WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal castings

  1. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  2. Metal Casting--Industry of the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-23

    This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies Metal Casting Industry of The Future; a partnership between the Department of Energy and the metal casting industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.

  3. Low Loss Advanced Metallic Fuel Casting Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kihwan; Ko, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghwan; Song, Hoon; Lee Chanbock

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of fuel slug casting, loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and the fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycles streams in the fabrication process. Recycle streams include fuel slug reworks, returned scraps, and fuel casting heels, which are a special concern in the counter gravity injection casting process because of the large masses involved. Large recycle and waste streams result in lowering the productivity and the economic efficiency of fuel production. To increase efficiency the fuel losses in the furnace chamber, crucible, and the mold, after casting a considerable amount of fuel alloy in the casting furnace, will be quantitatively evaluated. After evaluation the losses will be identified and minimized. It is expected that this study will contribute to the minimization of fuel losses and the wastes streams in the fabrication process of the fuel slugs. Also through this study the technical readiness level of the metallic fuel fabrication process will be further enhanced. In this study, U-Zr alloy system fuel slugs were fabricated by a gravity casting method. Metallic fuel slugs were successfully fabricated with 19 slugs/batch with diameter of 5mm and length of 300mm. Fuel losses was quantitatively evaluated in casting process for the fuel slugs. Fuel losses of the fuel slugs were so low, 0.1∼1.0%. Injection casting experiments have been performed to reduce the fuel loss and improve the casting method. U-Zr fuel slug having φ5.4-L250mm was soundly fabricated with 0.1% in fuel loss. The fuel losses could be minimized to 0.1%, which showed that casting technology of fuel slugs can be a feasible approach to reach the goal of the fuel losses of 0.1% or less in commercial scale

  4. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  5. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  6. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, Robert E. [Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States)

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  7. Casting Development of Metallic Fuel for SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.; Kim, J.H.; Ko, Y.M.; Woo, Y.M.; Kim, K.H.; Lee, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D programme of Korea. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, the generation of long-lived radioactive wastes and a loss of volatile species should be minimised during the recycled fuel fabrication step. In this study, fuel slug fabrication method has been introduced to develop an innovative fabrication process of metal fuel of SFR for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am. Metal fuel slugs were fabricated with an improved injection casting method in KAERI. Volatile species can be retained through the use of a cover gas with over pressure and covered crucibles. Experimental results show that the Mn was not volatilized and conserved in inert gas conditions compared to the vacuum condition. The volatility of Mn can be controlled by changing the casting process, and minimal Mn (and Am) loss is possible. An improved casting method under an inert atmosphere is more effective in the prevention of vaporisation than casting under a vacuum and reduced atmosphere. In addition, improved casting under a reduced atmosphere shows a considerable effect in the prevention of vaporisation. (authors)

  8. Direct metal laser sintering: a digitised metal casting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nandini, V Vidyashree

    2013-12-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  9. Pipe Rolling from Continuous Cast Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhordania, I.; Chkhartishvili, I.; Lordkipanidze, J.; Melashvili, Z.; Papava, K.; Khundadze, K.

    2007-01-01

    The approach to manufacturing of high quality pipes as a result of solid and hollow billet rolling from continuous cast metal is shown. Optimal parameters of piercing, temperature of piercing and piercing rolling mill rollers speed have been experimentally established. (author)

  10. Reinforcement of Aluminum Castings with Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q

    2004-01-07

    The project ''Reinforcement of Aluminum Casting with Dissimilar Metal'' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Cummins Inc. This project, technologies have been developed to reinforce aluminum castings with steel insert. Defect-free bond between the steel insert and the aluminum casting has been consistently obtained. The push-out experiment indicated that the bond strength is higher than that of the Al-Fin method. Two patents have been granted to the project team that is comprised of Cummins Inc. and ORNL. This report contains four sections: the coating of the steel pins, the cast-in method, microstructure characterization, and the bond strength. The section of the coating of the steel pins contains coating material selection, electro-plating technique for plating Cu and Ni on steel, and diffusion bonding of the coatings to the steel. The section of cast-in method deals with factors that affecting the quality of the metallurgical bond between the coated steel and the aluminum castings. The results of microstructure characteristics of the bonding are presented in the microstructure characterization section. A push-out experiment and the results obtained using this method is described in the section of bond strength/mechanical property.

  11. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Fabricated with Ringless Casting Investment System and Metal Ring Casting Investment System: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavathi, M; Sachin, Bhuvana; Prasanna, B G; Shreeharsha, T V; Praveen, B; Ragher, Mallikarjuna

    2016-02-01

    The thermal expansion of the investment can be restricted by the metal casting ring because the thermal expansion of the ring is less than that of the investment. The ringless casting procedure is in use in clinical dentistry, though there is little scientific data to support its use in fixed partial dentures. In this study, marginal discrepancy of castings produced with the ringless casting technique and the conventional technique using the metal rings were compared. A total of 30 wax patterns were fabricated directly on a metal die. Optical stereomicroscope was used to measure the marginal discrepancy between the metal die and wax patterns. A total of 15 castings were invested using Bellavest T phosphate-bonded investment with the ringless technique and 15 were invested with the same investment with a metal ring; 30 castings were produced using a nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy. The internal surface of the castings was not modified and seated with finger pressure. The vertical marginal discrepancy was measured using an optical stereomicroscope at a magnification of 100x. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using students t-test (paired t-test and unpaired t-test). The castings of the ringless technique provided less vertical marginal discrepancy (240.56 ± 45.81 μ) than the castings produced with the conventional metal ring technique (281.98± 53.05 μ). The difference was statistically significant. The ringless casting technique had produced better marginal accuracy compared with conventional casting technique. Ringless casting system can be used routinely for clinical purpose.

  12. Casting of electron field defining apertures: Casting with the metal mold kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dea, D.; San Luis, E.

    1988-01-01

    Cerrobend alloy casts are made to define the desired electron field shapes. These custom casts are fabricated for the selected electron applicator size that has been chosen for the patient. When the cast is placed into that selected electron applicator, it will block out areas that are not to be treated. When an all metal mold assembly was used for the fabrication of these casts, the lip region of the cast which is used to accurately align the cast in the actual treatment applicator, had an irregular edge that prevented an accurate alignment of the cast. To eliminate the irregular edges on the lip region of the cast, the metal mold assembly was heated to approximately 80-85 degrees C before the molten cerrobend alloy was poured into it. The heating of the metal mold assembly helps eliminate the irregular edges on the lip region of the cast. Unfortunately it also created new flaws such as holes, dents, cracks and/or crystallization of the cast as it solidified. These flaws were controlled by cooling the metal mold assembly and the cast immediately after the pouring of the molten cerrobend alloy, evenly with water

  13. Report on results of current and future metal casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-28

    New modeling capabilities needed to simulate the casting of metallic fuels are added to Truchas code. In this report we summarize improvements we made in FY2015 in three areas; (1) Analysis of new casting experiments conducted with BCS and EFL designs, (2) the simulation of INL’s U-Zr casting experiments with Flow3D computer program, (3) the implementation of surface tension model into Truchas for unstructured mesh required to run U-Zr casting.

  14. Casting metal microstructures from a flexible and reusable mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Andrew H.; King, William P.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes casting-based microfabrication of metal microstructures and nanostructures. The metal was cast into flexible silicone molds which were themselves cast from microfabricated silicon templates. Microcasting is demonstrated in two metal alloys of melting temperature 70 °C or 138 °C. Many structures were successfully cast into the metal with excellent replication fidelity, including ridges with periodicity 400 nm and holes or pillars with diameter in the range 10-100 µm and aspect ratio up to 2:1. The flexibility of the silicone mold permits casting of curved surfaces, which we demonstrate by fabricating a cylindrical metal roller of diameter 8 mm covered with microstructures. The metal microstructures can be in turn used as a reusable molding tool.

  15. Simulation of the injection casting of metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Tokiwai, Moriyasu.

    1989-01-01

    For the fabrication of metallic fuel pins, injection casting is a preferable process because the simplicity of the process is suitable for remote operation. In this process, the molten metal in the crucible is injected into evacuated molds (suspended above the crucible) by pressurizing the casting furnace. Argonne National Laboratory has already adopted this process in the Integral Fast Reactor program. To obtain fuel pins with good quality, the casting parameters, such as the molten metal temperature, the magnitude of the pressure applied, the pressurizing rate, the cooling time, etc., must be optimized. Otherwise, bad-quality castings (short castings, rough surfaces, shrinkage cavities, mold fracture) may result. Therefore, it is very important in designing the casting equipment and optimizing the operation conditions to be able to predict the fluid and thermal behavior of the castings. This paper describes methods to simulate the heat and mass transfer in the molds and molten metallic fuel during injection casting. The results obtained by simulation are compared with experimental ones. Also, appropriate casting conditions for the uranium-plutonium-zirconium alloy are discussed based on the simulated results

  16. Microstructured metal molds fabricated via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Andrew H; King, William P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investment casting process to produce aluminum molds having integrated microstructures. Unlike conventional micromolding tools, the aluminum mold was large and had complex curved surfaces. The aluminum was cast from curved microstructured ceramic molds which were themselves cast from curved microstructured rubber. The aluminum microstructures had an aspect ratio of 1:1 and sizes ranging from 25 to 50 µm. Many structures were successfully cast into the aluminum with excellent replication fidelity, including circular, square and triangular holes. We demonstrate molding of large, curved surfaces having surface microstructures using the aluminum mold.

  17. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  18. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gawdzińska K.; Chybowski L.; Przetakiewicz W.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC). A certificate of non-combustibil...

  19. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Kennedy, J.R.; Crapps, J.; Unal, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Gravity casting is a feasible process for casting of metallic fuels: – May not be as robust as CGIC, more parameter dependent to find right “sweet spot” for high quality castings; – Fluid flow is very important and is affected by mold design, vent size, super heat, etc.; – Pressure differential assist was found to be detrimental. • Simulation found that vent location was important to allow adequate filling of mold; • Surface tension plays an important role in determining casting quality; • Casting and simulations high light the need for better characterized fluid physical and thermal properties; • Results from simulations will be incorporated in GACS design such as vent location and physical property characterization

  20. Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, Robert [Eppich Technologies, Syracuse, IN (United States); Naranjo, Robert D. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The project examined cases where metal casters had implemented ITP research results and the benefits they received due to that implementation. In cases where casters had not implemented those results, the project examined the factors responsible for that lack of implementation. The project also informed metal casters of the free tools and service offered by the ITP Technology Delivery subprogram.

  1. Manufacturing of Cast Metal Foams with Irregular Cell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupová I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are materials of which the research is still on-going, with the broad applicability in many different areas (e.g. automotive industry, building industry, medicine, etc.. These metallic materials have specific properties, such as large rigidity at low density, high thermal conductivity, capability to absorb energy, etc. The work is focused on the preparation of these materials using conventional casting technology (infiltration method, which ensures rapid and economically feasible method for production of shaped components. In the experimental part we studied conditions of casting of metallic foams with open pores and irregular cell structure made of ferrous and nonferrous alloys by use of various types of filler material (precursors.

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  3. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  4. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  5. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Yasuhide; Mori, Yukihide

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the plant concept of metal fuel fabrication system (38tHM/y) using casting process in electrolytic recycle, which based on recent studies of its equipment design and quality control system. And we estimate the cost of its construction and operation, including costs of maintenance, consumed hardware and management of waste. The content of this work is as follows. (1) Designing of fuel fabrication equipment: We make material flow diagrams of the fuel fabrication plant and rough designs of the injection casting furnace, demolder and inspection equipment. (2) Designing of resolution system of liquid waste, which comes from analytical process facility. Increased analytical items, we rearrange analytical process facility, estimate its chemicals and amount of waste. (3) Arrangement of equipments: We made a arrangement diagram of the metal fuel fabrication equipments in cells. (4) Estimation of cost data: We estimated cost to construct the facility and to operate it. (author)

  6. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC. A certificate of non-combustibility test of cast aluminum-ceramic foam for marine applications was included inside the paper. The composite foam was prepared by the gas injection method, consisting in direct injection of gas into liquid metal. Foams with closed and open cells were examined. The foams were foaming with foaming gas consisting of nitrogen or air. This work is one of elements of researches connected with description of properties of composite foams. In author's other works acoustic properties of these materials will be presented.

  7. The Effect of Nodular Cast Iron Metal Matrix on the Wear Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gumienny

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on the effect of the nodular cast iron metal matrix composition on the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance. Nodular cast iron with different metal matrix obtained in the rough state and ADI were tested. To research of abrasive and adhesive wear the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides and without this component were chosen. The influence of the carbides amount for cast iron wear resistance was examined. It was found, that the highest abrasive ...

  8. Casting of metallic fuel containing minor actinide additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Henslee, S.P.; Sanecki, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A significant attribute of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is the transmutation of long-lived minor actinide fission products. These isotopes require isolation for thousands of years, and if they could be removed from the waste, disposal problems would be reduced. The IFR utilizes pyroprocessing of metallic fuel to separate auranium, plutonium, and the minor actinides from nonfissionable constituents. These materials are reintroduced into the fuel and reirradiated. Spent IFR fuel is expected to contain low levels of americium, neptunium, and curium because the hard neutron spectrum should transmute these isotopes as they are produced. This opens the possibility of using an IFR to trnasmute minor actinide waste from conventional light water reactors (LWRs). A standard IFR fuel is based on the alloy U-20% Pu-10% Zr (in weight percent). A metallic fuel system eases the requirements for reprocessing methods and enables the minor actinide metals to be incorporated into the fuel with simple modifications to the basic fuel casting process. In this paper, the authors report the initial casting experience with minor actinide element addition to an IFR U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel

  9. Passive Time Coincidence Measurements with HEU and DU Metal Castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConchie, Seth M.; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T.; Wright, Michael C.; Archer, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A Department of Energy sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Y-12 National Security Complex program of passive time coincidence measurements has been initiated at Y-12 to evaluate the ability to determine the presence of high enriched uranium (HEU) and distinguish it from depleted uranium (DU). This program uses the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) without an active interrogation source. Previous passive NMIS measurements with Pu metal and Pu oxide have been successful in determining the Pu mass, assuming a known 240Pu content. The spontaneous fission of uranium metal is considerably lower than Pu and measurements of this type have been performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work presents results of measurements of HEU and DU metal castings using moderated 3He detectors.

  10. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  11. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-11

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  12. Consumable electrode arc casting of copper-refactory metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.L.; Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on consumable electrode arc casting that has been developed as a preparation method for producing high strength/high electrical and thermal conductivity metal-metal matrix composites. Electrode configuration and melting parameters have been studied to improve ingot homogeneity. Alloy ingot impurities have been reduced by a combination of mold material and melting practice. Alloys containing 15 to 20 vol % Cr, Mo, Nb, Ta and V have been prepared with strengths of 150-300 ksi produced in deformation processed Cu-Nb sheet and wire respectively. Significant differences in strengthening behavior are attributed to filament morphology which is related to the deformation mode. Cold axisymmetric deformations of 99.999% reduction in area have been achieved with axisymmetric deformation providing the highest strengthening

  13. Consumable electrode arc casting of copper-refractory metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.L.; Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on consumable electrode arc casting that has been developed as a preparation method for producing high strength/high electrical and thermal conductivity metal-metal matrix composites. Electrode configuration and melting parameters have been studied to improve ingot homogeneity. Alloy ingot impurities have been reduced by a combination of mold material and melting practice. Alloys containing 15 to 20 vol. % Cr, Mo, Nb, Ta and V have been prepared with strengths of 150-300 ksi produced in deformation processed Cu-Nb sheet and wire respectively. Significant differences in strengthening behavior are attributed to filament morphology which is related to the deformation mode. Cold axisymmentric deformations of 99.999% reduction in area have been achieved with axisymmetric deformation providing the highest strengthening

  14. Application of metal oxide refractories for melting and casting reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessen, N.C. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Townsend, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive investigations have been conducted to develop metal oxide refractories for containment of molten uranium and uranium alloys. Since uranium and uranium alloys are readily susceptable to the formation of complex oxides, carbides, nitrides, intermetallic compounds, and suboxide reactions, severe problems exist for the production of quality castings. These contamination reactions are dependent on temperature, pressure, and molten metal interfacial reactions. The need for high purity metals to meet specification repeatedly has resulted in the development of improved metal oxide refractories and sophisticated furnace controls. Applications of Y 2 O 3 for use as a crucible and mold coating, precision molds and cores, and high temperature castable ceramics are discussed. Experimental results on melt impurity levels, thermal controls during melting, surface interactions and casting quality are presented

  15. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  16. Metal Casting--Industry of the Future; Industrial Partnerships: Advancing Energy and Environmental Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.

    2001-02-05

    This tri-fold brochure describe the partnering activities of the Office of Industrial Technologies' (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) for Metal Casting. Information on what works for the Metal Casting industry, examples of successful partnerships, and benefits of partnering with OIT are included.

  17. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  18. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, D. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology] [comp.

    1994-06-01

    Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

  19. PLC and SCADA based automation of injection casting process for casting of uranium-zirconium blanket fuel slugs for metallic fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yathish Kumar, G.; Jagadeeschandran, J.; Avvaru, Prafulla Kumar; Yadaw, Abhishek Kumar; Lavakumar, R.; Prabhu, T.V.; Muralidharan, P.; Anthonysamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of metallic (U-6wt.%Zr) slugs involves melting of binary alloy under vacuum and injection casting into quartz moulds at high pressure. Injection casting system housed inside glove box comprises of high vacuum, induction melting, high pressure control, motion control, mould preheating, chamber cooling, crucible handling and glove box pressure control systems. The technology development for process automation of injection casting system and process optimisation for fabrication of metallic (U-6%Zr) slugs is outlined in this paper. (author)

  20. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorn, M.I.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a

  1. [Cervical adaptation of complete cast crowns of various metal alloys, with and without die spacers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephano, C B; Roselino, R F; Roselino, R B; Campos, G M

    1989-01-01

    A metallic replica from a dental preparation for crown was used to make 8 class-IV stone dies. The wax patterns for the casting of the crowns were obtained in two conditions: a) from the stone die with no spacer; and b) from the stone die with an acrylic spacer. Thus, 64 metallic crowns were casted, using 4 different alloys: DURACAST (Cu-Al), NICROCAST (Ni-Cr) and DURABOND (Ni-Cr), and gold. The casted crowns were fitted in the metallic replica and measured as to the cervical discrepance of fitting. The results showed that the use of die spacers decreases the clinical discrepancies of fitting of the casted crowns (in a statistically significant level), no matter the metallic alloy employed.

  2. Casting of Motorcycle Piston from Aluminium Piston Scrap using Metallic Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Uchenna OZIOKO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The casting of motorcycle piston was carried out using metallic mould. The prepared piston sand core was positioned in the mould to provide casting with contours and cavities. The molten metal of required composition was poured into the metallic mould, allowed to solidify and take the desired shape of the cavity. Aluminium silicon piston scraps were used as the casting material. Melting of the aluminium piston scraps was achieved using local crucible furnace and finally pouring the molten metal into the metallic mould having the prepared piston sand core in place to obtain the piston. After fettling and cleaning, the casting was found to be good. The composition test revealed that the scrap piston was made from LM29 aluminium alloy. The cast piston was machined and subjected to performance rating test in a Jincheng AX100 motorcycle engine. The rating used was based on a scale from 1 to 10. The higher the rating, the better the evaluation of the piston in the specific area rated. Deposits are evaluated by appearance, ranging from 10 (clean - absence of deposits to 0.0 (maximum deposits. In spite of various production constraints the result of the performance test was good. The rating showed that the locally cast piston compared favourably with imported piston.

  3. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  4. Weld microstructure in cast AlSi9/SiC(p metal matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wysocki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Welded joint in cast AlSi9/SiC/20(p metal matrix composite by manual TIG arc welding using AlMg5 filler metal has been described inhis paper. Cooling curves have been stated, and the influence in distribution of reinforced particles on crystallization and weldmicrostructure. Welded joint mechanical properties have been determined: hardness and tensile.

  5. Fabricating Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Microcomponent by Suction Casting Using Silicon Micromold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A suction casting process for fabricating Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass microcomponent using silicon micromold has been studied. A complicated BMG microgear with 50 μm in module has been cast successfully. Observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that the cast microgear duplicates the silicon micromold including the microstructure on the surface. The amorphous state of the microgear is confirmed by transmission election microscopy. The nanoindentation hardness and elasticity modulus of the microgear reach 6.5 GPa and 94.5 GPa. The simulation and experimental results prove that the suction casting process with the silicon micromold is a promising one-step method to fabricate bulk metallic glass microcomponents with high performance for applications in microelectromechanical system.

  6. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  7. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure is usually imperfect - composites contain various types of defects [2, 3-5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  8. Classification of Structure Defects of Metal Matrix Castings with Saturated Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdzińska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Definition of a composite [1] describes an ideal composite material with perfect structure. In real composite materials, structure isusually imperfect – composites contain various types of defects [2, 3–5], especially as the casted composites are of concern. The reason for this is a specific structure of castings, related to course of the manufacturing process. In case of metal matrix composite castings, especially regarding these manufactured by saturation, there is no classification of these defects [2, 4]. Classification of defects in castings of classic materials (cast iron, cast steel, non-ferrous alloys is insufficient and requires completion of specific defects of mentioned materials. This problem (noted during manufacturing metal matrix composite castings with saturated reinforcement in Institute of Basic Technical Sciences of Maritime University Szczecin has become a reason of starting work aimed at creating such classification. As a result, this paper was prepared. It can contribute to improvement of quality of studied materials and, as a consequence, improve the environment protection level.

  9. Feasibility of producing cast-refractory metal-fiber superalloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of direct casting as a practical method for producing cast superalloy tungsten or columbium alloy fiber composites while retaining a high percentage of fiber strength. Fourteen nickel base, four cobalt, and three iron based matrices were surveyed for their degree of reaction with the metal fibers. Some stress-rupture results were obtained at temperatures of 760, 816, 871, and 1093 C for a few composite systems. The feasibility of producing acceptable composites of some cast nickel, cobalt, and iron matrix alloys with tungsten or columbium alloy fibers was demonstrated.

  10. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  11. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de Oliveira Bauer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS and elongation (EL tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM, fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD, with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05. The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99, and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch. Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  12. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlke, R. D.; Cookson, John M.; Shouwei Hao; Prasad Krishna; Bilkey, Kevin T.

    2001-01-01

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive

  13. EXAMPLES OF 3D-TECHNOLOGIES IN FOUNDRY PROCESSES. DECREASE IN METAL CONSUMPTION IN CASTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Doroshenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review describes the design of metal castings produced by use of 3D-technologies. Some new ways of 3D-processing of materials connected with additive processes are described, which represents the next step in environmental resource-saving production. Examples of patterns and casting of complex design with an optimal combination of materials, durability and attractive appearance are shown. Described 3D high-tech processes are expanding the existing range of metal products and the ways of its production.

  14. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  15. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Alex

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The Ni-Cr cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four methods evaluated in this study.

  16. Surface Crystallization in Mg-Based Bulk Metallic Glass during Copper Mold Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The localized crystallization of Mg54Cu28Ag7Y11 bulk metallic glass (BMG in the injection casting process using a copper mold was investigated. It has been found that several crystalline phases were formed close to the as-cast surface but did not exist in the internal part of the BMG plate. It is abnormal that the as-cast surface is partially crystallized with higher cooling rate than that of inside. Overheating of the melt and nucleation induced by the surface of copper mold play key roles in the abnormal crystallization. It is suggested that the function of copper mold to trigger heterogeneous nucleation cannot be totally ignored, although it provides the high cooling rate for the glass formation during casting.

  17. Volatile Elements Retention During Injection Casting of Metallic Fuel Slug for a Recycling Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kuk, Seoung-Woo; Keum, Chang-Woon; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    The as-cast fuels prepared by injection casting were sound and the internal integrities were found to be satisfactory through gamma-ray radiography. U and Zr were uniform throughout the matrix of the slug, and the impurities, i.e., oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, satisfied the specification of the total impurities of less than 2000 ppm. The losses of the volatile Mn were effectively controlled using argon over pressures, and dynamic pumping for a period of time before injection showed no detrimental effect on the Mn loss by vaporization. This result suggests that volatile minor actinide-bearing fuels for SFRs can be prepared by improved injection methods. A practical process of metallic fuel fabrication for an SFR needs to be cost efficient, suitable for remote operation, and capable of mass production while reducing the amount of radioactive waste. Injection casting was chosen as the most promising technique, and this technique has been applied to fuel slug fabrication for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) driver and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel pins. Because of the simplistic nature of the process and equipment, compared to other processes examined, this process has been successfully used in a remote operation environment for fueling of the EBR-II reactor. In this study, several injection casting methods were applied in order to prepare metallic fuel for an fast reactor that control the transport of volatile elements during fuel melting and casting. Mn was selected as a surrogate alloy since it possesses a total vapor pressure equivalent to that of a volatile minor actinide-bearing fuel. U.10Zr and U.10Zr.5Mn (wt%) metallic fuels were injection cast under various casting conditions and their soundness was characterized

  18. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: Cast metal occlusal surface

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Kumar; Aman Arora; Reena Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal sur...

  19. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  20. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  1. Effect of mold designs on molten metal behaviour in high-pressure die casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M. D.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Khan, A. A.; Mohamad, M. R.; Suffian, M. S. Z. M.; Yunos, Y. S.; Wong, L. K.; Mohtar, M. Z.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a research study conducted in a local automotive component manufacturer that produces aluminium alloy steering housing local and global markets. This study is to investigate the effect of design modification of mold in die casting as to improve the production rate. Design modification is carried out on the casting shot of the mold. Computer flow simulation was carried out to study the flow of molten metal in the mold with respect to the mold design modification. The design parameters of injection speed, die temperature and clamping force has been included in the study. The result of the simulation showed that modifications of casting shot give significant impact towards the molten flow behaviour in casting process. The capabilities and limitations of die casting process simulation to conduct defect analysis had been optimized. This research will enhance the efficiency of the mass production of the industry of die casting with the understanding of defect analysis, which lies on the modification of the mold design, a way early in its stages of production.

  2. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: cast metal occlusal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Arora, Aman; Yadav, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, however, these methods are time-consuming, expensive and requires many cumbersome steps. These methods also requires the patient to be without the prosthesis for the time during which the laboratory procedures are performed. This article presents a quick, simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on complete dentures.

  3. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: Cast metal occlusal surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, however, these methods are time-consuming, expensive and requires many cumbersome steps. These methods also requires the patient to be without the prosthesis for the time during which the laboratory procedures are performed. This article presents a quick, simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on complete dentures.

  4. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Timothy D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Dykes, Charles D.

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  5. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P Metal ion release from the two alloys increased with increasing HP concentrations (over 3000% increase in Ni and 1400% increase in Pd ions were recorded when HP concentration increased from 0% to 30%). Surface roughness values of the samples before and after bleaching were not significantly different (P > 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  6. Review of Grain Refinement of Cast Metals Through Inoculation: Theories and Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhilin

    2017-10-01

    The inoculation method of grain refinement is widely used in research and industry. Because of its commercial and engineering importance, extensive research on the mechanisms/theories of grain refinement and development of effective grain refiners for diverse cast metals/alloys has been conducted. In 1999, Easton and St. John reviewed the mechanisms of grain refinement of cast Al alloys. Since then, grain refinement in alloys of Al, Mg, Fe, Ti, Cu, and Zn has evolved a lot. However, there is still no full consensus on the mechanisms/theories of grain refinement. Moreover, some new grain refiners developed based on the theories do not ensure efficient grain refinement. Thus, the factors that contribute to grain refinement are still not fully understood. Clarification of the prerequisite issues that occur in grain refinement is required using recent theories. This review covers multiple metals/alloys and developments in grain refinement from the last twenty years. The characteristics of effective grain refiners are considered from four perspectives: effective particle/matrix wetting configuration, sufficiently powerful segregating elements, preferential crystallographic matching, and geometrical features of effective nucleants. Then, recent mechanisms/theories on the grain refinement of cast metals/alloys are reviewed, including the peritectic-related, hypernucleation, inert nucleant, and constitutional supercooling-driven theories. Further, developments of deterministic and probabilistic modeling and nucleation crystallography in the grain refinement of cast metals are reviewed. Finally, the latest progress in the grain refinement of cast Zn and its alloys is described, and future work on grain refinement is summarized.

  7. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  8. Interfacial reaction in cast WC particulate reinforced titanium metal matrix composites coating produced by laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dejian; Hu, Peipei; Min, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Laser injection of ceramic particle was conducted to produce particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Cast WC particle (WCp) was used as injection reinforcement to avoid excessive release of carbon atoms into the melt pool. The interfaces and boundaries between WC and Ti matrix were investigated by electron microscopy study. Compared with single crystal WCp, cast WCp was an appropriate solution to control the reaction products (TiC) in the matrix and the total amount of reaction products was significantly reduced. Irregular-shape reaction layers were formed around cast WCp. The reaction layers consist of a W2C layer and a mixed layer of W and TiC. Such reaction layers are effective in load transfer under an external load.

  9. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Mathilde I; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2008-12-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a time-course experiment was performed under laboratory conditions. Earthworms were incubated in perspex columns filled with sandy soil (2% organic matter, 2.9% clay) or loamy clay soil (15% organic matter, 20% clay), and surface casts were collected after up to 80 days. On the sandy soil, A. caliginosa and L. rubellus brought approximately 7.1-16 g dry wt. casts/g fresh wt. earthworm to the surface, which is significantly more than A. chlorotica and L. terrestris (2.5-5.0 g dry wt./g fresh wt.). A. caliginosa was the only species that produced significantly more surface casts in the sandy soil than in the loamy clay soil. In the loamy clay soil, no differences in biomass-corrected casting rates were found among the species. Surface casting rates tended to decrease after 20 days. Considering the densities of the different species in a Dutch floodplain area Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden, surface cast production is estimated to amount to 2.0 kg dry soil/m2 after 80 days, which could be extrapolated to 2.7-9.1 kg/m2 per year. These amounts correspond to a surface deposition of a layer of approximately 1.9-6.5 mm/year, which is of the same order or even slightly higher than the sedimentation rate and much higher than the amount of soil brought to the soil surface by bioturbating small mammals.

  10. Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bobby R.; Tracy, Donald B.; Griffiths, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

  11. Application of the Pareto chart and Ishikawa diagram for the identification of major defects in metal composite castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdzińska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This author discusses the use of selected quality management tools, i.e. the Pareto chart and Ishikawa fishbone diagram, for the descriptionof composite casting defects. The Pareto chart allows to determine defect priority related with metallic composite castings, while theIshikawa diagram indicates the causes of defect formation and enables calculating defect weights.

  12. Computer Simulation of the Formation of Non-Metallic Precipitates During a Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisz D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors own computer software, based on the Ueshima mathematical model with taking into account the back diffusion, determined from the Wołczyński equation, was developed for simulation calculations. The applied calculation procedure allowed to determine the chemical composition of the non-metallic phase in steel deoxidised by means of Mn, Si and Al, at the given cooling rate. The calculation results were confirmed by the analysis of samples taken from the determined areas of the cast ingot. This indicates that the developed computer software can be applied for designing the steel casting process of the strictly determined chemical composition and for obtaining the required non-metallic precipitates.

  13. Effects of Rare Earth Metal Addition on Wear Resistance of Chromium-Molybdenum Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasinska J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses changes in the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel modified with rare earth metals (REM. The changes were assessed using scanning microscopy. The wear response was determined in the Miller test to ASTM G75. Abrasion tests were supplemented with the surface profile measurements of non-modified and modified cast steel using a Talysurf CCI optical profilometer. It was demonstrated that the modification substantially affected the microstructure of the alloy, leading to grain size reduction and changed morphology of non-metallic inclusions. The observed changes in the microstructure resulted in a three times higher impact strength (from 33 to 99 kJ/cm2 and more than two times higher resistance to cracking (from 116 to 250 MPa. The following surface parameters were computed: Sa: Arithmetic mean deviation of the surface, Sq: Root-mean-square deviation of the surface, Sp: Maximum height of the peak Sv: Maximum depth of the valley, Sz: Ten Point Average, Ssk: Asymmetry of the surface, Sku: Kurtosis of the surface. The findings also indicated that the addition of rare earth metals had a positive effect on the abrasion behaviour of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel.

  14. Comparison of internal fit between implant abutments and cast metal crowns vs laser-sintered crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçarslan, Mehmet Ali; Özkan, Pelin; Uludag, Bülent; Mumcu, Emre

    2014-07-01

    A common problem related to cemented single crowns is the internal misfit, which may cause inadequate retention, especially when seated on the implant abutment. The aim of this study was to compare the internal fit of Co-Cr crowns using a traditional lost-wax casting technique from laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy crowns. Twelve metallic crowns per each technique were fabricated. The effect of the thickness of cement, originated internal gap was evaluated. Crowns were cemented on the implant abutments with resin cement, and the internal fit of crowns was measured at five areas with an optical microscope. The data were analyzed, and the means were compared with a t-test (pcrowns obtained through the lost wax method (min. 65.50 ± 9.54 μm and max. 313.46 ± 48.12 μm). The fit of the metal crown likely varies with the fabrication technique. The use of techniques that enable the adjustment of crown parameters, such as the laser sintering technique, maintains the desired fit between casting and implant abutments. This study investigated which technique affects the internal fit of cemented implant-supported crowns, comparing the use of lost wax casting and laser-sintered metal dental alloys. The results of this study indicate that the use of laser-sintered crowns can improve for crown accuracy.

  15. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  16. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Derui; Lian Haiping

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  17. Effect of Intraoral Mechanical Cleaning Techniques on Bond Strength of Cast Crowns to Metal Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZain, Sahar; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Alqahtani, Ali

    2017-11-30

    To evaluate the effect of cleaning of metal cores from provisional cement, using an intraoral airborne-particle abrasion method, on the bond strength of permanent resin cement with cast crowns to cores. Thirty stainless steel models of a standard complete crown tooth preparation were fabricated. Thirty Type III gold crowns were fabricated. Each cast crown corresponded to one stainless steel crown preparation model. All crowns were cemented with noneugenol zinc oxide cement and stored for 7 days at 37°C. All crowns were debonded, and the cement was cleaned with airborne-particle abrasion using 50 μm aluminum oxide at 4.1 bar (0.41 MPa) followed by ultrasonic cleaning. Based on the mechanical cleaning technique of the remaining provisional cement on surfaces of cast cores, specimens were equally divided into 3 groups: hand cleaning (HC) with a dental excavator, hand cleaning followed by polishing using a brush and pumice (BP), and hand cleaning followed by intraoral airborne-particle abrasion (APA). All crowns were then cemented to their corresponding cores using universal resin cement. All crowns were stored for 7 days at 37°C. An Instron universal testing machine was used to record the bond strength of crowns. Airborne-particle abrasion method for intraoral mechanical cleaning revealed a statistically significantly higher bond strength compared to the other two methods. When comparing the three methods of provisional cement cleaning from metal cores, airborne-particle abrasion resulted in the highest bond strength for cast crowns. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Comparison of the bond strength of laser-sintered and cast base metal dental alloys to porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akova, Tolga; Ucar, Yurdanur; Tukay, Alper; Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi; Brantley, William A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strengths of cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys and the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy to dental porcelain. Dental porcelain was applied on two cast and one laser-sintered base metal alloy. Ten specimens were prepared for each group for bond strength comparison. ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (alpha=0.05) was used for statistical analysis. Fractured specimens were observed with a stereomicroscope to classify the type of failure after shear bond testing. While the mean shear bond strength was highest for the cast Ni-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (81.6+/-14.6 MPa), the bond strength was not significantly different (P>0.05) from that for the cast Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (72.9+/-14.3 MPa) and the laser-sintered Co-Cr metal-ceramic specimens (67.0+/-14.9 MPa). All metal-ceramic specimens prepared from cast Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys exhibit a mixed mode of cohesive and adhesive failure, whereas five of the metal-ceramic specimens prepared from the laser-sintered Co-Cr alloy exhibited the mixed failure mode and five specimens exhibited adhesive failure in the porcelain. The new laser-sintering technique for Co-Cr alloy appears promising for dental applications, but additional studies of properties of the laser-sintered alloy and fit of castings prepared by this new technique are needed before its acceptance into dental laboratory practice. Laser sintering of Co-Cr alloy seems to be an alternative technique to conventional casting of dental alloys for porcelain fused to metal restorations.

