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Sample records for metal catalyzed hydrogen

  1. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid in nitrite-containing simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

    1994-08-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 -, and NO 2 - were used as media to evaluate the stability of formic acid towards hydrogen evolution by the reaction HCO 2 H → H 2 + CO 2 catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Small scale experiments using 40-50 mL of feed simulant in closed glass reactors (250-550 mL total volume) at 80-100 degree C were used to study the effect of nitrite and nitrate ion on the catalytic activities of the noble metals for formic acid decomposition. Reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase as a function of time. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl 3 ·3H 2 O, was found to be the most active catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid above ∼80 degree C in the presence of nitrite ion in accord with earlier observations. The inherent homogeneous nature of the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed formic acid decomposition is suggested by the approximate pseudo first-order dependence of the hydrogen production rate on Rh concentration. Titration of the typical feed simulants containing carbonate and nitrite with formic acid in the presence of rhodium at the reaction temperature (∼90 degree C) indicates that the nitrite-promoted Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid occurs only after formic acid has reacted with all of the carbonate and nitrite present to form CO 2 and NO/N 2 O, respectively. The catalytic activities of Ru and Pd towards hydrogen generation from formic acid are quite different than those of Rh in that they are inhibited rather than promoted by the presence of nitrite ion

  2. Single-site catalyst promoters accelerate metal-catalyzed nitroarene hydrogenation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2018-04-04

    Atomically dispersed supported metal catalysts are drawing wide attention because of the opportunities they offer for new catalytic properties combined with efficient use of the metals. We extend this class of materials to catalysts that incorporate atomically dispersed metal atoms as promoters. The catalysts are used for the challenging nitroarene hydrogenation and found to have both high activity and selectivity. The promoters are single-site Sn on TiO2 supports that incorporate metal nanoparticle catalysts. Represented as M/Sn-TiO2 (M = Au, Ru, Pt, Ni), these catalysts decidedly outperform the unpromoted supported metals, even for hydrogenation of nitroarenes substituted with various reducible groups. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts result from the creation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2 surface by single-site Sn, which leads to efficient, selective activation of the nitro group coupled with a reaction involving hydrogen atoms activated on metal nanoparticles.

  3. Single-site catalyst promoters accelerate metal-catalyzed nitroarene hydrogenation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang; Guan, Erjia; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Junhao; Zhu, Yihan; Han, Yu; Yang, Ming; Cen, Cheng; Fu, Gang; Gates, Bruce C.; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2018-01-01

    Atomically dispersed supported metal catalysts are drawing wide attention because of the opportunities they offer for new catalytic properties combined with efficient use of the metals. We extend this class of materials to catalysts that incorporate atomically dispersed metal atoms as promoters. The catalysts are used for the challenging nitroarene hydrogenation and found to have both high activity and selectivity. The promoters are single-site Sn on TiO2 supports that incorporate metal nanoparticle catalysts. Represented as M/Sn-TiO2 (M = Au, Ru, Pt, Ni), these catalysts decidedly outperform the unpromoted supported metals, even for hydrogenation of nitroarenes substituted with various reducible groups. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts result from the creation of oxygen vacancies on the TiO2 surface by single-site Sn, which leads to efficient, selective activation of the nitro group coupled with a reaction involving hydrogen atoms activated on metal nanoparticles.

  4. Noble metal catalyzed aqueous phase hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived pyrolysis oil and related model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Ben, Haoxi; Du, Xiaotang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Fan; Liu, Wei; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin pyrolysis oil and related model compounds were investigated using four noble metals supported on activated carbon. The hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol has three major reaction pathways and the demethylation reaction, mainly catalyzed by Pd, Pt and Rh, produces catechol as the products. The presence of catechol and guaiacol in the reaction is responsible for the coke formation and the catalysts deactivation. As expected, there was a significant decrease in the specific surface area of Pd, Pt and Rh catalysts during the catalytic reaction because of the coke deposition. In contrast, no catechol was produced from guaiacol when Ru was used so a completely hydrogenation was accomplished. The lignin pyrolysis oil upgrading with Pt and Ru catalysts further validated the reaction mechanism deduced from model compounds. Fully hydrogenated bio-oil was produced with Ru catalyst. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming [Augusta, GA

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  6. Oxidation of Phenol by Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Metal-Containing Poly(amidoxime Grafted Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany El-Hamshary

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyamidoxime chelating resin was obtained from polyacrylonitrile (PAN grafted starch. The nitrile groups of the starch-grafted polyacrylonitrile (St-g-PAN were converted into amidoximes by reaction with hydroxylamine under basic conditions. The synthesized graft copolymer and polyamidoxime were characterized by FTIR, TGA and elemental microanalysis. Metal chelation of the polyamidoxime resin with iron, copper and zinc has been studied. The produced metal-polyamidoxime polymer complexes were used as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol using H2O2 as oxidizing agent. The oxidation of phenol depends on the central metal ion present in the polyamidoxime complex. Reuse of M-polyamidoxime catalyst/H2O2 system showed a slight decrease in catalytic activities for all M-polyamidoxime catalysts.

  7. Complementary Strategies for Directed C(sp3 )-H Functionalization: A Comparison of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Activation, Hydrogen Atom Transfer, and Carbene/Nitrene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John C K; Rovis, Tomislav

    2018-01-02

    The functionalization of C(sp 3 )-H bonds streamlines chemical synthesis by allowing the use of simple molecules and providing novel synthetic disconnections. Intensive recent efforts in the development of new reactions based on C-H functionalization have led to its wider adoption across a range of research areas. This Review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of three main approaches: transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, 1,n-hydrogen atom transfer, and transition-metal-catalyzed carbene/nitrene transfer, for the directed functionalization of unactivated C(sp 3 )-H bonds. For each strategy, the scope, the reactivity of different C-H bonds, the position of the reacting C-H bonds relative to the directing group, and stereochemical outcomes are illustrated with examples in the literature. The aim of this Review is to provide guidance for the use of C-H functionalization reactions and inspire future research in this area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-04

    The present invention provides a class of catalyst compounds that can safely and effectively release hydrogen gas from a chemical substrate without producing either noxious byproducts or byproducts that will deactivate the catalyst. The present invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain stable under the reaction conditions required for an effective hydrogen production system. Described herein are compounds for use as catalysts, as well as methods for producing hydrogen from formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalysts. The methods include contacting formic acid and/or a formate with a catalyst as described herein, as well as methods of producing formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalyst and methods for generating electricity using the catalysts described herein.

  9. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Guan, Chao; Pan, Yupeng; Hu, Jinsong; Li, Huaifeng

    2018-01-01

    invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain

  10. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  11. AB/sub 5/-catalyzed hydrogen evolution cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D E; Sawada, T; Shepard, V R; Tsujikawa, Y

    1984-01-01

    The AB/sub 5/ metal compounds are highly efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolyte. Three types of AB/sub 5/-catalyzed cathode structures were made, using the hydride-forming AB/sub 5/ compounds in particulate form. Plastic-bonded cathodes containing >90 w/o AB/sub 5/ (finished-weight basis) were the most efficient, giving hydrogen evolution overpotentials (/eta/ /SUB H2/ ) of about 0.05 V at 200 mA cm/sup -2/. However, they tended to swell and shed material during electrolysis. Pressed, sintered cathodes containing 40-70 w/o catalyst in a nickel binder gave /eta/ /SUB H2/ about0.08 V; catalyst retention was excellent. Porous, sintered cathode coatings were made with 30-70 w/o AB/sub 5/ catalyst loadings. Their overpotentials were similar to those of the pressed, sintered cathodes. However, at catalyst loadings below about 40 w/o, high overpotentials characteristic of the nickel binder were observed. The structural and electrochemical properties of the three AB/sub 5/-catalyzed cathodes are discussed.

  12. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Redox potential monitoring as a method to control unwanted noble metal-catalyzed hydrogen generation from formic acid treatment of simulated nuclear waste media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major nonradioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2- , NO 3 - , and NO 2 - were used to study redox potential changes in reactions of formic acid at 90 C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a redox electrode to follow redox potential changes as a function of time. In the initial phase of formic acid addition to nitrite-containing feed simulants, the redox potential of the reaction mixture rises typically to +400 mV relative to the Al/AgCl electrode because of the generation of the moderately strongly oxidizing nitrous acid. No H 2 production occurs at this stage of the reaction as long as free nitrous acid is present. After all of the nitrous acid has been destroyed by reduction to N 2 O and NO and disproportionation to NO/NO 3 - , the redox potential of the reaction mixture becomes more negative than the Ag/AgCl electrode. The experiments outlined in this paper suggest the feasibility of controlling the production of H 2 by limiting the amount of formic acid used and monitoring the redox potential during formic acid treatment

  14. Fe3O4 and metal-organic framework MIL-101(Fe) composites catalyze luminol chemiluminescence for sensitively sensing hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian Tang, Xue; Dan Zhang, Yi; Wei Jiang, Zhong; Mei Wang, Dong; Zhi Huang, Cheng; Fang Li, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    In this work, Fe 3 O 4 and metal-organic framework MIL-101(Fe) composites (Fe 3 O 4 /MIL-101(Fe)) was demonstrated to possess excellent catalytic property to directly catalyze luminol chemiluminescence without extra oxidants. We utilized Fe 3 O 4 /MIL-101(Fe) to develop a ultra-sensitive quantitative analytical method for H 2 O 2 and glucose. The possible mechanism of the chemiluminescence reaction had been investigated. Under optimal conditions, the relative chemiluminescence intensity was linearly proportional to the logarithm of H 2 O 2 concentration in the range of 5-150nM with a limit of detection of 3.7nM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3), and glucose could be linearly detected in the range from 5 to 100nM and the detection limit was 4.9nM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3). Furthermore, the present approach was successfully applied to quantitative determination of H 2 O 2 in medical disinfectant and glucose in human serum samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metallic hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm 3 and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures

  16. Automated Quantum Mechanical Predictions of Enantioselectivity in a Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanfei; Wheeler, Steven E

    2017-07-24

    A computational toolkit (AARON: An automated reaction optimizer for new catalysts) is described that automates the density functional theory (DFT) based screening of chiral ligands for transition-metal-catalyzed reactions with well-defined reaction mechanisms but multiple stereocontrolling transition states. This is demonstrated for the Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of (E)-β-aryl-N-acetyl enamides, for which a new C 2 -symmetric phosphorus ligand is designed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fluorinated cobalt for catalyzing hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdim, O.; Demirci, U.B.; Brioude, A.; Miele, P. [Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, UMR 5615 CNRS Universite Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-07-15

    The present paper reports preliminary results relating to a search for durable cobalt-based catalyst intended to catalyze the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}). Fluorination of Co [Suda S, Sun YM, Liu BH, Zhou Y, Morimitsu S, Arai K, et al. Catalytic generation of hydrogen by applying fluorinated-metal hydrides as catalysts. Appl Phys A 2001; 72: 209-12.] has attracted our attention whereas the fluorination of Co boride has never been envisaged so far. Our first objective was to compare the reactivity of fluorinated Co with that of Co boride. We focused our attention on the formation of Co boride from fluorinated Co. Our second objective was to show the fluorination effect on the reactivity of Co. Our third objective was to find an efficient, durable Co catalyst. It was observed a limited stabilization of the Co surface by virtue of the fluorination, which made the formation of surface Co boride more difficult while the catalytic activity was unaltered. The fluorination did not affect the number of surface active sites. Nevertheless, it did not prevent the formation of Co boride. The fluorination of Co boride was inefficient. Hence, fluorination is a way to gain in stabilization of the catalytic surface but it is quite inefficient to hinder the boride formation. Accordingly, it did not permit to compare the reactivity of Co boride with that of Co. (author)

  18. Chitosan catalyzes hydrogen evolution at mercury electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Římánková, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 44, JUL2014 (2014), s. 59-62 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Chitosan * Glucosamine-containing polymers * Catalytic hydrogen evolution Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.847, year: 2014

  19. Hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report briefly describes the results of the single projects promoted by the German Council of Research (DFG). The subjects deal with diffusion, effusion, permeation and solubility of hydrogen in metals. They are interesting for many disciplines: metallurgy, physical metallurgy, metal physics, materials testing, welding engineering, chemistry, nuclear physics and solid-state physics. The research projects deal with the following interrelated subjects: solubility of H 2 in steel and effects on embrittlement, influence of H 2 on the fatigue strength of steel as well as the effect of H 2 on welded joints. The studies in solid-state research can be divided into methodological and physico-chemical studies. The methodological studies mainly comprise investigations on the analytical determination of H 2 by means of nuclear-physical reactions (e.g. the 15 N method) and the application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Physico-chemical problems are mainly dealt with in studies on interfacial reactions in connection with the absorption of hydrogen and on the diffusion of H 2 in different alloy systems. The properties of materials used for hydrogen storage were the subject of several research projects. 20 contributions were separately recorded for the data bank 'Energy'. (MM) [de

  20. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  1. An optimized hydrogen target for muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.i [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with the optimization of the processes involved in muon catalyzed fusion. Muon catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) is studied in all layers of the solid hydrogen structure H/0.1%T+D{sub 2}+HD. The layer H/T acts as an emitter source of energetic t{mu} atoms, due to the so-called Ramsauer-Townsend effect. These t{mu} atoms are slowed down in the second layer (degrader) and are forced to take place nuclear fusion in HD. The degrader affects time evolution of t{mu} atomic beam. This effect has not been considered until now in {mu}CF-multilayered targets. Due to muon cycling and this effect, considerable reactions occur in the degrader. In our calculations, it is shown that the fusion yield equals 180{+-}1.5. It is possible to separate events that overlap in time.

  2. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  3. Hydrogen permeation through metallic foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.I.B.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The process of electrolytic permeation of hydrogen through metallic foils is studied. A double electrolytic cell, in glass, in which the two compartments of reaction are separated by a metallic foil to be studied, was built. As direct result, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal is obtained. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the palladium and, in austenitic stainless steels 304 and 304 L, used in the Angra-1 reactor, were obtained. Samples of stainless steels with and without welding, were used. (Author) [pt

  4. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F [Northville, MI; Nakamura, Kenji [Toyota, JP; Au, Ming [Martinez, GA; Zidan, Ragaiy [Alken, SC

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  5. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, preparation of such catalyzers and their industrial application. In view of the specific features of SO2 hydrogenation and organic sulfur hydrolysis during low-temperature hydrogenation, a new technical process involving joint application of hydrogenation catalyzers and hydrolysis catalyzers was proposed. In addition, low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers and low-temperature hydrolysis catalyzers suitable for low-temperature conditions were developed. Joint application of these two kinds of catalyzers may reduce the inlet temperatures in the conventional hydrogenation reactors from 280 °C to 220 °C, at the same time, hydrogenation conversion rates of SO2 can be enhanced to over 99%. To further accelerate the hydrolysis rate of organic sulfur, the catalyzers for hydrolysis of low-temperature organic sulfur were developed. In lab tests, the volume ratio of the total sulfur content in tail gas can be as low as 131 × 10−6 when these two kinds of catalyzers were used in a proportion of 5:5 in volumes. Industrial application of these catalyzers was implemented in 17 sulfur recovery tail gas processing facilities of 15 companies. As a result, Sinopec Jinling Petrochemical Company had outstanding application performances with a tail gas discharging rate lower than 77.9 mg/m3 and a total sulfur recovery of 99.97%.

  6. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  7. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    high temperatures and long reaction times. To address this issue, we have developed several new families of carbon- and boron-based ligands, which are even better donors. The corresponding metal complexes (particularly gold, rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium) of all these species will be tested in the Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkynes, allenes, and also alkenes with ammonia and hydrazine. We will also develop metal-free catalytic processes for the functionalization of ammonia and hydrazine. By possessing both a lone pair of electrons and an accessible vacant orbital, singlet carbenes resemble and can mimic the chemical behavior of transition metals. Our preliminary results demonstrate that specially designed carbenes can split the N–H bond of ammonia by an initial nucleophilic activation that prevents the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, which is the major hurdle for the transition metal catalyzed functionalization of NH3. The use of purely organic compounds as catalysts will eliminate the major drawbacks of transition-metal-catalysis technology, which are the excessive cost of metal complexes (metal + ligands) and in many cases the toxicity of the metal.

  8. New Transition metal assisted complex borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesha Srinivasan; Elias Lee Stefanakos; Yogi Goswami

    2006-01-01

    High capacity hydrogen storage systems are indeed essential for the on-board vehicular application that leads to the pollution free environment. Apart from the various hydrogen storage systems explored in the past, complex hydrides involving light weight alkali/alkaline metals exhibits promising hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation characteristics. New transition metal assisted complex borohydrides [Zn(BH 4 ) 2 ] have been successfully synthesized by an inexpensive mechano-chemical process. These complex hydrides possesses gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity of ∼8.4 wt.% at around 120 C. We have determined the volumetric hydrogen absorption and desorption of these materials for a number of cycles. Another complex borohydride mixture LiBH 4 /MgH 2 catalyzed with ZnCl 2 has been synthesized and characterized using various analytical techniques. (authors)

  9. Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

  10. Storage of hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.

    1981-01-01

    A review is dedicated to a problem of hydrogen storage as fuel of future, that can be used under various conditions, is easily obtained with the help of other types of energy and can be transformed into them. Data on reversible metal-hydrogen systems, where hydrogen can be obtained by the way of reaction of thermal decomposition are presented. Pressure-temperature-content diagrams, information on concrete Pd-H, TiFe-H, V-N systems are presented and analyzed from the point of view of thermodynamics. A table with thermodynamical characteristics of several hydrides is presented. The majority of known solid hydrides in relation to their use for hydrogen storage are characterized. The review includes information on real or supposed uses in concrete systems: in fuel cells, for levelling of loading of electric plants, in automobile engines, in hydride engines, for heat storage [ru

  11. Metal-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luiz C.; Lucca Junior, Emilio C. de; Ferreira, Marco A. B.; Polo, Ellen C., E-mail: ldias@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-12-15

    The aldol reaction is one of the most powerful and versatile methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Traditionally, this reaction was developed in a stoichiometric version; however, great efforts in the development of chiral catalysts for aldol reactions were performed in recent years. Thus, in this review article, the development of metal-mediated chiral catalysts in Mukaiyama-type aldol reaction, reductive aldol reaction and direct aldol reaction are discussed. Moreover, the application of these catalysts in the total synthesis of complex molecules is discussed. (author)

  12. The behavior of hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Makoto

    1975-01-01

    Explanation is made on the equilibrium diagrams of metal-hydrogen systems and the state of hydrogen in metals. Some metals perform exothermic reaction with hydrogen, and the others endothermic reaction. The former form stable hydrides and solid solutions over a wide range of composition. Hydrogen atoms in fcc and bcc metals are present at the interstitial positions of tetrahedron lattice and octahedron lattice. For example, hydrogen atoms in palladium are present at the intersititial positions of octahedron. When the ratio of the composition of hydrogen and palladium is 1:1, the structure becomes NaCl type. Hydrogen atoms in niobium and vanadium and present interstitially in tetrahedron lattice. Metal hydrides with high hydrogen concentration are becoming important recently as the containers of hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms diffuse in metals quite easily. The activation energy of the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in Nb and V is about 2-3 kcal/g.atom. The diffusion coefficient is about 10 -5 cm 2 /sec in alpha phase at room temperature. The number of jumps of a hydrogen atom between neighboring lattice sites is 10 11 --10 12 times per second. This datum is almost the same as that of liquid metals. Discussion is also made on the electronic state of hydrogen in metals. (Fukutomi, T.)

  13. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  14. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines assisted by a thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingyang; Wen, Jialin; Tan, Renchang; Huang, Kexuan; Metola, Pedro; Wang, Rui; Anslyn, Eric V; Zhang, Xumu

    2014-08-04

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines catalyzed by rhodium/bis(phosphine)-thiourea provided chiral amines with up to 97% yield and 95% ee. (1)H NMR studies, coupled with control experiments, implied that catalytic chloride-bound intermediates were involved in the mechanism through a dual hydrogen-bonding interaction. Deuteration experiments proved that the hydrogenation proceeded through a pathway consistent with an imine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis of heterocycles through transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøy, Mette; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    of structurally complex and diverse heterocycles. In this Concept article, we attempt to cover this area of research through a selection of recent versatile examples. A sea of opportunities! Transition-metal-catalyzed isomerization of N- and O-allylic compounds provides a mild, selective and synthetically...... versatile method to form iminium and oxocarbenium ions. Given the number of reactions involving these highly electrophilic intermediates, this concept provides a sea of opportunities for heterocycle synthesis, (see scheme; Nu=nucleophile). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  16. Silica metal-oxide vesicles catalyze comprehensive prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, Bruno Mattia; Botta, Lorenzo; Pérez-Valverde, Maritza Iveth; Saladino, Raffaele; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Garcia Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2018-03-30

    It has recently been demonstrated that mineral self-assembled structures catalyzing prebiotic chemical reactions may form in natural waters derived from serpentinization, a geological process widespread in the early stages of Earth-like planets. We have synthesized self-assembled membranes by mixing microdrops of metal solutions with alkaline silicate solutions in the presence of formamide (NH2CHO), a single carbon molecule, at 80ºC. We found that these bilayer membranes, made of amorphous silica and metal oxide-hydroxide nanocrystals, catalyze the condensation of formamide, yielding the four nucleobases of RNA, three aminoacids and several carboxylic acids in a single pot experiment. Besides manganese, iron and magnesium, two abundant elements in the earliest Earth crust that are key in serpentinization reactions, are enough to produce all these biochemical compounds. These results suggest that the transition from inorganic geochemistry to prebiotic organic chemistry is common on a universal scale and, most probably, earlier than ever thought for our planet. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Heterocycles by Transition Metals Catalyzed Intramolecular Cyclization of Acetylene Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizer, S.A.; Yerzhanov, K.B.; Dedeshko, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Review shows the new strategies in the synthesis of heterocycles, having nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur atoms, via transition metals catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of acetylenic compounds on the data published at the last 30 years, Unsaturated heterocyclic compounds (pyrroles and pyrroline, furans, dihydro furans and benzofurans, indoles and iso-indoles, isoquinolines and isoquinolinones, aurones, iso coumarins and oxazolinone, lactams and lactones with various substitutes in heterocycles) are formed by transition metals, those salts [PdCl 2 , Pd(OAc) 2 , HgCl 2 , Hg(OAc) 2 , Hg(OCOCF 3 ) 2 , AuCl 3 ·2H 2 O, NaAuCl 4 ·2H 2 O, CuI, CuCl], oxides (HgO) and complexes [Pd(OAc) 2 (PPh 3 )2, Pd(PPh 3 ) 4 , PdCl 2 (MeCN) 2 , Pd(OAc ) 2 /TPPTS] catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of acetylenic amines, amides, ethers, alcohols, acids, ketones and βdiketones. More complex hetero polycyclic systems typical for natural alkaloids can to obtain similar. Proposed mechanisms of pyrroles, isoquinolines, iso indoles and indoles, benzofurans and iso coumarins, thiazolopyrimidinones formation are considered. (author)

  18. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, H.F.; Badcock, C.C.; Quinzio, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H 2 ) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H 2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H 2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi 5 in a Ni/H 2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  19. Characteristics of hydrogen evolution and oxidation catalyzed by Desulfovibrio caledoniensis biofilm on pyrolytic graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lin; Duan Jizhou; Zhao Wei; Huang Yanliang; Hou Baorong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have the ability to catalyze the hydrogen evolution and oxidation on pyrolytic graphite electrode. → The SRB biofilm decreases the overpotential and electron transfer resistance by the CV and EIS detection. → The SRB biofilm can transfer electrons to the 0.24 V polarized pyrolytic graphite electrode and the maximum current is 0.035 mA, which is attributed to SRB catalyzed hydrogen oxidation. → The SRB biofilm also can obtain electron from the -0.61 V polarized PGE to catalyze the hydrogen evolution. - Abstract: Hydrogenase, an important electroactive enzyme of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), has been discovered having the capacity to connect its activity to solid electrodes by catalyzing hydrogen evolution and oxidation. However, little attention has been paid to similar electroactive characteristics of SRB. In this study, the electroactivities of pyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE) coated with SRB biofilm were investigated. Two corresponding redox peaks were observed by cyclic voltammetry detection, which were related to the hydrogen evolution and oxidation. Moreover, the overpotential for the reactions decreased by about 0.2 V in the presence of the SRB biofilm. When the PGE coated with the SRB biofilm was polarized at 0.24 V (vs. SHE), an oxidation current related to the hydrogen oxidation was found. The SRB biofilm was able to obtain electrons from the -0.61 V (vs. SHE) polarized PGE to form hydrogen, and the electron transfer resistance also decreased with the formation of SRB biofilm, as measured by the non-destructive electrochemical impendence spectroscopy detection. It was concluded that the hydrogen evolution and oxidation was an important way for the electron transfer between SRB biofilm and solid electrode in anaerobic environment.

  20. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan; Caps, Valerie; Tuel, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional

  1. Asymmetric hydrogenation of quinolines catalyzed by iridium complexes of monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrsic, Natasa; Lefort, Laurent; Boogers, Jeroen A. F.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; de Vries, Johannes G.; Mršić, Nataša

    The monodentate BINOL-derived phosphoramidite PipPhos is used as ligand for the iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 2- and 2,6-substituted quinolines. If tri-ortho-tolylphosphine and/or chloride salts are used as additives enantioselectivities are strongly enhanced up to 89%. NMR indicates

  2. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example......, we show that it can store 9.1% hydrogen by weight in the form of ammonia. The storage is completely reversible, and by combining it with an ammonia decomposition catalyst, hydrogen can be delivered at temperatures below 620 K....

  3. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musket, R. G.

    1989-04-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation, and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are (a) uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, (b) hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, (c) hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, (d) tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and (e) hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals.

  4. Applications of ion implantation for modifying the interactions between metals and hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musket, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantations into metals have been shown recently to either reduce or enhance interactions with gaseous hydrogen. Published studies concerned with modifications of these interactions are reviewed and discussed in terms of the mechanisms postulated to explain the observed changes. The interactions are hydrogenation, hydrogen permeation and hydrogen embrittlement. In particular, the results of the reviewed studies are 1. uranium hydriding suppressed by implantation of oxygen and carbon, 2. hydrogen gettered in iron and nickel using implantation of titanium, 3. hydriding of titanium catalyzed by implanted palladium, 4. tritium permeation of 304L stainless steel reduced using selective oxidation of implanted aluminum, and 5. hydrogen attack of a low-alloy steel accelerated by implantation of helium. These studies revealed ion implantation to be an effective method for modifying the interactions of hydrogen gas with metals. (orig.)

  5. Oxidation of lignin-carbohydrate complex from bamboo with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by Co(salen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of salen complexes toward hydrogen peroxide has been long recognized. Co(salen was tested as catalyst for the aqueous oxidation of a refractory lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC isolated from sweet bamboo (Dendrocalamushamiltonii in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Co(salen catalyzed the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with LCC. From the spectra analyses, lignin units in LCC were undergoing ring-opening, side chain oxidation, demethoxylation, β-O-4 cleavage with Co(salen catalytic oxidation. The degradation was also observed in the carbohydrate of LCC. The investigation on the refractory LCC degradation catalyzed by Co(salen may be an important aspect for environmentally-oriented biomimetic bleaching in pulp and paper industry.

  6. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Quinoxalines Catalyzed by Iridium/PipPhos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrsic, Natasa; Jerphagnon, Thomas; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; de Vries, Johannes G.

    2009-01-01

    A catalyst made in situ from the (cyclooctadiene)iridium chloride dimer, [Ir(COD)Cl](2), and the monodentate phosphoramidite ligand (S)-PipPhos was used in the enantioselective hydrogenation of 2- and 2,6-substituted quinoxalines. In the presence of piperidine hydrochloride as additive full

  7. Towards hydrogen metallization: an Ab initio approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, St.

    1998-01-01

    The quest for metallic hydrogen is a major goal for both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics. Hydrogen and deuterium have been compressed up to 200 GPa in diamond anvil cells, without any clear evidence for a metallic behaviour. Loubeyere has recently suggested that hydrogen could metallize, at pressures within experimental range, in a new Van der Waals compound: Ar(H 2 ) 2 which is characterized at ambient pressure by an open and anisotropic sublattice of hydrogen molecules, stabilized by an argon skeleton. This thesis deals with a detailed ab initio investigation, by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methods, of the evolution under pressure of this compound. In a last chapter, we go to much higher pressures and temperatures, in order to compare orbital and orbital free ab initio methods for the dense hydrogen plasma. (author)

  8. Interaction of hydrogen with metallic nanojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbritter, Andras; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Peter; Mihaly, Gyoergy [Electron Transport Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Department of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-03-15

    We study the behavior of hydrogen molecules between atomic-sized metallic electrodes using the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We focus on the interaction H{sub 2} with monoatomic gold chains demonstrating the possibility of a hydrogen molecule being incorporated in the chain. We also show that niobium is strongly reactive with hydrogen, which enables molecular transport studies between superconducting electrodes. This opens the possibility for a full characterization of the transmission properties of molecular junctions with superconducting subgap structure measurements.

  9. Metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization and radical polyaddition for precision polymer synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, M; Satoh, K [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kamigaito, M, E-mail: kamigait@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.j

    2009-08-01

    The metal-catalyzed radical addition reaction can be evolved into two different polymerization mechanisms, i.e.; chain- and step-growth polymerizations, while both the polymerizations are based on the same metal-catalyzed radical formation reaction. The former is a widely employed metal-catalyzed living radical polymerization or atom transfer radical polymerization of common vinyl monomers, and the latter is a novel metal-catalyzed radical polyaddition of designed monomer with an unconjugated C=C double bond and a reactive C-Cl bond in one molecule. The simultaneous ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization of methyl acrylate and radical polyaddition of 3-butenyl 2-chloropropionate was achieved with Ru(Cp*)Cl(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2} to afford the controlled polymers, in which the homopolymer segments with the controlled chain length were connected by the ester linkage.

  10. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xia [value too long for type character varying(50); Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of

  11. Synthesis of heterocycles via transition-metal-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-07

    Transition-metal (TM)-catalyzed hydroarylation reactions of alkynes have received much attention, because they enable the net insertion of alkyne C-C triple bonds into C-H bonds of aromatic precursors, resulting in regio- and stereo-selective formation of synthetically useful arylalkenes. Taking advantage of this feature, TM-catalyzed alkyne hydroarylations have been successfully used for the synthesis of heterocycles. TM-catalyzed alkyne hydroarylations can be classified into three major categories depending on the type of reaction and precursors involved: (1) palladium-catalyzed reductive Heck reactions of alkynes with aryl halides, (2) TM-catalyzed conjugate arylation reactions of activated alkynes with arylboronic acids, and (3) TM-catalyzed aromatic C-H alkenylations with alkynes. This review surveys heterocycle synthesis via TM-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes according to the above classification, with an emphasis on the scope and limitations, as well as the underlying mechanisms.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen in zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.N.; Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.

    1991-02-01

    Determination of hydrogen in zirconium metallic have been performed using the hot vacuum extraction system and the gas chromatographic technique. The zirconium metallic samples were hydrieded by electrolitic technique at difference temperatures and times, then the samples were annealing at vacuum and eatching by fluoridric acid solution. The details of the hydrieded process, analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author)

  13. Theory of hydrogen chemisorption on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenig, W.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of hydrogen chemisorption on metals is presented. Green's function is derived taking into account the coupling strength between metal and chemisorbed atom and the strength of the interatomic Coulomb repulsion, allowing the calculation of the local density of states at the adatom, especially for the limiting cases of strong and weak coupling

  14. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan

    2010-10-20

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional catalysts such as Ti-containing mesoporous silicas, which convert phenols to the corresponding benzoquinones, gold nanoparticles are very selective to biaryl compounds (3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl diphenoquinone and 2,2′,3,3′,5,5′-hexamethyl-4,4′- biphenol, respectively). Products yields and selectivities depend on the solvent used, the best results being obtained in methanol with yields >98%. Au offers the possibility to completely change the selectivity in the oxidation of substituted phenols and opens interesting perspectives in the clean synthesis of biaryl compounds for pharmaceutical applications. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen influence on metals behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tison, P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes are used in order to investigate the influence of natural oxides and trapping on the permeability of low alloys steels, and martensitic, ferritic, austenitic stainless steels. The permeability of superficial oxides is investigated by reducing and reoxidising the upstream and downstream surfaces (gas ingoing and outgoing faces). The simultaneous or successive use of hydrogen and deuterium enables a direct demonstration of trapping during permeation measurements and a study of the interactions between the diffusing gas and hydrogen absorbed during steel making and processing [fr

  16. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  17. Transition metal-catalyzed carboxylation reactions with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ruben; Tortajada, Andreu; Juliá-Hernández, Francisco; Borjesson, Marino; Moragas, Toni

    2018-05-03

    Driven by the inherent synthetic potential of CO2 as an abundant, inexpensive and renewable C1 chemical feedstock, the recent years have witnessed renewed interest in devising catalytic CO2 fixations into organic matter. Although the formation of C-C bonds via catalytic CO2 fixation remained rather limited for a long period of time, a close look into the recent literature data indicates that catalytic carboxylation reactions have entered a new era of exponential growth, evolving into a mature discipline that allows for streamlining the synthesis of carboxylic acids, building blocks of utmost relevance in industrial endeavours. These strategies have generally proven broadly applicability and convenient to perform. However, substantial challenges still need to be addressed reinforcing the need to cover metal-catalyzed carboxylation arena in a conceptual and concise manner, delineating the underlying new principles that are slowly emerging in this vibrant area of expertise. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  19. Asymmetric Chemoenzymatic Reductive Acylation of Ketones by a Combined Iron-Catalyzed Hydrogenation-Racemization and Enzymatic Resolution Cascade

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2017-02-28

    A general and practical process for the conversion of prochiral ketones into the corresponding chiral acetates has been realized. An iron carbonyl complex is reported to catalyze the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation-hydrogenation of prochiral ketones. By merging the iron-catalyzed redox reactions with enantioselective enzymatic acylations a wide range of benzylic, aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic ketones, as well as diketones, were reductively acylated. The corresponding products were isolated with high yields and enantioselectivities. The use of an iron catalyst together with molecular hydrogen as the hydrogen donor and readily available ethyl acetate as acyl donor make this cascade process highly interesting in terms of both economic value and environmental credentials.

  20. [Effects of metal-catalyzed oxidation on the formation of advanced oxidation protein products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Peng, Ai; Zhu, Kai-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Ll, Xin-Hua; Li, Chang-Bin

    2008-03-11

    To explore the relationship between metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and the formation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs). Specimens of human serum albumin (HSA) and pooled plasma were collected from 3 healthy volunteers and 4 uremia patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A incubated with copper sulfate solution of the concentrations of 0, 0.2, or 0.5 mmol/L, Group B, incubated with hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L, and Group C, incubated with copper sulfate 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/L plus hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L. 30 min and 24 h later the AOPP level was determined by ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to observe the fragmentation effect on plasma proteins. Ninhydrin method was used to examine the protein fragments. The scavenging capacity of hydroxyl radical by macromolecules was measured so as to estimate the extent of damage for proteins induced by MCO. (1) The AOPP level of the HSA and plasma specimens of the uremia patients increased along with the increase of cupric ion concentration in a dose-dependent manner, especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.05). (2) Aggregation of proteins was almost negligible in all groups, however, HPLC showed that cupric ion with or without hydrogen peroxide increased the fragments in the HAS specimens (with a relative molecular mass of 5000) and uremia patients' plasma proteins (with the molecular mass 7000). (3) The plasma AOPP level of the healthy volunteers was 68.2 micromol/L +/- 2.4 micromol/L, significantly lower than that of the uremia patients (158.5 micromol/L +/- 8.2 micromol/L). (4) The scavenging ability to clear hydroxyl radical by plasma proteins of the healthy volunteers was 1.38 -9.03 times as higher than that of the uremia patients. MCO contributes to the formation of AOPPs mainly through its fragmentation effect to proteins.

  1. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  2. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  4. Hydrogen storage properties of metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, energy needs are mainly covered by fossil energies leading to pollutant emissions mostly responsible for global warming. Among the different possible solutions for greenhouse effect reduction, hydrogen has been proposed for energy transportation. Indeed, H 2 can be seen as a clean and efficient energy carrier. However, beside the difficulties related to hydrogen production, efficient high capacity storage means are still to be developed. Many metals and alloys are able to store large amounts of hydrogen. This latter solution is of interest in terms of safety, global yield and long term storage. However, to be suitable for applications, such compounds must present high capacity, good reversibility, fast reactivity and sustainability. In this paper, we will review the structural and thermodynamic properties of metallic hydrides. (authors)

  5. TEM analysis of the microstructure in TiF3-catalyzed and pure MgH2 during the hydrogen storage cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danaie, Mohsen; Mitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    We utilized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, with a cryogenically cooled sample stage, to detail the microstructure of partially transformed pure and titanium fluoride-catalyzed magnesium hydride powder during hydrogenation cycling. The TiF 3 -catalyzed MgH 2 powder demonstrated excellent hydrogen storage kinetics at various temperatures, whereas the uncatalyzed MgH 2 showed significant degradation in both kinetics and capacity. TEM analysis on the partially hydrogen absorbed and partially desorbed pure Mg(MgH 2 ) revealed a large fraction of particles that were either not transformed at all or were completely transformed. On the other hand, in the MgH 2 +TiF 3 system it was much easier to identify regions with both the hydride and the metal phase coexisting in the same particle. This enabled us to establish the metal hydride orientation relationship (OR) during hydrogen absorption. The OR was determined to be (1 1 0)MgH 2 || (−1 1 0 −1)Mg and [−1 1 1]MgH 2 || [0 1 −1 1]Mg. During absorption the number density of the hydride nuclei does not show a dramatic increase due the presence of TiF 3 . Conversely, during desorption the TiF 3 catalyst substantially increases the number of the newly formed Mg crystallites, which display a strong texture correlation with respect to the parent MgH 2 phase. Titanium fluoride also promotes extensive twinning in the hydride phase.

  6. 1H NMR studies of substrate hydrogen exchange reactions catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, N.; Nakayama, T.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange reactions of various L-amino acids catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11) have been studied. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid exchange of the alpha- and beta-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium from the solvent. The rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange was about 40 times faster than that of the enzymatic elimination reaction of the sulfur-containing amino acids. The enzyme also catalyzes the exchange reaction of alpha- and beta-hydrogens of the straight-chain L-amino acids which are not susceptible to elimination. The exchange rates of the alpha-hydrogen and the total beta-hydrogens of L-alanine and L-alpha-aminobutyrate with deuterium followed first-order kinetics. For L-norvaline, L-norleucine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and L-methionine, the rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange followed first-order kinetics, but the rate of total beta-hydrogen exchange decreased due to a primary isotope effect at the alpha-position. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan slowly underwent alpha-hydrogen exchange. The pro-R hydrogen of glycine was deuterated stereospecifically

  7. Determination of hydrogen in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen will be invariably present in all materials. Its presence in excess is harmful and sometimes calamitous. Hydrogen embrittlement can occur quite readily in most high strength materials, irrespective of their composition or structure. It is therefore essential to maintain low levels of hydrogen. To know the amount of hydrogen present in the materials, it is essential to determine it with high degree of precision and accuracy. It is required to give the uncertainty associated with the measurement to increase the confidence on measurements. Several methodologies are available for the determination of hydrogen. It its isotope, deuterium, also co-exists it becomes all the more difficult to determine these individually. Hot vacuum extraction cum quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS) developed in our laboratory to determine hydrogen and deuterium is routinely employed for the determination of hydrogen and deuterium in metals and alloys. The present paper deals in detail about our experiences with HVE-QMS and estimation of uncertainty associated in this methodology. (author)

  8. Transition Metal Catalyzed Synthesis of Carboxylic Acids, Imines, and Biaryls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santilli, Carola; Madsen, Robert

    the carboxylate.  Manganese catalyzed radical Kumada-type reaction between aryl halidesand aryl Grignard reagents. The reaction between aryl halides and aryl Grignard reagents catalyzed by MnCl2 has been extended to several methyl-substituted aryl iodide reagents byperforming the reaction at 120 ˚C in a microwave...... oven (Scheme ii). A limitation of the heterocoupling process is the concomitant dehalogenation of the aryl halide and homocoupling of the Grignard reagent leading low to moderate yields of the desired heterocoupling product. The mechanism of the cross-coupling process was investigated by performing two...

  9. Hydrogen transfer reduction of polyketones catalyzed by iridium complexes: a novel route towards more biocompatible materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Barbara; Crottib, Corrado; Farnetti, Erica

    2008-09-14

    Transfer hydrogenation from 2-propanol to CO/4-methylstyrene and CO/styrene polyketones was catalyzed by [Ir(diene)(N-N)X] (N-N = nitrogen chelating ligand; X = halogen) in the presence of a basic cocatalyst. The reactions were performed using dioxane as cosolvent, in order to overcome problems due to low polyketone solubility. The polyalcohols were obtained in yields up to 95%, the conversions being markedly dependent on the nature of the ligands coordinated to iridium as well as on the experimental conditions.

  10. Solubility and diffusion of hydrogen in pure metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipf, H.

    2001-01-01

    Basic facts are presented of the absorption of hydrogen gas by metals and the diffusion of hydrogen in metals. Specifically considered are crystalline metals without defects and lattice disorder (pure metals), low hydrogen concentrations and the possibility of high hydrogen gas pressures. The first introductory topic is a short presentation of typical phase diagrams of metal hydrogen systems. Then, hydrogen absorption is discussed and shown to be decisively determined by the enthalpy of solution, in particular by its sign which specifies whether absorption is exothermic or endothermic. The formation of high-pressure hydrogen gas bubbles in a metal, which can lead to blistering, is addressed. It is demonstrated that bubble formation will, under realistic conditions, only occur in strongly endothermically hydrogen absorbing metals. The chief aspects of hydrogen diffusion in metals are discussed, especially the large size of the diffusion coefficient and its dependence on lattice structure. It is shown that forces can act on hydrogen in metals, causing a directed hydrogen flux. Such forces arise, for instance, in the presence of stress and temperature gradients and can result in local hydrogen accumulation with potential material failure effects. The final aspect discussed is hydrogen permeation, where the absorption behavior of the hydrogen is found to be in general more decisive on the permeation rate than the value of the diffusion coefficient. (orig.)

