrode band because of the welding current. Several variants of arranging the electrodes are presented in detail. (UWI) [de

  19. Nanothorn electrodes for ionic polymer-metal composite artificial muscles.

    Palmre, Viljar; Pugal, David; Kim, Kwang J; Leang, Kam K; Asaka, Kinji; Aabloo, Alvo

    2014-08-22

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) have recently received tremendous interest as soft biomimetic actuators and sensors in various bioengineering and human affinity applications, such as artificial muscles and actuators, aquatic propulsors, robotic end-effectors, and active catheters. Main challenges in developing biomimetic actuators are the attainment of high strain and actuation force at low operating voltage. Here we first report a nanostructured electrode surface design for IPMC comprising platinum nanothorn assemblies with multiple sharp tips. The newly developed actuator with the nanostructured electrodes shows a new way to achieve highly enhanced electromechanical performance over existing flat-surfaced electrodes. We demonstrate that the formation and growth of the nanothorn assemblies at the electrode interface lead to a dramatic improvement (3- to 5-fold increase) in both actuation range and blocking force at low driving voltage (1-3 V). These advances are related to the highly capacitive properties of nanothorn assemblies, increasing significantly the charge transport during the actuation process.

  20. Ionic polymer-metal composite enabled robotic manta ray

    Chen, Zheng; Um, Tae I.; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2011-04-01

    The manta ray, Manta birostris, demonstrates excellent swimming capabilities; generating highly efficient thrust via flapping of dorsally flattened pectoral fins. In this paper, we present an underwater robot that mimics the swimming behavior of the manta ray. An assembly-based fabrication method is developed to create the artificial pectoral fins, which are capable of generating oscillatory with a large twisting angle between leading and trailing edges. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators are used as artificial muscles in the fin. Each fin consists of four IPMC beams bonded with a compliant poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane. By controlling each individual IPMC strips, we are able to generate complex flapping motions. The fin is characterized in terms of tip deflection, tip blocking force, twist angle, and power consumption. Based on the characteristics of the artificial pectoral fin, a small size and free-swimming robotic manta ray is developed. The robot consists of two artificial pectoral fins, a rigid body, and an on-board control unit with a lithium ion rechargeable battery. Experimental results show that the robot swam at a speed of up to 0.055 body length per second (BL/sec).

  1. Bio-applications of ionic polymer metal composite transducers

    Aw, K C; McDaid, A J

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic actuators have advanced performance which in some aspects can surpass that of humans, however they are lacking when it comes to developing devices which are capable of operating together with humans. Bio-inspired transducers, for example ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC), which have similar properties to human tissue and muscle, demonstrate much future promise as candidates for replacing traditional robotic actuators in medical robotics applications. This paper outlines four biomedical robotics applications, an IPMC stepper motor, an assistive glove exoskeleton/prosthetic hand, a surgical robotic tool and a micromanipulation system. These applications have been developed using mechanical design/modelling techniques with IPMC ‘artificial muscle’ as the actuation system. The systems are designed by first simulating the performance using an IPMC model and dynamic models of the mechanical system; the appropriate advanced adaptive control schemes are then implemented to ensure that the IPMCs operate in the correct manner, robustly over time. This paper serves as an overview of the applications and concludes with some discussion on the future challenges of developing real-world IPMC applications

  2. A nonlinear model for ionic polymer metal composites as actuators

    Bonomo, C.; Fortuna, L.; Giannone, P.; Graziani, S.; Strazzeri, S.

    2007-02-01

    This paper introduces a comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of motion actuators based on ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) working in air. Significant quantities ruling the acting properties of IPMC-based actuators are taken into account. The model is organized as follows. As a first step, the dependence of the IPMC absorbed current on the voltage applied across its thickness is taken into account; a nonlinear circuit model is proposed to describe this relationship. In a second step the transduction of the absorbed current into the IPMC mechanical reaction is modelled. The model resulting from the cascade of both the electrical and the electromechanical stages represents a novel contribution in the field of IPMCs, capable of describing the electromechanical behaviour of these materials and predicting relevant quantities in a large range of applied signals. The effect of actuator scaling is also investigated, giving interesting support to the activities involved in the design of actuating devices based on these novel materials. Evidence of the excellent agreement between the estimations obtained by using the proposed model and experimental signals is given.

  3. Bio-applications of ionic polymer metal composite transducers

    Aw, K. C.; McDaid, A. J.

    2014-07-01

    Traditional robotic actuators have advanced performance which in some aspects can surpass that of humans, however they are lacking when it comes to developing devices which are capable of operating together with humans. Bio-inspired transducers, for example ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC), which have similar properties to human tissue and muscle, demonstrate much future promise as candidates for replacing traditional robotic actuators in medical robotics applications. This paper outlines four biomedical robotics applications, an IPMC stepper motor, an assistive glove exoskeleton/prosthetic hand, a surgical robotic tool and a micromanipulation system. These applications have been developed using mechanical design/modelling techniques with IPMC ‘artificial muscle’ as the actuation system. The systems are designed by first simulating the performance using an IPMC model and dynamic models of the mechanical system; the appropriate advanced adaptive control schemes are then implemented to ensure that the IPMCs operate in the correct manner, robustly over time. This paper serves as an overview of the applications and concludes with some discussion on the future challenges of developing real-world IPMC applications.

  4. Milling of Nanoparticles Reinforced Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    Alokesh Pramanik

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the face milling of nanoparticles reinforced Al-based metal matrix composites (nano-MMCs using a single insert milling tool. The effects of feed and speed on machined surfaces in terms of surface roughness, surface profile, surface appearance, chip surface, chip ratio, machining forces, and force signals were analyzed. It was found that surface roughness of machined surfaces increased with the increase of feed up to the speed of 60 mm/min. However, at the higher speed (100–140 mm/min, the variation of surface roughness was minor with the increase of feed. The machined surfaces contained the marks of cutting tools, lobes of material flow in layers, pits and craters. The chip ratio increased with the increase of feed at all speeds. The top chip surfaces were full of wrinkles in all cases, though the bottom surfaces carried the evidence of friction, adhesion, and deformed material layers. The effect of feed on machining forces was evident at all speeds. The machining speed was found not to affect machining forces noticeably at a lower feed, but those decreased with the increase of speed for the high feed scenario.

  5. Dynamic curvature sensing employing ionic-polymer–metal composite sensors

    Bahramzadeh, Yousef; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic curvature sensor is presented based on ionic-polymer–metal composite (IPMC) for curvature monitoring of deployable/inflatable dynamic space structures. Monitoring the curvature variation is of high importance in various engineering structures including shape monitoring of deployable/inflatable space structures in which the structural boundaries undergo a dynamic deployment process. The high sensitivity of IPMCs to the applied deformations as well as its flexibility make IPMCs a promising candidate for sensing of dynamic curvature changes. Herein, we explore the dynamic response of an IPMC sensor strip with respect to controlled curvature deformations subjected to different forms of input functions. Using a specially designed experimental setup, the voltage recovery effect, phase delay, and rate dependency of the output voltage signal of an IPMC curvature sensor are analyzed. Experimental results show that the IPMC sensor maintains the linearity, sensitivity, and repeatability required for curvature sensing. Besides, in order to describe the dynamic phenomena such as the rate dependency of the IPMC sensor, a chemo-electro-mechanical model based on the Poisson–Nernst–Planck (PNP) equation for the kinetics of ion diffusion is presented. By solving the governing partial differential equations the frequency response of the IPMC sensor is derived. The physical model is able to describe the dynamic properties of the IPMC sensor and the dependency of the signal on rate of excitations

  6. The effect of chemical composition and granulation of Fe - based fillers on properties of metal resinous composite

    Janecki, J.; Dasiewicz, J.; Pawelec, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the authors present metal-resinous composites with Fe based fillers of various element constitution and granulation. The analysis of influence of filler type on coefficient of linear thermal expansion of composite materials was performed. Friction and wear tests (composite-bronze and composite-steel pairs) were carried out. It was stated that the thinner granulation of main filler has a positive effect on coefficient of linear thermal expansion and friction/wear characteristics. The presence of copper, nickel and molybdenum in the filler is beneficial for some properties of the composite. (author)

  7. Performance of refractory alloy-clad fuel pins

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1984-12-01

    This paper discusses objectives and basic design of two fuel-cladding tests being conducted in support of SP-100 technology development. Two of the current space nuclear power concepts use conventional pin type designs, where a coolant removes the heat from the core and transports it to an out-of-core energy conversion system. An extensive irradiation testing program was conducted in the 1950's and 1960's to develop fuel pins for space nuclear reactors. The program emphasized refractory metal clad uranium nitride (UN), uranium carbide (UC), uranium oxide (UO 2 ), and metal matrix fuels (UCZr and BeO-UO 2 ). Based on this earlier work, studies presented here show that UN and UO 2 fuels in conjunction with several refractory metal cladding materials demonstrated high potential for meeting space reactor requirements and that UC could serve as an alternative but higher risk fuel