  19. Heavy Metals in ToxCast: Relevance to Food Safety (SOT) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to heavy metals occurs through food contamination due to industrial processes, vehicle emissions and farming methods. Specific toxicity endpoints have been associated with metal exposures, e.g. lead and neurotoxicity; however, numerous varieties of heavy metals have not been systematically examined for potential toxicities. We describe results from testing a large set of heavy metal-containing compounds in extensive suites of in vitro assays to suggest possible molecular initiating events in toxicity pathways. A broad definition of heavy metals that includes As, Se and organometallics or inorganic salts containing metals in Group III or higher (MW > 40) was used to identify 75 different compounds tested in the EPA’s ToxCast assays encompassing biochemical, cellular and model organism assays. These 75, plus an additional 100 metal-containing compounds, were tested in Tox21 quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) assays covering nuclear receptor and stress pathways. Known activities were confirmed such as activation of stress pathways and nuclear receptors (RXR, PPARg) as well as overt cytotoxicity. Specifically, organotin and organomercury were among the most potent of over 8K chemicals tested. The HTS results support known toxicities, including promiscuous GPCR activity for mercury compounds consistent with the neuropsychiatric effects seen in mercury poisoning (Mad Hatter’s Syndrome). As such, HTS approaches provide an efficient method

  20. Evaluation of the pattern dimensions of cast-metal posts in uniradicular teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Assunção Vital

    Full Text Available Introduction Accurate dimensions of cast-metal posts are relevant to the survival of dental prostheses. Objective The aim of this study was to verify if the dimensions of cast-metal posts accord with ideal clinical criteria. Material and method For the evaluation, 285 periapical radiographs, from a total of 80 teeth, were taken from the charts of patients that attended the clinics at the Dental School of the Federal University of Goiás, from March 2008 to October 2012. Only periapical radiographs of single-rooted teeth with post and core were included in the study. The radiographic evaluation was conducted with the assistance of a magnifying glass and a view box, in a room with low luminosity. The dimensions of the post and core were established with the help of a digital caliper, and the following measurements were considered: a LR (Length Remnant; b LP (Length Post; c BS (Bone Support; d DR (Diameter Root; e DP (mesiodistal diameter post. The post and core were classified as acceptable or deficient by reference values with a margin of error of 0.2 mm. For descriptive analysis, the data were cataloged using SPSS software (version 17.0. Result With regard to the length of the post and core, only 26.25% and 43.75% of the post and core were classified as acceptable according to the two-thirds rule and fulcrum dental rule, respectively. With regard to the mesiodistal diameter of the post and core, 55% were classified as acceptable. Conclusion Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the cast-metal posts evaluated do not accord with the ideal clinical criteria.

  1. Process research into metallic pipe wear of hot chamber die casting machines and methods ofincreasing wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhametzyanova, G. F.; Kolesnikov, MS; Mukhametzyanov, I. R.; Astatshenko, V. I.

    2017-09-01

    The kinetics and reasons for metallic pipe wear of hot chamberzinc alloy die casting machines are established.Increasing metallic pipe wear components wear resistance is being achieved by means of die steelДИ - 22 with electroslag remelting modification and electron-beamremelting modification and after the processes of nitriding and boriding besides.

  2. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  3. A preliminary evaluation into the performance of posterior resin bonded cast metal restorations (adhesive onlays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchan, S M; Eder, A; Marchan, Q M; Coldero, L; Choon, A Tang; Smith, W A

    2013-03-01

    Posterior resin bonded cast metal restorations (adhesive onlays) were used in a variety of clinical scenarios including: management of tooth wear and cracked tooth, as retainers for fixed bridge work, for correction of the occlusal plane and in providing cuspal coverage following endodontic treatment. The mean length in service for the examined onlays was 42 months, with a range of 9-75 months. Two restorations in two patients failed resulting in an overall success of 94%. Patient satisfaction was high at 95%. Such restorations seem to be a viable option for managing a number of clinical scenarios.

  4. The cavitation erosion of ultrasonic sonotrode during large-scale metallic casting: Experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Liu, Zhilin; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lihua; Li, Ruiqing; Jiang, Ripeng; Dong, Fang

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonic sonotrodes play an essential role in transmitting power ultrasound into the large-scale metallic casting. However, cavitation erosion considerably impairs the in-service performance of ultrasonic sonotrodes, leading to marginal microstructural refinement. In this work, the cavitation erosion behaviour of ultrasonic sonotrodes in large-scale castings was explored using the industry-level experiments of Al alloy cylindrical ingots (i.e. 630 mm in diameter and 6000 mm in length). When introducing power ultrasound, severe cavitation erosion was found to reproducibly occur at some specific positions on ultrasonic sonotrodes. However, there is no cavitation erosion present on the ultrasonic sonotrodes that were not driven by electric generator. Vibratory examination showed cavitation erosion depended on the vibration state of ultrasonic sonotrodes. Moreover, a finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate the evolution and distribution of acoustic pressure in 3-D solidification volume. FE simulation results confirmed that significant dynamic interaction between sonotrodes and melts only happened at some specific positions corresponding to severe cavitation erosion. This work will allow for developing more advanced ultrasonic sonotrodes with better cavitation erosion-resistance, in particular for large-scale castings, from the perspectives of ultrasonic physics and mechanical design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Indirect Fabrication of Lattice Metals with Thin Sections Using Centrifugal Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jiwon; Ju, Jaehyung; Thurman, James

    2016-05-14

    One of the typical methods to manufacture 3D lattice metals is the direct-metal additive manufacturing (AM) process such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Electron Beam Melting (EBM). In spite of its potential processing capability, the direct AM method has several disadvantages such as high cost, poor surface finish of final products, limitation in material selection, high thermal stress, and anisotropic properties of parts. We propose a cost-effective method to manufacture 3D lattice metals. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed protocol on fabrication of 3D lattice metals having a complex shape and a thin wall thickness; e.g., octet truss made of Al and Cu alloys having a unit cell length of 5 mm and a cell wall thickness of 0.5 mm. An overall experimental procedure is divided into eight sections: (a) 3D printing of sacrificial patterns (b) melt-out of support materials (c) removal of residue of support materials (d) pattern assembly (e) investment (f) burn-out of sacrificial patterns (g) centrifugal casting (h) post-processing for final products. The suggested indirect AM technique provides the potential to manufacture ultra-lightweight lattice metals; e.g., lattice structures with Al alloys. It appears that the process parameters should be properly controlled depending on materials and lattice geometry, observing the final products of octet truss metals by the indirect AM technique.

  6. Study of carbon and silicon loss through oxidation in cast iron base metal using rotary furnace for melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvester Olanrewaju OMOLE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The projection of loss of carbon and silicon through oxidation is uncertain phenomenon depending on the furnace used for melting, which affect the carbon equivalent value (CEV of cast iron produced. CEV enhances the fluidity of molten metal as well as having great effects on the mechanical properties of cast products. Study on the way elemental loss takes place during melting with rotary furnace will give idea of approach to minimize the loss. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the magnitude of the elemental loss with rotary furnace and means to minimize the loss. 60kg of grey cast iron scrap was charged into rotary furnace of 100kg capacity after preheating the furnace for 40 minutes. Graphite and ferrosilicon was added to the charge in order to obtain a theoretical composition of not less than 4.0% carbon and 2.0% silicon. Charges in the furnace were heated to obtain molten metal which was tapped at 1400°C. Tapping was done for casting at three different times. The castings solidified in sand mould and allowed to cool to room temperature in the mould. Castings were denoted as sample 1, 2 and 3. Final compositions of each casting were analyzed with optical light emission spectrometer. Sample 1 has 2.95% carbon and 1.82% silicon. Sample 2 has 2.88% carbon and 1.70% silicon and sample 3 has 2.75% carbon and 1.63% silicon.

  7. The influence of the pure metal components of four different casting alloys on the electrochemical properties of the alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Süleyman H; Pekmez, Nuran Ozçiçek; Keyf, Filiz; Canli, Fulya

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the pure metal components of the four different casting alloys on the corrosion behaviors of these alloys tested. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out on four different types of casting alloys and their pure metals at 37 degrees C in an artificial saliva solution. The ions released from the alloys into the solutions during the polarization test were also determined quantitatively using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Ni-Cr (M1) and Co-Cr (M2) alloys had a more homogenous structure than palladium based (M3) and gold based (M4) alloys in terms of the pitting potentials of the casting alloys and those of the pure metals composing the alloys. The total ion concentration released from M3 and M4 was less than from M1 and M2. This may be because M3 and M4 alloys contained noble metals. It was also found that the noble metals in the M3 and M4 samples decreased the current density in the anodic branch of the potentiodynamic polarization curves. In other words, noble metals contributed positively to dental materials. Corrosion resistance of the casting alloys can be affected by the pure metals they are composed of. Au and Pd based noble alloys dissolved less than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr based alloys.

  8. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  9. Effect of graphite on folded metal occurrence in honed surfaces of grey and compacted cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Vale, João Luiz; da Silva, Carlos Henrique; Pintaúde, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Grey cast iron (GCI) and compacted graphite iron (CGI) are the most employed materials to manufacture cylinder liners. The use of diamond tools to hone the surfaces resulted in an increase of the so-called folded metal occurrence. This irregularity can reduce the performance of engines and investigations to understand it have been made. In this sense, the current study aims to correlate the variation of graphite and the folded metal occurrence. Different samples of GCI and CGI were extracted directly of engine blocks, resulting in four metallurgical conditions. Topographical analysis was conducted in an optical interferometer and a dedicated routine to count the folded metal was developed using 3D images. Folded metal occurrence can be associated to a specific region of topography and to an increase in the graphite area fraction. Experimental evidences were provided revealing cross-sectional images of grooves using a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the present investigation shows that a larger amount of folded metal was related to the microstructure of thicker walls of compact graphite iron.

  10. Quantitative analysis of leaching of different metals in human saliva from dental casting alloys: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramashanker Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Metal-based dentures show maximum leaching immediately after wearing of the prosthesis which decreased significantly over the period of 3 days. Cr and Mn were the metal ions mainly found in saliva of cast partial denture wearer. No concentration of cobalt, molybdenum (Mo and iron (Fe was found in saliva of metal base denture wearer. There was a significant change in concentration of elutes in saliva in first 72 h/3 days making time an effective variable was observed.

  11. Off-loading of hindfoot and midfoot neuropathic ulcers using a fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Eran; Daniels, Timothy R; Finestone, Aharon; Nof, Matityahu

    2007-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a method of off-loading large neuropathic ulcers of the hindfoot and midfoot. The device used is composed of a fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup and a window around the ulcer. A retrospective study of 14 diabetic and nondiabetic patients was performed. All had chronic plantar hindfoot or midfoot neuropathic ulcers that failed to heal with conventional treatment methods. A fiberglass total contact cast with a metal stirrup was applied. A window was made over the ulcer to allow daily ulcer care. The average duration of ulcer before application of the metal stirrup was 26 + 13.2 (range 7 to 52) months. The ulcer completely healed in 12 of the 14 patients treated. The mean time for healing was 10.8 weeks for midfoot ulcers and 12.3 weeks for heel ulcers. Complications developed in four patients: three developed superficial wounds and one developed a full-thickness wound. In three of these four patients, local wound care was initiated, and the stirrup cast was continued to complete healing of the primary ulcer. A fiberglass cast with a metal stirrup is an effective off-loading device for midfoot and hindfoot ulcers. It is not removable and does not depend on patient compliance. The window around the ulcer allows for daily wound care, drainage of the ulcer and the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) treatment. The complication rate is comparable to that of total contact casting.

  12. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2-4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30-40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four methods evaluated in this study.

  13. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  14. Damage evolution in freeze cast metal/ceramic composites exhibiting lamellar microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution in a single domain aluminium/alumina freeze-cast composite has been examined using 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT. A single domain was extracted and loaded incrementally at an orientation of 45° to the lamellae, with the damage being assessed after each of eight compressive loading steps. Prior to loading, significant damage was observed at the metal-ceramic interface – this is thought to have formed during machining and can be ascribed to weak interfacial bonding associated with the Cu coating applied to the ceramic preform prior to metal infiltration. Further interfacial damage was seen to initiate after loading to 170MPa and to develop with each subsequent load step. Damage was also observed in the ceramic lamellae, with a series of parallel cracks forming across the alumina, perpendicular to the domain orientation. These sets of parallel, intra-lamellae cracks were closely spaced, but initiated independently, with coalescence only occurring at higher loads. Both the interfacial and intra-lamellae cracking initiated after loading to 170MPa, with the intra-lamellae cracks propagating into the metal matrix after loading to 240MPa. The cracks in the ceramic lamellae were found to form and develop independent of the interfacial cracks, with discrete crack paths and morphologies being observed in each case. Despite this, the underlying driving force was the same for each damage mode, with crack propagation being driven by an elastic-plastic mismatch between the metal matrix and ceramic lamellae.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of graded impedance impactors for gas gun experiments from tape cast metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L. Peter; Orlikowski, Daniel; Nguyen, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile and impactor planarity in gas gun experiments

  16. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Steel Continuous Casting Billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ying; Wang, Yufeng; Li, Shusen; Zhang, Lifeng; Zuo, Xiangjun; Lekakh, Simon N.; Peaslee, Kent

    2014-08-01

    This work applied automated particle analysis to study non-metallic inclusions in steel. Compared with traditional methods, the approach has the advantage of capturing the morphology, measuring the size, recording the original positions, and identifying the composition of inclusions on a selected area in a short time. The morphology and composition of typical inclusions were analyzed using partial acid extraction and discussed through thermodynamic calculation. Steel samples were collected from the entire cross section of billets cast during times of steady state and ladle change. The spatial distribution of inclusions agreed well with the measurement of the total oxygen. The spatial distribution of inclusions was plotted to represent the entrapment positions of inclusions on the casting strand and their concentration on the cross section of the billet. Also, regarding the different size and type of inclusions, the spatial distribution of classified inclusions was explored such as the distribution of sulfide, oxide, and high sodium and potassium content inclusions. The sufficient information could be used to identify the source of inclusions and guide the steel refining process.

  17. Effect of electric arc, gas oxygen torch and induction melting techniques on the marginal accuracy of cast base-metal and noble metal-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cogolludo, Pablo; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most appropriate alloy composition and melting technique by evaluating the marginal accuracy of cast metal-ceramic crowns. Seventy standardised stainless-steel abutments were prepared to receive metal-ceramic crowns and were randomly divided into four alloy groups: Group 1: palladium-gold (Pd-Au), Group 2: nickel-chromium-titanium (Ni-Cr-Ti), Group 3: nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and Group 4: titanium (Ti). Groups 1, 2 and 3 were in turn subdivided to be melted and cast using: (a) gas oxygen torch and centrifugal casting machine (TC) or (b) induction and centrifugal casting machine (IC). Group 4 was melted and cast using electric arc and vacuum/pressure machine (EV). All of the metal-ceramic crowns were luted with glass-ionomer cement. The marginal fit was measured under an optical microscope before and after cementation using image analysis software. All data was subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Duncan's multiple range test was run for post-hoc comparisons. The Student's t-test was used to investigate the influence of cementation (α=0.05). Uncemented Pd-Au/TC samples achieved the best marginal adaptation, while the worst fit corresponded to the luted Ti/EV crowns. Pd-Au/TC, Ni-Cr and Ti restorations demonstrated significantly increased misfit after cementation. The Ni-Cr-Ti alloy was the most predictable in terms of differences in misfit when either torch or induction was applied before or after cementation. Cemented titanium crowns exceeded the clinically acceptable limit of 120μm. The combination of alloy composition, melting technique, casting method and luting process influences the vertical seal of cast metal-ceramic crowns. An accurate use of the gas oxygen torch may overcome the results attained with the induction system concerning the marginal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Sphere Properties on Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Cast Composite Metal Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Garcia-Avila

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-steel composite metal foams (Al-S CMF are manufactured using steel hollow spheres, with a variety of sphere carbon content, surface roughness, and wall porosity, embedded in an Aluminum matrix through gravity casting technique. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the material were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and quasi-static compressive testing. Higher carbon content and surface roughness in the sphere wall were responsible for an increase in formation of intermetallic phases which had a strengthening effect at lower strain levels, increasing the yield strength of the material by a factor of 2, while higher sphere wall porosity resulted in a decrease on the density of the material and improving its cushioning and ductility maintaining its energy absorption capabilities.

  19. Fabrication and Tribological Behavior of Stir Cast Mg/B4C Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Bala, Niraj

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) have emerged as good alternative material to conventional materials due to their promising advanced properties. In the present work, magnesium-based metal matrix composites (MMMCs) reinforced with B4C particles were successfully fabricated by cost-effective conventional stir casting technique. MMMCs with an average particle size of 63 µm and different weight percent (wt pct) of B4C between 3 and 12 were fabricated. Wear tests were carried out using a pin-on-disk against a steel disk under dry sliding condition at loads that varied between 1 and 5 kg at fixed sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The wear data clearly showed that wear resistance of cast composites is better than that of unreinforced magnesium, which is attributed to dispersion hardening caused by carbide particles. An increase in wt pct of B4C showed the wear resistance and hardness to increase significantly. The wear rate and coefficient of friction increased with an increase in applied load. The SEM and EDS analysis of the worn surfaces delineated the dominant wear mechanisms to be abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation under the different sliding conditions. At lower loads, the wear mechanism transformed from severe abrasive wear in pure magnesium (Mg) to mild abrasion, slight delamination, and oxidation in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composite. At higher loads, severe abrasion, adhesion, delamination, and oxidation were found to be the major wear mechanisms in pure Mg, whereas in the Mg/12 wt pct B4C fabricated composites the corresponding mechanisms were mild abrasion, mild adhesion, slight delamination, and oxidation.

  20. Alternative granular media for the metal casting industry. Final report, September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichelaar, P.J.; Ramrattan, S.N.; Tieder, R.E. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Silica sand for foundry use is inexpensive to purchase, readily transported and widely available. As a result, it is universally used. However, three factors are becoming increasingly significant as more environmental regulations are promulgated. First, the disposal of waste foundry sand has become an excessively burdensome cost. Second, the phase changes which occur in the silica structure on heating and cooling cause thermal breakdown of the sand into smaller unusable fractions. Third, silica is a relatively weak mineral. Alternatives to silica sand which can withstand the rigors of repetitive reuse must be seriously evaluated as a way to control production costs of the domestic metal casting industry. Chromite sands, olivine sands and carbon sands have each been successfully used to solve operating problems and thus have developed their specific niches in the foundry materials inventory. However, there are several other materials that are candidates for replacing silica sand, such as fused alumina, sintered bauxite and sintered oil well proppants. These media, and others that are generically similar, are manufactured for specific purposes. Compositions and shapes could be readily tailored for used in a metal casting environment of total recycling and materials conservation. This study examines materials that are readily available as alternatives to silica sand from a functionality perspective and a cost perspective. Some of the alternative materials are natural and others are synthetic and thus referring to them as ``sands`` has the potential to cause confusion; the generic term ``granular medium`` is used in this study to mean any material that could functionally substitute for silica sand in the foundry process.

  1. Influence of Rare Earth Metals on Microstructure and Inclusions Morphology G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the microstructure and morphology of non-metallic inclusions of G17CrMo5-5 cast carbon steel The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time about 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The REM was in the form of mishmetal of the composition 49, 8% Ce, 21, 8% La, 17, 1% Nd, 5, 5% Pr and 5, 35% the rest of REM. Therareearth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace.

  2. The influence of surface condition on the metal dusting behavior of cast and wrought chromia forming alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermse, C.G.M.; Asteman, H.; Ijzerman, R.M.; Jakobi, D.

    2013-01-01

    The current work investigated the impact of surface condition on the metal dusting behavior of chromia forming alloys. Five commercial alloys were included in the study, wrought 800H, 353MA, and cast G4859, G4852 Micro, and ET45 Micro, these alloys have a chromium and nickel content in the range of

  3. Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These

  4. Effect of recasting on element release from base metal dental casting alloys in artificial saliva and saline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K.; Kumar Shetty, K. Harish; Shetty, A. Nityananda; Nandish, Bantarahalli Thopegowda

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the concentration of ion release from recasted base metal alloys in various pH conditions using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Materials and Methods: Specimens of commercially available dental casting alloys (cobalt [Co]-chromium [Cr] and nickel [Ni]- chromium [Cr]) were prepared using lost-wax casting techniques and were stored in the test solution for 1 week and 4 weeks, and ions released during chemical corrosion were detected using AAS. Results: An increase in the quantity of ion release was observed with recasting. These changes were higher after twice recasting in Ni-Cr alloy. PMID:29279626

  5. An Investigation on Metallic Ion Release from Four Dental Casting Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nejatidanesh

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Element release from dental casting alloys into the oral environment is of clinical concern and is considered to be a potential health problem to all patients.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the metallic ion release of four base metal alloys.Materials and Methods: Two Ni-Cr (Minalux and Supercast and two Co-Cr alloys (Minalia and Wironit were examined. Nine specimens of each type were prepared in 13×11×1.4 mm dimensions and each of the four alloys (3 specimens per group were conditioned in artificial saliva at 37 c for one, three and seven days.The conditioning media were analyzed for element-release using Inductive CoupledPlasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (ICPAES. Collected data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan multiple range test (P< 0.05.Results: The greatest amount of element release was seen after seven days (134.9 ppb Supercast, 159.2 ppb Minalux, 197.2 ppb Minalia, and 230.2 ppb Wironit. There was a significant difference between the released elements from the alloys after the three conditioning times (p<0.001.Conclusion: Element release from the studied alloys is proportional to the conditioning time. The Ni-Cr alloys tested in this investigation were more resistant to corrosion as compared to the Co-Cr alloys in artificial saliva. Supercast had the highest corrosion resistance.

  6. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  7. Yttria coating on quartz mould inner surface for fabrication of metal fuel slug using injection casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod, A.V.; Hemanth Kumar, S.; Manivannan, A.; Muralidaran, P.; Anthonysamy, S.; Sudha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Quartz moulds are used for casting metal alloy of U-Zr slugs by injection casting process. Ceramic (Y 2 O 3 ) coating on inner surface of the quartz mould is provided to avoid silica contamination in the fuel slugs during casting. Experiments were carried out to standardise the coating process and optimising various parameters such as particle size of Y 2 O 3 , choice of suitable binder, method for application of coating, drying and sintering at high temperature to ensure uniformity and strength of coating. Required Coating thickness of ∼40 μm was achieved on a quartz mould of inner diameter of 4.98±0.01mm. Experimental procedure for coating on inner surface of the quartz tubes using yttrium oxide is described in this work. (author)

  8. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  9. Study on interfacial heat transfer coefficient at metal/die interface during high pressure die casting process of AZ91D alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Zhi-peng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure die casting (HPDC process is one of the fastest growing and most efficient methods for the production of complex shape castings of magnesium and aluminum alloys in today’s manufacturing industry.In this study, a high pressure die casting experiment using AZ91D magnesium alloy was conducted, and the temperature profiles inside the die were Measured. By using a computer program based on solving the inverse heat problem, the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC was calculated and studied. The results show that the IHTC between the metal and die increases right after the liquid metal is brought into the cavity by the plunger,and decreases as the solidification process of the liquid metal proceeds until the liquid metal is completely solidified,when the IHTC tends to be stable. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient shows different characteristics under different casting wall thicknesses and varies with the change of solidification behavior.

  10. Material Properties of Various Light Metals Produced by Heated Mold Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Miyamoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt was made to develop high quality cast aluminum alloys via a new casting technology, e.g., the heated mold continuous casting (HMC with ultrasonic vibration (UV process. With the UV process in the continuous casting process, fine and spherical grains were obtained, where the lattice structure is formed similarly before the UV process while dislocation density increases. The mechanical properties of the UV-HMC Al alloys are higher than those for the related cast Al alloys without UV although still high material ductility is obtained. The lattice and dislocation characteristics of the continuous cast samples made with and without the UV processes were analyzed systematically by the EBSD observations to interrupt clearly their mechanical properties.

  11. Exploitation of rare earth metals in cast steel production for power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kasińska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experiments carried out on industrial melts. There has been tested the REM influence on carbon properties (0.20%C as well as austenitic cast steel Cr-Ni 18/8+Ti type.It was found that REM cause an essential improvement of cast steels impact strength and in case of austenitic cast steel – also the corrosion resistance improvement in boiling 65%HNO3 (Huey test.

  12. [Developing a plan of treatment with a cast metal frame removable partial denture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, D J; Barèl, J C; Keltjens, H M A M; de Baat, C; Creugers, N H J

    2011-02-01

    When considering prosthetic replacement of absent teeth, a treatment plan is necessary. In evaluating whether replacement of teeth is sensible, the causes and consequences of tooth loss must be considered. This concerns information about problems having to do with the patient, potential complications, purely prosthodontic problems, and specific problems. The patient-related problems require collecting data through patient history as well as a clinical and radiologic examination. Complications are risk-factors which negatively influence the prognosis of general health or of a treatment. Potential complications should be eliminated as much as possible through a preliminary treatment. Purely prosthodontic problems are conditions in the area of absence of several teeth or parts of them, and in the area of occlusal and mandibular stability and articulation. Specific problems may be related to inadequate interocclusal space and the quality of the abutment teeth. A cast metal frame removable partial denture may be a relatively inexpensive and minimally treatment alternative for an expensive and complicated treatment with 1 or more fixed partial dentures.

  13. A comparative study on microgap of premade abutments and abutments cast in base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalithamma, Jaini Jaini; Mallan, Sreekanth Anantha; Murukan, Pazhani Appan; Zarina, Rita

    2014-06-01

    The study compared the marginal accuracy of premade and cast abutments. Premade titanium, stainless steel, and gold abutments formed the control groups. Plastic abutments were cast in nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium and grade IV titanium. The abutment/implant interface was analyzed. Analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test revealed no significant difference in mean marginal microgap between premade gold and titanium abutments and between premade stainless steel and cast titanium abutments. Statistically significant differences (P < .001) were found among all other groups.

  14. A comparative evaluation of the effect of dentin desensitizers on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saili M Chandavarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Desensitizers are used to reduce dentin hypersensitivity. They affect the surface texture of prepared dentin and may alter the retention of fixed restorations. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the effect of dentin desensitizers on the retention of complete cast metal crowns luted with glass ionomer cement. Subjects and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted human premolars were subjected to standardized tooth preparation (20° total convergence, 4 mm axial height with a computer numerically controlled machine. Individual cast metal crowns were fabricated from a base metal alloy. Dentin desensitizers included none (control, a glutaraldehyde (GLU based primer (Gluma desensitizer, casein phosphopeptide (CPP-amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP (GC Mousse, erbium, chromium: YSGG laser (Waterlase MD Turbo, Biolase and Pro-Argin (Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief desensitizing polishing paste. After desensitization, crowns were luted with glass ionomer cement and kept for 48 h at 37°C in 100% relative humidity. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine by applying a load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis included One-way ANOVA, followed by the Scheffe post-hoc test with P < 0.05. Results: All dentin desensitizers showed significantly different values: Pro-Argin (4.10 Megapascals [Mpa] < CPP-ACP (4.01 mpa < GLU based primer (3.87 Mpa < Virgin dentin (3.65 Mpa < LASER (3.37 Mpa. Conclusions : On comparing the effect of prepared virgin dentin, GLU based primer, CPP-ACP, LASER and Pro-Argin on the retention of complete cast metal crowns luted with glass ionomer cement on prepared teeth, it can be concluded that Pro-Argin and CPP-ACP showed the best retention in this in vitro study.

  15. Derivative thermo analysis of the Al-Si cast alloy with addition of rare earths metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krupiński

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the dependence between chemical composition, structure and cooling rate of Al–Si aluminium cast alloy was investigated. For studying of the structure changes the thermo-analysis was carried out, using the UMSA (Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer device. For structure investigation optical and electron scanning microscopy was used, phase and chemical composition of the Al cast alloy also using qualitative point-wise EDS microanalysis.

  16. Quantitative analysis of leaching of different metals in human saliva from dental casting alloys: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Ramashanker; Gautam, Roopali; Chand, Pooran; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Singh, Raghuwar Dayal; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The issue of biomaterial-derived ionic release in various sites of the human body has attracted the interest of many investigators because of the possibility that debris or degradation products elicit a foreign body reaction or have a role in the induction of pathological processes. The purpose was to evaluate the saliva of denture wearers after insertion of the prosthesis for leaching of metals from metallic denture. Total 20 subjects of age group of 40-60 years including both males (10) and females (10) were selected for the study. Total subjects were divided into 2 groups each containing 10 subjects, Group I (control group): Subjects having dentition intact up to second molar and free of any dental restoration; Group II (study group): Partially edentulous subjects rehabilitated with cast-metal removable partial denture. Saliva samples were taken at three stages that is, 1 h, 24 h and 72 h after the denture insertion from subjects of study group as well as from the control group. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to estimate the concentration of elemental ions. Obtained data's were analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 15.0 statistical analysis software. The values were represented in a number (%) and mean ± standard deviation. At 1 h, 24 h and 72 h after the denture insertion in study group, chromium (Cr) had statistically significant higher mean concentration as compared to manganese (Mn) (P Metal-based dentures show maximum leaching immediately after wearing of the prosthesis which decreased significantly over the period of 3 days. Cr and Mn were the metal ions mainly found in saliva of cast partial denture wearer. No concentration of cobalt, molybdenum (Mo) and iron (Fe) was found in saliva of metal base denture wearer. There was a significant change in concentration of elutes in saliva in first 72 h/3 days making time an effective variable was observed.

  17. The effect of veneering on the marginal fit of CAD/CAM-generated, copy-milled, and cast metal copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Caglar, Ipek; Hologlu, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    This in vitro study investigated the marginal fit of metal and zirconia copings before and after veneering on dies with shoulder/chamfer (s/c) finish lines. Using CAD/CAM, ten (n = 10) each s/c zirconia (NZ) copings and ten (n = 10) each s/c metal (MM) copings were generated. As controls, ten (n = 10) each s/c zirconia copings were copy-milled (ZZ) and ten (n = 10) each s/c metal copings were cast (CC). The vertical marginal discrepancy of the copings was measured at 20 predefined spots of the circular shoulder and chamfer finish lines in microns (μm) before and after a first and a second veneering firing using a stereomicroscope at ×40 magnification. Data were statistically analyzed, and the comparisons of CAD/CAM-milled (NZ, MM), copy-milled (ZZ), and cast (CC) copings before and after veneering were made at a significance level of p veneering firing (40 ± 8/42 ± 7). MM copings showed gap values similar to NZ. Second firings did not significantly increase gaps in all groups except ZZ2 of chamfer finish line. Veneering increased the marginal gap width of copings. Within the limits of this in vitro study, aesthetic ceramic veneering of CAD/CAM-generated copings caused a statistically significant but tolerable loss of marginal fit precision.

  18. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys. Part 4: effect of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Akira; Ogura, Hideo

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a casting investment that prevents the blackening of the cast surface of noble metal alloys. Experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which a hydroxide, namely Mg(OH)2 or Ca(OH)2, was added. An Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The addition of both hydroxides showed a significant effect on the color of as-cast surfaces, which was improved with increase in additive content. When Mg(OH)2 or Ca(OH)2 was added at more than 4.0 mass% to the investment, it was useful in preventing the blackening of the as-cast surfaces of an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. As for differences in the effects between Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2, they were not found.

  19. Influence of liquid surface segregation on the pitting corrosion behavior of semi-solid metal high pressure die cast alloy F357

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal processing results in liquid segregation at the surface of the components. The pitting behaviour of this surface layer of semi-solid metal processed alloy F357 was compared with the centre (or bulk) of cast plates in 3.5% Na...

  20. Wear and Friction Behavior of Stir Cast Al-TiB2 Metal Matrix Composites with Various Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Al- TiB2 metal matrix composites are fabricated using stir cast method and its tribological characterization is done using three different lubricants. Tribological studies are performed in a multi-tribotester using block-on-roller configuration under 25-75 N loads and 400-600 rpm rotational speeds. Four different weight percentages of TiB2 are considered in this study. Comparison between dry condition and lubricated conditions is gleaned to differentiate wear and friction characteristics and SEM images are taken to fortify them. Lubricated conditions yield large reduction in wear and friction compared to dry condition.

  1. Determination of the heat transfer coefficient at the metal-die interface for high pressure die cast AlSi9Cu3Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Alastair; Thornhill, David; Armstrong, Cecil; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    When simulating the High Pressure Die Casting 'HPDC' process, the heat transfer coefficient 'HTC' between the casting and the die is critical to accurately predict the quality of the casting. To determine the HTC at the metal-die interface a production die for an automotive engine bearing beam, Die 1, was instrumented with type K thermocouples. A Magmasoft simulation model was generated with virtual thermocouple points placed in the same location as the production die. The temperature traces from the simulation model were compared to the instrumentation results. Using the default simulation HTC for the metal-die interface, a poor correlation was seen, with the temperature response being much less for the simulation model. Because of this, the HTC at the metal-die interface was modified in order to get a better fit. After many simulation iterations, a good fit was established using a peak HTC of 42,000 W/m 2 K, this modified HTC was further validated by a second instrumented production die, proving that the modified HTC gives good correlation to the instrumentation trials. The updated HTC properties for the simulation model will improve the predictive capabilities of the casting simulation software and better predict casting defects. - Highlights: → The HTC between the casting and die is critical to predict casting quality. → A Magmasoft simulation model was used to simulate the casting die. → A good fit to the simulation model was established using a peak HTC of 42 kW/m 2 K. → The improved simulation model will improve the accuracy to predict casting defects.