  11. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The design and characterization of new materials for hydrogen storage is an important area of research, as the ability to store hydrogen at lower pressures and higher temperatures than currently feasible would lower operating costs for small hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent promising materials for use in storing hydrogen in this capacity. MOFs are highly porous, three-dimensional crystalline solids that are formed via linkages between metal ions (e.g., iron, nickel, and zinc) and organic molecules. MOFs can store hydrogen via strong adsorptive interactions between the gas molecules and the pores of the framework, providing a high surface area for gas adsorption and thus the opportunity to store hydrogen at significantly lower pressures than with current technologies. By lowering the energy required for hydrogen storage, these materials hold promise in rendering hydrogen a more viable fuel for motor vehicles, which is a highly desirable outcome given the clean nature of hydrogen fuel cells (water is the only byproduct of combustion) and the current state of global climate change resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The work presented in this report is the result of collaborative efforts between researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and General Motors Corporation (GM) to discover novel MOFs promising for H2 storage and characterize their properties. Described herein are several new framework systems with improved gravimetric and volumetric capacity to strongly bind H2 at temperatures relevant for vehicle storage. These materials were rigorously characterized using neutron diffraction, to determine the precise binding locations of hydrogen within the frameworks, and high-pressure H2 adsorption measurements, to provide a comprehensive picture of H2 adsorption at all relevant pressures. A

  12. Solubility of hydrogen in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    Correlations exist between the heat of solution of hydrogen and the difference in energy between the lowest lying energy levels of the trivalent d/sup n-1/s electronic configuration and the divalent d/sup n-2/s 2 (or the tetravalent d/sup n/) configuration of the neutral gaseous atoms. The trends observed in the transition metal series are discussed in relation to the number of valence electrons per atom in the transition elements in their metallic and neutral states

  13. Modeling evolution of hydrogen bonding and stabilization of transition states in the process of cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by human butyrylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were performed on the prereactive enzyme-substrate complex, transition states, intermediates, and product involved in the process of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine. The computational results consistently reveal a unique role of the oxyanion hole (consisting of G116, G117, and A199) in BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine, compared to acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylcholine. During BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine, only G117 has a hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen (O31) of the cocaine benzoyl ester in the prereactive BChE-cocaine complex, and the NH groups of G117 and A199 are hydrogen-bonded with O31 of cocaine in all of the transition states and intermediates. Surprisingly, the NH hydrogen of G116 forms an unexpected hydrogen bond with the carboxyl group of E197 side chain and, therefore, is not available to form a hydrogen bond with O31 of cocaine in the acylation. The NH hydrogen of G116 is only partially available to form a weak hydrogen bond with O31 of cocaine in some structures involved in the deacylation. The change of the estimated hydrogen-bonding energy between the oxyanion hole and O31 of cocaine during the reaction process demonstrates how the protein environment can affect the energy barrier for each step of the BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine. These insights concerning the effects of the oxyanion hole on the energy barriers provide valuable clues on how to rationally design BChE mutants with a higher catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed Csp2-monofluoro-, difluoro-, perfluoromethylation and trifluoromethylthiolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Landelle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, transition metal-mediated reactions have joined the toolbox of chemists working in the field of fluorination for Life-Science oriented research. The successful execution of transition metal-catalyzed carbon–fluorine bond formation has become a landmark achievement in fluorine chemistry. This rapidly growing research field has been the subject of some excellent reviews. Our approach focuses exclusively on transition metal-catalyzed reactions that allow the introduction of –CFH2, –CF2H, –CnF2n+1 and –SCF3 groups onto sp² carbon atoms. Transformations are discussed according to the reaction-type and the metal employed. The review will not extend to conventional non-transition metal methods to these fluorinated groups.

  15. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D 2 O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed

  16. Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.; Reilly, J.; Bloch, F.; Wirsing, E.

    1977-01-01

    Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70 0 C; zirconium, 500 to 600 0 C; LaNi 5 , -78 to +30 0 C; Mg 2 Ni, 300 to 375 0 C; palladium, 0 to 70 0 C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%

  17. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (rate upon decreasing the particle size to 10 nm was even greater than would be expected based upon the increase in surface area. While specific surface area increased by a factor of 6 in going from rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  18. Beckmann rearrangement of aldoximes catalyzed by transition metal salts: mechanical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusink, A.J.; Meerbeek, T.G.; Noltes, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Beckmann rearrangement of aldoximes catalyzed by transition metal salts like palladium and nickel acetylacetonates is shown to be a dehydration‐hydration reaction in which the anti‐oxime is converted into nitrile and the nitrile is converted into amide.

  19. Alkanes from Bioderived Furans by using Metal Triflates and Palladium-Catalyzed Hydrodeoxygenation of Cyclic Ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai-Jie; Deng, Jin; Cui, Min-Shu; Li, Xing-Long; Liu, Xin-Xin; Zhu, Rui; Wu, Wei-Peng; Fu, Yao

    2015-12-21

    Using a metal triflate and Pd/C as catalysts, alkanes were prepared from bioderived furans in a one-pot hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process. During the reaction, the metal triflate plays a crucial role in the ring-opening HDO of furan compounds. The entire reaction process has goes through two major phases: at low temperatures, saturation of the exocyclic double bond and furan ring are catalyzed by Pd/C; at high temperatures, the HDO of saturated furan compounds is catalyzed by the metal triflate. The reaction mechanism was verified by analyzing the changes of the intermediates during the reaction. In addition, different metal triflates, solvents, and catalyst recycling were also investigated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. PipPhos and MorfPhos : Privileged monodentate phosphoramidite ligands for rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernsmann, Heiko; van den Berg, M; Hoen, Robert; Minnaard, AJ; Mehler, G; Reetz, MT; De Vries, JG; Feringa, BL

    2005-01-01

    A library of 20 monodentate phosphoramidite ligands has been prepared and applied in rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation. This resulted in the identification of two ligands, PipPhos and MorfPhos, that afford excellent and in several cases unprecedented enantioselectivities in the

  1. Tritiated hydrogen conversion on heated metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, G.; Mihaila, V.; Purghel, L.; Rebigan, F.

    1995-01-01

    This work reports investigations on tritiated hydrogen conversion to tritiated water on heated metallic surfaces. The HT conversion process has been revealed for copper, aluminium and stainless steel W4541 surfaces in the temperature range 150 to 300 o C, in case of the static regime and in the range 250 to 400 o C for the dynamic case. The most significant catalytic activity was shown by the copper sample. Studies on this subject are used as input information for different nuclear accident scenarios implying tritium leakage

  2. Permeation of hydrogen through metal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienhold, P.; Rota, E.; Waelbroeck, F.; Winter, J.; Banno, Tatsuya.

    1986-08-01

    Experiments show that the permeant flux of hydrogen through a metal membrane at low driving pressures ( r is introduced into the model as a new material constant and the rate equations are given. After the description of the wall pump effect, a variety of different limiting cases are discussed for a symmetrical permeation membrane. This is modified to the asymmetric case and to the influence of particle implantation. The permeation number W turns out to be a dimensionless quantity which characterizes the permeation range and predicts the permeant flux in steady state. (orig.)

  3. Metal Catalyzed Fusion: Nuclear Active Environment vs. Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot

    2009-03-01

    To achieve radiationless dd fusion and/or other LENR reactions via chemistry: some focus on environment of interior or altered near-surface volume of bulk metal; some on environment inside metal nanocrystals or on their surface; some on the interface between nanometal crystals and ionic crystals; some on a momentum shock-stimulation reaction process. Experiment says there is also a spontaneous reaction process.

  4. Anoxia stimulates microbially catalyzed metal release from Animas River sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saup, Casey M; Williams, Kenneth H; Rodríguez-Freire, Lucía; Cerrato, José M; Johnston, Michael D; Wilkins, Michael J

    2017-04-19

    The Gold King Mine spill in August 2015 released 11 million liters of metal-rich mine waste to the Animas River watershed, an area that has been previously exposed to historical mining activity spanning more than a century. Although adsorption onto fluvial sediments was responsible for rapid immobilization of a significant fraction of the spill-associated metals, patterns of longer-term mobility are poorly constrained. Metals associated with river sediments collected downstream of the Gold King Mine in August 2015 exhibited distinct presence and abundance patterns linked to location and mineralogy. Simulating riverbed burial and development of anoxic conditions, sediment microcosm experiments amended with Animas River dissolved organic carbon revealed the release of specific metal pools coupled to microbial Fe- and SO 4 2- -reduction. Results suggest that future sedimentation and burial of riverbed materials may drive longer-term changes in patterns of metal remobilization linked to anaerobic microbial metabolism, potentially driving decreases in downstream water quality. Such patterns emphasize the need for long-term water monitoring efforts in metal-impacted watersheds.

  5. Anoxia stimulates microbially catalyzed metal release from Animas River sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saup, Casey M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Rodríguez-Freire, Lucía; Cerrato, José M.; Johnston, Michael D.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The Gold King Mine spill in August 2015 released 11 million liters of metal-rich mine waste to the Animas River watershed, an area that has been previously exposed to historical mining activity spanning more than a century. Although adsorption onto fluvial sediments was responsible for rapid immobilization of a significant fraction of the spill-associated metals, patterns of longer-term mobility are poorly constrained. Metals associated with river sediments collected downstream of the Gold King Mine in August 2015 exhibited distinct presence and abundance patterns linked to location and mineralogy. Simulating riverbed burial and development of anoxic conditions, sediment microcosm experiments amended with Animas River dissolved organic carbon revealed the release of specific metal pools coupled to microbial Fe- and SO 4 2- reduction. Results suggest that future sedimentation and burial of riverbed materials may drive longer-term changes in patterns of metal remobilization linked to anaerobic microbial metabolism, potentially driving decreases in downstream water quality. Such patterns emphasize the need for long-term water monitoring efforts in metal-impacted watersheds.

  6. Oxidation of cyclohexane catalyzed by metal-ion-exchanged zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sökmen, Ilkay; Sevin, Fatma

    2003-08-01

    The ion-exchange rates and capacities of the zeolite NaY for the Cu(II), Co(II), and Pb(II) metal ions were investigated. Ion-exchange equilibria were achieved in approximately 72 h for all the metal ions. The maximum ion exchange of metal ions into the zeolite was found to be 120 mg Pb(II), 110 mg Cu(II), and 100 mg Co(II) per gram of zeolite NaY. It is observed that the exchange capacity of a zeolite varies with the exchanged metal ion and the amount of metal ions exchanged into zeolite decreases in the sequence Pb(II) > Cu(II) > Co(II). Application of the metal-ion-exchanged zeolites in oxidation of cyclohexane in liquid phase with visible light was examined and it is observed that the order of reactivity of the zeolites for the conversion of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol is CuY > CoY > PbY. It is found that conversion increases by increase of the empty active sites of a zeolite and the formation of cyclohexanol is favored initially, but the cyclohexanol is subsequently converted to cyclohexanone.

  7. Metallic Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Y.H.; Catalano, Jacopo; Guazzone, Federico

    2013-01-01

    membrane fabrication methods have matured over the last decades, and the deposition of very thin films (1–5 µm) of Pd over porous ceramics or modified porous metal supports is quite common. The H2 permeances and the selectivities achieved at 400–500 °C were in the order of 50–100 Nm3/m/h/bar0.5 and greater......Composite palladium membranes have extensively been studied in laboratories and, more recently, in small pilot industrial applications for the high temperature separation of hydrogen from reactant mixtures such as water-gas shift (WGS) reaction or methane steam reforming (MSR). Composite Pd...... than 1000, respectively. This chapter describes in detail composite Pd-based membrane preparation methods, which consist of the grading of the support and the deposition of the dense metal layer, their performances, and their applications in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) at high temperatures (400...

  8. Theoretical study on platinum-catalyzed isotope exchange reaction mechanism of hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Wang Heyi; Luo Shunzhong

    2009-04-01

    Based on electron and vibration approximate means and the density function theory B3LYP, the ΔG degree and equilibrium pressures of adsorption and dissociation reactions of H 2 and water vapor on Pt surface have been calculated. The adsorption, dissociation and coadsorption actions of H 2 and water were analyzed. According to the ΔG degree, hydrogen molecule combines with metal atoms in single atom, and water vapor molecule has no tendency to dissociate on Pt surface. The dissociation of hydrogen molecule would hold back the direct adsorption of water vapor molecules on Pt surface. The structures of Pt-H (OH 2 ) n + (n=1, 2, 3) hydroniums were optimized. According to the mulliken overlap populations, Pt-H (OH 2 ) + is not stable or produced. Hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between hydration layer and D atoms which adsorb on Pt surface via intermediates (H 2 O) n D + (ads) (n≥2). (authors)

  9. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  10. Direct Vinylation of Alcohols or Aldehydes Employing Alkynes as Vinyl Donors: A Ruthenium Catalyzed C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patman, Ryan L.; Chaulagain, Mani Raj; Williams, Vanessa M.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation, 2-butyne couples to benzylic and aliphatic alcohols 1a–1i to furnish allylic alcohols 2a–2i, constituting a direct C-H vinylation of alcohols employing alkynes as vinyl donors. Under related transfer hydrogenation conditions employing formic acid as terminal reductant, 2-butyne couples to aldehydes 4a, 4b, and 4e to furnish identical products of carbonyl vinylation 2a, 2b, and 2e. Thus, carbonyl vinylation is achieved from the alcohol or the aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of any stoichiometric metallic reagents. Nonsymmetric alkynes 6a–6c couple efficiently to aldehyde 4b to provide allylic alcohols 2m–2o as single regioisomers. Acetylenic aldehyde 7a engages in efficient intramolecular coupling to deliver cyclic allylic alcohol 8a. PMID:19173651

  11. Metal complex derivatives of hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohol, D.; Blinn, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Derivatives of hydrogen uranyl phosphate were prepared by incorporating transition metal complexes into the uranyl phosphate matrix. The transition metal complexes employed include bis(ethylenediamine)copper(II), bis(1,3-propanediamine)copper(II) chloride, (triethylenetetramine)copper(II), (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)copper(II), (1,4,8,12-tetraazacyclopentadecane)copper(II), (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)nickel(II) chloride, (triethylenetetramine)nickel(II) and others. The chemical analyses of these derivatives indicated that the incorporation of the transition metal complexes into the uranyl phosphate matrix via ion exchange was not stoichiometric. The extent of ion exchange is dependent on the size and structure of the transition metal complex. All complexes were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, electronic and infrared spectra, thermal analyses and chemical analysis. An attempt was made to correlate the degree of quenching of the luminescence of the uranyl ion to the spacing between the uranyl phosphate layers in the derivatives

  12. The use of phosphite-type ligands in the Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, Sergey E; Ozolin, Dmitry V; Ivanov, Pavel Yu; Melman, Artem; Velezheva, Valeriya S; Davankov, Vadim A

    2014-01-01

    A series of chiral phosphite-type ligands was tested in asymmetric Ir-catalyzed hydrogenation of quinolines and 2,4,5,6-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazino(3,2,1-j,k)carbazole. Hydrogenation of quinaldine hydrochloride provided superior enantioselectivity up to 65% ee compared to quinaldine free base. The ligands were tested for the first time in the asymmetric Ir-Ircatalyzed hydrogenation of 2,4,5,6-tetrahydro-1H-pyrazino(3,2,1-j,k)carbazole yielding the antidepressant drug, pirlindole. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Szostak, Jack W.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA world requires among other processes the non-enzymatic, template-directed replication of genetic polymers such as RNA or related nucleic acids, possibly catalyzed by metal ions. The absence of uridilate derivative polymerization on adenine containing templates has been...... the main issue preventing an efficient template-directed RNA polymerization. We report here the investigation of template-directed RNA polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice. In particular, it was found that activated Uridilate monomers in the presence of metal-ion catalysts could efficiently......-pairing opportunities. These results suggest that a template-directed RNA polymerization catalyzed by metal-ions could be carried out under eutectic phase in water-ice conditions....

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Technical University, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have recently received considerable attention because of their high specific micropore volume and the ability to store gas molecules exceeding the storage capacity of traditional adsorbents. A variety of differences in the MOFs structures makes it difficult to analyze the influence of different factors on hydrogen uptake capabilities in MOFs. We have investigated the influence of the minor structural changes of the MOFs on their hydrogen storage capacity. The influence of the incorporated metal was shown for following isostructural compounds: Cu{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2} (BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) and Mo{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}; Zn{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO and Co{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}DABCO (BDC=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate, DABCO=1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). Our research interest is directed also towards the discovery of new MOFs, as well as adjusting the pore dimensions of MOFs, using different building blocks, solvent and solvent mixtures, in order to improve gas uptake and adsorption properties. Magnesium-based MOFs were found with the same network topology, very small pore size and selective adsorption behaviour. They show a guest-induced reversible structure transformation due to the flexibility of the Mg{sub 3}-cluster and the organic linkers. This effect could be used for fitting the pore sizes and for the increase of gas sorption capability in Mg contained MOFs after all. The hydrogen adsorption was also studied in several Al-based IRMOFs.

  15. Hydrogen absorption-desorption at metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.A.; Pataki, L.

    1991-04-01

    On the basis of experimental studies, it has been proposed that when zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) is exposed to hydrogen at 300 degrees C or higher, a reaction occurs to produce metallic zirconium and water, thereby increasing the electrical conductivity of the oxide film and its permeability to hydrogen. A series of experiments has been performed in which specimens of zirconium and zirconium-2.5% niobium were either hydrided or deuterided in a furnace at a temperature between 300 degrees C and 800 degrees C and in an atmosphere that consisted primarily of either hydrogen (H 2 ) or deuterium (D 2 ). After cooling a specimen to room temperature, it was placed in a thermogravimetric analyzer that was equipped with a mass spectrometer, TGA-MS. Each specimen was then heated to 1200 degrees C at a controlled rate in a primarily helium atmosphere monitored with the mass spectrometer. Light water (H 2 O) evolved from the hydrided specimens and heavy water (D 2 0) from the deuterided ones and there was a weight loss of the specimens that accompanied the water evolution. The specimens having approximately the same amount of hydride but more oxide also evolved more H 2 O, and that the H 2 O did not come from reactions between impurity H 2 and oxygen (O 2 ) in the TGA-MS. Heating a zirconium or zirconium alloy specimen that contains a hydride or deuteride phase within and an oxide layer on its surface causes the hydrogen to diffuse toward the surface and when it encounters the oxide a reaction follows that produces water. The conventional mechanism for the dissipation of the imperviousness of ZrO 2 to H 2 that results from the oxide being exposed to a reducing atmosphere will not explain the water production observed in these experiments. However, the existence of the proposed reaction can account for the elevated hydrogen concentration in an oxide film that has been observed to accompany the aqueous corrosion of zirconium and the effects on both the electrical conductivity and

  16. First-row transition metal hydrogenation and hydrosilylation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Tufan K.; Pal, Raja; Levin, Hagit Ben-Daat; Porter, Tyler M.; Ghosh, Chandrani

    2017-07-18

    Transition metal compounds, and specifically transition metal compounds having a tetradentate and/or pentadentate supporting ligand are described, together with methods for the preparation thereof and the use of such compounds as hydrogenation and/or hydrosilylation catalysts.

  17. Conversion of cellulose and cellobiose into sorbitol catalyzed by ruthenium supported on a polyoxometalate/metal-organic framework hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinzhu; Wang, Shengpei; Huang, Jing; Chen, Limin; Ma, Longlong; Huang, Xing

    2013-08-01

    Cellulose and cellobiose were selectively converted into sorbitol over water-tolerant phosphotungstic acid (PTA)/metal- organic-framework-hybrid-supported ruthenium catalysts, Ru-PTA/MIL-100(Cr), under aqueous hydrogenation conditions. The goal was to investigate the relationship between the acid/metal balance of bifunctional catalysts Ru-PTA/MIL-100(Cr) and their performance in the catalytic conversion of cellulose and cellobiose into sugar alcohols. The control of the amount and strength of acid sites in the supported PTA/MIL-100(Cr) was achieved through the effective control of encapsulated-PTA loading in MIL-100(Cr). This design and preparation method led to an appropriately balanced Ru-PTA/MIL-100(Cr) in terms of Ru dispersion and hydrogenation capacity on the one hand, and acid site density of PTA/MIL-100(Cr) (responsible for acid-catalyzed hydrolysis) on the other hand. The ratio of acid site density to the number of Ru surface atoms (nA /nRu ) of Ru-PTA/MIL-100(Cr) was used to monitor the balance between hydrogenation and hydrolysis functions; the optimum balance between the two catalytic functions, that is, 8.84sorbitol of 57.9% at complete conversion of cellulose, and 97.1% yield in hexitols with a selectivity for sorbitol of 95.1% at complete conversion of cellobiose) were obtained using a Ru-PTA/MIL-100(Cr) catalyst with loadings of 3.2 wt % for Ru and 16.7 wt % for PTA. This research thus opens new perspectives for the rational design of acid/metal bifunctional catalysts for biomass conversion. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides and oxides for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of hydrogen evolution by basal planes of 2D metal dichalcogenides and oxides in the 2H and 1T class of structures using the hydrogen binding energy as a computational activity descriptor. For some groups of systems like the Ti, Zr, and Hf dichalcogenides the hydrogen...

  19. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metallic hydrogen provides a compelling material for constructing a condensed matter model of the Sun and the photosphere. Like diamond, metallic hydrogen might have the potential to be a metastable substance requiring high pressures for forma- tion. Once created, it would remain stable even at lower pressures. The metallic form of hydrogen was initially conceived in 1935 by Eugene Wigner and Hillard B. Huntington who indirectly anticipated its elevated critical temperature for liquefaction (Wigner E. and Huntington H.B. On the possibility of a metallic modification of hydro- gen. J. Chem. Phys. , 1935, v.3, 764–770. At that time, solid metallic hydrogen was hypothesized to exist as a body centered cubic, although a more energetically accessible layered graphite-like lattice was also envisioned. Relative to solar emission, this struc- tural resemblance between graphite and layered metallic hydrogen should not be easily dismissed. In the laboratory, metallic hydrogen remains an elusive material. However, given the extensive observational evidence for a condensed Sun composed primarily of hydrogen, it is appropriate to consider metallic hydrogen as a solar building block. It is anticipated that solar liquid metallic hydrogen should possess at least some layered order. Since layered liquid metallic hydrogen would be essentially incompressible, its invocation as a solar constituent brings into question much of current stellar physics. The central proof of a liquid state remains the thermal spectrum of the Sun itself. Its proper understanding brings together all the great forces which shaped modern physics. Although other proofs exist for a liquid photosphere, our focus remains solidly on the generation of this light.

  20. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate catalyzed in-situ transesterification of Nannochloropsis to fatty acid methyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yingqiang; Cooke, Peter; Reddy, Harvind K.; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Zheling; Deng, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification of wet algae. • [Bmim][HSO_4] served as both effective solvent and excellent acid catalyst. • Proposed a mechanism for [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification. • Identified cell walls and lipid droplets in algae using confocal imaging tests. • Obtained crude biodiesel yield about 95% in 30 min at 200 °C. - Abstract: 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Bmim][HSO_4]) is used as a solvent and an acid catalyst for in-situ extractive transesterification of wet Nannochloropsis with methanol. The reaction is supposed to be a five-step process: (1) wet algae cell wall dissolves in ionic liquid at reaction temperatures; (2) hydrogen ions and sulfate ions release from the ionization of HSO_4"−. The hydrogen ions (H"+) act as catalysts for accelerating the reactive extraction of triglyceride from wet Nannochloropsis; (3) hydrogen ions and methanol molecules transfer from bulk to active site of cells without passing through cell wall that is dissolved by ionic liquid; (4) in-situ transesterification of lipid (mainly triglycerides) with methanol; and (5) products transfer from inside of algae cells to outside of cells. The crude biodiesel yield of [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification is about 95.28% at reaction temperature of 200 °C, reaction time of 30 min, mass ratio of [Bmim][HSO_4] to wet Nannochloropsis of 0.9:1, and a mass ratio of methanol to wet algae of 3:1. It decreases to 81.23% after [Bmim][HSO_4] is recycled for 4 times, which indicates that [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification is an economic approach for biodiesel production from wet algae.

  1. Noble metal-catalyzed homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in treating simulated nuclear waste media with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-09-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO 3 2 -, NO 3 -, and NO 2 - were used to study reactions of formic acid at 90 degrees C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO 2 , H 2 , NO, and N 2 O in the gas phase and a microammonia electrode to analyze the NH 4 +/NH 3 in the liquid phase as a function of time. The following reactions have been studied in these systems since they are undesirable side reactions in nuclear waste processing: (1) Decomposition of formic acid to CO 2 + H 2 is undesirable because of the potential fire and explosion hazard of H 2 . Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl 3 -3H 2 O, was found to be the most active catalyst for H 2 generation from formic acid above ∼ 80 degrees C in the presence of nitrite ion. The H 2 production rate has an approximate pseudo first-order dependence on the Rh concentration, (2) Generation of NH 3 from the formic acid reduction of nitrate and/or nitrite is undesirable because of a possible explosion hazard from NH 4 NO 3 accumulation in a waste processing plant off-gas system. The Rh-catalyzed reduction of nitrogen-oxygen compounds to ammonia by formic acid was found to exhibit the following features: (a) Nitrate rather than nitrite is the principal source of NH 3 . (b) Ammonia production occurs at the expense of hydrogen production. (c) Supported rhodium metal catalysts are more active than rhodium in any other form, suggesting that ammonia production involves heterogeneous rather than homogeneous catalysis

  2. High temperature equation of state of metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, V. T.

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures from 3000 to 20 000 K and densities from 0.2 to 3 mol/cm 3 , which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron-proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local-field approximation. The proton-proton interaction is taken into account in the hard-spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and third-order perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately high temperatures and densities, although it is much smaller than the second-order term. The thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen are monotonically increasing functions of density and temperature. The values of pressure for the temperatures and pressures that are characteristic of the conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth coincide with the corresponding values reported by the discoverers of metallic hydrogen to a high degree of accuracy. The temperature and density ranges are found in which there exists a liquid phase of metallic hydrogen

  3. The conversion of dimethyl ether over Pt/H-ZSM5. A bifunctional catalyzed reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, C.W.R.; Wolthuizen, J.P.; Hooff, van J.H.C.; Imelik, B.; Naccache, C.; Coudurier, G.

    1985-01-01

    At low temperatures dimethylether mixed with hydrogen reacts over a platinum loaded H-ZSM5 catalyst selectivity to methane. Two successive steps can be distinguished; first the acid-catalyzed formation of a trimethyloxoniumion, followed by a metal-catalyzed hydrogenation to methane. Experiments with

  4. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  5. Hydrogen evolution by a metal-free electrocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao

    2014-04-28

    Electrocatalytic reduction of water to molecular hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction may provide a sustainable energy supply for the future, but its commercial application is hampered by the use of precious platinum catalysts. All alternatives to platinum thus far are based on nonprecious metals, and, to our knowledge, there is no report about a catalyst for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution beyond metals. Here we couple graphitic-carbon nitride with nitrogen-doped graphene to produce a metal-free hybrid catalyst, which shows an unexpected hydrogen evolution reaction activity with comparable overpotential and Tafel slope to some of well-developed metallic catalysts. Experimental observations in combination with density functional theory calculations reveal that its unusual electrocatalytic properties originate from an intrinsic chemical and electronic coupling that synergistically promotes the proton adsorption and reduction kinetics. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogen as a New Alloying Element in Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen was regarded as a harmful impurity in many alloys and particularly in steels where it gives rise to a specific type of embrittlement and forms various discontinuities like flakes and blowholes. For this reason, the researcher efforts were mainly focused on eliminating hydrogen's negative impacts and explaining its uncommonly high diffusivity in condensed phases. Meanwhile, positive characteristics of hydrogen as an alloying element remained unknown for quite a long time. Initial reports in this field did not appear before the early 1970s. Data on new phase diagrams are given for metal-hydrogen systems where the metal may or may not form hydrides. Various kinds of hydrogen impact on structure formation in solidification, melting and solid-solid transformations are covered. Special attention is given to the most popular alloys based on iron, aluminum, copper, nickel, magnesium and titanium. Detailed is what is called gas-eutectic reaction resulting in a special type of gas-solid structure named gasarite. Properties and applications of gasars - gasaritic porous materials - are dealt with. Various versions of solid-state alloying with hydrogen are discussed that change physical properties and fabrication characteristics of metals. Details are given on a unique phenomenon of anomalous spontaneous deformation due to combination of hydrogen environment and polymorphic transformation. All currently known versions of alloying with hydrogen are categorized for both hydride-forming and non-hydrid forming metals

  7. Hydrogen-bonded intermediates and transition states during spontaneous and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Mark C; Rodriguez, Jorge H

    2014-07-07

    Understanding mechanisms of (+)-anti-BPDE detoxification is crucial for combating its mutagenic and potent carcinogenic action. However, energetic-structural correlations of reaction intermediates and transition states during detoxification via hydrolysis are poorly understood. To gain mechanistic insight we have computationally characterized intermediate and transition species associated with spontaneous and general-acid catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-anti-BPDE. We studied the role of cacodylic acid as a proton donor in the rate limiting step. The computed activation energy (ΔG‡) is in agreement with the experimental value for hydrolysis in a sodium cacodylate buffer. Both types of, spontaneous and acid catalyzed, BPDE hydrolysis can proceed through low-entropy hydrogen bonded intermediates prior to formation of transition states whose energies determine reaction activation barriers and rates.

  8. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  9. Solutions to commercializing metal hydride hydrogen storage products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, J.J.; Belanger, R.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Whilst the concept of a Hydrogen economy in the broad sense may for some analysts and Fuel Cell technology developers be an ever moving target the use of hydrogen exists and is growing in other markets today. The use of hydrogen is increasing. Who are the users? What are their unique needs? How can they better be served? As the use of hydrogen increases there are things we can do to improve the perception and handling of hydrogen as an industrial gas that will impact the future issues of hydrogen as a fuel thereby assisting the mainstream availability of hydrogen fuel a reality. Factors that will induce change in the way hydrogen is used, handled, transported and stored are the factors to concentrate development efforts on. Other factors include: cost; availability; safety; codes and standards; and regulatory authorities acceptance of new codes and standards. New methods of storage and new devices in which the hydrogen is stored will influence and bring about change and increased use. New innovative products based on Metal Hydride hydrogen storage will address some of the barriers to widely distributed hydrogen as a fuel or energy carrier to which successful fuel cell product commercialization is subject. Palcan has developed innovative products based on it's Rare Earth Metal Hydride alloy. Some of these innovations will aid the distribution of hydrogen as a fuel and offer alternatives to the existing hydrogen user and to the Fuel Cell product developer. An overview of the products and how these products will affect the distribution and use of hydrogen as an industrial gas and fuel is presented. (author)

  10. Interactions of hydrogen isotopes and oxides with metal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Cleaver, J.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results. (authors)

  11. Interactions of hydrogen isotopes and oxides with metal tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G. R. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3860 (United States); Cleaver, J. [Idaho State Univ., 921 South 8th Avenue, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results. (authors)

  12. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, Glen R.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results

  13. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of 2-methylpyridine catalyzed by several fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Hirohumi; Fukuzumi, Kazuo.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction of 2-methylpyridine has been studied by using several fatty acids as catalysts. The reaction was carried out in a sealed pyrex tube at 120 0 C, and the contents of the products were determined by mass spectrometry. Reaction of 2-methylpyridine with monodeuteroacetic acid (1 : 1, mol/mol) arrived at a equilibrium (d 0 reversible d 1 reversible d 2 reversible d 3 ) in 2 hr (d 0 41%, d 1 42%, d 2 15%, d 3 2%). No exchange was observed for the reaction of pyridine with monodeuteroacetic acid. The conversion-time curves of typical series reactions (d 0 → d 1 → d 2 → d 3 ) were obtained for the fatty acid catalyzed exchange in deuterium oxide. The effect of the fatty acid RCO 2 H (substrate : fatty acid : D 2 O=1 : 0.86 : 27.6, mol/mol/mol) on the conversion was in the order of R; C 1 --C 3 4 --C 10 , where the reaction mixtures were homogeneous in the case of C 1 --C 3 and were heterogeneous in the case of C 4 --C 10 . The effects of the initial concentration of the substrates and the catalysts (RCO 2 H) on the total conversion were studied by using some fatty acids (R; C 2 , C 4 and C 9 ) in deuterium oxide (for 2 hr). The total conversion of the substrate increases with increasing the concentration of the acids. The total conversion decreases in the case of R=C 9 , but, increases in the case of R=C 2 with increasing the concentration of the substrate. In the case of reactions with low concentrations of the substrate, the reactivity was in the order of C 9 >C 4 >C 2 , while with high concentrations, the reactivity was in the order of C 4 >C 2 >C 9 and C 9 >C 4 >C 2 with high and low concentrations of the acids, respectively. A possible reaction mechanism was proposed and discussed. (auth.)

  14. γ-Sultam-cored N,N-ligands in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aryl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Slavko; Modec, Barbara; Stephan, Michel; Mohar, Barbara

    2016-02-14

    The synthesis of new enantiopure syn- and anti-3-(α-aminobenzyl)-benzo-γ-sultam ligands 6 and their application in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of ketones using formic acid/triethylamine is described. In particular, benzo-fused cyclic ketones afforded excellent enantioselectivities in reasonable time employing a low loading of the syn ligand-containing catalyst. A never-before-seen dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) during reduction of a γ-keto carboxylic ester (S7) derivative of 1-indanone is realized leading as well to excellent induction.

  15. Rhodium-catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Dehydroamino Ketones: A General Approach to Chiral α-amino Ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenchao; Wang, Qingli; Xie, Yun; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-01-01

    Rhodium/DuanPhos-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of aliphatic α-dehydroamino ketones has been achieved and afforded chiral α-amino ketones in high yields and excellent enantioselectives (up to 99 % ee), which could be reduced further to chiral β-amino alcohols by LiAlH(tBuO)3 with good yields. This protocol provides a readily accessible route for the synthesis of chiral α-amino ketones and chiral β-amino alcohols. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for hydrogen storage have continued to receive intense interest over the past decade. MOFs are a class of organic-inorganic hybrid crystalline materials consisting of metallic moieties that are linked by strong...

  17. Precipitation of metal sulphides using gaseous hydrogen sulphide: mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed that describes the precipitation of metal sulffides in an aqueous solution containing two different heavy metal ions. The solution is assumed to consist of a well-mixed bulk and a boundary layer that is contacted with hydrogen sulphide gas. The model makes use

  18. Precipitation of metal sulphides using gaseous hydrogen sulphide : mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarazi, Mousa Al-; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed that describes the precipitation of metal sulphides in an aqueous solution containing two different heavy metal ions. The solution is assumed to consist of a well-mixed bulk and a boundary layer that is contacted with hydrogen sulphide gas. The model makes use

  19. Direct observation and modelling of ordered hydrogen adsorption and catalyzed ortho-para conversion on ETS-10 titanosilicate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Gribov, Evgueni N; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-06-07

    Hydrogen physisorption on porous high surface materials is investigated for the purpose of hydrogen storage and hydrogen separation, because of its simplicity and intrinsic reversibility. For these purposes, the understanding of the binding of dihydrogen to materials, of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the ortho-para conversion during thermal and pressure cycles are crucial for the development of new hydrogen adsorbents. We report the direct observation by IR spectroscopic methods of structured hydrogen adsorption on a porous titanosilicate (ETS-10), with resolution of the kinetics of the ortho-para transition, and an interpretation of the structure of the adsorbed phase based on classical atomistic simulations. Distinct infrared signals of o- and p-H2 in different adsorbed states are measured, and the conversion of o- to p-H2 is monitored over a timescale of hours, indicating the presence of a catalyzed reaction. Hydrogen adsorption occurs in three different regimes characterized by well separated IR manifestations: at low pressures ordered 1:1 adducts with Na and K ions exposed in the channels of the material are formed, which gradually convert into ordered 2:1 adducts. Further addition of H2 occurs only through the formation of a disordered condensed phase. The binding enthalpy of the Na+-H2 1:1 adduct is of -8.7+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1), as measured spectroscopically. Modeling of the weak interaction of H2 with the materials requires an accurate force field with a precise description of both dispersion and electrostatics. A novel three body force field for molecular hydrogen is presented, based on the fitting of an accurate PES for the H2-H2 interaction to the experimental dipole polarizability and quadrupole moment. Molecular mechanics simulations of hydrogen adsorption at different coverages confirm the three regimes of adsorption and the structure of the adsorbed phase.

  20. Recent advances in transition-metal-catalyzed intermolecular carbomagnesiation and carbozincation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Murakami

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbomagnesiation and carbozincation reactions are efficient and direct routes to prepare complex and stereodefined organomagnesium and organozinc reagents. However, carbon–carbon unsaturated bonds are generally unreactive toward organomagnesium and organozinc reagents. Thus, transition metals were employed to accomplish the carbometalation involving wide varieties of substrates and reagents. Recent advances of transition-metal-catalyzed carbomagnesiation and carbozincation reactions are reviewed in this article. The contents are separated into five sections: carbomagnesiation and carbozincation of (1 alkynes bearing an electron-withdrawing group; (2 alkynes bearing a directing group; (3 strained cyclopropenes; (4 unactivated alkynes or alkenes; and (5 substrates that have two carbon–carbon unsaturated bonds (allenes, dienes, enynes, or diynes.

  1. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the more

  3. Synthesis of Polycyclic Ring Systems Using Transition Metal Catalyzed Cyclizations of Diazo Alkynyl Ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Padwa

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The rhodium(II-catalyzed reaction of α-diazo ketones bearing tethered alkyne units represents a new and useful method for the construction of a variety of substituted cyclopentenones. The process proceeds by addition of the rhodium-stabilized carbenoid onto the acetylenic π-bond to give a vinyl carbenoid intermediate. The resulting rhodium complex undergoes a wide assortment of reactions including cyclopropanation, 1,2-hydrogen migration, CH-insertion, addition to tethered alkynes and ylide formation. When 2-alkynyl-2-diazo-3-oxobutanoates were treated with a Rh(II-catalyst, furo[3,4-c]furans were formed in excellent yield.

  4. Complex metal hydrides for hydrogen, thermal and electrochemical energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...... how complex metal hydrides may act in an integrated setup with a fuel cell. This review focuses on the unique properties of light element complex metal hydrides mainly based on boron, nitrogen and aluminum, e.g., metal borohydrides and metal alanates. Our hope is that this review can provide new...

  5. Hydrogen damage in metals, particularly in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funes, A.J.

    1982-03-01

    Hydrogen damage examples of practical interest for the engineer are presented, showing the scope of the problem and its importance in relation to technological development, particularly of CANDU reactor and of heavy water production plants. The fundamental triangle of the hydrogen embrittlement is established as follows: presence of hydrogen in the crystalline network, structure susceptible of damage, and effort. The initial collection of examples is classified in function of the observed effects. For the consideration of the causes of said effects three models of hydrogen interaction with the crystalline network are described, indicating their scopes and limitations. Then the use of the models is explained, both in order to obtain practical information (evaluation tests, acceptance and rejection criteria) and for the validation and improvement of the models themselves (study methods). Solutions for attenuating the hydrogen embrittlement and a programme of studies and tests are proposed to be carried out by the National Atomic Energy Commission. Among the latter, the local development of a microimpression method to detect the evaluation of absorbed hydrogen, comparable with the autoradiography of high resolution, and a mechanical test yielding results on fragility comparable with those obtained through the test of standard disks, are described. (M.E.L.) [es

  6. Theoretical study of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alyson C M; Pavão, A C

    2018-05-04

    Adsorption, absorption and desorption energies and other properties of hydrogen storage in palladium and in the metal hydrides AlH 3 , MgH 2 , Mg(BH 4 ) 2 , Mg(BH 4 )(NH 2 ) and LiNH 2 were analyzed. The DFT calculations on cluster models show that, at a low concentration, the hydrogen atom remains adsorbed in a stable state near the palladium surface. By increasing the hydrogen concentration, the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites are sequentially occupied. In the α phase the tetrahedral site releases hydrogen more easily than at the octahedral sites, but the opposite occurs in the β phase. Among the hydrides, Mg(BH 4 ) 2 shows the highest values for both absorption and desorption energies. The absorption energy of LiNH 2 is higher than that of the palladium, but its desorption energy is too high, a recurrent problem of the materials that have been considered for hydrogen storage. The release of hydrogen, however, can be favored by using transition metals in the material structure, as demonstrated here by doping MgH 2 with 3d and 4d-transition metals to reduce the hydrogen atomic charge and the desorption energy.

  7. Hydrogen-induced high damping of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are two important topics concerned with the recent researches on the damping materials of hydrogenated metallic glasses (HMGs). One is the mechanism of the high hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs. The other is the materials processing of 'bulk' HMGs for engineering. This article describes the summary of our recent studies on these topics. The first one is closely related to the local structure of the metallic glasses. Therefore, our recent results on the intermediate-range local structure of the simple two Zr-based metallic glasses are described, which has been clarified by the Voronoi analysis using the experimental data of the neutron diffraction measurements. The hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs is also discussed on the basis of these recent results of the local structure of the metallic glasses. In terms of the second topic, the first successful preparation of heavily hydrogenated Zr-based bulk HMG rods without hydrogen-induced surface embrittlement is described. They are prepared by a powder-compact-melting and liquid-casting process using Zr-Al-Ni-Cu metallic glass and ZrH 2 powders as the starting materials. It has been found that they have high damping properties.

  8. Metal-functionalized silicene for efficient hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tanveer; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-10-21

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are used to investigate the electronic structure along with the stability, bonding mechanism, band gap, and charge transfer of metal-functionalized silicene to envisage its hydrogen-storage capacity. Various metal atoms including Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, and Ca are doped into the most stable configuration of silicene. The corresponding binding energies and charge-transfer mechanisms are discussed from the perspective of hydrogen-storage compatibility. The Li and Na metal dopants are found to be ideally suitable, not only for strong metal-to-substrate binding and uniform distribution over the substrate, but also for the high-capacity storage of hydrogen. The stabilities of both Li- and Na-functionalized silicene are also confirmed through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that both of the alkali metals, Li(+) and Na(+), can adsorb five hydrogen molecules, attaining reasonably high storage capacities of 7.75 and 6.9 wt %, respectively, with average adsorption energies within the range suitable for practical hydrogen-storage applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metal oxide/hydrogen battery; Kinzoku sankabutsu/suiso denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, M.; Niki, H. [Toshiba Research and Development Centre, Komukai, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1995-07-04

    The metal oxide-hydrogen battery consisting mainly of hydrogen storage alloy has high energy density and high volume efficiency. However, it is disadvantageous that the self-discharge takes place since the discharge capacity is lowered due to the delivery of stored hydrogen from the hydrogen electrode. This invention relates to the metal oxide-hydrogen battery consisting of hydrogen storage alloy. Hydrogen storage alloy which is composed of LaNi5 system homogeneous solid solution having an equilibrium plateau pressure of less than 1 atm at 20{degree}C is used. As a result, the battery voltage change and the self-discharge can be reduced, and the cell performance can be improved. Examples of LaNi5 system hydrogen storage alloy are ANi(5-x)Mx (A = La, Mm, and Ca, M = Al, Mn, Si, Ge, Fe, B, Ga, Cu, In, and Co). LaNi(4.7)Al(0.3) and MmNi(4.2)Mn(0.8) are preferable. 3 figs.

  10. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  11. Hydrogenation of ethene catalyzed by Ir atom deposited on γ-Al2O3(001) surface: From ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yongchang; Sun, Zhaolin; Song, Lijuan; Li, Qiang; Xu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Ethene hydrogenation reaction, catalyzed by an iridium atom adsorbed on γ-Al 2 O 3 (001) surface, is studied via ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The catalyzed reaction process and activation energy are compared with the counterparts of a reaction occurs in vacuum condition. It is found that the activation energy barrier is substantially lowered by the adsorbed Ir atom on the γ-Al 2 O 3 (001). The catalyzed reaction is modeled in two steps: (1) Hydrogen molecular dissolution and then bonded with C 2 H 4 molecular. (2) Desorption of the C 2 H 6 molecular from the surface. -- Highlights: ► The ethene hydrogenation reaction is simulated with nudged elastic band methods. ► The catalytic effect of the Ir atom on γ-Al 2 O 3 (001) surface is modeled. ► Details of the catalytic reaction are exhibited.