  8. Thin-film composite materials as a dielectric layer for flexible metal-insulator-metal capacitors.

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Meena, Jagan Singh; Wu, Chung-Shu; Tiwari, Rajanish N; Chu, Min-Ching; Chang, Feng-Chih; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2010-09-24

    A new organic-organic nanoscale composite thin-film (NCTF) dielectric has been synthesized by solution deposition of 1-bromoadamantane and triblock copolymer (Pluronic P123, BASF, EO20-PO70-EO20), in which the precursor solution has been achieved with organic additives. We have used a sol-gel process to make a metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIM) comprising a nanoscale (10 nm-thick) thin-film on a flexible polyimide (PI) substrate at room temperature. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope revealed that the deposited NCTFs were crack-free, uniform, highly resistant to moisture absorption, and well adhered on the Au-Cr/PI. The electrical properties of 1-bromoadamantane-P123 NCTF were characterized by dielectric constant, capacitance, and leakage current measurements. The 1-bromoadamantane-P123 NCTF on the PI substrate showed a low leakage current density of 5.5 x 10(-11) A cm(-2) and good capacitance of 2.4 fF at 1 MHz. In addition, the calculated dielectric constant of 1-bromoadamantane-P123 NCTF was 1.9, making them suitable candidates for use in future flexible electronic devices as a stable intermetal dielectric. The electrical insulating properties of 1-bromoadamantane-P123 NCTF have been improved due to the optimized dipole moments of the van der Waals interactions.

  9. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  10. Composite nanoparticles containing rare earth metal and methods of preparation thereof

    Kandapallil, Binil Itty Ipe; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Johnson, Francis

    2018-04-10

    The present invention is directed to composite nanoparticles comprising a metal, a rare earth element, and, optionally, a complexing ligand. The invention is also directed to composite nanoparticles having a core-shell structure and to processes for preparation of composite nanoparticles of the invention.

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of wear characteristics of aluminum based metal matrix composites using RSM

    Selvi, S.; Rajasekar, E.

    2015-01-01

    The tribological properties such as wear rate, hardness of the aluminum-fly ash composite synthesized by stir casting were investigated by varying the weight % of fly ash from 5 to 20 with constant weight % of zinc and magnesium metal powder. A mathematical model was developed to predict the wear rate of aluminum metal matrix composites and the adequacy of the model was verified using analysis of variance. Scanning electron microscopy was used for the microstructure analysis which showed a uniform distribution of fly ash in the metal matrix. Energy - dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for the elemental analysis or chemical characterization of a sample. The results showed that addition of fly ash to aluminum based metal matrix improved both the mechanical and tribological properties of the composites. The fly ash particles improved the wear resistance of the metal matrix composites because the hardness of the samples taken increased as the fly ash content was increased.

  12. Heavy metal and proximate composition associated with the ...

    User

    2014-05-08

    May 8, 2014 ... Levels of Cu, Mn, Pd and Zn in mushroom samples analysed were ... metal concentration in soil and fungal factors such as species ..... Levels of trace elements in the fruiting bodies ... Toxicity of non-radioactive heavy metals.

  13. Studies of heavy metal contents and microbial composition of ...

    FLEXI-DONEST

    the use of private electricity generating sets, in recent times, have ... soil and evaluate the impact of heavy metal on soil degradable ..... a reasonable length of time by herbivores may .... Heavy Metals in Root, Stem and Leaves of Acalypha.

  14. Design optimization of multi-layer Silicon Carbide cladding for light water reactors

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, MSC01 1120 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • SiC cladding designs are optimized with a multi-layer structural analysis code. • Layer radial thickness fraction that minimizes cladding fracture probability exists. • The demonstrated procedure is applicable for multi-layer SiC cladding design. • Duplex SiC with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 is optimal in a reference case. • Increasing composite thermal conductivity markedly decreases SiC cladding stress. - Abstract: A parametric study that demonstrates a methodology for determining the optimum bilayer composition in a duplex SiC cladding is discussed. The structural performance of multi-layer SiC cladding design is significantly affected by radial thickness fraction of each layer. This study shows that there exists an optimal composite/monolith radial thickness fraction that minimizes failure probability for a duplex SiC cladding in steady-state operation. An exemplary reference case study shows that the duplex cladding with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 and the outer CVD-SiC fraction ∼0.6 is found to be the optimal SiC cladding design for the current PWRs with the reference material choice for CVD-SiC and fiber reinforced composite. A marginal increase in the composite fraction from the presented optimal designs may lead to increase structural integrity by introducing some unquantified merits such as increasing damage tolerance. The major factors that affect the optimum cladding designs are temperature gradients and internal gas pressure. Clad wall thickness, thermal conductivity, and Weibull modulus are among the key design parameters/material properties.

  15. Automatic welding and cladding in heavy fabrication

    Altamer, A. de

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the automatic welding processes used by an Italian fabricator of pressure vessels for petrochemical and nuclear plant. The automatic submerged arc welding, submerged arc strip cladding, pulsed TIG, hot wire TIG and MIG welding processes have proved satisfactory in terms of process reliability, metal deposition rate, and cost effectiveness for low alloy and carbon steels. An example shows sequences required during automatic butt welding, including heat treatments. Factors which govern satisfactory automatic welding include automatic anti-drift rotator device, electrode guidance and bead programming system, the capability of single and dual head operation, flux recovery and slag removal systems, operator environment and controls, maintaining continuity of welding and automatic reverse side grinding. Automatic welding is used for: joining vessel sections; joining tubes to tubeplate; cladding of vessel rings and tubes, dished ends and extruded nozzles; nozzle to shell and butt welds, including narrow gap welding. (author)

  16. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    Chen, Ye; Khashab, Niveen M.; Tao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets

  17. The development and mechanical characterization of aluminium copper-carbon fiber metal matrix hybrid composite

    Manzoor, M. U.; Feroze, M.; Ahmad, T.; Kamran, M.; Butt, M. T. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) come under advanced materials that can be used for a wide range of industrial applications. MMCs contain a non-metallic reinforcement incorporated into a metallic matrix which can enhance properties over base metal alloys. Copper-Carbon fiber reinforced aluminium based hybrid composites were prepared by compo casting method. 4 weight % copper was used as alloying element with Al because of its precipitation hardened properties. Different weight compositions of composites were developed and characterized by mechanical testing. A significant improvement in tensile strength and micro hardness were found, before and after heat treatment of the composite. The SEM analysis of the fractured surfaces showed dispersed and embedded Carbon fibers within the network leading to the enhanced strength.

  18. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  19. Microstructures and properties of TiN reinforced Co-based composite coatings modified with Y_2O_3 by laser cladding on Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    Weng, Fei; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Liu, Jianli; Zhao, Longjie

    2015-01-01

    In this study, TiN reinforced composite coatings were fabricated on Ti–6Al–4V substrate by laser cladding with Co42 self-fluxing alloy, TiN and Y_2O_3 mixed powders. Microstructures and wear resistance of the cladding coatings with and without Y_2O_3 addition were investigated comparatively. Results showed that the coatings were mainly comprised of γ-Co/Ni, TiN, CoTi, CoTi_2, NiTi, TiC, Cr_7C_3, TiB, Ti_5Si_3 and TiC_0_._3N_0_._7 phases. The coatings showed metallurgical bonding free of pores and cracks with the substrate. Compared with the Ti–6Al–4V substrate, the microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings was enhanced by 3–4 times and 9.5–11.9 times, respectively. With 1.0 wt.% Y_2O_3 addition, the microstructure of the coating was refined significantly, and the microhardness and dry sliding wear resistance were enhanced further. The effects of Y_2O_3 were attributed to the residual Y_2O_3 and decomposed Y atoms. - Graphical abstract: The diagram illustration for the action mechanism of Y_2O_3: (a) dissolution of Y_2O_3 and TiN, (b) re-formation of TiN and in situ formation of TiC, (c) growth of TiN, TiC and the distribution of Y atoms. - Highlights: • Coatings showing metallurgical bonding with the substrate were fabricated. • The effect of Y_2O_3 on the refinement of the microstructure is notable. • A kind of Y_2O_3 centered core–shell structure was picked out in the coating. • Microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings was enhanced significantly.