  2. The influence of environment on corrosion of cast iron and carbon steel representing samples of outdoor metal technical heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelec, M.; Marczak, J.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Zatorska, A.; Sarzynski, A.; Czyz, K.; Zasada, D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of annual measurements of the corrosion progress at test samples of cast iron and carbon steel placed in different natural environments. Comparative tests were performed in two outdoor stations, one at the Railway Museum in central Warsaw and one at the location of a Railway Museum in the small town of Sochaczew, 50 km west of Warsaw. The influence of surface roughness on the development of corrosion was determined by two kinds of treatment of all sample surfaces - metal brush or grinding. Stratigraphy and composition of corrosion products in quarterly periods were analyzed with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman laser spectroscopy. Comparative tests were performed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) system equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and micro-chemical analytical methods. The corrosion layers on carbon steel have proven to be thicker on average than on cast iron, and thicker on the brushed parts of both materials. Furthermore, a thicker corrosion layer was found on the cast iron test samples exposed in Sochaczew than in Warsaw. Different iron oxides, namely lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite and magnetite were identified in the surface Raman spectra of corrosion layers, the last compound only in the sample from Sochaczew. SEM EDS measurements of surface elemental concentrations showed a higher concentration of sulfur in all samples from Sochaczew. Registered LIBS spectra have been additionally analyzed with statistical approach, using Factorial Analysis (FA). Results generally confirmed conclusions drawn from SEM/Raman/LIBS results.

  3. Heavy Metals in ToxCast: Relevance to Food Safety (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to heavy metals occurs through food contamination due to industrial processes, vehicle emissions and farming methods. Specific toxicity endpoints have been associated with metal exposures, e.g. lead and neurotoxicity; however, numerous varieties of heavy metals hav...

  4. Internal fit of single crowns produced by CAD-CAM and lost-wax metal casting technique assessed by the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn Einar; Rønold, Hans Jacob; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-03-01

    Whether single crowns produced by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have an internal fit comparable to crowns made by lost-wax metal casting technique is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the internal fit of single crowns produced with the lost-wax and metal casting technique with that of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique. The internal fit of 5 groups of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique was compared with that of single crowns produced in cobalt-chromium with the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. Comparison was performed using the triple-scan protocol; scans of the master model, the crown on the master model, and the intaglio of the crown were superimposed and analyzed with computer software. The 5 groups were milled presintered zirconia, milled hot isostatic pressed zirconia, milled lithium disilicate, milled cobalt-chromium, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The cement space in both the mesiodistal and buccopalatal directions was statistically smaller (Pcrowns made by the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique compared with that of crowns produced by the CAD-CAM technique. Single crowns made using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique have better internal fit than crowns produced using the CAD-CAM technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Processing and Characterization of Functionally Graded Aluminum (A319)—SiCp Metallic Composites by Centrifugal Casting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, E.; Jacob, Jibin C.; Rajan, T. P. D.; Joseph, M. A.; Pai, B. C.

    2016-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) are successfully adopted for the design and fabrication of engineering components with location-specific properties. The present study describes the processing and characterization of A319 Aluminum functionally graded metal matrix composites (FGMMC) with 10 and 15 wt pct SiCp reinforcements. The liquid stir casting method is used for composite melt preparation followed by FGMMC formation by vertical centrifugal casting method. The process parameters used are the mold preheating temperature of 523 K (250 °C), melt pouring temperature of 1013 K (740 °C), and mold rotation speed of 1300 rpm. The study analyzes the distribution and concentration of reinforcement particles in the radial direction of the FGMMC disk along with the effects of gradation on density, hardness, mechanical strength, the variation in coefficient of thermal expansion and the wear resistance properties at different zones. Microstructures of FGMMC reveal an outward radial gradient distribution of reinforcements forming different zones. Namely, matrix-rich inner, transition, particles-rich outer, and chill zone of a few millimeters thick at the outer most periphery of the casting are formed. From 10-FGM, a radial shift in the position of SiCp maxima is observed in 15-FGM casting. The mechanical characterization depicts enhanced properties for the particle-rich zone. The hardness shows a graded nature in correlation with particle concentration and a maximum of 94.4 HRB has been obtained at the particle-rich region of 15-FGM. In the particle-rich zone, the lowest CTE value of 20.1 µm/mK is also observed with a compressive strength of 650 MPa and an ultimate tensile strength of 279 MPa. The wear resistance is higher at the particle-rich zone of the FGMMC.

  6. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 1. Application of developed investment for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Akira; Goto, Shin-ichi; Wakamatsu, Yasushi; Yara, Atushi; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a casting investment that prevents the blackening of the cast surface of noble metal alloys. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which the metallic powders such as boron (B), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al) and titanium (Ti) were added as oxidizing agents. An Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the addition of each metal powder was evaluated from the color difference between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. The color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. A lower mean value in the color difference was obtained at 0.25-1.00 mass% B content. B and Al are useful as an additive in a gypsum-bonded investment to prevent the blackening of an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The effects of Si and Ti powder addition could not be found.

  7. The effect of occlusal surface relief of dies on marginal adaptation of metal-ceramic casting copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Fariba Saleh; Abolfazli, Nader; Mahboub, Farhang; Razavi, Fariba Emadian

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of occlusal relief of dies on internal adaptation of metal-ceramic casting copings. Standardized preparations were made on 80 extracted third molar teeth. Impressions were made with poly(vinyl siloxane), and stone dies were prepared. Dies were covered with four layers of die spacer, covering the entire preparation together with the occlusal surface excluding the apical 0.5 mm of the preparation in group 1 (40 specimens), and covering the same area excluding the occlusal surface in group 2 (40 specimens). Copings were cast using nickel-chromium-based metal ceramic alloy and cemented using zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were sectioned along the long axis. Internal discrepancies were recorded with a 0.001-mm resolution stereoscope at 6 points: the middle of the occlusal surface (MO), middle of the lingual wall (ML), middle of the buccal wall (MB), middle of the buccal shoulder finish line (MSH), middle of the lingual chamfer finish line (MCH), and middle of the buccal bevel finish line (MBL). Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Significance level was set at p die with no relief. Leaving the occlusal part of the die uncovered with the die spacer improved the crown seating considerably in the occlusal surface as well as shoulder and bevel margins. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Rare earth metals influence on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH and G17CrMo5-5 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on modification influence of REM on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH cast carbon steel and G17CrMo5-5 high-temperature cast steel. The tests have been performed on successive industrial melts. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metals were modified. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. There were tested mechanical properties (Re,Rm, plastic properties (A5,Z and impact strength (KV, and on the basis of the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated. It was noticed that the REM modification brings essential increase of impact strength as well as fracture toughness determined by KJC factor.

  9. Arrays of hollow out-of-plane microneedles made by metal electrodeposition onto solvent cast conductive polymer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, I; Liu, Y; Stoeber, B; Häfeli, U O

    2013-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery using microneedles is a technique to potentially replace hypodermic needles for injection of many vaccines and drugs. Fabrication of hollow metallic microneedles so far has been associated with time-consuming steps that restrict batch production of these devices. Here, we are presenting a novel method for making metallic microneedles with any desired height, spacing, and lumen size. In our process, we use solvent casting to coat a mold, which contains an array of pillars, with a conductive polymer composite layer. The conductive layer is then used as a seed layer in a metal electrodeposition process. To characterize the process, the conductivity of the polymer composite with respect to different filler concentrations was investigated. In addition, plasma etching of the polymer was characterized. The electroplating process was also studied further to control the thickness of the microneedle array plate. The strength of the microneedle devices was evaluated through a series of compression tests, while their performance for transdermal drug delivery was tested by injection of 2.28 µm fluorescent microspheres into animal skin. The fabricated metallic microneedles seem appropriate for subcutaneous delivery of drugs and microspheres. (paper)

  10. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  11. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  12. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-11-01

    The study examines current and emerging melting technologies and discusses their technical barriers to scale-up issues and research needed to advance these technologies, improving melting efficiency, lowering metal transfer heat loss, and reducing scrap.

  14. Cast Metal Occlusals: A Vital Tool for Single Complete Denture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti S Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occlusal surface of the acrylic teeth of a single complete denture in opposition to natural dentition wears out with its use for a longer period of time, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, change in centric occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances etc. Re-fabrication of new denture set over a period of time, inclusion of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. are some of the treatment options available to counteract that problem. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, some of which are time-consuming, expensive and require many cumbersome steps. This clinical case describes the sequence of steps for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on single complete denture using the lost wax technique.

  15. Comparison of Fracture Strength of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Two Different Cast Metallic Post Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Haghighi Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Endodontically treated teeth are more prone to fracture. The post and core are often used to provide the necessary retention for prosthetic rehabilitation. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to: 1 compare the fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth restored either with Nickel-Chromium (Ni- Cr post or Non- Precious Gold-color alloy (NPG post compared to the control group and 2 evaluate the fracture site in each group. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was carried out for 45 extracted maxillary premolars. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (n=15. Group1: restored with NPG post and core, group2: restored with Ni-Cr post and core, and group 3, no post and core were used after endodontic treatment and the access cavity was filled with amalgam. Failure force was recorded in Newton when root or remaining coronal structure fracture was occurred. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student t-test and Tukey HSD test to compare the three groups. Results: There was a statistically significant difference among all groups (P<0.05. Fracture resistance of the teeth restored by NPG posts was significantly higher than those restored by Ni- Cr (P<0.001. Results showed that the fracture mainly occurred in the root of the teeth restored with Ni- Cr and NPG post while fractures occurred in the core portion of the teeth restored with amalgam. Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicated that the fracture strength of the teeth without using cast post and core was significantly lower than the teeth restored with cast post and core. Also the teeth restored by NPG post had a significantly higher fracture resistance than Ni-Cr posts.

  16. Corrosion resistance of cast irons and titanium alloys as reference engineered metal barriers for use in basalt geologic storage: a literature assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, L.A.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A survey and assessment of the literature on the corrosion resistance of cast irons and low-alloy titanium are presented. Selected engineering properties of cast iron and titanium are briefly described; however, the corrosion resistance of cast iron and titanium in aqueous solutions or in soils and their use in a basalt repository are emphasized. In evaluating the potential use of cast iron and titanium as structural barrier materials for long-lived nuclear waste packages, it is assumed that titanium has the general corrosion resistance to be used in relatively thin cross sections whereas the cost and availability of cast iron allows its use even in very thick cross sections. Based on this assumption, the survey showed that: The uniform corrosion of low-alloy titanium in a basalt environment is expected to be extremely low. A linear extrapolation of general corrosion rates with an added corrosion allowance suggests that a 3.2- to 6.4-mm-thick wall may have a life of 1000 yr. Pitting and crevice corrosion are not likely corrosion modes in basalt ground waters. It is also unlikely that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in the commercially pure (CP) titanium alloy or in palladiumor molybdenum-alloyed titanium materials. Low-alloy cast irons may be used as barrier metals if the environment surrounding the metal keeps the alloy in the passive range. The solubility of the corrosion product and the semipermeable nature of the oxide film allow significant uniform corrosion over long time periods. A linear extrapolation of high-temperature corrosion rates on carbon steels and corrosion rates of cast irons in soils gives an estimated metal penetration of 51 to 64 mm after 1000 yr. A corrosion allowance of 3 to 5 times that suggests that an acceptable cast iron wall may be from 178 to 305 mm thick. Although they cannot be fully assessed, pitting and crevice corrosion should not affect cast iron due to the ground-water chemistry of basalt

  17. A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: A foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.H.

    1997-09-01

    The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. This volume provides project reports, case studies, and publicity information.

  18. A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: a foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension-enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. Each of the task areas includes specific subtasks which are described.

  19. Evaluation of marginal and internal gaps of metal ceramic crowns obtained from conventional impressions and casting techniques with those obtained from digital techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathika Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accuracy in fit of cast metal restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining the success of the restoration. A well-fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margin and with regard to its internal surface. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the marginal fit of metal ceramic crowns obtained by conventional inlay casting wax pattern using conventional impression with the metal ceramic crowns obtained by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technique using direct and indirect optical scanning. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study on preformed custom-made stainless steel models with former assembly that resembles prepared tooth surfaces of standardized dimensions comprised three groups: the first group included ten samples of metal ceramic crowns fabricated with conventional technique, the second group included CAD/CAM-milled direct metal laser sintering (DMLS crowns using indirect scanning, and the third group included DMLS crowns fabricated by direct scanning of the stainless steel model. The vertical marginal gap and the internal gap were evaluated with the stereomicroscope (Zoomstar 4; post hoc Turkey's test was used for statistical analysis. One-way analysis of variance method was used to compare the mean values. Results and Conclusion: Metal ceramic crowns obtained from direct optical scanning showed the least marginal and internal gap when compared to the castings obtained from inlay casting wax and indirect optical scanning. Indirect and direct optical scanning had yielded results within clinically acceptable range.

  20. Non-Gold Base Dental Casting Alloys. Volume 2. Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    nature of nickel release in human saliva at pH levels of 2 through 6 for 5, 10, 20, and 30 days, the specimens were immersed for 120 days. The results...poor thermal con- ductors--a property which can be beneficial to pulpal tissues. COPING - A designation for the metal substructure of a single unit

  1. Simplified model of metal solidification in the thin plane cavity of the casting mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In thc papcr, a innthcmatical inodcl of thc solidification of a thin-wallcd casting, which takcs into account thc proccss or filling thc mouldcavity wilh moltcn tnetal. has hccn proposed. Prcssurc and vcloci~yf iclds wcrc obtaincd by solving thc ino~ncntl~mctl iiations and rhccontinuity cquation. whilc [he thcrtnal hclds were ubtaincd by solving thc hcat conduction equation containing rhc convcciion tcrm.Making assumptions rcla~ingt o both thc rnatcrial and Ihc gcornctry e l t he rcgion. thc gcncral equations for continuity and rnomcntiun havcbccn rcduccd to single cquation for prcssurc. This approach Icads as to furlhcr si~npliryo f ~licf luid flow cnlculations, I11 thc tnodcl onctakes into account intcrdcpcndcncc Ihc hcat Iransfcr and fluid flow phcnomcna. Coupling of zhc thcrmnl and fluid flow plicnomcna hasbccn takcn into consideration by the changcs of thc fluidity fitnction and thcnnophysical paramctcrs of alloy with rcspcct lo thcrcrnperaLure. Thc problem has bccn solvcd by ihc finilc clcmcnt mcrhod.

  2. Casting technology for ODS steels - dispersion of nanoparticles in liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, M.; Grants, I.; Kaldre, I.; Bojarevics, A.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    Dispersion of particles to produce metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNC) can be achieved by means of ultrasonic vibration of the melt using ultrasound transducers. However, a direct transfer of this method to produce steel composites is not feasible because of the much higher working temperature. Therefore, an inductive technology for contactless treatment by acoustic cavitation was developed. This report describes the samples produced to assess the feasibility of the proposed method for nano-particle separation in steel. Stainless steel samples with inclusions of TiB2, TiO2, Y2O3, CeO2, Al2O3 and TiN have been created and analyzed. Additional experiments have been performed using light metals with an increased value of the steady magnetic field using a superconducting magnet with a field strength of up to 5 T.

  3. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities: Establishing methods for testing the safe design of ductile cast iron casks with higher content of metallic recycling material (EBER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, U.; Voelzke, H.; Droste, B.

    2001-01-01

    The safe design of ductile cast iron (DCI) casks with higher content of metallic recycling material is investigated. Based upon the requirements of transport and storage containers for radioactive waste appropriate test scenarios are defined. A representative accident scenario (5 m drop of a cubic DCI container with given material properties onto a hard repository ground simulating concrete target) is analysed numerically by means of the finite element method using three-dimensional models. Dynamic flow curves of ductile cast iron with different scrap metal additions which are necessary for precise elastic-plastic calculations are given. The accuracy and numerical stability of the resulting dynamic stresses and strains are investigated. A comparison between calculation results and measurements from drop tests with DCI containers shows, that known mechanical effects like bending vibrations of the container walls are reflected by the finite element models. The detailed stress analysis and knowledge of the material properties are prerequisites for the safety assessment concept developed for DCI casks with higher content of metallic recycling material. Equations for semi-elliptical surface cracks in the walls of a cubically shaped container which are used in the safety assessment concept are verified under dynamic conditions. This allows the specification of the maximum permissible size of crack-like flaws depending on the material quality. Mainly the fracture mechanical properties of ductile cast iron with higher content of metallic recycling material determine the suitability of such materials for transport and storage containers. (orig.) [de

  4. Production of Decorative Cast Metal Matrix Composites with a Complex Relief and Nonmetal Reinforcement Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Spasova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is relevant to the research of possibilities for the production of decorative complex relief metal matrix composites (MMCs of the “invitro” type, with unformed and unchanging reinforcement (strengthening phase in the process of creating a composite. The research on the methods of metal matrix composites development in this paper has been brought to the application of different space vacuum schemes for composite synthesisof vacuuming the space for composites synthesis by using the notion of the “capillary forming”. In this method the metal matrix (copper alloy melt was infiltrated in the space between the pellets of reinforcement phase (quartz particles – SiO2, whereas the classical method adopted for the obtaining MMCs “in vitro”, uses a mechanism of forced insertion of the reinforcement phase into the ready for use melt, followed by homogenization of the composite structure. In the particular case, because the obtained composite will have a complex relief three-dimensional surface, the conditions for compacting the building phases in the three directions x, y, z should be virtually equalized. In order to accomplish the task set, a laboratory system is developed. The experiments were conducted with laboratory equipment elaborated on the base of another equipment for "capillary forming" with extra vacuum. The structures of the obtained MMCs were tested by metallographic analysis.

  5. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Figure 55 Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. Figure 56 Aluminum die casting top surface. Risers removed... ladle and transferred to the shot sleeve. Upon pouring the metal, the ram is actuated and the casting made. To test the mechanical operation of...mnui i .MI iiiiiuH ’ -84- Figure 55. Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. ■ ■ wmmm*mm

  6. Ultrasonically nebulised electrolysed oxidising water: a promising new infection control programme for impressions, metals and gypsum casts used in dental hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Yu, X; Gu, Z

    2008-04-01

    Controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, metals and dental casts in dental hospitals remains a challenge. Current disinfection methods have various drawbacks. This study introduced and provided a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of using ultrasonically nebulised, electrolysed oxidising water (UNEOW) as a new infection control programme. UNEOW was produced from freshly generated electrolysed oxidising water (EOW). Samples of impressions, titanium and gypsum were subjected to the following treatments: (1) immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10min; (2) immersion in EOW for 10min; (3) exposure to UNEOW for 15, 30 and 45min; (4) no disinfection (control). Bactericidal efficacy was examined using Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores as indicators. Dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and effect of corrosion were also evaluated for the different samples. Results showed that except for B. subtilis var. niger spores on gypsum casts, the bacterial reduction log(10) values after 30-45min treatment with UNEOW were all above 4. The impression dimensional changes showed no difference between control and UNEOW groups, but both were significantly lower than the EOW and sodium hypochlorite groups (Pimpressions and gypsum casts. No assessable corrosion was found on the titanium surface after a 45min treatment with UNEOW. The findings indicated that use of UNEOW is a feasible and promising approach for controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, gypsum casts and denture metals in dental facilities.

  7. Optimization of neutron tomography for rapid hydrogen concentration inspection of metal castings

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, M R; Shields, K

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement describes a group of phenomena leading to the degradation of metal alloy properties. The hydrogen concentration in the alloy can be used as an indicator for the onset of embrittlement. A neutron tomography system has been optimized to perform nondestructive detection of hydrogen concentration in titanium aircraft engine compressor blades. Preprocessing of backprojection images and postprocessing of tomographic reconstructions are used to achieve hydrogen concentration sensitivity below 200 ppm weight. This paper emphasizes the postprocessing techniques which allow automated reporting of hydrogen concentration.

  8. Evaluating the Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) Method to Join Magnesium Castings to Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Stephen [FCA US LLC, Auburn Hills, MI (United States)

    2016-02-24

    This presentation discusses advantages and best practices for incorporating magnesium in automotive component applications to achieve substantial mass reduction, as well as some of the key challenges with respect to joining, coating, and galvanic corrosion, before providing an introduction and status update of the U.S. Department of Energy and Department of Defense jointly sponsored Upset Protrusion Joining (UPJ) process development and evaluation project. This update includes sharing performance results of a benchmark evaluation of the self-pierce riveting (SPR) process for joining dissimilar magnesium (Mg) to aluminum (Al) materials in four unique coating configurations before introducing the UPJ concept and comparing performance results of the joints made with the UPJ process to those made with the SPR process. Key results presented include: The benchmark SPR process can produce good joints in the MgAM60B-Al 6013 joint configuration with minimal cracking in the Mg coupons if the rivet is inserted from the Mg side into the Al side; Numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the SPR process separated after only 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing due to fracture of the rivet as a result of hydrogen embrittlement; For the same joint configurations, UPJ demonstrated substantially higher pre-corrosion joint strengths and post-corrosion joint strengths, primarily because of the larger diameter protrusion compared to smaller SPR rivet diameter and reduced degradation due to accelerated corrosion exposure; As with the SPR process, numerous bare Mg to bare Al joints made with the UPJ process also separated after 6-wks of accelerated corrosion testing, but unlike the SPR experience, the UPJ joints experienced degradation of the boss and head because of galvanic corrosion of the Mg casting, not hydrogen embrittlement of the steel rivet; In the configuration where both the Mg and Al were pretreated with Alodine 5200 prior to joining and the complete assembly was powder

  9. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    o Metal preparation o Ladle fill o Pouring 0 Mold shakeout o Casting cleanup o Inspection o Weld correction o Heat treatment and straightening o...presents a summary of foundry data for the 10 Hitchcock cast - ings. Included are the ladle chemistry and the pouring date, temperature, and time for each...properties, and full range stress- strain curves to failure for each specimen d. Chemistry of molten metal in ladle for each casting 3.4.3.2 The foundry

  10. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked.

  11. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Yasuhide; Yamada, Seiya

    2005-02-01

    In this research work for the metal fuel fabrication system (38 tHM/y), the studies of the concept of the main process equipments were performed based on the previous studies on the process design and the quality control system design. In this study the handling equipment of the products were also designed, according to these designs the handling periods were evaluated. Consequently the numbers of the equipments were assessed taking into account for the method of the blending the fuel composition. (1) Structural concept design of the major equipments, the fuel handling machine and the gravimetries in the main fabrication process. The structural concept were designed for the fuel composition blending equipment, the fuel pin assembling equipment, the sodium bonding equipment, the handling equipment for fuel slug palettes, the handling equipment for fuel pins and the gravimetries. (2) Re-assessment of the numbers of the equipments taking account of the handling periods. Based on the results of item (1) the periods were evaluated for the fuel slug and pin handling. Processing time of demolder is short, then the number of it is increased to two. Three vehicles are also added to transfer the slugs and a heel smoothly. (3) Design of the buffer storages. The buffer storages among the equipments were designed through the comparison of the process speed between the equipments taking into account for the handling periods. The required amount of the structural parts (for example cladding materials) was assessed for the buffer in the same manner and the amount of the buffer facilities were optimized. (author)

  12. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Metal-ceramic Bond Strengths of Nickel Chromium and Cobalt Chromium Alloys on Repeated Castings: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atluri, Kaleswara Rao; Vallabhaneni, Tapan Teja; Tadi, Durga Prasad; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Averneni, Premalatha

    2014-09-01

    Recasting the base metal alloys is done as a routine procedure in the dental laboratories whenever there is casting failure or to decrease the unit cost of a fixed partial denture. However, this procedure may affect the metal ceramic bond. Furthermore, it is unclear, as to which test closely predicts the bond strength of metal-ceramic interface. The aim was to compare the bond strength of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys with dental ceramic on repeated castings using shear bond test with a custom made apparatus. Sixty metal ceramic samples were prepared using Wiron 99 and Wirobond C, respectively. Three subgroups were prepared for each of the groups. The first subgroup was prepared by casting 100% fresh alloy. The second and third subgroups were prepared by adding 50% of fresh alloy and the remnants of the previous cast alloy. The bond load (N) between alloy and dental porcelain was evaluated using universal testing machine using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, which had a 2500-kgf load cell. Mean values were compared using oneway analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey's test and Student's t-test. The mean shear bond load of A0 (842.10N) was significantly higher than the load of A1 (645.50N) and A2 (506.28N). The mean shear bond load of B0 (645.57N) was significantly higher than the load of B1 (457.35N) and B2 (389.30N). Significant reduction in the bond strength was observed with the addition of the first recast alloy (A1 and B1) compared with the addition of second recast alloy (A2 and B2). Ni-Cr alloys (664.63N) showed higher bond strengths compared to that of Co-Cr alloys (497.41N). The addition of previously used base metal dental alloy for fabricating metal ceramic restorations is not recommended.

  14. Technical cost modelling for a novel semi-solid metal (SSM) casting processes for automotive component manufacturing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlale, NS

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available modelling and was compared with the cost of two competing technologies, forging and die casting. The cost model was developed in a spreadsheet using engineering models, data from literature and information provided by process experts. Estimated engineering...

  15. Biocompatibility effects of indirect exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2013-11-01

    The study employed a three-dimensional (3D) human-derived oral mucosal model to assess the biocompatibility of base-metal dental casting alloys ubiquitous in fixed prosthodontic and orthodontic dentistry. Oral mucosal models were generated using primary human oral keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells seeded onto human de-epidermidised dermal scaffolds. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) base-metal alloy immersion solutions were exposed to oral mucosal models for increasing time periods (2-72h). Analysis methodologies (histology, viable cell counts, oxidative stress, cytokine expression and toxicity) were performed following exposure. Ni-based alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly decreased cell viability (Palloy immersion solutions did not elicit adverse oxidative stress (P>0.4755) or cellular toxicity (Pmetal alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly detrimental effects to the oral mucosal models, it was possible to distinguish between Ni-Cr alloys using the approach employed. The study employed a 3D human-derived full-thickness differentiated oral mucosal model suitable for biocompatibility assessment of base-metal dental casting alloys through discriminatory experimental parameters. Increasing incidences of Ni hypersensitivity in the general population warrants serious consideration from dental practitioners and patients alike where fixed prosthodontic/orthodontic dental treatments are the treatment modality involved. The novel and analytical oral mucosal model has the potential to significantly contribute to the advancement of reproducible dental medical device and dental material appraisals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and application of inverse heat transfer model between liquid metal and shot sleeve in high pressure die casting process under non-shooting condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bo Yu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To predict the heat transfer behavior of A380 alloy in a shot sleeve, a numerical approach (inverse method is used and validated by high pressure die casting (HPDC experiment under non-shooting condition. The maximum difference between the measured and calculated temperature profiles is smaller than 3 ℃, which suggests that the inverse method can be used to predict the heat transfer behavior of alloys in a shot sleeve. Furthermore, the results indicate an increase in maximum interfacial heat flux density (qmax and heat transfer coefficient (hmax with an increase in sleeve filling ratio, especially at the pouring zone (S2 zone. In addition, the values of initial temperature (TIDS and maximum shot sleeve surface temperature (Tsimax at the two end zones (S2 and S10 are higher than those at the middle zone (S5. Moreover, in comparison with fluctuations in heat transfer coefficient (h with time at the two end zones (S2 and S10, 2.4-6.5 kW·m-2·K-1, 3.5-12.5 kW·m-2·K-1, respectively, more fluctuations are found at S5 zone, 2.1-14.7 kW·m-2·K-1. These differences could theoretically explain the formation of the three zones: smooth pouring zone, un-smooth middle zone and smooth zone, with different morphologies in the metal log under the non-shot casting condition. Finally, our calculations also reveal that the values of qmax and hmax cast at 680 ℃ are smaller than those cast at 660 ℃ and at 700 ℃.

  17. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  18. Acquisition of a Modified Suction Casting Instrument for the Fabrication of Radiation Tolerant Bulk nNanostructured Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-13

    may be used to turn samples in situ, without opening the chamber as shown in Fig. 2.2. Fig. 2.3 illustrates the operation principles of...without opening the chamber. Fig. 2.3. Schematics of the key component of the suction casting technique and its operation principle . Final progress...35, 8630, (1987). [24] L. F. Kiss , G. Huhn, T. Kemeny, J. Balogh, D. Kaptas, “Magnetic properties of Fe-Zr metastable phases”, J. Magn. Magn. Mater

  19. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Quarterly project status report, October 1--December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-12-31

    The first series of experiments at the CMI-Tech Center was successfully conducted on October 14 and 15 with the participation of the University of Michigan team. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the die surface temperatures (or near the surface) have a close correlation with the metal pressure profiles. Considering the difference in timing of the peak die temperatures, the high melt temperature and hotter die temperature for Inter 54 might cause a longer solidification time, and the pressure would decrease more slowly than for Inter 12. The slopes of the metal pressure profiles at the low pressure setting are almost linear. This may mean that the low metal pressure couldn`t effectively keep a pressure channel opened. In other words, as temperature decreased, the solid fraction increased and the solidified shell strengthened, and the pressure, which couldn`t overcome the resistance, would drop linearly. However, at the high pressure, there are inflection points in the pressure profiles. The inflection points are at about 8,500 psi for both the low and the high melt temperature settings. This suggests that the metal pressure was sufficient enough to overcome the resistance of the solidified shell before the inflection point was reached. A preliminary microstructure analysis shows that the dendrite arms at the location near the gate are much coarser than that at the top of the casting. The influence of intensification pressure on microstructure needs further verification and study.

  20. Evaluation of the marginal fit of metal copings fabricated on three different marginal designs using conventional and accelerated casting techniques: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Vaidya

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Among the three marginal designs studied, shoulder with bevel showed the best marginal fit with conventional as well as accelerated casting techniques. Accelerated casting technique could be a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional casting technique. The marginal fit between the two casting techniques showed no statistical difference.

  1. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  2. Developing technological process of obtaining giality casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Issagulov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the process of manufacturing castings using sand-resin forms and alloying furnace. Were the optimal technological parameters of manufacturing shell molds for the manufacture of castings of heating equipment. Using the same upon receipt of castings by casting in shell molds furnace alloying and deoxidation of the metal will provide consumers with quality products and have a positive impact on the economy in general engineering.

  3. Investigation of Elastic Deformation Mechanism in As-Cast and Annealed Eutectic and Hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al Metallic Glasses by Multiscale Strain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic deformation behaviors of as-cast and annealed eutectic and hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glasses (BMG were investigated on a basis of different strain-scales, determined by X-ray scattering and the strain gauge. The microscopic strains determined by Direct-space method and Reciprocal-space method were compared with the macroscopic strain measured by the strain gauge, and the difference in the deformation mechanism between eutectic and hypoeutectic Zr–Cu–Al BMGs was investigated by their correlation. The eutectic Zr50Cu40Al10 BMG obtains more homogeneous microstructure by free-volume annihilation after annealing, improving a resistance to deformation but degrading ductility because of a decrease in the volume fraction of weakly-bonded regions with relatively high mobility. On the other hand, the as-cast hypoeutectic Zr60Cu30Al10 BMG originally has homogeneous microstructure but loses its structural and elastic homogeneities because of nanocluster formation after annealing. Such structural changes by annealing might develop unique mechanical properties showing no degradations of ductility and toughness for the structural-relaxed hypoeutectic Zr60Cu30Al10 BMGs.

  4. Contact Pressure and Sliding Velocity Maps of the Friction, Wear and Emission from a Low-Metallic/Cast-Iron Disc Brake Contact Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wahlström

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 µm (PM10 from car disc brakes contribute up to 50% of the total non-exhaust emissions from road transport in the EU. These emissions come from the wear of the pad and rotor contact surfaces. Yet few studies have reported contact pressures and offered sliding speed maps of the friction, wear, and particle emission performance of disc brake materials at a material level. Such maps are crucial to understanding material behaviour at different loads and can be used as input data to numerical simulations. A low-metallic pad and grey cast-iron rotor contact pair commonly used today in passenger car disc brakes was studied using a pin-on-disc tribometer at twelve contact pressure and sliding speed combinations. Maps of the coefficient of friction, specific wear rate, particle number, and mass rate are presented and discussed.

  5. Hair casts

    OpenAIRE

    Sweta S Parmar; Kirti S Parmar; Bela J Shah

    2014-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions, which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  6. MicroCast: Additive Manufacturing of Metal Plus Insulator Structures with Sub-mm Features, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel method for fabricating electronics containing both metals and polymers can be adapted to quickly and effectively produce micro-well sensors. The process...

  7. Study of formation of aluminium billet in casting mold during continuous casting and forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stulov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Aluminium billet formation and solidified skin thickness distribution along casting mold walls at different levels of liquid metal were investigated. The casting mold consisted of two rotating inclined walls in its upper part and two reciprocating vertical walls. The reduction of skin of casting proceeded in the upper part of mold. Based on the experimental results obtained the influence of metal level in a casting mold on billet formation is determined> The reduction degree needed for continuous process of casting and forging is also defined. The change in skin thickness with billet length under various crystallization conditions is established

  8. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  9. Machinability and Tribological Properties of Stir Cast LM6/SiC/GR Hybrid Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahat Montasser S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on machining characteristics in turning of LM6/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites is made of (Al-11.8%Si/SiC/Gr hybrid metal matrix composites. The process performances such as porosity, wear rate of the composites, tool wear, tool life, specific modulus, surface roughness and material removal rate with equal weight fraction of SiC and Gr particulates of 3%, 7%, 10% and 13% reinforcement are investigated. This experimental analysis and test results on the machinability of Al/SiCMMC will provide essential guidelines to the manufacturers. Hybird metal matrix composites reinforced with graphite particles posses better machinability and tribological properties.

  10. Effect of Some Parameters on the Cast Component Properties in Hot Chamber Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Singh, Harvir

    2016-04-01

    Hot chamber die casting process is designed to achieve high dimensional accuracy for small products by forcing molten metal under high pressure into reusable moulds, called dies. The present research work is aimed at study of some parameters (as a case study of spring adjuster) on cast component properties in hot chamber die casting process. Three controllable factors of the hot chamber die casting process (namely: pressure at second phase, metal pouring temperature and die opening time) were studied at three levels each by Taguchi's parametric approach and single-response optimization was conducted to identify the main factors controlling surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the casting. Castings were produced using aluminium alloy, at recommended parameters through hot chamber die casting process. Analysis shows that in hot chamber die casting process the percentage contribution of second phase pressure, die opening time, metal pouring temperature for surface hardness is 82.48, 9.24 and 6.78 % respectively. While in the case of weight of cast component the contribution of second phase pressure is 94.03 %, followed by metal pouring temperature and die opening time (4.58 and 0.35 % respectively). Further for dimensional accuracy contribution of die opening time is 76.97 %, metal pouring temperature is 20.05 % and second phase pressure is 1.56 %. Confirmation experiments were conducted at an optimal condition showed that the surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the castings were improved significantly.