  12. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  13. Hydrogen formation in metals and alloys during fusion reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Mori, Seiji

    1994-08-01

    The results of neutron transport calculations of the hydrogen formation based on the JENDL gas-production cross section file are discussed for some metals and alloys, namely 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, austenitic stainless steel (Ti modified 316SS:PCA), ferritic steel (Fe-8Cr-2W:F82H) and the vanadium-base alloy (V-5Cr-5Ti). Impact of the steel fraction in steel/water homogeneous blanket/shield compositions on the hydrogen formation rate in above-mentioned metals and alloys is discussed both for the hydrogen formation in the first wall and the blanket/shield components. The results obtained for the first wall are compared with those for the helium formation obtained at JAERI by the same calculational conditions. Hydrogen formation rates at the first wall having 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo are larger than those of helium by 3-8 times. (author)

  14. Solubility of hydrogen isotopes in stressed hydride-forming metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Ambler, J.F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Components made from hydride-forming metals can be brittle when particles of hydride are present. The solid solubility limit of hydrogen in these metals needs to be known so that fracture resistance can be properly assessed. Stress affects the solubility of hydrogen in metals. As hydrogen dissolves the metal volume increases, an applied hydrostatic tensile stress supplies work to increase the solubility. Precipitation of hydrides increases the volume further. A hydrostatic tensile stress promotes the formation of hydrides and tends to reduce the terminal solubility. For materials containing hydrogen in solution in equilibrium with hydrides, the effect of stress on the terminal solubility is given. Hydrogen migrates up tensile stress gradients because of the effect of stress on the solubility and solubility limit. Consequently, hydrogen concentrates at flaws. When hydrides are present in the metal matrix, those remote from the flaw tip will preferentially dissolve in favor of those precipitated at the flaw. If the stress is large enough, at some critical condition the hydrides at the flaw will crack. This is delayed hydrogen cracking. Notched and fatigue-cracked cantilever beam specimens (6) (38 x 4 x 3 mm) were machined from the circumferential direction of several cold-worked Zr-2.5 at. % Nb pressure tubes. The chemical compositions had the ranges (in atomic %) Nb - 2.5 to 2.7; O - 0.58 to 0.71; H - 0.018 to 0.18. The effect of test temperature is for a specimen containing 0.13 at. % protium and 0.29 at .% deuterium. Between 505 K and 530 K was less than 1 hr, between 530 K and 537 K it increased to 25.8 h, while at 538 K no cracking was observed up to the 54 h

  15. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    of the renewable energy sources [2]. Borohydrides have received great attention as energy carrier due to their high gravimetric content of hydrogen, though unfortunately they are currently not applicable for industrial use due to high thermal stability and poor recycling. The purpose of the investigation...

  16. Hydrogen permeation resistant layers for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1980-03-01

    Reviewing the literature in the tritium diffusion field one can readily see a wide divergence in results for both the response of permeation rate to pressure, and the effect of oxide layers on total permeation rates. The basic mechanism of protective oxide layers is discussed. Two coatings which are less hydrogen permeable than the best naturally occurring oxide are described. The work described is part of an HEDL-ANL cooperative research program on Tritium Permeation in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors. This includes permeation work on hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium with the hydrogen-deuterium research leading to the developments presented

  17. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    already use hydrogen for weather balloons . Besides cost, hydrogen has other advantages over helium. Hydrogen has more lift than helium, so larger...of water vapor entering the gas stream, and avoid damaging the balloon /aerostat (aerostats typically have an operational temperature range of -50 to...Aerostats: “Gepard” Tethered Aerostats with Mobile Mooring Systems. Available at http://rosaerosystems.com/aero/obj7. Accessed June 4, 2015. 11

  18. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Isimjan, Tayirjan; Yu, Weili; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  19. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  20. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-01-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm–1 μm) with metal-oxide core–shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg–Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  1. Investigation of transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Juliet M; Corbin, Joshua R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2018-04-11

    Transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer is a powerful method for incorporating new CN bonds into relatively unfunctionalized scaffolds. In this communication, we report the first examples of site- and chemoselective CH bond amination reactions in aqueous media. The unexpected ability to employ water as the solvent in these reactions is advantageous in that it eliminates toxic solvent use and enables reactions to be run at increased concentrations with lower oxidant loadings. Using water as the reaction medium has potential to expand the scope of nitrene transfer to encompass a variety of biomolecules and highly polar substrates, as well as enable pH control over the site-selectivity of CH bond amination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transition Metal Catalyzed Reactions of Carbohydrates: a Nonoxidative Approach to Oxygenated Organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Mark

    1997-01-08

    There is a critical need for new environmentally friendly processes in the United States chemical industry as legislative and economic pressures push the industry to zero-waste and cradle-to-grave responsibility for the products they produce. Carbohydrates represent a plentiful, renewable resource, which for some processes might economically replace fossil feedstocks. While the conversion of biomass to fuels, is still not generally economical, the selective synthesis of a commodity or fine chemical, however, could compete effectively if appropriate catalytic conversion systems can be found. Oxygenated organics, found in a variety of products such as nylon and polyester, are particularly attractive targets. We believe that with concerted research efforts, homogeneous transition metal catalyzed reactions could play a significant role in bringing about this future green chemistry technology.

  3. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage...... inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy....... field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...

  4. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  5. Softening of metals under hydrogen ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Korshunov, S.N.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Skorlupkin, I.D.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental study results are presented on steel type 18-10 creep under hydrogen ion irradiation. The Irradiation of annealed specimens is accomplished by 15 keV H 2 + ions with a dose up to 10 22 m -2 at current density of 0.6 A/m 2 at temperatures of 570-770 K. Creep tests show that the irradiation at T = 770 K results in a sharp increase of creep rate. At t 570 K the effect of ion-induced creep in steel 18-10 is not observed. The model is proposed which explains the ion-induced creep by accumulation of hydrogen along grain boundaries, their weakening and removal of obstacles to sliding [ru

  6. Composite metal-hydrogen electrodes for metal-hydrogen batteries. Final report, October 1, 1993 - April 15, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Weismann, H.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding those of commercially available metal hydride materials and fast hydrogen charging and discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films and multilayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 μm thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices

  7. Oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by selenium(IV)-containing peroxotungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yiwen; He, Qihui; Zhang, Zheng; Ding, Naidong; Hu, Baixing

    2011-11-28

    With stoichiometric H(2)O(2) as oxidant, dibenzothiophene (DBT) is oxidized to its corresponding sulfone with high efficiency, catalyzed by a sub-valence heteronuclear peroxotungstate, [C(18)H(37)N(CH(3))(3)](4)[H(2)Se(IV)(3)W(6)O(34)], under mild biphase conditions and the catalyst shows remarkable selectivity of catalytic oxidation towards DBT, cinnamyl alcohol and quinoline.

  8. Hydrogen axion star: metallic hydrogen bound to a QCD axion BEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yang; Barger, Vernon; Berger, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison,1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-12-23

    As a cold dark matter candidate, the QCD axion may form Bose-Einstein condensates, called axion stars, with masses around 10{sup −11} M{sub ⊙}. In this paper, we point out that a brand new astrophysical object, a Hydrogen Axion Star (HAS), may well be formed by ordinary baryonic matter becoming gravitationally bound to an axion star. We study the properties of the HAS and find that the hydrogen cloud has a high pressure and temperature in the center and is likely in the liquid metallic hydrogen state. Because of the high particle number densities for both the axion star and the hydrogen cloud, the feeble interaction between axion and hydrogen can still generate enough internal power, around 10{sup 13} W×(m{sub a}/5 meV){sup 4}, to make these objects luminous point sources. High resolution ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes can discover HAS via black-body radiation.

  9. Development of composite metallic membranes for hydrogen purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, F.

    2003-12-01

    Fuel cells are able to convert chemical energy into electric power. There are different types of cells; the best for automotive applications are Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. But, these systems need hydrogen of high purity. However, fuel reforming generates a mixture of gases, from which hydrogen has to be extracted before supplying the electrochemical cell. The best way for the purification of hydrogen is the membrane separation technology. Palladium is selectively permeable to hydrogen and this is the reason why this metal is largely used for the membrane development. This work deals with the development of hydrogen-selective membranes by deposition of a thin film of palladium onto a porous mechanical support. For this, we have used the electroless plating technique: a palladium salt and a reducing agent are mixed and the deposition takes place onto the catalytic surface of the substrate. After bibliographic investigations, experimental studies have been performed first with a dense metallic substrate in order to better understand the different parameters controlling the deposition. First of all, potentiometric measurements have been carried out to follow the electrochemical reactions in the bath. Then, kinetic measurements of the coating thickness have been recorded to understand the effect of the bath conditions on the yield and the adhesion of the film. Finally, the electroless plating method has been applied to deposit palladium membranes onto porous stainless steel substrates. After optimisation, the resulting membranes were tested for their hydrogen permeation properties. (author)

  10. Hydrogen storage alloys for nickel/metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Tetsuo; Myamura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Uehara, Itsuki [Osaka National Research Inst. (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    Efforts to improve performance of metal hydride electrodes such as substitution of alloy components, heat treatment, and surface treatment intended to change surface and bulk structure of hydrogen storage alloys, mainly LaNi{sub 5} based alloys, are reviewed. The importance of control of morphology is emphasized. (author)

  11. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes

  12. Removal of heavy metal from industrial wastewater using hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The batch removal of heavy metals lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) from industrial wastewater effluent under different experimental conditions using hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Experimental results indicated that at pH 6.5, pre-treatment analysis gave the following values: Pb 57.63 mg/l, Zn 18.9 mg/l and Cu ...

  13. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, F B; Grzetic, V [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1983-02-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  14. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  15. Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jacob Lindner; Moses, Poul Georg; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on carbon supported MoS2 nanoparticles is investigated and compared to findings with previously published work on Au(111) supported MoS2. An investigation into MoS2 oxidation is presented and used to quantify the surface concentration of MoS2. Other metal sul...

  16. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  17. Luminescent chemical waves in the Cu(II)-catalyzed oscillatory oxidation of SCN- ions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, Katarzyna; Jurczakowski, Rafał; Lewera, Adam; Orlik, Marek

    2007-05-10

    The oscillatory oxidation of thiocyanate ions with hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by Cu2+ ions in alkaline media, was so far observed as occurring simultaneously in the entire space of the batch or flow reactor. We performed this reaction for the first time in the thin-layer reactor and observed the spatiotemporal course of the above process, in the presence of luminol as the chemiluminescent indicator. A series of luminescent patterns periodically starting from the random reaction center and spreading throughout the entire solution layer was reported. For a batch-stirred system, the bursts of luminescence were found to correlate with the steep decreases of the oscillating Pt electrode potential. These novel results open possibilities for further experimental and theoretical investigations of those spatiotemporal patterns, including studies of the mechanism of this chemically complex process.

  18. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  19. Palladium-Catalyzed Atom-Transfer Radical Cyclization at Remote Unactivated C(sp3 )-H Sites: Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of Hybrid Vinyl Palladium Radical Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnyy, Maxim; Parasram, Marvin; Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    A novel mild, visible-light-induced palladium-catalyzed hydrogen atom translocation/atom-transfer radical cyclization (HAT/ATRC) cascade has been developed. This protocol involves a 1,5-HAT process of previously unknown hybrid vinyl palladium radical intermediates, thus leading to iodomethyl carbo- and heterocyclic structures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Biomimetic oxidation of carbamazepine with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a manganese porphyrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia M. B. Neves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory project is planned for an undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students prepare a manganese porphyrin able to mimic the oxidative metabolism of carbamazepine, one of the most frequently prescribed drugs in the treatment of epilepsy. The in vitro oxidation of carbamazepine results in the formation of the corresponding 10,11-epoxide, the main in vivo metabolite. The reaction is catalyzed by manganese porphyrin in the presence of H2O2, an environmentally-friendly oxidant. Through this project students will develop their skills in organic synthesis, coordination chemistry, chromatographic techniques such as TLC and HPLC, UV-visible spectrophotometry, and NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Biomimetic oxidation of carbamazepine with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a manganese porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Claudia M.B.; Simoes, Mario M.Q.; Domingues, Fernando M.J.; Neves, M. Graca P.M.S.; Cavaleiro, Jose A.S., E-mail: msimoes@ua.pt [Dept. de Quimica, QOPNA, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-07-01

    This laboratory project is planned for an undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students prepare a manganese porphyrin able to mimic the oxidative metabolism of carbamazepine, one of the most frequently prescribed drugs in the treatment of epilepsy. The in vitro oxidation of carbamazepine results in the formation of the corresponding 10,11-epoxide, the main in vivo metabolite. The reaction is catalyzed by manganese porphyrin in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, an environmentally-friendly oxidant. Through this project students will develop their skills in organic synthesis, coordination chemistry, chromatographic techniques such as TLC and HPLC, UV-visible spectrophotometry, and NMR spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Insulator-metal transition of fluid molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically compressed fluid hydrogen shows evidence for metallization at the relatively low pressure of 140 GPa (1.4 Mbar) while experiments on solid hydrogen made in a diamond-anvil cell have failed to detect any evidence for gap closure up to a pressure of 230 GPa (2.3 Mbar). Two possible mechanisms for metal- liclike resistivity are put forward. The first is that as a consequence of the large thermal disorder in the fluid (kT∼0.2 endash 0.3 eV) short-range molecular interactions lead to band tailing that extends the band edge into the gap, resulting in closure at a lower pressure than in the solid. The second mechanism argues that molecular dissociation creates H atoms that behave similar to n-type donors in a heavily doped semiconductor and undergo a nonmetal-metal Mott-type transition. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterns of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom—surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy, the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields. (atomic and molecular physics)

  4. A neutronic method to determine low hydrogen concentrations in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennun, Leonardo; Santisteban, Javier; Diaz-Valdes, J.; Granada, J.R.; Mayer, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method for the non-destructive determination of low hydrogen content in metals. The method is based on measurements of neutron inelastic scattering combined with cadmium filters. Determination is simple and the method would allow to construct a mobile device, to perform the analysis 'in situ'. We give a brief description of the usual methods to determine low hydrogen contents in solids, paying special attention to those methods supported by neutron techniques. We describe the proposed method, calculations to achieve a better sensitivity, and experimental results

  5. Nuclear processes in deuterium/natural hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelensky, V.F.

    2013-01-01

    The survey presents the analysis of the phenomena taking place in deuterium - metal and natural hydrogen - metal systems under cold fusion experimental conditions. The cold fusion experiments have shown that the generation of heat and helium in the deuterium-metal system without emission of energetic gamma-quanta is the result of occurrence of a chain of chemical, physical and nuclear processes observed in the system, culminating in both the fusion of deuterium nuclei and the formation of a virtual, electron-modified excited 4He nucleus. The excitation energy of the helium nucleus is transferred to the matrix through emission of conversion electrons, and that, under appropriate conditions, provides a persistent synthesis of deuterium. The processes occurring in the deuterium/natural hydrogen - metal systems have come to be known as chemonuclear DD- and HD-fusion. The mechanism of stimulation of weak interaction reactions under chemonuclear deuterium fusion conditions by means of strong interaction reactions has been proposed. The results of numerous experiments discussed in the survey bear witness to the validity of chemonuclear fusion. From the facts discussed it is concluded that the chemonuclear deuterium fusion scenario as presented in this paper may serve as a basis for expansion of deeper research and development of this ecologically clean energy source. It is shown that the natural hydrogen-based system, containing 0.015% of deuterium, also has good prospects as an energy source. The chemonuclear fusion processes do not require going beyond the scope of traditional physics for their explanation

  6. Hydrogenation of esters catalyzed by ruthenium PN3-Pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2014-08-11

    Hydrogenation of esters under mild conditions was achieved using air-stable ruthenium PN3-pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm. High efficiency was achieved even in the presence of water. DFT studies suggest a bimolecular proton shuttle mechanism which allows H2 to be activated by the relatively stable catalyst with a reasonably low transition state barrier. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Catalytic activation of molecular hydrogen in alkyne hydrogenation reactions by lanthanide metal vapor reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.; Bloom, I.; Engerer, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    A rotary metal vapor was used in the synthesis of Lu, Er, Nd, Sm, Yb, and La alkyne, diene, and phosphine complexes. A typical catalytic hydrogenation experiment is described. The lanthanide metal vapor product is dissolved in tetrahydrofuran or toluene and placed in a pressure reaction vessel 3-hexyne (or another substrate) is added, the chamber attached to a high vacuum line, cooled to -196 0 C, evacuated, warmed to ambient temperature and hydrogen is added. The solution is stirred magnetically while the pressure in monitored. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography. Rates and products of various systems are listed. This preliminary survey indicates that catalytic reaction chemistry is available to these metals in a wide range of coordination environments. Attempts to characterize these compounds are hampered by their paramagnetic nature and their tendency to polymerize

  8. Oxidative Esterification of Aldehydes with Urea Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin-Ae; Kim, Yoon Mi; Lee, Jong Chan [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a new, environmentally benign and highly efficient oxidative preparation of methyl esters by the reaction of various aldehydes with UHP in methanol catalyzed by readily accessible aluminum(III) chloride hexahydrate. This new greener and cost effective direct esterification method can serve as a useful alternative to existing protocols. Esters are some of the most important functional groups in organic chemistry and have been found in the sub-structure of a variety of natural products, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. Numerous methods have been reported for the preparation of various esters. In particular, this method gives low yields for both aldehydes containing electron donating substituents in aromatic rings and heterocyclic aldehydes. Therefore, development of a more general, efficient, and greener protocol for the esterification of aldehydes with readily available catalyst is still desirable.

  9. Improved metal-adhesive polymers from copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Adrian A; Delaney, Mac; O'Brien, Jeff; Kim, Hyonny; Iovine, Peter M; Díaz Díaz, David; Finn, M G

    2014-08-18

    Electrically conductive adhesive polymers offer many potential advantages relative to Sn-Pb solders, including reduced toxicity, low cost, low processing temperatures, and the ability to make application-specific formulations. Polymers generated from the copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction between multivalent azides and alkynes have previously been identified as strong metal-binding adhesives. Herein we demonstrate that the performance of these materials can be remarkably improved by the incorporation of a flexibility-inducing difunctionalized component and a tertiary amine additive in optimized concentrations. The best formulations were identified by means of rapid adhesion testing of a library of potential candidates by using a custom-built instrument and validated in an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)-standard lap-shear test. Characteristic phase transitions were identified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for adhesives with and without the additives as a function of curing temperature. The incorporation of flexible components was found to more than double the strength of the adhesive. Moreover, the adhesive was made electrically conductive by the inclusion of 20 wt% silver-coated copper flakes and further improved in this regard by the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the formulation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Development of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria using hydrogen from radiolysis or metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.F.; Sellier, R.; Marty, V.; Camaro, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of many parameters need to be studied to characterize the long term behavior of nuclear waste in a deep repository. These parameters concern the chemical effects, radiolytic effects, mechanical properties, water composition, and microbiological activity. To evaluate microbial activity in such an environment, work was focused on an inventory of key nutrients (C, H, 0, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The production of hydrogen in the nuclear waste environment leads to the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria, which modify the gas production balance. A deep repository containing bituminized waste drums implies several sources of hydrogen: - water radiolysis; -corrosion of metal containers; - radiolysis of the embedding matrix (bitumen). Two deep geological disposal conditions leading to H 2 production in a bituminized nuclear waste environment were simulated in the present study: - H 2 production by iron corrosion under anaerobic conditions was simulated by adding 10% of H 2 in the atmosphere; - H 2 production by radiolysis of bitumen matrix was approached by subjecting this material to external gamma irradiation with a dose rate near real conditions (6 Gy/h). The presence of dissolved H 2 in water allows the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria leading to: - CO 2 and N 2 production; - H 2 consumption; - lower NO 3 - concentration caused by reduction to nitrogen. In the first case, hydrogen consumption is limited by the NO 3 - release rate from the bitumen matrix. In the second case, however, under gamma radiation at a low dose rate, hydrogen production is weak, and the hydrogen is completely consumed by microorganisms. Knowledge about these hydrogen oxidizing bacteria is just beginning to emerge. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria adapt well to hydrogen metabolism (autotrophic metabolism) by oxidizing H 2 instead of hydrocarbons. (authors)

  11. Catalyzed Na2LiAlH6 for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.Z.; Martinez-Franco, E.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Bormann, R.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the complex alanate Na 2 LiAlH 6 is synthesized by high-energy milling of powder blends containing NaH and LiAlH 4 . The related thermodynamics are determined. In addition, a comprehensive study was performed to investigate the influence of different oxide and halide catalysts on the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption, as well as their general drawback to decrease storage capacity

  12. Heterogeneously catalyzed deuterium separation processes: Hydrogen-water exchange studies at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, J.D.; Rolston, J.H.; Au, J.C.; Den Hartog, J.; Tremblay, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    New processes for the separation of hydrogen isotopes are required to produce heavy water for CANDU nuclear reactors and to extract tritium formed in the moderator during reactor operation. Wetproofed platinum catalysts capable of promoting rapid exchange of isotopes between countercurrent flows of hydrogen and liquid water in packed columns have been developed at CRNL over the past 15 years. These catalysts provide a catalystic surface for the gas phase exchange reaction H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/ + HD/sub (g)/ ↔ HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2(g)/ as well as a large liquid surface for the liquid phase isotope transfer reaction HDO/sub (v)/ + H/sub 2/O/sub (iota)/↔HDO/sub (iota)/+H/sub 2/O/sub (v)/. Any economic stand-alone heavy water separation process, based on bithermal hydrogen-water exchange over wetproofed platinum catalysts, requires rapid overall exchange of isotopes between two phases at two temperatures. Catalysts developed for cold tower operation at 25-60 0 C are now being tested in a laboratory scale stainless steel trickle bed reactor for performance and stability at simulated hot tower conditions, 150 0 C and 2.0 MPa pressure. Catalytically active layers containing platinum supported on carbon or crystalline silica and wetproofed with Teflon have been prepared on ceramic spheres and stainless steel screening and tested in both random and ordered bed columns

  13. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2014), s. 2313-2333 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metal-hydrid phase transformation * hydrogen diffusion * swelling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/pdfs.jsp?paperID=10195&mode=full

  14. Mitigation of hydrogen by oxidation using nitrous oxide and noble metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    This test studied the ability of a blend of nuclear-grade, noble-metal catalysts to catalyze a hydrogen/nitrous oxide reaction in an effort to mitigate a potential hydrogen (H 2 ) gas buildup in the Hanford Site Grout Disposal Facility. For gases having H 2 and a stoichiometric excess of either nitrous oxide or oxygen, the catalyst blend can effectively catalyze the H 2 oxidation reaction at a rate exceeding 380 μmoles of H 2 per hour per gram of catalyst (μmol/h/g) and leave the gas with less than a 0.15 residual H 2 Concentration. This holds true in gases with up to 2.25% water vapor and 0.1% methane. This should also hold true for gases with up to 0.1% carbon monoxide (CO) but only until the catalyst is exposed to enough CO to block the catalytic sites and stop the reaction. Gases with ammonia up to 1% may be slightly inhibited but can have reaction rates greater than 250 μmol/h/g with less than a 0.20% residual H 2 concentration. The mechanism for CO poisoning of the catalyst is the chemisorption of CO to the active catalyst sites. The CO sorption capacity (SC) of the catalyst is the total amount of CO that the catalyst will chemisorb. The average SC for virgin catalyst was determined to be 19.3 ± 2.0 μmoles of CO chemisorbed to each gram of catalyst (μmol/g). The average SC for catalyst regenerated with air was 17.3 ± 1.9 μmol/g

  15. Experimental Challenges in Studying Hydrogen Absorption in Ultrasmall Metal Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlotea, Claudia; Oumellal, Yassine; Provost, Karine; Ghimbeu, Camelia Matei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances on synthesis, characterization, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultrasmall metal nanoparticles (defined here as objects with average size ≤3 nm) are briefly reviewed in the first part of this work. The experimental challenges encountered in performing accurate measurements of hydrogen absorption in Mg- and noble metal-based ultrasmall nanoparticles are addressed. The second part of this work reports original results obtained for ultrasmall bulk-immiscible Pd–Rh nanoparticles. Carbon-supported Pd–Rh nanoalloys in the whole binary chemical composition range have been successfully prepared by liquid impregnation method followed by reduction at 300°C. EXAFS investigations suggested that the local structure of these nanoalloys is partially segregated into Rh-rich core and Pd-rich surface coexisting within the same nanoparticles. Downsizing to ultrasmall dimensions completely suppresses the hydride formation in Pd-rich nanoalloys at ambient conditions, contrary to bulk and larger nanosized (5–6 nm) counterparts. The ultrasmall Pd 90 Rh 10 nanoalloy can absorb hydrogen-forming solid solutions under these conditions, as suggested by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Apart from this composition, common laboratory techniques, such as in situ XRD, DSC, and PCI, failed to clarify the hydrogen interaction mechanism: either adsorption on developed surfaces or both adsorption and absorption with formation of solid solutions. Concluding insights were brought by in situ EXAFS experiments at synchrotron: ultrasmall Pd 75 Rh 25 and Pd 50 Rh 50 nanoalloys absorb hydrogen-forming solid solutions at ambient conditions. Moreover, the hydrogen solubility in these solid solutions is higher with increasing Pd content, and this trend can be understood in terms of hydrogen preferential occupation in the Pd-rich regions, as suggested by in situ EXAFS. The Rh-rich nanoalloys (Pd 25 Rh 75 and Pd 10 Rh 90 ) only adsorb hydrogen on the developed surface of ultrasmall

  16. Selective gettering of hydrogen in high pressure metal iodide lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuus, G.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main problems in the manufacture of high pressure gas discharge lamps is the elimination of gaseous impurities from their arc tubes. Long degassing processes of all the lamp components are necessary in order to produce lamps with a low ignition voltage and good maintenance of the radiation properties. The investigation described deals with a selective getter place in the arc tube which can replace the long degassing process. The getter consists of a piece of yttrium encapsulated in thin tantalum foil. By this way it is possible to use the gettering action of tantalum and yttrium without having reaction between the metal iodide of the arc tube and yttrium. Yttrium is used because this metal can adsorb a large quantity of hydrogen even at a temperature of 1000 0 C. Hydrogen forms the main gaseous impurity in the high pressure metal iodide lamp. For this reason the adsorption properties like adsorption rate and capacity of the tantalum--yttrium getter for hydrogen are examined, and the results obtained from lamp experiments are given

  17. Diazo compounds and N-tosylhydrazones: novel cross-coupling partners in transition-metal-catalyzed reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-02-19

    Transition-metal-catalyzed carbene transformations and cross-couplings represent two major reaction types in organometallic chemistry and organic synthesis. However, for a long period of time, these two important areas have evolved separately, with essentially no overlap or integration. Thus, an intriguing question has emerged: can cross-coupling and metal carbene transformations be merged into a single reaction cycle? Such a combination could facilitate the development of novel carbon-carbon bond-forming methodologies. Although this concept was first explored about 10 years ago, rapid developments inthis area have been achieved recently. Palladium catalysts can be used to couple diazo compounds with a wide variety of organic halides. Under oxidative coupling conditions, diazo compounds can also react with arylboronic acids and terminal alkynes. Both of these coupling reactions form carbon-carbon double bonds. As the key step in these catalytic processes, Pd carbene migratory insertion plays a vital role in merging the elementary steps of Pd intermediates, leading to novel carbon-carbon bond formations. Because the diazo substrates can be generated in situ from N-tosylhydrazones in the presence of base, the N-tosylhydrazones can be used as reaction partners, making this type of cross-coupling reaction practical in organic synthesis. N-Tosylhydrazones are easily derived from the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. The Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of N-tosylhydrazones is considered a complementary reaction to the classic Shapiro reaction for converting carbonyl functionalities into carbon-carbon double bonds. It can also serve as an alternative approach for the Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of carbonyl compounds, which is usually achieved via triflates. The combination of carbene formation and cross-coupling in a single catalytic cycle is not limited to Pd-catalyzed reactions. Recent studies of Cu-, Rh-, Ni-, and Co-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with diazo

  18. Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 x10 -7 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 x10 -4 g H 2 /hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges

  19. Hydrogen storage by reaction between metallic amides and imides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, J.B.; Cahen, S.; Tarascon, J.M.; Janot, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper details the various metal-N-H systems reported in the literature as possible hydrogen storage materials. In a first part, we discuss the hydrogen storage performances of the Li-N-H system and the desorption mechanism of the LiH-LiNH 2 mixture is especially presented. The possibility of storing hydrogen using two other binary systems (Mg-N-H and Ca-N-H) is described in a second part. In the third part of the paper, we discuss about the performances of the highly promising Li-Mg-N-H system, for which a nice reversibility is obtained at 200 C with an experimental hydrogen capacity of about 5.0 wt.%. Other ternary systems, as Li-B-N-H and Li-Al-N-H, are presented in the last part of this review paper. We especially emphasize the performances obtained in our Laboratory at Amiens with a LiAl(NH 2 ) 4 -LiH mixture able to desorb around 6.0 wt.% of hydrogen at only 130 C. (authors)

  20. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  1. Application of Phosphine-Phosphite Ligands in the Iridium Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydrogenation of 2-Methylquinoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rubio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogenation of 2-methylquinoline with Ir catalysts based on chiral phosphine-phosphites has been investigated. It has been observed that the reaction is very sensitive to the nature of the ligand. Optimization of the catalyst, allowed by the highly modular structure of these phosphine-phosphites, has improved the enantioselectivity of the reaction up to 73% ee. The influence of additives in this reaction has also been investigated. Contrary to the beneficial influence observed in related catalytic systems, iodine has a deleterious effect in the present case. Otherwise, aryl phosphoric acids produce a positive impact on catalyst activity without a decrease on enantioselectivity.

  2. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  3. Transition metal-catalyzed couplings of alkynes to 1,3-enynes: modern methods and synthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Barry M; Masters, James T

    2016-04-21

    The metal-catalyzed coupling of alkynes is a powerful method for the preparation of 1,3-enynes, compounds that are of broad interest in organic synthesis. Numerous strategies have been developed for the homo- and cross coupling of alkynes to enynes via transition metal catalysis. In such reactions, a major issue is the control of regio-, stereo-, and, where applicable, chemoselectivity. Herein, we highlight prominent methods for the selective synthesis of these valuable compounds. Further, we illustrate the utility of these processes through specific examples of their application in carbocycle, heterocycle, and natural product syntheses.

  4. Radiolytic and photochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in solution catalyzed by transition metal complexes with some selected macrocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodkowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the work presented in this report is an explanation of the mechanism of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) reduction catalyzed by transition metal complexes with some selected macrocycles. The catalytic function of two electron exchange centers in the reduction of CO 2 , an inner metal and a macrocycle ring, was defined. Catalytic effects of rhodium, iron and cobalt porphyrins, cobalt and iron phthalocyanines and corroles as well as cobalt corrins have been investigated. CO 2 reduction by iron ions without presence of macrocycles and also in presence of copper compounds in aqueous solutions have been studied as well

  5. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  6. Experimental studies on cold fusion and hydrogen-metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locou, P.

    2007-01-01

    The cold fusion is a nuclear fusion realized in pervading conditions of temperature and pressure. My own process is parallel to that of the team of the University of Los Angeles, but shaped in 1996 within my personal and private Laboratory: A small cylinder in which we replace the air by some deuterium to the gas state in - 33 d egree (the deuterium is some hydrogen with a neutron, which we find in quantity in the sea water). We introduce a crystal there, extremely rare - the property of which is to emit continuously one thousand times dose of successful energy and it during several years without outside pyro, natural excitement - electric - that is it creates an electric field in the slightest change in temperature. We carry then the whole in + 7 d egree, what generates in some seconds a 200 000 volt electric field, an intense enough field to separate the pits of the deuterium of their electrons and to admit them to collide with those of the crystal. There is a fusion of protons between them (positive particles of the pit (core)) and a emission of neutrons, which do not merge. It is this emission which serves for measuring the quantity of energy produced by the fusion (merger). We so managed to produce some energy in unlimited quantity, allowing us to feed our installation with electric current in total autarky, and to reduce so our costs of functioning to divers domains. This crystal is exceptional in its applications and to give it the name would return has to break our current headway: the thorough problem, in this current period of takeover by the financial bodies of the possible patents, brought to us to the biggest caution as regards our results. And, as we look for no outside financing, we do not need to submit ourselves to the requirements lauded by the scientific Community, only our results are strictly estimated. For example we can make estimate our bars or patches of Hydrogen - Metal: a simple spectroscopy in YEW will give as result, only, the element H

  7. Improved hydrogen storage properties of MgH2 catalyzed with TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangir, Mukesh; Meena, Priyanka; Jain, I. P.

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the hydrogenation properties of the MgH2, various concentration of rutile Titanium Oxide (TiO2) (X wt%= 5, 10, 15 wt %) is added to MgH2 by ball milling and the catalytic effect of TiO2 on hydriding/dehydriding properties of MgH2 has been investigated. Result shows that the TiO2 significantly reduced onset temperature of desorption. Onset temperature as low as 190 °C were observed for the MgH2-15 wt% TiO2 sample which is 60 °C and 160 °C lower than the as-milled and as-received MgH2. Fromm the Kissinger plot the activation energy of 15 wt% TiO2 added sample is calculated to be -75.48 KJ/mol. These results indicate that the hydrogenation properties of MgH2-TiO2 have been improved compared to the as-milled and as-received MgH2. Furthermore, XRD and XPS were performed to characterize the structural evolution upon milling and dehydrogenation.

  8. Remediation of diesel-contaminated soils using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide: a laboratory evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, P.; Achari, G.; Mahmoud, M.; Joshi, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation conducted to determine the optimum amount of Fenton's reagent that allows for effective treatment of diesel-contaminated soils. Two types of soils spiked with 5,000 mg/kg diesel fuel were treated in vial reactors with varying concentrations and volumes of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, Ottawa sand spiked with 5,000 mg/kg of diesel was treated with different H 2 O 2 to iron ratios. The gases produced during the remediation process were measured and analyzed to evaluate the oxidation of diesel range organics. As much as 40 % of diesel range organics was removed when 5 grams of silty clay were treated with 20 mL of 20 % H 2 O 2 . The same concentration and volume of hydrogen peroxide removed about 63 % of diesel range organics from sandy silt. The optimal molar ratio of H 2 O 2 : iron catalyst was found to vary between 235:1 to 490:1. (author)

  9. Hydrogenation of intermediate products of furfural production at promoted nickel catalyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beysekov, T.

    1980-01-01

    Examines activity of Ni-Al-Fe acids with additives Ti and W, as well as those promoted with chrome Nio-Al-Ti acids for a hydrogenation reaction of fufural condensate and raw material invarious conditions of production. It was shown that four-component acids demonstrate high activity and selectivity in tetrahydrofuryl alcohol. Hydrogenation rate of furfural condensate on more active compounds of acids is by 1.2-1.4 times higher than in non-promoted with the fourth component of acid. The promoting effect of fourth components, based on data of phase-structural analysis, is explained by changes in the number of correlations of known phases and eutectics, and formation of new presently undeciphered intermetallides, the destruction of which aids, apparently, in the formation of qualitatively new active centers on the surface. It was established that stationary acids also have high activity and stability. Changing leaching depths, H/sub 2/ pressure, temperature, rate of H/sub 2/ bubbling has a favorable effect on the end product.

  10. The mechanism of transition-metal (Cu or Pd)-catalyzed synthesis of benzimidazoles from amidines: theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Gu, Honghong; Wu, Caihong; Du, Lijuan

    2014-11-28

    In this study, the Cu(OAc)2- and [PdCl2(PhCN)2]-catalyzed syntheses of benzimidazoles from amidines were theoretically investigated using density functional theory calculations. For the Cu-catalyzed system, our calculations supported a four-step-pathway involving C-H activation of an arene with Cu(II) via concerted metalation-deprotonation (CMD), followed by oxidation of the Cu(II) intermediate and deprotonation of the imino group by Cu(III), and finally reductive elimination from Cu(III). In our calculations, the barriers for the CMD step and the oxidation step are the same. The results are different from the ones reported by Fu et al. in which the whole reaction mechanism includes three steps and the CMD step is rate determining. On the basis of the calculation results for the [PdCl2(PhCN)2]-catalyzed system, C-H bond breaking by CMD occurs first, followed by the rate-determining C-N bond formation and N-H deprotonation. Pd(III) species is not involved in the [PdCl2(PhCN)2]-catalyzed syntheses of benzimidazoles from amidines.

  11. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  12. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  13. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation in shallow subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K.; Healy, O.; Spanbauer, T. L.; Snow, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic, microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation has been demonstrated in a variety of sediments, soils, and groundwater. To date, studies evaluating U bio-oxidation and mobilization have primarily focused on anthropogenically U contaminated sites. In the Platte River Basin U originating from weathering of uranium-rich igneous rocks in the Rocky Mountains was deposited in shallow alluvial sediments as insoluble reduced uranium minerals. These reduced U minerals are subject to reoxidation by available oxidants, such nitrate, in situ. Soluble uranium (U) from natural sources is a recognized contaminant in public water supplies throughout the state of Nebraska and Colorado. Here we evaluate the potential of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbially catalyzed metal/radionuclide oxidation in subsurface sediments near Alda, NE. Subsurface sediments and groundwater (20-64ft.) were collected from a shallow aquifer containing nitrate (from fertilizer) and natural iron and uranium. The reduction potential revealed a reduced environment and was confirmed by the presence of Fe(II) and U(IV) in sediments. Although sediments were reduced, nitrate persisted in the groundwater. Nitrate concentrations decreased, 38 mg/L to 30 mg/L, with increasing concentrations of Fe(II) and U(IV). Dissolved U, primarily as U(VI), increased with depth, 30.3 μg/L to 302 μg/L. Analysis of sequentially extracted U(VI) and U(IV) revealed that virtually all U in sediments existed as U(IV). The presence of U(IV) is consistent with reduced Fe (Fe(II)) and low reduction potential. The increase in aqueous U concentrations with depth suggests active U cycling may occur at this site. Tetravalent U (U(IV)) phases are stable in reduced environments, however the input of an oxidant such as oxygen or nitrate into these systems would result in oxidation. Thus co-occurrence of nitrate suggests that nitrate could be used by bacteria as a U(IV) oxidant. Most probable number

  15. Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in bcc and fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of the metal--hydrogen systems are described. The large number of anomalous properties are the reason for continuous scientific effort. The time scale of hydrogen motion is extremely short. The characteristic frequencies of the localized modes of hydrogen in Ta, Nb, or V are in the order of 10 -14 sec (energies between 0.1 to 0.2 eV); the jump frequencies for H-diffusion at elevated temperatures in those systems are between 10 +12 to 10 +13 sec -1 . They are comparable with the correlation times for diffusion in liquids and more than ten orders of magnitude larger than the jump times for nitrogen in Nb. Out of the large number of experimental data this paper will survey only some recent results on representative fcc and bcc metals for dilute H solutions. The nature of the elementary step in H-diffusion is described. Here the temperature and isotope dependence of the H-diffusion coefficient gives hints to the mechanism involved. The experimental results are discussed in terms of semiclassical and quantum mechanical diffusion theories

  16. Metal-hydrogen systems with an exceptionally large and tunable thermodynamic destabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, Peter; Longo, Alessandro; Mooij, L.P.A.; Bras, Wim; Dam, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is a key element in the energy transition. Hydrogen-metal systems have been studied for various energy-related applications, e.g., for their use in reversible hydrogen storage, catalysis, hydrogen sensing, and rechargeable batteries. These applications depend strongly on the

  17. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  18. Controlled delamination of metal films by hydrogen loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Eugen

    2008-11-18

    n this work we quantitatively determine the adhesion energy between metal films and their substrates. Therefore a new controlled buckling technique is established, applying the strong compressive in-plane stress that results in thin films clamped on rigid substrates during hydrogen loading. When the elastic energy stored in the H-loaded thin film exceeds the adhesion energy between film and substrate, delamination occurs. At the onset of delamination, a critical hydrogen concentration, a critical stress value and a critical bending of the substrate are present, which are quantitative measures for the adhesion energy and permit its calculation. As the critical values are determined at the onset of delamination, plastic deformation is negligible, which denies the quantitative determination of adhesion energies in conventional test setups. In multilayer-systems, adhesion energies between substrates and films that hardly absorb hydrogen can be measured by the controlled buckling technique, when the films of interest are coated with hydrogen absorbing films (active layer). The measurements are performed easily and can be repeated under the same test conditions, while variables such as the thickness of the coating materials or the boundary surface structure can be varied and optimized. In this work the adhesion energies of different materials on polycarbonate and niobium on sapphire are investigated. (orig.)

  19. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Some aspects of hydrogen interaction with amorphous metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, L.V.; Khonik, V.A.; Skryabina, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    For the first time is considered change of some properties of amorphous metallic materials (AMM) directly in the process of hydrogenation. A supposition is made that many found effects are consequence of accumulation and relief of internal stresses during hydrogenation, exposure or following annealing of AMM. Fe 81 B 14 Si 15 , Fe 52 Co 20 Si 15 B 13 , Fe 5 Co 70 Si 15 B 10 , Fe 5 Co 58 Ni 10 Si 11 B 16 , Co 67 Fe 4 Cr 7 Si 8 B 14 84KChSP, Ni 60 Nb 35 Ti 5 , Ni 60 Nb 40 and Pd 17,5 Cu 6 Si 16.5 AMM were investigated. 24 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  2. Degradation of phenolic compounds with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by enzyme from Serratia marcescens AB 90027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ri-Sheng; Sun, Min; Wang, Chun-Ling; Deng, Sheng-Song

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, the degradation of phenolic compounds using hydrogen peroxide as oxidizer and the enzyme extract from Serratia marcescens AB 90027 as catalyst was reported. With such an enzyme/H2O2 combination treatment, a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was achieved, e.g., degradation of hydroquinone exceeded 96%. From UV-visible and IR spectra, the degradation mechanisms were judged as a process of phenyl ring cleavage. HPLC analysis shows that in the degradation p-benzoquinone, maleic acid and oxalic acid were formed as intermediates and that they were ultimately converted to CO2 and H2O. With the enzyme/H2O2 treatment, vanillin, hydroquinone, catechol, o-aminophenol, p-aminophenol, phloroglucinol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde were readily degraded, whereas the degradation of phenol, salicylic acid, resorcinol, p-cholorophenol and p-nitrophenol were limited. Their degradability was closely related to the properties and positions of their side chain groups. Electron-donating groups, such as -OH, -NH2 and -OCH3 enhanced the degradation, whereas electron-withdrawing groups, such as -NO2, -Cl and -COOH, had a negative effect on the degradation of these compounds in the presence of enzyme/H2O2. Compounds with -OH at ortho and para positions were more readily degraded than those with -OH at meta positions.