  20. Microstructure and high temperature oxidation resistance of in-situ synthesized TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al intermetallic composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy by laser cladding process

    Liu, Hongxi, E-mail: piiiliuhx@sina.com; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yehua; Zhou, Rong

    2016-06-15

    High temperature anti-oxidation TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al intermetallic composite coatings were fabricated with the powder and AlN powder on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface by 6 kW transverse-flow CO{sub 2} laser apparatus. The chemical composition, morphology and microstructure of the TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al composite coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). In order to evaluate the high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al coating, the isothermal oxidation test was performed in a high temperature resistance furnace at 600 °C and 800 °C, respectively. The result shows that the composite coating has a rapidly solidified fine microstructure consisting of TiN primary phase (granular-like, flake-like or dendrites), with an even distribution in Ti{sub 3}Al matrix. It indicates that a physical and chemical reaction between Ti powder and AlN powder has completely occurred under the laser irradiation condition. In addition, the microhardness of the TiN/Ti3Al intermetallic composite coating is 3.4 times higher than that of the Ti6Al4V alloy substrate and reaches 844 HV{sub 0.2}. The high temperature oxidation behavior test reveals that the high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al composite coating is much better than that of titanium alloy substrate. The excellent high temperature oxidation resistance of TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al intermetallic composite coating is attributed to the formation of reinforced phases TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}. The laser cladding TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al intermetallic composite coating is anticipated to be a promising high temperature oxidation resistance coating for Ti6Al4V alloy. - Highlights: • In-situ TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al composite coating was synthesized on Ti6Al4V alloy by laser cladding. • The influence of Ti and AlN molar ratio on the microstructure of the coating was studied. • The TiN/Ti{sub 3}Al intermetallic

  1. Influence of additions of nanoparticles TaC on a microstructure laser cladding

    Murzakov, M A; Petrovskiy, V N; Polski, V I; Mironov, V D; Prokopova, N M; Tret'yakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    The features of a laser cladding of nickel-based powders with TaC nanopowder additives have been experimentally investigated. The minimum depth of pro-melting of a basis, microhardness distribution over the cross section of the substrate, and the saturation of the metal of the cladding with basis components has been determined in the experiments

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Farahmand, Parisa

    advantages due to creating coating layers with superior properties in terms of purity, homogeneity, low dilution, hardness, bonding, and microstructure. In the development of modern materials for hardfacing applications, the functionality is often improved by combining materials with different properties into composites. Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) coating is a composite material with two constituent parts, i.e., matrix and the reinforcement. This class of composites are addressing improved mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength, toughness, and tribological and chemical resistance. Fabrication of MMCs is to achieve a combination of properties not achievable by any of the materials acting alone. MMCs have attracted significant attention for decades due to their combination of wear-resistivity, corrosion-resistivity, thermal, electrical and magnetic properties. Presently, there is a strong emphasis on the development of advanced functional coatings for corrosion, erosion, and wear protection for different industrial applications. In this research, a laser cladding system equipped with a high power direct diode laser associated with gas driven metal powder delivery system was used to develop advanced MMC coatings. The high power direct diode laser used in this study offers wider beam spot, shorter wavelength and uniform power distribution. These properties make the cladding set-up ideal for coating due to fewer cladding tracks, lower operation cost, higher laser absorption, and improved coating qualities. In order to prevent crack propagation, porosity, and uniform dispersion of carbides in MMC coating, cladding procedure was assisted by an induction heater as a second heat source. The developed defect free MMC coatings were combined with nano-size particles of WC, rare earth (RE) element (La2O3), and Mo as a refractory metal to enhance mechanical properties, chemical composition, and subsequently improve the tribological performance of the coatings. The resistance

  3. Implications and control of fuel-cladding chemical interaction for LMFBR fuel pin design

    Roake, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI) is typically incorporated into the design of an LMFBR fuel pin as a wastage allowance. Several interrelated factors are considered during the evolution of an LMFBR fuel pin design. Those which are indirectly affected by FCCI include: allowable pin power, fuel restructuring, fission gas migration and release from the fuel, fuel cracking, fuel swelling, in-reactor cladding creep, cladding swelling, and the cladding mechanical strain. Chemical activity of oxygen is the most readily controlled factor in FCCI. Two methods are being investigated: control of total oxygen inventory by limiting fuel O/M, and control of oxygen activity with buffer metals

  4. Implications and control of fuel-cladding chemical interaction for LMFBR fuel pin design

    Roake, W E [Westinghouse-Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1977-04-01

    Fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI) is typically incorporated into the design of an LMFBR fuel pin as a wastage allowance. Several interrelated factors are considered during the evolution of an LMFBR fuel pin design. Those which are indirectly affected by FCCI include: allowable pin power, fuel restructuring, fission gas migration and release from the fuel, fuel cracking, fuel swelling, in-reactor cladding creep, cladding swelling, and the cladding mechanical strain. Chemical activity of oxygen is the most readily controlled factor in FCCI. Two methods are being investigated: control of total oxygen inventory by limiting fuel O/M, and control of oxygen activity with buffer metals.

  5. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  6. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  7. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  8. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CLV/CEV Composite and Metallic Structural Components, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CLV/CEV composite and metallic structures. This developed...

  9. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review.

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  10. The Micromechanics of Deformation and Failure in Metal-Matrix Composites

    Needleman, Alan

    1997-01-01

    .... However, metal-matrix composites often have low ductility and low fracture toughness. An improved understanding of the basic deformation and failure mechanisms is needed to overcome these problems...

  11. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  12. Mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction: US interpretation

    Adamson, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in LMFBR fuel pins are reviewed and examined in terms of in-pile and out-of-pile data. From this examination several factors are identified which may govern the occurrence of localized deep intergranular penetrations of Type-316SS cladding. Using a plausible mechanistic hypothesis for FCCI, first steps have been taken towards developing a quantitative, physically-meaningful, mathematical method of predicting cladding wastage in operating fuel pins. Both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of FCCI are considered in the development of this prediction method, together with a fuel chemistry model that describes the evolution of thermochemical conditions at the fuel-cladding gap. On the basis of results from recent fuel pin and laboratory tests a thermal transport mechanism has been proposed to explain the thermal gradient-induced migration of Fe, Cr, and Ni from cladding into the fuel. This mechanism involves chemical transport of the metallic cladding components (as tellurides) in liquid Cs-Te. (author)

  13. Mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction: US interpretation

    Adamson, M G [General Electric Company, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1977-04-01

    Proposed mechanisms of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in LMFBR fuel pins are reviewed and examined in terms of in-pile and out-of-pile data. From this examination several factors are identified which may govern the occurrence of localized deep intergranular penetrations of Type-316SS cladding. Using a plausible mechanistic hypothesis for FCCI, first steps have been taken towards developing a quantitative, physically-meaningful, mathematical method of predicting cladding wastage in operating fuel pins. Both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of FCCI are considered in the development of this prediction method, together with a fuel chemistry model that describes the evolution of thermochemical conditions at the fuel-cladding gap. On the basis of results from recent fuel pin and laboratory tests a thermal transport mechanism has been proposed to explain the thermal gradient-induced migration of Fe, Cr, and Ni from cladding into the fuel. This mechanism involves chemical transport of the metallic cladding components (as tellurides) in liquid Cs-Te. (author)

  14. Mechanical and magnetic properties of semi-Heusler/light-metal composites consolidated by spark plasma sintering

    Koller, M.; Chráska, Tomáš; Cinert, Jakub; Heczko, Oleg; Kopeček, Jaromír; Landa, Michal; Mušálek, Radek; Rameš, Michal; Seiner, Hanuš; Stráský, J.; Janeček, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 126, July (2017), s. 351-357 ISSN 0264-1275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : Metal–metal composites * Spark plasma sintering * Light metals * Ferromagnetic alloys * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials; JI - Composite Materials (FZU-D); JI - Composite Materials (UT-L) OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics; Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics (FZU-D); Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics (UT-L) Impact factor: 4.364, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0264127517303842?via%3Dih

  15. Fluid Structure Interaction Analysis in Manufacturing Metal/Polymer Macro-Composites

    Baesso, R.; Lucchetta, G.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer Injection Forming (PIF) is a new manufacturing technology for sheet metal-polymer macro-composites, which results from the combination of injection moulding and sheet metal forming. This process consists on forming the sheet metal according to the boundary of the mould cavity by means of the injected polymer. After cooling, the polymer bonds permanently to the metal resulting in a sheet metal-polymer macro-composite product. Comparing this process to traditional ones (where the polymeric and metal parts are joined together after separate forming) the main advantages are both reduction of production costs and increase of part quality. This paper presents a multi-physics numerical simulation of the process performed in the Ansys/CFX environment

  16. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report A lloy Development for High Burnup Cladding . Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs

  17. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  18. Machinability of titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs)