  11. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-09-30

    In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

  12. [Effect of the change in sulphate and dissolved oxygen mass concentration on metal release in old cast iron distribution pipes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-li; Shi, Bao-you; Sun, Hui-fang; Zhang, Zhi-huan; Gu, Jun-nong; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-09-01

    To understand the processes of corrosion by-product release and the consequent "red water" problems caused by the variation of water chemical composition in drinking water distribution system, the effect of sulphate and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on total iron release in corroded old iron pipe sections historically transporting groundwater was investigated in laboratory using small-scale pipe section reactors. The release behaviors of some low-level metals, such as Mn, As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni, in the process of iron release were also monitored. The results showed that the total iron and Mn release increased significantly with the increase of sulphate concentration, and apparent red water occurred when sulphate concentration was above 400 mg x L(-1). With the increase of sulfate concentration, the effluent concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni also increased obviously, however, the effluent concentrations of these metals were lower than the influent concentrations under most circumstances, which indicated that adsorption of these metals by pipe corrosion scales occurred. Increasing DO within a certain range could significantly inhibit the iron release.

  13. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  14. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - White Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  15. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron.Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron , uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditionalmaterials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  16. Assessment of heavy metal content and DNA damage in Hypsiboas faber (anuran amphibian) in coal open-casting mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocche, Jairo José; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Hainzenreder, Giana; Mendonça, Rodrigo Ávila; Peres, Poliana Bernardo; Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims Dos; Debastiani, Rafaela; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes de

    2013-07-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the heavy metal content in the tissues of Hypsiboas faber from a coal mining area and to compare the DNA damage in the blood cells of these animals with that of animals living in an unpolluted area. The heavy metal content was detected according to the technique of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and the DNA damage was assessed by the Comet assay. Our results reveal that the specimens of H. faber collected from the coal mining area exhibited elements of order Fe>Cu>Al>Zn>Rb>Mn>Br, independently of the organ. The values of Comet assay parameters (DNA damage index and DNA damage frequency) were significantly higher in specimens collected from the coal mining area than in the reference animals. Our study concludes that the coal mining residues are genotoxic to amphibians and may have adverse effects on soil, water, vegetation and wild animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of glass fiber and cast metal posts with different alloys for reconstruction of teeth without ferrule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Okumura, Marlice Hayumi Theles; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; Oliveira, Hiskell Francine Fernandes; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different materials for restoration of teeth without ferrule by three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). Five models simulating the maxillary central incisor and surrounding bone were simulated according to the type of post: glass fibre post (GFP) or cast metal post (CMP) with different alloys such as gold (Au), silver-palladium (AgPd), copper-aluminum (CuAl) and nickel-chromium (NiCr). Models were designed using Invesalius and Rhinoceros. FEAs were made using FEMAP and NeiNastran, with an applied axial force of 100 N and oblique occlusal load at 45°. Stress distribution among groups was analysed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post-hoc Tukey's test. The GFP showed the best stress distribution in the post, followed by CMP with Au, AgPd, CuAl and NiCr alloys, respectively (p  .05). Under oblique load, the GFP generated the highest values of tension among the models, followed by the CMP with NiCr alloy than other models (p < .001). The use of GFP resulted in a lower stress concentration in the post, but increased stress in the tooth without ferrule. The CMP with NiCr alloy exhibited the highest stress distribution among other CMP. To avoid higher stress in teeth, alloys of Au, AgPd and CuAl, respectively, are recommended.

  18. Effects of metallic Ti particles on the aging behavior and the influenced mechanical properties of squeeze-cast (SiCp+Ti)/7075Al hybrid composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Chen, Weiping; Yang, Chao; Zhu, Dezhi; Li, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    The effects of metallic Ti particles on the aging behavior of squeeze-cast (SiC p +Ti)/7075Al hybrid composites and the mechanical properties of the aging treated composites were investigated. Results shown that the precipitation hardening of the hybrid composites during aging processes was delayed due to the segregation of solute Mg atoms in the vicinity of the Ti particles even though the activation energy of the η′ precipitates in the hybrid composites was reduced when compared with the Ti particle-free composites. The segregation of the solute Mg atoms was facilitated as a result of the high diffusivity paths formed by the generated dislocations in the matrix induced by the thermal misfit between the SiC particle and the matrix. The smaller activation energy for the hybrid composite may attribute to a significant reduction in the nucleation rate of the dislocation nucleated η′ precipitates compared with the Ti particle-free composite. After aging treated under the optimum aging conditions, the tensile strength of both composites was improved because of the precipitation hardening of the matrix alloy. In contrast with the reduced ductility of the traditional Ti particle-free composites after aging treatment, the ductility of the Ti particle-containing composites was improved as a result of the strengthened interfaces between the Ti particles and the matrix alloy

  19. Infiltração marginal de agentes cimentantes em coroas metálicas fundidas Marginal microleakage of cast metal crowns luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomie Nakakuki de CAMPOS

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos principais objetivos do cimento, que fixa a restauração protética ao dente, é o selamento da fenda existente entre os mesmos. Para avaliar a infiltração marginal, foram feitos preparos cavitários padronizados, em 20 dentes naturais extraídos. As coroas totais foram fundidas em NiCr, sendo 10 cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco e 10 com cimento resinoso Panavia 21. As amostras foram submetidas à ciclagem térmica e em seguida foram colocadas em solução de azul de metileno a 0,5%. Após o seccionamento vestíbulo-lingual, os corpos-de-prova foram examinados com lupa de aumento. Houve diferença significante entre os dois cimentos testados, sendo que 100% das amostras cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco apresentaram infiltração atingindo dentina e polpa e 100% das amostras cimentadas com Panavia 21 não sofreram qualquer tipo de infiltração. Conclui-se que: o cimento resinoso Panavia 21 apresentou melhores resultados, quanto ao grau de infiltração, quando comparado com o cimento de fosfato de zinco, na cimentação de coroas metálicas fundidas em NiCr.One of the main goals of the luting agent, which bonds the cast restoration to the prepared tooth, is to seal the gap between them. Standardized preparations were made on 20 extracted teeth in order to evaluate microleakage. The crowns were made in NiCr, and in one group of 10 crowns zinc phosphate was used as the luting agent; in the other 10, Panavia 21 was used. The samples were thermocycled and then put into methylene blue solution (0.5%. After buccolingual sectioning of the cemented crowns, the samples were examined with a magnifier. There was a significant difference between the two groups: 100% of the zinc phosphate cemented crowns presented microleakage reaching the dentin and the pulp and 100% of the samples with Panavia 21 did not suffer any microleakage. So, as to the marginal microleakage with cast metal crowns in NiCr, the Panavia 21 luting agent

  20. Influence of heat treatments for laser welded semi solid metal cast A356 alloy on the fracture mode of tensile specimens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kunene, G

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR rheo-process was used to prepare the aluminium A356 SSM slurries and thereafter plates (4x80x100 mm3) were cast using a 50 Ton Edgewick HPDC machine. Plates in the as cast, T4 and T6 heat treatment conditions which had passed radiography...

  1. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, E L

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV Ni-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesised that the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm™ and maintained until full thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disc exposure (2-72 h). Biocompatibility assessment involved histological analyses with cell viability measurements, oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity analyses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis determined elemental ion release levels. We detected adverse morphology with significant reductions in cell viability, significant increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models compared with untreated oral mucosal models, and adverse effects were increased for the Ni-Cr alloy that leached the most Ni. Co-Cr demonstrated significantly enhanced biocompatibility compared with Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models. The human-derived full-thickness oral mucosal model discriminated between dental alloys and provided insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity, highlighting potential clinical relevance.

  2. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Hutto, William R.; Philips, Albert R.

    1989-09-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  3. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  4. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  5. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswari, B. Devi; Rajakumar, M.; Lambodaran, G.; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS) and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding). In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has a chemical

  6. PERSPECTIVES OF USING OF HIGH-SPEED STEELS FOR PRODUCTION OF CAST METAL-CUTTING INSTRUMENT. THE WAYS OF THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Chaus

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are examined the peculiarities of the structure and characteristics of cast and deformed high-speed steels R6M5 and R6M5K5. It is established, that there is practically no difference in hardness and heat stability, at the same time cast steels because of the structure specificity are inferior to the deformed ones in impact elasticity, considerably exceeding them in endurance. On the basis of industrial tests it is shown that at correct nomenclature choice for embedding there are being created the backgrounds for secure work of cast instrument, resistance of which can be even higher as compared to the traditional instrument due to higher endurance of cast-steel

  7. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  8. RESOURCES-ECONOMY TECHNOLOGY OF CASTINGS PRODUCTION OF NICKEL-CONTAINING CAST-IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological process of the cast-iron IChH28H2 alloying by means of insertion into burden composition of briquettes of dead nickel-chromic catalysts is developed. This technology allows to carry out recycling of expensive metals such as nickel, and in that way to decrease the cost price of castings

  9. Engineering design of centrifugal casting machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnowo, Roni; Gunara, Sophiadi

    2017-06-01

    Centrifugal casting is a metal casting process in which metal liquid is poured into a rotating mold at a specific temperature. Given round will generate a centrifugal force that will affect the outcome of the casting. Casting method is suitable in the manufacture of the casting cylinder to obtain better results. This research was performed to design a prototype machine by using the concept of centrifugal casting. The design method was a step-by-step systematic approach in the process of thinking to achieve the desired goal of realizing the idea and build bridges between idea and the product. Design process was commenced by the conceptual design phase and followed by the embodiment design stage and detailed design stage. With an engineering design process based on the method developed by G. E. Dieter, draft prototype of centrifugal casting machine with dimension of 550×450×400 mm, ¼ HP motor power, pulley and belt mechanism, diameter of 120-150mm, simultaneously with the characteristics of simple casting product, easy manufacture and maintenance, and relatively inexpensive, was generated.

  10. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys Part 2. Application of developed investment for type 4 gold alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Akira; Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Goto, Shin-ichi; Kato, Katuma; Yara, Atushi; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the developed investment for the prevention of blackening of a cast Type 4 gold and to analyze the oxides on its surface in relation to the blackening of the alloy. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which boron (B) or aluminum (Al) was added as a reducing agent. A Type 4 gold alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the additives was evaluated from the color difference (deltaE*) between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. B and Al were effective to prevent the blackening of a Type 4 gold alloy and the color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. The prevention of the blackening of the gold alloy can be achieved by restraining the formation of CuO.

  11. Advanced lost foam casting quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Objective is to advance the state of the art in lost foam casting technology, in order to improve the competitiveness of the US metals casting industries. The following tasks are reported on pyrolysis defects and sand distortion, bronze casting technology, steel casting technology, sand filling and compaction, coating technology, precision pattern production, and computational modeling.

  12. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwonka, T.S. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    This report details results of a 30-month program to develop methods of making clean ferrous castings, i.e., castings free of inclusions and surface defects. The program was divided into 3 tasks: techniques for producing clean steel castings, electromagnetic removal of inclusions from ferrous melts, and study of causes of metal penetration in sand molds in cast iron.

  13. design, construction and performance evaluation of multiple casting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Therefore, it is necessary to manage time required to transport the molten metal. The complex ... Logistic performance evaluation of squeeze casting technique has been used to analyze simulation of squeeze casting equipment [4]. It was identified that the utilization ... operations, molten metal delivery, preheating, no.

  14. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  15. Investigate the Possibility of Tekcast Methods Used for Casting Polymeric Resin Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäsiar H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution gives an overview of knowledge about the method of centrifugal casting with orientate on Tekcast system. Company Tekcast Industries has developed a device for centrifugal casting, extending the area of production of castings or prototyping of metal or plastic. Materials suitable for the centrifugal casting with flexible operating parameters may include non-ferrous metal alloy based on zinc or aluminum or non-metallic materials such as polyester resins, polyurethane resins, epoxy resins, waxes and the like. The casting process is particularly suitable for a wide range of commercial castings and decorative objects.

  16. The present status of dental titanium casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Toru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okuno, Osamu; Takada, Yukyo

    1998-09-01

    Experimentation in all aspects of titanium casting at universities and industries throughout the world for the last 20 years has made titanium and titanium-alloy casting nearly feasible for fabricating sound cast dental prostheses, including crowns, inlays, and partial and complete dentures. Titanium casting in dentistry has now almost reached the stage where it can seriously be considered as a new method to compete with dental casting using conventional noble and base-metal alloys. More than anything else, the strength of titanium’s appeal lies in its excellent biocompatibility, coupled with its comparatively low price and abundant supply. Research efforts to overcome some problems associated with this method, including studies on the development of new titanium alloys suitable for dental use, will continue at many research sites internationally.

  17. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  18. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  19. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  20. The Up-to-14-Year Survival and Complication Burden of 256 TiUnite Implants Supporting One-Piece Cast Abutment/Metal-Ceramic Implant-Supported Single Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Terry R

    To assess the estimated cumulative survival (ECS) and explore the technical and biologic complications of 256 TiUnite implants (Nobel Biocare) supporting one-piece cast abutment/metal-ceramic implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) in situ for up to 14 years. A prospective sequentially recruited cohort of 207 patients received 256 metal-ceramic ISCs on TiUnite implants between 2001 and 2014. All but 24 patients with 27 crowns were clinically evaluated between January 2014 and April 2015 in conjunction with or in addition to their tailored maintenance program. Radiographs were obtained, and any previously recorded treatments associated with the crowns were tabulated. The ECS and standard errors were calculated with the life table actuarial method and Greenwood's formula, respectively. The log rank test was applied to assess differences between anterior and posterior crowns. Complication incidence, severity, and economic burden, measured in time/cost accounting units (TAUs), were tallied and compared descriptively. Independent groups were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test and related groups with the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The mean clinical service time of the crowns was 5.61 years (44 ≥ 10 years). The 14-year ECS was 95.95% ± 3.20% with no significant difference between anterior and posterior prostheses. Only seven implants lost marginal bone ≥ one thread from the time of crown insertion. There were 30 nonterminal complications (16 biologic, 14 mechanical). The associated economic burden was low (n = 35 TAUs). High gold-alloy one-piece cast abutment/metal-ceramic ISCs on TiUnite implants exhibited excellent longevity and few complications over 14 years.

  1. Study of pinholes genesis in iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Elbel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study concerns the formation of pinholes in castings formed by reaction between a green foundry mould and lamellargraphite cast iron. Great numbers of works have been aimed at clarifying the causes of pinholes formation in iron castings. In spite of thisthere exists no united opinion on the pinholes formation (genesis and the authors of this contribution having studied this phenomenon incompacted graphite and spheroidal graphite iron castings were also aimed at lamellar graphite cast iron and they applied for it theirknowledge gained in study of reoxidation processes during casting of ferrous alloys.Methodology: Experiments were done on castings of stepped bars moulded in green bentonite mixtures with s graduated moisture and withuse of two types of carbonaceous matters. Metal was melted in a 100 kg induction furnace from the same charge. Inoculation was done ina ladle after pouring out from the furnace. Aluminium was dosed in the ladle in some cases and the inoculator kind was changed too.Results: Pinholes were present on castings as small flat pits; on horizontal surfaces sooner singly, on casting edges in clusters. Theformation of pinholes wasn’t caused by high moisture of moulds but the defect was sensitive to aluminium content in metal. In castingswith high aluminium content > 0.01 % the pinholes were present in great numbers, and namely both under low, and also high moi stures ofmoulding mixtures. In melts with low content of Al < 0.01 % the pinholes occurred less extensively only.Practical implications: Conclusions from literature about influence of Al on pinholes occurrence were confirmed in such a way. Study ofthe defect morphology has shown that the question is a oxidation reaction type of pinholes caused by oxidation of the residual meltbetween dendrites with formation of CO.

  2. Casting and Splinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-21

    article /80165-technigue Self Evaluation Is injured extremity in desired position? »- Empty can position »- Wrist extension 20° );;>- MCP Oexion...periodically throughout the day If cast feels tight despite elevation seek medical assistance Do not scratch under cast; do not get cast wet Get

  3. Numerical Modelling of Metal/Flux Interface in a Continuous Casting Mould / Modelowanie Numeryczne Powierzchni Międzyfazowej Metal/Ciekły Żużel W Krystalizatorze Do Ciągłego Odlewania Stali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jowsa J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of liquid slag in the mould is one of the key research areas of the continuous steel casting process. Numerical simulations of steel casting in the mould equipped with submerged entry nozzle, intended for slab casting, have been carried out within the study. For modelling the behaviour of the interfaces of the liquid steel - liquid slag - air system, the VOF method was employed. In the conducted simulations, seven different procedures for the discretization of the interface of individual phases were tested. The computation results have revealed that the “entrapment” of fine slag portions into liquid steel occurs in the system under investigation; the cause of this phenomenon is explicated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz theory.

  4. New Approaches to Aluminum Integral Foam Production with Casting Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Güner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Integral foam has been used in the production of polymer materials for a long time. Metal integral foam casting systems are obtained by transferring and adapting polymer injection technology. Metal integral foam produced by casting has a solid skin at the surface and a foam core. Producing near-net shape reduces production expenses. Insurance companies nowadays want the automotive industry to use metallic foam parts because of their higher impact energy absorption properties. In this paper, manufacturing processes of aluminum integral foam with casting methods will be discussed.

  5. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Produced with Different Investment Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R K

    2009-04-01

    The use of casting ring to produce accurate castings has been challenged with the introduction of a ringless casting technique. This study compared the marginal accuracy of all - metal complete coverage crowns fabricated with ringless, split plastic ring and metal ring investment systems. A total of 40 all- metal complete coverage crowns were fabricated on a metal die. The crowns were divided in 4 groups (Group A, B, C and D) of 10 patterns each. A ringless system of investing and casting was used for group A whereas a split plastic ring system was used for group B. Groups C and D utilized metal ring with single and double layers of asbestos free cellulose acetate liner respectively for investing and casting procedures. The restorations were seated on the metal die and the vertical marginal discrepancy was evaluated by measuring the gap between the finish line on the die and the margins of the crown on four specific sites with an optical microscope. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA and multiple comparison "t" test. The mean vertical marginal discrepancy for groups A, B, C and D was 95μm, 136μm, 128μm and 104μm respectively. Vertical marginal discrepancy on each surface was compared among the four groups. Difference of vertical marginal discrepancy on buccal surface (p0.05). Accurate castings with better marginal fit can be produced with ringless casting technique.

  6. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 3. Effect of reducing agent addition on the strength and expansion of the investments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yukun; Nakai, Akira; Ogura, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    Different reducing agents (B, Al, Si and Ti) were individually added to two gypsum-bonded investments to prepare investments preventing surface blackening of some noble cast alloys. The effect of different additive contents on green-body and burnout compressive strength, setting and thermal expansion of the investments were evaluated. The strength and expansion of the investments were changed by the additives. The compressive strength of Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The burnout strength of B-added investments significantly increased while green-body strength remained unchanged. The setting expansion of the B-added investments increased while those of the Al-, Si- and Ti-added investments decreased with the increase of additive contents. The thermal expansion of the Si- and Ti-added investments decreased, and that of the Al- and B-added investments remained unchanged. Further study is necessary to evaluate the effects of these additives on the accuracy of dental castings.

  7. Modelling the Cast Component Weight in Hot Chamber Die Casting using Combined Taguchi and Buckingham's π Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder

    2018-02-01

    Hot chamber (HC) die casting process is one of the most widely used commercial processes for the casting of low temperature metals and alloys. This process gives near-net shape product with high dimensional accuracy. However in actual field environment the best settings of input parameters is often conflicting as the shape and size of the casting changes and one have to trade off among various output parameters like hardness, dimensional accuracy, casting defects, microstructure etc. So for online inspection of the cast components properties (without affecting the production line) the weight measurement has been established as one of the cost effective method (as the difference in weight of sound and unsound casting reflects the possible casting defects) in field environment. In the present work at first stage the effect of three input process parameters (namely: pressure at 2nd phase in HC die casting; metal pouring temperature and die opening time) has been studied for optimizing the cast component weight `W' as output parameter in form of macro model based upon Taguchi L9 OA. After this Buckingham's π approach has been applied on Taguchi based macro model for the development of micro model. This study highlights the Taguchi-Buckingham based combined approach as a case study (for conversion of macro model into micro model) by identification of optimum levels of input parameters (based on Taguchi approach) and development of mathematical model (based on Buckingham's π approach). Finally developed mathematical model can be used for predicting W in HC die casting process with more flexibility. The results of study highlights second degree polynomial equation for predicting cast component weight in HC die casting and suggest that pressure at 2nd stage is one of the most contributing factors for controlling the casting defect/weight of casting.

  8. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application ...

  9. Expandable pattern casting research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  10. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste......–ideological field, the concept of caste-hierarchy seems to continue as an influencing factor, even in the operation of leftist politics....

  11. Evolution of halictine castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  12. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  13. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should be...

  14. Microstructure of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    R. Dabrowski; K.N. Braszczynska -Malik; J. Braszczynski

    2009-01-01

    Microstructure analyses of high-pressure die-casting AM50 magnesium alloy are presented. Investigated pressure casting wasproduced on a cold chamber die-casting machine with locking force at 1100 tones in “FINNVEDEN Metal Structures”. Light microscopyand X-ray phase analysis techniques were used to characterize the obtained material. In microstructure, an

  15. Status quo and development trend of lost foam casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zitian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lost foam casting (LFC technology has been widely applied to cast iron and cast steel. However, the development of LFC for Al and Mg alloys was relatively slower than that for cast iron and cast steel. The application of LFC to Al and Mg alloys needs more effort, especially in China. In this paper, the development history of LFC is reviewed, and the application situations of LFC to Al and Mg alloys are mainly discussed. Meanwhile, the key problems of LFC for Al and Mg alloys are also pointed out. Finally, the prospects for LFC technology are discussed, and some special new LFC technologies are introduced for casting Al and Mg alloys. In future, the development trends of green LFC technology mainly focus on the special new LFC methods, metal material, coating, heat treatment, new foam materials as well as purification technology of tail gas, etc.

  16. Ultrasonic Inspection Techniques Possibilities for Centrifugal Cast Copper Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konar R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with ultrasonic testing possibilities of the copper alloy centrifugal casts. It focused on the problems that arise when testing of castings is made of non-ferrous materials. Most common types of casting defects is dedicated in theoretical introduction of article. Ultrasonic testing technique by conventional ultrasound system is described in the theoretical part too. Practical ultrasonic testing of centrifugal copper alloy cast - brass is in experimental part. The experimental sample was part of centrifugally cast brass ring with dimensions of Ø1200x34 mm. The influence of microstructure on ultrasonic attenuation and limitations in testing due to attenuation is describes in experimental part. Conventional direct single element contact ultrasound probe with frequencies of 5 MHz, 3.5 MHz and 2 MHz were used for all experimental measurements. The results of experimental part of article are recommendations for selecting equipment and accessories for casting testing made of non-ferrous metals.

  17. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅲ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 5: White Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  19. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  1. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  2. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  3. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  4. A randomized controlled trial comparing interim acrylic prostheses with and without cast metal base for immediate loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Eloana; Lee, Hyung Joo; Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Trevisan, Roseli Latenek; Luiz, Jaques; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial used resonance frequency analysis (RFA) to assess the effects of the presence or absence of a cast rigid bar splinting multiple implants in the stability of immediately loaded implants. Twenty-nine edentulous patients were randomly divided into two groups: G1 with full-arch implant-fixed prostheses and G2 with multiple implant splinting via acrylic resin denture bases. All implants were immediately loaded. RFA measurements assessed implant stability at three different times (T0--at baseline, T1--4 months, and T2--8 months. Wilcoxon and Friedman tests and a multivariate model with repeated measures for longitudinal data were used for statistical comparison (α = 0.05). Twenty-nine patients were assessed (G1 = 15 and G2 = 14). Implant and prostheses survival rates were 100% for both groups after the 8-month observation period and no significant differences in the mean ISQ values were found at the different implant stability assessment times (P > 0.05). The different splinting protocols did not appear to affect implant stability during the 8-month observation period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  6. Higher Education's Caste System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  7. Cool Cast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeve to protect it in the bath or shower. A splint does the same thing as a cast: It keeps the broken or injured bone from moving so it can heal. It also usually has a soft layer of cotton inside. A splint can be made from the same materials as a cast or may be a pre- ...

  8. Modified Injection Casting for Preventing the Evaporation of Volatile Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chan Bock

    2013-01-01

    Am addition to the metal fuel hampers conventional fuel fabrication processes because of the high vapor pressure of Am at melting temperature of uranium alloys. An advanced fuel casting system to control transport of volatile elements during melting of a fuel alloy with minor actinides (MA) has been developed. It is necessary to minimize the vaporization of Am and volume of radioactive wastes. In this study, advanced fuel slug fabrication methods have been introduced to develop an innovative fabrication process of metal fuel of SFR for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am. Metal fuel slugs were fabricated by improved injection casting method in KAERI. Fuel slugs for SFR were characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, alternative fabrication method of metal fuel slugs has been applied and evaluated by improved injection casting method, melted fuel material under inert atmosphere, instead of vacuum injection casting method in KAERI. Surrogate fuel slugs were generally soundly cast with the adjustment of casting process parameters by the modified injection casting method

  9. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  10. Improvement of corrosion resistance in NaOH solution and glass forming ability of as-cast Mg-based bulk metallic glasses by microalloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the addition of Ag on the glass forming ability (GFA and corrosion behavior were investigated in the Mg-Ni-based alloy system by X-ray diffraction (XRD and electrochemical polarization in 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Results shows that the GFA of the Mg-Ni-based BMGs can be improved dramatically by the addition of an appropriate amount of Ag; and the addition element Ag can improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass. The large difference in atomic size and large negative mixing enthalpy in alloy system can contribute to the high GFA. The addition element Ag improves the forming speed and the stability of the passive film, which is helpful to decrease the passivation current density and to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass.

  11. Machinability of cast commercial titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, I; Kiyosue, S; Ohkubo, C; Aoki, T; Okabe, T

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the machinability of cast orthopedic titanium (metastable beta) alloys for possible application to dentistry and compared the results with those of cast CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-7Nb, which are currently used in dentistry. Machinability was determined as the amount of metal removed with the use of an electric handpiece and a SiC abrasive wheel turning at four different rotational wheel speeds. The ratios of the amount of metal removed and the wheel volume loss (machining ratio) were also evaluated. Based on these two criteria, the two alpha + beta alloys tested generally exhibited better results for most of the wheel speeds compared to all the other metals tested. The machinability of the three beta alloys employed was similar or worse, depending on the speed of the wheel, compared to CP Ti. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Casting of microstructured shark skin surfaces and possible applications on aluminum casting parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Ivanov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the project Functional Surfaces via Micro- and Nanoscaled Structures?which is part of the Cluster of Excellence 揑ntegrative Production Technology?established and financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG, an investment casting process to produce 3-dimensional functional surfaces down to a structural size of 1 μm on near-net-shape-casting parts has been developed. The common way to realize functional microstructures on metallic surfaces is to use laser ablation, electro discharge machining or micro milling. The handicap of these processes is their limited productivity. The approach of this project to raise the efficiency is to use the investment casting process to replicate microstructured surfaces by moulding from a laser-microstructured grand master pattern. The main research objective deals with the investigation of the single process steps of the investment casting process with regard to the moulding accuracy. Actual results concerning making of the wax pattern, suitability of ceramic mould and core materials for casting of an AlSi7Mg0.3 alloy as well as the knock-out behavior of the shells are presented. By using of the example of an intake manifold of a gasoline race car engine, a technical shark skin surface has been realized to reduce the drag of the intake air. The intake manifold consists of an air-restrictor with a defined inner diameter which is microstructured with technical shark skin riblets. For this reason the inner diameter cannot be drilled after casting and demands a very high accuracy of the casting part. A technology for the fabrication and demoulding of accurate microstructured castings are shown. Shrinkage factors of different moulding steps of the macroscopic casting part as well as the microscopic riblet structure have been examined as well.

  13. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  14. The Abrasive Wear Resistance of Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of cast iron to abrasive wear depends on the metal abrasive hardness ratio. For example, hardness of the structural constituents of the cast iron metal matrix is lower than the hardness of ordinary silica sand. Also cementite, the basic component of unalloyed white cast iron, has hardness lower than the hardness of silica. Some resistance to the abrasive effect of the aforementioned silica sand can provide the chromium white cast iron containing in its structure a large amount of (Cr, Fe7C3 carbides characterised by hardness higher than the hardness of the silica sand in question. In the present study, it has been anticipated that the white cast iron structure will be changed by changing the type of metal matrix and the type of carbides present in this matrix, which will greatly expand the application area of castings under the harsh operating conditions of abrasive wear. Moreover, the study compares the results of abrasive wear resistance tests performed on the examined types of cast iron. Tests of abrasive wear resistance were carried out on a Miller machine. Samples of standard dimensions were exposed to abrasion in a double to-and-fro movement, sliding against the bottom of a trough filled with an aqueous abrasive mixture containing SiC + distilled water. The obtained results of changes in the sample weight were approximated with a power curve and shown further in the study.

  15. Neutron radiography inspection of investment castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, W.J.; Barrett, J.R.; Springgate, M.E.; Shields, K.C.

    2004-01-01

    Investment casting, also known as the lost wax process, is a manufacturing method employed to produce near net shape metal articles. Traditionally, investment casting has been used to produce structural titanium castings for aero-engine applications with wall thickness less than 1 in (2.54 cm). Recently, airframe manufacturers have been exploring the use of titanium investment casting to replace components traditionally produced from forgings. Use of titanium investment castings for these applications reduces weight, cost, lead time, and part count. Recently, the investment casting process has been selected to produce fracture critical structural titanium airframe components. These airframe components have pushed the traditional inspection techniques to their physical limits due to cross sections on the order of 3 in (7.6 cm). To overcome these inspection limitations, a process incorporating neutron radiography (n-ray) has been developed. In this process, the facecoat of the investment casting mold material contains a cocalcined mixture of yttrium oxide and gadolinium oxide. The presence of the gadolinium oxide, allows for neutron radiographic imaging (and eventual removal and repair) of mold facecoat inclusions that remain within these thick cross sectional castings. Probability of detection (POD) studies have shown a 3x improvement of detecting a 0.050x0.007 in 2 (1.270x0.178 mm 2 ) inclusion of this cocalcined material using n-ray techniques when compared to the POD using traditional X-ray techniques. Further, it has been shown that this n-ray compatible mold facecoat material produces titanium castings of equal metallurgical quality when compared to the traditional materials. Since investment castings can be very large and heavy, the neutron radiography facilities at the University of California, Davis McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (UCD/MNRC) were used to develop the inspection techniques. The UCD/MNRC has very unique facilities that can handle large parts

  16. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gibbs, Paul Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solis, Eunice Martinez [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to produce a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.

  17. Investigating of the Knocking Out Properties of Moulding Sands with New Inorganic Binders Used for Castings of Non-ferrous Metal Alloys in Comparison with the Previously Used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Izdebska-Szanda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigations, which make a fragment of the broad-scale studies carried out as a part of the projectPOIG.01.01.02-00-015/09 “Advanced materials and technologies”.One of the objectives of the introduction of new inorganic binders is to provide a good knocking out properties of moulding sands, whilemaintaining an appropriate level of strength properties.Therefore, a logical continuation of the previous studies were carried out the tests knocking out properties of moulding sands with newinorganic binders, including making moulds, pouring them by the chosen of non-ferrous metal alloys, knoking-out, and determining theknocking out work.The results of the study were related to the research results obtained by applying the moulding sand performed by existing technology.

  18. Evaluation of metal ion release from Ti6Al4V and Co-Cr-Mo casting alloys: in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sawy, Amal A; Shaarawy, Mohammed A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of ions released from Ti6Al4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys both in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-one discs of each alloy were constructed and divided into seven groups. Three specimens from each group were immersed in a buffered saline solution over a period of 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Twenty-eight participants were also included in the study, where the study group consisted of 14 mandibular partially edentulous patients, and the control group consisted of 14 volunteers. The study group was further divided into two equal groups: the first group received removable partial dentures (RPDs) constructed from Co-Cr-Mo alloy, while the second group received RPDs constructed from Ti6Al4V alloy. Saliva samples were collected from each participant over the same study period. The conditioning media and saliva samples were analyzed using a spectrophotometer. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis (p metal ions released from the studied alloys were significantly higher in the in vitro than in the in vivo study group during the follow-up periods. A statistically significant increase in ion concentrations of the different elements for both alloys was found with time (p metallic ions from Co-Cr-Mo and Ti6Al4V alloys were higher in the buffered saline solutions than in the studied saliva samples and control groups; however, these amounts were still within the physiological limit of trace elements in the human body. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Effect of Selected Parameters of Pressure Die Casting on Quality of AlSi9Cu3 Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pałyga Ł.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results on the effects of die-casting process on the strength parameters of castings of the aluminium AlSi9Cu3 alloy belonging to the group of EN AB-46000, made on renovated high pressure die-casting machine. Specimens for quality testing were taken from the places of the casting most loaded during the service. The aim of a research was to prove how the new die-casting process control capabilities influence on the tensile strength of the cast material defined as a value of the breaking force of the specimens. It has been found that it is possible to specify a set of recommended settings valves of second (II and third (III phase, which are responsible for filling the metal mould on die-casting pressure machine. From the point of view of the finished cast element, it was noticed that exceeding the prescribed values of valve settings does not bring further benefits and even causes unnecessary overload and reduce the durability of the mold. Moreover, it was noticed that reduction of the predetermined setting of the second phase (II valve leads to the formation of casting defects again.

  20. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important

  1. Centrifugal vacuum casting for fuel cladding tube blanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskii, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyi, B.P.; Zeidlits, M.P.; Vanzha, A.F.; Rubashko, V.G.; Ryabchikov, L.N.; Smirnov, Y.K.; Bespalova, V.R.; Mashkarova, V.T.; Rybal'chenko, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced technique for making tube blanks with an acceptable level of nonmetallic inclusions is vacuum induction melting combined with centrifugal casting, as the latter gives a cylindrical casting having an axial hole, while the cast metal has elevated density and contains fewer nonmetallic inclusions than does the metal cast in a stationary mold. The reduction in the nonmetallic inclusions occurs because of increased rates of floating up in the rotating mold on account of the centrifugal force and the rejection to the inner surface. One can choose the parameters such as the pouring speed, rotational speed, mold cooling, and liquid-metal temperature and can introduce a deoxidizer to remove the nonmetallic inclusions or reduce the grain size of them and produce an appropriate cast structure and obtain a metal whose quality is the same as that on vacuum induction melting with secondary arc remelting. For these purposes, the authors have developed centrifugal-casting machines for use under vacuum or in inert gases with horizontal and vertical mold rotation axes

  2. Aluminium Foam and Magnesium Compound Casting Produced by High-Pressure Die Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iban Vicario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are two of the main focal points in vehicle design, promoting the reduction in the weight of vehicles by using lighter materials. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of different aluminium foams and injection parameters in order to obtain compound castings with a compromise between the obtained properties and weight by high-pressure die cast (HPDC using aluminium foams as cores into a magnesium cast part. To evaluate the influence of the different aluminium foams and injection parameters on the final casting products quality, the type and density of the aluminium foam, metal temperature, plunger speed, and multiplication pressure have been varied within a range of suitable values. The obtained compound HPDC castings have been studied by performing visual and RX inspections, obtaining sound composite castings with aluminium foam cores. The presence of an external continuous layer on the foam surface and the correct placement of the foam to support injection conditions permit obtaining good quality parts. A HPDC processed magnesium-aluminium foam composite has been developed for a bicycle application obtaining a suitable combination of mechanical properties and, especially, a reduced weight in the demonstration part.