  3. Modeling hydrogen storage in boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokarev, A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms was considered as a novel material for hydrogen storage. Density functional theory calculations were used to model key properties of the material, such as geometry, hydrogen packing...

  4. Hydrogen isotope exchange in a metal hydride tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a model of the displacement of one hydrogen isotope within a metal hydride tube by a different isotope in the gas phase that is blown through the tube. The model incorporates only the most basic parameters to make a clear connection to the theory of open-tube gas chromatography, and to provide a simple description of how the behavior of the system scales with controllable parameters such as gas velocity and tube radius. A single tube can be seen as a building block for more complex architectures that provide higher molar flow rates or other advanced design goals.

  5. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  6. Towards hydrogen metallization: an Ab initio approach; Vers la metallisation de l`hydrogene: approche AB initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, St

    1999-12-31

    The quest for metallic hydrogen is a major goal for both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics. Hydrogen and deuterium have been compressed up to 200 GPa in diamond anvil cells, without any clear evidence for a metallic behaviour. Loubeyere has recently suggested that hydrogen could metallize, at pressures within experimental range, in a new Van der Waals compound: Ar(H{sub 2}){sub 2} which is characterized at ambient pressure by an open and anisotropic sublattice of hydrogen molecules, stabilized by an argon skeleton. This thesis deals with a detailed ab initio investigation, by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methods, of the evolution under pressure of this compound. In a last chapter, we go to much higher pressures and temperatures, in order to compare orbital and orbital free ab initio methods for the dense hydrogen plasma. (author) 109 refs.

  7. Towards hydrogen metallization: an Ab initio approach; Vers la metallisation de l`hydrogene: approche AB initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, St

    1998-12-31

    The quest for metallic hydrogen is a major goal for both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics. Hydrogen and deuterium have been compressed up to 200 GPa in diamond anvil cells, without any clear evidence for a metallic behaviour. Loubeyere has recently suggested that hydrogen could metallize, at pressures within experimental range, in a new Van der Waals compound: Ar(H{sub 2}){sub 2} which is characterized at ambient pressure by an open and anisotropic sublattice of hydrogen molecules, stabilized by an argon skeleton. This thesis deals with a detailed ab initio investigation, by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methods, of the evolution under pressure of this compound. In a last chapter, we go to much higher pressures and temperatures, in order to compare orbital and orbital free ab initio methods for the dense hydrogen plasma. (author) 109 refs.

  8. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  9. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiya, Md Mainul Hossain; Kim, Kwang J

    2016-01-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi 5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C–50 °C. Stress–strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress–strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future. (paper)

  10. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  11. A hydrogen-bonding network is important for oxidation and isomerization in the reaction catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Chen, Lin; Sampson, Nicole S.; Vrielink, Alice

    2009-01-01

    The importance of active-site electrostatics for oxidative and reductive half-reactions in a redox flavoenzyme (cholesterol oxidase) have been investigated by a combination of biochemistry and atomic resolution crystallography. A detailed examination of active-site dynamics demonstrates that the oxidation of substrate and the re-oxidation of the flavin cofactor by molecular oxygen are linked by a single active-site asparagine. Cholesterol oxidase is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation and isomerization of 3β-hydroxysteroids. Structural and mutagenesis studies have shown that Asn485 plays a key role in substrate oxidation. The side chain makes an NH⋯π interaction with the reduced form of the flavin cofactor. A N485D mutant was constructed to further test the role of the amide group in catalysis. The mutation resulted in a 1800-fold drop in the overall k cat . Atomic resolution structures were determined for both the N485L and N485D mutants. The structure of the N485D mutant enzyme (at 1.0 Å resolution) reveals significant perturbations in the active site. As predicted, Asp485 is oriented away from the flavin moiety, such that any stabilizing interaction with the reduced flavin is abolished. Met122 and Glu361 form unusual hydrogen bonds to the functional group of Asp485 and are displaced from the positions they occupy in the wild-type active site. The overall effect is to disrupt the stabilization of the reduced FAD cofactor during catalysis. Furthermore, a narrow transient channel that is shown to form when the wild-type Asn485 forms the NH⋯π interaction with FAD and that has been proposed to function as an access route of molecular oxygen, is not observed in either of the mutant structures, suggesting that the dynamics of the active site are altered

  12. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Hemoglobin-catalyzed Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation and the Fate of Polysulfide Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Yadav, Pramod K.; An, Sojin; Seravalli, Javier; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan-Med); (UNL)

    2017-02-17

    Hydrogen sulfide is a cardioprotective signaling molecule but is toxic at elevated concentrations. Red blood cells can synthesize H2S but, lacking organelles, cannot dispose of H2S via the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. We have recently shown that at high sulfide concentrations, ferric hemoglobin oxidizes H2S to a mixture of thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides in which the latter species predominates. Here, we report the crystal structure of human hemoglobin containing low spin ferric sulfide, the first intermediate in heme-catalyzed sulfide oxidation. The structure provides molecular insights into why sulfide is susceptible to oxidation in human hemoglobin but is stabilized against it in HbI, a specialized sulfide-carrying hemoglobin from a mollusk adapted to life in a sulfide-rich environment. We have also captured a second sulfide bound at a postulated ligand entry/exit site in the α-subunit of hemoglobin, which, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first direct evidence for this site being used to access the heme iron. Hydrodisulfide, a postulated intermediate at the junction between thiosulfate and polysulfide formation, coordinates ferric hemoglobin and, in the presence of air, generated thiosulfate. At low sulfide/heme iron ratios, the product distribution between thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides was approximately equal. The iron-bound polysulfides were unstable at physiological glutathione concentrations and were reduced with concomitant formation of glutathione persulfide, glutathione disulfide, and H2S. Hence, although polysulfides are unlikely to be stable in the reducing intracellular milieu, glutathione persulfide could serve as a persulfide donor for protein persulfidation, a posttranslational modification by which H2S is postulated to signal.

  13. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Coupling Reactions: Concepts, Classifications, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Lin; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    Transition metal‐catalyzed decarbonylative coupling reactions have emerged as a powerful alternative to conventional cross‐coupling protocols due to the advantages associated with the use of carbonyl‐containing functionalities as coupling electrophiles instead of commonly used organohalides or sulfates. A wide variety of novel transformations based on this concept have been successfully achieved, including decarbonylative carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond forming reactions. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress in this field and present a comprehensive overview of metal‐catalyzed decarbonylative coupling reactions with carbonyl derivatives.

  14. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Coupling Reactions: Concepts, Classifications, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Lin

    2018-05-14

    Transition metal‐catalyzed decarbonylative coupling reactions have emerged as a powerful alternative to conventional cross‐coupling protocols due to the advantages associated with the use of carbonyl‐containing functionalities as coupling electrophiles instead of commonly used organohalides or sulfates. A wide variety of novel transformations based on this concept have been successfully achieved, including decarbonylative carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond forming reactions. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress in this field and present a comprehensive overview of metal‐catalyzed decarbonylative coupling reactions with carbonyl derivatives.

  15. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  16. Hydrogen Storage using Metal Hydrides in a Stationary Cogeneration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzung, Maxime; Chaudourne, Serge; Perret, Christian; Latroche, Michel; Percheron-Guegan, Annick; Marty Philippe

    2006-01-01

    In the frame of the development of a hydrogen production and storage unit to supply a 40 kW stationary fuel cell, a metal hydride storage tank was chosen according to its reliability and high energetic efficiency. The study of AB5 compounds led to the development of a composition adapted to the project needs. The absorption/desorption pressures of the hydride at 75 C (2 / 1.85 bar) are the most adapted to the specifications. The reversible storage capacity (0.95 %wt) has been optimized to our work conditions and chemical kinetics is fast. The design of the Combined Heat and Power CHP system requires 5 kg hydrogen storage but in a first phase, only a 0.1 kg prototype has been realised and tested. Rectangular design has been chosen to obtain good compactness with an integrated plate fin type heat exchanger designed to reach high absorption/desorption rates. In this paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the Metal Hydride tank (MH tank) during absorption/desorption cycles are given. (authors)

  17. Radiative proton-capture nuclear processes in metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2001-01-01

    Protons being the lightest nuclei, metallic hydrogen may exhibit the features of quantum liquids most relevant to enormous enhancement of nuclear reactions; thermonuclear and pycnonuclear rates and associated enhancement factors of radiative proton captures of high-Z nuclei as well as of deuterons are evaluated. Atomic states of high-Z impurities are determined in a way consistent with the equations of state and screening characteristics of the metallic hydrogen. Rates of pycnonuclear p-d reactions are prodigiously high at densities ≥20 g/cm 3 , pressures ≥1 Gbar, and temperatures ≥950 K near the conditions of solidification. It is also predicted that proton captures of nuclei such as C, N, O, and F may take place at considerable rates, owing to strong screening by K-shell electrons, if the densities ≥60-80 g/cm 3 , the pressures ≥7-12 Gbar, and the temperatures just above solidification. The possibilities and significance of pycnonuclear p-d fusion experiments are specifically remarked

  18. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  19. New Trends in Oxidative Functionalization of Carbon–Hydrogen Bonds: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy B. Shul’pin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review describes new reactions catalyzed by recently discovered types of metal complexes and catalytic systems (catalyst + co-catalyst. Works of recent years (mainly 2010–2016 devoted to the oxygenations of saturated, aromatic hydrocarbons and other carbon–hydrogen compounds are surveyed. Both soluble metal complexes and solid metal compounds catalyze such transformations. Molecular oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, alkyl peroxides, and peroxy acids were used in these reactions as oxidants.

  20. The Manganese-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reaction and the Influence of Trace Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santilli, Carola; Beigbaghlou, Somayyeh Sarvi; Ahlburg, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The substrate scope of the MnCl2-catalyzed cross-coupling between aryl halides and Grignard reagents has been extended to several methyl-substituted aryl iodides by performing the reaction at elevated temperature in a microwave oven. A radical clock experiment revealed the presence of an aryl...

  1. Synthesis of a novel chemotype via sequential metal-catalyzed cycloisomerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Leng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequential cycloisomerizations of diynyl o-benzaldehyde substrates to access novel polycyclic cyclopropanes are reported. The reaction sequence involves initial Cu(I-mediated cycloisomerization/nucleophilic addition to an isochromene followed by diastereoselective Pt(II-catalyzed enyne cycloisomerization.

  2. Manganese Catalyzed α-Olefination of Nitriles by Primary Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Das, Uttam Kumar; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2017-08-30

    Catalytic α-olefination of nitriles using primary alcohols, via dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols with nitriles, is presented. The reaction is catalyzed by a pincer complex of an earth-abundant metal (manganese), in the absence of any additives, base, or hydrogen acceptor, liberating dihydrogen and water as the only byproducts.

  3. Hydrogen Sensors Using Nitride-Based Semiconductor Diodes: The Role of Metal/Semiconductor Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Irokawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C-V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C-V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I-V characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C-V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations.

  4. Hydrogen chemisorption and oxidation of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethin, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the catalytic activity of WC, focusing on the possible influence of point defects. The chemisorption of H on WC and titanium oxycarbides was studied with differential scanning calorimetry. The catalytic activity of these materials for oxidation of H was determined by potentiostatic steady-state and potentiodynamic measurements in acid electrolyte. Compositions of WC surfaces were determined by x-ray photoemission and related to the catalytic behavior. Titanium oxycarbide surfaces were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Of the carbides tested only one WC preparation was able to chemisorb H. Both WC powders investigated catalyzed H oxidation with similar specific activities. Spectroscopic studies showed that the active surface of WC was a mixture of WO 3 and a carbon-deficient WC phase. This result indicates that carbon vacancies are the active sites in tungsten carbide. Theoretical models of a carbon vacancy surrounded by metal atoms suggested by calculations by other workers support this assignment and identify the important role of the W6s level. The measured value of the heat of chemisorption is consistent with the proposed model

  5. Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Brent Gunnoe

    2011-02-17

    Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt

  6. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2 NO(PH 3 ) 2 and a small proton donor H 2 O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions

  7. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  8. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Heiko [KemKom, Libellenweg 2, 25917 Leck, Nordfriesland (Germany)], E-mail: jacobsen@kemkom.com

    2008-04-03

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO){sub 2}NO(PH{sub 3}){sub 2} and a small proton donor H{sub 2}O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  9. Interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with bulk defects and surfaces of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenbacher, F.

    1994-05-01

    The thesis deals with the interaction of hydrogen with defects in metals and the interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with metal surfaces studied by ion-beam techniques and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), respectively. The first part of the thesis discusses the interaction of hydrogen with simple defects in transition metals. The trap-binding enthalpies and the lattice location of hydrogen trapped to vacancies have been determined, and an extremely simple and versatile picture of the hydrogen-metal interaction has evolved, in which the trap strength is mainly determined by the local electron density. Any dilution of the lattice will lead to a trap, vacancies and voids being the strongest trap. It is found that hydrogen trapped to vacancies in fcc metals is quantum-mechanically delocalized, and the excitation energies for the hydrogen in the vacancy potential are a few MeV only. The interaction of hydrogen with metal surfaces is studied by the transmission channeling (TC) technique. It is found that hydrogen chemisorbs in the highest-coordinated sites on the surfaces, and that there is a direct relationship between the hydrogen-metal bond length and the coordination number for the hydrogen. In the final part of the thesis the dynamics of the chemisorption process for oxygen and hydrogen on metal surfaces is studied by STM, a fascinating and powerful technique for exploring the atomic-scale realm of surfaces. It is found that there is a strong coupling between the chemisorption process and the distortion of the metal surface. The adsorbates induce a surface reconstruction, i.e. metal-metal bond breaks and metal-adsorbate bounds form. Whereas hydrogen interacts weakly with the metals and induces reconstructions where only nnn metals bonds are broken, oxygen interacts strongly with the metal, and the driving force for the O-induced reconstructions appears to be the formation of low-coordinated metal-O rows, formed by breaking of nn metal bonds. Finally it is shown

  10. An electrochemical method for determining hydrogen concentrations in metals and some applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    An electrochemical method was developed for the determination of hydrogen in metals using the EG&G-PARC Model 350A Corrosion Measurement Console. The method was applied to hydrogen uptake, both during electrolysis and electroplating, and to studies of hydrogen elimination and the effect of heat treatment on elimination times. Results from these studies are presented.

  11. Mechanistic Insights on C-O and C-C Bond Activation and Hydrogen Insertion during Acetic Acid Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Ruthenium Clusters in Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, Junnan; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Chin, Ya-Huei [Cathy

    2016-06-07

    Catalytic pathways for acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrogen (H2) reactions on dispersed Ru clusters in the aqueous medium and the associated kinetic requirements for C-O and C-C bond cleavages and hydrogen insertion are established from rate and isotopic assessments. CH3COOH reacts with H2 in steps that either retain its carbon backbone and lead to ethanol, ethyl acetate, and ethane (47-95 %, 1-23 %, and 2-17 % carbon selectivities, respectively) or break its C-C bond and form methane (1-43 % carbon selectivities) at moderate temperatures (413-523 K) and H2 pressures (10-60 bar, 298 K). Initial CH3COOH activation is the kinetically relevant step, during which CH3C(O)-OH bond cleaves on a metal site pair at Ru cluster surfaces nearly saturated with adsorbed hydroxyl (OH*) and acetate (CH3COO*) intermediates, forming an adsorbed acetyl (CH3CO*) and hydroxyl (OH*) species. Acetic acid turnover rates increase proportionally with both H2 (10-60 bar) and CH3COOH concentrations at low CH3COOH concentrations (<0.83 M), but decrease from first to zero order as the CH3COOH concentration and the CH3COO* coverages increase and the vacant Ru sites concomitantly decrease. Beyond the initial CH3C(O)-OH bond activation, sequential H-insertions on the surface acetyl species (CH3CO*) lead to C2 products and their derivative (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) and the competitive C-C bond cleavage of CH3CO* causes the eventual methane formation. The instantaneous carbon selectivities towards C2 species (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) increase linearly with the concentration of proton-type Hδ+ (derived from carboxylic acid dissociation) and chemisorbed H*. The selectivities towards C2 products decrease with increasing temperature, because of higher observed barriers for C-C bond cleavage than H-insertion. This study offers an interpretation of mechanism and energetics and provides kinetic evidence of carboxylic acid assisted proton-type hydrogen (Hδ+) shuffling during H

  12. Studies about interaction of hydrogen isotopes with metals and intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasut, F.; Anisoara, P.; Zamfirache, M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen is a non-toxic but highly inflammable gas. Compared to other inflammable gases, its range of inflammability in air is much broader (4-74.5%) but it also vaporizes much more easily. Handling of hydrogen in form of hydrides enhances safety. The interaction of hydrogen with metals and intermetallic compounds is a major field within physical chemistry. Using hydride-forming metals and intermetallic compounds, for example, recovery, purification and storage of heavy isotopes in tritium containing system can solve many problems arising in the nuclear-fuel cycle. The paper presents the thermodynamics and the kinetics between hydrogen and metal or intermetallic compounds. (author)

  13. Asymmetric Chemoenzymatic Reductive Acylation of Ketones by a Combined Iron-Catalyzed Hydrogenation-Racemization and Enzymatic Resolution Cascade

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Brzozowska, Aleksandra; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    . By merging the iron-catalyzed redox reactions with enantioselective enzymatic acylations a wide range of benzylic, aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic ketones, as well as diketones, were reductively acylated. The corresponding products were isolated with high

  14. Applications of some microscopic, diffraction and absorption techniques to the study of metal--hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Several experimental techniques were reviewed which are used to investigate metal hydrogen systems. The first technique is metallography and optical microscopy. This is a very old technique which was found to be very powerful in the case of metal hydrogen systems. A few examples of such work are shown and the results are discussed

  15. Standard practice for evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals by an electrochemical technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This practice gives a procedure for the evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals using an electrochemical technique which was developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. While this practice is primarily intended for laboratory use, such measurements have been conducted in field or plant applications. Therefore, with proper adaptations, this practice can also be applied to such situations. 1.2 This practice describes calculation of an effective diffusivity of hydrogen atoms in a metal and for distinguishing reversible and irreversible trapping. 1.3 This practice specifies the method for evaluating hydrogen uptake in metals based on the steady-state hydrogen flux. 1.4 This practice gives guidance on preparation of specimens, control and monitoring of the environmental variables, test procedures, and possible analyses of results. 1.5 This practice can be applied in principle to all metals and alloys which have a high solubility for hydrogen, and for which the hydrogen permeation is ...

  16. NATO International Symposium on the Electronic Structure and Properties of Hydrogen in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Satterthwaite, C

    1983-01-01

    Hydrogen is the smallest impurity atom that can be implanted in a metallic host. Its small mass and strong interaction with the host electrons and nuclei are responsible for many anomalous and interesting solid state effects. In addition, hydrogen in metals gives rise to a number of technological problems such as hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen storage, radiation hardening, first wall problems associated with nuclear fusion reactors, and degradation of the fuel cladding in fission reactors. Both the fundamental effects and applied problems have stimulated a great deal of inter­ est in the study of metal hydrogen systems in recent years. This is evident from a growing list of publications as well as several international conferences held in this field during the past decade. It is clear that a fundamental understanding of these problems re­ quires a firm knowledge of the basic interactions between hydrogen, host metal atoms, intrinsic lattice defects and electrons. This understanding is made particularly di...

  17. Modeling of hydrogen isotopes separation in a metal hydride bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Corriou, J.P.; Schweich, D.

    1999-01-01

    A predictive model for hydrogen isotopes separation in a non-isothermal bed of unsupported palladium hydride particles is derived. It accounts for the non-linear adsorption-dissociation equilibrium, hydrodynamic dispersion, pressure drop, mass transfer kinetics, heat of sorption and heat losses at the bed wall. Using parameters from the literature or estimated with classical correlations, the model gives simulated curves in agreement with previously published experiments without any parameter fit. The non-isothermal behavior is shown to be responsible for drastic changes of the mass transfer rate which is controlled by diffusion in the solid-phase lattice. For a feed at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, the endothermic hydride-to-deuteride exchange is kinetically controlled, whereas the reverse exothermic exchange is nearly at equilibrium. Finally, a simple and efficient thermodynamic model for the dissociative equilibrium between a metal and a diatomic gas is proposed. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Neutron spectroscopy of fast hydrogen diffusion in BCC transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.; Lottner, V.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering reveals microscopic details of both the time and space development of the H-diffusion process on an atomic scale. After outlining the method on the example of PdH/sub x/, new results on the jump geometry in bcc metals are surveyed. In particular, the anomalous diffusion behavior of H in Nb, Ta, and V at elevated temperature is emphasized, where correlated jump processes are important. The influence of impurities on the H-diffusion process is demonstrated by experiments performed on NbH/sub x/ doped with nitrogen impurities, which act as trapping centers for the diffusing hydrogen. The results are discussed in terms of a two-state random walk model which includes multiple trapping and detrapping processes. The concentration and temperature dependence of the capture and escape rates of traps are obtained

  19. Electron-doping by hydrogen in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sehoon; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the atomic and electronic structures of 2H-phase transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC), 2H-MX2, with and without defects, where M is Mo or W and X is S, Se or Te. We find that doping of atomic hydrogen on 2H-MX2 induces electron doping in the conduction band. To understand the mechanism of this electron doping, we analyze the electronic structures with and without impurities. We also calculate the diffusion energy barrier to discuss the spatial stability of the doping. Based on these results, we suggest a possible way to fabricate elaborately-patterned circuits by modulating the carrier type of 2H-MoTe2. We also discuss possible applications of this doping in designing nano-devices. This work was supported by NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2011-0018306) and KISTI supercomputing center (Project No. KSC-2016-C3-0052).

  20. Modeling Evolution of Hydrogen Bonding and Stabilization of Transition States in the Process of Cocaine Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Human Butyrylcholinesterase

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were performed on the prereactive enzyme-substrate complex, transition states, intermediates, and product involved in the process of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (−)-cocaine. The computational results consistently reveal a unique role of the oxyanion hole (consisting of G116, G117, and A199) in BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of cocaine, as compared to acetylcholinester...

  1. Light Metal Decorated Graphdiyne (GDY) Nanosheets for Reversible Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, P; Dhinakaran, A K; Naqvi, S R; Rao, Sankara Gollu; Ahuja, Rajeev; Hussain, Tanveer

    2018-05-29

    The sensitive nature of molecular hydrogen (H2) interaction with the surfaces of pristine and functionalized nanostructures, especially two-dimensional materials (2D) has been a subject of debate for a while now. An accurate approximation of H2 adsorption mechanism has a vital significance for the specific fields like H2 storage applications. Owing to the importance of this issue, we have performed a comprehensive DFT study by means of several different approximations to investigate the structural, electronic, charge transfer and energy storage properties of pristine and functionalized graphdiyne (GDY) nano sheets. The dopants considered here include light-metals Li, Na, K, Ca, Sc and Ti, which make uniform distribution over GDY even at high doping concentration due to their strong binding and charge transfer mechanism. Upon 11% of metal functionalization, GDY changes into metallic state from being a small band gap semiconductor. Such situations turn the dopants to a partial positive state, which is favorable for adsorption of H2 molecules. The adsorption mechanism of H2 on GDY has been studied and compared by different methods like GGA, vdW-DF and DFT-D3 functionals. It has been established that each functionalized systems anchor multiple H2 molecules with adsorption energies that falls into a suitable range regardless of the functional used for approximations. A significantly high H2 storage capacity would guarantee that light metal-doped GDY nano sheets could serve the purpose of an efficient and reversible H2 storage material. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzung, M.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author) [fr

  3. Cellular automaton model for hydrogen transport dynamics through metallic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen re-emission and re-combination at the surface of first wall materials are a crucial issue for the understanding of the fuel recycling and for the tritium inventory in plasma facing materials. It is know to be difficult to model the transient behaviour of those processes due to their complex time-transient nature. However, cellular automata (CA) are powerful tools to model such complex systems because of their nature of discreteness in both dependent and independent variables. Then the system can be represented by the fully local interactions between cells. For that reason, complex physical and chemical systems can be described by fairly simple manner. In this study, the kinetics of desorption of adsorbed hydrogen from an ideal metallic surface is modelled in CA. Thermal desorption is simulated with this model and the comparison with the theory of rate processes is performed to identify the validity of this model. The overall results show that this model is reasonable to express the desorption kinetics

  4. New vistas in the determination of hydrogen in aerospace engine metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, were studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it was found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conformed closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, were essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. Finally, it has been found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the 'fast' hydrogen is not due to surface and subsurface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  5. Adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by metals in non-equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, A.I.; Notkin, M.E.; Pustovojt, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    To study the interaction of thermonuclear plasma and additions with metallic walls, nonequilibrium system of thermal atomary hydrogen - ''cold'' (300-1100 K) metal is experimentally investigated. Atomary hydrogen was feeded to samples of Ni and Pd in the shape of atomic beam, coming into vacuum from high-frequency gaseous discharge. It is shown that hydrogen solubility under nonequilibrium conditions increases with surface passivation (contamination); in this case it surpasses equilibrium solubility by value orders. Nickel and iron dissolve more hydrogen than palladium at a certain state of surface ( passivation) and gas (atomary hydrogen). The sign of the temperature dependence of hydrogen solubility in passivated N 1 and Fe changes when alterating molecular hydrogen by atomary hydrogen

  6. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M.; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating.

  7. Hydrogen-Bond Directed Regioselective Pd-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation: The Construction of Chiral α-Amino Acids with Vicinal Tertiary and Quaternary Stereocenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xuan; Liu, Delong; An, Qianjin; Zhang, Wanbin

    2015-12-04

    A Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of azlactones with 4-arylvinyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-ones was developed, providing "branched" chiral α-amino acids with vicinal tertiary and quaternary stereocenters, in high yields and with excellent selectivities. Mechanistic studies revealed that the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Pd-allylic complex and azlactone isomer is responsible for the excellent regioselectivities. This asymmetric alkylation can be carried out on a gram scale without a loss of catalytic efficiency, and the resulting product can be further transformed to a chiral azetidine in two simple steps.

  8. Metal-support interactions in electrocatalysis: Hydrogen effects on electron and hole transport at metal-support contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of hydrogen on electron and hole transport at metal support contacts during electrocatalysis. When hydrogen dissolves in high work function metals such as Pt, Rh or Ru the contact forms between the semiconductor and the hydrogenated metal, which has a work function that is lower than that of the pure metal. Thus by changing the gaseous atmosphere that envelopes metal-substrate contacts, it is possible to reversibly change their diode characteristics. In some cases, such as Pt on n-TiO/sub 2/, Rh on n-TiO/sub 2/ and Ru on n-TiO/sub 2/, it is even possible to reversibly convert Schottky diodes into ohmic contacts by changing the atmosphere from air to hydrogen. In contacts between hydrogen dissolving group VIII metals and semiconducting substrates, one can test for interfacial reaction of the catalysts and the substrate by examining the electrical characteristics of the contacts in air (oxygen) and in hydrogen. In the absence of interfacial reaction, large hydrogen induced variation in the barrier heights is observed and the hydrogenated contacts, approach ideality (i.e. their non-ideality factor is close to unity). When a group VIII metal and a substrate do react, the reaction often produces a phase that blocks hydrogen transport to the interface between the substrate and the reaction product. In this case the hydrogen effect is reduced or absent. Furthermore, because such reaction often introduces defects into the surface of the semiconductor, the contacts have non-ideal diode characteristics

  9. Hydrogen storage evaluation based on investigations of the catalytic properties of metal/metal oxides in electrospun carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Young-Seak [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea); Kim, Taejin [Core Technology Research Center for Fuel Cell, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea)

    2009-05-15

    In order to investigate the catalytic capacity of metals and metal oxides based on electrospun carbon fibers for improving hydrogen storage, electrospinning and heat treatments were carried out to obtain metal/metal oxide-embedded carbon fibers. Although the fibers were treated with the same activation procedure, they had different pore structures, due to the nature of the metal oxide. When comparing the catalytic capacity of metal and metal oxide, metal exhibits better performance as a catalyst for the improvement of hydrogen storage, when considering the hydrogen storage system. When a metal oxide with an m.p. lower than the temperature of heat treatment was used, the metal oxide was changed to metal during the heat treatment, developing a micropore structure. The activation process produced a high specific surface area of up to 2900 m{sup 2}/g and a pore volume of up to 2.5 cc/g. The amount of hydrogen adsorption reached approximately 3 wt% at 100 bar and room temperature. (author)

  10. Application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides in future energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guoqiang, Jiang [Sichuan Inst. of Materials and Technology, Chengdu, SC (China)

    1994-12-01

    The probable application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides to future energy source is reviewed. Starting from existing state of China`s energy source, the importance for developing hydrogen energy and fusion energy is explained. It is suggested that the application investigation of hydrogen energy and hydrogen storage materials should be spurred and encouraged; keeping track of the development on tritium technology for fusion reactor is stressed.

  11. Application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides in future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guoqiang

    1994-12-01

    The probable application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides to future energy source is reviewed. Starting from existing state of China's energy source, the importance for developing hydrogen energy and fusion energy is explained. It is suggested that the application investigation of hydrogen energy and hydrogen storage materials should be spurred and encouraged; keeping track of the development on tritium technology for fusion reactor is stressed

  12. New efficient hydrogen process production from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Jean Michel [Unite URMITE, UMR 6236 CNRS, Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille 05 (France)

    2010-04-15

    While the source of hydrogen constitutes a significant scientific challenge, addressing issues of hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery is equally important. None of the current hydrogen storage options, liquefied or high pressure H{sub 2} gas, metal hydrides, etc.. satisfy criteria of size, costs, kinetics, and safety for use in transportation. In this context, we have discovered a methodology for the production of hydrogen on demand, in high yield, under kinetic control, from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives and methanol as co-reagent under mild conditions catalyzed by a cheap ammonium fluoride salt. Finally, the silicon by-products can be efficiently recycle leading to an environmentally friendly source of energy. (author)

  13. Proton conducting ceramics for potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, H.; Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis and chemical characterization of proton conductor ceramics. • Qualification of ceramics for hydrogen sensors in molten lithium–lead. • Ceramics have well-defined grains with a wide distribution of sizes. • Good agreement with predictions obtained with BaZrY, BaCeZrY and SrFeCo ceramics. -- Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic (Pb–15.7Li) is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. Also, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. Potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten lithium–lead eutectic have been designed at the Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) at Barcelona and are under development and qualification. The probes are based on the use of solid state electrolytes and works as proton exchange membranes (PEM). In this work the following compounds: BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α}, Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}-Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized in order to be tested as PEM H-probes. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements at 500 °C have been performed at a fixed hydrogen concentration. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor elements BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 7−δ} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation (deviation around 60 mV). In contrast, the sensor constructed using the proton conductor element Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}–Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} showed a deviation higher than 100 mV between experimental an theoretical data.

  14. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO) 3 (PR 3 ) 2 (H 2 ) (CO = carbonyl; PR 3 = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H 2 exchanges easily with D 2 . This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H 2 bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H 2 )(R 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PR 2 ) 2 were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig

  15. Electronic specific heats in metal--hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flotow, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic specific heats of metals and metal--hydrogen systems can in many cases be evaluated from the measured specific heats at constant pressure, C/sub p/, in the temperature range 1 to 10 K. For the simplest case, C/sub p/ = γT + βT 3 , where γT represents the specific heat contribution associated with the conduction electrons, and βT 3 represents lattice specific heat contribution. The electronic specific heat coefficient, γ, is important because it is proportional to electron density of states at the Fermi surface. A short description of a low temperature calorimetric cryostat employing a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigeration is given. Various considerations and complications encountered in the evaluation of γ from specific heat data are discussed. Finally, the experimental values of γ for the V--Cr--H system and for the Lu--H system are summarized and the variations of γ as function of alloy composition are discussed

  16. Hydrogen transport behavior of metal coatings for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma-facing components for experimental and commercial fusion reactor studies may include cladding or coatings of refractory metals like tungsten on metallic structural substrates such as copper, vanadium alloys and austenitic stainless steel. Issues of safety and fuel economy include the potential for inventory buildup and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies with 3-keV D 3 + ion beams to investigate the hydrogen transport behavior in tungsten coatings on substrates of copper. These experiments entailed measurements of the deuterium re-emission and permeation rates for tungsten, copper, and tungsten-coated copper specimens at temperatures ranging from 638 K to 825 K and implanting particle fluxes of approximately 5 x 10 19 D/m 2 s. Diffusion constants and surface recombination coefficients with enhancement factors due to sputtering were obtained from these measurements. These data may be used in calculations to estimate permeation rates and inventory buildups for proposed diverter designs. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  18. Enhanced hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanostructured Mg-based composites with nanoparticle metal catalysts dispersed on supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeong; Tuck, Mark; Kondakindi, Rajender; Seo, Chan-Yeol; Dehouche, Zahir; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanocrystalline MgH 2 co-catalyzed with Ba 3 (Ca 1+x Nb 2-x )O 9-δ (BCN) proton conductive ceramics and nanoparticle bimetallic catalyst of Ni/Pd dispersed on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) support has been investigated. The nanoparticle bimetallic catalysts of Ni/Pd supported by SWNTs were synthesized based on a novel polyol method using NiCl 2 .6H 2 O, PdCl 2 , NaOH and ethylene glycol (EG). The nanostructured Mg composites co-catalyzed with BCN and bimetallic supported catalysts exhibited stable hydrogen desorption capacity of 6.3-6.7 wt.% H 2 and the significant enhancement of hydrogen desorption kinetics at 230-300 deg. C in comparison to either non-catalyzed MgH 2 or the nanocomposite of MgH 2 catalyzed with BCN

  19. Review of thermodinamic and mechanical properties of hydrogen-transition metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, H.; Katz, Y.

    1978-04-01

    A large body of fundamental and empirical knowledge has been acquired during many years of research concerning the interactions between hydrogen and metals, the location of hydrogen in metal structures, its mobility in metals and its influence on mechanical properties of metals. Much progress has been made in the understanding of related phenomena, and various theories have been proposed, but considerable disagreement still exist about basic mechanisms involved. The growing interest in these subjects and their important role in science and technology are well documented by many reviews and symposia. A general survey of these topics with reference to experimental results and theories related to thermodynamic and mechanical properties of hydrogen-transition metal systems, such as H-Pd, H-Ti, H-Fe etc. is given in the present review. Special emphasis is given to hydrogen embrittlement of metals

  20. The metal-carbon-fluorine system for improving hydrogen storage by using metal and fluorine with different levels of electronegativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Young-Seak [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, BK21-E2M, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    In order to improve the capacity of hydrogen storage using activated carbon nanofibers, metal and fluorine were introduced into the activated carbon nanofibers by electrospinning, heat treatment, and direct fluorination. The pore structure of the samples was developed by the KOH activation process and investigated using nitrogen isotherms and micropore size distribution. The specific surface area and total pore volume approached 2800 m{sup 2}/g and 2.7 cc/g, respectively. Because of the electronegativity gap between the two elements (metal and fluorine), the electron of a hydrogen molecule can be attracted to one side. This reaction effectively guides the hydrogen molecule into the carbon nanofibers. The amount of hydrogen storage was dramatically increased in this metal-carbon-fluorine system; hydrogen content was as high as 3.2 wt%. (author)

  1. Total Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Delavatine A: Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Indene-Type Tetrasubstituted Olefins and Kinetic Resolution through Pd-Catalyzed Triflamide-Directed C-H Olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyin; Wang, Jinxin; Li, Jian; Yang, Fan; Liu, Guodu; Tang, Wenjun; He, Weiwei; Fu, Jian-Jun; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Ang; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2017-04-19

    Delavatine A (1) is a structurally unusual isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Incarvillea delavayi. The first and gram-scale total synthesis of 1 was accomplished in 13 steps (the longest linear sequence) from commercially available starting materials. We exploited an isoquinoline construction strategy and developed two reactions, namely Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of indene-type tetrasubstituted olefins and kinetic resolution of β-alkyl phenylethylamine derivatives through Pd-catalyzed triflamide-directed C-H olefination. The substrate scope of the first reaction covered unfunctionalized olefins and those containing polar functionalities such as sulfonamides. The kinetic resolution provided a collection of enantioenriched indane- and tetralin-based triflamides, including those bearing quaternary chiral centers. The selectivity factor (s) exceeded 100 for a number of substrates. These reactions enabled two different yet related approaches to a key intermediate 28 in excellent enantiopurity. In the synthesis, the triflamide served as not only an effective directing group for C-H bond activation but also a versatile functional group for further elaborations. The relative and absolute configurations of delavatine A were unambiguously assigned by the syntheses of the natural product and its three stereoisomers. Their cytotoxicity against a series of cancer cell lines was evaluated.

  2. Metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electro- and photochemical reduction of water to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, David Z; Chantarojsiri, Teera; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-07-21

    Climate change, rising global energy demand, and energy security concerns motivate research into alternative, sustainable energy sources. In principle, solar energy can meet the world's energy needs, but the intermittent nature of solar illumination means that it is temporally and spatially separated from its consumption. Developing systems that promote solar-to-fuel conversion, such as via reduction of protons to hydrogen, could bridge this production-consumption gap, but this effort requires invention of catalysts that are cheap, robust, and efficient and that use earth-abundant elements. In this context, catalysts that utilize water as both an earth-abundant, environmentally benign substrate and a solvent for proton reduction are highly desirable. This Account summarizes our studies of molecular metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen. Inspired by concept transfer from biological and materials catalysts, these scaffolds are remarkably resistant to decomposition in water, with fast and selective electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversions that are sustainable for several days. Their modular nature offers a broad range of opportunities for tuning reactivity by molecular design, including altering ancillary ligand electronics, denticity, and/or incorporating redox-active elements. Our first-generation complex, [(PY4)Co(CH3CN)2](2+), catalyzes the reduction of protons from a strong organic acid to hydrogen in 50% water. Subsequent investigations with the pentapyridyl ligand PY5Me2 furnished molybdenum and cobalt complexes capable of catalyzing the reduction of water in fully aqueous electrolyte with 100% Faradaic efficiency. Of particular note, the complex [(PY5Me2)MoO](2+) possesses extremely high activity and durability in neutral water, with turnover frequencies at least 8500 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst per hour and turnover numbers over 600 000 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst over 3 days at an

  3. Heat of solution and site energies of hydrogen in disordered transition-metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, R.C.; Griessen, R.

    1989-01-01

    Site energies, long-range effective hydrogen-hydrogen interactions, and the enthalpy of solution in transition-metal alloys are calculated by means of an embedded-cluster model. The energy of a hydrogen atom is assumed to be predominantly determined by the first shell of neighboring metal atoms. The semiempirical local band-structure model is used to calculate the energy of the hydrogen atoms in the cluster, taking into account local deviations from the average lattice constant. The increase in the solubility limit and the weak dependence of the enthalpy of solution on hydrogen concentration in disordered alloys are discussed. Calculated site energies and enthalpies of solution in the alloys are compared with experimental data, and good agreement is found. Due to the strong interactions with the nearest-neighbor metal atoms, hydrogen atoms can be used to determine local lattice separations and the extent of short-range order in ''disordered'' alloys

  4. Mechanistic aspects of the metal catalyzed alternating copolymerization of epoxides and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, Markus; Molnar, Ferenc; Zintl, Manuela; Luinstra, Gerrit A; Preishuber-Pflügl, Peter; Rieger, Bernhard

    2005-09-05

    The cobalt-catalyzed alternating copolymerization of epoxides and CO is a novel, direct approach to aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). This reaction was found to be catalyzed by Ph3Si[Co(CO)4] (4) and pyridine affording in a first step the stable mono-insertion product Ph3Si-O-CH(CH3)-CH2-CO-Co(CO)4 (5). However, a profound mechanistic understanding, especially of the role of pyridine as the key component for the polymerization reaction was missing. ATR-IR online monitoring under catalytic conditions and DFT calculations were used to show that an acylpyridinium cation is formed by cleavage of the cobalt-acyl bond of 5 in the presence of pyridine. The Lewis acid thus generated activates the next incoming epoxide monomer for ring opening through [Co(CO)4]-. The catalytic cycle is completed by a subsequent CO insertion in the new cobalt-alkyl bond. The calculations are used to explore the energetic hypersurface of the polymerization reaction and are complemented by extended experimental investigations that also support the mechanistic hypotheses.

  5. Stereo-specificity for pro-(R) hydrogen of NAD(P)H during enzyme-catalyzed hydride transfer to CL-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-01-01

    A dehydrogenase from Clostridium sp. EDB2 and a diaphorase from Clostridium kluyveri were reacted with CL-20 to gain insights into the enzyme-catalyzed hydride transfer to CL-20, and the enzyme's stereo-specificity for either pro-R or pro-S hydrogens of NAD(P)H. Both enzymes biotransformed CL-20 at rates of 18.5 and 24 nmol/h/mg protein, using NADH and NADPH as hydride-source, respectively, to produce a N-denitrohydrogenated product with a molecular weight of 393 Da. In enzyme kinetics studies using reduced deuterated pyridine nucleotides, we found a kinetic deuterium isotopic effect of 2-fold on CL-20 biotransformation rate using dehydrogenase enzyme against (R)NADD as a hydride-source compared to either (S)NADD or NADH. Whereas, in case of diaphorase, the kinetic deuterium isotopic effect of about 1.5-fold was observed on CL-20 biotransformation rate using (R)NADPD as hydride-source. In a comparative study with LC-MS, using deuterated and non-deuterated NAD(P)H, we found a positive mass-shift of 1 Da in the N-denitrohydrogenated product suggesting the involvement of a deuteride (D - ) transfer from NAD(P)D. The present study thus revealed that both dehydrogenase and diaphorase enzymes from the two Clostridium species catalyzed a hydride transfer to CL-20 and showed stereo-specificity for pro-R hydrogen of NAD(P)H

  6. Twisted Amides: From Obscurity to Broadly Useful Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions by N-C Amide Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwei; Szostak, Michal

    2017-05-29

    The concept of using amide bond distortion to modulate amidic resonance has been known for more than 75 years. Two classic twisted amides (bridged lactams) ingeniously designed and synthesized by Kirby and Stoltz to feature fully perpendicular amide bonds, and as a consequence emanate amino-ketone-like reactivity, are now routinely recognized in all organic chemistry textbooks. However, only recently the use of amide bond twist (distortion) has advanced to the general organic chemistry mainstream enabling a host of highly attractive N-C amide bond cross-coupling reactions of broad synthetic relevance. In this Minireview, we discuss recent progress in this area and present a detailed overview of the prominent role of amide bond destabilization as a driving force in the development of transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions by N-C bond activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Reversible Interconversion between 2,5-Dimethylpyrazine and 2,5-Dimethylpiperazine by Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation for Efficient Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Wada, Tomokatsu; Shiraishi, Takumi

    2017-08-28

    A new hydrogen storage system based on the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of nitrogen heterocyclic compounds, employing a single iridium catalyst, has been developed. Efficient hydrogen storage using relatively small amounts of solvent compared with previous systems was achieved by this new system. Reversible transformations between 2,5-dimethylpyrazine and 2,5-dimethylpiperazine, accompanied by the uptake and release of three equivalents of hydrogen, could be repeated almost quantitatively at least four times without any loss of efficiency. Furthermore, hydrogen storage under solvent-free conditions was also accomplished. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Amine-free reversible hydrogen storage in formate salts catalyzed by ruthenium pincer complex without pH control or solvent change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Czaun, Miklos; Goeppert, Alain; Haiges, Ralf; Jones, John-Paul; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A

    2015-04-24

    Due to the intermittent nature of most renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, energy storage is increasingly required. Since electricity is difficult to store, hydrogen obtained by electrochemical water splitting has been proposed as an energy carrier. However, the handling and transportation of hydrogen in large quantities is in itself a challenge. We therefore present here a method for hydrogen storage based on a CO2 (HCO3 (-) )/H2 and formate equilibrium. This amine-free and efficient reversible system (>90 % yield in both directions) is catalyzed by well-defined and commercially available Ru pincer complexes. The formate dehydrogenation was triggered by simple pressure swing without requiring external pH control or the change of either the solvent or the catalyst. Up to six hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles were performed and the catalyst performance remained steady with high selectivity (CO free H2 /CO2 mixture was produced). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A metal-catalyzed enyne-cyclization step for the synthesis of bi- and tricyclic scaffolds amenable to molecular library production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Peng; Cohrt, Anders Emil O'Hanlon; Petersen, Rico

    2016-01-01

    A facile metal-catalyzed diversification step for the synthesis of novel bi- and tricyclic scaffolds from enyne substrates is reported in this study. From a single starting material, topologically diverse scaffolds for library synthesis can be generated and decorated in a few steps. The methodology...