    Aramesh, Maryam

    Titanium metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs), as a new generation of materials, have various potential applications in aerospace and automotive industries. The presence of ceramic particles enhances the physical and mechanical properties of the alloy matrix. However, the hard and abrasive nature of these particles causes various issues in the field of their machinability. Severe tool wear and short tool life are the most important drawbacks of machining this class of materials. There is very limited work in the literature regarding the machinability of this class of materials especially in the area of tool life estimation and tool wear. By far, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools appear to be the best choice for machining MMCs from researchers' point of view. However, due to their high cost, economical alternatives are sought. Cubic boron nitride (CBN) inserts, as the second hardest available tools, show superior characteristics such as great wear resistance, high hardness at elevated temperatures, a low coefficient of friction and a high melting point. Yet, so far CBN tools have not been studied during machining of Ti-MMCs. In this study, a comprehensive study has been performed to explore the tool wear mechanisms of CBN inserts during turning of Ti-MMCs. The unique morphology of the worn faces of the tools was investigated for the first time, which led to new insights in the identification of chemical wear mechanisms during machining of Ti-MMCs. Utilizing the full tool life capacity of cutting tools is also very crucial, due to the considerable costs associated with suboptimal replacement of tools. This strongly motivates development of a reliable model for tool life estimation under any cutting conditions. In this study, a novel model based on the survival analysis methodology is developed to estimate the progressive states of tool wear under any cutting conditions during machining of Ti-MMCs. This statistical model takes into account the machining time in

  19. Development of nuclear fuel for the future -Development of performance improvement of the cladding by ion beam-

    Choi, Byung Hoh; Jung, Moon Kyoo; Jung, Kee Suk; Kim, Wan; Lee, Jae Hyung; Song, Tae Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jun Kun [Sung Kyoon Kwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuk Sang [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    In this research we analyzed the state of art related to the surface treatment method of nuclear fuel cladding for the development of the surface treatment technique of nuclear fuel cladding by ion beam while investigating major causes of the leakage of fuel rods. Ion implantation simulation code called TRIM-95 was used to decide basic parameters of ion beams and setup an appropriate process for ion implantation. Performance of the ion beam extraction was measured after adding the needed vacuum and cooling system to the existing gas and metal ion implanters. Target system for the ion implantation of fuel cladding improved and a plasma accelerator was installed on the target chamber of the metal ion implanter. The plasma accelerator is used to produce low energy, high current ion beams. The mechanical and chemical properties of the implanted Zircaloy-4 such as micro hardness, wear resistance, fretting wear, friction coefficient and corrosion resistance was measured under the room temperature and atmosphere. A micro structure and composition analysis of Zircaloy-4 sample was performed before and after the implantation to study the cause of the improvement in the mechanical and chemical characteristics. 94 figs, 11 tabs, 51 refs. (Author).

  20. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO2 and/or H2S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  1. Explosion Clad for Upstream Oil and Gas Equipment

    Banker, John G.; Massarello, Jack; Pauly, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Today's upstream oil and gas facilities frequently involve the combination of high pressures, high temperatures, and highly corrosive environments, requiring equipment that is thick wall, corrosion resistant, and cost effective. When significant concentrations of CO 2 and/or H 2 S and/or chlorides are present, corrosion resistant alloys (CRA) can become the material of choice for separator equipment, piping, related components, and line pipe. They can provide reliable resistance to both corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. For these applications, the more commonly used CRA's are 316L, 317L and duplex stainless steels, alloy 825 and alloy 625, dependent upon the application and the severity of the environment. Titanium is also an exceptional choice from the technical perspective, but is less commonly used except for heat exchangers. Explosion clad offers significant savings by providing a relatively thin corrosion resistant alloy on the surface metallurgically bonded to a thick, lower cost, steel substrate for the pressure containment. Developed and industrialized in the 1960's the explosion cladding technology can be used for cladding the more commonly used nickel based and stainless steel CRA's as well as titanium. It has many years of proven experience as a reliable and highly robust clad manufacturing process. The unique cold welding characteristics of explosion cladding reduce problems of alloy sensitization and dissimilar metal incompatibility. Explosion clad materials have been used extensively in both upstream and downstream oil, gas and petrochemical facilities for well over 40 years. The explosion clad equipment has demonstrated excellent resistance to corrosion, embrittlement and disbonding. Factors critical to insure reliable clad manufacture and equipment design and fabrication are addressed.

  2. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  3. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  4. The significance of cladding material on the integrity of nuclear pressure vessels with cracks

    Sattari-Far, Iradj.

    1989-05-01

    The significance of the austenitic cladding layer is reviewed in this literature study. The cladding induced stresses are generally not considered when evaluating the severity of flaws in reactor pressure vessels. It has been shown that this emission may be misleading. The necessity to consider the cladding induced stresses is also emphasized in the latest edition of ASME XI. Contrary to what is commonly assumed, the austenitic cladding displays a charpy V transition region with a low ductility. The interface material (HAZ) is the most influenced region by irradiation, and a transition shift of over 100 degree C may be expected. Because of the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and the base metal, cladding induced stresses can be set up. Even after PWHT, residual stresses of yield magnitude remain in the cladding and the HAZ at ambient temperature. The cladding induced stresses are temperature dependent and decrease as the temperature increases. The cladding induced stresses have a significant influence on small defects near the inside surface of a pressure vessel. For semielliptical surface cracks, the maximum CTOD-value along the crack front is not found at the deepest point, but in the cladding/base metal interface, having a magnitude three times higher than the value in the deepest point. It implies that this type of crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface. At some point in time, the crack will reach a geometry which may cause such a severe condition at the deepest point that it will start to grow in the depth direction as well. The initiation and growth behaviour of such cracks need to be investigated to be able to assess the significance of cladding on the integrity of nuclear pressure vessels. (author) (50 figs., 33 refs.)

  5. CASTI handbook of cladding technology. 2. ed.

    Smith, L.; Celant, M.

    2000-01-01

    This updated (2000) CASTI handbook covers all aspects of clad products - the different means of manufacture, properties and applications in various industries. Topics include: an introduction to cladding technology, clad plate, clad pipes, bends, clad fittings, specification requirements of clad products, welding clad products, clad product application and case histories from around the world. Unique to this book is the documentation of case histories of major cladding projects from around the world and how the technology of that day has withstood the demands of time. Filled with over 100 photos and graphics illustrating the various cladding technology examples and products, this book truly documents the most recent technologies in the field of cladding technology used worldwide

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Clads of Inconel 625 and Metco 41C

    Němeček, Stanislav; Fidler, Lukáš; Fišerová, Pavla

    The present paper explores the impact of laser cladding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of the resulting surface. Powders of Inconel 625 and austenitic Metco 41C steel were deposited on steel substrate. It was confirmed that the level of dilution has profound impact on the corrosion resistance and that dilution has to be minimized. However, the chemical composition of the cladding is altered even in the course of the cladding process, a fact which is related to the increase in the substrate temperature. The cladding process was optimized to achieve maximum corrosion resistance. The results were verified and validated using microscopic observation, chemical analysis and corrosion testing.

  7. Oxidation behaviors of the TiNi/Ti_2Ni matrix composite coatings with different contents of TaC addition fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser cladding

    Lv, Y.H.; Li, J.; Tao, Y.F.; Hu, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    The TiNi/Ti_2Ni matrix composite coatings were fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser cladding the mixtures of NiCrBSi and different contents of TaC (0 wt%, 5 wt%, 15 wt%, 30 wt% and 40 wt%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used to examine the microstructures of the coatings. Oxidation behaviors of these coatings were also investigated at 800 °C for 50 h in air. The results showed that the coating without TaC addition was mainly composed of TiNi/Ti_2Ni as the matrix and TiC/TiB_2/TiB as the reinforcement. TaC was dissolved completely and precipitated again during laser cladding. Ta and C from the added TaC mainly existed as the solute atoms in the solid solutions of TiC, TiB_2 and TiB in the coatings with TaC addition. The addition of TaC refined the microstructures of the coatings. In the oxidation test, the oxidation process was divided into the violent oxidation stage and the slow oxidation stage. The oxidation rates of the substrate and the coatings with different contents of TaC (0, 5, 15, 30, 40 wt%) were 0.644, 0.287, 0.173, 0.161, 0.223 and 0.072 mg cm"−"2 h"−"1 in the first stage, 0.884, 0.215, 0.136, 0.126, 0.108 and 0.040 mg"2 cm"−"4 h"−"1 in the second stage, respectively. The weight gain of these samples were 6.70, 3.30, 2.86, 2.64, 2.41 and 1.69 mg cm"−"2, respectively after the whole oxidation test. The oxidation film formed on the surface of the coating without TaC addition mainly consisted of TiO_2, Al_2O_3, and a small amount of NiO, Cr_2O_3 and SiO_2. Moreover, Ta_2O_5 was also formed on the surfaces of these coatings with different contents of TaC. The oxides formed during the oxidation test were supposed to be responsible for the improvement in oxidation resistance of these coatings. - Highlights: • The composite coatings with TaC addition were fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser cladding. • Effect of TaC addition on microstructural evolution of the coatings was

  8. Oxidation behaviors of the TiNi/Ti{sub 2}Ni matrix composite coatings with different contents of TaC addition fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser cladding

    Lv, Y.H.; Li, J., E-mail: jacob_lijun@sina.com; Tao, Y.F.; Hu, L.F.