  3. Tundish Technology for Casting Clean Steel: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2016-08-01

    With increasing demand of high-quality clean steel, cleanliness is of paramount importance in steel production and casting. Tundish plays an important role in controlling the continuously cast steel quality as it links a batch vessel, ladle, to a continuous casting mold. Tundish is also the last vessel in which metal flows before solidifying in mold. For controlling the quality of steel, flow and temperature control of the melt are critical, and these are presented in this paper. Use of proper flux, design of flow control devices, and gas injection in tundish become important factors in casting clean steel. Recycling of hot tundish, centrifugal flow tundish, H-shaped tundish, etc. are some of the developments which were implemented to cast clean steel and these are discussed.

  4. Casting Simulation of an Austrian Bronze Age Sword Hilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, Annalisa; Mödlinger, Marianne; Piccardo, Paolo; Montesano, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    Bronze Age swords with a metal hilt can be considered the peak of Bronze Age casting technologies. To reconstruct the casting techniques used more than 3000 years ago, a metal hilted sword of the Schalenknauf type from Lower Austria was studied with the aid of macroscopic analyses and simulation of mold filling and casting solidification. A three-dimensional model of the hilt was created based on optical scanner measurements performed on a hilt recently discovered during archaeological excavations. Three different configurations of the gating system were considered, two on the pommel disk and one on the knob, and the effect of its location on the formation of casting defects was investigated. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to detect internal defects, such as gas and shrinkage porosity, which were then compared with those calculated by simulation. The best match between actual and predicted hilt quality demonstrated the location of the gating system, which turned out to be on the pommel disk.

  5. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Sub Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  6. Radiographic analysis of 1000 cast posts in Sergipe state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Garcez MENDONÇA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endodontically treated teeth with extensive coronary destruction require posts and cores to enable prosthetic restoration. Despite the increasing use of prefabricated posts, cast metal posts and cores are still widely used. The quality of the latter is important for the longevity of restorative treatment, and failure can occur if the fundamental principles are not followed. Objective To radiographically evaluate the prosthetic principles of 1000 cast metal post-and-core restorations performed in single-rooted teeth and their coherence with the principles used for their confection. Material and method Digital periapical radiographs of 1000 endodontically treated, single-rooted teeth with cast metal posts and cores were selected from the collection of a radiology clinic (Centro de Imagem, Aracaju/SE, Brazil. The images were analyzed using a measurement software (ImageJ, USA in accordance with the fundamental prosthetic principles: length and diameter of the post, ratio between post and bone crest, contiguity of post to the root canal, gap between post and the remaining root canal filling, amount of remaining root canal filling, and absence of periapical lesion. The data were qualitatively analyzed, classified into ideal and not ideal, and submitted to the chi-square test (α=0.05. Result Only 6.7% of the cast metal posts analyzed were satisfactorily fabricated. Conclusion Many prosthetic criteria are neglected during the manufacturing of cast metal post and cores, resulting in inadequate work that may compromise the longevity of restorative treatments.

  7. Investigation of Shrinkage Defect in Castings by Quantitative Ishikawa Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkalingam B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal casting process involves processes such as pattern making, moulding and melting etc. Casting defects occur due to combination of various processes even though efforts are taken to control them. The first step in the defect analysis is to identify the major casting defect among the many casting defects. Then the analysis is to be made to find the root cause of the particular defect. Moreover, it is especially difficult to identify the root causes of the defect. Therefore, a systematic method is required to identify the root cause of the defect among possible causes, consequently specific remedial measures have to be implemented to control them. This paper presents a systematic procedure to identify the root cause of shrinkage defect in an automobile body casting (SG 500/7 and control it by the application of Pareto chart and Ishikawa diagram. with quantitative Weightage. It was found that the root causes were larger volume section in the cope, insufficient feeding of riser and insufficient poured metal in the riser. The necessary remedial measures were taken and castings were reproduced. The shrinkage defect in the castings was completely eliminated.

  8. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE CAST IRON AND STEEL MODIFYING PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of modification of cast iron and steel\\^ were analyzed and thermodinamic performance criterion of modifiers was defined. It is shown that in cast irons, Mg, Ca and P3M mostly act like refining modifiers. In steel they act as refining and surfactant species. Effectiveness of modifiers for steel is determined by their high degassing and surface activity, low distribution coefficient, weak interaction with Ъ-Ре, low activity in liquid metal.

  9. Processing Design of Miniature Casting Incorporating Stereolithography Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pei-Hsing Huang; Wei-Ju Huang

    2017-01-01

    Investment casting is commonly used in the production of metallic components with complex shapes, due to its high dimensional precision, good surface finish, and low cost. However, the process is cumbersome, and the period between trial casting and final production can be very long, thereby limiting business opportunities and competitiveness. In this study, we replaced conventional wax injection with stereolithography (SLA) 3D printing to speed up the trial process and reduce costs. We also u...

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  11. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  12. Impact Characteristics of Diffusion Bonds of Ferritic Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Shizuo, MUKAE; Kazumasa, NISHIO; Mitsuaki, KATOH; Norikazu, NAKAMURA; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center

    1990-01-01

    Impact characteristics of diffusion bonded joints of ferritic spheroidal graphite cast irons and cast iron to mild steel have been investigated using an instrumented Charpy impact test machine. The tests were performed at 0℃ after ferritizing the joints. Main results obtained are as follows : (1) Absorbed energy of the cast iron joints banded without an insert metal was about 5 J, which was much lower than that of the base metal. (2) Absorbed energy of the cast iron joints bonded with Ni foil...

  13. Structure and properties of gray iron casted in the electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the national [1] and foreign [2] literature the methods of improving the homogeneity of the structure of castings using forced convection of the solidifying metal in the casting mould or the crystallizer are presented. This article presents the influence of chosen parameters of the rotating electromagnetic filed that is forcing the movement of melted metal in the mould on the morphology of graphite and the abrasive wear of the grey cast iron. The effect of this examination is the obtained modification of the flake graphite divisions morphology and a alteration of the abrasive wear resistance of the castings manufactured this way.

  14. Application of statistical methods for analyzing the relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer in sand molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. A. Owusu

    1999-03-31

    This report presents a statistical method of evaluating geometric tolerances of casting products using point cloud data generated by coordinate measuring machine (CMM) process. The focus of this report is to present a statistical-based approach to evaluate the differences in dimensional and form variations or tolerances of casting products as affected by casting gating system, molding material, casting thickness, and casting orientation at the mold-metal interface. Form parameters such as flatness, parallelism, and other geometric profiles such as angularity, casting length, and height of casting products were obtained and analyzed from CMM point cloud data. In order to relate the dimensional and form errors to the factors under consideration such as flatness and parallelism, a factorial analysis of variance and statistical test means methods were performed to identify the factors that contributed to the casting distortion at the mold-metal interface.

  15. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  16. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  17. Casting evaluation of U-Zr alloy system fuel slug for SFR prepared by injection casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-01-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U-Pu-Zr alloys for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) have conventionally been fabricated by a vacuum injection casting method. Recently, management of minor actinides (MA) became an important issue because direct disposal of the long-lived MA can be a long-term burden for a tentative repository up to several hundreds of thousand years. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, remote fabrication capability in a shielded hot cell should be prepared. Moreover, generation of long-lived radioactive wastes and loss of volatile species should be minimized during the recycled fuel fabrication step. In order to prevent the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied applying gravity casting, and improved injection casting in KAERI, including melting under inert atmosphere. And then, metal fuel slugs were examined with casting soundness, density, chemical analysis, particle size distribution and microstructural characteristics. Based on these results there is a high level of confidence that Am losses will also be effectively controlled by application of a modest amount of overpressure. A surrogate fuel slug was generally soundly cast by improved injection casting method, melted fuel material under inert atmosphere

  18. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    % in AM50 to over 9% in AZ91, more of the intermetallic Mg17Al12 is formed in the microstructure. For instance, for 15 increase in the aluminum content from AM50 to AM60, the volume fraction of eutectic present in the microstructure increases by 35%! Eventually, the brittle Mg17Al12 compound forms an interconnected network that reduces ductility and impact resistance. The lower aluminum in AM50 and AM60 are therefore a desirable feature in applications that call for higher impact resistance. Further improvement in impact resistance depends on the processing condition of the casting. Sound castings without porosity and impurities will have better mechanical properties. Since magnesium oxidizes readily, good melting and metal transfer practices are essential. The liquid metal has to be protected from oxidation at all times and entrainment of oxide films in the casting needs to be prevented. In this regard, there is evidence that us of vacuum to evacuate air from the die casting cavity can improve the quality of the castings. Fast cooling rates, leading to smaller grain size are beneficial and promote superior mechanical properties. Micro-segregation and banding are two additional defect types often encountered in magnesium alloys, in particular in AZ91D. While difficult to eliminate, segregation can be minimized by careful thermal management of the dies and the shot sleeve. A major source of segregation is the premature solidification in the shot sleeve. The primary solid dendrites are carried into the casting and form a heterogeneous structure. Furthermore, during the shot, segregation banding can occur. The remedies for this kind of defects include a hotter shot sleeve, use of insulating coatings on the shot sleeve and a short lag time between pouring into the shot sleeve and the shot.

  19. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  20. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  1. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are also available (Moore 1984; Ohnaka 1988; Flemings 1990; Roy et al 1992; Ghosh. 1997). In addition, some recent research papers will also be referred to as required. Original references of earlier studies are omitted for the sake of brevity. The basic principles of formation of microsegregation in castings and ingots were.

  2. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  3. Wear resistance of cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pietrowski; G. Gumienny

    2008-01-01

    In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  4. Numerical study of crucial parameters in tilt casting for titanium aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of the tilt casting process for TiAl alloys was investigated to achieve a tranquil mould filling and TiAl castings free of defects. Titanium alloys are very reactive in molten state, so they are widely melted in cold crucible, e.g. the Induction Skull Melting (ISM furnace. Then the crucible holding the molten metal together with the mould is rotated to transfer the metal into the mould — ISM+ tilt casting. This paper emphasizes the effect of crucial parameters on mould filling and solidification of the castings during tilt casting. All crucial parameters, such as rotation rate, rotation profile, venting, initial mould temperature, casting orientation, feeder design, change of radius in 'T' junction and mould insulation have been discussed using numerical modeling data. Simulations were performed using a 3D CFD code PHYSICA implemented with front tracking, heat transfer algorithms and a turbulence model (which accounts for an advancing solid front.

  5. Evaluation of Cracking Causes of AlSi5Cu3 Alloy Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eperješi Š.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the castings made from aluminum-silicon alloys by pressure die casting are increasingly used in the automotive industry. In practice, on these castings are high demands, mainly demands on quality of their structure, operating life and safety ensuring of their utilization. The AlSi5Cu3 alloy castings are widely used for production of car components. After the prescribed tests, the cracks and low mechanical properties have been identified for several castings of this alloy, which were produced by low pressure casting into a metal mould and subsequent they were heat treated. Therefore, analyses of the castings were realized to determine the causes of these defects. Evaluation of structure of the AlSi5Cu3 alloy and causes of failure were the subjects of investigation presented in this article.

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 1: Introduction (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 2: Grey Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  8. Graphite nodules in fatigue-tested cast iron characterized in 2D and 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Fæster, Søren; Hansen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Thick-walled ductile iron casts have been studied by applying (i) cooling rate calculations by FVM, (ii) microstructural characterization by 2D SEM and 3D X-ray tomography techniques and (iii) fatigue testing of samples drawn from components cast in sand molds and metal molds. An analysis has shown...... correlations between cooling rate, structure and fatigue strengths demonstrating the benefit of 3D structural characterization to identify possible causes of premature fatigue failure of ductile cast iron....

  9. Investigate The Effect of Additives on Mechanical Properties During Casting of 6351 Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum is one of the significant and widely used metals in the manufacturing industries. The effectiveness of casting processes depends upon various process parameters like type of sand, moulding process and additive used. However, the additive in the sand plays important roles to make a perfect casting. Hence, in this research work the experiment were performed to investigate the effect of additives like Tamarind Powder, Starch Powder and Coal dust on the Mechanical Properties namely during casting of aluminium alloys.

  10. Manufacture of tube billets for fuel cans by vacuum centrifugal casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyj, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum device for induction melting with centrifugal casting in the ingot mold with rotation vertical or horisontal axis is presented. Removing and grinding of nonmetallic inclusions are realized by selection of casting conditions and of chemically active reducer, sound metal with high ductility is obtained. Data on micro- and macrostructure of casted tube billets made of 08Kh18N10T and 06Kh16H15M3B stainless steels, designed for manufacture of fuel cans are presented

  11. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  12. Simulation of mould filling process for composite skeleton castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dziuba

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors showed selected results of simulation and experimental studies on temperature distribution during solidification of skeleton casting and mould filling process. The aim of conducted simulations was the choice of thermal and geometrical parameters for the needs of designed calculations of the skeleton castings and the estimation of the guidelines for the technology of manufacturing. The subject of numerical simulation was the analysis of ability of filling the channels of core by liquid metal at estability technological parameters.. Below the assumptions and results of the initial simulated calculations are presented. The total number of the nodes in the casting was 1920 and of the connectors was 5280 what gave filling of 100% for the nodes and 99,56% for the connectors in the results of the simulation. Together it resulted as 99,78 % of filling the volume of the casting. The nodes and connectors were filled up to the 30 level of the casting in the simulation. The all connectors were filled up to the 25 level of the casting in the simulation. Starting from the 25 level individual connectors at the side surface of the casting weren’t filled up. The connectors weren’t supplied by multi-level getting system. The differences of filling the levels are little (maximally 5 per cent.

  13. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  14. Challenges in lost foam casting of AZ91 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichler, L.; Ravindran, C.; Machin, A. [Center for Near-net-shape Casting of Materials, Ryerson Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    There is an enhanced interest in magnesium alloy castings for automotive and aerospace applications, often with a view to replacing aluminum alloy castings. Lost foam casting (LFC) is a favored process mainly due to its near-net-shape capability. However, LFC of magnesium alloys poses unique challenge mainly because of the endothermic nature of the process, and hence the tendency of the magnesium alloy to 'freeze' before filling the pattern assembly. In this pioneering research, magnesium alloy AZ91-E was cast to study the effects of melt superheat, mold medium preheating, foam density and coating permeability on freezing range, mold filling and metal flow. Image analysis of microstructural features was carried out. (orig.)

  15. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  16. Die Casting Part Distortion: Prediction and Attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr, R. Allen Miller

    2002-02-12

    The goal of this research was to predict the part deformation and residual stresses after ejection from the die and cooling to room temperature. A finite element model was built to achieve this goal and several modeling techniques were investigated throughout this research. Die-casting is a very complex process and the researchers are faced with a large number of hard to solve physical problems when modeling the process. Several assumptions are made in our simulation model. The first significant assumption is the instantaneous cavity filling. This means that the cavity filling stage is not considered in our model. Considering the cavity filling stage increases the modeling complexity as a result of different flow patterns. expected in the shot sleeve, gate, runner and different cavity features. The flow of gas from the cavity through the vents is another problem that is ignored in our model as a result of this assumption. Our second assumption is that the cast metal has uniform temperature distribution inside the cavity, at the starting point of simulation. This temperature is assumed to be over liquidus limit, i.e. the solid fraction is 0.0% of the cast metal. The third assumption is due to ABAQUS (commercial software used in this research) limitations. ABAQUS cannot deal with multi-phase models; therefore we use solid elements to define the casting instead of multi-phase (liquid/solid) elements. Liquid elements can carry the hydrostatic pressure from the shot sleeve and apply it on the cavity surfaces, while the solid elements do not have this capability. To compensate for this assumption we add the cavity pressure as a boundary condition and apply it on the cavity surface separately from the part. Another issue with this assumption is that, liquid casting can follow the cavity shape when it distorts. With the use of solid elements to represent the casting during its liquid state, it loses this capability to follow the cavity. Several techniques were tested to

  17. Impact of as-cast structure on structure and properties of twin-roll cast AA8006 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slamova, M.; Ocenasek, V. [Vyzkumny Ustav Kovu, Panenske Brezany (Czechoslovakia); Juricek, Z.

    2000-07-01

    Sheet production by twin-roll casting (TRC) process is a well established practice in the aluminium industry because it offers several advantages in comparison with DC casting and hot rolling, esp. lower production and investment costs. Thin strips exhibiting a combination of good strength and high ductility are required for various applications and for this reason alloys with higher Fe and Mn content such as AA 8006 displace AA 1xxx or AA 8011 alloys. However, TRC of AA 8006 strips involves several problems, e.g. casting conditions and subsequent treatment procedures need fine tuning. The results of an investigation of the effect of casting conditions on structure and properties of AA 8006 strips are presented. The influence of casting speed, grain refiner addition, molten metal level in the tundish, tip setback and roll separating force was investigated. The impact of imperfect as-cast structure on structure and properties of thin strips in H22 and O tempers was evaluated and compared with strips from good as-cast material. (orig.)

  18. Making Artificial Heart Components – Selected Aspects Of Casting Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobczak J.J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study shown possibilities of Rapid Prototyping techniques (RP and metal casting simulation software (MCSS, including non inertial reference systems. RP and MCSS have been used in order to design and produce essential elements for artificial heart. Additionally it has been shown possibilities of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM technique and DodJet technology using prototyped elements of rotodynamic pump. MAGMASOFT® software allowed to verify the cast kit heart valves model. Optical scanner Atos III enabled size verification of experimental elements supplied by rapid prototyping together with metal casting elements. Due to the selection of ceramic materials and assessment of molten metal – ceramic reactivity at high temperatures together with pattern materials selection model it was possible to design, manufacture a ceramic mould for titanium based alloys. The casting structure modification has been carried out by means of high isostatic pressure technique (HIP. The quality assessment of the casting materials has been performed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF, ARL 4460 Optical Emission Spectrometer, metallographic techniques and X-ray computed tomography.

  19. Effect of Stone Cast Type on Complete Denture Base Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Hamdan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few researches have been conducted researches on the influence of the type of dental stone used for fabrication of casts on the adaptation of denture bases. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two types of stone casts on the accuracy of fit in complete denture bases. Methods: Using sixty fully replicated master casts obtained by duplicating a metal die representing an edentulous maxillary arch, 30 casts were poured in type III dental stone and 30 made from type V dental stone. All dentures were completely waxed using a same thickness of base plate wax and teeth were made for the purpose of accuracy. Following polymerization in the same working conditions, dentures were trimmed. After silicone injection between each denture and metal die was performed, weighing the elastomeric silicone layer was performed to study adaptation of dentures. Metal die was used both before copying the casts and   after storing them in water for two months. Results: The values ​​for silicone layer weight (in grams in the group with dental stone type III were greater than the values in type V  regardless of the studied period (both after polymerization and after water immersion for a period of two months in the sample (p

  20. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Kasińska J.; Gajewski M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM) on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the ...

  1. Main directions in casting of turbine and nuclear equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobezhimov, P.I.

    1979-01-01

    The main technological processes of production of big castings of austenitic and pearlitic steels for power engineering, including nuclear power engineering, are shown. It is noted that application of cast parts in the NPP equipment permits to reduce liquid metal consumption, amount of machining and to exclude welding. A great attention is paid to improvement of the reinforced casting method, for example, for the NPP gate valve casings, by way of turning the mold filled with liquid metal by 90 deg. New processes of production of molds and mold rods, and new compositions of molding sand mixtures are considered. Perspective utilization of self-set molding mixtures containing organic and nonorganic binders is noted

  2. Triple Plate Mold Final Report: Optimization of the Mold Design and Casting Parameters for a Thin U-10mo Fuel Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-04

    This work describes the experiments and modeling that have been performed to improve and try to optimize the simultaneous casting of three plates of U-10wt%Mo in a single coil vacuum induction melting (VIM) furnace. The plates of interest are 280 mm wide by 203 mm tall by 5 mm thick (11" x 8" x 0.2"). The initial mold design and processing parameters were supplied by Y-12. The mold and casting cavity were instrumented with a number of thermocouples, and the casting performed to determine the thermal history of the mold and casting. The resulting cast plates were radiographed and numerous defects identified. Metallography was performed to help identify the nature of the radiographically observed defects. This information was then used to validate a mold filling and solidification model of that casting. Based on the initial casting, good casting design practice, and process simulation of several design alternatives, a revised design was developed with the goal of minimizing casting defects such as porosity. The redesigned mold had a larger hot-top and had its long axis along the horizontal direction. These changes were to try to develop a strong thermal gradient conducive to good feeding and minimization of micro- and macroporosity in the cast plates. An instrumented casting was then performed with the revised mold design and a linear distributor. This design yielded cast plates with significantly less radiographically identified defects. Unfortunately, there was significant variation in plate weight and metal content in their hot-tops. Fluid flow simulations were then performed on this mold/distributor design. This helped identify the issue with this linear distributor design. Additional simulations were then performed on candidate distributor redesigns and a preferred distributor annular design was identified. This improved annular design was used to produce a third instrumented casting with favorable results. These refined designs and their radiographic

  3. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  4. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  5. Casting made simple using modified sprue design: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Eswaran Baskaran

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The new sprue technique can be an alternative and convenient method for casting which would minimize metal wasting and less time consuming. However, further studies with same technique on various parameters are to be conducted for its broad acceptance.

  6. Rapid precision casting for complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanpu DONG

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on Vacuum Differential Pressure Casting (VDPC precision forming technology and the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS Rapid Prototyping (RP technology, a rapid manufacturing method called Rapid Precision Casting (RPC process from computer three-dimensional solid models to metallic parts was investigated. The experimental results showed that the main advantage of RPC was not only its ability to cast higher internal quality and more accurate complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts, but also the greatly-reduced lead time cycle from Selective Laser Sintering(SLS plastic prototyping to metallic parts. The key forming technology of RPC for complex thin-walled metallic parts has been developed for new casting production and Rapid Tooling (RT, and it is possible to rapidly manufacture high-quality and accurate metallic parts by means of RP in foundry industry.

  7. Influence of moulding conditions and mould characteristics on the contraction defects appearance in ductile iron castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sertucha, J.; Suarez, R.; Legazpi, J.; Gacetabeitia, P.

    2007-01-01

    Shrinkage defects appearance in cast iron has traditionally been related to the solidification processes of the metal and the feedings ability among the different sections of castings. Recent studies have demonstrated that sand moulds properties and their thermal behaviour after pouring step have an important influence on these defects formation too. The influence of the moulding process parameters and the mould characteristics on the contraction defects is analysed in this work using test casting designed specifically for this purpose. Additionally the most important parameters are determined in order to control the manufacturing process and minimise the shrinkage appearance in the castings. (Author) 14 refs

  8. Application of 3-D numerical simulation software SRIFCAST to produce ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing WANG

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on a method using numerical simulation equations and their solution schemes for liquid metal flows and heat transfer during mold filling and the solidification process of casting, 3-D numerical simulation software SRIFCAST was created. This includes enmeshment of casting; velocity and temperature fields calculation; displaying iso-temperature lines; velocity vectors and 3-D temperature fields on a Windows 9x operating system. SRIFCAST was applied to produce sound castings of automobile and diesel engines, and also to connect with microstructure simulation for ductile iron castings.

  9. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy-SiC{sub p} composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baalasuburamaniam, R.; Cvetnic, C.; Ravindran, C. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Industrial Engineering, Centre for the Near-Net-Shape Processing of Materials, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: rbalasub@ryerson.ca; ccvetnic@ryerson.ca; rravindr@ryerson.ca

    2002-07-01

    Metal matrix composites are a viable alternative to cast irons in automotive components with possible increase in strength-to-weight ratio. Lost foam casting of aluminum alloy matrix composite containing 20 volume percent SiC was carried out at 690, 730, and 770{sup o}C with a view to determining the effects of cooling rate on microstructure, particle distribution, microporosity and mechanical properties. These results were compared with those for the matrix material cast under similar conditions. The results and the correlations are of particular interest as there is no published literature on lost foam casting of composite materials. (author)

  10. Application of magnetic adaptive testing to cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Skrbek, B.; Uchimoto, T.; Kadlecová, Jana; Stupakov, Oleksandr; Perevertov, Oleksiy; Dočekal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2007), 129-132 ISSN 1335-1532 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nondestructive testing * ferromagnetic materials * cast iron * metallic matrix * graphite inclusions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  11. System for control of electroslag casting in a collar mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnerney , J.W.; Dewey, B.R.; Hutton, J.T.; David, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the initial development of an electroslag casting control system. The main emphasis of our work and the results reported herein deal with the attempts to develop techniques for locating and controlling the liquid slag-metal interface. Thermocouples embedded in the mold wall provide a simple but accurate means for locating the interface

  12. Validation of stress prediction during solidification of cast components

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paine, AP

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available to solidify and undergoes changes in phases where different material laws are valid. In the fluid state the metal is almost stress free but as the part starts to solidify and shrink, stresses are induced in the casting due to constraints from the mould. Some...

  13. Loss of Alloy in Cast Restorations Fabricated by Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, George

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the quantity of alloy lost in the fabrication of three types of cast restoration by dental students, and identified the proportion of loss at each of the four principal stages of the fabrication process. Suggestions for reducing metal loss and related costs in dental schools are offered. (MSE)

  14. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  15. Materials on dies for pressure die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution the stress of die materials of thermal fatigue is defi ned and material life is derived theoretically and compared with the measured values. The important properties of the die materials as thermal conductivity, coeffi cient of thermal expansivity, modulus of elasticity and mechanical properties are described. Binding to it single die materials as carbon steels and chrome-tungsten steels are analyzed. As the perspective die material for pressure die casting of ferrous metals appears molybdenum with regard to advantageous properties.

  16. Steel Casting Requirements for Ordnance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel , *Castings, *Nondestructive testing , * Charpy impact tests , Tensile properties, Loads(Forces), Toughness, Hardness, Etching, Heat treatment, Microstructure, Shells(Structural forms), Economic analysis

  17. Review of the continuous casting of steel by strip casting technology. Twin roll method system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarrondo, I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to compete in the future steel market and to maintain market share, the steel makers will need to use new efficient technologies capable of supplying steel strip products of high quality at low cost. In this way, the strip casting technology by twin rol method is one of the most important research are in the iron and steel industry today. This review makes a general description of the strip casting technology as well as its different steps, such us; metal delivery and casting, solidification process, hot rolling reduction step, etc. Through mathematical and physical models, the influence on microstructure texture surface quality and mechanical properties of the materials obtained by this method are described as a function of processing parameters, specially the roughness of the rolls. the manufacturing of carbon, stainless and electrical steels involves smaller capital and operating cost, lower gas emissions, and an opportunity to create new grades due to a faster solidification rate that leads to a different solidification structures. In sight of all this it is likely that Strip Casting technology will make a profound impact on the manufacturing landscape of the 21 s t century. (Author) 177 refs

  18. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Arthur M.; Sprecace, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  19. Marginal Gap of Milled versus Cast Gold Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Russell; Verrett, Ronald; Haney, Stephan; Mansueto, Michael; Challa, Suman

    2017-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated and compared the vertical marginal gap of cast and milled full coverage gold copings using two margin designs (chamfer and chamfer bevel) before and after fitting adjustments. Ten impressions were made of two metal master dies (one chamfer margin, one chamfer-bevel margin) and poured twice in Type IV stone. The 20 subsequent casts with 40 dies were split into four groups (n = 10); cast gold bevel, cast gold chamfer, milled gold bevel, and milled gold chamfer groups. The cast specimens received approximately 40 μm die relief no closer than 1 mm from the finish line. Cast copings were hand waxed, cast in a high noble gold alloy, chemically divested, and the sprues were removed. For milled gold copings, casts were scanned and copings designed using 3shape D900 scanner and software. Parameters were set to approximate analog fabrication (cement gap = 0.01 mm; extra cement gap = 0.04 mm, drill radius = 0.65 mm). Copings were milled from the same high noble alloy. All copings were seated on their respective master die in a custom scanning jig and measured using a measuring microscope at 90× (60 measurements per specimen, 15 per surface). Following initial measurements, all copings were adjusted on stone dies. The number of adjustment cycles was recorded and post-adjustment measurements were made using the same method. Data were analyzed using independent and paired t-tests. Milled gold copings with a beveled margin (11.7 ± 20.4 μm) had a significantly (p < 0.05) smaller marginal gap than cast gold copings with a beveled margin (43.6 ± 46.8 μm) after adjustment. Cast gold copings with a chamfer margin (22.7 ± 24.7 μm) had a significantly (p < 0.05) smaller marginal gap than milled gold copings with a chamfer margin (27.9 ± 31.6 μm) following adjustments. Adjustments significantly decreased marginal gap for both cast groups (p < 0.05) and the milled chamfer bevel group (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect on the milled chamfer

  20. Comparison of the heat treatment response of SSM-HPDC 6082 and 6004 wrought alloys with A356 and F357 casting alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Müller, H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal high pressure die casting was used to produce plates from traditional wrought Al-Mg-Si alloys 6082 and 6004, as well as from traditional casting Al-Si-Mg alloys A356 and F357. The high Si-content of the casting alloys offer several...

  1. Method for determining the formation of shrinkage defects in the castings

    OpenAIRE

    R. Dyja; N. Sczygiol

    2011-01-01

    Simple simulations of solidification of metals and alloys generally provide results for determining the temperature distribut ion in a given time or solidification time for the specific locations of the casting. These data allow to unambiguously determine the position of thermal centers. However, knowledge about the location of thermal centers is not synonymous with the information about the location of any shrinkage defects in the casting, because the physical behaviour of molten metal shoul...

  2. Geometrical modulus of a casting and its influence on solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Havlicek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: The work analyses the importance of the known criterion for evaluating the controlled solidification of castings, so called geometrical modulus defined by N. Chvorinov as the first one. Geometrical modulus influences the solidification process. The modulus has such specificity that during the process of casting formation it is not a constant but its initial value decreases with the solidification progress because the remaining melt volume can decrease faster than its cooling surface.Methodology: The modulus is determined by a simple calculation from the ratio of the casting volume after pouring the metal in the mould to the cooled mould surface. The solidified metal volume and the cooled surface too are changed during solidification. That calculation is much more complicated. Results were checked up experimentally by measuring the temperatures in the cross-section of heavy steel castings during cooling them.Results: The given experimental results have completed the original theoretical calculations by Chvorinov and recent researches done with use of numerical calculations. The contribution explains how the geometrical modulus together with the thermal process in the casting causes the higher solidification rate in the axial part of the casting cross-section and shortening of solidification time. Practical implications: Change of the geometrical modulus negatively affects the casting internal quality. Melt feeding by capillary filtration in the dendritic network in the casting central part decreases and in such a way the shrinkage porosity volume increases. State of stress character in the casting is changed too and it increases.

  3. Directly susceptible, noncarbon metal ceramic composite crucible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Morrow, S. Marvin; Rexford, Donald

    1999-01-01

    A sintered metal ceramic crucible suitable for high temperature induction melting of reactive metals without appreciable carbon or silicon contamination of the melt. The crucible comprises a cast matrix of a thermally conductive ceramic material; a perforated metal sleeve, which serves as a susceptor for induction heating of the crucible, embedded within the ceramic cast matrix; and a thermal-shock-absorber barrier interposed between the metal sleeve and the ceramic cast matrix to allow for differential thermal expansions between the matrix and the metal sleeve and to act as a thermal-shock-absorber which moderates the effects of rapid changes of sleeve temperature on the matrix.

  4. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  5. Fabrication of uranium alloy fuel slug for sodium-cooled fast reactor by injection casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hoon Song; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U-Zr alloys for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) have been fabricated using an injection casting method. However, casting alloys containing volatile radioactive constituents such as Am can cause problems in a conventional injection casting method. Therefore, in this study, several injection-casting methods were applied to evaluate the volatility of the metal-fuel elements and control the transport of volatile elements. Mn was selected as a volatile surrogate alloy since it possesses a total vapor pressure equivalent to that of minor actinide-bearing fuels for SFRs. U-10 wt% Zr and U-10 wt% Zr-5 wt% Mn metal fuels were prepared, and the casting processes were evaluated. The casting soundness of the fuel slugs was characterized by gamma-ray radiography and immersion density measurements. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of fuel slugs. Fuel losses after casting were also evaluated according to the casting conditions. (author)

  6. Manufacturing of aluminum composite material using stir casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, M.H.; Panhwar, M.I.; Unar, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7 xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is available on reinforcement of 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles in 7 xxx aluminum matrix. The 7 xxx series aluminum matrix usually contains Cu-Zn-Mg; Therefore, the present research was conducted to investigate the effect of elemental metal such as Cu-Zn-Mg in aluminum matrix on mechanical properties of stir casting of aluminum composite materials reinforced with alpha 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles using simple foundry melting alloying and casting route. The age hardening treatments were also applied to study the aging response of the aluminum matrix on strength, ductility and hardness. The experimental results indicate that aluminum matrix cast composite can be manufactured via conventional foundry method giving very good responses to the strength and ductility up to 10% 'AI/sub 2/O/sub 3/' particles reinforced in aluminum matrix. (author)

  7. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Martin f. Helmke,

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we sampled iron ore, cast iron furnace products, slag, soil, groundwater, streamflow, and streambed sediment. It was important for us to determine which trace metals from the smelted ore were incorporated into the cast iron in order to provide a complete picture of the fate of those metals. It was the only missing piece of information after all other media were sampled. Standard techniques were used to sample and analyze all media except cast iron. Standard techniques require collecting samples in the field, shipping them to a laboratory, and performing a destructive analysis. We needed a nonstandard approach for analysis of the cast iron artifacts.

  8. The influence of the tablet height and final pressure on the final quality of the casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Malik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of die casting is in the connection of final quality of produced castings influenced by a lot of technological factors. These factors influence each other. This represents the complex reciprocal connections between the character of alloy, mould cavity filling time, construction of a mould and the efficiency of die cast machine. Between technological factors influencing the quality of casting belong the final pressure and the height of the tablet in the filling chamber. The final pressure should replace the gravity feeding of the molten metal into empty spaces of the casting and inhibit the clustering of bubbles, the tablet height eliminates the air amount enclosed in casting after pressing.