  10. Synthesis of hexahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline compound libraries through a Pictet–Spengler cyclization/metal-catalyzed cross coupling/amidation sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rico; Cohrt, A. Emil; Petersen, Michael Åxman

    2015-01-01

    incorporating two handles for diversification, were synthesized through an oxidative cleavage/Pictet–Spengler reaction sequence in high overall yields. A subsequent metal-catalyzed cross coupling/amidation protocol was developed and its utility in library synthesis was validated by construction of a 20-membered...

  11. Multidentate Di-N-heterocyclic carbene ligands for transition metal catalyzed hydrogenation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijter, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic catalysts play an important role in creating a more sustainable society. The use of catalysts has environmental as well as economic advantages. They speed up reactions without being consumed in the reaction itself. Moreover, they reduce the amount of byproducts and waste significantly.

  12. Impact of different metal turbidities on radiolytic hydrogen generation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhar, A.G.; Belapurkar, A.D.; Venkateswaran, G.; Kishore, K.

    2005-01-01

    Radiolytic hydrogen generation on γ irradiation of turbid solutions containing metal turbidities such as titanium, nickel, iron, chromium, copper, indium, and aluminium was studied. It is suggested that the chemical reactivity of the metal in the turbid solution with e aq -/H/OH produced by radiolysis of water interferes with the recombination reactions which destroy H 2 and H 2 O 2 , thus leading to higher yield of hydrogen. The rate of generation of hydrogen and the G(H 2 ) value is related to the reactivity of the metal ion/hydroxylated species with the free radicals. (orig.)

  13. Quantum-mechanical approach to the state of hydrogen in b. c. c. metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukai, Y; Sugimoto, H

    1980-01-01

    A first step towards consistent understanding of various properties of interstitial hydrogen in b.c.c. metals has been made by solving a Schroedinger equation for hydrogen atoms in the field of interaction with surrounding metal atoms. Properties investigated include the nature of self-trapped states, the relative stability of self-trapped configurations, the average stress field (P-tensor), the excitation energy to be determined by neutron spectroscopy, etc. Calculations were performed on hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) in group-V metals (V, Nb, Ta), and good agreement was obtained with many different kinds of observations. Some predictions and tentative explanations are also presented.

  14. Quantum-mechanical approach to the state of hydrogen in B. C. C. metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukai, Y; Sugimoto, H [Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1980-01-01

    A first step towards consistent understanding of various properties of interstitial hydrogen in B.C.C. metals has been made by solving a Schroedinger equation for hydrogen atoms in the field of interaction with surrounding metal atoms. Properties investigated include a nature of self-trapped states, a relative stability of self-trapped configurations, the average stress field (P-tensor), the excitation energy to be determined by neutron spectroscopy, etc. Calculations were performed on hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) in group-V metals (V, Nb, Ta), and good agreement was obtained with many different kinds of observations. Some predictions and tentative explanations are also presented.

  15. Hydrogen evolution by a metal-free electrocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Luhua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Du, Aijun; Jaronieć, Mietek; Qiao, Shizhang

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalytic reduction of water to molecular hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction may provide a sustainable energy supply for the future, but its commercial application is hampered by the use of precious platinum catalysts. All

  16. Transition metal-catalyzed carbocyclization of nitrogen and oxygen-tethered 1,n-enynes and diynes: synthesis of five or six-membered heterocyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di-Han; Zhang, Zhen; Shi, Min

    2012-10-25

    Cycloisomerization of 1,n-enynes and diynes is a powerful method in organic synthesis to access heterocyclic compounds and has drawn increasing attention from organic chemists. In this paper, we attempted to summarize our recent results on the transition metal-catalyzed cycloisomerization to synthesize five or six-membered heterocyclic compounds using 1,n-enynes and diynes having a propargylic ester moiety. First, we will describe the synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted 3-pyrrolines via gold catalyzed cycloisomerization of 1,6-diynes. In addition, we will also disclose a novel silver catalyzed tandem 1,3-acyloxy migration/Mannich-type addition/elimination of the sulfonyl group of N-sulfonylhydrazone-propargylic esters to 5,6-dihydropyridazin-4-one derivatives. Furthermore, we will introduce three interesting examples of the synthesis of bicyclic compounds via titanium or rhodium catalyzed carbocyclization of enynes. In this context, we have presented that 1,n-enynes and diynes containing propargylic esters are highly reactive and useful starting materials for the cycloisomerization catalyzed by a transition metal catalyst.

  17. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  18. Tailoring the Hydrogen Detection Properties of Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelsma, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an essential role in many sectors of the industry. For example, hydrogen is necessary to produce ammonia, it can be used to determine the quality of products (hydrogen is produced during food ageing), or it can result in medical diagnostics (e.g. lactose intolerance). In addition,

  19. Nano tubular Transition Metal Oxide for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekantan, S.; San, E.P.; Kregvirat, W.; Wei, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    TiO 2 , transition metal oxide nano tubes were successfully grown by anodizing of titanium foil (Ti) in ethylene glycol electrolyte containing 5wt. % hydrogen peroxide and 5wt. % ammonium fluoride for 60 minutes at 60V. It was found such electrochemical condition resulted in the formation of nano tube with average diameter of 90nm and length of 6.6 μm. These samples were used to study the effect of W loading by RF sputtering on TiO 2 nano tubes. Amorphous TiO 2 nano tube substrate leads to enhance incorporation of W instead of anatase. Therefore for the entire study, W was sputtered on amorphous TiO 2 nano tube substrate. TiO 2 nano tube sputtered for 1 minute resulted in the formation of W-O-Ti while beyond this point (10 minutes); it accumulates to form a self independent structure of WO 3 on the surface of the nano tubes. TiO 2 nano tube sputtered for 1 minute at 150 W and annealed at 450 degree Celsius exhibited best photocurrent density (1.4 mA/ cm 2 ) with photo conversion efficiency of 2.5 %. The reason for such behavior is attributed to W 6+ ions allows for electron traps that suppress electron hole recombination and exploit the lower band gap of material to produce a water splitting process by increasing the charge separation and extending the energy range of photoexcitation for the system. (author)

  20. Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjichristos, John [Defkalion GT SA, 1140 Homer Street, Suite 250, Vancouver BC V682X6 (Canada); Gluck, Peter [Retired from INCDTIM Cluj-Napoca in 1999 (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U)

  1. Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjichristos, John; Gluck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U)

  2. Metal oxide-hydrogen secondary battery; Kinzoku sankabutsu-suiso niji denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosobuchi, H.; Edoi, M.; Katsumata, T.

    1995-06-06

    Recently, the metal oxide - hydrogen secondary battery characterized by employing the hydrogen storage alloy as the hydrogen negative electrode draws attention. However, the secondary batteries equipped with the negative electrode composed of hydrogen storage alloy powder have such shortcoming that the charge-discharge cycle life is rather short and it changes widely from battery to battery, as the hydrogen storage alloy is disintegrated. This invention solves the problem. Employing the alloy having a composition expressed as LmNi(w)Co(X)Mn(y)Al(z) (Lm = rare earth elements including La) can suppress the disintegration of hydrogen storage alloy powder during the charge-discharge cycle. In addition, controlling the oxygen content in the hydrogen storage alloy powder to 500 - 1500ppm can reduce the oxidation corrosion of the hydrogen storage alloy, resulting in suppression of its deterioration. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Experimental and Computational Study of an Unexpected Iron-Catalyzed Carboetherification by Cooperative Metal and Ligand Substrate Interaction and Proton Shuttling

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Brzozowska, Aleksandra; Azofra, Luis Miguel; Jang, Yoon Kyung; Cavallo, Luigi; Rueping, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    An iron-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenols to deoxygenated pyranose glycals has been developed. Combined experimental and computational studies show that the iron complex exhibits a dual catalytic role in that the non-innocent cyclopentadienone ligand acts as proton shuttle by initial hydrogen abstraction from the alcohol and by facilitating protonation and deprotonation events in the isomerization and demetalation steps. Molecular orbital analysis provides insight into the unexpected and selective formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran.

  4. Experimental and Computational Study of an Unexpected Iron-Catalyzed Carboetherification by Cooperative Metal and Ligand Substrate Interaction and Proton Shuttling

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2017-09-26

    An iron-catalyzed cycloisomerization of allenols to deoxygenated pyranose glycals has been developed. Combined experimental and computational studies show that the iron complex exhibits a dual catalytic role in that the non-innocent cyclopentadienone ligand acts as proton shuttle by initial hydrogen abstraction from the alcohol and by facilitating protonation and deprotonation events in the isomerization and demetalation steps. Molecular orbital analysis provides insight into the unexpected and selective formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran.

  5. Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions; Annual technical report, August 1, 1992--August 1, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, J.A.

    1993-08-10

    Achievements are reported for the following 4 areas: {pi}/{sigma} equillibria in aldehyde and ketone complexes; thermodynamic ligand binding affinities ({alpha},{beta} unsaturated organic carbonyl compounds); (a new form of coordinated carbon) an unsupported C{sub 3} chain that spans two different transition metals; and (a new form of coordinated carbon) an C{sub 3} chain that is anchored by a metal on each end and spanned by a third.

  6. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. M.; Yang, C. C.; Wang, C. C.; Wen, Z.; Zhu, Y. F.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Zheng, W. T.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials—hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g-1, which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  7. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  8. Ultrapure hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides for fuel cells and hybrid vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almasan, V.; Biris, A.; Coldea, I.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Popeneciu, G.; Ardelean, O.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In hydrogen economy, efficient compressors are indispensable elements in the storage, transport and distribution of the produced hydrogen. Energetic efficient technologies can contribute to H 2 pipelines transport to the point of use and to distribute H 2 by refuelling stations. Characteristic for metal hydrides systems is the wide area of possibilities to absorb hydrogen at low pressure from any source of hydrogen, to store and deliver it hydrogen at high pressure (compression ratio more than 30). On the basis of innovative concepts and advanced materials for H 2 storage/compression (and fast thermal transfer), a fast mass (H 2 ) and heat transfer unit will be developed suitable to be integrated in a 3 stage thermal compressor. Metal hydrides used for a three stage hydrogen compression system must have different equilibrium pressures, namely: for stage 1, low pressure H 2 absorption and resistant to poisoning with impurities of hydrogen, for stage 2, medium pressure H 2 absorption and for stage 3, high pressure hydrogen delivery (120 bar). In the case of compression device based on metallic hydrides the most important properties are the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate, a smaller process enthalpy and a great structural stability on long term hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. These properties require metal hydrides with large differences between the hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures at equilibrium, within a rather small temperature range. The main goal of this work is to search and develop metal hydride integrated systems for hydrogen purification, storage and compression. After a careful screening three hydrogen absorbing alloys will be selected. After selection, the work up of the alloys composition on the bases of detailed solid state studies, new multi-component alloys will be developed, with suitable thermodynamic and kinetic properties for a hydrogen compressor. The results of the study are the following: new types of hydrogen

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement of metals. A bibliography with abstracts. Search period covered: 1964--August 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.

    1975-10-01

    The research covers the hydrogen embrittlement of both ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys and includes nuclear technology, aircraft metallurgy, mechanical properties, testing, electroplating, fatigue, corrosion and fracture. Contains 230 abstracts

  10. Tunable differentiation of tertiary C-H bonds in intramolecular transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joshua R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-04-13

    Metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions are an appealing and efficient strategy for accessing tetrasubstituted amines through the direct amination of tertiary C-H bonds. Traditional catalysts for these reactions rely on substrate control to achieve site-selectivity in the C-H amination event; thus, tunability is challenging when competing C-H bonds have similar steric or electronic features. One consequence of this fact is that the impact of catalyst identity on the selectivity in the competitive amination of tertiary C-H bonds has not been well-explored, despite the potential for progress towards predictable and catalyst-controlled C-N bond formation. In this communication, we report investigations into tunable and site-selective nitrene transfers between tertiary C(sp 3 )-H bonds using a combination of transition metal catalysts, including complexes based on Ag, Mn, Rh and Ru. Particularly striking was the ability to reverse the selectivity of nitrene transfer by a simple change in the identity of the N-donor ligand supporting the Ag(i) complex. The combination of our Ag(i) catalysts with known Rh 2 (ii) complexes expands the scope of successful catalyst-controlled intramolecular nitrene transfer and represents a promising springboard for the future development of intermolecular C-H N-group transfer methods.

  11. Metal-Catalyzed Intra- and Intermolecular Addition of Carboxylic Acids to Alkynes in Aqueous Media: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Francos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The metal-catalyzed addition of carboxylic acids to alkynes is a very effective tool for the synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized olefinic compounds in an atom-economical manner. Thus, a large variety of synthetically useful lactones and enol-esters can be accessed through the intra- or intermolecular versions of this process. In order to reduce the environmental impact of these reactions, considerable efforts have been devoted in recent years to the development of catalytic systems able to operate in aqueous media, which represent a real challenge taking into account the tendency of alkynes to undergo hydration in the presence of transition metals. Despite this, different Pd, Pt, Au, Cu and Ru catalysts capable of promoting the intra- and intermolecular addition of carboxylic acids to alkynes in a selective manner in aqueous environments have appeared in the literature. In this review article, an overview of this chemistry is provided. The synthesis of β-oxo esters by catalytic addition of carboxylic acids to terminal propargylic alcohols in water is also discussed.

  12. High capacity hydrogen absorption in transition-metal ethylene complexes: consequences of nanoclustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A B; Shivaram, B S

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that organo-metallic complexes formed by laser ablating transition metals in ethylene are high hydrogen absorbers at room temperature (Phillips and Shivaram 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 105505). Here we show that the absorption percentage depends strongly on the ethylene pressure. High ethylene pressures (>100 mTorr) result in a lowered hydrogen uptake. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that while low pressure ablations result in metal atoms dispersed uniformly on a near atomic scale, high pressure ones yield distinct nanoparticles with electron energy-loss spectroscopy demonstrating that the metal atoms are confined solely to the nanoparticles.

  13. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  14. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelhelm, P.A.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the

  15. Tunable hydrogen storage in magnesium-transition metal compounds: first-principles calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; Tiwari, Dhirendra; Tiwari, D.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium dihydride (MgH2) stores 7.7 wt % hydrogen but it suffers from a high thermodynamic stability and slow (de)hydrogenation kinetics. Alloying Mg with lightweight transition metals (TM) (=Sc,Ti,V,Cr) aims at improving the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We study the structure and

  16. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  17. Assessment for ion beam analysis methods about hydrogen isotope in hydrogen storaged metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wei; Long Xinggui; Shi Liqun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, experimental arrangements of measuring hydrogen isotope concentration and distribution in metal hydride with ion beam analysis methods were reported, and the advantage and disadvantage of different methods were analyzed too. Experiment results show that it can get abundant information and accurate value by these ways. It can get an accurate value since it's the Rutherford cross-section, and the Mylar film used in the experiment is thin enough for H, D and T distinguishing each other while using ERD analysis method with 6.0 MeV O ion beam to proceed this work, but the disadvantage of this method is that the sample preparing is more difficult, and the analysis depth is lower. It could get the distribution information of H, D and T and the analysis depth is about 3.0 μm while using ERD analysis method with 7.4 MeV 4 He ion beam, but the disadvantage is that the spectra of H, D and T overlap each other, which makes a big error in simulated calculation. If using PBS method with 3.0 MeV proton, the analysis depth is deeper, but it couldn't get the H distribution information. (authors)

  18. Lipase-supported metal-organic framework bioreactor catalyzes warfarin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ling; Yang, Ni-Shin; Chen, Ya-Ting; Lirio, Stephen; Wu, Cheng-You; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2015-01-02

    A green and sustainable strategy synthesizes clinical medicine warfarin anticoagulant by using lipase-supported metal-organic framework (MOF) bioreactors (see scheme). These findings may be beneficial for future studies in the industrial production of chemical, pharmaceutical, and agrochemical precursors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Thermodynamic driving force effects in the oxygen reduction catalyzed by a metal-free porphyrin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojánek, Antonín; Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, SI (2012), s. 457-462 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0697 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxygen reduction * metal-free porphyrin * electrocatalysis Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.777, year: 2012

  20. Transition-Metal-Mediated or -Catalyzed Syntheses of Steroids and Steroid-Like Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotora, Martin; Hessler, F.; Eignerová, B.

    -, č. 1 (2012), s. 29-42 ISSN 1434-193X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : steroids * synthesis design * synthetic methods * asymmetric synthesis * transition metals Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.344, year: 2012

  1. Comparative study of hydrogen storage on metal doped mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, P. M.; Sapag, K.; Oliva, M. I.; Eimer, G. A.

    2018-06-01

    The hydrogen adsorption capacity of mesoporous materials MCM-41 modified with Co, Fe, Ti, Mg and Ni at 77 K and 10 bar was investigated. Various techniques including XRD, N2 adsorption and DRUV-vis were employed for the materials characterization. The results showed that a low nickel loading on MCM-41 support promoted the presence of hydrogen-favorable sites, increasing the hydrogen storage capacity.

  2. Inhibition of cellulase-catalyzed lignocellulosic hydrolysis by iron and oxidative metal ions and complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejirian, Ani; Xu, Feng

    2010-12-01

    Enzymatic lignocellulose hydrolysis plays a key role in microbially driven carbon cycling and energy conversion and holds promise for bio-based energy and chemical industries. Cellulases (key lignocellulose-active enzymes) are prone to interference from various noncellulosic substances (e.g., metal ions). During natural cellulolysis, these substances may arise from other microbial activities or abiotic events, and during industrial cellulolysis, they may be derived from biomass feedstocks or upstream treatments. Knowledge about cellulolysis-inhibiting reactions is of importance for the microbiology of natural biomass degradation and the development of biomass conversion technology. Different metal ions, including those native to microbial activity or employed for biomass pretreatments, are often tested for enzymatic cellulolysis. Only a few metal ions act as inhibitors of cellulases, which include ferrous and ferric ions as well as cupric ion. In this study, we showed inhibition by ferrous/ferric ions as part of a more general effect from oxidative (or redox-active) metal ions and their complexes. The correlation between inhibition and oxidation potential indicated the oxidative nature of the inhibition, and the dependence on air established the catalytic role that iron ions played in mediating the dioxygen inhibition of cellulolysis. Individual cellulases showed different susceptibilities to inhibition. It is likely that the inhibition exerted its effect more on cellulose than on cellulase. Strong iron ion chelators and polyethylene glycols could mitigate the inhibition. Potential microbiological and industrial implications of the observed effect of redox-active metal ions on enzymatic cellulolysis, as well as the prevention and mitigation of this effect in industrial biomass conversion, are discussed.

  3. Rupture mechanics of metallic alloys for hydrogen transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, I.; Briottet, L.; Lemoine, P.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim to establish a cheap hydrogen distribution system, the transport by pipelines is a solution particularly interesting. Among the high limit of elasticity steels, the X80 has been chosen for hydrogen transport. Its chemical composition and microstructure are given. Important microstructural changes have been revealed in the sheet thickness: the microstructure is thinner and richer in perlite in surface than in bulk. In parallel to this microstructural evolution, a microhardness gradient has been observed: the material microhardness is stronger in surface than in bulk of the sheet. The use of this material for hydrogen transport requires to study its resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The main aim of this work is to develop an easy rupture mechanics test allowing to qualify the studied material in a gaseous hydrogen environment, to determine the sensitivity of the studied material to the hydrogen embrittlement and to better understand the mechanisms of the hydrogen embrittlement for ferritic materials. Two experimental tests have been used for: the first one is a traction machine coupled to an autoclave; the second one allows to carry out disk rupture tests. The toughness of the material in a gaseous hydrogen environment has thus been determined. The resistance of the material to hydrogen embrittlement has been characterized and by simulation, it has been possible to identify the areas with a strong concentration in hydrogen. The second aim of this work is to study the influence of the steel microstructure on the hydrogen position in the material and on the resistance of the material to the hydrogen embrittlement. The preferential trapping sites on the material not mechanically loaded have at first been identified, as well as the hydrogen position on the different phases and at the ferrite/cementite interface. The interaction between the mechanical loads, the position and the trapping of the hydrogen have been studied then. At last, has been

  4. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Á lvarez, Andrea; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Bavykina, Anastasiya V.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek

    2017-01-01

    carefully summarize the state of the art in the development of heterogeneous catalysts for these important hydrogenation reactions. Finally, in an attempt to give an order of magnitude regarding CO2 valorization, we critically assess economical aspects

  5. Electroreduction of CO2 Catalyzed by a Heterogenized Zn–Porphyrin Complex with a Redox-Innocent Metal Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Transition-metal-based molecular complexes are a class of catalyst materials for electrochemical CO2 reduction to CO that can be rationally designed to deliver high catalytic performance. One common mechanistic feature of these electrocatalysts developed thus far is an electrogenerated reduced metal center associated with catalytic CO2 reduction. Here we report a heterogenized zinc–porphyrin complex (zinc(II) 5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin) as an electrocatalyst that delivers a turnover frequency as high as 14.4 site–1 s–1 and a Faradaic efficiency as high as 95% for CO2 electroreduction to CO at −1.7 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode in an organic/water mixed electrolyte. While the Zn center is critical to the observed catalysis, in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies reveal that it is redox-innocent throughout the potential range. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the porphyrin ligand may act as a redox mediator. Chemical reduction of the zinc–porphyrin complex further confirms that the reduction is ligand-based and the reduced species can react with CO2. This represents the first example of a transition-metal complex for CO2 electroreduction catalysis with its metal center being redox-innocent under working conditions. PMID:28852698

  6. Transglutaminase-Catalyzed Bioconjugation Using One-Pot Metal-Free Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel, Natalie M; Toulouse, Jacynthe L; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2017-10-18

    General approaches for controlled protein modification are increasingly sought-after in the arena of chemical biology. Here, using bioorthogonal reactions, we present combinatorial chemoenzymatic strategies to effectuate protein labeling. A total of three metal-free conjugations were simultaneously or sequentially incorporated in a one-pot format with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) to effectuate protein labeling. MTG offers the particularity of conjugating residues within a protein sequence rather than at its extremities, providing a route to labeling the native protein. The reactions are rapid and circumvent the incompatibility posed by metal catalysts. We identify the tetrazine ligation as most-reactive for this purpose, as demonstrated by the fluorescent labeling of two proteins. The Staudinger ligation and strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition are alternatives. Owing to the breadth of labels that MTG can use as a substrate, our results demonstrate the versatility of this system, with the researcher being able to combine specific protein substrates with a variety of labels.

  7. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  8. A calculation of the surface recombination rate constant for hydrogen isotopes on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The surface recombination rate constant for hydrogen isotopes on a metal has been calculated using a simple model whose parameters may be determined by direct experimental measurements. Using the experimental values for hydrogen diffusivity, solubility, and sticking coefficient at zero surface coverage a reasonable prediction of the surface recombination constant may be made. The calculated recombination constant is in excellent agreement with experiment for bcc iron. A heuristic argument is developed which, along with the rate constant calculation, shows that surface recombination is important in those metals in which hydrogen has an exothermic heat of solution. (orig.)

  9. Texture-geometric deformational effects in some metal-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spivak, L.V.; Kats, M.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    Possible deformation effects were studied in vanadium, tantalum, niobium, palladium and iron which occurred during electrolytic hydrogenation of specimens preliminarily deformed by torsion and then annealed. Noticeable texture-geometric effects were observed and related to the system tendency to enhance the degree of specimen form symmetry during hydrogenation. The latter was an off-beat realization of Le-Chatelier principle. It was assumed that the nature of deformation effects was connected with one of minimization channels for overall elastic stress fields in metals being hydrogenated. Some distinction was revealed in behaviour of 5a group metal, palladium and iron

  10. Recent progress in transition-metal-catalyzed reduction of molecular dinitrogen under ambient reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-05

    This paper describes our recent progress in catalytic nitrogen fixation by using transition-metal-dinitrogen complexes as catalysts. Two reaction systems for the catalytic transformation of molecular dinitrogen into ammonia and its equivalent such as silylamine under ambient reaction conditions have been achieved by the molybdenum-, iron-, and cobalt-dinitrogen complexes as catalysts. Many new findings presented here may provide new access to the development of economical nitrogen fixation in place of the Haber-Bosch process.

  11. Cycloadditions to Epoxides Catalyzed by GroupIII-V Transition-Metal Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-25

    Complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are gaining increasing importance as Lewis acid catalysts for the cycloaddition of dipolarophiles to epoxides. This review examines the latest reports, including homogeneous and heterogeneous applications. The pivotal step for the cycloaddition reactions is the ring opening of the epoxide following activation by the Lewis acid. Two modes of cleavage (C-C versus C-O) have been identified depending primarily on the substitution pattern of the epoxide, with lesser influence observed from the Lewis acid employed. The widely studied cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxides to afford cyclic carbonates (C-O bond cleavage) has been scrutinized in terms of catalytic efficiency and reaction mechanism, showing that unsophisticated complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are excellent molecular catalysts. These metals have been incorporated, as well, in highly performing, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. Cycloadditions to epoxides with other dipolarophiles (alkynes, imines, indoles) have been conducted with scandium triflate with remarkable performances (C-C bond cleavage). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cycloadditions to Epoxides Catalyzed by GroupIII-V Transition-Metal Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio; Pelletier, Jeremie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are gaining increasing importance as Lewis acid catalysts for the cycloaddition of dipolarophiles to epoxides. This review examines the latest reports, including homogeneous and heterogeneous applications. The pivotal step for the cycloaddition reactions is the ring opening of the epoxide following activation by the Lewis acid. Two modes of cleavage (C-C versus C-O) have been identified depending primarily on the substitution pattern of the epoxide, with lesser influence observed from the Lewis acid employed. The widely studied cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxides to afford cyclic carbonates (C-O bond cleavage) has been scrutinized in terms of catalytic efficiency and reaction mechanism, showing that unsophisticated complexes of groupIII-V transition metals are excellent molecular catalysts. These metals have been incorporated, as well, in highly performing, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. Cycloadditions to epoxides with other dipolarophiles (alkynes, imines, indoles) have been conducted with scandium triflate with remarkable performances (C-C bond cleavage). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Nanoconfined Alkali-metal borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has been identified as a promising energy carrier. Its combustion is not associated with pollution when generated from renewable energy sources like solar and wind. The large-scale use of hydrogen for intermittent energy storage and as a fuel for cars can contribute to the realization of a

  14. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  15. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Susan K.; Zhang, Guoqi; Vasudevan, Kalyan V.

    2017-02-14

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  16. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V.; Zhang, Guoqi; Hanson, Susan K.

    2016-09-06

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  17. The influence of hydrogen on the fatigue life of metallic leaf spring components in a vacuum environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouters, M.H.M.; Slot, H.M.; Zwieten, W. van; Veer, J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is used as a process gas in vacuum environments for semiconductor manufacturing equipment. If hydrogen dissolves in metallic components during operation it can result in hydrogen embrittlement. In order to assess if hydrogen embrittlement occurs in such a vacuum environment a special

  18. Research on the surface chemical behavior of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere by XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiaoguo; Wang Xiaolin; Yu Yong; Zhao Zhengping

    2001-01-01

    The surface chemical behavior clean uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 100 and 200 degree C is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. It leads to hydriding reaction when the hydrogen exposure is 12.0 Pa·s, and the U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 is found to be 378.7 eV. The higher temperature (200 degree C) is beneficial to UH 3 formation at the same hydrogen exposures. XPS elemental depth profiles indicate that the distribution of uranium surface layer is UO 2 , UH 3 and U after exposure to 174.2 Pa·s hydrogen

  19. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...... = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Er) have been synthesized, which pave the way for studying the polymorphic transition in these compounds, obtaining new bimetallic borohydrides and designing new reactive hydride composites with improved hydrogen storage capacities. Two novel polymorphs of Pr(BH4)3 are identified...

  20. A comparative study for Hydrogen storage in metal decorated graphyne nanotubes and graphyne monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinlian; Guo, Yanhua; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Yingru; Cao, Juexian

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study for hydrogen storage in metal decorated graphyne nanotubes and graphyne monolayers has been investigated within the framework of first-principle calculations. Our results show that the binding energies of Li, Ca, Sc, Ti on graphyne nanotubes are stronger than that on graphyne monolayers. Such strong binding would prevent the formation of metal clusters on graphyne nanotubes. From the charge transfer and partial density of states, it is found that the curvature effect of nanotubes plays an important role for the strong binding strength of metal on graphyne nanotubes. And the hydrogen storage capacity is 4.82 wt%, 5.08 wt%, 4.88 wt%, 4.76 wt% for Li, Ca, Sc, Ti decorated graphyne nanotubes that promise a potential material for storing hydrogen. - Graphical abstract: Metal atoms (Li, Ca, Sc and Ti) can strongly bind to graphyne nanotubes to avoid the formation of metal clusters, and a capacity of Ca@graphyne nanotube is 5.08 wt% which is close to the requirement of DOE in 2015. Twenty-four hydrogen molecules absorb to Ti-decorated graphyne nanotube. - Highlights: • The binding strength for metal on graphyne nanotubes is much stronger than that on γ-graphyne monolayer. • Metal atoms can strongly bind to the curving triangle acetylenes rings to avoid the formation of metal clusters. • A capacity of Ca@graphyne nanotube is 5.08 wt% which is close to the requirement of DOE in 2015.

  1. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  2. Catalyzed ozonation process with GAC and metal doped-GAC for removing organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B.S.; Kang, J.W.; Song, S.J. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei Univ., Wonju Campus, Hyeung-up Myon (Korea); Oh, H.J. [Water Resources and Environmental Research Div., Korea Inst. of Construction Technology, Kyonggi-do (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    This study investigates the catalytic role of granular activated carbon (GAC) and metal (Mn or Fe) doped-GAC in transforming ozone into more reactive secondary radicals such as OH radicals for the treatment of wastewater. The GAC doped with Mn showed the highest catalytic performance of ozone decomposition into OH radical (OH{sup .}) production. Likewise, activated carbon alone could accelerate ozone decomposition, resulting in the formation of OH{sup .}s. In the presence of promoters, ozone depletion rate was enhanced further by the Mn-GAC catalyst system even in an acidic pH aqueous condition. (orig.)

  3. Amorphous SiOx nanowires catalyzed by metallic Ge for optoelectronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Tianxiao; Chen Zhigang; Wu Yueqin; Lin Jianhui; Zhang Jiuzhan; Fan Yongliang; Yang Xinju; Jiang Zuimin; Zou Jin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Metallic Ge has been demonstrated as an effective catalyst for the growth of SiO x nanowires on Si substrates. → Such a catalyst may avoid catalyst contamination caused by their unconsciousness left in the nanowires. → Two broad peaks centered at 410 nm and 570 nm were observed in photoluminescence spectrum, indicating that such SiO x nanowires have the potential applications in white light-emitting diodes, full-colour display, full-colour indicator and light sources. - Abstract: Amorphous SiO x nanowires, with diameters of ∼20 nm and lengths of tens of μm, were grown from self-organized GeSi quantum dots or GeSi alloy epilayers on Si substrates. The morphologies and yield of these amorphous nanowires depend strongly upon the synthesis temperature. Comparative experiments indicate that the present SiO x nanowires are induced by metallic Ge as catalysts via the solid liquid solid growth mechanism. Two broad peaks centered at 410 nm and 570 nm were observed in photoluminescence spectrum, indicating that such SiO x nanowires have the potential applications in white light-emitting diodes, full-colour display, full-colour indicator and light sources.

  4. Isolated Fe sites in Metal Organic Framework catalyze the direct conversion of methane to methanol

    KAUST Repository

    Osadchii, Dmitrii

    2018-05-10

    Hybrid materials bearing organic and inorganic motives have been extensively discussed as playgrounds for the implementation of atomically resolved inorganic sites within a confined environment, with an exciting similarity to enzymes. Here, we present the successful design of a site-isolated mixed-metal Metal Organic Framework that mimics the reactivity of soluble methane monooxygenase enzyme reactivity and demonstrates the potential of this strategy to overcome current challenges in selective methane oxidation. We describe the synthesis and characterisation of an Fe-containing MOF that comprises the desired antiferromagnetically cou-pled high spin species in a coordination environment closely resembling that of the enzyme. An electrochemi-cal synthesis method is used to build the microporous MOF matrix while integrating, with an exquisite con-trol, the atomically dispersed Fe active sites in the crystalline scaffold. The model mimics the catalytic C-H activation behaviour of the enzyme to produce methanol, and shows that the key to this reactivity is the for-mation of isolated oxo-bridged Fe units.

  5. Isolated Fe sites in Metal Organic Framework catalyze the direct conversion of methane to methanol

    KAUST Repository

    Osadchii, Dmitrii; Olivos Suarez, Alma Itzel; Szé csé nyi, Á gnes; Li, Guanna; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Dugulan, A Iulian; Serra-Crespo, Pablo; Hensen, Emiel J. M.; Veber, Sergey L.; Fedin, Matvey V.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Pidko, Evgeny A; Gascon, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid materials bearing organic and inorganic motives have been extensively discussed as playgrounds for the implementation of atomically resolved inorganic sites within a confined environment, with an exciting similarity to enzymes. Here, we present the successful design of a site-isolated mixed-metal Metal Organic Framework that mimics the reactivity of soluble methane monooxygenase enzyme reactivity and demonstrates the potential of this strategy to overcome current challenges in selective methane oxidation. We describe the synthesis and characterisation of an Fe-containing MOF that comprises the desired antiferromagnetically cou-pled high spin species in a coordination environment closely resembling that of the enzyme. An electrochemi-cal synthesis method is used to build the microporous MOF matrix while integrating, with an exquisite con-trol, the atomically dispersed Fe active sites in the crystalline scaffold. The model mimics the catalytic C-H activation behaviour of the enzyme to produce methanol, and shows that the key to this reactivity is the for-mation of isolated oxo-bridged Fe units.

  6. Chemical Reactions Catalyzed by Metalloporphyrin-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Aparecida Dias de Freitas Castro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic versatility and the potential application of metalloporphyrins (MP in different fields have aroused researchers’ interest in studying these complexes, in an attempt to mimic biological systems such as cytochrome P-450. Over the last 40 years, synthetic MPs have been mainly used as catalysts for homogeneous or heterogeneous chemical reactions. To employ them in heterogeneous catalysis, chemists have prepared new MP-based solids by immobilizing MP onto rigid inorganic supports, a strategy that affords hybrid inorganic-organic materials. More recently, materials obtained by supramolecular assembly processes and containing MPs as building blocks have been applied in a variety of areas, like gas storage, photonic devices, separation, molecular sensing, magnets, and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. These coordination polymers, known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, contain organic ligands or complexes connected by metal ions or clusters, which give rise to a 1-, 2- or 3-D network. These kinds of materials presents large surface areas, Brønsted or redox sites, and high porosity, all of which are desirable features in catalysts with potential use in heterogeneous phases. Building MOFs based on MP is a good way to obtain solid catalysts that offer the advantages of bioinspired systems and zeolitic materials. In this mini review, we will adopt a historical approach to present the most relevant MP-based MOFs applicable to catalytic reactions such as oxidation, reduction, insertion of functional groups, and exchange of organic functions.

  7. High-Performance Black Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells by a Highly Simplified Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Etching Method

    KAUST Repository

    Ying, Zhiqin

    2016-05-20

    A wet-chemical surface texturing technique, including a two-step metal-catalyzed chemical etching (MCCE) and an extra alkaline treatment, has been proven as an efficient way to fabricate high-efficiency black multicrystalline (mc) silicon solar cells, whereas it is limited by the production capacity and the cost cutting due to the complicated process. Here, we demonstrated that with careful control of the composition in etching solution, low-aspect-ratio bowl-like nanostructures with atomically smooth surfaces could be directly achieved by improved one-step MCCE and with no posttreatment, like alkali solution. The doublet surface texture of implementing this nanobowl structure upon the industrialized acidic-textured surface showed concurrent improvement in optical and electrical properties for realizing 18.23% efficiency mc-Si solar cells (156 mm × 156 mm), which is sufficiently higher than 17.7% of the solely acidic-textured cells in the same batch. The one-step MCCE method demonstrated in this study may provide a cost-effective way to manufacture high-performance mc-Si solar cells for the present photovoltaic industry. © 2016 IEEE.

  8. Multiscale study on hydrogen mobility in metallic fusion divertor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinola, K.

    2010-01-01

    For achieving efficient fusion energy production, the plasma-facing wall materials of the fusion reactor should ensure long time operation. In the next step fusion device, ITER, the first wall region facing the highest heat and particle load, i.e. the divertor area, will mainly consist of tiles based on tungsten. During the reactor operation, the tungsten material is slowly but inevitably saturated with tritium. Tritium is the relatively short-lived hydrogen isotope used in the fusion reaction. The amount of tritium retained in the wall materials should be minimized and its recycling back to the plasma must be unrestrained, otherwise it cannot be used for fueling the plasma. A very expensive and thus economically not viable solution is to replace the first walls quite often. A better solution is to heat the walls to temperatures where tritium is released. Unfortunately, the exact mechanisms of hydrogen release in tungsten are not known. In this thesis both experimental and computational methods have been used for studying the release and retention of hydrogen in tungsten. The experimental work consists of hydrogen implantations into pure polycrystalline tungsten, the determination of the hydrogen concentrations using ion beam analyses (IBA) and monitoring the out-diffused hydrogen gas with thermodesorption spectrometry (TDS) as the tungsten samples are heated at elevated temperatures. Combining IBA methods with TDS, the retained amount of hydrogen is obtained as well as the temperatures needed for the hydrogen release. With computational methods the hydrogen-defect interactions and implantation-induced irradiation damage can be examined at the atomic level. The method of multiscale modelling combines the results obtained from computational methodologies applicable at different length and time scales. Electron density functional theory calculations were used for determining the energetics of the elementary processes of hydrogen in tungsten, such as diffusivity and

  9. Zirconium-Based metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) material with high hydrostability for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Material-based solutions, such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs), continue to attract increasing attention as viable options for hydrogen storage applications. MOFs are widely regarded as promising materials for hydrogen storage due to their high...

  10. Microstructural studies of hydrogen and deuterium in bcc refractory metals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.C.

    1984-04-01

    Research was conducted on the microstructural atomic arrangements in alloys of hydrogen and deuterium with bcc refractory metals with emphasis on V and Nb. Because these are interstitial phases in which the host metal lattice is substantially deformed by the incorporation of the H(D) atoms, there are pronounced x-ray scattering effects. X-ray diffraction was used, with neutron scattering providing useful corollary data. One objective was to determine the phase relations, solid solution structures and phase transitions in metal-hydride alloys which depend upon the hydrogen-hydrogen interaction via the displacement field of the metal atoms. This has often included the elucidation of subtle thermodynamic properties (as in critical wetting) which are revealed in structural studies. Crystals were supplied for positron annihilation studies of the Fermi surface of H-Ta alloys which have revealed significant electronic trends. Work on alkali-graphite intercalates was initiated

  11. Hydrogenated Graphene Nanoflakes: Semiconductor to Half-Metal Transition and Remarkable Large Magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Sun, Xin; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2012-03-08

    The electronic and magnetic properties of graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) can be tuned by patterned adsorption of hydrogen. Controlling the H coverage from bare GNFs to half hydrogenated and then to fully hydrogenated GNFs, the transformation of small-gap semiconductor {yields} half-metal {yields} wide-gap semiconductor occurs, accompanied by a magnetic {yields} magnetic {yields} nonmagnetic transfer and a nonmagnetic {yields} magnetic {yields} nonmagnetic transfer for triangular and hexagonal nanoflakes, respectively. The half hydrogenated GNFs, associated with strong spin polarization around the Fermi level, exhibit the unexpected large spin moment that is scaled squarely with the size of flakes. The induced spin magnetizations of these nanoflakes align parallel and lead to a substantial collective character, enabling the half hydrogenated GNFs to be spin-filtering flakes. These hydrogenation-dependent behaviors are then used to realize an attractive approach to engineer the transport properties, which provides a new route to facilitate the design of tunable spin devices.

  12. Enhanced hydrogen storage properties of MgH2 co-catalyzed with K2NiF6 and CNTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, N N; Ismail, M

    2016-12-06

    The composite of MgH 2 /K 2 NiF 6 /carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is prepared by ball milling, and its hydrogenation properties are studied for the first time. MgH 2 co-catalyzed with K 2 NiF 6 and CNTs exhibited an improvement in the onset dehydrogenation temperature and isothermal de/rehydrogenation kinetics compared with the MgH 2 -K 2 NiF 6 composite. The onset dehydrogenation temperature of MgH 2 doped with 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 and 5 wt% CNTs is 245 °C, which demonstrated a reduction of 25 °C compared with the MgH 2 + 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 composite. In terms of rehydrogenation kinetics, MgH 2 doped with 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 and 5 wt% CNTs samples absorbed 3.4 wt% of hydrogen in 1 min at 320 °C, whereas the MgH 2 + 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 sample absorbed 2.6 wt% of hydrogen under the same conditions. For dehydrogenation kinetics at 320 °C, the MgH 2 + 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 + 5 wt% CNTs sample released 3.3 wt% hydrogen after 5 min of dehydrogenation. By contrast, MgH 2 doped with 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 released 3.0 wt% hydrogen in the same time period. The apparent activation energy, E a , for the dehydrogenation of MgH 2 doped with 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 reduced from 100.0 kJ mol -1 to 70.0 kJ mol -1 after MgH 2 was co-doped with 10 wt% K 2 NiF 6 and 5 wt% CNTs. Based on the experimental results, the hydrogen storage properties of the MgH 2 /K 2 NiF 6 /CNTs composite is enhanced because of the catalytic effects of the active species of KF, KH and Mg 2 Ni that are formed in situ during dehydrogenation, as well as the unique structure of CNTs.