    2016-09-15

    The TiNi/Ti{sub 2}Ni matrix composite coatings were fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser cladding the mixtures of NiCrBSi and different contents of TaC (0 wt%, 5 wt%, 15 wt%, 30 wt% and 40 wt%). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used to examine the microstructures of the coatings. Oxidation behaviors of these coatings were also investigated at 800 °C for 50 h in air. The results showed that the coating without TaC addition was mainly composed of TiNi/Ti{sub 2}Ni as the matrix and TiC/TiB{sub 2}/TiB as the reinforcement. TaC was dissolved completely and precipitated again during laser cladding. Ta and C from the added TaC mainly existed as the solute atoms in the solid solutions of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and TiB in the coatings with TaC addition. The addition of TaC refined the microstructures of the coatings. In the oxidation test, the oxidation process was divided into the violent oxidation stage and the slow oxidation stage. The oxidation rates of the substrate and the coatings with different contents of TaC (0, 5, 15, 30, 40 wt%) were 0.644, 0.287, 0.173, 0.161, 0.223 and 0.072 mg cm{sup −2} h{sup −1} in the first stage, 0.884, 0.215, 0.136, 0.126, 0.108 and 0.040 mg{sup 2} cm{sup −4} h{sup −1} in the second stage, respectively. The weight gain of these samples were 6.70, 3.30, 2.86, 2.64, 2.41 and 1.69 mg cm{sup −2}, respectively after the whole oxidation test. The oxidation film formed on the surface of the coating without TaC addition mainly consisted of TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a small amount of NiO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. Moreover, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} was also formed on the surfaces of these coatings with different contents of TaC. The oxides formed during the oxidation test were supposed to be responsible for the improvement in oxidation resistance of these coatings. - Highlights: • The composite coatings with TaC addition were fabricated on Ti6Al4V by laser

  9. Toward superlensing with metal-dielectric composites and multilayers

    Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Thoreson, M.D.; Chen, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of two types of adjustable, near-field superlens designs: metal–dielectric composites and metal–dielectric multilayer films. We fabricated a variety of films with different materials, thicknesses and compositions. These samples were characterized physically...... and optically to determine their film composition, quality, and optical responses. Our results on metal–dielectric composites indicate that although the real part of the effective permittivity generally follows effective medium theory predictions, the imaginary part does not and substantially higher losses...

  10. Composite metal-ceramic material for high temperature energy conversion applications

    Wolff, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    At Eindhoven Universitu of technology a composite metal-ceramic material is being developed. It will serve as a protective confinement for a combustion heated Thermionic Energy Converter (TEC). This protective confinement of 'hot shell' consists of a composite W-TiN-SiC layer structure. The outer

  11. Dual energy CT inspection of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite combined with metal components

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jakůbek, J.; Kumpová, Ivana; Pichotka, M.

    6, Part B, November (2016), s. 47-55 ISSN 2214-6571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-07210S Keywords : dual energy computed tomography * carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite * metal artefact suppression Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214657116300107

  12. Using thin metal layers on composite structures for shielding the electromagnetic pulse caused by nearby lightning

    Blaj, M.A.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Damstra, G.C.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Electronic systems in composite structures could be vulnerable to the (dominant magnetic) field caused by a lightning strike, because only thin layers of metal can be used on composite structures. Thin layers result in a very low shielding effectiveness against magnetic fields. Many experiments

  13. Production of oxide-metal P/M composites using pulsed plasma heating

    Blinkov, I.V.; Manukhin, A.V.; Ostapovich, A.O.; Pavlov, IU.A.

    1987-08-01

    The possibility of producing oxide-metal P/M composites using plasma generated by a pulsed discharge is investigated experimentally for the system Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/-Ni. It is found that Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/ metallization in plasma is accompanied by spheroidization; changes in the physicomechanical properties of the Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/-Ni composite during plasma treatment are examined. The characteristic features of the process associated with the effect of pulsed energy on the disperse flow of the oxide-metal mixture are discussed. 7 references.

  14. Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and their Composites

    Flores, K M; Suh, D; Howell, R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Dauskardt, R H

    2001-01-01

    The fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass and a composite utilizing a crystalline reinforcement phase are reviewed. The relationship between stress state, free volume and shear band formation are discussed. Positron annihilation techniques were used to confirm the predicted increase in free volume after plastic straining. Strain localization and failure were examined for a wide range of stress states. Finally, methods for toughening metallic glasses are considered. Significant increases in toughness are demonstrated for a composite bulk metallic glass containing a ductile second phase which stabilizes shear band formation and distributes plastic deformation

  15. Development of Composite Grinding Wheels for Hard and Soft Metals

    Pruti, Faruk

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the performance of grinding wheel in terms of its internal granular particles and their effect on the surface finish for both soft and hard metals subjected to both dry and wet conditions of use. The study considers the properties of materials of construction including hardness of the granular particles and their size and distributions that affects the grinding wheel efficiency in abrading of soft and hard metal surfaces. Furthermore, in order to improve grinding pe...

  16. Alkylamine functionalized metal-organic frameworks for composite gas separations

    Long, Jeffrey R.; McDonald, Thomas M.; D'Alessandro, Deanna M.

    2018-01-09

    Functionalized metal-organic framework adsorbents with ligands containing basic nitrogen groups such as alkylamines and alkyldiamines appended to the metal centers and method of isolating carbon dioxide from a stream of combined gases and carbon dioxide partial pressures below approximately 1 and 1000 mbar. The adsorption material has an isosteric heat of carbon dioxide adsorption of greater than -60 kJ/mol at zero coverage using a dual-site Langmuir model.

  17. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding Development

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Griffith, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R and D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental enhancements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and fuel/cladding interaction to allow improved fuel economy via power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an 'accident tolerant' fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. In a staged development approach, the LWRS program will engage stakeholders throughout the development process to ensure commercial viability of the investigated technologies. Applying minimum performance criteria, several of the top-ranked materials and fabrication concepts will undergo a rigorous series of mechanical, thermal and chemical characterization tests to better define their properties and operating potential in a relatively low-cost, nonnuclear test series. A reduced number of options will be recommended for test rodlet fabrication and in-pile nuclear testing under steady-state, transient and accident conditions. (author)

  18. DECONTAMINATION OF ZIRCALOY SPENT FUEL CLADDING HULLS

    Rudisill, T; John Mickalonis, J

    2006-01-01

    The reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generates a Zircaloy cladding hull waste which requires disposal as a high level waste in the geologic repository. The hulls are primarily contaminated with fission products and actinides from the fuel. During fuel irradiation, these contaminants are deposited in a thin layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) which forms on the cladding surface at the elevated temperatures present in a nuclear reactor. Therefore, if the hulls are treated to remove the ZrO 2 layer, a majority of the contamination will be removed and the hulls could potentially meet acceptance criteria for disposal as a low level waste (LLW). Discard of the hulls as a LLW would result in significant savings due to the high costs associated with geologic disposal. To assess the feasibility of decontaminating spent fuel cladding hulls, two treatment processes developed for dissolving fuels containing zirconium (Zr) metal or alloys were evaluated. Small-scale dissolution experiments were performed using the ZIRFLEX process which employs a boiling ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F)/ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) solution to dissolve Zr or Zircaloy cladding and a hydrofluoric acid (HF) process developed for complete dissolution of Zr-containing fuels. The feasibility experiments were performed using Zircaloy-4 metal coupons which were electrochemically oxidized to produce a thin ZrO 2 layer on the surface. Once the oxide layer was in place, the ease of removing the layer using methods based on the two processes was evaluated. The ZIRFLEX and HF dissolution processes were both successful in removing a 0.2 mm (thick) oxide layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons. Although the ZIRFLEX process was effective in removing the oxide layer, two potential shortcomings were identified. The formation of ammonium hexafluorozirconate ((NH 4 ) 2 ZrF 6 ) on the metal surface prior to dissolution in the bulk solution could hinder the decontamination process by obstructing the removal of

  19. Elimination of Start/Stop defects in laser cladding

    Ocelik, V.; Eekma, M.; Hemmati, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser cladding represents an advanced hard facing technology for the deposition of hard, corrosion and wear resistant layers of controlled thickness onto a selected area of metallic substrate. When a circular geometry is required, the beginning and the end of the laser track coincide in the same

  20. Composite nanomaterials of semiconductors and noble metals as plasmonic photocatalysts

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Law, Matt; Zhang, Jingdong

    behavior, and can be more stable under operating conditions. Composite photocatalysts of semiconductor nanoparticles (SNPs) and PNPs exploit broadly the solar spectrum, provide new catalytic routes and expand the scope of solar photocatalysis. The newly initiated project aims at developing composite...