  9. A method of improving the soundness of lead-free bronze casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.A.; Hassan, M.A.; Qazi, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes an investigation into the effect of adding bismuth in cast bronzes for the production of sound casting without segregation. The materials are widely used for sand castings required to resist pressure and to have good corrosion resistance and good bearing properties. Their main applications are therefore in water and oil service parts such as water pipe joints, valves, pump bodies and as bearing shells for heavy duty. In spite of the excellent casting characteristics of these alloys, castings tend to be porous. This property causes leakage under pressure and mechanical weakness and the causes and control of the defect have been investigated. The results indicate that bismuth improves the soundness and mechanical properties of the tin bronze castings as compared to leaded gun metals. (author)

  10. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-12-01

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Science of Casting and Solidification: ASM Handbook Contributions — Honoring Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupulescu, Afina; Henry, Scott; Marken, Karen; Lampman, Steven

    Many of the metal casting processes are still empirical in nature. Many others are deeply rooted in mathematics and therefore, suitable for modeling. Science of casting and solidification is a major technical asset for foundry operations and of extreme importance in understanding different length scales microstructural changes and evolution as well as developing new processes and materials. In his attempt to describe combinations of solidification theory, research results and industrial practice, Professor Doru Michael Stefanescu (ASM Fellow, 1997) has made tremendous contributions to the field. Many of his views on casting and solidification are valued as important impacts within professional environments such as TMS and ASM International. He has written many articles for the ASM Handbook series on subjects including basic metallurgy of cast iron, compacted graphite irons, solidification, thermodynamic properties of iron-base alloys, and computational modeling. He was also Volume Chair for Volume 15: Casting, of the 9th Edition Metals Handbook.

  12. Influence of electromagnetic field parameters on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve the unification of the casting structure may be the application of forced convection of liquid metal during thecrystallization in the form or continuous casting mould. This paper presents the results describing the influence of selected parameters of rotating electromagnetic field enforcing the movement of liquid metal in the form on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron. The results were fragmented graphite flakes in conditions of regulating the rate of cooling in the range of temperature TZAL

  13. Getter Incorporation into Cast Stone and Solid State Characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, Robert M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowden, Mark E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Du, Yingge [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pearce, Carolyn I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Clayton, Ray E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saslow, Sarah A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is collecting relevant available data on waste forms for use as a supplemental immobilization technology, to provide the additional capacity needed to treat low-activity waste (LAW) in Hanford Site tanks and complete the tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost-effective manner. One candidate supplemental waste form, fabricated using a low-temperature process, is a cementitious grout called Cast Stone. Cast Stone has been under investigation for this application at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since initial screening tests in FY13. This report is the culmination of work to lower the diffusivities of Tc and I from Cast Stone using getters. Getters are compounds added to a system designed to selectively sequester a species of interest to provide increased stability to the species. The work contained within this report is related to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment. However, this work contains valuable information which may be used in performance assessment maintenance past FY17, and in future waste form development. This report on performance characterization of Tc and I getters in Cast Stone fabricated with simulated LAW covers several areas of interest and major findings to WRPS: investigating performance of potassium metal sulfide (KMS-2-SS) and tin (II) apatite (Sn-A) as Tc getters when incorporated into Cast Stone; investigating performance of silver exchanged zeolite (Ag-Z) and argentite (Arg) as I getters when incorporated into Cast Stone; utilizing sequential addition of Tc and I getters to overcome any deleterious interactions between the getters in solution; determining, for the first time, Tc distribution within the cured Cast Stone and its evolution during leaching; and performing solid state characterization of getters and Cast Stone samples to support leach test findings and develop a

  14. [A study for non-asbestos casting liners. An experimental study of the adaptability of MOD casting to die].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, H; Ibaraki, Y; Yamamura, H; Yokouchi, A; Ohnuma, S; Odachi, T; Nittono, M; Iioka, A; Miyata, T; Haraguchi, K

    1990-12-01

    Asbestos liners for investment metal casting has frequently been used in dental laboratory work. In recent years, the dangerous properties of asbestos to the human body were reported in Europe and the United States, and casting liners without asbestos were developed and marketed by many manufacturers. These are so-called non-asbestos liners. This study evaluated the adaptability of MOD inlay castings to dies using 8 kinds of commercial non-asbestos liners of ADA standard No. 2 specifications. The results were as follows; Single and double layers of Casting ribbon, New Asbestos Ribon, Shofu experimental, and KAOLIN showed good adaptation. Shofu experimental with a single layer showed the best marginal adaptation (10 microns). OVAL LINERS and CASTING LINERS with single layer showed good adaptation, but with double layers the adaptation was poor. In FLASK LINER, the double layer showed better adaptation than that with a single layer. Most non-asbestos liners used in this study are adequate in useful to MOD inlay castings.

  15. The influence of the parameters of lost foam process on the quality of aluminum alloys castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aćimović-Pavlović Zagorka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of application of Lost foam process for aluminum alloys castings of a simple geometry. The process characteristic is that patterns and gating of moulds, made of polymers, stay in the mould till the liquid metal inflow. In contact with the liquid metal, pattern intensely and in relatively short time decomposes and evaporates, which is accompanied by casting crystallization. As a consequence of polymer pattern decomposition and evaporation a great quantity of liquid and gaseous products are produced, which is often the cause of different types of casting errors. This paper presents the results of a research with a special consideration given to detecting and analyzing the errors of castings. In most cases the cause of these errors are defects of polymer materials used for evaporable patterns production, as well as defects of materials for refractory coatings production for polymer patterns. The researches have shown that different types of coatings determine properties of the obtained castings. Also, the critical processing parameters (polymer pattern density, casting temperature, permeability of refractory coating and sand, construction of patterns and gating of moulds significantly affect on castings quality. During the research a special consideration was given to control and optimization of these parameters with the goal of achieving applicable castings properties. The study of surface and internal error of castings was performed systematically in order to carry out preventive measures to avoid errors and minimize production costs. In order to achieve qualitative and profitable castings production by the method of Lost foam it is necessary to reach the balance in the system: evaporable polymer pattern - liquid metal - refractory coating - sandy cast in the phase of metal inflow, decomposition and evaporation of polymer pattern, formation and solidification of castings. By optimizing the processing

  16. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  17. Gating system optimization of low pressure casting A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold based on numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wenming

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate the shrinkage porosity in low pressure casting of an A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold casting, numerical simulation on filling and solidification processes of the casting was carried out using the ProCAST software. The gating system of the casting is optimized according to the simulation results. Results show that when the gating system consists of only one sprue, the filling of the molten metal is not stable; and the casting does not follow the sequence solidification, and many shrinkage porosities are observed through the casting. After the gating system is improved by adding one runner and two in-gates, the filling time is prolonged from 4.0 s to 4.5 s, the filling of molten metal becomes stable, but this casting does not follow the sequence solidification either. Some shrinkage porosity is also observed in the hot spots of the casting. When the gating system was further improved by adding risers and chill to the hot spots of the casting, the shrinkage porosity defects were eliminated completely. Finally, by using the optimized gating system the A356 aluminum alloy intake manifold casting with integrated shape and smooth surface as well as dense microstructure was successfully produced.

  18. Project Based Learning on Casting of Aluminium Tensile Test Specimen for Mechanical Engineering Students, State Polytechnic of Malang on Odd Semester of Academic Year 2016/2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem faced by students is the difficulty of understanding on metal casting topic in the lesson of Materials Technology which is conducted by lectures only. The research objective is to find out the improvement of score on metal casting topic for 1G students from Mechanical Engineering Department, State Polytechnic of Malang (Polinema in odd Semester, Academic Year 2016/2017. Research method were facilitation of applied metal casting through pretest of metal casting, added a description of the design and modification of metal mould for Aluminium, visit to a home industry of Aluminium casting, students practice of Aluminium casting in a home industry, student groups presentation and discussion in the subtopics of (1 design and mould manufacture, (2 Aluminium casting practice, and (3 tensile testing with cast Aluminium specimen, as well as posttest on metal casting. The research result is an increasing in average score from 46.56 to 53.6 (22% that means by adding the practice to the theory involved is increase a significant impact on understanding of Aluminium casting for students.

  19. Cast iron freezing mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillybeck, N. P.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This task focused on liquid phase sintering and infiltration studies of refractory metals and metal composites. Particular emphases was placed on those powered metal compacts which produce liquid alloys in sintering. For this class of materials, heating to a two phase region causes the constituent components to react, forming an alloy liquid which must wet the solid phase. Densification is initially driven by the free energy effects which cause rapid rearrangement. Further densification occurs by evaporation and condensation, surface diffusion, bulk flow, and volume diffusion.

  20. Caste, social stigma and identity processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2011-01-01

    Caste persists as an important socio-psychological phenomenon in many spheres of Indian social life and particularly within village contexts. It is argued that socio-psychological insights into caste identity and caste- based stigma may complement ongoing sociological and anthropological research into caste. Drawing upon identity process theory, this article explores the possible functions performed by caste-based stigma both for the higher caste groups (HCGs) and the ‘Scheduled Caste’ (SC) g...

  1. Benchmark testing the flow and solidification modeling of AI castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirrell, B.; Holliday, M.; Campbell, J.

    1996-03-01

    Although the heat flow aspects of the simulation of castings now appears to be tolerably well advanced, a recent exercise has revealed that computed predictions can, in fact, be widely different from experimentally observed values. The modeling of flow, where turbulence is properly taken into account, appears to be good in its macroscopic ability. However, better resolution and the possible general incorporation of surface tension will be required to simulate the damaging effect of air entrainment common in most metal castings. It is envisaged that the results of this excercise will constitute a useful benchmark test for computer models of flow and solidification for the foreseeable future.

  2. Fabrication and Microstructure of Metal-Metal Syntactic Foams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadler, J

    1998-01-01

    .... The composite microstructure consists of thin-wall, hollow Fe-Cr stainless steel spheres cast in various metal matrices including aluminum alloys 6061, 7075, 413, magnesium alloy AZ31B, and unalloyed...

  3. EFFECT OF CAST RECTIFIERS ON THE MARGINAL FIT OF UCLA ABUTMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Ana Paula Gumieiro; de Vasconcellos, Diego Klee; Mesquita, Alfredo Mikail Melo; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed the effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments compared to premachined UCLA abutments. The influence of casting and porcelain baking on the marginal misfit of these components was also investigated. Methods: Two groups were analyzed: test group – 10 cast UCLA abutments, finished with cast rectifier and submitted to ceramic application; control group – 10 premachined UCLA abutments, cast with noble metal alloy and submitted to ceramic application. Vertical misfit measurements were performed under light microscopy. In the test group, measurements were performed before and after the use of cast rectifiers, and after ceramic application. In the control group, measurements were performed before and after casting, and after ceramic application. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 5%). Results: The use of cast rectifiers significantly reduced the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments (from 25.68μm to 14.83μm; p<0.05). After ceramic application, the rectified cylinders presented misfit values (16.18μm) similar to those of premachined components (14.3 μm). Casting of the premachined UCLA abutments altered the marginal misfit of these components (from 9.63 μm to 14.6 μm; p<0.05). There were no significant changes after porcelain baking, in both groups. Conclusion: The use of cast rectifiers reduced the vertical misfit of cast UCLA abutments. Even with carefully performed laboratory steps, changes at the implant interface of premachined UCLA abutments occurred. Ceramic application did not alter the marginal misfit values of UCLA abutments. PMID:19089125

  4. Effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal fit of UCLA abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gumieiro Jaime

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effect of cast rectifiers on the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments compared to premachined UCLA abutments. The influence of casting and porcelain baking on the marginal misfit of these components was also investigated. METHODS: Two groups were analyzed: test group - 10 cast UCLA abutments, finished with cast rectifier and submitted to ceramic application; control group - 10 premachined UCLA abutments, cast with noble metal alloy and submitted to ceramic application. Vertical misfit measurements were performed under light microscopy. In the test group, measurements were performed before and after the use of cast rectifiers, and after ceramic application. In the control group, measurements were performed before and after casting, and after ceramic application. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test (a= 5%. RESULTS: The use of cast rectifiers significantly reduced the marginal misfit of cast UCLA abutments (from 25.68mm to 14.83mm; p<0.05. After ceramic application, the rectified cylinders presented misfit values (16.18mm similar to those of premachined components (14.3 mm. Casting of the premachined UCLA abutments altered the marginal misfit of these components (from 9.63 mm to 14.6 mm; p<0.05. There were no significant changes after porcelain baking, in both groups. CONCLUSION: The use of cast rectifiers reduced the vertical misfit of cast UCLA abutments. Even with carefully performed laboratory steps, changes at the implant interface of premachined UCLA abutments occurred. Ceramic application did not alter the marginal misfit values of UCLA abutments.

  5. Analysis of four dental alloys following torch/centrifugal and induction/ vacuum-pressure casting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geoffrey A; Luo, Qing; Hefti, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown casting methodology to influence the as-cast properties of dental casting alloys. It is important to consider clinically important mechanical properties so that the influence of casting can be clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how torch/centrifugal and inductively cast and vacuum-pressure casting machines may affect the castability, microhardness, chemical composition, and microstructure of 2 high noble, 1 noble, and 1 base metal dental casting alloys. Two commonly used methods for casting were selected for comparison: torch/centrifugal casting and inductively heated/ vacuum-pressure casting. One hundred and twenty castability patterns were fabricated and divided into 8 groups. Four groups were torch/centrifugally cast in Olympia (O), Jelenko O (JO), Genesis II (G), and Liberty (L) alloys. Similarly, 4 groups were cast in O, JO, G, and L by an inductively induction/vacuum-pressure casting machine. Each specimen was evaluated for casting completeness to determine a castability value, while porosity was determined by standard x-ray techniques. Each group was metallographically prepared for further evaluation that included chemical composition, Vickers microhardness, and grain analysis of microstructure. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant differences among the main effects. Statistically significant effects were examined further with the Tukey HSD procedure for multiple comparisons. Data obtained from the castability experiments were non-normal and the variances were unequal. They were analyzed statistically with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant results were further investigated statistically with the Steel-Dwass method for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The alloy type had a significant effect on surface microhardness (P<.001). In contrast, the technique used for casting did not affect the microhardness of the test specimen (P=.465). Similarly, the interaction between the alloy and casting

  6. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  7. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  8. Quantitative NDT structuroscopy of cast iron castings for vehicles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, B.; Tomáš, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3-4 (2011), s. 293-305 ISSN 1741-8410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic method * structuroscopy * cast iron * clutch disks Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  9. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained should this project resume at a later date.

  10. The EC CAST project (carbon-14 source term)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a key radionuclide in the assessment of the safety of underground geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes. It is possible for carbon-14 to be released from waste packages in a variety of chemical forms, both organic and inorganic, and as dissolved or gaseous species The EC CAST (CArbon-14 Source Term) project aims to develop understanding of the generation and release of carbon-14 from radioactive waste materials under conditions relevant to packaging and disposal. It focuses on the release of carbon-14 from irradiated metals (steels and zirconium alloys), from irradiated graphite and from spent ion-exchange resins. The CAST consortium brings together 33 partners. CAST commenced in October 2013 and this paper describes progress to March 2015. The main activities during this period were reviews of the current status of knowledge, the identification and acquisition of suitable samples and the design of experiments and analytical procedures. (authors)

  11. Esthetic modification of cast dental-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S D

    1990-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of conventional opaque substructures (eg, metal ceramic restorations) used for creating esthetic complete crown restorations are reviewed, and the esthetic advantages of veneering a translucent crown (Dicor) are considered. An appropriate aluminous veneering porcelain was identified (Vitadur Veneer). This veneer porcelain was chosen to match the thermal coefficient of expansion of the cast glass-ceramic substructure. A flexural strength study was then completed and it showed no difference in the strength of the veneered and nonveneered translucent cast glass-ceramic specimens. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the interface between the porcelain veneer and cast glass-ceramic substructure had no visible porosity and resulted in a continuous-appearing structure. Potential coping designs, as well as the clinical applications and ramifications of this modified crown, are discussed.

  12. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HARDENING OF UNINTERRUPTEDLY-CASTED BRONZE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional numerical model for calculation of thermal fields during solidification of continuously casted bronze casting is developed. Coefficients of heat transfer on borders of calculation areas on the basis of the solution of inverse heat transfer conduction problem are determined. The analysis of thermal fields, depending on loop variables of drawing and the sizes of not cooled zone of crystallizer is curried out.

  13. A foam melting model for lost foam casting of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulk, D.A. [Manufacturing Systems Research Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    In lost foam casting of aluminum the liquid metal normally decomposes the foam pattern by ablation. But sometimes polymer vapor bubbling through the liquid metal accumulates along an upward-facing flow front until it opens a finite gap between the liquid metal and the decomposing foam. This changes the foam decomposition mechanism along that front from direct ablation to melting. A mathematical model is formulated for heat conduction, convection, and radiation across the gap, coupled with the vaporization of the excess polymer liquid behind the metal front and the resulting buoyant movement of polymer vapor bubbles through the liquid metal. Both models are combined to obtain an analytical solution for one-dimensional bottom filling of a pattern with uniform thickness. The results from this solution not only compare well with available experimental data, but they also explain how part thickness, metal temperature, and pressure affect filling speeds in bottom-fill situations. (author)

  14. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  15. 3D scanning based mold correction for planar and cylindrical parts in aluminum die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Seno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum die casting is an important manufacturing process for mechanical components. Die casting is known to be more accurate than other types of casting; however, post-machining is usually necessary to achieve the required accuracy. The goal of this investigation is to develop machining- free aluminum die casting. Improvement of the accuracy of planar and cylindrical parts is expected by correcting metal molds. In the proposed method, the shape of cast aluminum made with the initial metal molds is measured by 3D scanning. The 3D scan data includes information about deformations that occur during casting. Therefore, it is possible to estimate the deformation and correction amounts by comparing 3D scan data with product computer-aided design (CAD data. We corrected planar and cylindrical parts of the CAD data for the mold. In addition, we corrected the planar part of the metal mold using the corrected mold data. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by evaluating the accuracy improvement of the cast aluminum made with the corrected mold.

  16. Automatic inspection of surface defects in die castings after machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Świłło

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A new camera based machine vision system for the automatic inspection of surface defects in aluminum die casting was developed by the authors. The problem of surface defects in aluminum die casting is widespread throughout the foundry industry and their detection is of paramount importance in maintaining product quality. The casting surfaces are the most highly loaded regions of materials and components. Mechanical and thermal loads as well as corrosion or irradiation attacks are directed primarily at the surface of the castings. Depending on part design and processing techniques, castings may develop surface discontinuities such as cracks or tears, inclusions due to chemical reactions or foreign material in the molten metal, and pores that greatly influence the material ability to withstand these loads. Surface defects may act as a stress concentrator initiating a fracture point. If a pressure is applied in this area, the casting can fracture. The human visual system is well adapted to perform in areas of variety and change; the visual inspection processes, on the other hand, require observing the same type of image repeatedly to detect anomalies. Slow, expensive, erratic inspection usually is the result. Computer based visual inspection provides a viable alternative to human inspectors. Developed by authors machine vision system uses an image processing algorithm based on modified Laplacian of Gaussian edge detection method to detect defects with different sizes and shapes. The defect inspection algorithm consists of three parameters. One is a parameter of defects sensitivity, the second parameter is a threshold level and the third parameter is to identify the detected defects size and shape. The machine vision system has been successfully tested for the different types of defects on the surface of castings.

  17. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  18. Preventing cracks when casting steel slag ladles

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, M.; Shvetsov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the improvement of large steel casting technology where slag ladle casting is taken as an example. The temperature measurement of the crystallization process of casting is held. The causes of the formation of cracks are reviewed. To prevent the formation of cracks the recommendations are developed to improve the casting technology.

  19. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J.A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  20. Some Theoretical Considerations on Caste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caste as a system of social stratification was an encompassing system in the past. There was reciprocal system of exchange goods and services. With time, occupation and mode of generation of livelihood of various caste groups changed, and the traditional form of jajmani system fizzled out. This paper provides an account of changing perspectives of caste relations in social science writing and political discourse. The discourse of caste has been shifted from ritual hierarchy and social discrimination to an instrument to mobilize people for economic and political gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v7i0.10437 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 7, 2013; 51-86

  1. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  2. Research of complex briquetted modifiers influence on cast iron properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталя Валеріївна Сусло

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Such properties of cast iron as hardness and shock resistance are relevant and have been investigated. Some possible ways to improve these properties have been studied and solutions to the assigned tasks in accordance with modern trends have been found. The use of nano-dispersed modifiers is most promising in modification. The compositions of experimental complex briquetted modifiers have been developed. The technology of cast iron processing with complex briquetted modifiers has been developed. A series of experiments on the effect of a complex briquetted modifier introduced into cast iron on its properties were carried out. The rational content of components in the briquette that makes maximum use of the modifying effect and improves such service characteristics of cast iron as hardness, impact - and wear-resistance has been defined. Ways of a briquette destruction in metal have been explored. The effect of an organic binder amount on the destruction of a briquette and its dissolution in the melt has been investigated. Rational composition of the briquetted modifier that makes it possible to increase hardness and impact resistance of cast iron has been developed

  3. Glass forming ability and magnetic properties of Co{sub (40.2−x)}Fe{sub (20.1+x)}Ni{sub 6.7}B{sub 22.7}Si{sub 5.3}Nb{sub 5} (x=0–10) bulk metallic glasses produced by suction casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarlar, Kagan [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Physics Department, Kamil Ozdag Faculty of Sciences, Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, YunusEmre Campus, 70100 Karaman (Turkey); Kucuk, Ilker, E-mail: ikucuk@uludag.edu.tr [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, Gorukle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    The effect of Fe concentration on the glass forming ability (GFA) and magnetic properties in Co{sub (40.2−x)}Fe{sub (20.1+x)}Ni{sub 6.7}B{sub 22.7}Si{sub 5.3}Nb{sub 5} (x=0–10) bulk metallic glasses were investigated. By suction casting method, the bulk metallic glasses with diameters up to 2 mm were produced. We try to find out which Fe concentration makes an influence on Co based system's magnetic properties and glass forming ability. The curves of thermal analysis, obtained using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), show that the Co{sub (40.2−x)}Fe{sub (20.1+x)}Ni{sub 6.7}B{sub 22.7}Si{sub 5.3}Nb{sub 5} (x=0–10) have a supercooled liquid region (∆T{sub x}) of about 44 K. The saturation magnetizations (J{sub s}) for as-cast BMG alloys were in the range of 0.62 T−0.81 T. - Highlights: • The effect of Fe concentration on the glass forming ability. • The substitution of an appropriate amount of Fe can enhance the GFA. • The substitution of Fe for Co also improves soft magnetic properties of the BMGs. • The high of J{sub s} 0.62−0.81 T with a low H{sub c} of 2−289 A/m of the alloys.

  4. New sol–gel refractory coatings on chemically-bonded sand cores for foundry applications to improve casting surface quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Stage, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Foundry refractory coatings protect bonded sand cores and moulds from producing defective castings during the casting process by providing a barrier between the core and the liquid metal. In this study, new sol–gel refractory coating on phenolic urethane cold box (PUCB) core was examined...

  5. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  6. Numerical simulation of complex multi-phase fluid of casting process and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Li-liang

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The fluid of casting process is a typical kind of multi-phase flow. Actually, many casting phenomena have close relationship with the multi-phase flow, such as molten metal filling process, air entrapment, slag movement, venting process of die casting, gas escaping of lost foam casting and so on. Obviously, in order to analyze these phenomena accurately, numerical simulation of the multi-phase fluid is necessary. Unfortunately, so far, most of the commercial casting simulation systems do not have the ability of multi-phase flow modeling due to the difficulty in the multi-phase flow calculation. In the paper, Finite Different Method (FDM technique was adopt to solve the multi-phase fluid model. And a simple object of the muiti-phase fluid was analyzed to obtain the fluid rates of the liquid phase and the entrapped air phase.

  7. Laser welding of SSM Cast A356 aluminium alloy processed with CSIR-Rheo technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of aluminium alloy A356 were manufactured by Semi Solid Metals HPDC technology, developed recently in CSIR, Pretoria. They were butt welded in as cast conditions using as Nd: YAG laser. The best metal and weld microstructure were presented...

  8. Production and characterization of cast aluminum sponges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivarola, M.E; Marmo Lupano, J.M; Malachevsky, M.T

    2004-01-01

    Cellular materials have unique physical features that make them particularly appropriate for applications that require high mechanical resistance and low weight. They can be produced in different ways: by powder metallurgy, by infiltration over plastic foams, adding a releasing agent of gas to a fused metal or simply injecting gas into it. Cellular structures can also be formed by casting onto a pore forming material. This work proposes a method that is basically similar to the last one mentioned but that allows the resulting material's porosity and topology to be controlled. Thus, the mechanical or thermal features of the material that is being manufactured can be predicted and/or designed. First the three dimensional print of a mold is made in a 3D printer, which is the negative of the piece that will be produced. Then a vacuum assisted aluminum cast is made. A preliminary study is presented for the applicability of this method and the mechanical properties of the resulting sponges (CW)

  9. Untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharinin Artem Igorevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Untouchable Castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined in this article. This region is one of the most populated in India. Also it is one of the most social mixed-composed in whole State. That’s why main conclusions which were made on this material can be extrapolated to all social space of country. The authors choose four ethno-caste groups, which represent the majority in untouchables and the three smallest in jaties. Their positions in regional hierarchy and economic specialization are analyzed in detail. There are a lot of information about their number, social structure, literacy rating, endogamy, day-to-day practices, customs and other features. Special accents were pointed on mind orientation of their elites toward integration in modern society or, conversely, toward the conservation of traditional forms of existence. The issues of origin and social evolution of untouchable castes of Uttar Pradesh are examined. There is assessment of castes’ sanskritization or other forms of social selfdevelopment. The quality of “scheduled” castes social environment is analyzed. As a marks of its positiveness the data about discrimination untouchables from other social groups and degree of political representativeness of “scheduled” castes, accessibility of education and labour were chosen. The conclusions were made about development degree of some castes. The factors that play role in positive changes in contemporary conditions were determined. The authors put forward their own hypothesis of future development of untouchable castes in Uttar Pradesh. Empiric base of this article was established on sources that have Indian origin and historical and social research of outstanding western indologies.

  10. Validation Studies of Temperature Distribution and Mould Filling Process for Composite Skeleton Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors showed selected results of simulation and experimental studies on temperature distribution during solidification of composite skeleton casting and mould filling process (Fig. 4, 5, 6. The basic subject of the computer simulation was the analysis of ability of metal to fill the channels creating the skeleton shape and prepared in form of a core. Analysis of filling for each consecutive levels of the skeleton casting was conducted for simulation results and real casting. The skeleton casting was manufactured according to proposed technology (Fig. 5. Number of fully filled nodes in simulation was higher than obtained in experimental studies. It was observed in the experiment, that metal during pouring did not flow through the whole channel section, what enabled possibilities of reducing the channel section and pointed out the necessity of local pressure increase.

  11. A novel method for Al/SiC composite fabrication. Lost foam casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guler, Kerem A.; Kisasoz, Alptekin; Karaaslan, Ahmet [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, an innovative manufacturing approach to cast metal-matrix composite is proposed. Aluminum matrix composite production by lost foam casting has been investigated. In order to produce metal-matrix composite by lost foam casting, expanded polystyrene boards were designed as sandwich shaped and three layered. SiC particulates with 60 {mu}m average grain size were settled between the board layers, while A6063 and A413 aluminum alloys were used as matrix materials. The effect of the matrix materials on the mechanical properties of the composite specimens was investigated and fabricated specimens were characterized using image analysis, hardness tests, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results show that in the lost foam casting method, the hardness of the A6063 and the A413 materials specimens increases with SiC reinforcement up to 70% and 80%, respectively. (orig.)

  12. Improvement of quality of a gravity die casting made from aluminum bronze be application of numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fajkiel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the possibility of improving the quality of gravity die cast connectors for overhead power transmission lines. The castings were made from aluminum bronze, grade CuAl9Fe1Ni1. A MAGMAsoft computer programme was used for simulation of the process of die filling and casting solidification to avoid defects, like shrinkage depression and gas porosities. The results of the simulation have finally led to redesigning of the metal feeding and cooling system and to reduced level of defects in castings.

  13. Interproximal distance analysis of stereolithographic casts made by CAD-CAM technology: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melanie; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Bansal, Naveen K

    2017-11-01

    The accuracy of interproximal distances of the definitive casts made by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology is not yet known. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the interproximal distances of stereolithographic casts made by CAD-CAM technology with those of stone casts made by the conventional method. Dentoform teeth were prepared for a single ceramic crown on the maxillary left central incisor, a 3-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) on the second premolar for a metal-ceramic crown, and a maxillary right first molar for a metal crown. Twenty digital intraoral impressions were made on the dentoform with an intraoral digital impression scanner. The digital impression files were used to fabricate 20 sets of stereolithographic casts, 10 definitive casts for the single ceramic crown, and 10 definitive casts for the FDP. Furthermore, 20 stone casts were made by the conventional method using polyvinyl siloxane impression material with a custom tray. Each definitive cast for stereolithographic cast and stone cast consisted of removable die-sectioned casts (DC) and nonsectioned solid casts (SC). Measurements of interproximal distance of each cast were made using CAD software to provide mean ±standard deviation (SD) values. Data were first analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), using different methods of cast fabrication (stone and stereolithography) as one within subject factor and different cast types (DC and SC) as another within subject factor. Post hoc analyses were performed to investigate the differences between stone and stereolithographic casts depending upon the results from the repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05). Analysis of interproximal distances showed the mean ±SD value of the single ceramic crown group was 31.2 ±24.5 μm for stone casts and 261.0 ±116.1 μm for stereolithographic casts, whereas the mean ±SD value for the FDP group was 46.0 ±35.0 μm for stone casts and 292.8

  14. Instant Casting Movie Theater: The Future Cast System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Akinobu; Wemler, Shuhei; Machida, Tamotsu; Takebayashi, Masao; Morishima, Shigeo

    We have developed a visual entertainment system called “Future Cast” which enables anyone to easily participate in a pre-recorded or pre-created film as an instant CG movie star. This system provides audiences with the amazing opportunity to join the cast of a movie in real-time. The Future Cast System can automatically perform all the processes required to make this possible, from capturing participants' facial characteristics to rendering them into the movie. Our system can also be applied to any movie created using the same production process. We conducted our first experimental trial demonstration of the Future Cast System at the Mitsui-Toshiba pavilion at the 2005 World Exposition in Aichi Japan.

  15. An optimization of injecting system in die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WU

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available After many years of development, die casting technology of metallic materials has been matured. In this paper,the lower-support and its injecting system were created with commercial software. And then the simulation software FLOW3D was applied to study the flow behavior of the melt during injection filling process. Both temperature field and defect distribution were simulated. Based on these results, the better injecting system with two additional overflows wasadopted.

  16. Solubility of Hydrogen and Nitrogen in liquid cast iron during melting and mold filling

    OpenAIRE

    Diószegi, Attila; Elfsberg, Jessica; Diószegi, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Defect formation like gas- and shrinkage porosity at cast iron component production is related to the content of gaseous elements in the liquid metal. The present work investigate the solubility of hydrogen and nitrogen in liquid iron aimed for production of lamellar and compacted graphite cast iron. The used methods and instruments are a combination of commercial measuring devices and novel experimental assemblies for measuring solubility of hydrogen and nitrogen during melting and mold fill...

  17. Microstructural evolution of directionally solidified DZ125 superalloy castings with different solidification methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Bingming

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of Ni-base superalloy castings are closely related to the uniformity of their as-cast microstructure, and different solidification methods have serious effect on microstructural uniformity. In this paper, the influences of high rate solidification (HRS process (with or without superheating and liquid metal cooling (LMC process on the microstructure of DZ125 superalloy were investigated. Blade-shape castings were solidified at rates of 40 μm·s-1 to 110 μm·s-1 using HRS process and a comparative experiment was carried out at a rate of 70 μm·s-1 by LMC process. The optical microscope (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to observe the microstructure and the grain size was analyzed using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD technique. Results show that for the castings by either HRS or LMC process, the primary dendrite arm spacing and size of γ' precipitates decrease with increasing the withdrawal rate; the dendrites and γ' precipitates at the upper section of the blade are coarser than those in the middle, especially for the HRS castings without high superheating technique. When the withdrawal rate is 70 μm·s-1, the castings by HRS with high superheating technique have the smallest PDAS with fine γ' precipitates; while the size distribution of γ' precipitates is more homogenous in LMC castings, and the number of larger grains in LMC castings is smaller than that in the HRS castings. Moreover, high superheating technique yields smaller grains in the castings. Both the LMC method and HRS with high superheating technique can be used to prepare castings with reduced maximum grain size.

  18. Casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies. Technical progress report, September 29, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    First year efforts as part of a three year program to address metal casting dimensional control and fatigue life prediction for permanent mold casting dies are described. Procedures have been developed and implemented to collect dimensional variability data from production steel castings. The influence of process variation and casting geometry variables on dimensional tolerances have been investigated. Preliminary results have shown that these factors have a significant influence on dimensional variability, although this variability is considerably less than the variability indicated in current tolerance standards. Gage repeatability and reproducibility testing must precede dimensional studies to insure that measurement system errors are acceptably small. Also initial efforts leading to the development and validation of a CAD/CAE model to predict the thermal fatigue life of permanent molds for aluminum castings are described. An appropriate thermomechanical property database for metal, mold and coating materials has been constructed. A finite element model has been developed to simulate the mold temperature distribution during repeated casting cycles. Initial validation trials have indicated the validity of the temperature distribution model developed.

  19. Molten Metal Explosions are Still Occurring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    and cast by a variety of methods in the aluminum industry every day, safely and without incident. However, as with other molten substances, molten...Incidents in this operation are predominantly Force 1 with metal popping from unheated troughs, crucibles, ladles , etc. Exceptions are steel drain...thermiting dross into a water puddle and was fatally burned. Casting : Incidents continue to be reported for dc casting arising from bleed-outs

  20. Development of vacuum die-casting process

    OpenAIRE

    Masashi Uchida

    2009-01-01

    The vacuum die-casting process, started 25 years ago in Japan, has been widely applied. This technology contributes very much to improvement of castings quality. The main factor causing the defects of die castings is the trapped air in the mold cavity, while the key technology of vacuum die-casting process is to avoid the trapped air effectively by evacuating the cavity before casting. At the same time, due to the shot speed and the casting pressure reduced in half, the service life of the di...

  1. Surface Modification of Cored, Thin Walled Castings of Nickel Superalloy IN-713C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binczyk F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In current casting technology of cored, thin walled castings, the modifying coating is applied on the surface of wax pattern and, after the removal of the wax, is transferred to inner mould surface. This way the modification leading to grain refinement occur on the surface of the casting. In thin walled castings the modification effect can also be seen on the other (external side of the casting. Proper reproduction of details in thin walled castings require high pouring temperature which intensify the chemical reactions on the mould – molten metal interface. This may lead to degradation of the surface of the castings. The core modification process is thought to circumvent this problem. The modifying coating is applied to the surface of the core. The degradation of internal surface of the casting is less relevant. The most important factor in this technology is “trough” modification – obtaining fine grained structure on the surface opposite to the surface reproduced by the core.