  13. Computational investigation of the effects of barrier layers on the permeation of hydrogen through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a computational investigation of the permeation behavior of oxide-coated metal membranes are presented. A steady-state permeation model was developed which promises to be useful in evaluation of oxide layers on metals as hydrogen permeation barriers. The pressure and thickness dependence of steady state permeation through oxide-coated metal membranes is described using plots of logarithmic functions. (U.S.)

  14. Influence of gamma radiation reaction on the hydroesterification of butenes catalyzed by metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velde, J. van der.

    1976-01-01

    In the hydro carboxylation reaction, which first has been studied by Reppe, olefine and acetylene compounds are processed with carbon monoxide and water at high pressures and high temperatures in the presence of metal carbonyls. This reaction can be enhanced considerably by application of ionizing radiation. Lower pressures and in particular lower temperatures can be used if gamma irradiation is performed during carboxylation. For the experiments a mixture of buten-1 and buten-2 as well as pure buten-1 and pure buten-2 has been used to study the behaviour of these olefines with respect to the isomerization of the reaction products and to the olefines not transformed in the reaction process. Replacing water, methanol has been used as a reaction component, thus obtaining directly the respective carbonyl acid esters, which can be analysed quantitatively and qualitatively with respect to their isomeric composition by gaschromatography. (orig./HK) [de

  15. Insights into the Metal Salt Catalyzed 5-Ethoxymethylfurfural Synthesis from Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of common metal salts as catalysts for 5-ethoxymethylfurfural (EMF synthesis from carbohydrate transformation was performed. Initial screening suggested AlCl3 as an efficient catalyst for EMF synthesis (45.0% from fructose at 140 °C. Interestingly, CuSO4 and Fe2(SO43 were found to yield comparable EMF at lower temperature of 110 to 120 °C, and high yields of ethyl levulinate (65.4–71.8% were obtained at 150 °C. However, these sulfate salts were inactive in EMF synthesis from glucose and the major product was ethyl glucoside with around 80% yield, whereas EMF of 15.2% yield could be produced from glucose using CrCl3. The conversion of sucrose followed the accumulation of the reaction pathways of fructose and glucose, and a moderate yield of EMF could be achieved.

  16. Cobalt-Embedded Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nanotubes Efficiently Catalyze Hydrogen Evolution Reaction at All pH Values

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zou, X.; Huang, X.; Goswami, A.; Silva, R.; Sathe, B. R.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Asefa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 17 (2014), s. 4372-4376 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * cobalt nanoparticles * electrocatalysis * hydrogen evolution reaction * water splitting Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 11.261, year: 2014

  17. Activation of aqueous hydrogen peroxide for non-catalyzed dihydroperoxidation of ketones by azeotropic removal of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkl Renar, K; Pečar, S; Iskra, J

    2015-09-28

    Cyclic and acyclic ketones were selectively converted to gem-dihydroperoxides in 72-99% yield with 30% aq. hydrogen peroxide by azeotropic distillation of water from the reaction mixture without any catalyst. The reactions were more selective than with 100% H2O2 and due to neutral conditions also less stable products could be obtained.

  18. Development of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria using hydrogen from radiolysis or metal corrosion; Developpement de populations microbiennes oxydant l'hydrogene produit par radiolyse ou par corrosion des metaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libert, M F; Sellier, R; Marty, V; Camaro, S [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SEP), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of many parameters need to be studied to characterize the long term behavior of nuclear waste in a deep repository. These parameters concern the chemical effects, radiolytic effects, mechanical properties, water composition, and microbiological activity. To evaluate microbial activity in such an environment, work was focused on an inventory of key nutrients (C, H, 0, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The production of hydrogen in the nuclear waste environment leads to the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria, which modify the gas production balance. A deep repository containing bituminized waste drums implies several sources of hydrogen: - water radiolysis; -corrosion of metal containers; - radiolysis of the embedding matrix (bitumen). Two deep geological disposal conditions leading to H{sub 2} production in a bituminized nuclear waste environment were simulated in the present study: - H{sub 2} production by iron corrosion under anaerobic conditions was simulated by adding 10% of H{sub 2} in the atmosphere; - H{sub 2} production by radiolysis of bitumen matrix was approached by subjecting this material to external gamma irradiation with a dose rate near real conditions (6 Gy/h). The presence of dissolved H{sub 2} in water allows the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria leading to: - CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} production; - H{sub 2} consumption; - lower NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration caused by reduction to nitrogen. In the first case, hydrogen consumption is limited by the NO{sub 3}{sup -} release rate from the bitumen matrix. In the second case, however, under gamma radiation at a low dose rate, hydrogen production is weak, and the hydrogen is completely consumed by microorganisms. Knowledge about these hydrogen oxidizing bacteria is just beginning to emerge. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria adapt well to hydrogen metabolism (autotrophic metabolism) by oxidizing H{sub 2} instead of hydrocarbons. (authors)

  19. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  20. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B.; Davidson, Lauren M.; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P.; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R.

    2016-10-01

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or ‘black silicon’. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional ‘iso-texturing’ (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63 Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8 Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting

  1. Homologation of methanol catalyzed by transition metal complexes in the presence of tertiary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masato; Ogata, Ikuei

    1987-12-18

    This paper describes the homologation of methanol by transition metal carbonyl catalysts in the presence of tertiary amines. Methanol was reacted with amine using a catalyst at 180/sup 0/C under 100 atm in the atmosphere of CO and H/sub 2/ mixed at the ratio of 4 in an autoclave. The reaction activities and selectivities of ethanol using iron carbonyl and Co carbonyl catalysts are superior. Only the iron catalyst was used hereafter because phosphine is required for the latter catalyst. N-methyl- piperidine, a cyclic amine, is superior to the other amines. The selectivity of ethanol is higher under higher partial pressure of H/sub 2/ and lower partial pressure of CO. The conversion rate is optimum at 180/sup 0/ and it goes down with increasing the temperature from it. Since the selectivity is markedly decreased with increasing amine, the reaction activity must be balanced with the amount of amine. The presence of solvent affects it. (3 figs, 6 tabs, 15 refs)

  2. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Álvarez, Andrea

    2017-06-28

    The recent advances in the development of heterogeneous catalysts and processes for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to formate/formic acid, methanol, and dimethyl ether are thoroughly reviewed, with special emphasis on thermodynamics and catalyst design considerations. After introducing the main motivation for the development of such processes, we first summarize the most important aspects of CO2 capture and green routes to produce H2. Once the scene in terms of feedstocks is introduced, we carefully summarize the state of the art in the development of heterogeneous catalysts for these important hydrogenation reactions. Finally, in an attempt to give an order of magnitude regarding CO2 valorization, we critically assess economical aspects of the production of methanol and DME and outline future research and development directions.

  3. Methodologies for hydrogen determination in metal oxides by prompt gamma activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, E.; Biegalski, S.R.; Landsberger, S.

    2007-01-01

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA), available at University of Texas at Austin (UT), has been employed for the direct determination of hydrogen content in a series of metal oxide materials typically used as cathodes in lithium ion battery systems. Special attention was given to the experimental setup including potential sources of error and system calibration for the detection of hydrogen. Spectral interference with hydrogen arising from cobalt was identified and corrected for. Limits of detection as a function of cobalt mass present in a given sample are also discussed. PGAA has proven to be a novel and precise technique for the determination of hydrogen in metal oxides. This type of investigation could provide valuable insight regarding the factors that limit the practical capacities of lithium ion oxide cathodes

  4. Recyclable hydrogen storage system composed of ammonia and alkali metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki; Hino, Satoshi [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Haruyuki [Higashi-Fuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Misyuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) reacts with alkali metal hydrides MH (M = Li, Na, and K) in an exothermic reaction to release hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at room temperature, resulting that alkali metal amides (MNH{sub 2}) which are formed as by-products. In this work, hydrogen desorption properties of these systems and the condition for the recycle from MNH{sub 2} back to MH were investigated systematically. For the hydrogen desorption reaction, the reactivities of MH with NH{sub 3} were better following the atomic number of M on the periodic table, Li < Na < K. It was confirmed that the hydrogen absorption reaction of all the systems proceeded under 0.5 MPa of H{sub 2} flow condition below 300 C. (author)

  5. First-principles study of hydrogen diffusion in transition metal Rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Wulijibilige; Cui, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the diffuse pattern and path of hydrogen in transition metal rhodium are investigated by the first-principles calculations. Density functional theory is used to calculate the system energies of hydrogen atom occupying different positions in rhodium crystal lattice. The results indicate that the most stable position of hydrogen atom in rhodium crystal lattice locates at the octahedral interstice, and the tetrahedral interstice is the second stable site. The activation barrier energy for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen in transition metal rhodium is quantified by determining the most favorable path, i.e., the minimum-energy pathway for diffusion, that is the indirect octahedral-tetrahedral-octahedral (O-T-O) pathway, and the activation energy is 0.8345eV

  6. Effect of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on tracer diffusion of tritium in alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kan; Hashizume, Kenichi; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    2009-01-01

    Tracer diffusion coefficients of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metal-hydrogen systems, α-MH(D)xTy (M=V and Ta; x>>y), were measured in order to clarify the effects of coexistent hydrogen isotopes on the tritium diffusion behavior. The hydrogen concentration dependence of such behavior and the effects of the coexistent hydrogen isotopes (protium and deuterium) were determined. The results obtained in the present (for V and Ta) and previous (for Nb) studies revealed that tritium diffusion was definitely dependent on hydrogen concentration but was not so sensitive to the kind of coexistent hydrogen isotopes. By summarizing those data, it was found that the hydrogen concentration dependence of the tracer diffusion coefficient of tritium in the alpha phase of group-V metals could be roughly expressed by a single empirical curve. (author)

  7. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V., E-mail: viny.veronika@gmail.com [Engineering Physics, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganeca 10 Gd. T.P. Rachmat, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Hidayat, N. N., E-mail: avantgarde.vee@gmail.com; Agusta, M. K., E-mail: kemal@fti.itb.ac.id; Dipojono, H. K., E-mail: dipojono@tf.itb.ac.id

    2015-09-30

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO{sub 3} sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  8. A Biomimetic Approach to New Adsorptive Hydrogen Storage Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongcai J [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-12

    In the past decades, there has been an escalation of interest in the study of MOFs due to their fascinating structures and intriguing application potentials. Their exceptionally high surface areas, uniform yet tunable pore sizes, and well-defined adsorbate-MOF interaction sites make them suitable for hydrogen storage. Various strategies to increase the hydrogen capacity of MOFs, such as constructing pore sizes comparable to hydrogen molecules, increasing surface area and pore volume, utilizing catenation, and introducing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) have been widely explored to increase the hydrogen uptake of the MOFs. MOFs with hydrogen uptake approaching the DOE gravimetric storage goal under reasonable pressure but cryo- temperature (typically 77 K) were achieved. However, the weak interaction between hydrogen molecules and MOFs has been the major hurdle limiting the hydrogen uptake of MOFs at ambient temperature. Along the road, we have realized both high surface area and strong interaction between framework and hydrogen are equally essential for porous materials to be practically applicable in Hydrogen storage. Increasing the isosteric heats of adsorption for hydrogen through the introduction of active centers into the framework could have great potential on rendering the framework with strong interaction toward hydrogen. Approaches on increasing the surface areas and improving hydrogen affinity by optimizing size and structure of the pores and the alignment of active centers around the pores in frameworks have been pursued, for example: (a) the introduction of coordinatively UMC (represents a metal center missing multiple ligands) with potential capability of multiple dihydrogen-binding (Kubas type, non-dissociative) per UMC, (b) the design and synthesis of proton-rich MOFs in which a + H3 binds dihydrogen just like a metal ion does, and (c) the preparation of MOFs and PPNs with well aligned internal electric fields. We believe the

  9. Solar hydrogen production with semiconductor metal oxides: new directions in experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdes, Alvaro; Brillet, Jeremie; Graetzel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    An overview of a collaborative experimental and theoretical effort toward efficient hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical splitting of water into di-hydrogen and di-oxygen is presented here. We present state-of-the-art experimental studies using hematite and TiO2 functionalized with gold n...... nanoparticles as photoanode materials, and theoretical studies on electro and photo-catalysis of water on a range of metal oxide semiconductor materials, including recently developed implementation of self-interaction corrected energy functionals....

  10. Indirect, reversible high-density hydrogen storage in compact metal ammine salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Klerke, Asbjørn

    2008-01-01

    The indirect hydrogen storage capabilities of Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Ca(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Mn(NH3)(6)Cl-2, and Ni(NH3)(6)Cl-2 are investigated. All four metal ammine chlorides can be compacted to solid tablets with densities of at least 95% of the crystal density. This gives very high indirect hydrogen...

  11. A fast response hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating onto a fiber's end-face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haitao; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qiu-Ze; Cao, Jingxiao; Han, Dao-Fu; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated an integrated hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating fabricated on a fiber end-face. The grating consists of three thin metal layers in stacks, Au, WO3 and Pd. The WO3 is used as a waveguide layer between the Pd and Au layer. The Pd layer is etched by using a focused ion beam (FIB) method, forming a Pd metallic grating with period of 450 nm. The sensor is experimentally exposed to hydrogen gas environment. Changing the concentration from 0% to 4% which is the low explosive limit (LEL), the resonant wavelength measured from the reflection experienced 28.10 nm spectral changes in the visible range. The results demonstrated that the sensor is sensitive for hydrogen detection and it has fast response and low temperature effect.

  12. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented Electrochemical Kinetic Model (EKM), describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, has been extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e. the charge transfer kinetics and electrical double layer charging. A complete set of

  13. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented electrochemical kinetic model, describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, was extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e., the charge-transfer kinetics and electrical double-layer charging. A complete set of equations

  14. Infrared laser induced organic reactions. 2. Laser vs. thermal inducment of unimolecular and hydrogen bromide catalyzed bimolecular dehydration of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a mixture of reactant molecules can be induced by pulsed infrared laser radiation to react via a route which is totally different from the pathway resulting from heating the mixture at 300 0 C. The high-energy unimolecular elimination of H 2 O from ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol and HBr can be selectively induced with a pulsed CO 2 laser in preference to either a lower energy bimolecular HBr-catalyzed dehydration or the more facile dehydration of 2-propanol. Heating the mixture resulted in the almost exclusive reaction of 2-propanol to produce propylene. It was demonstrated that the bimolecular ethanol + HBr reaction cannot be effectively induced by the infrared laser radiation as evidenced by the detrimental effect on the yield of ethylene as the HBr pressure was increased. The selective, nonthermal inducement of H 2 O elimination from vibrationally excited ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol required relatively low reactant pressures. At higher pressures intermolecular V--V energy transfer allowed the thermally more facile dehydration from 2-propanol to become the predominant reaction channel

  15. Treatment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soils using hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by waste basic oxygen furnace slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, T.T.; Kao, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The contamination of subsurface soils with petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread environmental problem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of applying waste basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) as the catalyst to enhance the Fenton-like oxidation to remediate fuel oil or diesel contaminated soils. The studied controlling factors that affect the removal efficiency of petroleum hydrocarbons included concentrations of H 2 O 2 , BOF slag dosages, types of petroleum hydrocarbons (e.g., fuel oil and diesel), and types of iron mineral. Experimental results indicate that oxidation of petroleum hydrocarbon via the Fenton-like process can be enhanced with the addition of BOF slag. Results from the X-ray powder diffraction analysis reveal that the major iron type of BOF slag/sandy loam system was iron mineral (e.g., α-Fe 2 O 3 and α-FeOOH). Approximately 76% and 96% of fuel oil and diesel removal were observed (initial total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration = 10,000 mg kg -1 ), respectively, with the addition of 15% of H 2 O 2 and 100 g kg -1 of BOF slag after 40 h of reaction. Because BOF slag contains extractable irons such as amorphous iron and soluble iron, it can act as an iron sink to supply iron continuously for Fenton-like oxidation. Results demonstrate that Fenton-like oxidation catalyzed by BOF slag is a potential method to be able to remediate petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soils efficiently and effectively.

  16. The motion of hydrogen isotopes in metals and intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexel, W.; Murani, A.; Tocchetti, D.; Kley, W.

    1976-08-01

    The existence of local and band modes of hydrogen and deuterium impurities in α-palladium hydride was observed by inelastic scattering of thermal neutrons of 12.6 meV. The first and second harmonic of the hydrogen local mode could be observed at Esub(1)sup(H)=(66+-4)meV and Esub(2)sup(H)=(135+-15)meV. For deuterium the first harmonics appears at Esub(1)sup(D)=(48+-4)meV. The width of the hydrogen local mode Esub(1)sup(H) is changing from 30 to 20 meV and its position from 63 to 66meV if the hydrogen concentration is altered from 2.7 to 0.2 atom percent. The intensity of the Esub(1)sup(H) mode, integrated for scattering angles from 11 0 till 68 0 and a mean k-vector pointing in the [210]-direction, is decreasing by a factor of 5 with respect to harmonic oscillator while the intensity of the second harmonic Esub(2)sup(H) and of the band modes stays almost constant if the temperature is changed from 423 0 K till 673 0 K. The behavior of this intensity distributions with temperature indicates a partition of the proton motions in diffusive and localized motions and supports the assumption of an anharmonic periodic potential along the [110] direction. The frequency distribution function of the hydrogen band modes has a shape as expected from measured dispersion curves. For [Pdsub(0.018)sup(D)-Pd] a broad quasielastic line is observed that indicates the existence of overdamped phonons in the vicinity of the impurity atom

  17. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  18. Properties and application of noble metal catalysts for heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, G; Frohning, C D; Cornils, B [Ruhrchemie A.G., Oberhausen (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-07-01

    The special properties of the six platinum group elements - ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum - make them useful as active metals for catalytic reactions. Especially valuable is their property of favouring a single reaction even when the possibility of a number of parallel reactions exists under certain reaction conditions. This selectivity of the noble metal catalyst may be directed or enhanced through appropriate choise of the metal, the reaction conditions, the duration of the reaction, the amount of hydrogen etc. Even the physical state of the catalyst - supported or unsupported - is of influence when using noble metal catalysts as described in this report.

  19. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides......Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...

  20. Characterisation of hydrocarbonaceous overlayers important in metal-catalysed selective hydrogenation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, David; Warringham, Robbie [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Guidi, Tatiana [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Stewart F., E-mail: stewart.parker@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of a commercial dehydrogenation catalyst. • The overlayer present on the catalyst is predominantly aliphatic. • A population of strongly hydrogen bonded hydroxyls is also present. - Abstract: The hydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes over supported metal catalysts is an important industrial process and it has been shown that hydrocarbonaceous overlayers are important in controlling selectivity profiles of metal-catalysed hydrogenation reactions. As a model system, we have selected propyne hydrogenation over a commercial Pd(5%)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Inelastic neutron scattering studies show that the C–H stretching mode ranges from 2850 to 3063 cm{sup −1}, indicating the mostly aliphatic nature of the overlayer and this is supported by the quantification of the carbon and hydrogen on the surface. There is also a population of strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls, their presence would indicate that the overlayer probably contains some oxygen functionality. There is little evidence for any olefinic or aromatic species. This is distinctly different from the hydrogen-poor overlayers that are deposited on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts during methane reforming.

  1. Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized palladium-platinum nanoparticles-catalyzed hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakap, Murat

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic use of highly efficient poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized palladium-platinum nanoparticles (4.2 ± 1.9 nm) in the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane is reported. The catalyst is prepared by co-reduction of two metal ions in ethanol/water mixture by an alcohol reduction method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. They are recyclable and highly active for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane even at very low concentrations and temperature, providing a record numbers of average turnover frequency value (125 mol H2/mol cat.min-1) and maximum hydrogen generation rate (3468 L H2 min-1 (mol cat)-1). They also provide activation energy of 51.7 ± 2 kJ/mol for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

  2. In-situ hydrogen in metal determination using a minimum neutron source strength and exposure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, M; Agamy, S; Khalil, M Y

    2013-08-01

    Water is frequently present in the environment and is a source of hydrogen that can interact with many materials. Because of its small atomic size, a hydrogen atom can easily diffuse into a host metal, and though the metal may appear unchanged for a time, the metal will eventually abruptly lose its strength and ductility. Thus, measuring the hydrogen content in metals is important in many fields, such as in the nuclear industry, in automotive and aircraft fabrication, and particularly, in offshore oil and gas fields. It has been demonstrated that the use of nuclear methods to measure the hydrogen content in metals can achieve sensitivity levels on the order of parts per million. However, the use of nuclear methods in the field has not been conducted for two reasons. The first reason is due to exposure limitations. The second reason is due to the hi-tech instruments required for better accuracy. In this work, a new method using a low-strength portable neutron source is explored in conjunction with detectors based on plastic nuclear detection films. The following are the in-situ requirements: simplicity in setup, high reliability, minimal exposure dose, and acceptable accuracy at an acceptable cost. A computer model of the experimental setup is used to reproduce the results of a proof-of-concept experiment and to predict the sensitivity levels under optimised experimental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient Synthesis of Functionalized 1-oxo-1-phenyl-2-acetic Acids through Ru(II)-catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Binwei; Meng, Yanqiu [Shenyang Univ. of Chemical Technology, Shenyang (Korea, Republic of); Yan, Yunnan [Gannan Medical Univ., Ganzhou (Korea, Republic of); Tang, Xiaobo; Eric Xu, H.; Yi, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Qiu [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou (China)

    2013-10-15

    A new and alternative method for the efficient synthesis of indanylacetic acid 2 has been developed. The methodology used RuCl(p-cymene)[(R,R)-TsDPEN] as the catalyst and formic acid-triethylamine as the hydrogen source at room temperature under solvent-free conditions, and the reactions have excellent chemoselectivity and good compatibility of substrates. Used our developed method as the starting step, gram scale synthesis of GR24 was achieved smoothly with an overall yield of 72%. All the results suggested that further development of such methodology may be of interest. Further work to establish the mechanistic reasons for selectivity and to further explore the synthetic scope of this mode of transfer hydrogenation is in progress. The synthetic SL analog, GR24 is a very potent germination stimulant, which is widely used in parasitic weed research to stimulate germination and as a standard for comparison of new germinating agents. Owing to the prevalence of GR24, its total synthesis constitutes a hot area of research. So far all known synthetic routes of GR24 used indanylacetic acid 2 as a key intermediate, for which very few methods of building compound 2 have been reported.

  4. A Bimetallic Nickel–Gallium Complex Catalyzes CO 2 Hydrogenation via the Intermediacy of an Anionic d 10 Nickel Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarota, Ryan C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Vollmer, Matthew V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Xie, Jing [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Ye, Jingyun [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Linehan, John C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Burgess, Samantha A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Gagliardi, Laura [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Lu, Connie C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States

    2017-09-28

    Large-scale CO2 hydrogenation could offer a renewable stream of industrially important C1 chemicals while reducing CO2 emissions. Critical to this opportunity is the requirement for inexpensive catalysts based on earth-abundant metals instead of precious metals. We report a nickel-gallium complex featuring a Ni(0)→Ga(III) bond that shows remarkable catalytic activity for hydrogenating CO2 to formate at ambient temperature (3150 turnovers, turnover frequency = 9700 h-1), compared with prior homogeneous Ni-centred catalysts. The Lewis acidic Ga(III) ion plays a pivotal role by stabilizing reactive catalytic intermediates, including a rare anionic d10 Ni hydride. The structure of this reactive intermediate shows a terminal Ni-H, for which the hydride donor strength rivals those of precious metal-hydrides. Collectively, our experimental and computational results demonstrate that modulating a transition metal center via a direct interaction with a Lewis acidic support can be a powerful strategy for promoting new reactivity paradigms in base-metal catalysis. The work was supported as part of the Inorganometallic Catalysis Design Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DE-SC0012702. R.C.C. and M.V.V. were supported by DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship programs, respectively. J.C.L., S.A.B., and A.M.A. were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Treatment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soils using hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by waste basic oxygen furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, T.T. [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Kao, C.M., E-mail: jkao@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-15

    The contamination of subsurface soils with petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread environmental problem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of applying waste basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) as the catalyst to enhance the Fenton-like oxidation to remediate fuel oil or diesel contaminated soils. The studied controlling factors that affect the removal efficiency of petroleum hydrocarbons included concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BOF slag dosages, types of petroleum hydrocarbons (e.g., fuel oil and diesel), and types of iron mineral. Experimental results indicate that oxidation of petroleum hydrocarbon via the Fenton-like process can be enhanced with the addition of BOF slag. Results from the X-ray powder diffraction analysis reveal that the major iron type of BOF slag/sandy loam system was iron mineral (e.g., {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-FeOOH). Approximately 76% and 96% of fuel oil and diesel removal were observed (initial total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration = 10,000 mg kg{sup -1}), respectively, with the addition of 15% of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 100 g kg{sup -1} of BOF slag after 40 h of reaction. Because BOF slag contains extractable irons such as amorphous iron and soluble iron, it can act as an iron sink to supply iron continuously for Fenton-like oxidation. Results demonstrate that Fenton-like oxidation catalyzed by BOF slag is a potential method to be able to remediate petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated soils efficiently and effectively.

  6. NOBLE METAL CHEMISTRY AND HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D

    2008-06-25

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell vessels were performed with the primary purpose of producing melter feeds for the beaded frit program plus obtaining samples of simulated slurries containing high concentrations of noble metals for off-site analytical studies for the hydrogen program. Eight pairs of 22-L simulations were performed of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. These sixteen simulations did not contain mercury. Six pairs were trimmed with a single noble metal (Ag, Pd, Rh, or Ru). One pair had all four noble metals, and one pair had no noble metals. One supporting 4-L simulation was completed with Ru and Hg. Several other 4-L supporting tests with mercury have not yet been performed. This report covers the calculations performed on SRNL analytical and process data related to the noble metals and hydrogen generation. It was originally envisioned as a supporting document for the off-site analytical studies. Significant new findings were made, and many previous hypotheses and findings were given additional support as summarized below. The timing of hydrogen generation events was reproduced very well within each of the eight pairs of runs, e.g. the onset of hydrogen, peak in hydrogen, etc. occurred at nearly identical times. Peak generation rates and total SRAT masses of CO{sub 2} and oxides of nitrogen were reproduced well. Comparable measures for hydrogen were reproduced with more variability, but still reasonably well. The extent of the reproducibility of the results validates the conclusions that were drawn from the data.

  7. Modelling of fatigue crack propagation assisted by gaseous hydrogen in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in a hydrogenous environment indicate that hydrogen created by surface reactions, then drained into the plastic zone, leads to a modification of deformation and damage mechanisms at the fatigue crack tip in metals, resulting in a significant decrease of crack propagation resistance. This study aims at building a model of these complex phenomena in the framework of damage mechanics, and to confront it with the results of fatigue crack propagation tests in high pressure hydrogen on a 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel. To do so, a cohesive zone model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A specific traction-separation law was developed, which is suitable for cyclic loadings, and whose parameters depend on local hydrogen concentration. Furthermore, hydrogen diffusion in the bulk material takes into account the influence of hydrostatic stress and trapping. The mechanical behaviour of the bulk material is elastic-plastic. It is shown that the model can qualitatively predict crack propagation in hydrogen under monotonous loadings; then, the model with the developed traction-separation law is tested under fatigue loading. In particular, the simulated crack propagation curves without hydrogen are compared to the experimental crack propagation curves for the 15-5PH steel in air. Finally, simulated fatigue crack propagation rates in hydrogen are compared to experimental measurements. The model's ability to assess the respective contributions of the different damage mechanisms (HELP, HEDE) in the degradation of the crack resistance of the 15-5PH steel is discussed. (author)

  8. Investigation of hydrogen micro-kinetics in metals with ion beam implantation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.S.; Peng, H.B.; Lv, H.Y.; Han, Y.C.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important subjects in the fusion material research is to study the hydrogen and helium concentration, diffusion and evolution in the structure material of fusion reactor, since the hydrogen and helium can be continuously produced by the large dose fast neutron irradiation on material. Various analysis Methods can be used, but the ion beam analysis method has some advantages for studying the hydrogen behaviors in nano- or micrometer resolution. In this work, the hydrogen motion and three-dimensional distribution after implantation into metal has been studied by resonance NRA, micro-ERDA and XRD etc Methods. The resolution of the H-depth-profile is in nanometer level and the lateral resolution can be reached to 2 micrometers. The evolution of hydrogen depth-profile in a titanium sample has been studied versus the change of normal stress in samples. Evident hydrogen diffusion has been observed, while a normal stress is changed in the range of 107-963 MPa. A new phase transformation during the hydrogenation is observed by the in-situ XRD analysis. The further study on the hydrogen behaviors in the structure materials of fusion reactor is in plan. (authors)

  9. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng; Wang, Yuan; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  11. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2017-05-30

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  12. Use of Heterogenized Metal Complexes in Hydrogenation Reactions: Comparison of Hydrogenation and CTH Reactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bata, P.; Zsigmond, A.; Gyémánt, M.; Czeglédi, A.; Klusoň, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2015), s. 9281-9294 ISSN 0922-6168. [Pannonian Symposium on Catalysis /12./. Castle Trest, 16.09.2014-20.09.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : catalytic transfer hydrogenation * iron-phthalocyanine catalyst * chemoselectivity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2015

  13. Kinetic formulae for muon-catalyzed fusion of hydrogen isotopes and their application to the description of the data for pure deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, A.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the time distributions of muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) events in pure deuterium targets published before 1987 are analysed using the kinetic formalism developed by the author and collaborators in a series of papers. The formalism enables one to describe these time distributions in an arbitrary mixture of hydrogen isotopes with strict inclusion of registration efficiency and dead time. The kinetic formulae for such distributions can be readily obtained using a prescription based on the theory of signal-flow graphs even for very complicated kinetic situations, thus, allowing one to avoid the simplifying assumptions which have been usually made in earlier analyses. Practically all important processes forming the muon-catalysis chain can be strictly taken into account in the approximation of constant transition rates. Consecutive μCF cycles can be described separately, which provides a useful tool in data analysis. The developed formalism is applied to the existing data for pure deuterium. First cycle-by-cycle time distributions reported for room temperature by the Gatchina group are analysed. 93 refs., 14 figs. (author)

  14. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.P. da.

    1981-01-01

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  15. Graphene on metal surfaces and its hydrogen adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mie; Hornekær, L.; Hammer, B.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of graphene with various metal surfaces is investigated using density functional theory and the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA) M06-L functional. We demonstrate that this method is of comparable accuracy to the random-phase approximation (RPA). With M06-L we study...... large systems inaccessible to RPA with H adsorbed on graphene on a selected strongly (Ni) and a selected weakly (Pt) interacting substrate. Very stable graphane-like clusters, where every other C atom binds to a H atom above and every other to a metal atom below, are found on both substrates...

  16. Hydrogen Mobility in Disordered Metals Studied by $\\mu$SR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A few studies of the behaviour of positive muons in metal hydrides have been made during the last three years under the code SC76, although this code is intended primarily for ``diffusion and trapping of positive muons`` in pure or very weakly doped metals. It has been shown in these studies that $\\mu$SR can provide important information even in concentrated hydrides like $ NbH _{,} _{0},7 - _{0} _{,} _{9} $ and $ Zr V _{2} H _{2} _{m}inus _{3} $ especially concerning mutual $\\mu

  17. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  18. An efficient and high-yielding one-pot synthesis of 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones catalyzed by sodium hydrogen carbonate under solvent-free conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Asieh Vafaee; Abolghasem Davoodnia; Mehdi Pordel; Mohammad Reza Bozorgmehr

    2015-01-01

    Sodium hydrogen carbonate, NaHCO3, efficiently catalyzes the one-pot, three-component reaction of phthalhydrazide, an aromatic aldehyde, and malononitrile or ethyl cyanoacetate under solvent-free conditions, to afford the corresponding 1H-pyrazolo[1,2-b]phthalazine-5,10-diones in high yields. Easy work‐up, inexpensive and readily available catalyst and avoiding the use of harmful organic solvents are other advantages of this simple procedure.

  19. Metal-loaded SBA-16-like silica – Correlation between basicity and affinity towards hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouargli-Saker, R.; Bouazizi, N.; Boukoussa, B.; Barrimo, Diana; Paola-Nunes-Beltrao, Ana; Azzouz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal dispersion in longitudinal channels confers adsorption properties to SBA-16. • Both Fe"0-NPs and Cu"0-NPs seem to be responsible of this effect. • Effect of the repetitive adsorption-desorption cycles on CO_2 and water sorption. • Hydrogen storage on the functionalized materials. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of Cu"o (CuNPs) and Fe"o (FeNPs) were dispersed in SBA-16-like silica, resulting metal-loaded materials (Cu-SBA-16 and Fe-SBA-16) with improved affinity towards hydrogen. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that MNP dispersion occurs mainly inside SBA-16 channels. MNP incorporation was found to confer affinity to the silica surface, since higher CO_2 retention capacity (CRC) was registered Cu/SBA-16 and Fe/SBA-16. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of the affinity towards hydrogen, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests. This was explained in terms of strong hydrogen interaction with MNP and lattice oxygen atoms. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-16 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

  20. Metal-loaded SBA-16-like silica – Correlation between basicity and affinity towards hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouargli-Saker, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, El M’naouer, BP 1505, Oran (Algeria); Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Bouazizi, N. [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Unité de recherche, Electrochimie, Matériaux et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Gabès, Université de Gabès, Cité Erriadh, 6072 Gabès (Tunisia); Boukoussa, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, El M’naouer, BP 1505, Oran (Algeria); Lqamb, Laboratório de Química Analítica Ambiental, Faculdade de Química, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Barrimo, Diana [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Paola-Nunes-Beltrao, Ana [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada); Laboratory of Materials Chemistry L.C.M, University of Oran1 Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El-Mnaouer, 31000 Oran (Algeria); Azzouz, A., E-mail: azzouz.a@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C3P8 (Canada)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Metal dispersion in longitudinal channels confers adsorption properties to SBA-16. • Both Fe{sup 0}-NPs and Cu{sup 0}-NPs seem to be responsible of this effect. • Effect of the repetitive adsorption-desorption cycles on CO{sub 2} and water sorption. • Hydrogen storage on the functionalized materials. - Abstract: Nanoparticles of Cu{sup o} (CuNPs) and Fe{sup o} (FeNPs) were dispersed in SBA-16-like silica, resulting metal-loaded materials (Cu-SBA-16 and Fe-SBA-16) with improved affinity towards hydrogen. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that MNP dispersion occurs mainly inside SBA-16 channels. MNP incorporation was found to confer affinity to the silica surface, since higher CO{sub 2} retention capacity (CRC) was registered Cu/SBA-16 and Fe/SBA-16. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of the affinity towards hydrogen, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests. This was explained in terms of strong hydrogen interaction with MNP and lattice oxygen atoms. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-16 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

  1. Metal-inorganic-organic matrices as efficient sorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Nousir, Saadia; Bouazizi, Nabil; Roy, René

    2015-03-01

    Stabilization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) without re-aggregation is a major challenge. An unprecedented strategy is developed for achieving high dispersion of copper(0) or palladium(0) on montmorillonite-supported diethanolamine or thioglycerol. This results in novel metal-inorganic-organic matrices (MIOM) that readily capture hydrogen at ambient conditions, with easy release under air stream. Hydrogen retention appears to involve mainly physical interactions, slightly stronger on thioglycerol-based MIOM (S-MIOM). Thermal enhancement of desorption suggests also a contribution of chemical interactions. The increase of hydrogen uptake with prolonged contact times arises from diffusion hindrance, which appears to be beneficial by favoring hydrogen entrapment. Even with compact structures, MIOMs act as efficient sorbents with much higher efficiency factor (1.14-1.17 mmol H 2 m(-2)) than many other sophisticated adsorbents reported in the literature. This opens new prospects for hydrogen storage and potential applications in microfluidic hydrogenation reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hydrogen-water deuterium exchange over metal oxide promoted nickel catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagert, N H; Shaw-Wood, P E; Pouteau, R M.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1975-11-01

    Specific rates have been measured for hydrogen-water deuterium isotope exchange over unsupported nickel promoted with about 20% of various metal oxides. The oxides used were Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MoO/sub 2/, MnO, WO/sub 2/-WO/sub 3/, and UO/sub 2/. Nickel surface areas, which are required to measure the specific rates, were determined by hydrogen chemisorption. Specific rates were measured as a function of temperature in the range 353 to 573 K and as a function of the partial pressure of hydrogen and water over a 10-fold range of partial pressure. The molybdenum and tungsten oxides gave the highest specific rates, and manganese and uranium oxides the lowest. Chromium oxide was intermediate, although it gave the highest rate per gram of catalyst. The orders with respect to hydrogen and water over molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide promoted nickel were consistent with a mechanism in which nickel oxide is formed from the reaction of water with the catalyst, and then is reduced by hydrogen. Over manganese and uranium oxide promoted catalysts, these orders are consistent with a mechanism in which adsorbed water exchanges with chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on the nickel surface. Chromium oxide is intermediate. It was noted that those oxides which favored the nickel oxide route had electronic work functions closest to those of metallic nickel and nickel oxide.

  3. Hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications: Challenges, opportunities and prospects for metal-organic frameworks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available and release, and cycle life of the materials. In the past decade, there has been growing interest in metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as hydrogen storage materials and significant progress has been made in this regard. The challenges, opportunities...

  4. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  5. Method for hydrogen production and metal winning, and a catalyst/cocatalyst composition useful therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1987-10-13

    A catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition of matter is useful in electrolytically producing hydrogen or electrowinning metals. Use of the catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition causes the anode potential and the energy required for the reaction to decrease. An electrolyte, including the catalyst/cocatalyst composition, and a reaction medium composition further including organic material are also described.

  6. Charge transfer between hydrogen(deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez T, I.; Cisneros G, C.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of the experiments on charge transfer between hydrogen (deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors are given. Emphasis is given to describing different experimental techniques. The results of calculations if available, are compared with existing experimental data. (author)

  7. Butterfly valve with metal seals controls flow of hydrogen from cryogenic through high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Butterfly valve with metal seals operates over a temperature range of minus 423 degrees to plus 440 degrees F with hydrogen as a medium and in a radiation environment. Media flow is controlled by an internal butterfly disk which is rotated by an actuation shaft.

  8. Modulated synthesis of zirconium-metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modulated synthesis of Zr-metal organic framework (Zr-MOF) with improved ease of handling and decreased reaction time is reported to yield highly crystalline Zr-MOF with well-defined octahedral shaped crystals for practical hydrogen storage...

  9. Role of synergism effect of mixed metal oxides on molecular hydrogen formation from photocatalitic water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmudov, H.M.; Ismayilova, M.K.; Jafarova, N.A.; Azizova, K.V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen production using photocatalysis. In particular, we focus on the role of synergism on the reaction rate. For hydrogen production presented photocatalyst is composed of nanoAl_2O_3 and dispers TiO_2. Yet, the presence of the two mixed metal oxides together results in considerable enhancement of the reaction rate. The main reason for this is the increase of the charge carriers lifetime allowing for electron transfer to hydrogen ions and hole transfer to oxygen ions. It was investigated the mechanism of water splitting in presence of mixed nanocatalysed. It has been shown that the effect occurs during irradiation as a result of photooxidation of water with mixed metal oxides catalyst.

  10. Electrochemical reduction of metal ions in dilute solution using hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegies Zwart, I.; Wijnbelt, E.C.W.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Reduction of metal ions in dilute solutions is of great interest for purification of waste waters and process liquids. A new electrochemical cell has been introduced. This cell - a GBC-cell - is a combination of a gasdiffusion electrode in direct contact with a packed bed of carbon particles.

  11. Metal-organic framework based on copper(I) sulfate and 4,4'-bipyridine catalyzes the cyclopropanation of styrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Fanian; Silva, Ana Rosa; Rocha, Joao

    2011-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) formulated as Cu 2 (4,4'-bpy) 2 SO 4 .6(H 2 O), [abbreviation: (1); bpy or 4,4'-bpy=4,4'-bipyridine; SO 4 2- =sulfate group] has been reported. The structure of this MOF consists of Cu + nodes connected via 4,4'-bpy to form infinite chains, with two neighboring chains further bridged on the nodes by SO 4 2- , resulting in a 1-D double chain network. Guest water molecules reside in between the chains and are hydrogen-bonded to the O and S atoms from the nearest sulfate groups, leading to the formation of a 3-D supramolecular framework. This MOF is good heterogeneous catalyst for the cyclopropanation of styrene, with high trans cyclopropane diastereoselectivity and was recycled and reused for three consecutive cycles without a significant loss of catalytic activity. - Graphical Abstract: A new MOF structure built up of 4,4 ' -bipyridine, sulphate and Cu(I), is an active heterogeneous catalyst for cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyldiazoacetate. Highlights: → The synthesis is different from solvothermal synthesis for other Cu(I) compounds. → The compound and the structure are new. → H bonds form infinite planes among water molecules and sulphate species. → H bonding interaction makes the structure into a 3D supramolecular framework. → Active catalytic property as heterogeneous catalyst for cyclopropanation of styrene.