  1. Mixing implants of differing metallic composition in the treatment of upper-extremity fractures.

    Acevedo, Daniel; Loy, Bo Nasmyth; Loy, Bo Nasymuth; Lee, Brian; Omid, Reza; Itamura, John

    2013-09-01

    Mixing implants with differing metallic compositions has been avoided for fear of galvanic corrosion and subsequent failure of the implants and of bone healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate upper-extremity fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation with metallic implants that differed in metallic composition placed on the same bone. The authors studied the effects of using both stainless steel and titanium implants on fracture healing, implant failure, and other complications associated with this method of fixation. Their hypothesis was that combining these metals on the same bone would not cause clinically significant nonunions or undo clinical effects from galvanic corrosion. A retrospective review was performed of 17 patients with upper-extremity fractures fixed with metal implants of differing metallic compositions. The primary endpoint was fracture union. Eight clavicles, 2 proximal humeri, 3 distal humeri, 3 olecranons, and 1 glenoid fracture with an average follow-up 10 months were reviewed. All fractures healed. One patient experienced screw backout, which did not affect healing. This study implies that mixing implants with differing metallic compositions on the same bone for the treatment of fractures does not adversely affect bone healing. No evidence existed of corrosion or an increase in complications with this method of treatment. Contrary to prior belief, small modular hand stainless steel plates can be used to assist in reduction of smaller fracture fragments in combination with anatomic titanium plates to obtain anatomic reduction of the fracture without adversely affecting healing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Mechanical tests imaging on metallic matrix composites. Experimental contribution to homogenization methods validation and identification of phase-related mechanical properties

    Quoc-Thang Vo

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on a matrix/inclusion metal composite. A simple method is proposed to evaluate the elastic properties of one phase while the properties of the other phase are assumed to be known. The method is based on both an inverse homogenization scheme and mechanical field's measurements by 2D digital image correlation. The originality of the approach rests on the scale studied, i.e. the microstructure scale of material: the characteristic size of the inclusions is about few tens of microns. The evaluation is performed on standard uniaxial tensile tests associated with a long-distance microscope. It allows observation of the surface of a specimen on the microstructure scale during the mechanical stress. First, the accuracy of the method is estimated on 'perfect' mechanical fields coming from numerical simulations for four microstructures: elastic or porous single inclusions having either spherical or cylindrical shape. Second, this accuracy is estimated on real mechanical field for two simple microstructures: an elasto-plastic metallic matrix containing a single cylindrical micro void or four cylindrical micro voids arranged in a square pattern. Third, the method is used to evaluate elastic properties of αZr inclusions with arbitrary shape in an oxidized Zircaloy-4 sample of the fuel cladding of a pressurized water reactor after an accident loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In all this study, the phases are assumed to have isotropic properties. (author) [fr

  3. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  4. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  5. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  6. Gradient composite metal-ceramic foam as supportive component for planar SOFCs and MIEC membranes

    Smorygo, Oleg; Mikutski, Vitali; Marukovich, Alexander; Sadykov, Vladislav; Usoltsev, Vladimir; Mezentseva, Natalia; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Bobrenok, Oleg

    2011-06-01

    A novel approach to the design of planar gradient porous supports for the thin-film SOFCs and MIEC membranes is described. The support's thermal expansion is controlled by the creation of a two-component composite metal-ceramic foam structure. Thin MIEC membranes and SOFCs were prepared on the composite supports by the layerwise deposition of composite functional layers including complex fluorites and perovskites. Lab-scale studies demonstrated promising performance of both MIEC membrane and SOFC.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of MoS2/Ti composite coatings on Ti6Al4V prepared by laser cladding

    Yang, Rongjuan; Liu, Zongde; Wang, Yongtian; Yang, Guang; Li, Hongchuan

    2013-02-01

    The MoS2/Ti composite coating with sub-micron grade structure has been prepared on Ti6Al4V by laser method under argon protection. The morphology, microstructure, microhardness and friction coefficient of the coating were examined. The results indicated that the molybdenum disulfide was decomposed during melting and resolidification. The phase organization of composite coating mainly consisted of ternary element sulfides, molybdenum sulfides and titanium sulfides. The friction coefficient of and the surface roughness the MoS2/Ti coating were lower than those of Ti6Al4V. The composite coating exhibits excellent adhesion to the substrates, less surface roughness, good wear resistance and harder surface.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of MoS2/Ti composite coatings on Ti6Al4V prepared by laser cladding

    Rongjuan Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The MoS2/Ti composite coating with sub-micron grade structure has been prepared on Ti6Al4V by laser method under argon protection. The morphology, microstructure, microhardness and friction coefficient of the coating were examined. The results indicated that the molybdenum disulfide was decomposed during melting and resolidification. The phase organization of composite coating mainly consisted of ternary element sulfides, molybdenum sulfides and titanium sulfides. The friction coefficient of and the surface roughness the MoS2/Ti coating were lower than those of Ti6Al4V. The composite coating exhibits excellent adhesion to the substrates, less surface roughness, good wear resistance and harder surface.

  9. Interdiffusion between U-Zr-Mo and stainless steel cladding

    Hwang, J. Y.; Lee, B. S.; Lee, J. T.; Kang, Y. H.

    1998-01-01

    Interdiffusion investigations were carried out at 700 deg C for 200 hours for the diffusion couples assembled with the U-Zr-Mo ternary fuel versus austenitic stainless steel D9 and the U-Zr-Mo ternary fuel versus martensitic stainless steel HT9 respectively to investigate the fuel-cladding compatibility. SEM-EDS analysis was utilized to determine the composition and the penetration depths of the reaction layers. In the case of Fuel/D9 couple, (Fe, Cr, Ni) of the cladding elements formed the precipitates with the Zr, Mo and diminished the U concentration upto 800μ length from the fuel side. Composition of the precipitates was varied with the penetrated elements. In Fuel/HT9 couple, reaction layer was smaller than that of D9 couples and was less affected by cladding elements. The eutectic reaction appeared partially in the Fuel/HT9 diffusion couple

  10. One-step synthesis of gold bimetallic nanoparticles with various metal-compositions

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Takai, Osamu; Saito, Nagahiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in an aqueous solution discharge. ► Alloying gold with divalent sp metals, trivalent sp metals, 3d or 4d metals. ► Formation mechanism of bimetallic nanoparticles by metal reduction and gold erosion. ► Blue and red shift of surface plasmon resonance. -- Abstract: A rapid, one-step process for the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles by simultaneous metal reduction and gold erosion in an aqueous solution discharge was investigated. Gold bimetallic nanoparticles were obtained by alloying gold with various types of metals belonging to one of the following categories: divalent sp metals, trivalent sp metals, 3d or 4d metals. The composition of the various gold bimetallic nanoparticles obtained depends on electrochemical factors, charge transfer between gold and other metal, and initial concentration of metal in solution. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy show that the gold bimetallic nanoparticles were of mixed pattern, with sizes of between 5 and 20 nm. A red-shift of the surface plasmon resonance band in the case of the bimetallic nanoparticles Au–Fe, Au–Ga, and Au–In, and a blue-shift of the plasmon band of the Au–Ag nanoparticles was observed. In addition, the interaction of gold bimetallic nanoparticles with unpaired electrons, provided by a stable free radical molecule, was highest for those NPs obtained by alloying gold with a 3d metal

  11. Physicochemical and Electrophysical Properties of Metal/Semiconductor Containing Nanostructured Composites

    Gerasimov, G. N.; Gromov, V. F.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2018-06-01

    The properties of nanostructured composites based on metal oxides and metal-polymer materials are analyzed, along with ways of preparing them. The effect the interaction between metal and semiconductor nanoparticles has on the conductivity, photoconductivity, catalytic activity, and magnetic, dielectric, and sensor properties of nanocomposites is discussed. It is shown that as a result of this interaction, a material can acquire properties that do not exist in systems of isolated particles. The transfer of electrons between metal particles of different sizes in polymeric matrices leads to specific dielectric losses, and to an increase in the rate and a change in the direction of chemical reactions catalyzed by these particles. The interaction between metal-oxide semiconductor particles results in the electronic and chemical sensitization of sensor effects in nanostructured composite materials. Studies on creating molecular machines (Brownian motors), devices for magnetic recording of information, and high-temperature superconductors based on nanostructured systems are reviewed.

  12. Method and composition for testing for the presence of an alkali metal

    Guon, J.