  2. Evaluation of marginal gap of Ni-Cr copings made with conventional and accelerated casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar Tannamala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Conventional casting techniques following the manufacturers′ recommendations are time consuming. Accelerated casting techniques have been reported, but their accuracy with base metal alloys has not been adequately studied. Aim: We measured the vertical marginal gap of nickel-chromium copings made by conventional and accelerated casting techniques and determined the clinical acceptability of the cast copings in this study. Settings and Design: Experimental design, in vitro study, lab settings. Materials and Methods: Ten copings each were cast by conventional and accelerated casting techniques. All copings were identical, only their mold preparation schedules differed. Microscopic measurements were recorded at ×80 magnification on the perpendicular to the axial wall at four predetermined sites. The marginal gap values were evaluated by paired t test. Results: The mean marginal gap by conventional technique (34.02 μm is approximately 10 μm lesser than that of accelerated casting technique (44.62 μm. As the P value is less than 0.0001, there is highly significant difference between the two techniques with regard to vertical marginal gap. Conclusion: The accelerated casting technique is time saving and the marginal gap measured was within the clinically acceptable limits and could be an alternative to time-consuming conventional techniques.

  3. CAST Physics Proposal to SPSC

    CERN Document Server

    CAST, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The CAST experiment has the potential to search for solar axions (dark matter particle candidates) or other particles with similar coupling. E.g., paraphtons (Hidden Sector), chameleons (dark energy), while considering the possibility whether CAST could be transformed to an antenna for relic axions with rest mass up to 0.1 to 1meV. While axion searches suggest detectors with lower background, paraphoton and chameleon searches require detectors with sub-keV threshold energy and the use of transparent windows in front of the Micromegas detectors, which cover 3 out of the 4 CAST magnet exits. Ongoing theoretical estimates and experimental investigations will define the priorities of the suggested 4 physics items of this proposal for the period 2012-2014.

  4. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  5. Cast composites with Al-matrix reinforced with intermetallic carbide phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work authors presented collected results from studies concerning the manufacturing of metal matrix composites with reinforcement of intermetallic phases, mainly carbides, with use of different casting techniques. For composite matrix different Al-Si alloys were used. Presented results include microstructural studies, quantitative analysis, phases description and their chemical composition. In this part of the work authors characterized the transition zone between the reinforcing particles and metal matrix, showing the possibilities of controlling the properties of the transition zone and type of occurring transition phases.During the studies two casting methods were used: permanent mould casting and lost wax casting. Authors indicated restrictions and possibilities of these methods in dispersive composite elements reinforced with metallic particles. The characteristic feature of such particles is their physical and chemical reactivity, which deteriorates the rheological properties of the liquid dispersion. Selection of technological parameters for manufacturing and casting was aimed on proper filling of the mould with liquid dispersion.Both methods of casting were used for manufacturing of elements which technical application requires special tribological properties, eg. brake discs. Operating properties of all obtained composites were studied and analyzed. Authors showed the analysis of tribological studies connected with the composite structure and type and quantity of the reinforcement used.

  6. The Tendencies of Piece Casting from Modified Irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinca Ionel Lupinca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have presented the metalographic studies made on the grey cast irons treated with complex modifying substances, type FeSiMgRE (Mg alloy and their influence on the compactness degree of graphite separations. For research and experiments, a melt of grey iron was produced in an induction furnace of a capacity of 5to, starting with a metallic charge made from 100% synthetic pig iron. We realized eight practical charge made modification, by using different combinations of modifying substance and in different concentrations. The addition of carbon to the melt was performed using electrode graphite powder in the metallic charge.

  7. Effect of melting technology on the properties of G17CrMo5-5 steel for cast turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mańkowski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Two technologies of the G17CrMo 5-5 cast steel melting were compared, i.e. the so far used oxygen-recovery melting technology (electricarc furnace + ladle furnace – EAF + LF and a new recovery melting technology (electric induction furnace + ladle furnace - EIF + LF.The effect of the melting technology on the properties of cast steel for turbine parts was determined. The cast steel was evaluated in term of its metallurgical purity and mechanical properties. During melting of G17CrMo 5-5 steel in induction furnace, lower total content of oxygen in casting was reached, but nitrogen content was higher than it was in the cast steel from arc furnace. Metal refining in LF improved the steel desulphurising degree and contributed to modification of the non-metallic inclusions.

  8. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  9. Amorphous Metals for Opto-Mechanical Fixtures and Mechanisms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The new JPL Metallurgy Facility is a small-scale foundry-type laboratory with capabilities for fabricating new metal alloys and metal-matrix-composites, casting...

  10. Embedding methods of solidified waste in metal matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.

    1979-01-01

    The embedding of simulated waste calcines by three different methods (vacuum-pressure casting, centrifugal casting, and metal stirred with the calcines) was investigated. The experimental performance is described and advantages and disadvantages noted. The feasibility of embedding fines by stirring in metal was shown. In addition, an estimation of the influence of porosity on the properties of composites was carried out

  11. CAST-IRONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Krutilin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of physical-mechanical characteristics of cast iron slugs, received by semicontinuos way of casting, at temperatures from 850 up to 1100^ С are given. 

  12. Cast Care: Do's and Don'ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Cast care. In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 25, 2018. Pfenninger JL, et al. Casts immobilization and upper extremity splinting. In: Pfenninger and Fowler's ...

  13. Chemical corrosion in cast iron in soil-water medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, K; Panday, Y D

    2001-02-01

    Grey cast iron metal strips were allowed to rust in varying compositions of soil-water media under the controlled environment. The process of corrosion was monitored by non-electrochemical method. Assessment of the extent of corrosion was carried out, both visually and by the method of weight loss coupons. It was found that a 80:20 weight:volume percent (w/v%) composition caused the most severe case of corrosion over a period of seven days. It was also observed that the corrosion in cast iron obeyed the relation, D = ktn [10]. The value of 'n' increased as corrosion became more severe. Gravimetric analysis and evidence from the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) proved that gamma-FeOOH was one of the intermediates of corrosion in grey cast iron in soil-water media. An attempt has also been made to propose a mechanism for the corrosion in cast iron strips in soil-water media. It was found to be consistent with the one proposed by McEnaney and Smith [11].

  14. Boron solubility in Fe-Cr-B cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Changqing; Kelly, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Boron solubility in the as-cast and solution treated martensite of Fe-Cr-B cast irons, containing approximately 1.35 wt.% of boron, 12 wt.% of chromium, as well as other alloying elements, has been investigated using conventional microanalysis. The significant microstructural variations after tempering at 750 deg. C for 0.5-4 h, compared with the original as-cast and solution treated microstructures, indicated that the matrix consisted of boron and carbon supersaturated solid solutions. The boron solubility detected by electron microprobe was between 0.185-0.515 wt.% for the as-cast martensite and 0.015-0.0589 wt.% for the solution treated martensite, much higher than the accepted value of 0.005 wt.% in pure iron. These remarkable increases are thought to be associated with some metallic alloying element addition, such as chromium, vanadium and molybdenum, which have atomic diameters larger than iron, and expand the iron lattice to sufficiently allow boron atoms to occupy the interstitial sites in iron lattice

  15. WEAR-RESISTANCE OF CHROMIC CAST IRONS OF EUTECTIC COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Baranovskij

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Casting of wear-resistant chrome cast irons in combined molds and iron chills is studied. Application of these ways of casting results in blending of carbides and increasing of hardness of castings.

  16. Reducing the Incidence of Cast-related Skin Complications in Children Treated With Cast Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difazio, Rachel L; Harris, Marie; Feldman, Lanna; Mahan, Susan T

    2017-12-01

    Cast immobilization remains the mainstay of pediatric orthopaedic care, yet little is known about the incidence of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization. The purposes of this quality improvement project were to: (1) establish a baseline rate of cast-related skin complications in children treated with cast immobilization, (2) identify trends in children who experienced cast-related skin complications, (3) design an intervention aimed at decreasing the rate of cast-related skin complications, and (4) determine the effectiveness of the intervention. A prospective interrupted time-series design was used to determine the incidence of cast-related skin complications overtime and compare the rates of skin complications before and after an intervention designed to decrease the incidence of cast-related heel complications. All consecutive patients who were treated with cast immobilization from September 2012 to September 2014 were included. A cast-related skin complications data collection tool was used to capture all cast-related skin complications. A high rate of heel events was noted in our preliminary analysis and an intervention was designed to decrease the rate of cast-related skin complications, including the addition of padding during casting and respective provider education. The estimated cast-related skin events rate for all patients was 8.9 per 1000 casts applied. The rate for the total preintervention sample was 13.6 per 1000 casts which decreased to 6.6 in the postintervention sample. When examining the heel-only group, the rate was 17.1 per 1000 lower extremity casts applied in the preintervention group and 6.8 in the postintervention group. Incorporating padding to the heel of lower extremity cast was an effective intervention in decreasing the incidence of cast-related skin complications in patients treated with cast immobilization. Level II.

  17. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  18. Inoculation Effects of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.

  19. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  20. Search for chameleons with CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm) and to photons (βΥ) via the Primako eect. By reducing the X-ray detection...

  1. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  2. Polymer-melt interactions during casting formation in the lost foam process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivkumar, S.; Yao, X.; Makhlouf, M. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The lost foam casting process utilizes injection modeled polymeric foam patterns for the production of metallic components. Foamed polymer patterns of the desired shape are coated with a water-based refractory slurry, dried and embedded in unbonded sand. Molten metal is poured directly on the coated polymer. The polymer undergoes thermal degradation and is gradually replaced by the liquid metal to yield the casting after solidification. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is the most common pattern material used in commercial practice. The use of EPS patterns with ferrous castings may result in the formation of carbonaceous defects in the casting. Consequently, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and copolymers of EPS and PMMA have been developed for ferrous castings. The thermal degradation of the foamed pattern results in the formation of gaseous degradation products and of a partially depolymerized viscous residue. The fraction of viscous residue increased with temperature and is essentially constant above about 650 C. During the filling of EPS patterns, nearly 60% of the polymer is converted to the viscous residue and 40% is transformed to gaseous products. In the case of PMM, almost 60% of the polymer undergoing degradation at the metal front is transformed to gaseous products. The melt flow velocity during the filling of the mold generally increases with temperature.

  3. EFFECT OF CASTING MOULD ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 6063 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WASIU AJIBOLA AYOOLA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern production methods for casting articles include the use of sand- mould, metal-mould, die, and centrifugal castings. Castings produced using sand mould is known to have peculiar microstructures depending on average size, distribution and shape of the moulding sand grains and the chemical composition of the alloy. These affect the surface finish, permeability and refractoriness of all the castings. In this paper, the effect of using CO2 process, metal mould, cement-bonded sand mould and naturally-bonded sand mould on the hardness, tensile and impact strengths of as-cast 6063 Aluminum alloy is presented. The results show that there is significant increase in hardness(33.7 HB of the alloy when naturally-bonded sand mould is used for its production over that of metal, CO2 and cement moulds. The stress-strain curves behaviour of the samples also indicated that sample from naturally bonded sand has highest tensile strength with superior ductility. The alloy shows highest impact strength when metal mould is used for sample preparation in comparison with other moulds.

  4. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 23.621 Section 23.621... Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d... do not support structural loads. (b) Bearing stresses and surfaces. The casting factors specified in...

  5. A boxing procedure for corrected cast impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, I H

    1994-01-01

    This new method for boxing a corrected cast impression for a distal extension removable partial denture improves the procedure. The framework with its impression is seated on the remainder of the cast after anatomic ridges have been removed and luted with sticky wax, and the assembly is inserted into a previously formed thermoplastic box and poured to make a new corrected cast.

  6. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fractures, but can be used when limbs are healing after a surgery. There are many types of casts. The most common casts are: Short arm casts: placed from the knuckles of the hand to just below the elbow. These types of ...

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Directionally Freeze-cast Copper Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia I. Cuba Ramos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of their excellent thermal and electric conductivities, copper foams are ideally suited for applications such as heat exchangers, catalyst supports and EMI-shields. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of copper with ~80% aligned, elongated, interconnected pores via directional freeze casting, a well established processing technique for porous ceramics. First, an aqueous slurry of 40−80 nm cupric oxide powders was directionally solidified, resulting in a preform consisting of elongated, aligned dendrites of pure ice separated by interdendritic ice walls with high oxide powder content. Oxide rather than metallic nanometric particles are used, as the latter would oxidize rapidly and uncontrollably when suspended in the aqueous solution used during directional casting. The preforms were then freeze-dried to sublimate the ice and sintered in a hydrogen-bearing atmosphere to reduce the copper oxide to metallic copper particles and densify these copper particles. Microstructural analysis of the copper foams shows that three types of porosities are present: (i aligned, elongated pores replicating the ice dendrites created during the freeze-casting process; (ii micro-porosity in the partially sintered copper walls separating the elongated pores; and (iii cracks in these copper walls, probably created because of shrinkage associated with the reduction of the oxide powders.

  8. Alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites formed by centrifugal slip casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zygmuntowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the possibility of fabricating the alumina matrix ceramic-nickel composites with gradient concentration of metal particles. Centrifugal slip casting method was chosen for the composite fabrication. This method allows fabrication of the graded distribution of nickel particles in the hollow cylinder composites. The horizontal rotation axis was applied. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and quantitative description of the microstructure. The macroscopic as well as SEM observations of the prepared composites confirmed the gradient concentration of Ni particles in the composite materials. The application of the centrifugal slip casting method allows for the graded distribution of metal particles in the samples.

  9. Determining casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts by computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Oberdorfer, Bernd; Habe, Daniel; Schumacher, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Three types of near-net shape casting aluminum parts were investigated by computed tomography to determine casting defects and evaluate quality. The first, second, and third parts were produced by low-pressure die casting (Al-12Si-0.8Cu-0.5Fe-0.9Mg-0.7Ni-0.2Zn alloy), die casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), and semi-solid casting (A356, Al-7Si-0.3Mg), respectively. Unlike die casting (second part), low-pressure die casting (first part) significantly reduced the formation of casting defects (i.e., porosity) due to its smooth filling and solidification under pressure. No significant casting defect was observed in the third part, and this absence of defects indicates that semi-solid casting could produce high-quality near-net shape casting aluminum parts. Moreover, casting defects were mostly distributed along the eutectic grain boundaries. This finding reveals that refinement of eutectic grains is necessary to optimize the distribution of casting defects and reduce their size. This investigation demonstrated that computed tomography is an efficient method to determine casting defects in near-net shape casting aluminum parts.

  10. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kasińska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has beenperformed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the cracking mechanism of Charpy specimens and the impact strength were all changed. The following properties were tested: mechanical properties (y, UTS, plastic properties (necking, elongation and impact strength (SCI. In the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated.

  11. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the cracking mechanism of Charpy specimens and the impact strength were all changed. The following properties were tested: mechanical properties (σy, σUTS, plastic properties (necking, elongation and impact strength (SCI. In the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated.

  12. Plasma sprayed coatings on mild steel split moulds for uranium casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Padmanaban, P.V.A.; Venkatramani, N.; Singh, S.P.; Saha, D.P.; Date, V.G.

    2002-01-01

    High velocity high temperature plasma jets are used to deposit metals and ceramics on metallic substrates for oxidation and corrosion protection applications. Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on metallic substrates are also used to prevent its reaction with molten metals. Metal-alumina duplex coatings on mild steel split moulds have been developed and successfully used for casting of uranium. Techno-economics of the coated moulds against the conventional graphite moulds are a major advantage. Mild steel moulds of 600 mm long and 75 mm in diameter have been plasma spray coated with alumina over a bond coat of molybdenum. In-plant tests showed an increase in number of castings per mould compared to the commonly used graphite moulds. (author)

  13. Effect of inclusions on mechanical properties of Nb stabilized austenitic stainless steels (316Nb) with centrifugal and sand casting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Mehmet; Çapan, Levon Josef

    2018-01-01

    In this study, 316Nb stabilized austenitic stainless steel pieces were produced via sand and centrifugal casting method in order to be investigated. Heat treatments were done in two stages, and cooling was made in various quenching mediums. As-cast parts and the parts with only the highest and the lowest tensile strength were investigated. Metallographical analyses were made and the content of non-metallic inclusions was examined. Various types of carbides in microstructures were determined by means of SEM-EDX analysis. The sand casting samples had more non-metallic inclusions than the centrifugal casting ones. After the tensile tests, it was seen that these inclusions had significant effect on the mechanical properties. The tensile strength, the yield strength, the elongation and the hardness values of the centrifugal casting samples were higher than the sand casting ones. Investigating the SEM-EDX analyses, it was determined that the sand cast samples had chromium carbides in small quantities, in addition to niobium carbides. Centrifugal cast parts had niobium carbides.

  14. Current research progress in grain refinement of cast magnesium alloys: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Yahia; Qiu, Dong; Jiang, Bin; Pan, Fusheng; Zhang, Ming-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Grain refinement of cast magnesium alloys, particularly in magnesium–aluminium (Mg–Al) based alloys, has been an active research topic in the past two decades, because it has been considered as one of the most effective approaches to simultaneously increase the strength, ductility and formability. The development of new grain refiners was normally based on the theories/models that were established through comprehensive and considerable studies of grain refinement in cast Al alloys. Generally, grain refinement in cast Al can be achieved through either inoculation treatment, which is a process of adding, or in situ forming, foreign particles to promote heterogeneous nucleation rate, or restricting grain growth by controlling the constitutional supercooling or both. But, the concrete and tangible grain refinement mechanism in cast metals is still not fully understood and there are a number of controversies. Therefore, most of the new developed grain refiners for Mg–Al based alloys are not as efficient as the commercially available ones, such as zirconium in non-Al containing Mg alloys. To facilitate the research in grain refinement of cast magnesium alloys, this review starts with highlighting the theoretical aspects of grain refinement in cast metals, followed by reviewing the latest research progress in grain refinement of magnesium alloys in terms of the solute effect and potent nucleants

  15. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  16. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K. [National Institute of Rock Mechanics, KGF (India)

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  17. Modeling of solidification of MMC composites during gravity casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zagórski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with computer simulation of gravity casting of the metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramics (MMC into sand mold. The subject of our interest is aluminum matrix composite (AlMMC reinforced with ceramic particles i.e. silicon carbide SiC and glass carbon Cg. The created model describes the process taking into account solidification and its influence on the distribution of reinforcement particles. The computer calculation has been carried out in 2D system with the use of Navier-Stokes equations using ANSYS FLUENT 13. The Volume of Fluid approach (VOF and enthalpy method have been used to model the air-fluid free surface (and also volume fraction of particular continuous phases and the solidification of the cast, respectively.

  18. Mathematical modeling for surface hardness in investment casting applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupinder

    2012-01-01

    Investment casting (IC) has many potential engineering applications. Not much work hitherto has been reported for modeling the surface hardness (SH) in IC of industrial components. In the present study, outcome of Taguchi based macro model has been used for developing a mathematical model for SH; using Buckingham's π theorem. Three input parameters namely volume/surface area (V/A) ratio of cast components, slurry layer's combination (LC) and molten metal pouring temperature were selected to give output in form of SH. This study will provide main effects of these variables on SH and will shed light on the SH mechanism in IC. The comparison with experimental results will also serve as further validation of model

  19. Simulation for grinding balls production using sand mold-gravity casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Shofi, A.; Herlina, U.; Prilitasari, N. M.; Triapriani, Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this present work, the grinding balls from high chromium white cast iron (ASTM A-532) were produced by using sand mold-gravity casting. The simulation casting process was conducted before making these grinding balls by using SOLIDCast™ version 8.2.0. The gating system design and the pouring temperature of hot metal were investigated clearly to obtain grinding balls with no-defect. The sound casting of grinding balls was resulted by using the proper gating system with the addition of vent air on the top of each grinding ball’s mold. The dimension of vent air was reduced by the increasing of pouring temperature, thus it resulted on the increasing of the yield production of grinding balls.

  20. Influence of Temperature and Rolling Speed on Twin Roll Cast Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, G.; Bohlen, J.; Stutz, L.; Letzig, D.; Kainer, K. U.

    Reducing vehicle weight and emissions by lightweight design is a major goal of the automotive industry. Magnesium as the lightest structural metal offers a significant weight saving potential compared to steel and aluminum. Cast magnesium components are widely used, e.g. as engine blocks or gear box housings. The application of magnesium sheets is currently hampered by the low formability of magnesium which means that a large number of rolling passes is required to roll a DC cast slab to final gauge sheet. This large number of rolling steps is the main reason for the high cost of magnesium sheets. An alternative, cost-efficient production route for magnesium sheets with improved properties is feedstock production by twin roll casting (TRC). In this paper we report the results of twin roll casting experiments on the magnesium alloy AZ31 (Mg-3Al-lZn-Mn) and discuss the influence of the process on the micro structure and texture of the strips.

  1. CAD/CAM DESIGN AND GENETIC OPTIMIZATION OF FEEDERS FOR SAND CASTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljko Dučić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes methodology of feeder design and optimization for sand casting process. Casting part is a part of excavator buckets, i.e. holder of the cutting tooth. Process of design and optimization is based on the application of the rules, which are the result of many years of work researchers in the field of metal casting. Computer Aided Design (CAD is used as a methodology in the design of feeders. Genetic Algorithm (GA as an artificial intelligence technique is used in the optimization process of the feeder geometry. Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM is used as methodology that involves numerical simulation of the casting process. Numerical simulation is used to verify the validity of the optimized geometry of the feeding system.

  2. Evaluating the Tensile Properties of Aluminum Foundry Alloys through Reference Castings-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilchandra, A R; Arnberg, Lars; Bonollo, Franco; Fiorese, Elena; Timelli, Giulio

    2017-08-30

    The tensile properties of an alloy can be exploited if detrimental defects and imperfections of the casting are minimized and the microstructural characteristics are optimized through several strategies that involve die design, process management and metal treatments. This paper presents an analysis and comparison of the salient characteristics of the reference dies proposed in the literature, both in the field of pressure and gravity die-casting. The specimens produced with these reference dies, called separately poured specimens, are effective tools for the evaluation and comparison of the tensile and physical behaviors of Al-Si casting alloys. Some of the findings of the present paper have been recently developed in the frame of the European StaCast project whose results are complemented here with some more recent outcomes and a comprehensive analysis and discussion.

  3. Search for chameleons with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassopoulos, V; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Bräuninger, H; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Christensen, F; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Desch, K; Dermenev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Friedrich, P; Galán, J; García, J A; Gardikiotis, A; Garza, J G; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Hailey, C; Haug, F; Hasinoff, M D; Hofmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakobsen, A; Jakovčić, K; Kaminski, J; Karuza, M; Kavuk, M; Krčmar, M; Krieger, C; Krüger, A; Lakić, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubičić, A; Luzón, G; Neff, S; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovarov, M J; Raffelt, G; Riege, H; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Solanki, S K; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K; Brax, P; Lavrentyev, I; Upadhye, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter ($\\beta_{\\rm m}$) and to photons ($\\beta_{\\gamma}$) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1$\\,$keV to 400$\\,$eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600$\\,$eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of $\\beta_{\\gamma}\\!\\lesssim\\!10^{11}$ for $1<\\beta_{\\rm m}<10^6$.

  4. Search for chameleons with CAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anastassopoulos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a search for (solar chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST. This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (βm and to photons (βγ via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV CAST became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of βγ≲1011 for 1<βm<106.

  5. Carbon in condensed hydrocarbon phases, steels and cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAFAROVA Victoria Alexandrovna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a review of studies carried out mainly by the researchers of the Ufa State Petroleum Technological University, which are aimed at detection of new properties of carbon in such condensed media as petroleum and coal pitches, steels and cast irons. Carbon plays an important role in the industry of construction materials being a component of road and roof bitumen and setting the main mechanical properties of steels. It was determined that crystal-like structures appear in classical glass-like substances – pitches which contain several thousands of individual hydrocarbons of various compositions. That significantly extends the concept of crystallinity. In structures of pitches, the control parameter of the staged structuring process is paramagnetism of condensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Fullerenes were detected in steels and cast irons and identified by various methods of spectrometry and microscopy. Fullerene С60, which contains 60 carbon atoms, has diameter of 0,7 nm and is referred to the nanoscale objects, which have a significant influence on the formation of steel and cast iron properties. It was shown that fullerenes appear at all stages of manufacture of cast irons; they are formed during introduction of carbon from the outside, during crystallization of metal in welded joints. Creation of modified fullerene layers in steels makes it possible to improve anticorrosion and tribological properties of structural materials. At the same time, outside diffusion of carbon from the carbon deposits on the metal surface also leads to formation of additional amount of fullerenes. This creates conditions for occurrence of local microdistortions of the structure, which lead to occurrence of cracks. Distribution of fullerenes in iron matrix is difficult to study as the method is labor-intensive, it requires dissolution of the matrix in the hydrofluoric acid and stage fullerene separation with further identification by spectral methods.

  6. Die Casting Part Distortion: Prediction and Attenuation; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen Miller, R.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research was to predict the part deformation and residual stresses after ejection from the die and cooling to room temperature. A finite element model was built to achieve this goal and several modeling techniques were investigated throughout this research. Die-casting is a very complex process and the researchers are faced with a large number of hard to solve physical problems when modeling the process. Several assumptions are made in our simulation model. The first significant assumption is the instantaneous cavity filling. This means that the cavity filling stage is not considered in our model. Considering the cavity filling stage increases the modeling complexity as a result of different flow patterns. expected in the shot sleeve, gate, runner and different cavity features. The flow of gas from the cavity through the vents is another problem that is ignored in our model as a result of this assumption. Our second assumption is that the cast metal has uniform temperature distribution inside the cavity, at the starting point of simulation. This temperature is assumed to be over liquidus limit, i.e. the solid fraction is 0.0% of the cast metal. The third assumption is due to ABAQUS (commercial software used in this research) limitations. ABAQUS cannot deal with multi-phase models; therefore we use solid elements to define the casting instead of multi-phase (liquid/solid) elements. Liquid elements can carry the hydrostatic pressure from the shot sleeve and apply it on the cavity surfaces, while the solid elements do not have this capability. To compensate for this assumption we add the cavity pressure as a boundary condition and apply it on the cavity surface separately from the part. Another issue with this assumption is that, liquid casting can follow the cavity shape when it distorts. With the use of solid elements to represent the casting during its liquid state, it loses this capability to follow the cavity. Several techniques were tested to

  7. The effect of recasting on bond strength between porcelain and base-metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Azam S; Rokni, Shahin Rezaii; Mohammadi, Abolghasem; Bahrami, Mehran

    2011-04-01

    Long-term success of metal ceramic restorations depends on metal ceramic bond strength. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recasting of base-metal alloys has any effect on metal ceramic bond strength. Super Cast and Verabond base-metal alloys were used to cast 260 wax patterns. The alloy specimens were equally divided into five groups and cast as: group A 0.0%, B 25%, C 50%, D 75%, and E 100% once-cast alloy. Each group was divided into two subgroups: the first group was cast with Super Cast and the second with Verabond. In each subgroup half of the cast alloys were veneered with Vita VMK 68 and the others with Ceramco 3. Recasting decreased bond strength (p alloy. Group E with 100% new Super Cast alloy veneered with Vita VMK 68 porcelain had the highest bond strength (30.75 ± 9.58 MPa), and group B including 25% new and 75% recast Super Cast alloy veneered with the same porcelain had the lowest bond strength (21.72 ± 5.19 MPa). By adding over 50% once-cast alloy in base-metal alloys, metal-ceramic bond strength decreases significantly. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Effect of cast steel production metallurgy on the emergence of casting defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Čamek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents metallurgical possibilities of high alloy cast steel production in open induction medium frequency furnaces and an electric arc furnace in a gravity die casting foundry. The observation was focused on the emergence of gas defects in steel castings. The content of gases achieved during the metallurgical processes was evaluated for every unit of the production equipment and the casting ladle before casting into disposable sand moulds. The sand mould area was considered to be constant. The aim was to evaluate the current metallurgical possibilities of affecting the content of gases in high alloy cast steel in the current technical conditions of the foundry.

  9. Low-head feeding system for thin section castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sabah S.; Kleeb, Thomas R.; Lewis, Thomas W.; McDermott, John F.; Ozgu, Mustafa R.; Padfield, Ralph C.; Rego, Donovan N.; Vassilicos, Achilles

    1990-01-01

    A feed system is provided for conveying molten metal to a thin section caster having mold surfaces moving exclusively in the direction of casting. The feed system has a passage of circular cross section adjacent to one end thereof for receiving molten metal and a rectangular cross section at the delivery end thereof adjacent to the caster. The feed system is designed for supplying molten metal to the caster at low pressure for "closed-pool" type caster operation. The point of highest elevation in the metal flow passage of the feed system is on the upper surface of a transition portion where the cross section changes from circular to rectangular adjacent to the nozzle. The level or height of the high point above the centerline of the nozzle exit is selected so as to be less than the pressure of the metal measured in inches at the nozzle exit. This feature enables the maintenance of positive pressure in the metal within the feed system so that ingress of air into the metal is prevented.

  10. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  11. Influence of Addition of Briquettes with Dust Content into the Charge of Electric Induction Furnace on Cast Iron Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Foundry dust from blasting and grinding of castings contain a high amount of iron, ergo it is possible its recycling in foundry process.Dust was compacted by briquetting, two kinds of briquettes were prepared (A contained 95% magnetic part of dust from casting blasting+5% bentonite and B contained 95% mixture of dust from casting grinding and magnetic part of dust from casting blasting + 5%bentonite and used as a part of charge into the electric induction furnace. It was found that addition of briquettes has had an influence of a chemical composition of cast iron above all on content of sulphur, phosphorus and silicon. It was not reflected in decrease in tensile strength and in microstructure. Yield of metal from briquettes was not lower then 70%.

  12. The evaluation of working casts prepared from digital impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Y C; Park, Y S; Kim, H K; Hong, Y S; Ahn, J S; Ryu, J J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of working casts of a digital impression system by comparing them with the original, virtual, and rapid prototyping casts. A total of 54 cast sets in clinically stable occlusion were used. They were scanned by an iTero intraoral scanner and converted into STL format virtual casts. Rapid prototyping casts and polyurethane casts were fabricated from the iTero milling system based on the virtual casts. Several horizontal and vertical measurements were performed from the four types of casts, that is, original stone casts, virtual casts, rapid prototyping casts, and polyurethane casts of iTero. Measurement error, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and differences among the casts were calculated and compared. Casts from iTero milling machines exhibited greater dimensional differences and lower ICC values than did other casts. In addition, many of the measurements of the iTero working casts showed statistically significant differences in comparison to the three other types of casts. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences between the virtual and original casts. Virtual casts made by the iTero intraoral scanner exhibited excellent reproducibility. However, the casts from the iTero milling machine showed greater dimensional differences and lower reproducibility compared to other types of casts.

  13. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  14. Homogenity of Die Casting and Returning Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Malik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneity of die castings is influenced by wide range of technological parameters as piston velocity in filling chamber of die casting machine, filling time of mould cavity, temperature of cast alloy, temperature of the mould, temperature of filling chamber, surface pressure on alloy during mould filling, final pressure and others. Based on stated parameters it is clear, that main parameters of die casting are filling time of die mould cavity and velocity of the melt in the ingates. Filling time must ensure the complete filling of the mould cavity before solidification process can negatively influence it. Among technological parameters also belong the returning material, which ratio in charge must be constrained according to requirement on final homogeneity of die castings. With the ratio of returning material influenced are the mechanical properties of castings, inner homogeneity and chemical composition.

  15. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  16. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk [CanmetMATERIALS; Li, Delin [CanmetMATERIALS

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using

  17. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  18. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early wr...

  19. Thermo-mechanical properties and cracking during solidification of thin slab cast steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santillana, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays a vast majority of the steel produced worldwide is via the continuous casting process route because this is the most low-cost, efficient and high quality method to mass produce metal products in a variety of sizes and shapes. Most of the continuous casters are the initial manufacturing step

  20. ALLOYING OF CUPOLA IRON WITH CAST IRON DUE TO APPLICATION OF USED COPPER-MAGNESIUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alloying process of cupola iron by means of input into charge structure of briquettes of the worked-out coppermagnesium catalysts is investigated. This technology allows to carry out recycling of expensive metals, such as copper, and to raise strength properties of cast iron melted in a cupola.

  1. Spray casting project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step

  2. Advances in Technology of Soluble Cores for Die Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelínek P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of technologies is developed that substitute simple metal cores in the high-pressure casting technology. Soluble cores, namely on the salt basis, represent the highest prospect. The contribution gives the results of the production of salt cores by high-pressure squeezing and shooting with using a binder. Special attention is paid to the shape of NaCl salt crystals with additives and the influence on strength properties of cores. A technology of bonding the salt cores is developing. Salinity of circulating water is studied and it is checked with the aid of electrical conductance.

  3. Modeling of the temperature field of the casting ladle lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotsky, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a method for calculating the temperature field of the casting ladle lining by a modified relaxation method. Given such initial data as the metal temperature in the ladle, the ambient temperature, and the lining structure, this method permits calculating the stationary temperature fields both inside the lining and on the surface of the ladle jacket. The model was tested by comparing experimentally measured temperature values on the surface of the ladle jacket with calculated temperatures. A satisfactory agreement between calculated and experimental temperature values of the ladle surface has been obtained.

  4. Control of Cast Iron Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.; Lillybeck, N.; Franco, N.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of microgravity for industrial research in the processing of cast iron was investigated. Solidification experiments were conducted using the KC-135 and F-104 aircraft, and an experiment plan was developed for follow-on experiments using the Shuttle. Three areas of interest are identified: (1) measurement of thermophysical properties in the melt; (2) understanding of the relative roles of homogeneous nucleation, grain multiplication, and innocultants in forming the microstructure; and (3) exploring the possibility of obtaining an aligned graphite structure in hypereutectic Fe, Ni, and Co.

  5. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  6. Simulation of Hardening and Cooling Processes for Moving Melts in Special Casting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Esman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model and an algorithm for numerical solution of conjugate problem concerning hydrodynamics and heat transfer of hardening and cooling processes with liquid metal flow is given in the paper.Quantitative relationships between heating and hydrodynamic parameters of moving melts in the channels of metallic molds of special casting technologies have been determined in the paper. The analysis of temperature pattern and velocity field makes it possible to reveal an influence of boundary conditions on melt flow structure.

  7. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one’s profession became ‘hereditary,’ resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one’s caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violatio...

  8. Preferential dissolution behaviour in Ni–Cr dental cast alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ni–Cr–Mo dental alloy was fabricated by three different casting methods, viz. centrifugal casting, high frequency induction casting and vacuum pressure casting. The dependence of cast microstructure on the electrochemical corrosion behaviour was investigated using potentiodynamic cyclic and potentiostatic polarization ...

  9. Development and application of titanium alloy casting technology in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Hai

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and research of casting titanium alloy and its casting technology, especially its application in aeronautical industry in China are presented. The technology of moulding, melting and casting of titanium alloy, casting quality control are introduced. The existing problem and development trend in titanium alloy casting technology are also discussed.