  12. Investigation of the Alkaline Electrochemical Interface and Development of Composite Metal/Metal-Oxides for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael

    Understanding the fundamentals of electrochemical interfaces will undoubtedly reveal a path forward towards a society based on clean and renewable energy. In particular, it has been proposed that hydrogen can play a major role as an energy carrier of the future. To fully utilize the clean energy potential of a hydrogen economy, it is vital to produce hydrogen via water electrolysis, thus avoiding co-production of CO2 inherent to reformate hydrogen. While significant research efforts elsewhere are focused on photo-chemical hydrogen production from water, the inherent low efficiency of this method would require a massive land-use footprint to achieve sufficient hydrogen production rates to integrate hydrogen into energy markets. Thus, this research has primarily focused on the water splitting reactions on base-metal catalysts in the alkaline environment. Development of high-performance base-metal catalysts will help move alkaline water electrolysis to the forefront of hydrogen production methods, and when paired with solar and wind energy production, represents a clean and renewable energy economy. In addition to the water electrolysis reactions, research was conducted to understand the de-activation of reversible hydrogen electrodes in the corrosive environment of the hydrogen-bromine redox flow battery. Redox flow batteries represent a promising energy storage option to overcome the intermittency challenge of wind and solar energy production methods. Optimization of modular and scalable energy storage technology will allow higher penetration of renewable wind and solar energy into the grid. In Chapter 1, an overview of renewable energy production methods and energy storage options is presented. In addition, the fundamentals of electrochemical analysis and physical characterization of the catalysts are discussed. Chapter 2 reports the development of a Ni-Cr/C electrocatalyst with unprecedented mass-activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline

  13. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  14. Study of hydrogen consumption reaction catalyzed by Pd ions in the simulated high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    To ensure the safety for storage of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) in tanks is one of the most important safety issues in a reprocessing plant since almost all radioactive materials under processing are collected in these tanks. Accordingly the behavior of radiolytically formed hydrogen (H 2 ) in these tanks is one of key issues and has been studied by several researchers because it might cause an explosion. They reported that not all of H 2 formed in HLLW comes out in the gas phase because H 2 is consumed by some un-clarified secondary reaction which may be caused by the irradiation and/or by the catalytic effect of certain fission product (FP) in HLLW. In order to clarify such effect, we carried out the experiments using the simulated high level liquid waste (SHLLW) with and without palladium (Pd) group ions under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. As a result, it was found that H 2 consumption reaction is not caused by radiation as was understood so far but is caused by a catalytic effect of Pd ion in SHLLW. That is, H 2 is reacting with HNO 3 and forming H 2 O and NOx. Using the catalytic reaction rate constant measured in the experiments, the analysis showed that the H 2 concentration in the gas phase of an HLLW tank does not reach its explosion limit of 4% even if the sweeping air stops for a long time. (authors)

  15. Aqueous phase hydrogenation of phenol catalyzed by Pd and PdAg on ZrO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, Karen A.; Hori, Carla E.; Noronha, Fabio B.; Shi, Hui; Gutierrez, Oliver Y.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenation of phenol in aqueous phase was studied over a series of ZrO2-supported Pd catalysts in order to explore the effects of particle size and of Ag addition on the activity of Pd. Kinetic assessments were performed in a batch reactor, on monometallic Pd/ZrO2 samples with different Pd loadings (0.5%, 1% and 2%), as well as on a 1% PdAg/ZrO2 sample. The turnover frequency (TOF) increases with the Pd particle size. The reaction orders in phenol and H2 indicate that the surface coverages by phenol, H2 and their derived intermediates are higher on 0.5% Pd/ZrO2 than on other samples. The activation energy was the lowest on the least active sample (0.5% Pd/ZrO2), while being identical on 1% and 2% Pd/ZrO2 catalysts. Thus, the significantly lower activity of the small Pd particles (1-2 nm on average) in 0.5%Pd/ZrO2 is explained by the unfavorable activation entropies for the strongly bound species. The presence of Ag increases considerably the TOF of the reaction by decreasing the Ea and increasing the coverages of phenol and H2.

  16. Hydrogenation of cyclohexene with LaNi5−xAlxHn metal hydrides suspended in cyclohexane or ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogenation of cyclohexene on the metal hydride forming alloys LaNi4.8Al0.2, LaNi4.9Al0.1 and LaNi5, all suspended in cyclohexane and LaNi5 suspended in ethanol, has been investigated. Two sources for hydrogen are recognized: hydrogen supplied by the gas phase and hydrogen which is available

  17. Hydrogenation of cyclohexene with LaNi@#5@#-@#x@#Al@#x@#Hn metal hydrides, suspended in cyclohexane or ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogenation of cyclohexene on the metal hydride forming alloys LaNi4.8Al0.2, LaNi4.9Al0.1 and LaNi5, all suspended in cyclohexane and LaNi5 suspended in ethanol, has been investigated. Two sources for hydrogen are recognized: hydrogen supplied by the gas phase and hydrogen which is available

  18. Improved synthesis and hydrogen storage of a microporous metal-organic framework material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Shaojuan; Liu Shaobing; Zhao Qiang; Li Jinping

    2009-01-01

    A microporous metal-organic framework MOF-5 [Zn 4 O(BDC) 3 , BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic] was synthesized with and without H 2 O 2 by improved methods based on the previous studies. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption, and their hydrogen storage capacities were measured. The synthesis experiments showed that H 2 O 2 favored the growth of high quality sample, large pore volume and high specific surface area. The measurements of hydrogen storage indicated that the sample with higher specific surface area and large pore volume showed better hydrogen storage behavior than other samples. It was suggested that specific surface area and pore volume influenced the capacity of hydrogen storage for MOF-5 material.

  19. Inspection of the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield by cold neutron radiography at CMRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Huo, Heyong; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Yang; Yin, Wei; Sun, Yong; Liu, Bin; Tang, Bin [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2017-04-11

    The inspection of the process of gas pressure change is important for some applications (e.g. gas tank stockpile or two phase fluid model) which need quantitative and non-touchable measurement. Neutron radiography provides a suitable tool for such investigations with nice resolution. The quantitative cold neutron radiography (CNR) is developed at China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) to measure the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, even small change of the hydrogen pressure can be inspected by CNR. The dark background and scattering neutron effect are both corrected to promote measurement precision. The results show that CNR can measure the hydrogen gas pressure exactly and the pressure value average relative error between CNR and barometer is almost 1.9%.

  20. Gold Supported on Graphene Oxide: An Active and Selective Catalyst for Phenylacetylene Hydrogenations at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Huang, Xing; Teschner, Detre

    2014-01-01

    A constraint to industrial implementation of gold-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation is that the catalytic activity was always inferior to those of other noble metals. In this work, gold was supported on graphene oxide (Au/GO) and used in a hydrogenation application. A 99% selectivity toward styrene...

  1. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  2. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  3. Ortho-para-conversion of hydrogen in films of rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhavoronkova, K.N.; Peshkov, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated is specific catalytic activity of REE to clarify to what an extent the change of electron structure of the metals might influence their catalytic properties. Conducted is investigation of Sc, It, La and other lanthanides, except Eu amd Pm prepared in the form of metallic films, impowdered in vacuum of 10 -7 torr. It is established, that pape earth elements as catalysts of low-temperature ortho-para-conversion od hydrogen are divided into 2 groups, differing by mechanism of the reaction. Comparison of experimental results with the calculation results of absolute rates of paramagnetic conversion and also with investigation results of isotopjc exchange on these metals showed, that on the metals of group 1 conversjon proceeds according to chemical mechanism, and on the metals of group 2 - according to oscillating magnetic mechanism

  4. Ab initio study of hydrogen adsorption on benzenoid linkers in metal-organic framework materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yi; Zeng, X C

    2007-01-01

    We have computed the energies of adsorption of molecular hydrogen on a number of molecular linkers in metal-organic framework solid materials using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular orbital methods. We find that the hybrid B3LYP (Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr) DFT method gives a qualitatively incorrect prediction of the hydrogen binding with benzenoid molecular linkers. Both local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) DFT methods are inaccurate in predicting the values of hydrogen binding energies, but can give a qualitatively correct prediction of the hydrogen binding. When compared to the more accurate binding-energy results based on the ab initio Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) method, the LDA results may be viewed as an upper limit while the GGA results may be viewed as a lower limit. Since the MP2 calculation is impractical for realistic metal-organic framework systems, the combined LDA and GGA calculations provide a cost-effective way to assess the hydrogen binding capability of these systems

  5. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177) synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viditha, V.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Srilatha, K.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P. (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this paper we study about its synthesis and hydrogen storage capacities of MOF-177 at different pressures ranging from 25, 50, 75 and 100 bar respectively. The obtained samples are characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The recorded results show that the obtained hydrogen capacity is 1.1, 2.20, 2.4 and 2.80 wt%. The desorption capacity is 0.9, 2.1, 2.37 and 2.7 wt% at certain temperatures like 373 K.

  6. Theoretical examination of the trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.; Nordlander, P.; Besenbacher, F.; Norskov, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the defect trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals has been extended in two respects. A new transport formalism has been developed which takes account not only of the diffusion, trapping, and surface release of the hydrogen, which were included in earlier treatments, but also the diffusion, recombination, agglomeration, and surface annihilation of the vacancy and interstitial traps. In addition, effective-medium theory has been used to examine multiple hydrogen occupancy of the vacancy, and, for the fcc structure, appreciable binding enthalpies relative to the solution site have been found for occupancies of up to six. These extensions have been employed to model the depth distribution of ion-implanted hydrogen in Ni and Al during linear ramping of temperature, and the results have been used to interpret previously published data from these metals. The agreement between theory and experiment is good for both systems. In the case of Ni, the two experimentally observed hydrogen-release stages are both accounted for in terms of trapping at vacancies with a binding enthalpy that depends upon occupancy in accord with effective-medium theory

  7. On the Hydrogen Cyanide Removal from Air using Metal loaded Polyacrylonitrile Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozorgmehr Maddah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study highlights the potential application of electrospun polyacrylonitrile/metal salts (CrO3, CuCO3 nanofibrous filter media impregnated with TEDA (PAN-M-TEDA as an efficient adsorbent for hydrogen cyanide removal from air. The PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber before and after adsorption of hydrogen cyanide was characterized with Fourier transform infrared microscopy (FTIR. The concentration of hydrogen cyanide passes through the samples was determined by measuring the absorption of hydrogen cyanide in the solution containing indicator via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed that introducing metal salts to PAN nanofiber along with their impregnation with TEDA, significantly increases the adsorption capacity of nanofibrous filter media. The adsorption of hydrogen cyanide over PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber was also studied as a function of thickness, PAN concentration and TEDA concentration by response surface methodology (RSM based on central composite design. It is found that the highest adsorption capacity can be achieved at thickness 28.42 mm, PAN concentration 16.19 w/v % and TEDA concentration 14.80 w/v %.

  8. The behaviour of uranium metal in hydrogen atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Stevens, J.C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal leads to the formation of UO 2 due to traces of water vapour or oxygen. When extremely pure H 2 is used uranium hydride may be formed but, even with 99.9999% H 2 , uranium dioxide forms preferentially. The present work identifies the presence of UH 3 in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum of a uranium sample which has been exposed to ca. 10 10 L† H 2 at ca. 200 0 C. This spectrum indicates that the hydride possesses a high degree of covalency, since the oxidation state of uranium in UH 3 appears to be ca. 1.4. (author)

  9. Mechanistic studies related to the metal catalyzed reduction of carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons. Final report, April 1, 1977-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, C.P.

    1985-02-01

    Studies of compounds related to proposed intermediates in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts have been carried out. The synthesis, structure, and reactions of metal formyl compounds have been investigated. The synthesis and desproportionation reactions of hydroxymethyl metal compounds have been explored. Reactions involving interconversion of n 5 - and n'-C 5 H 5 organometallic compounds have been discovered. New synthetic routes to bimetallic compounds with bridging hydrocarbon ligands have been developed. The first bimetallic compound with a budging CH ligand has been prepared. The hydrocarbation reaction in which the CH bond of a bridging methylidyne complex adds across a carbon-carbon double bond has been discovered. New heterobimetallic compounds linked by a heterodifunctional ligand and heterobimetallic compounds with directly bonded early and late transition metals have been synthesized in a search for new CO hydrogenation catalysts. 36 refs

  10. Hydrogen storage properties of carbon nanomaterials and carbon containing metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehlen, Jan Petter

    2003-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is structural investigations of carbon containing materials in respect to their hydrogen storage properties. This work was initially triggered by reports of extremely high hydrogen storage capacities of specific carbon nanostructures. It was decided to try to verify and understand the mechanisms in play in case of the existence of such high hydrogen densities in carbon. Two different routes towards the goal were employed; by studying selected hydrides with carbon as one of its constituents (mainly employing powder diffraction techniques in combination with hydrogen absorption and desorption measurements) and by carefully conducting hydrogen sorption experiments on what was believed to be the most ''promising'' carbon nanomaterial sample. In the latter case, a lot of effort was attributed to characterisations of different carbon nanomaterial containing samples with the aid of electron microscopy. Three different carbon-containing metal hydride systems, Y2C-H, YCoC-H and Y5SiC0.2-H, were examined. A relation between hydrogen occupation and the local arrangement of metal and carbon atoms surrounding the hydrogen sites was established. Several characteristic features of the compounds were noted in addition to solving the structure of the former unknown deuterideY5Si3C0.2D2.0 by the use of direct methods. Several carbon-nanomaterial containing samples were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction, thus gaining knowledge concerning the structural aspects of nanomaterials. Based on these investigations, a specific sample containing a large amount of open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes was chosen for subsequent hydrogen storage experiments. The latter experiments revealed moderate hydrogen storage capacities of the nanotubes not exceeding the values obtained for more conventional forms of carbon. These two different routes in investigating the hydrogen storage properties of carbon and carbon containing alloys

  11. Hydrogen storage properties of carbon nanomaterials and carbon containing metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maehlen, Jan Petter

    2003-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is structural investigations of carbon containing materials in respect to their hydrogen storage properties. This work was initially triggered by reports of extremely high hydrogen storage capacities of specific carbon nanostructures. It was decided to try to verify and understand the mechanisms in play in case of the existence of such high hydrogen densities in carbon. Two different routes towards the goal were employed; by studying selected hydrides with carbon as one of its constituents (mainly employing powder diffraction techniques in combination with hydrogen absorption and desorption measurements) and by carefully conducting hydrogen sorption experiments on what was believed to be the most ''promising'' carbon nanomaterial sample. In the latter case, a lot of effort was attributed to characterisations of different carbon nanomaterial containing samples with the aid of electron microscopy. Three different carbon-containing metal hydride systems, Y2C-H, YCoC-H and Y5SiC0.2-H, were examined. A relation between hydrogen occupation and the local arrangement of metal and carbon atoms surrounding the hydrogen sites was established. Several characteristic features of the compounds were noted in addition to solving the structure of the former unknown deuterideY5Si3C0.2D2.0 by the use of direct methods. Several carbon-nanomaterial containing samples were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction, thus gaining knowledge concerning the structural aspects of nanomaterials. Based on these investigations, a specific sample containing a large amount of open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes was chosen for subsequent hydrogen storage experiments. The latter experiments revealed moderate hydrogen storage capacities of the nanotubes not exceeding the values obtained for more conventional forms of carbon. These two different routes in investigating the hydrogen storage properties of carbon and

  12. Bio-oil Stabilization by Hydrogenation over Reduced Metal Catalysts at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Lee, Suh-Jane; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-30

    Biomass fast pyrolysis integrated with bio-oil upgrading represents a very attractive approach for converting biomass to hydrocarbon transportation fuels. However, the thermal and chemical instability of bio-oils presents significant problems when they are being upgraded, and development of effective approaches for stabilizing bio-oils is critical to the success of the technology. Catalytic hydrogenation to remove reactive species in bio-oil has been considered as one of the most efficient ways to stabilize bio-oil. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of hydrogenation of actual bio-oils over a Ru/TiO2 catalyst under conditions relevant to practical bio-oil hydrotreating processes. Bio-oil feed stocks, bio-oils hydrogenated to different extents, and catalysts have been characterized to provide insights into the chemical and physical properties of these samples and to understand the correlation of the properties with the composition of the bio-oil and catalysts. The results indicated hydrogenation of various components of the bio-oil, including sugars, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids, over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst and 120 to 160oC. Hydrogenation of these species significantly changed the chemical and physical properties of the bio-oil and overall improved its thermal stability, especially by reducing the carbonyl content, which represented the content of the most reactive species (i.e., sugar, aldehydes, and ketones). The change of content of each component in response to increasing hydrogen additions suggests the following bio-oil hydrogenation reaction sequence: sugar conversion to sugar alcohols, followed by ketone and aldehyde conversion to alcohols, followed by alkene and aromatic hydrogenation, and then followed by carboxylic acid hydrogenation to alcohols. Hydrogenation of bio-oil samples with different sulfur contents or inorganic material contents suggested that sulfur poisoning of the reduced Ru metal catalysts was

  13. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börries, S., E-mail: stefan.boerries@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Metz, O.; Pranzas, P.K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Bücherl, T. [ZTWB Radiochemie München (RCM), Technische Universität München (TUM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Söllradl, S. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRMII), Technische Universität München (TUM), Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-10-11

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  14. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  15. Effect of Microstructure on Hydrogen Diffusion in Weld and API X52 Pipeline Steel Base Metals under Cathodic Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of microstructure on hydrogen permeation of weld and API X52 base metal under cathodic protection. The microstructures analyzed were of the API X52, as received, quenched, and annealed, and the welded zone. The test was performed in base metal (BM, quenched base metal (QBM, annealed base metal (ABM, and weld metal (WM. Hydrogen permeation flows were evaluated using electrochemical tests in a Devanathan cell. The potentiodynamic polarization curves were carried out to evaluate the corrosion resistance of each microstructure. All tests were carried out in synthetic soil solutions NS4 and NS4 + sodium thiosulfate at 25°C. The sodium thiosulfate was used to simulate sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB. Through polarization, assays established that the microstructure does not influence the corrosion resistance. The permeation tests showed that weld metal had lower hydrogen flow than base metal as received, quenched, and annealed.

  16. Metal organoclays with compacted structure for truly physical capture of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M. Nazir; Sennour, Radia; Arus, Vasilica Alisa; Sallam, Lamyaa M.; Roy, René; Azzouz, Abdelkrim

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionalization of thio-dendrons onto montmorillonite clay. • Incorporation and stabilization of PdNP in to the functionalized clays. • Role of −S:Pd and −O:Pd interactions in NP dispersion and stabilization. • Applications of PdNP incorporated modified clays for physical adsorption of H_2. - Abstract: Truly reversible capture of hydrogen was achieved at ambient conditions on Pd-loaded organo-montmorillonites obtained by photo-addition of different thiols on propargylated-TRIS cations already grafted on the clay surface. TEM insights showed that more than 90% of Pd"0 incorporated occur as 0.3–0.5 nm subnanoparticles (PdSNPs). XPS and NMR analyses revealed simultaneous strong S:Pd"0 and O:Pd"0 interactions that ”cement” the organic moiety around PdSNPs. The significant decrease in porosity suggests a compacted structure that impedes not only metal aggregation, but also hydrogen diffusion in the metal bulk. Thus, hydrogen appears to adsorb mainly via physical condensation around PdSNPs. These thiol-clay matrices showed hydrogen surface affinity factors of up to 0.51 mmol m"−"2 at ambient temperature and pressure. This is higher than those reported for much more sophisticated materials. DSC measurements showed very low desorption heat between 20 and 80 °C. Hydrogen release was achieved merely under vacuum or slight heating starting from 40 °C and was almost completed up to 85 °C. This provides a proof of concept of truly reversible capture of hydrogen for concentration and/or storage purposes. Such a performance has never been achieved at ambient temperature and pressure. These findings open new prospects to develop low-cost materials for reversible hydrogen storage without energy and safety constraints.

  17. Metal organoclays with compacted structure for truly physical capture of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M. Nazir; Sennour, Radia [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Arus, Vasilica Alisa [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Catalysis and Microporous Materials Laboratory, Vasile-Alecsandri University of Bacau, 600115 (Romania); Sallam, Lamyaa M. [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Roy, René, E-mail: roy.rene@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Azzouz, Abdelkrim, E-mail: azzouz.a@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Functionalization of thio-dendrons onto montmorillonite clay. • Incorporation and stabilization of PdNP in to the functionalized clays. • Role of −S:Pd and −O:Pd interactions in NP dispersion and stabilization. • Applications of PdNP incorporated modified clays for physical adsorption of H{sub 2}. - Abstract: Truly reversible capture of hydrogen was achieved at ambient conditions on Pd-loaded organo-montmorillonites obtained by photo-addition of different thiols on propargylated-TRIS cations already grafted on the clay surface. TEM insights showed that more than 90% of Pd{sup 0} incorporated occur as 0.3–0.5 nm subnanoparticles (PdSNPs). XPS and NMR analyses revealed simultaneous strong S:Pd{sup 0} and O:Pd{sup 0} interactions that ”cement” the organic moiety around PdSNPs. The significant decrease in porosity suggests a compacted structure that impedes not only metal aggregation, but also hydrogen diffusion in the metal bulk. Thus, hydrogen appears to adsorb mainly via physical condensation around PdSNPs. These thiol-clay matrices showed hydrogen surface affinity factors of up to 0.51 mmol m{sup −2} at ambient temperature and pressure. This is higher than those reported for much more sophisticated materials. DSC measurements showed very low desorption heat between 20 and 80 °C. Hydrogen release was achieved merely under vacuum or slight heating starting from 40 °C and was almost completed up to 85 °C. This provides a proof of concept of truly reversible capture of hydrogen for concentration and/or storage purposes. Such a performance has never been achieved at ambient temperature and pressure. These findings open new prospects to develop low-cost materials for reversible hydrogen storage without energy and safety constraints.

  18. Development of the work function approach to the underpotential deposition of metals. Application to the hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trasatti, S.

    1975-01-01

    A theory is developed for the underpotential deposition of metals. Concepts are then extended to oxygen and hydrogen adsorption. Analysis of results shows that, unlike oxygen adsorption, hydrogen adsorption in solution probably follows a different pattern with respect to the gas phase situation. The hydrogen evolution reaction is discussed in the light of the above findings and it is shown that usual concepts regarding the reactivity scale of metals towards hydrogen should be reconsidered taking into account solvent and entropy effects. The latters can account for the behaviour of sp-metals. The formers are important with transition metals. The final picture is consistent with the idea that M-H 2 O interactions are much stronger on transition than on sp-metals. (orig.) [de

  19. Metal oxide/hydrogen secondary battery; Kinzoku sankabutsu/suiso niji denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosobuchi, H.; Ema, M.

    1995-12-12

    Since the shape of powder produced by crushing the hydrogen storage alloy containing rare earth element varies widely, the density of the negative electrode made by packing the alloy powder is low. As a result, the secondary battery employing this negative electrode has a small discharge capacity. This invention solves the problem. Employing the hydrogen storage alloy containing rare earth element composed of particle shape of aspect ratio, A, of over 1.0 and below 3.0 gives rise to the negative electrode with high packing density, improving the discharge capacity of the metal oxide - hydrogen secondary battery. The more the shape of powder of hydrogen storage alloy containing rare earth element is near to sphere, the higher the packing density of negative electrode made of the hydrogen storage alloy containing rare earth element becomes. The preferable aspect ratio, A, of the powder is 1.0 {le} A {le} 2.0. Such alloy powder can be produced by mechanically grinding the rare-earth-element-containing hydrogen alloy ingot, or grinding by hydration, or grinding by atomizing followed by sieving. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  1. Unraveling the role of entropy in tuning unimolecular vs . bimolecular reaction rates: The case of olefin polymerization catalyzed by transition metals

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2018-04-24

    Olefin polymerization catalyzed by Group 4 transition metals is studied here as test case to reveal the entropy effects when bimolecular and unimolecular reactions are computed for processes occurring in solution. Catalytic systems characterized by different ligand frameworks, metal, and growing polymeric chain for which experimental data are available have been selected in order to validate the main approaches to entropy calculation. Applying the “standard” protocol results in a strong disagreement with the experimental results and the methods introducing a direct correction of the translational entropy term based on a single experimental parameter emerge as the most reliable. The general and powerful computational tool achieved in this study can represent a further step towards the “catalyst design” to control and predict the molecular mass of the resulting polymers.

  2. Cleavage of hydrogen by activation at a single non-metal centre - towards new hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Sławomir J

    2015-05-28

    Molecular surfaces of non-metal species are often characterized by both positive and negative regions of electrostatic potential (EP) at a non-metal centre. This centre may activate molecular hydrogen which further leads to the addition reaction. The positive EP regions at the non-metal centres correspond to σ-holes; the latter sites are enhanced by electronegative substituents. This is why the following simple moieties; PFH2, SFH, AsFH2, SeFH, BrF3, PF(CH3)2 and AsF(CH3)2, were chosen here to analyze the H2 activation and its subsequent splitting at the P, As, S, Se and Br centres. Also the reverse H-H bond reforming process is analyzed. MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed for systems corresponding to different stages of these processes. The sulphur centre in the SFH moiety is analyzed in detail since the potential barrier height for the addition reaction for this species is the lowest of the moieties analyzed here. The results of calculations show that the SFH + H2 → SFH3 reaction in the gas phase is endothermic but it is exothermic in polar solvents.

  3. Estudio cinético de la descomposición catalizada de peróxido de hidrógeno sobre carbón activado Kinetic study of the catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elihu Paternina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic study of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by activated carbon was carried out. The effect of concentrations of reactants and temperature were experimentally studied. Kinetic data were evaluated using differential method of initial rates of reaction. When a typical kinetic law for reactions in homogeneous phase is used, first order of reaction is obtained for hydrogen peroxide and activated carbon, and activation energy of 27 kJ mol-1 for the reaction was estimated. Experimentally was observed that surface of activated carbon is chemically modified during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, based on this result a scheme of reaction was proposed and evaluated. Experimental data fits very well to a Langmuir- Hinshelwood kinetic model and activation energy of 40 kJ mol-1 was estimated for reaction in heterogeneous phase.

  4. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Wolden, Colin A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo2C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo2C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft2 at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H2/N2 selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo2C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo2C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo2C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H2 flux of 238 SCFH/ft2 at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft2.psi. However, during testing of a Mo2C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft2.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with

  5. Study of a dense metal membrane reactor for hydrogen separation from hydroiodic acid decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosti, Silvano; Borelli, Rodolfo; Borgognoni, Fabio [ENEA, Dipartimento FPN, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Favuzza, Paolo; Tarquini, Pietro [ENEA, Dipartimento TER, C.R. ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Roma (Italy); Rizzello, Claudio [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Roma (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    A membrane reactor has been studied for separating the hydrogen produced by the dissociation of hydroiodic acid in the thermochemical-sulfur iodine process. A dense metal membrane tube of wall thickness 0.250 mm has been considered in this analysis for hosting a fixed-bed catalyst: the selective separation of hydrogen from an azeotropic H{sub 2}O-HI mixture has been studied in the temperature range of 700-800 K. The materials being considered for the construction of the membrane tube are niobium and tantalum; as a matter of fact, the most commonly used Pd-Ag membranes cannot withstand the corrosive environment generated by the hydroiodic acid. The Damkohler-Peclet analysis has been used for designing the membrane reactor, while a finite element method has simulated its behaviour: the effect of the temperature and pressure on the HI conversion and hydrogen yield has been evaluated. (author)

  6. Mechanical tunability via hydrogen bonding in metal-organic frameworks with the perovskite architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Thirumurugan, A; Barton, Phillip T; Lin, Zheshuai; Henke, Sebastian; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wharmby, Michael T; Bithell, Erica G; Howard, Christopher J; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-06-04

    Two analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the perovskite architecture, [C(NH2)3][Mn(HCOO)3] (1) and [(CH2)3NH2][Mn(HCOO)3] (2), exhibit significantly different mechanical properties. The marked difference is attributed to their distinct modes of hydrogen bonding between the A-site amine cation and the anionic framework. The stronger cross-linking hydrogen bonding in 1 gives rise to Young's moduli and hardnesses that are up to twice those in 2, while the thermal expansion is substantially smaller. This study presents clear evidence that the mechanical properties of MOF materials can be substantially tuned via hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  7. Acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lup, A. Ng K.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. W.; Aroua, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation is an oxygen removal process that occurs in the presence of hydrogen and catalysts. This study has shown the importance of acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts in having high hydrodeoxygenation activity and selectivity. These properties are required to ensure the catalyst has high affinity for C-O or C=O bonds and the capability for the adsorption and activation of H2 and O-containing compounds. A theoretical framework of temperature programmed desorption technique was also discussed for the quantitative understanding of these properties. By using NH3-TPD, the nature and abundance of acid sites of catalyst can be determined. By using H2-TPD, the nature and abundance of metallic sites can also be determined. The desorption activation energy could also be determined based on the Redhead analysis of TPD spectra with different heating rates.

  8. Hydrogen metal hydride storage with integrated catalytic recombiner for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinescu-Pasoi, L.; Behrens, U.; Langer, G.; Gramatte, W.; Rastogi, A.K.; Schmitt, R.E. (Battelle-Institut e.V., Frankfurt am Main (DE). Dept. of Energy Technology)

    1991-01-01

    A novel, thermodynamically efficient device is under development at Battelle in Frankfurt, by which the range of hydrogen-driven cars with a metal hydride tank might be roughly doubled. The device makes use of the properties of metal hydrides, combined with catalytic combustion. Its development is funded by the Hessian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Technology; it is to be completed by the end of 1990. High-temperature hydrides (HTH) have about three times the storage capacity of low temperature hydrides (LTH), but require relatively large amounts of heat at high temperatures to release the hydrogen. The exhaust heat from combustion-engine-driven vehicles is insufficient for this, and vehicles with electric (fuel cell) drive produce practically no exhaust heat at all. The Battelle-developed device is a combination of an HTH storage cell, an LTH storage cell and a catalyst. (author).

  9. Effect of preparation method of metal hydride electrode on efficiency of hydrogen electrosorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giza, Krystyna [Czestochowa University of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Production Engineering and Materials Technology; Drulis, Henryk [Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research PAS, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    The preparation of negative electrodes for nickel-metal hydride batteries using LaNi{sub 4.3}Co{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy is presented. The constant current discharge technique is employed to determine the discharge capacity, the exchange current density and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the studied electrodes. The electrochemical performance of metal hydride electrode is strongly affected by preparation conditions. The results are compared and the advantages and disadvantages of preparation methods of the electrodes are also discussed.

  10. Hydrogen-induced metallicity and strengthening of MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovkin, I.N., E-mail: yakov@iop.kiev.ua; Petrova, N.V.

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen inserted into MoS{sub 2} bilayers increases the interlayer interaction. • Adsorbed or intercalated H monolayer makes the surface metallic. • Fermi surface of the H/MoS{sub 2} shows a significant nesting. - Abstract: The performed DFT calculations for MoS{sub 2} layers with adsorbed and intercalated hydrogen indicate that the atomic hydrogen monolayer makes the surface metallic. The physisorbed H{sub 2} does not affect electronic properties of the MoS{sub 2} monolayer, which remains a direct gap semiconductor. Due to forming S–H–S bonds, hydrogen atoms, intercalated into the space between MoS{sub 2} layers, increase the interlayer interaction from 0.12 eV to 0.60 eV. The related increase of the stiffness of the Mo–H–Mo layered system is of a primary importance for the interpretation of images of the surface obtained with the Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (Kolosov and Yamanaka, 1993) [42].

  11. Hydrogen adsorption on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E.; Chahine, R.; Benard, P.; Lafi, L.; Dorval-Douville, G.; Chandonia, P.-A. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: Lyubov.Lafi@uqtr.ca

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' In recent years, several novel carbon-based microporous materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been proposed as promising adsorbents for hydrogen. Hydrogen adsorption measurements on Al-, Cr- and Zn-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are presented. The measurements were performed at temperatures ranging from 77 to 300K and pressures up to 50 atm using a volumetric approach. The maximum excess adsorption at 77K ranges from 2,8 to 3,9 wt % for the MOFs and from 1,5 to 2,5 wt % for the SWNTs. These values are reached at pressures below 40 atm. At room temperature and 40 atm, modest amounts of hydrogen are adsorbed (< 0,4 wt %). A Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) approach is used to investigate the measured adsorption isotherms and retrieve energetic and structural parameters. The adsorption enthalpy averaged over filling is found to be about 2,9 kJ/mol for the MOF-5 and about 3,6 - 4,2 kJ/mol for SWNTs. The uptake of hydrogen on SWNTs and MOF-5 appears to be due to physisorption and can be described, through the DA-model, by a traditional theory of micropore filling. (author)

  12. Method and apparatus for hydrogen production from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method, apparatuses and chemical compositions are provided for producing high purity hydrogen from water. Metals or alloys capable of reacting with water and producing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions are reacted with one or more inorganic hydrides capable of releasing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions, one or more transition metal compounds are used to catalyze the reaction and, optionally, one or more alkali metal-based compounds. The metal or alloy is preferably aluminum. The inorganic hydride is from a family of complex inorganic hydrides; most preferably, NaBH.sub.4. The transition metal catalyst is from the groups VIII and IB; preferably, Cu and Fe. The alkali metal-based compounds are preferably NaOH, KOH, and the like. Hydrogen generated has a purity of at least 99.99 vol. % (dry basis), and is used without further purification in all types of fuel cells, including the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell.

  13. Enhancing Charge Carrier Lifetime in Metal Oxide Photoelectrodes through Mild Hydrogen Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Ji-Wook

    2017-08-25

    Widespread application of solar water splitting for energy conversion is largely dependent on the progress in developing not only efficient but also cheap and scalable photoelectrodes. Metal oxides, which can be deposited with scalable techniques and are relatively cheap, are particularly interesting, but high efficiency is still hindered by the poor carrier transport properties (i.e., carrier mobility and lifetime). Here, a mild hydrogen treatment is introduced to bismuth vanadate (BiVO4), which is one of the most promising metal oxide photoelectrodes, as a method to overcome the carrier transport limitations. Time-resolved microwave and terahertz conductivity measurements reveal more than twofold enhancement of the carrier lifetime for the hydrogen-treated BiVO4, without significantly affecting the carrier mobility. This is in contrast to the case of tungsten-doped BiVO4, although hydrogen is also a donor type dopant in BiVO4. The enhancement in carrier lifetime is found to be caused by significant reduction of trap-assisted recombination, either via passivation or reduction of deep trap states related to vanadium antisite on bismuth or vanadium interstitials according to density functional theory calculations. Overall, these findings provide further insights on the interplay between defect modulation and carrier transport in metal oxides, which benefit the development of low-cost, highly-efficient solar energy conversion devices.

  14. Teaching - methodical and research center of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in the former Soviet Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, A.A; Sigov, A.S; Shinkarenko, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Teaching - Methodical and Research Center (TMRC) 'Sokolinaja Gora' is founded in order to provide methodical-information and scientific support of institutes of higher education in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia and in the countries of the Former Soviet union. It is independent association of creative communities of scientist of higher educational specialists. The main directions of the Center activity are: 1. Teaching-methodological support and development of teaching in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia in the countries of the Former Soviet Union. Themes of teaching includes the basic of safe using of hydrogen technologies and devices, ecological, economic and law aspects of new hydrogen power engineering, transition to which in 21 century is one of the central problems of mankind survival; 2. Organizing of joint researches by independent creative communities of scientists in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metal; 3. Independent scientific examination, which is made by Advisory Committee of High Technologies consisting of representatives of the countries of Former Soviet Union, which are standing participants of an Annual International Symposia 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals in the Former Soviet Union Countries'. Structure of the Center: 1. Center of strategic development in the field of high technologies; 2. Scientific Research Institute of Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals; 3. Teaching-Methodical Association in specialization 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and economics' and hydrogen wide spread training; 4. Media Center 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals', 5. Organizational Center; 6. Administrative Center. The Center will be established step-by-step in 2005-2010 on the basis of the following programs: Teaching-methodological program. On the basis of this program it is planned to

  15. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  16. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  17. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  18. Phosphate-Catalyzed Hydrogen Peroxide Formation from Agar, Gellan, and κ-Carrageenan and Recovery of Microbial Cultivability via Catalase and Pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kosei; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2017-11-01

    Previously, we reported that when agar is autoclaved with phosphate buffer, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is formed in the resulting medium (PT medium), and the colony count on the medium inoculated with environmental samples becomes much lower than that on a medium in which agar and phosphate are autoclaved separately (PS medium) (T. Tanaka et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:7659-7666, 2014, https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02741-14). However, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying this observation remain largely unknown. Here, we determined the factors affecting H 2 O 2 formation in agar. The H 2 O 2 formation was pH dependent: H 2 O 2 was formed at high concentrations in an alkaline or neutral phosphate buffer but not in an acidic buffer. Ammonium ions enhanced H 2 O 2 formation, implying the involvement of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by phosphate. We found that other gelling agents (e.g., gellan and κ-carrageenan) also produced H 2 O 2 after being autoclaved with phosphate. We then examined the cultivability of microorganisms from a fresh-water sample to test whether catalase and pyruvate, known as H 2 O 2 scavengers, are effective in yielding high colony counts. The colony count on PT medium was only 5.7% of that on PS medium. Catalase treatment effectively restored the colony count of PT medium (to 106% of that on PS medium). In contrast, pyruvate was not as effective as catalase: the colony count on sodium pyruvate-supplemented PT medium was 58% of that on PS medium. Given that both catalase and pyruvate can remove H 2 O 2 from PT medium, these observations indicate that although H 2 O 2 is the main cause of reduced colony count on PT medium, other unknown growth-inhibiting substances that cannot be removed by pyruvate (but can be by catalase) may also be involved. IMPORTANCE The majority of bacteria in natural environments are recalcitrant to laboratory culture techniques. Previously, we demonstrated that one reason for this is the formation of high H 2 O

  19. High performance hydrogen storage from Be-BTB metal-organic framework at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wei-Xian; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Cox, Barry J; Hill, James M; Hill, Matthew R

    2013-07-09

    The metal-organic framework beryllium benzene tribenzoate (Be-BTB) has recently been reported to have one of the highest gravimetric hydrogen uptakes at room temperature. Storage at room temperature is one of the key requirements for the practical viability of hydrogen-powered vehicles. Be-BTB has an exceptional 298 K storage capacity of 2.3 wt % hydrogen. This result is surprising given that the low adsorption enthalpy of 5.5 kJ mol(-1). In this work, a combination of atomistic simulation and continuum modeling reveals that the beryllium rings contribute strongly to the hydrogen interaction with the framework. These simulations are extended with a thermodynamic energy optimization (TEO) model to compare the performance of Be-BTB to a compressed H2 tank and benchmark materials MOF-5 and MOF-177 in a MOF-based fuel cell. Our investigation shows that none of the MOF-filled tanks satisfy the United States Department of Energy (DOE) storage targets within the required operating temperatures and pressures. However, the Be-BTB tank delivers the most energy per volume and mass compared to the other material-based storage tanks. The pore size and the framework mass are shown to be contributing factors responsible for the superior room temperature hydrogen adsorption of Be-BTB.

  20. Electronic Structure Calculations of Hydrogen Storage in Lithium-Decorated Metal-Graphyne Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dhilip Kumar, Thogluva Janardhanan

    2017-08-30

    Porous metal-graphyne framework (MGF) made up of graphyne linker decorated with lithium has been investigated for hydrogen storage. Applying density functional theory spin-polarized generalized gradient approximation with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional containing Grimme's diffusion parameter with double numeric polarization basis set, the structural stability, and physicochemical properties have been analyzed. Each linker binds two Li atoms over the surface of the graphyne linker forming MGF-Li 8 by Dewar coordination. On saturation with hydrogen, each Li atom physisorbs three H 2 molecules resulting in MGF-Li 8 -H 24 . H 2 and Li interact by charge polarization mechanism leading to elongation in average H-H bond length indicating physisorption. Sorption energy decreases gradually from ≈0.4 to 0.20 eV on H 2 loading. Molecular dynamics simulations and computed sorption energy range indicate the high reversibility of H 2 in the MGF-Li 8 framework with the hydrogen storage capacity of 6.4 wt %. The calculated thermodynamic practical hydrogen storage at room temperature makes the Li-decorated MGF system a promising hydrogen storage material.

  1. Metal Hydride Nanoparticles with Ultrahigh Structural Stability and Hydrogen Storage Activity Derived from Microencapsulated Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Zhu, Yunfeng; Lin, Huaijun; Liu, Yana; Zhang, Yao; Li, Shenyang; Ma, Zhongliang; Li, Liquan

    2017-06-01

    Metal hydrides (MHs) have recently been designed for hydrogen sensors, switchable mirrors, rechargeable batteries, and other energy-storage and conversion-related applications. The demands of MHs, particular fast hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics, have brought their sizes to nanoscale. However, the nanostructured MHs generally suffer from surface passivation and low aggregation-resisting structural stability upon absorption/desorption. This study reports a novel strategy named microencapsulated nanoconfinement to realize local synthesis of nano-MHs, which possess ultrahigh structural stability and superior desorption kinetics. Monodispersed Mg 2 NiH 4 single crystal nanoparticles (NPs) are in situ encapsulated on the surface of graphene sheets (GS) through facile gas-solid reactions. This well-defined MgO coating layer with a thickness of ≈3 nm efficiently separates the NPs from each other to prevent aggregation during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles, leading to excellent thermal and mechanical stability. More interestingly, the MgO layer shows superior gas-selective permeability to prevent further oxidation of Mg 2 NiH 4 meanwhile accessible for hydrogen absorption/desorption. As a result, an extremely low activation energy (31.2 kJ mol -1 ) for the dehydrogenation reaction is achieved. This study provides alternative insights into designing nanosized MHs with both excellent hydrogen storage activity and thermal/mechanical stability exempting surface modification by agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Leaching of metals from large pieces of printed circuit boards using citric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Umesh; Su, C; Hocheng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the leaching of metals from large pieces of computer printed circuit boards (CPCBs) was studied. A combination of citric acid (0.5 M) and 1.76 M hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) was used to leach the metals from CPCB piece. The influence of system variables such as H 2 O 2 concentration, concentration of citric acid, shaking speed, and temperature on the metal leaching process was investigated. The complete metal leaching was achieved in 4 h from a 4 × 4 cm CPCB piece. The presence of citric acid and H 2 O 2 together in the leaching solution is essential for complete metal leaching. The optimum addition amount of H 2 O 2 was 5.83 %. The citric acid concentration and shaking speed had an insignificant effect on the leaching of metals. The increase in the temperature above 30 °C showed a drastic effect on metal leaching process.

  3. Graphene–Noble Metal Nano-Composites and Applications for Hydrogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukumar Basu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graphene based nano-composites are relatively new materials with excellent mechanical, electrical, electronic and chemical properties for applications in the fields of electrical and electronic devices, mechanical appliances and chemical gadgets. For all these applications, the structural features associated with chemical bonding that involve other components at the interface need in-depth investigation. Metals, polymers, inorganic fibers and other components improve the properties of graphene when they form a kind of composite structure in the nano-dimensions. Intensive investigations have been carried out globally in this area of research and development. In this article, some salient features of graphene–noble metal interactions and composite formation which improve hydrogen gas sensing properties—like higher and fast response, quick recovery, cross sensitivity, repeatability and long term stability of the sensor devices—are presented. Mostly noble metals are effective for enhancing the sensing performance of the graphene–metal hybrid sensors, due to their superior catalytic activities. The experimental evidence for atomic bonding between metal nano-structures and graphene has been reported in the literature and it is theoretically verified by density functional theory (DFT. Multilayer graphene influences gas sensing performance via intercalation of metal and non-metal atoms through atomic bonding.

  4. Novel Dry-Type Glucose Sensor Based on a Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor Structure with Horseradish Peroxidase + Glucose Oxidase Catalyzing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Jenn; Wu, You-Lin; Hsu, Po-Yen

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we present a novel dry-type glucose sensor based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSC) structure using SiO2 as a gate dielectric in conjunction with a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) + glucose oxidase (GOD) catalyzing layer. The tested glucose solution was dropped directly onto the window opened on the SiO2 layer, with a coating of HRP + GOD catalyzing layer on top of the gate dielectric. From the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of the sensor, we found that the glucose solution can induce an inversion layer on the silicon surface causing a gate leakage current flowing along the SiO2 surface. The gate current changes Δ I before and after the drop of glucose solution exhibits a near-linear relationship with increasing glucose concentration. The Δ I sensitivity is about 1.76 nA cm-2 M-1, and the current is quite stable 20 min after the drop of the glucose solution is tested.