    1981-01-01

    A method and composition for detecting the presence of an alkali metal on the surface of a body such as a metal plate, tank, pipe or the like is provided. The method comprises contacting the surface with a thin film of a liquid composition comprising a light-colored pigment, an acid-base indicator, and a nonionic wetting agent dispersed in a liquid carrier comprising a minor amount of water and a major amount of an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of the lower aliphatic alcohols, ketones and ethers. Any alkali metal present on the surface in elemental form or as an alkali metal hydroxide or alkali metal carbonate will react with the acid-base indicator to produce a contrasting color change in the thin film, which is readily discernible by visual observation or automatic techniques

  13. Annex 3 - Testing the microstructure of the fuel element with metal uranium with aluminium cladding; Prilog 3 - Ispitivanje mikrostrukture gorivnog elementa na bazi metalnog urana sa aluminijumskom kosuljicom

    Milosevic, S; Momcilovic, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Based on the uranium microstructure in the fuel element, i.e. grain size, presence of other phases, porosity and the position of metal connections, some data could be obtained about the mechanical and thermal treatment of the uranium during fuel element fabrication. The mentioned characteristics could indicate the behaviour of the fuel under reactor operating conditions taking into account its stable dimensions and roughness of its surfaces. Na osnovu mikrostrukture urana u gorivnom elementu, odnosno velicine i oblika njegovih kristalnih zrna, prisustva drugih faza, pozoziteta kao i rasporeda metalnih ukljucaka, mogu se dobiti izvesni podaci o tome koje je postupke mehanickog i termickog tretiranja pretrpeo uran u pripremi za gorivni elemenat. Prethodne karakteristike takodje mogu da daju predstavu o tome kako ce se gorivo ponasati u uslovima rada reaktora, s obzirom na njegovu dimenzionu stabilnost i ogrubljivanje njegove povrsine (author)

  14. Characteristics of diffusion zone in changing glass-metal composite processing conditions

    Lyubimova, O. N.; Morkovin, A. V.; Andreev, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    The influence of manufacturing technology on the characteristics of the glass and steel contact zone in manufacturing new structural material - glass-metal composite is studied theoretically and experimentally. Different types of structures in the contact zone and its dimensions affect the strength characteristics of the composite. Knowledge about changing the width of the glass and steel contact zone after changing such parameters of the technological regime as temperature, holding time and use of solders will allow one to control the structure and characteristics of the glass-metal composite. Experimental measurements of the width of the diffusion zone in the glass-metal composite for different regimes and their statistical processing according to the full factor experiment are presented in this article. The results of analysis of some mechanical characteristics of the diffusion zone are presented: microhardness and modulus of elasticity for samples, prepared according to different processing regimes.

  15. Al/Ni metal intermetallic composite produced by accumulative roll bonding and reaction annealing

    Mozaffari, A.; Hosseini, M.; Manesh, H. Danesh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Al/Ni metallic composites produced by accumulative roll bonding were heat treated at different temperatures and periods, to investigate the effect of reaction annealing on the structure and mechanical properties. → Based on the annealing conditions, various intermetallic phases were formed. The structure and composition of the composites were detected by SEM and XRD techniques. → The strength of the initial metallic composite can be improved due to the formation of the hard intermetallic phases, by the heat treatment process. - Abstract: In this research, Al/Ni multilayers composites were produced by accumulative roll bonding and then annealed at different temperatures and durations. The structure and mechanical properties of the fabricated metal intermetallic composites (MICs) were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were used to evaluate the structure and composition of the composite. The Al 3 Ni intermetallic phase is formed in the Al/Ni interface of the samples annealed at 300 and 400 deg. C. When the temperature increased to 500 deg. C, the Al 3 Ni 2 phase was formed in the composite structure and grew, while the Al 3 Ni and Al phases were simultaneously dissociated. At these conditions, the strength of MIC reached the highest content and was enhanced by increasing time. At 600 deg. C, the AlNi phase was formed and the mechanical properties of MIC were intensively degraded due to the formation of structural porosities.

  16. Fabrication techniques of metal liner used for pressure vessels made by composite material

    Takahashi, W.K.; Al-Qureshi, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    Different viable techniques for the manufacturing of metal liner used for pressure vessels are presented. The aim of these metal liner is to avoid the fluid leakage from the pressurized vessel and to serve as a mandreal to be wound by composite material. The studied techniques are described and the practical results are illustrated. Finally a comparative study of the manufacturing techniques is made in order to define the process that furnishes the metal liner with the best characteristics. The advantages offered by these type of pressure vessels when compared with the conventional metallic vessels, are also presented. (Author) [pt

  17. Disulfide polymer grafted porous carbon composites for heavy metal removal from stormwater runoff

    Ko, Dongah; Mines, Paul D.; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2018-01-01

    The emerging concern of heavy metal pollution derived from stormwater runoff has triggered a demand for effective heavy metal sorbents. To be an effective sorbent, high affinity along with rapid sorption kinetics for environmental relevant concentrations of heavy metals is important. Herein, we...... have introduced a new composite suitable for trace metal concentration removal, which consists of cheap and common granular activated carbon covered with polymers containing soft bases, thiols, through acyl chlorination (DiS-AC). Material characterization demonstrated that the polymer was successfully...

  18. Microstructures and properties of TiN reinforced Co-based composite coatings modified with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser cladding on Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    Weng, Fei, E-mail: wengfeisdu@126.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong University, Suzhou Institute, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yu, Huijun, E-mail: yhj2001@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High-efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture (Ministry of Education), School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong University, Suzhou Institute, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen, Chuanzhong, E-mail: czchen@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong University, Suzhou Institute, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Jianli, E-mail: jianli21s@163.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong University, Suzhou Institute, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhao, Longjie, E-mail: zhaoljsdu@sina.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Shandong University, Suzhou Institute, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-11-25

    In this study, TiN reinforced composite coatings were fabricated on Ti–6Al–4V substrate by laser cladding with Co42 self-fluxing alloy, TiN and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixed powders. Microstructures and wear resistance of the cladding coatings with and without Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition were investigated comparatively. Results showed that the coatings were mainly comprised of γ-Co/Ni, TiN, CoTi, CoTi{sub 2}, NiTi, TiC, Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, TiB, Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and TiC{sub 0.3}N{sub 0.7} phases. The coatings showed metallurgical bonding free of pores and cracks with the substrate. Compared with the Ti–6Al–4V substrate, the microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings was enhanced by 3–4 times and 9.5–11.9 times, respectively. With 1.0 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition, the microstructure of the coating was refined significantly, and the microhardness and dry sliding wear resistance were enhanced further. The effects of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were attributed to the residual Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and decomposed Y atoms. - Graphical abstract: The diagram illustration for the action mechanism of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}: (a) dissolution of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiN, (b) re-formation of TiN and in situ formation of TiC, (c) growth of TiN, TiC and the distribution of Y atoms. - Highlights: • Coatings showing metallurgical bonding with the substrate were fabricated. • The effect of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the refinement of the microstructure is notable. • A kind of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} centered core–shell structure was picked out in the coating. • Microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings was enhanced significantly.

  19. Composites

    Kasen, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the roles of composite laminates and aggregates in cryogenic technology. Filamentary-reinforced composites are emphasized because they are the most widely used composite materials. Topics considered include composite systems and terminology, design and fabrication, composite failure, high-pressure reinforced plastic laminates, low-pressure reinforced plastics, reinforced metals, selectively reinforced structures, the effect of cryogenic temperatures, woven-fabric and random-mat composites, uniaxial fiber-reinforced composites, composite joints in cryogenic structures, joining techniques at room temperature, radiation effects, testing laminates at cryogenic temperatures, static and cyclic tensile testing, static and cyclic compression testing, interlaminar shear testing, secondary property tests, and concrete aggregates. It is suggested that cryogenic composite technology would benefit from the development of a fracture mechanics model for predicting the fitness-for-purpose of polymer-matrix composite structures

  20. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  1. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites Containing Metal Reinforcements

    Kuentz, Lily; Salem, Anton; Singh, M.; Halbig, M. C.; Salem, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of polymeric systems using 3D printing has become quite popular recently due to rapid growth and availability of low cost and open source 3D printers. Two widely used 3D printing filaments are based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) systems. PLA is much more environmentally friendly in comparison to ABS since it is made from renewable resources such as corn, sugarcane, and other starches as precursors. Recently, polylactic acid-based metal powder containing composite filaments have emerged which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. The composite filaments have higher density than pure PLA, and the majority of the materials volume is made up of polylactic acid. In order to utilize functionalities of composite filaments, printing behavior and properties of 3-D printed composites need to be characterized and compared with the pure PLA materials. In this study, pure PLA and composite specimens with different metallic reinforcements (Copper, Bronze, Tungsten, Iron, etc) were 3D printed at various layer heights and resulting microstructures and properties were characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) behavior of filaments with different reinforcements were studied. The microscopy results show an increase in porosity between 3-D printed regular PLA and the metal composite PLA samples, which could produce weaker mechanical properties in the metal composite materials. Tensile strength and fracture toughness behavior of specimens as a function of print layer height will be presented.

  2. Biocompatibility of a functionally graded bioceramic coating made by wide-band laser cladding.

    Weidong, Zhu; Qibin, Liu; Min, Zheng; Xudong, Wang

    2008-11-01

    The application of plasma spray is the most popular method by which a metal-bioceramic surface composite can be prepared for the repair of biological hard-tissue, but this method has disadvantages. These disadvantages include poor coating-to-substrate adhesion, low mechanical strength, and brittleness of the coating. In the investigation described in this article, a gradient bioceramic coating was prepared on a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy surface using a gradient composite design and wide-band laser cladding techniques. Using a trilayer-structure composed of a substratum, an alloy and bioceramics, the coating was chemically and metallurgically bonded with the substratum. The coating, which contains beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite, showed favorable biocompatibility with the bone tissue and promoted in vivo osteogenesis.

  3. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  4. Humidity Sensing Properties of Surface Modified Polyaniline Metal Oxide Composites

    S. C. Nagaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline- (PANI praseodymium Oxide (Pr2O3 composites have been synthesized by in situ polymerization method with different weight percentages. The synthesized composites have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The temperature dependent conductivity shows that the conductivity is due to the hopping of polarons and bipolarons. These composites show negative thermal coefficient (α behavior as a function of temperature, which is characteristic behavior of semiconducting materials. Sensor studies have been carried out by two-probe method and found that the sensitivity increases with increase in % RH. It is noticed that stability increase is due to the presence of Pr2O3 in polyaniline up to 30 wt%. A fast recovery and response time along with high sensitivity make these composites suitable for humidity sensors.

  5. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    NONE

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases.

  6. Technical committee meeting on fuel and cladding interaction. Summary report

    1977-04-01

    Experiments and experiences concerning fuel-cladding interaction in thermal and fast neutron flux burnup are dealt with. A number of results from in-pile and out-of pile experiments with different fuel pins with cladding made of different stainless steels showed the importance of corrosion process, dependent on the burnup, core temperature, metal-oxide ratio, and other steady state parameters in the core of fast reactors (most frequently LMFBRs). This is of importance for fuel pins design and fabrication. Mixed oxide fuel is treated in many cases

  7. Reactor fuel cladding tube with excellent corrosion resistance and method of manufacturing the same

    Okuda, Takanari; Kanehara, Mitsuo; Abe, Katsuhiro; Nishimura, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel cladding tube having an excellent corrosion resistance and thus a long life, and a suitable manufacturing method therefor. Namely, in the fuel cladding tube, the outer circumference of an inner layer made of a zirconium base alloy is coated with an outer layer made of a metal more corrosion resistant than the zirconium base alloy. Ti or a titanium alloy is suitable for the corrosion resistant metal. In addition, the outer layer can be coated by a method such as vapor deposition or plating, not limited to joining of the inner layer material and the outer layer material. Specifically, a composite material having an inner layer made of a zirconium alloy coated by the outer material made of a titanium alloy is applied with hot fabrication at a temperature within a range of from 500 to 850degC and at a fabrication rate of not less than 5%. The fabrication method includes any of extrusion, rolling, drawing, and casting. As the titanium-base alloy, a Ti-Al alloy or a Ti-Nb alloy containing Al of not more than 20wt%, or Nb of not more than 20wt% is preferred. (I.S.)

  8. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    Zhuang, W., E-mail: wyman.zhuang@dsto.defence.gov.au [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K. [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Paradowska, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface.

  9. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    Zhuang, W.; Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K.; Paradowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface

  10. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Congdon, James W [Aiken, SC

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  11. Graphene–Noble Metal Nano-Composites and Applications for Hydrogen Sensors

    Sukumar Basu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graphene based nano-composites are relatively new materials with excellent mechanical, electrical, electronic and chemical properties for applications in the fields of electrical and electronic devices, mechanical appliances and chemical gadgets. For all these applications, the structural features associated with chemical bonding that involve other components at the interface need in-depth investigation. Metals, polymers, inorganic fibers and other components improve the properties of graphene when they form a kind of composite structure in the nano-dimensions. Intensive investigations have been carried out globally in this area of research and development. In this article, some salient features of graphene–noble metal interactions and composite formation which improve hydrogen gas sensing properties—like higher and fast response, quick recovery, cross sensitivity, repeatability and long term stability of the sensor devices—are presented. Mostly noble metals are effective for enhancing the sensing performance of the graphene–metal hybrid sensors, due to their superior catalytic activities. The experimental evidence for atomic bonding between metal nano-structures and graphene has been reported in the literature and it is theoretically verified by density functional theory (DFT. Multilayer graphene influences gas sensing performance via intercalation of metal and non-metal atoms through atomic bonding.

  12. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Luo, Xiangwei [Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Niu, Jitai, E-mail: niujitai@163.com [Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe-Ni-Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn-Cd-Ag-Cu) with a melting point of about 400 Degree-Sign C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)-Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al-SiC composite.

  13. A new method for soldering particle-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    Lu, Jinbin; Mu, Yunchao; Luo, Xiangwei; Niu, Jitai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Soldering of 55% SiCp/Al composite and Kovar is first achieved in the world. ► The nickel plating is required on the surface of the composites before soldering. ► Low welding temperature is set to avoid overheating of the matrix. ► Chemical and metallurgical bonding of composites and Kovar is carried out. ► High tension strength of 225 MPa in soldering seam has been obtained. - Abstract: Soldering of aluminum metal matrix composites (Al–SiC) to other structural materials, or even to themselves, has proved unsuccessful mainly due to the poor wetting of these composites by conventional soldering alloys. This paper reports a new approach, which improves the wetting properties of these composites by molting solder alloys to promote stronger bonds. The new approach relies on nickel-plating of the composite's faying surface prior to application of a solder alloy. Based on this approach, an aluminum metal matrix composite containing 55 vol.% SiC particles is successfully soldered to a Fe–Ni–Co alloy (commercially known as Kovar 4J29). The solder material is a zinc-based alloy (Zn–Cd–Ag–Cu) with a melting point of about 400 °C. Microscopic examinations of the aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs)–Kovar interfaces show that the nickel-plating, prior to soldering, could noticeably enhance the reaction between the molten solder and composites. The fractography of the shear-tested samples revealed that fracture occurs within the composite (i.e. cohesive failure), indicating a good adhesion between the solder alloy and the Al–SiC composite.

  14. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  15. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  16. Laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    Comesaña, R; Quintero, F; Lusquiños, F; Pascual, M J; Boutinguiza, M; Durán, A; Pou, J

    2010-03-01

    Laser cladding by powder injection has been used to produce bioactive glass coatings on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Bioactive glass compositions alternative to 45S5 Bioglass were demonstrated to exhibit a gradual wetting angle-temperature evolution and therefore a more homogeneous deposition of the coating over the substrate was achieved. Among the different compositions studied, the S520 bioactive glass showed smoother wetting angle-temperature behavior and was successfully used as precursor material to produce bioactive coatings. Coatings processed using a Nd:YAG laser presented calcium silicate crystallization at the surface, with a uniform composition along the coating cross-section, and no significant dilution of the titanium alloy was observed. These coatings maintain similar bioactivity to that of the precursor material as demonstrated by immersion in simulated body fluid. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation cured polyester compositions containing metal-properties

    Szalińska, H.; Pietrzak, M.; Gonerski, A.

    The subject of the studies was unsaturated polyester resin, Polimal-109 and its compositions containing acrylates of: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, barium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper and acrylic acid. Polyester resin modified with acrylic acid salts was cured with 60Co gamma radiation. Measurements of Vicat softening temperature, water absorption, creep current resistance, volume and surface resistivity, the tangent of dielectric loss angle and permittivity of radiation cured compositions were carried out. The results of the studies presented testify to the fact that the properties of cross-linked polymers alter after ionogenic compounds have been introduced into them.

  18. Radiation cured polyester compositions containing metal-properties

    Szalinska, H.; Pietrzak, M.; Gonerski, A.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of the studies was unsaturated polyester resin, Polimal-109 and its compositions containing acrylates of: sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, barium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper and acrylic acid. Polyester resin modified with acrylic acid salts was cured with 60 Co gamma radiation. Measurements of Vicat softening temperature, water absorption, creep current resistance, volume and surface resistivity, the tangent of dielectric loss angle and permittivity of radiation cured compositions were carried out. The results of the studies presented testify to the fact that the properties of cross-linked polymers alter after ionogenic compounds have been introduced into them. (author)

  19. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  20. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.