  5. A manganese sulfite with extended metal-oxygen-metal bonds exhibiting hydrogen uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K. Prabhakara; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    A manganese sulfite of the formula Mn 5 (OH) 4 (SO 3 ) 3 .2H 2 O, I{a=7.5759(7) A, b=8.4749(8) A, c=10.852(1) A, β=100.732(2) o , Z=2, space group=P2 1 /m (no. 11), R 1 =0.0399 and wR 2 =0.1121 [for R indexes I>2σ(I)]}, comprising Mn 3 O 14 units and extended Mn-O-Mn bonds along the three dimensions has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. It has narrow channels along the b-axis and exhibits hydrogen storage of 2.1 wt% at 300 K and 134 bar. - Graphical abstract: A three-dimensional manganese sulfite with one-dimensional channels showing selective hydrogen absorption has been synthesized and characterized

  6. Tethering metal ions to photocatalyst particulate surfaces by bifunctional molecular linkers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2014-08-19

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of photocatalyst particulates modified with effective cocatalysts is presented; the method involves the sequential soaking of photocatalyst particulates in solutions containing bifunctional organic linkers and metal ions. The modification of the particulate surfaces is a universal and reproducible method because the molecular linkers utilize strong covalent bonds, which in turn result in modified monolayer with a small but controlled quantity of metals. The photocatalysis results indicated that the CdS with likely photochemically reduced Pd and Ni, which were initially immobilized via ethanedithiol (EDT) as a linker, were highly efficient for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from Na2S-Na2SO3-containing aqueous solutions. The method developed in this study opens a new synthesis route for the preparation of effective photocatalysts with various combinations of bifunctional linkers, metals, and photocatalyst particulate materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tethering metal ions to photocatalyst particulate surfaces by bifunctional molecular linkers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili; Isimjan, Tayirjan T.; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Anjum, Dalaver Hussain; Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Cavallo, Luigi; Garcia Esparza, Angel T.; Domen, Kazunari; Xu, Wei; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of photocatalyst particulates modified with effective cocatalysts is presented; the method involves the sequential soaking of photocatalyst particulates in solutions containing bifunctional organic linkers and metal ions. The modification of the particulate surfaces is a universal and reproducible method because the molecular linkers utilize strong covalent bonds, which in turn result in modified monolayer with a small but controlled quantity of metals. The photocatalysis results indicated that the CdS with likely photochemically reduced Pd and Ni, which were initially immobilized via ethanedithiol (EDT) as a linker, were highly efficient for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from Na2S-Na2SO3-containing aqueous solutions. The method developed in this study opens a new synthesis route for the preparation of effective photocatalysts with various combinations of bifunctional linkers, metals, and photocatalyst particulate materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. New template for metal decoration and hydrogen adsorption on graphene-like C3N4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Sun Hong; Chen Changfeng

    2009-01-01

    From density functional theory calculations we identify a graphene-like C 3 N 4 (g-C 3 N 4 ) as an excellent template for stable and well dispersed decoration of alkali (Li) and 3d transition metal (TM) atoms. The porous sites of g-C 3 N 4 accommodate excessive N lone-pair electrons and promote hybridization between the orbitals of N and the metal atoms. The most stable TM decorations (Ti and Sc) on g-C 3 N 4 exhibit high capacities of hydrogen adsorption with binding energies suitable for mobile applications. These metal decorated g-C 3 N 4 may also prove useful in catalytic and sensing applications for their unique nanoscale structural features unavailable in conventional nano-clusters.

  9. Study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere with XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1998-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 25 degree C and 200 degree C and effects of temperature and carbon monoxide to the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapor. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing exposure to H 2 in the initial stages. The U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 has been found to be 378.6 eV. Investigation indicates carbon monoxide inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmosphere

  10. Understanding hydrogen sorption in a metal-organic framework with open-metal sites and amide functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony T.

    2013-05-09

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) studies of the mechanism of hydrogen sorption in an rht-MOF known as Cu-TPBTM are presented. The MOF is a decorated/substituted isostructural analogue to the unembellished rht-MOF, PCN-61, that was studied previously [ Forrest, K. A.J. Phys. Chem. C 2012, 116, 15538-15549. ]. The simulations were performed using three different hydrogen potentials of increasing complexity. Simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values were in excellent agreement with the reported experimental data for only a polarizable model in one of four experimentally observed crystal structure configurations. The study demonstrates the ability of modeling to distinguish the differential sorption of distinct strucures; one configuration is found to be dominant due to favorable interactions with substrates. In addition, it was discovered that the presence of polar amide groups had a significant effect on the electrostatics of the Cu2+ ions and directs the low-pressure physisorption of hydrogen in the MOF. This is in contrast to what was observed in PCN-61, where an exterior copper ion had a higher relative charge and was the favored loading site. This tunability of the electrostatics of the copper ions via chemical substitution on the MOF framework can be explained by the presence of the negatively charged oxygen atom of the amide group that causes the interior Cu2+ ion to exhibit a higher positive charge through an inductive effect. Further, control simulations, taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by theoretical modeling, include artificially modified charges for both Cu2+ ions chosen equal to or with a higher charge on the exterior Cu2+ ion. This choice resulted in distinctly different hydrogen sorption characteristics in Cu-TPBTM with no direct sorption on the open-metal sites. Thus, this study demonstrates both the tunable nature of MOF platforms and the possibility for rational design of sorption

  11. Aerobic Asymmetric Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling between Two C(sp3)-H Groups Catalyzed by a Chiral-at-Metal Rhodium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuqi; Yuan, Wei; Gong, Lei; Meggers, Eric

    2015-10-26

    A sustainable C-C bond formation is merged with the catalytic asymmetric generation of one or two stereocenters. The introduced catalytic asymmetric cross-coupling of two C(sp3)-H groups with molecular oxygen as the oxidant profits from the oxidative robustness of a chiral-at-metal rhodium(III) catalyst and exploits an autoxidation mechanism or visible-light photosensitized oxidation. In the latter case, the catalyst serves a dual function, namely as a chiral Lewis acid for catalyzing enantioselective enolate chemistry and at the same time as a visible-light-driven photoredox catalyst. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Develop improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, K.

    1998-12-04

    The overall objective was to develop commercially viable metal hydrides capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen for use with PEM fuel cells and hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (HICE) applications. Such alloys are expected to result in system capacities of greater than 2 wt.%, making metal hydride storage systems (MHSS`s) a practical means of supplying hydrogen for many consumer applications. ECD`s (Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.) past work on sputtered thin films of transition metal-based alloys led to the commercialization of it`s nickel/metal hydride batteries, and similar work on thin film Mg-based alloys demonstrated potential to achieve very high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities approaching 2,500 Wh/Kg and 2,500 Wh/M{sup 3} respectively. Under this 2-year cost shared project with the DOE, the authors have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of scaling up the Mg-based hydrides from thin film to bulk production without substantial loss of storage capacity. ECD made progress in alloy development by means of compositional and process modification. Processes used include Mechanical Alloying, Melt spinning and novel Gas Phase Condensation. It was showed that the same composition when prepared by melt-spinning resulted in a more homogeneous material having a higher PCT plateau pressure as compared to mechanical alloying. It was also shown that mechanically alloyed Mg-Al-Zn results in much higher plateau pressures, which is an important step towards reducing the desorption temperature. While significant progress has been made during the past two years in alloy development and understanding the relationship between composition, structure, morphology, and processing parameters, additional R and D needs to be performed to achieve the goals of this work.

  13. The role of atomic hydrogen in regulating the scatter of the mass-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Toby; Cortese, Luca; Catinella, Barbara; Kilborn, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we stack neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) spectra for 9720 star-forming galaxies along the mass-metallicity relation. The sample is selected according to stellar mass (109 ≤ M⋆/M⊙ ≤ 1011) and redshift (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.05) from the overlap of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. We confirm and quantify the strong anticorrelation between H I mass and gas-phase metallicity at fixed stellar mass. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the relationship between gas content and metallicity is consistent between different metallicity estimators, contrary to the weaker trends found with star formation which are known to depend on the observational techniques used to derive oxygen abundances and star formation rates. When interpreted in the context of theoretical work, this result supports a scenario where galaxies exist in an evolving equilibrium between gas, metallicity and star formation. The fact that deviations from this equilibrium are most strongly correlated with gas mass suggests that the scatter in the mass-metallicity relation is primarily driven by fluctuations in gas accretion.

  14. On physics of the hydrogen plasticization and embrittlement of metallic materials, relevance to the safety and standards' problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yury S Nechaev; Georgy A Filippov; T Nejat Veziroglu

    2006-01-01

    In the present contribution, some related fundamental problems of revealing micro mechanisms of hydrogen plasticization, superplasticity, embrittlement, cracking, blistering and delayed fracture of some technologically important industrial metallic materials are formulated. The ways are considered of these problems' solution and optimizing the technological processes and materials, particularly in the hydrogen and gas-petroleum industries, some aircraft, aerospace and automobile systems. The results are related to the safety and standardization problems of metallic materials, and to the problem of their compatibility with hydrogen. (authors)

  15. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II. A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Before a solar model becomes viable in astrophysics, one mus t consider how the ele- mental constitution of the Sun was ascertained, especially relative to its principle com- ponents: hydrogen and helium. Liquid metallic hydrogen has been proposed as a solar structural material for models based on condensed matter (e .g. Robitaille P.-M. Liq- uid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys. , 2011, v. 3, 60–74. There can be little doubt that hydrogen plays a d ominant role in the uni- verse and in the stars; the massive abundance of hydrogen in t he Sun was established long ago. Today, it can be demonstrated that the near isointe nse nature of the Sun’s Balmer lines provides strong confirmatory evidence for a dis tinct solar surface. The situation relative to helium remains less conclusive. Stil l, helium occupies a prominent role in astronomy, both as an element associated with cosmol ogy and as a byproduct of nuclear energy generation, though its abundances within the Sun cannot be reliably estimated using theoretical approaches. With respect to th e determination of helium lev- els, the element remains spectroscopically silent at the le vel of the photosphere. While helium can be monitored with ease in the chromosphere and the prominences of the corona using spectroscopic methods, these measures are hig hly variable and responsive to elevated solar activity and nuclear fragmentation. Dire ct assays of the solar winds are currently viewed as incapable of providing definitive in formation regarding solar helium abundances. As a result, insight relative to helium r emains strictly based on the- oretical estimates which couple helioseismological appro aches to metrics derived from solar models. Despite their “state of the art” nature, heliu m estimates based on solar models and helioseismology are suspect on several fronts, i ncluding their reliance on solar opacities. The best knowledge can only come from the so

  16. Hydrogenation of benzaldehyde via electrocatalysis and thermal catalysis on carbon-supported metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yang; Sanyal, Udishnu; Pangotra, Dhananjai; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Gutierrez-Tinoco, Oliver Y.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2018-03-01

    Abstract Selective reduction of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol on C-supported Pt, Rh, Pd, and Ni in aqueous phase was conducted using either directly H2 (thermal catalytic hydrogenation, TCH) or in situ electrocatalytically generated hydrogen (electrocatalytic hydrogenation, ECH). In TCH, the intrinsic activity of the metals at room temperature and 1 bar H2 increased in the sequence Rh/C < Pt/C < Pd/C, while Ni/C is inactive at these conditions due to surface oxidation in the absence of cathodic potential. The reaction follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the second hydrogen addition to the adsorbed hydrocarbon being the rate-determining step. All tested metals were active in ECH of benzaldehyde, although hydrogenation competes with the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The minimum cathodic potentials to obtain appreciable ECH rates were identical to the onset potentials of HER. Above this onset, the relative rates of H reacting to H2 and H addition to the hydrocarbon determines the selectivity to ECH and TCH. Accordingly, the selectivity of the metals towards ECH increases in the order Ni/C < Pt/C < Rh/C < Pd/C. Pd/C shows exceptionally high ECH selectivity due to its surprisingly low HER reactivity under the reaction conditions. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the groups of Hubert A. Gasteiger at the Technische Universität München of Jorge Gascon at the Delft University of Technology for advice and valuable discussions. The authors are grateful to Nirala Singh, Erika Ember, Gary Haller, and Philipp Rheinländer for fruitful discussions. We are also grateful to Marianne Hanzlik for TEM measurements and to Xaver Hecht and Martin Neukamm for technical support. Y.S. would like to thank the Chinese Scholarship Council for the financial support. The research described in this paper is part of the Chemical Transformation Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), conducted under the Laboratory Directed Research and

  17. Study on Doppler coefficient for metallic fuel fast reactor added hydrogeneous moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuhumi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Osugi, Toshitaka; Okajima, Shigeaki; Andoh, Masaki; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Mukaiyama, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    A series of mock-up experiments for moderator added metallic fast reactor core was carried out at FCA to obtain the experimental verification for improvement of reactivity coefficients. Softened neutron spectrum increases Doppler effect by a factor of 2, and flatter adjoint neutron spectrum decreases Na void effect by a factor of 0.6 when hydrogen to heavy metal atomic number ratio is increased from 0.02 to 0.13. The experimental results are analyzed with SLALOM and CITATION-FBR, which is the standard design code system for a fast reactor at JAERI, and SRAC95 and CITATION-FBR. The present code system gives generally good agreement with the experimental results, especially by the use of the latter, the dependence of the Doppler effect to the hydrogen to fuel element atomic number density ratio is disappeared. Therefore, it looks possible to use the present code system for the conceptual design of a fast reactor system with hydrogeneous materials. (author)

  18. Enhanced Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage Performance on the Porous Graphene Network Immobilizing Cobalt Metal Nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myunggoo; Lee, Dong Heon; Jung, Hyun [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we attempted to apply Co metal nanoparticles decorated on the surface of the porous graphene (Co-PG) as the electrochemical hydrogen storage system. Co-PG was successfully synthesized by the soft-template method. To determine the synthetic strategy of porous graphene and Co nanoparticles, we compare the obtained Co-PG with two different materials such as Co nanoparticle decorated reduced graphene oxide without soft-template (Co-RGO) and porous graphene without Co nanoparticle (PG). The experimental details regarding the synthesis and characterization of the Co-PG, Co-RGO, and PG samples are provided in Supporting Information. Co-PG with interpenetrating porous networks and immobilized Co metal nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the soft-template method. The obtained Co-PG exhibited high-surface area with ink-bottle open pores owing to the homogeneous dispersion of P123 micellar rods. The XRD and FE-SEM analyses clearly confirm that Co nanoparticles were immobilized on to the surface of porous graphene without any significant aggregation. The as-obtained Co-PG showed good electrochemical performance such as capacity and cycle stability for hydrogen storage. Based on these results, we believe that the Co-PG with a high-specific surface area could be worthwhile to investigate as not only electrochemical hydrogen storage materials but also other energy storage applications.

  19. Enhanced Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage Performance on the Porous Graphene Network Immobilizing Cobalt Metal Nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myunggoo; Lee, Dong Heon; Jung, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to apply Co metal nanoparticles decorated on the surface of the porous graphene (Co-PG) as the electrochemical hydrogen storage system. Co-PG was successfully synthesized by the soft-template method. To determine the synthetic strategy of porous graphene and Co nanoparticles, we compare the obtained Co-PG with two different materials such as Co nanoparticle decorated reduced graphene oxide without soft-template (Co-RGO) and porous graphene without Co nanoparticle (PG). The experimental details regarding the synthesis and characterization of the Co-PG, Co-RGO, and PG samples are provided in Supporting Information. Co-PG with interpenetrating porous networks and immobilized Co metal nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by the soft-template method. The obtained Co-PG exhibited high-surface area with ink-bottle open pores owing to the homogeneous dispersion of P123 micellar rods. The XRD and FE-SEM analyses clearly confirm that Co nanoparticles were immobilized on to the surface of porous graphene without any significant aggregation. The as-obtained Co-PG showed good electrochemical performance such as capacity and cycle stability for hydrogen storage. Based on these results, we believe that the Co-PG with a high-specific surface area could be worthwhile to investigate as not only electrochemical hydrogen storage materials but also other energy storage applications

  20. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  1. Ultrahigh figure-of-merit for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride using ternary metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lunghao; Ceccato, R.; Raj, R.

    We report further increase in the figure-of-merit (FOM) for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4 than reported in an earlier paper [1], where a sub-nanometer layer of metal catalysts are deposited on carbon nanotube paper (CNT paper) that has been functionalized with polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic film. Ternary, Ru-Pd-Pt, instead of the binary Pd-Pt catalyst used earlier, together with a thinner CNT paper is shown to increase the figure-of-merit by up to a factor of six, putting is above any other known catalyst for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4. The catalysts are prepared by first impregnating the functionalized CNT-paper with solutions of the metal salts, followed by reduction in a sodium borohydride solution. The reaction mechanism and the catalyst efficiency are described in terms of an electric charge transfer, whereby the negative charge on the BH 4 - ion is exchanged with hydrogen via the electronically conducting SiCN/CNT substrate [1].

  2. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H 2 O, MgO, and SiO 2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures

  3. Catalytic Activities of Noble Metal Phosphides for Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Kanda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a highly active noble metal phosphide (NMXPY-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS catalyst with a high hydrogenating ability for heavy oils was studied. NMXPY catalysts were obtained by reduction of P-added noble metals (NM-P, NM: Rh, Pd, Ru supported on SiO2. The order of activities for the hydrogenation of biphenyl was Rh-P > NiMoS > Pd-P > Ru-P. This order was almost the same as that of the catalytic activities for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. In the HDS of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT, the HDS activity of the Rh-P catalyst increased with increasing reaction temperature, but the maximum HDS activity for the NiMoS catalyst was observed at 270 °C. The Rh-P catalyst yielded fully hydrogenated products with high selectivity compared with the NiMoS catalyst. Furthermore, XRD analysis of the spent Rh-P catalysts revealed that the Rh2P phase possessed high sulfur tolerance and resistance to sintering.

  4. Continuous metal scavenging and coupling to one-pot copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction in flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vural - Gursel, Dr. Iris; Aldiansyah, Ferry; Wang, Qi; Noël, Timothy; Hessel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Increasing usage of catalytic chemistry calls for efficient removal of metal traces. This paper describes the development and optimization of a scavenger-based extraction in flow to remove metal catalysts. It enables liquid-liquid extraction with slug flow and phase separation with a porous

  5. Hydrogen-absorbing alloys for the nickel-metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingming Geng; Jianwen Han; Feng Feng [University of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Mechanical and Materials Engineering; Northwood, D.O. [University of Windsor, Ontario (Canada). Mechanical and Materials Engineering]|[Ryerson Polytechnic University, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    In recent years, owing to the rapid development of portable electronic and electrical appliances, the market for rechargeable batteries has increased at a high rate. The nickel-metal hydride battery (Ni/MH) is one of the more promising types, because of its high capacity, high-rate charge/discharge capability and non-polluting nature. This type of battery uses a hydrogen storage alloy as its negative electrode. The characteristics of the Ni/MH battery, including discharge voltage, high-rate discharge capability and charge/discharge cycle lifetime are mainly determined by the construction of the negative electrode and the composition of the hydrogen-absorbing alloy. The negative electrode of the Ni/MH battery described in this paper was made from a mixture of hydrogen-absorbing alloy, nickel powder and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). A multicomponent MmNi{sub 5}-based alloy (Mm{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}Ni{sub 3.85} Co{sub 0.45}Mn{sub 0.35}Al{sub 0.35}) was used as the hydrogen-absorbing alloy. The discharge characteristics of the negative electrode, including discharge capacity, cycle lifetime, and polarization overpotential, were studied by means of electrochemical experiments and analysis. The decay of the discharge capacity for the Ni/MH battery (AA size, 1 Ah) was about 1% after 100 charge/discharge cycles and 10% after 500 charge/discharge cycles. (author)

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

    2011-07-14

    Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

  7. Stereoselective hydrogenation of olefins using rhodium-substituted carbonic anhydrase--a new reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qing; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2009-01-01

    One useful synthetic reaction missing from nature's toolbox is the direct hydrogenation of substrates using hydrogen. Instead nature uses cofactors like NADH to reduce organic substrates, which adds complexity and cost to these reductions. To create an enzyme that can directly reduce organic substrates with hydrogen, researchers have combined metal hydrogenation catalysts with proteins. One approach is an indirect link where a ligand is linked to a protein and the metal binds to the ligand. Another approach is direct linking of the metal to protein, but nonspecific binding of the metal limits this approach. Herein, we report a direct hydrogenation of olefins catalyzed by rhodium(I) bound to carbonic anhydrase (CA-[Rh]). We minimized nonspecific binding of rhodium by replacing histidine residues on the protein surface using site-directed mutagenesis or by chemically modifying the histidine residues. Hydrogenation catalyzed by CA-[Rh] is slightly slower than for uncomplexed rhodium(I), but the protein environment induces stereoselectivity favoring cis- over trans-stilbene by about 20:1. This enzyme is the first cofactor-independent reductase that reduces organic molecules using hydrogen. This catalyst is a good starting point to create variants with tailored reactivity and selectivity. This strategy to insert transition metals in the active site of metalloenzymes opens opportunities to a wider range of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  8. Hydrogen Doping into MoO3 Supports toward Modulated Metal-Support Interactions and Efficient Furfural Hydrogenation on Iridium Nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lifang; Chen, Ting; Chan, Hang Cheong; Shu, Yijin; Gao, Qingsheng

    2018-03-16

    As promising supports, reducible metal oxides afford strong metal-support interactions to achieve efficient catalysis, which relies on their band states and surface stoichiometry. In this study, in situ and controlled hydrogen doping (H doping) by means of H 2 spillover was employed to engineer the metal-support interactions in hydrogenated MoO x -supported Ir (Ir/H-MoO x ) catalysts and thus promote furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol. By easily varying the reduction temperature, the resulting H doping in a controlled manner tailors low-valence Mo species (Mo 5+ and Mo 4+ ) on H-MoO x supports, thereby promoting charge redistribution on Ir and H-MoO x interfaces. This further leads to clear differences in H 2 chemisorption on Ir, which illustrates its potential for catalytic hydrogenation. As expected, the optimal Ir/H-MoO x with controlled H doping afforded high activity (turnover frequency: 4.62 min -1 ) and selectivity (>99 %) in furfural hydrogenation under mild conditions (T=30 °C, PH2 =2 MPa), which means it performs among the best of current catalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A DFT investigation on group 8B transition metal-doped silicon carbide nanotubes for hydrogen storage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabtimsai, Chanukorn; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya; Tontapha, Sarawut; Wanno, Banchob

    2018-05-01

    The binding of group 8B transition metal (TMs) on silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNT) hydrogenated edges and the adsorption of hydrogen molecule on the pristine and TM-doped SiCNTs were investigated using the density functional theory method. The B3LYP/LanL2DZ method was employed in all calculations for the considered structural, adsorption, and electronic properties. The Os atom doping on the SiCNT is found to be the strongest binding. The hydrogen molecule displays a weak interaction with pristine SiCNT, whereas it has a strong interaction with TM-doped SiCNTs in which the Os-doped SiCNT shows the strongest interaction with the hydrogen molecule. The improvement in the adsorption abilities of hydrogen molecule onto TM-doped SiCNTs is due to the protruding structure and the induced charge transfer between TM-doped SiCNT and hydrogen molecule. These observations point out that TM-doped SiCNTs are highly sensitive toward hydrogen molecule. Moreover, the adsorptions of 2-5 hydrogen molecules on TM-doped SiCNT were also investigated. The maximum storage number of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on the first layer of TM-doped SiCNTs is 3 hydrogen molecules. Therefore, TM-doped SiCNTs are suitable to be sensing and storage materials for hydrogen gas.

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  11. First-principles study of hydrogen dissociation and diffusion on transition metal-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiwen; Guo, Xinjun; Wu, Mingyi; Sun, Qiang; Jia, Yu

    2014-01-01

    First-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and transition metals (TMs) doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces following Pozzo et al. work. Firstly, the stability of Mg(0 0 0 1) surface doped with transition metals atom has been studied. The results showed that transition metals on the left of the table tend to substitute Mg in the second layer, while the other transition metals prefer to substitute Mg in the first layer. Secondly, we studied hydrogen molecules dissociation and diffusion on clean and Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces which the transition metal atoms substituted both in the first layer and second layer. When transition metal atoms substitute in the first layer, the results agree with the Pozzo et al. result; when transition metal atoms substitute in the second layer, the results showed that the transition metals on the left of the periodic table impact on the dissociation barriers is less. However, for the transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) on the right, there is a great impact on the barriers. The transition metals doped surfaces bind the dissociated H atoms loosely, making them easily diffused. The results further reveal that the Fe dopant on the Mg surface is the best choice for H 2 dissociation and hydrogen storage.

  12. Porous Silicon Hydrogen Sensor at Room Temperature: The Effect of Surface Modification and Noble Metal Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayita KANUNGO

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon (PS was fabricated by anodization of p-type crystalline silicon of resistivity 2-5 Ω cm. After formation, the PS surface was modified by the solution containing noble metal like Pd. Pd-Ag catalytic contact electrodes were deposited on porous silicon and on p-Silicon to fabricate Pd-Ag/PS/p-Si/Pd-Ag sensor structure to carry out the hydrogen sensing experiments. The Sensor was exposed to 1% hydrogen in nitrogen as carrier gas at room temperature (270C. Pd modified sensor showed minimum fluctuations and consistent performance with 86% response, response time and recovery time of 24 sec and 264 sec respectively. The stability experiments were studied for both unmodified and Pd modified sensor structures for a period of about 24 hours and the modified sensors showed excellent durability with no drift in response behavior.

  13. Nuclear spin relaxation due to hydrogen diffusion in b.c.c. metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faux, D.A.; Hall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulation results for the proton-proton contribution to the T 1 -1 relaxation rate for hydrogen spins diffusing on the tetrahedral sites of a b.c.c. metal. It is assumed that each hydrogen blocks all sites to the zeroth (no multiple-occupancy), second or third neighbour and that longer-range interactions may be neglected. Comparisons are made to the BPP and Torrey models. It is found that both the BPP and Torrey models give reasonable values for the peak height but that their predictions for the peak position and the high- and low-temperature limit are in error, particularly for large blocking distances. (orig.)

  14. 3D imaging of hydrogen assisted cracking in metals using refraction enhanced synchrotron CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laquai, Rene; Mueller, Bernd R.; Bruno, Giovanni [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. 8.5 Micro-NDT; Schaupp, Thomas; Griesche, Axel; Kannengiesser, Thomas [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. 9.4 Weld Mechanics

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen in metals can cause a degradation of the mechanical properties with possible subsequent hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC). Though, the mechanism of HAC is not completely understood yet and thus suitable methods for in situ investigations to characterise the crack formation are needed. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known tool for analysing these properties. However, the effective resolution of the detector system limits the detection of small defects by CT. Analyser based imaging (ABI) takes advantage of X-ray refraction at interfaces between volumes of different density, i.e. of cracks, pores, inclusions, etc., within the sample to detect defects smaller than the resolution of the detector system. In this study, measurements on an aluminium alloy weld showed that ABI allows us to resolve the 3D structure of cracks undetected by absorption based CT. Prospective investigations will analyse HAC in steels.

  15. Titanium-Phosphonate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks with Hierarchical Porosity for Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hui

    2018-02-01

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production is crucial for solar-to-chemical conversion process, wherein high-efficiency photocatalysts lie in the heart of this area. Herein a new photocatalyst of hierarchically mesoporous titanium-phosphonate-based metal-organic frameworks, featuring well-structured spheres, periodic mesostructure and large secondary mesoporosity, are rationally designed with the complex of polyelectrolyte and cathodic surfactant serving as the template. The well-structured hierarchical porosity and homogeneously incorporated phosphonate groups can favor the mass transfer and strong optical absorption during the photocatalytic reactions. Correspondingly, the titanium phosphonates exhibit significantly improved photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate along with impressive stability. This work can provide more insights into designing advanced photocatalysts for energy conversion and render a tunable platform in photoelectrochemical field.

  16. 3D imaging of hydrogen assisted cracking in metals using refraction enhanced synchrotron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laquai, Rene; Mueller, Bernd R.; Bruno, Giovanni; Schaupp, Thomas; Griesche, Axel; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in metals can cause a degradation of the mechanical properties with possible subsequent hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC). Though, the mechanism of HAC is not completely understood yet and thus suitable methods for in situ investigations to characterise the crack formation are needed. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known tool for analysing these properties. However, the effective resolution of the detector system limits the detection of small defects by CT. Analyser based imaging (ABI) takes advantage of X-ray refraction at interfaces between volumes of different density, i.e. of cracks, pores, inclusions, etc., within the sample to detect defects smaller than the resolution of the detector system. In this study, measurements on an aluminium alloy weld showed that ABI allows us to resolve the 3D structure of cracks undetected by absorption based CT. Prospective investigations will analyse HAC in steels.

  17. Titanium-Phosphonate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks with Hierarchical Porosity for Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hui; Sun, Ying; Yuan, Zhong-Yong; Zhu, Yun-Pei; Ma, Tianyi

    2018-01-01

    Photocatalytic hydrogen production is crucial for solar-to-chemical conversion process, wherein high-efficiency photocatalysts lie in the heart of this area. Herein a new photocatalyst of hierarchically mesoporous titanium-phosphonate-based metal-organic frameworks, featuring well-structured spheres, periodic mesostructure and large secondary mesoporosity, are rationally designed with the complex of polyelectrolyte and cathodic surfactant serving as the template. The well-structured hierarchical porosity and homogeneously incorporated phosphonate groups can favor the mass transfer and strong optical absorption during the photocatalytic reactions. Correspondingly, the titanium phosphonates exhibit significantly improved photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate along with impressive stability. This work can provide more insights into designing advanced photocatalysts for energy conversion and render a tunable platform in photoelectrochemical field.

  18. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  19. Impact of metal and anion substitutions on the hydrogen storage properties of M-BTT metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kenji; Stück, David; Mino, Lorenzo; Chai, Jeng-Da; Bloch, Eric D; Zavorotynska, Olena; Murray, Leslie J; Dincă, Mircea; Chavan, Sachin; Bordiga, Silvia; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-23

    Microporous metal-organic frameworks are a class of materials being vigorously investigated for mobile hydrogen storage applications. For high-pressure storage at ambient temperatures, the M(3)[(M(4)Cl)(3)(BTT)(8)](2) (M-BTT; BTT(3-) = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate) series of frameworks are of particular interest due to the high density of exposed metal cation sites on the pore surface. These sites give enhanced zero-coverage isosteric heats of adsorption (Q(st)) approaching the optimal value for ambient storage applications. However, the Q(st) parameter provides only a limited insight into the thermodynamics of the individual adsorption sites, the tuning of which is paramount for optimizing the storage performance. Here, we begin by performing variable-temperature infrared spectroscopy studies of Mn-, Fe-, and Cu-BTT, allowing the thermodynamics of H(2) adsorption to be probed experimentally. This is complemented by a detailed DFT study, in which molecular fragments representing the metal clusters within the extended solid are simulated to obtain a more thorough description of the structural and thermodynamic aspects of H(2) adsorption at the strongest binding sites. Then, the effect of substitutions at the metal cluster (metal ion and anion within the tetranuclear cluster) is discussed, showing that the configuration of this unit indeed plays an important role in determining the affinity of the framework toward H(2). Interestingly, the theoretical study has identified that the Zn-based analogs would be expected to facilitate enhanced adsorption profiles over the compounds synthesized experimentally, highlighting the importance of a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the design and synthesis of new frameworks for H(2) storage applications.

  20. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  1. Influence of metal doping of a MOF-74 framework on hydrogen adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botas, J.A.; Calleja, G.; Orcajo, M.G. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Energy Technology; Sanchez-Sanchez, M. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica

    2010-07-01

    Microporous Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) adsorbents are considered an interesting option for hydrogen storage. Due to their porous nature and unusually high surface areas, these materials show an exceptional H{sub 2} uptake. Unfortunately, their interaction with H{sub 2} molecules is weak, so cryogenic temperatures are required to reach competitive H{sub 2} storage capacities. In this sense, the presence of coordinatively unsaturated and exposed metal centers in some MOF frameworks could increase the affinity for H{sub 2} through stronger metal-H{sub 2} interactions. In this preliminary work, the effect of doping a Zn{sup 2+}-MOF-74 framework with Co{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} on its adsorption properties for H{sub 2} has been studied. Characterization studies suggest that the samples prepared have actually the MOF-74 structure, in which the different tested heteroatom ions have been successfully incorporated. The differences in H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K and 87 K between the MOF-74 samples doped with the mentioned divalent metal ions were discussed as a function of their free pore volume and amount of metal incorporation. (orig.)

  2. Mesoscopic quantum effects in a bad metal, hydrogen-doped vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Will J.; Ji, Heng; Paik, Hanjong; Schlom, Darrell G.; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-05-01

    The standard treatment of quantum corrections to semiclassical electronic conduction assumes that charge carriers propagate many wavelengths between scattering events, and succeeds in explaining multiple phenomena (weak localization magnetoresistance (WLMR), universal conductance fluctuations, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations) observed in polycrystalline metals and doped semiconductors in various dimensionalities. We report apparent WLMR and conductance fluctuations in H x VO2, a poor metal (in violation of the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit) stabilized by the suppression of the VO2 metal-insulator transition through atomic hydrogen doping. Epitaxial thin films, single-crystal nanobeams, and nanosheets show similar phenomenology, though the details of the apparent WLMR seem to depend on the combined effects of the strain environment and presumed doping level. Self-consistent quantitative analysis of the WLMR is challenging given this and the high resistivity of the material, since the quantitative expressions for WLMR are derived assuming good metallicity. These observations raise the issue of how to assess and analyze mesoscopic quantum effects in poor metals.

  3. An iron/amine-catalyzed cascade process for the enantioselective functionalization of allylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Adrien; Constantieux, Thierry; Rodriguez, Jean

    2013-12-02

    Three is a lucky number: An enantioselective transformation of allylic alcohols into β-chiral saturated alcohols has been developed by combining two distinct metal- and organocatalyzed catalytic cycles. This waste-free triple cascade process merges an iron-catalyzed borrowing-hydrogen step with an aminocatalyzed nucleophilic addition reaction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Design of nanocoatings by in situ phosphatizing reagent catalyzed polysilsesquioxane for corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion on metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kimberly B.

    When a metal reacts with oxygen and water, a redox reaction happens, which will cause corrosion. Current surface pretreatment for inhibiting corrosion on metal alloys is a phosphate conversion bath. The phosphate conversion bath will generate a phosphate-chromate layer to adhere strongly to a metal substrate. However, it is toxic and unfriendly to the environment. Our group proposed an innovative coating that contains a phosphate component (ISPR-In-situ Phosphatizing Reagent) within a protective coating. The ISPR coating will form a bound phosphate layer on the metal surface acting as the corrosion barrier and enhancing adhesion into the metal surface; moreover, it is low in cost and non-toxic. Within this dissertation, there are four projects that investigate design of ISPR nanocoatings for the use of corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion. Surface modification and adjusting concentrations of materials with the different formulations are explored. The first project focuses on the adhesion enhancement of a coating created by modifying the surface of an aluminum panel. Secondly, the next project will discuss and present the use of three rare earth element formulations as a replacement for phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy, AZ61. The third project is the design of a nanocoating by using heat dissipating materials to fill in small vacant spaces in the ISPR network coating on various metal alloys. The last project, studies the strategic selection of incorporating metal components into ISPR network by the reduction potential values on several different alloys. Many methods of analysis are used; SEM, TEM, ASTM B117, ASTM D1308, ASTM D3359, EIS, and thickness probe. It was found that the addition of ISPR in the nanocoatings dramatically improves the vitality of metal alloys and these results will be presented during this dissertation.

  5. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  6. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen in diphosphide at a high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electronic, phonon, and other characteristics of the normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH k are analyzed. The properties of the initial substance, namely, diphosphine are calculated. In contrast to phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH 3 , a quasi-two-dimensional phosphorus-stabilized lattice of metallic hydrogen can be formed in this substance during hydrostatic compression at a high pressure. The formed structure with H–P–H elements is shown to be locally stable in phonon spectrum, i.e., to be metastable. The properties of diphosphine are compared with the properties of similar structures of sulfur hydrides.

  7. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen inside di-phosphide at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarenko, N N; Mazur, E A

    2016-01-01

    The method of mathematical modelling was used for the calculation of the structural, electronic, phononic, and other characteristics of various normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH k . It was shown that the di-phosphine may form 2D lattice of the metallic hydrogen in it, stabilized by phosphorus atoms under high hydrostatic pressure. The resulting structure with the elements of H-P-H has a locally stable (or metastable) phonon spectrum. The properties of di-phosphine were compared with the properties of similar structures such as the sulphur hydrides. (paper)

  8. On the effect of image states on resonant neutralization of hydrogen anions near metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    We directly assess the role of image state electronic structures on the ion-survival by comparing the resonant charge transfer dynamics of hydrogen anions near Pd(1 1 1), Pd(1 0 0), and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces. Our simulations show that image states that are degenerate with the metal conduction band favor the recapture of electrons by outgoing ions. In sharp contrast, localized image states that occur inside the band gap hinder the recapture process and thus enhance the ion-neutralization probability

  9. Quasi-two-dimensional metallic hydrogen in diphosphide at a high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A., E-mail: eugen-mazur@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The structural, electronic, phonon, and other characteristics of the normal phases of phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH{sub k} are analyzed. The properties of the initial substance, namely, diphosphine are calculated. In contrast to phosphorus hydrides with stoichiometry PH{sub 3}, a quasi-two-dimensional phosphorus-stabilized lattice of metallic hydrogen can be formed in this substance during hydrostatic compression at a high pressure. The formed structure with H–P–H elements is shown to be locally stable in phonon spectrum, i.e., to be metastable. The properties of diphosphine are compared with the properties of similar structures of sulfur hydrides.

  10. Preparation of deuterated heterocyclic five-membered ring compounds (furan, thiophene, pyrrole, and derivatives) by base-catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange with deuterium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, K.H.; Herrmann, M.; Moebius, G.; Sprinz, H.

    1984-01-01

    Several deuterated heterocyclic compounds of the type of furan,thiophene and pyrrole were prepared by base-catalyzed proton exchange with deuterium oxide at temperatures above 423 K in a closed system. The determination of deuterium and its distribution within the molecules was carried out by mass spectrometry and 1 H nmr spectrometry. (author)

  11. Electronic-structure studies of metal-hydrogen systems using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) radiation. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 August 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy studies of hydrogen-bearing metals and alloys have provided fundamental information concerning the electronic interactions of hydrides. Studies of surface oxidation of several hydrogen storage materials (the LaNi 5 -family) evaluated the role of surface oxidation on hydrogen uptake. Collaborative band theory studies were undertaken to support experimental studies of the metal-semiconductor transition in LaH 2 -LaH 3 and of the refractory metal mono- and submonohydrides

  12. Aerobic Transition-Metal-Free Synthesis of 2,3-Diarylindoles and 5-Aryluracils via Oxidative Nucleophilic Substitution of Hydrogen Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jin; Moon, Hye Ran; Kim, Su Yeon; Kim, Jae Nyoung [Chonnam National Un iversity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    2,3-diarylindoles and 5-aryluracils were synthesized by ONSH pathway under transition-metal-free conditions in good to moderate yields using molecular oxygen as an oxidant. As 2,3-diarylindoles have been found in many biologically important compounds, the synthesis of this scaffold has received much attention. Most frequently, 2,3-diarylindoles have been prepared via palladium-catalyzed arylations of 2-arylindole with bromoarenes. During our recent transition metal-catalyzed arylations of indoles and uracils, we were interested in the arylation in the absence of an expensive transition metal catalyst.

  13. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  14. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery- Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B K; Wainright, J S

    2012-05-15

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H(2)) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used.

  15. Analysis of Pressure Variations in a Low-Pressure Nickel-Hydrogen Battery– Part 2: Cells with Metal Hydride Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, B. K.; Wainright, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    A sub-atmospheric pressure nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery with metal hydride for hydrogen storage is developed for implantable neuroprosthetic devices. Pressure variations during charge and discharge of the cell are analyzed at different states of charge and are found to follow the desorption curve of the pressure composition isotherm (PCI) of the metal hydride. The measured pressure agreed well with the calculated theoretical pressure based on the PCI and is used to predict the state of charge of the battery. Hydrogen equilibration with the metal hydride during charge/discharge cycling is fast when the pressure is in the range from 8 to 13 psia and slower in the range from 6 to 8 psia. The time constant for the slower hydrogen equilibration, 1.37h, is similar to the time constant for oxygen recombination and therefore pressure changes due to different mechanisms are difficult to estimate. The self-discharge rate of the cell with metal hydride is two times lower in comparison to the cell with gaseous hydrogen storage alone and is a result of the lower pressure in the cell when the metal hydride is used. PMID:22711974

  16. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Photo-electrocatalytic hydrogen generation at dye-sensitised electrodes functionalised with a heterogeneous metal catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogeveen, Dijon A.; Fournier, Maxime; Bonke, Shannon A.; Fang, Xi-Ya; Mozer, Attila J.; Mishra, Amaresh; Bäuerle, Peter; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Spiccia, Leone

    2016-01-01

    Dye-sensitised photocathodes promoting hydrogen evolution are usually coupled to a catalyst to improve the reaction rate. Herein, we report on the first successful integration of a heterogeneous metal particulate catalyst, viz., Pt aggregates electrodeposited from acidic solutions on the surface of a NiO-based photocathode sensitised with a p-type perylenemonoimid-sexithiophene-triphenylamine dye (PMI-6T-TPA). The platinised dye-NiO electrodes generate photocurrent density of ca −0.03 mA cm −2 (geom.) with 100% faradaic efficiency for the H 2 evolution at 0.059 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun visible light irradiation (AM1.5G, 100 mW cm −2 , λ > 400 nm) for more than 10 hours in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 (aq.). The Pt-free dye-NiO and dye-free Pt-modified NiO cathodes show no photo-electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution under these conditions. The performance of these Pt-modified PMI-6T-TPA-based photoelectrodes compares well to that of previously reported dye-sensitised photocathodes for H 2 evolution.

  18. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H.; Chadderdon, David J.; Matthiesen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. Understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. Here, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. By understanding the underlying mechanisms it enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  19. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H; Chadderdon, David J; Matthiesen, John E; Qiu, Yang; Carraher, Jack M; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Wenzhen

    2017-10-11

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. However, understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. In this work, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. Understanding the underlying mechanisms enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  20. Design of hydroforming processes for metallic liners used in high pressure hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelin, J.C.; Labergere, C.; Thibaud, S.; Boudeau, N.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of an European project concerning hydrogen storage, one analyze the way to manufacture high pressure tanks (700bars) for hydrogen storage, intended to be embarked for using in motor vehicles. These tanks consist of a metallic liner, which ensure a barrier role compared to the hydrogen atoms as well as a part of the mechanical resistance, and of a composite envelope built by filament rolling up which ensures the complementary part of the mechanical resistance. The paper describes the work completed within this framework, on the basis of the simulation of the hydroforming process thanks to the complete control of the process, in volume of fluid injected. One was thus brought to develop an optimization module based on finite element calculations. This optimization module includes MPI library in order to launch several calculations in parallel on a Linux cluster. It consists in seeking the optimal evolution of the fluid volume injected vs. time to obtain a good quality component. In our case, the optimization criterion is based on the variation thickness of the tube and the possible appearance of necking. It is shown that such a way for controlling the process provide the way to get minimal thickness variation, comparatively to standard optimization approaches where the process parameters are discretized through processing time in a more standard way