  10. Development of NZP ceramic based {open_quotes}cast-in-place{close_quotes} diesel engine port liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaswaran, R.; Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-02-01

    BSX (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6-2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24}) and CSX (Ca{sub l-x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) type NZP ceramics were fabricated and characterized for: (i) thermal properties viz., thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, thermal stability and thermal shock resistance; (ii) mechanical properties viz., flexure strength and elastic modulus; and (iii) microstructures. Results of these tests and analysis indicated that the BS-25 (x=0.25 in BSX) and CS-50 (x=0.50 in CSX) ceramics had the most desirable properties for casting metal with ceramic in place. Finite element analysis (FEA) of metal casting (with ceramic in place) was conducted to analyze thermomechanical stresses generated and determine material property requirements. Actual metal casting trials were also conducted to verify the results of finite element analysis. In initial trials, the ceramic cracked because of the large thermal expansion mismatch (hoop) stresses (predicted by FEA also). A process for introduction of a compliant layer between the metal and ceramic to alleviate such destructive stresses was developed. The compliant layer was successful in preventing cracking of either the ceramic or the metal. In addition to these achievements, pressure slip casting and gel-casting processes for fabrication of NZP components; and acoustic emission and ultrasonics-based NDE techniques for detection of microcracks and internal flaws, respectively, were successfully developed.

  11. Streptococcus mutans attachment on a cast titanium surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicknan Soares da Rocha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the attachment of Streptococcus mutans and the corrosion of cast commercially pure titanium, used in dental dentures. The sample discs were cast in commercially pure titanium using the vacuum-pressure machine (Rematitan System. The surfaces of each metal were ground and polished with sandpaper (#300-4000 and alumina paste (0.3 µm. The roughness of the surface (Ra was measured using the Surfcorder rugosimeter SE 1700. Four coupons were inserted separately into Falcon tubes contained Mueller Hinton broth inoculated with S. mutans ATCC 25175 (10(9 cuf and incubated at 37 °C. The culture medium was changed every three days during a 365-day period, after which the falcons were prepared for observations by SEM. The mean Ra value of CP Ti was 0.1527 µm. After S. mutans biofilm removal, pits of corrosion were observed. Despite the low roughness, S. mutans attachment and biofilm formation was observed, which induced a surface corrosion of the cast pure titanium.

  12. The temperature gradient on section of casting in process of primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of defining in article was introduced the temperature gradient in process of primary crystallization during cooling the casting from chromium cast iron on basis of measurements of thermal field in test DTA-K3. Insert also the preliminary results of investigations of influence temperature gradient on structure of studied wear resistance chromium cast iron.

  13. Discrepancy measurements of copings prepared by three casting methods and two different alloys, on ITI implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siadat H.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: An important criterion for success assessment of implant-supported prostheses is marginal fit. Vertical and horizontal discrepancy can result in loosening of the prosthetic screw, crestal bone resorption, peri-implantitis and loss of osseointegration. Despite careful attention to waxing, investing, and casting, marginal discrepancies are inevitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal gap and overhang in three casting methods with two different alloys in ITI implants.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study 48 analog abutments were randomly divided into six groups as follows: 1 burn out cap + BegoStar, 2 impression cap + BegoStar, 3 conventional wax up + BegoStar, 4 burn out cap + Verabond2, 5 impression cap + Verabond2, 6 conventional wax up + Verabond2. Waxing was done in 0.7 mm thickness verified by a digital gauge and a putty index was made for all groups. Reamer was used for correction of the finish line after casting in all groups. Castings were seated on analog abutments and embedded in acrylic resin. Specimens were sectioned by isomet instrument and polished and cleaned by ultrasonic cleaner for 10 min. The marginal gap and overextended margins of castings were examined under a  Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM (X200. The mean gap and margin overextension were calculated for each group. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis and Bonferroni post-hoc test with p<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: No significant difference in gap size was observed among the three casting methods with two alloys (P=0.056. The marginal gap was not different in the studied casting methods (P=0.092. Gold alloy crowns showed lower marginal gaps compared to base metal alloy crowns (P<0.001. No significant difference in overhang size was observed among casting methods with two alloys (P=0.093. Base metal alloy crowns showed less overhang compared to gold alloy crowns (P<0.001. There was a

  14. Material properties of Al-Si-Cu aluminium alloy produced by the rotational cast technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Syahid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to explore microstructural and mechanical properties of cast Al-Si-Cu aluminum alloy (ADC12. To obtain excellent material properties, the cast Al alloys were produced by an originally developed mold rotational machine, namely liquid aluminum alloy is solidified during high speed rotating. The casting process was conducted under various casting conditions, in which the following factors were altered, e.g., melt temperature, metal mold temperature and different rotational speed. Microstructural characteristics were examined by direct observation using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the secondary dendrite arm spacing of alpha-Al phase (SDAS and the size of Si eutectic phase were identified. Mechanical properties were investigated by micro-hardness and tensile tests. Rotation speed and melt temperature were directly attributed to the SDAS, and severe shear stress arising from the rotation made fine and complicated grain structure, leading to the high mechanical properties. The extent of the shear stress was altered depending on the area of the sample due to the different shear stress. Furthermore, high melt temperature and high rotational speed decrease the size of Si eutectic phases. The high mechanical properties were detected for the cast samples produced by the casting condition as follows: melt temperature 700oC, mold temperature 400oC and rotation speed 400 rpm

  15. Gating System Design for Casting thin Aluminium Alloy (Al-Si Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor ANJO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminium oxide films, cuts and washes, low casting yield and entrapped gas. This study describes the design of a gating system to produce thin Aluminium cast alloy plates of different sizes and thicknesses of 4mm, 6mm, 8mm, and 10mm using the non-pressurized gating with ratio of 1:4:4 and green sand moulding technique. The gating design was based on the laws of fluid mechanics and empirical rules of gating for non ferrous metals. The equipments used for this experiment includes; a coal fired crucible furnace and an X-Ray machine. Materials used include; silica sand, clay, wood, glue and Aluminium alloy scraps. The experimental procedure involved: the gating design calculations, construction of wooden pattern and gating; using the wooden pattern and gating to produce the mould cavities and gating; melting, melt treatment and pouring of melt in the sand mould to produce the casting. The plate castings after removal from mould were visually examined for surface defects and after fettling and cleaning X-Ray radiography was used to find the internal soundness of the castings. From the results obtained in the experiment, it was found that there were no internal defects and quality castings were produced.

  16. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  18. Comparison of Dental Prostheses Cast and Sintered by SLM from Co-Cr-Mo-W Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myszka D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a comparative analysis of the metal substructure for dental prosthesis made from a Co-Cr-Mo-W alloy by two techniques, i.e. precision investment casting and selective laser melting (SLM. It was found that the roughness of the raw surface of the SLM sinter is higher than the roughness of the cast surface, which is compensated by the process of blast cleaning during metal preparation for the application of a layer of porcelain. Castings have a dendritic structure, while SLM sinters are characterized by a compact, fine-grain microstructure of the hardness higher by about 100 HV units. High performance and high costs of implementation the SLM technology are the cause to use it for the purpose of many dental manufacturers under outsourcing rules. The result is a reduction in manufacturing costs of the product associated with dental work time necessary to scan, designing and treatment of sinter compared with the time needed to develop a substructure in wax, absorption in the refractory mass, casting, sand blasting and finishing. As a result of market competition and low cost of materials, sinter costs decrease which brings the total costs related to the construction unit making using the traditional method of casting, at far less commitment of time and greater predictability and consistent sinter quality.

  19. State of Spent Molding Sands in the Mold Large-Size Cast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łucarz M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of spent moulding sands taken from the mould at various distances from the surface of the produced casting, are presented in the paper. The casting mould was made with an application of the cooling system of the metal core in order to increase the cooling rate of the ladle casting. As temperature measurements in the mould indicated the heat flow from the metal did not create conditions for the complete burning of a moulding sand. The analysis was performed to find out changes of spent moulding sands caused by degradation and destruction processes of organic binders. Conditions occurring in the casting mould were discussed on the bases of testing: ignition losses, dusts contents, pH reactions and the surface morphology of the moulding sand samples. Factors limiting the effective mould degassing were pointed out. Operations, possible for realization, which can limit the reasons of a periodical occurrence of increased amounts of casting defects due to changing gas evolution rates being the result of the technological process, were also indicated.

  20. [Application of analytical pyrolysis in air pollution control for green sand casting industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-jue; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Ying; Wang, Cheng-wen

    2010-02-01

    Analytic pyrolysis was conducted to simulate the heating conditions that the raw materials of green sand would experience during metal casting process. The volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from analytical pyrolysis were analyzed by gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector/mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS). The emissions from analytical pyrolysis exhibited some similarity in the compositions and distributions with those from actual casting processes. The major compositions of the emissions included benzene, toluene and phenol. The relative changes of emission levels that were observed in analytical pyrolysis of the various raw materials also showed similar trends with those observed in actual metal casting processes. The emission testing results of both analytic pyrolysis and pre-production foundry have shown that compared to the conventional phenolic urethane binder, the new non-naphthalene phenolic urethane binder diminished more than 50% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions, and the protein-based binder diminished more than 90% of HAP emissions. The similar trends in the two sets of tests offered promise that analytical pyrolysis techniques could be a fast and accurate way to establish the emission inventories, and to evaluate the relative emission levels of various raw materials of casting industry. The results of analytical pyrolysis could provide useful guides for the foundries to select and develop proper clean raw materials for the casting production.

  1. Tribological Properties of AlSi11-SiCp Composite Castings Produced by Pressure Die Casting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konopka Z.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The measurement results concerning the abrasive wear of AlSi11-SiC particles composites are presented in paper. The method of preparing a composite slurry composed of AlSi11 alloy matrix and 10, 20% vol.% of SiC particles, as well as the method of its high-pressure die casting was described. Composite slurry was injected into metal mould of cold chamber pressure die cast machine and castings were produced at various values of the piston velocity in the second stage of injection, diverse intensification pressure values, and various injection gate width values. Very good uniform arrangement of SiC particles in volume composite matrix was observed and these results were publicated early in this journal. The kinetics of abrasive wear and correlation with SiC particles arrangement in composite matrix were presented. Better wear resistance of composite was observed in comparison with aluminium alloy. Very strong linear correlation between abrasive wear and particle arrangement was observed. The conclusion gives the analysis and the interpretation of the obtained results.

  2. Identification of the steel viscosity and dynamic yield stress for the numerical modelling of casting simulations in the semi-solid state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solek K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of some casting processes cause flow of both liquid and semi-liquid metal alloys inside the die cavity. Generally, the continuous casting, squeeze casting or thixoforming could be classified as such processes. Design or optimisation of casting technology using numerical simulations requires knowledge of the rheological properties. The main objective of the experimental work, presented in this publication, is an analysis of the viscosity of 1.2080 (X210Cr12 high carbon steel in liquid and semisolid state. The secondary purpose of the experimental work was a development of the viscosity models used in continuous casting and thixoforming simulations. The significant achievement of this particular study was identification of thixotropy phenomenon which occurs not only during thixoforming, but also during magnetohydrodynamic stirring in continuous casting processes.

  3. Optimization of Casting Design Parameters on Fabrication of Reliable Semi-Solid Aluminum Suspension Control Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Kh. A.; Bouaicha, A.; Bouazara, M.

    2017-09-01

    The semi-solid casting process has the advantage of providing reliable mechanical aluminum parts that work continuously in dynamic as control arm of the suspension system in automotive vehicles. The quality performance of dynamic control arm is related to casting mold and gating system designs that affect the fluidity of semi-solid metal during filling the mold. Therefore, this study focuses on improvement in mechanical performance, depending on material characterization, and casting design optimization, of suspension control arms made of A357 aluminum semi-solid alloys. Mechanical and design analyses, applied on the suspension arm, showed the occurrence of mechanical failures at unexpected weak points. Metallurgical analysis showed that the main reason lies in the difficult flow of semi-solid paste through the thin thicknesses of a complex geometry. A design modification procedure is applied to the geometry of the suspension arm to avoid this problem and to improve its quality performance. The design modification of parts was carried out by using SolidWorks design software, evaluation of constraints with ABAQUS, and simulation of flow with ProCast software. The proposed designs showed that the modified suspension arm, without ribs and with a central canvas designed as Z, is considered as a perfect casting design showing an increase in the structural strength of the component. In this case, maximum von Mises stress is 199 MPa that is below the yield strength of the material. The modified casting mold design shows a high uniformity and minim turbulence of molten metal flow during semi-solid casting process.

  4. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one's profession became 'hereditary,' resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one's caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual's status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a 'black sheep effect,' that is, when high caste individuals' group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is ' Caste norm consistent' (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa 'Caste norm inconsistent' condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the 'black sheep' effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society.

  5. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Shoji; Sugiyama, Shuta; Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface ...

  6. Thin section casting program. Volume 2: Horizontal TSC (Thin-Section Casting) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    In horizontal thin-section casting (HTSC), 1-inch-thick steel sections are produced at speeds up to 600 ipm or about 60 tons per hour per foot of width (tphf). Liquid steel is fed from the ladle, and flows through a specially designed tundish, then flows through a refractory feeding tube and nozzle, with approximately the same external dimensions as the cast section, into a near-horizontal rectangular mold whose all four sides are traveling in the same direction and speed as the steel casting. This report is the second of a six volume set on thin section casting. This volume covers the research on horizontal thin section casting (TSC).

  7. The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jo; Scott, Fiona; Stott, Carol; Allison, Carrie; Bolton, Patrick; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Brayne, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test (CAST) is a parental questionnaire to screen for autism spectrum conditions. In this validation study, the CAST was distributed to 1925 children aged 5-11 in mainstream Cambridgeshire schools. A sample of participants received a full diagnostic assessment, conducted blind to screen status. The sensitivity of…

  8. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must be...

  9. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must be...

  10. Detection of Cast Shadows in Surveillance Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbou, Søren G.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarne Dissing; Stage, Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    Cast shadows from moving objects reduce the general ability of robust classification and tracking of these objects, in outdoor surveillance applications. A method for segmentation of cast shadows is proposed, combining statistical features with a new similarity feature, derived from a physics...

  11. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  12. Spatial Bimetallic Castings Manufactured from Iron Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a conception for manufacturing method of skeleton castings with composite features was shown. Main application of such castings are the working organs of machines subjected to intensive abrasive and erosive wear. Skeleton geometry was based on three-dimensional cubic net consisting of circular connectors and nodes joining 6 connectors according to Cartesian co-ordinate system. Dimension of an elementary cell was equal to 10 mm and diameter of single connector was equal to 5 mm. For bimetallic castings preparation two Fe based alloys were used: L25SHMN cast steel for skeleton substrate and ZlCr15NiMo cast iron for working part of the casting. In presented work obtained structure was analyzed with indication of characteristic regions. Authors described phenomena occurring at the alloys interface and phases in transition zone. A thesis was formulated concerning localization of transition zone at the cast iron matrix – cast steel reinforcement interface. Direction of further studies were indicated.

  13. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control

  14. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  15. Cast iron repair method of stitching pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, In Sik; Yu, Yeong Chul; Kim, Steve S.; Reed, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Many cast iron parts are welded and suffer from improper pre-heating and poor welding skills which destroy the castings due to new cracks, deformations etc. This is due mainly to the lack of understanding of the properties of cast iron. Welding, however impractical, was the only alternative for many years. Locks are used to add strength across a crack. Special drilling jigs are used to create a precise hole pattern that locks are driven into. Our locks have a unique ability to pull the sides of a crack together. Bottom locks are stacked or laminated to a depth of 80% of the casting thickness. Thicker surface locks finish off lock installation, allowing repairs in irregular shapes and contours. Installing products can be done quickly with pneumatic tools. Up to one inch of repair can be done in 5 minutes in 1/4 inch thick cast iron.

  16. Cast iron repair method of stitching pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, In Sik; Yu, Yeong Chul; Kim, Steve S.; Reed, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Many cast iron parts are welded and suffer from improper pre-heating and poor welding skills which destroy the casting due to new cracks, deformations etc. This is due mainly to the lack of understanding of the properties of cast iron. Welding, however impractical, was the only alternative for many years. Locks are used to add strength across a crack. Special drilling jigs are used to create a precise hole pattern that locks are driven into. Our locks have a unique ability to pull the sides of a crack together. Bottom locks are stacked or laminated to a depth of 80% of the casting thickness. Thicker surface locks finish off lock installation, allowing repairs in irregular shapes and contours. Installing products can be done quickly with pneumatic tools. Up to one inch of repair can be done in 5 minutes in 1/4 inches thick cast iron.

  17. Standard digital reference images for titanium castings

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The digital reference images provided in the adjunct to this standard illustrate various types and degrees of discontinuities occurring in titanium castings. Use of this standard for the specification or grading of castings requires procurement of the adjunct digital reference images, which illustrate the discontinuity types and severity levels. They are intended to provide the following: 1.1.1 A guide enabling recognition of titanium casting discontinuities and their differentiation both as to type and degree through digital radiographic examination. 1.1.2 Example digital radiographic illustrations of discontinuities and a nomenclature for reference in acceptance standards, specifications and drawings. 1.2 The digital reference images consist of seventeen digital files each illustrating eight grades of increasing severity. The files illustrate seven common discontinuity types representing casting sections up to 1-in. (25.4-mm). 1.3 The reference radiographs were developed for casting sections up to 1...

  18. The quality of the joint between alloy steel and unalloyed cast steel in bimetallic layered castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast process so-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic unalloyed cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The aim of paper was assessed the quality of the joint between bearing and working part in dependence of pouring temperature and carbon concentration in cast steel. The quality of the joint in bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing, structure and microhardness researches.

  19. A foam ablation model for lost foam casting of aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, M.R.; Caulk, D.A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    2005-09-01

    A model is developed for heat transfer, polymer vaporization, and gas diffusion at the interface between the advancing liquid metal and the receding foam pattern during mold filling in lost foam casting of aluminum. Most of the pattern interior decomposes by ablation, but the boundary cells decompose by a collapse mechanism, which creates an undercut in the pattern next to the coating. By regulating how much of the pattern coating is exposed to gas diffusion, the undercut controls the overall filling speed of the metal through the mold. Computed values for the foam decomposition energy from this model compare very well with experimental data on foam pyrolysis, and predicted filling speeds are consistent with observations in published experiments. In addition, the model explains several unusual observations about mold filling that until now have not been understood. (author)

  20. Rayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings and Ingots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rad, M. Torabi; Kotas, Petr; Beckermann, C.

    2013-01-01

    A Rayleigh number-based criterion is developed for predicting the formation of A-segregates in steel castings and ingots. The criterion is calibrated using available experimental data for ingots involving 27 different steel compositions. The critical Rayleigh number above which A-segregates can b......, the primary reason for this over-prediction is persumed to be the presence of a central zone of equiaxed grains in the casting sections. A-segregates do not form when the grain structure is equiaxed. © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2013...

  1. The Optimization of Costs and the Carbon Content in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzybowska

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article was introduced the conceptions of the optimization of the cast-iron batch near the use the mathematical programmer MATLAB. The results of industrial tests were showed with the use of the batch from sheet metals. It was showed on the possibility of formulating the tasks of optimizing with the use of the programming linear. It was showed on more effective utilization the power of productive foundries and minimalizing losses coming into being in the result of the inappropriate selection of the raw material composition. The conduct of optimizing the intervention of the fusion of cast iron was talked over.

  2. Peculiarities of the coolant of large ingots in crystallizators of semicontinuous casting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, V.Ya.; Marchenko, I.K.; Rimen, V.Kh.

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities of heat transfer in crystallizator of semicontinuous blank casting machine were investigated, taking carbon and chromium-nickel steels as an example. The effect of crystallizator cross-section and decrease of the rate of metal casting on ingot cooling was considered at that. It was established that nonuniformity of deformation of ingot skin as well as the state of crystallizator operating walls affect on heat transfer in crystallizator. Crystallizator structure with ribs in upper part and without ribs in lower cone part is optimal. It provides more uniform skin growth in initial period of solidification and compensation of gap, which appears due to shrinkage

  3. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  4. Structure of low-alloy constructional cast steel - a quantitative analysis of impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bartocha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of cast steel are primarily a function of chemical composition and solidification conditions i.e. primary structure, however, a significant role also plays its quality understood as purity metallurgical i.e. as small as possible content of harmful components of the structure. In work the results of porosity and non-metallic inclusions in steel cast structure quantity analysis are presented.A function which coefficient can be treated as parameters of unwontedstructurecomponent was statistically fittedto histograms of impurities distribution. The influence of O, N, P and S content on approximation function coefficients was analyzed.

  5. Possibilities of Pelletizing and Briquetting of Dusts from Castings Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Foundry dust can be divided into three groups: metallic dust with Fe content over 70%, mixed dust with Fe or SiO2 content between 10 –70% and sand wastes with minimum content of SiO2 about 70%. Dust from castings grinding with high Fe content (87.9% is still landfillin Slovakia. The aim of experiments with dust from grinding has been to find the cheapest way of dust agglomeration with minimumamount of binder because of melting in the electric induction furnace. The dust was pelletized and briquetted and as binders bentonite, water glass and cement were used. Briquettes made from dust from grinding with addition of water glass got compression strength after three months on the air about 82 kPa. Briquettes with addition of water glass were melted together with cast iron in electric induction furnace. Yield of metal from briquettes was around 80% and slag quantity around 4% (without briquettes the slag quantity was 1.4%.

  6. Method for determining the formation of shrinkage defects in the castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dyja

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Simple simulations of solidification of metals and alloys generally provide results for determining the temperature distribut ion in a given time or solidification time for the specific locations of the casting. These data allow to unambiguously determine the position of thermal centers. However, knowledge about the location of thermal centers is not synonymous with the information about the location of any shrinkage defects in the casting, because the physical behaviour of molten metal should be still considered. This paper presents authors’ own method of predicting the formation of shrinkage defects in the castings, basing on solidification simulation results, taking into account the basic rulesof behaviour of the molten metal. The effectiveness of the method has been tested on the basis of example simulations performed for the flat shape of the casting inlet systems. The advantage of the method is that it requires little additional computational effort. The article is summarized by conclusions reached on the basis of simulations, as well as the program for further work containing possible improvements of the algorithm.

  7. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

  8. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  9. Hand Book of Metal Material Contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yeong Hui

    1989-06-01

    This book first gives descriptions of using of this hand book and contents. It tells of steel such as bar steel, section steel, and steel sheet which are steel for general structure and steel for pressure vessel, a steel pipe, carbon steel for machine structure and alloy steel, steel for special things, stainless steel, heat resisting steel, tool steel, spring steel, forging, steel casting, nonferrous metal such as aluminium and aluminium alloy, casting, list of similar steel per metal, list of steel like ASTM, AISI per number, and list of collecting standard per metal material.

  10. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  11. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  12. Wettability and Surface Free Energy of Ti(C,N Coatings on Nickel-based Casting Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszek K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The production process of prosthetic restorations runs in two stages. In the first stage, the prosthetic foundation is produced of metal alloys. In the second stage, a facing material is applied on the produced element. In both stages, the wettability is significantly important, as well as the free surface energy relating to it. The quality of the obtained cast depends on the surface phenomena occurring between the metal alloy and the material of which the casting mould is made. The performed examinations also point to a relation between the ceramics joint and the base, depending on the wetting angle.

  13. Ponseti casting: a new soft option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, M B S; Gupta, M; Pattison, G T R; Dunn-van der Ploeg, I D

    2008-11-01

    We have modified the Ponseti casting technique by using a below-knee Softcast instead of an above-knee plaster of Paris cast. Treatment was initiated as soon as possible after birth and the Pirani score was recorded at each visit. Following the manipulation techniques of Ponseti, a below-knee Softcast was applied directly over a stockinette for a snug fit and particular attention was paid to creating a deep groove above the heel to prevent slippage. If necessary, a percutaneous Achilles tenotomy was performed and casting continued until the child was fitted with Denis Browne abduction boots. Between April 2003 and May 2007 we treated 51 consecutive babies with 80 idiopathic club feet with a mean age at presentation of 4.5 weeks (4 days to 62 weeks). The initial mean Pirani score was 5.5 (3 to 6). It took a mean of 8.5 weeks (4 to 53) of weekly manipulation and casting to reach the stage of percutaneous Achilles tenotomy. A total of 20 feet (25%) did not require a tenotomy and for the 60 that did, the mean Pirani score at time of operation was 2.5 (0.5 to 3). Denis Browne boots were applied at a mean of 10 weeks (4 to 56) after presentation. The mean time from tenotomy to boots was 3.3 weeks (2 to 10). We experienced one case of cast-slippage during a period of non-attendance, which prolonged the casting process. One case of prolonged casting required repeated tenotomy, and three feet required repeated tenotomy and casting after relapsing while in Denis Browne boots. We believe the use of a below-knee Softcast in conjunction with Ponseti manipulation techniques shows promising initial results which are comparable to those using above-knee plaster of Paris casts.

  14. LES‐VOF simulation of turbulent interfacial flow in the continuous casting mold

    OpenAIRE

    Saeedipour, Mahdi; Puttinger, Stefan; Pirker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Slag entrainment during continuous casting process is a multiscale problem strongly dependent on the molten metal flow in the mold. Large-scale flow structures in the mold interact with the slag layer at the top of the meniscus, and small-scale liquid structures in the form of slag droplets may be entrained into the solidifying metal. In this work a large eddy simulation - volume of fluid (LES-VOF) approach is applied to investigate the unsteady flow interaction with the metal-slag-air interf...

  15. CAST with its micromegas detector installed.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) uses a prototype LHC dipole magnet to search for very weakly interacting neutral particles called axions, which should originate in the core of the Sun. The magnet converts the solar axions to photons which are then detected by an X-ray detector based on Micromegas technology. CAST's Micromegas detector has now been installed. Photos 01 02: General view of the CAST experiment with the Micromegas detector in place. Photo 03: Close-up of the micromegas set-up.

  16. Sonic testing in assessment of casting quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Białobrzeski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study has been designing and putting in operation of a stand for sonic testing equipped with modern and readily available numerical devices and with the author’s own computer program, which enables recording and analysis of acoustic fields and of the frequency of free vibrations in selected castings made from Fe and Al alloys, and specifically also from magnesium alloys, and mastering the technique of making such tests along with their practical application in assessment of the quality of castings made from magnesium alloys and investment castings made from carbon steel.

  17. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  18. The Evolution of Cast Microstructures on the HAZ Liquation Cracking of Mar-M004 Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsin Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The causes of liquation cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of a cast Mar-M004 superalloy weld were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD were applied to identify the final microconstituents at the solidification boundaries of the cast alloy. Fine borides and lamellar eutectics were present in front of some γ-γ′ colonies, which were expected to be liquefied prematurely during welding. The metal carbide (MC enriched in Nb, Hf; M3B2 and M5B3 borides enriched in Cr and Mo; and lamellar Ni-Hf intermetallics were mainly responsible for the induced liquation cracking of the Mar-M004 weld, especially the MC carbides. Scanning electron microscope (SEM fractographs showed that the fracture features of those liquation cracks were associated with the interdendritic constituents in the cast superalloy.

  19. PECULIARITIES OF PROCESSES OF CARBIDE FORMATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Cr, Mn AND Ni IN WHITE CAST IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During crystallization of castings from white cast iron, carbides Me3С, Me7С3, Me23С6 were formed depending on chromium and carbon content. Impeded chromium diffusion caused formation of thermodynamically unstable and non-uniform phases (carbides. During heat treatment process stable equilibrium phases were formed as a result of rearrangement of the carbides’ crystal lattice, replacement of iron, manganese, nickel and silicon atoms by chromium atoms. The allocated atoms concentrated, forming inclusions of austenite inside the carbides. Holding during 9 hours at 720 °С and annealing decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr, and increased it in the cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr. Holding during 4.5 hours at 1050 °С and normalization decreased the non-uniformity of chromium distribution in the metallic base of cast iron containing 21,5 % Cr, and increased it in cast iron containing 11,5 % Cr.

  20. Assessment of the physical and mechanical properties of plaster of Paris bandage cast used as a splinting and casting materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Parmar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the physical and mechanical properties of plaster of Paris (POP bandage cast used as a splinting and casting materials. Materials and Methods: POP casts were divided into three Groups A, B and C with 2, 3 and 8 layer for POP bandage, respectively (n=6 in each group. Handling characters, technical easiness or difficulties, setting time, weight, diameter and thickness of the casts were recorded for different groups. The casts were mounted on universal testing machine and axial load was applied @ 10 mm/min until failure. The load deflection graphs were plotted. The maximum force at which failure of the casts occurred was recorded. Stress, strain, modulus of elasticity (MOE and stiffness of casts were calculated. Result: Construction of POP bandage cast was messy and required 45-60 min for hardening. 8 layer POP cast was comparatively heavier in weight and thicker in cross section than 3 layer cast followed by 2 layer cast. Under axial compression, the load bearing capacity of 8 layer POP casts was more than 2 and 3 layer cast. Conclusion: The values of load bearing capacity, stress, stiffness and MOE of cast were the highest for 8 layer POP cast followed by 2 and 3 layer cast. Use if splints with POP cast is recommended due to its poor mechanical properties.

  1. Low-cycle fatigue behavior of permanent mold cast and die-cast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Xin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue failure is one of the main failure forms of Al-Si-Cu-Mg aluminum alloys. To feature their mechanical aspect of fatigue behavior, the low-cycle fatigue behavior of permanent mold cast and die-cast Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys at room temperature was investigated. The experimental results show that both permanent mold cast and die-cast Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys mainly exhibit cyclic strain hardening. At the same total strain amplitude, the die-cast Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy shows higher cyclic deformation resistance and longer fatigue life than does the permanent mold cast Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy. The relationship between both elastic and plastic strain amplitudes with reversals to failure shows a monotonic linear behavior, and can be described by the Basquin and Coffin-Manson equations, respectively.

  2. Direct Cast U-6Nb – 2017 Progress on Cylindrical Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikin, Jr., Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-04

    This report describes work to further develop a sound technical basis and best practices for mold design and process parameters for the Direct Casting of U-6wt%Nb components. One major challenge to the production of U-6Nb components is the propensity for niobium segregation during casting and solidification. This is especially true for cylindrical castings where the vertical side walls allow flotation of Nb resulting in severe inverse macrosegregation. In this work, a small (120 mm diameter by 180 mm tall) and large cylinder (250 mm diameter by 310 mm tall) are examined with a focus on reducing, or eliminating, niobium segregation. It is demonstrated that counter gravity casting (top-to-bottom solidification) can be used to minimize segregation in the small cylinder. Attempts to counter gravity cast the large cylinder were unsuccessful, in large part due to size limitations of the current furnace. A path forward for casting of the large cylinders is discussed.

  3. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareg, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers.

  4. Modeling of Dendritic Evolution of Continuously Cast Steel Billet with Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Ji, Cheng; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-02-01

    In order to predict the dendritic evolution during the continuous steel casting process, a simple mechanism to connect the heat transfer at the macroscopic scale and the dendritic growth at the microscopic scale was proposed in the present work. As the core of the across-scale simulation, a two-dimensional cell automaton (CA) model with a decentered square algorithm was developed and parallelized. Apart from nucleation undercooling and probability, a temperature gradient was introduced to deal with the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) by considering its variation during continuous casting. Based on the thermal history, the dendritic evolution in a 4 mm × 40 mm region near the centerline of a SWRH82B steel billet was predicted. The influences of the secondary cooling intensity, superheat, and casting speed on the dendritic structure of the billet were investigated in detail. The results show that the predicted equiaxed dendritic solidification of Fe-5.3Si alloy and columnar dendritic solidification of Fe-0.45C alloy are consistent with in situ experimental results [Yasuda et al. Int J Cast Metals Res 22:15-21 (2009); Yasuda et al. ISIJ Int 51:402-408 (2011)]. Moreover, the predicted dendritic arm spacing and CET location agree well with the actual results in the billet. The primary dendrite arm spacing of columnar dendrites decreases with increasing secondary cooling intensity, or decreasing superheat and casting speed. Meanwhile, the CET is promoted as the secondary cooling intensity and superheat decrease. However, the CET is not influenced by the casting speed, owing to the adjusting of the flow rate of secondary spray water. Compared with the superheat and casting speed, the secondary cooling intensity can influence the cooling rate and temperature gradient in deeper locations, and accordingly exerts a more significant influence on the equiaxed dendritic structure.

  5. Casting directly from a computer model by using advanced simulation software FLOW-3D Cast ®

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sirviö; M. Woś

    2009-01-01

    ConiferRob - A patternless casting technique, originally conceived at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and furtherdeveloped at its spin-off company, Simtech Systems, offers up to 40% savings in product development costs, and up to two months shorterdevelopment times compared to conventional techniques. Savings of this order can be very valuable on today's highly competitivemarkets. Casting simulation is commonly used for designing of casting systems. However, most of the software are ...

  6. Gating Systems for Sizeable Castings from Al Alloys Cast into Ceramic Moulds

    OpenAIRE

    Stachovec I.; Horáček M.; Zemčík L.; Kolda V.; Horenský J.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to casting to conventional non-reusable “sand” moulds, for which calculating technique for an optimum design of the gating system is comparatively well-developed, a trial-and-error method is applied mostly for casting to ceramic shell moulds made by the investment casting technology. A technologist selects from gating systems of several types (that are standardized by the foundry mostly) on the basis of experience. However, this approach is not sustainable with ever growing demand...

  7. The effects of different casting techniques on the hardness, energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of casting technique on the impact strength, energy absorbance and hardness of sand cast Pb-Sb-Cu alloys was studied following casting of the alloys using three techniques. Cooling of the alloys after casting was carried out in water, air and furnace in order to vary the micro-structure of the alloys produced.

  8. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a resilient...

  9. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  10. Solidification control in continuous casting of steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    /lubrication at solid–liquid interface, high temperature properties of the solidifying shell etc. is necessary to control the continuous casting process. The present paper elaborates upon the knowledge developed in the areas of initial shell ...

  11. Ambiguous chairs cast in fabric formed concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of a specific experiment with a new casting technique for concrete structures, this paper discusses explorations of materiality as a way of generating discussion of the use of new technologies....

  12. Tailorable Porous Ceramics via Freeze Casting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Freeze casting of ceramics is a novel technique used to produce porous materials. The process involves solidifying a solvent in a ceramic slurry to produce a frozen...

  13. ToxCast/ToxRefDB

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ToxCast is used as a cost-effective approach for efficiently prioritizing the toxicity testing of thousands of chemicals. It uses data from state-of-the-art high...

  14. Caste in India, Past and Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Donald H.

    1971-01-01

    Traced is the sociocultural framework for the system in Indian culture which emphasized duty and obligations rather than individual freedom and rights. Also discussed are contemporary changes in the caste system. (DB)

  15. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza, J G; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.

    2014-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micr......Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments...... of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led...... to background levels below 10−6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10−7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO...

  16. Last cast for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first major contract signed for the LHC is drawing to a close. Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre (a member of the Arcelor Group) has just completed production of 50,000 tonnes of steel sheets for the accelerator's superconducting magnet yokes, in what has proved to be an exemplary partnership with CERN. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre. It was a bright red-letter day at the end of May, when Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre of the Arcelor Group marked the completion of one of the largest contracts for the LHC machine by casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes in the presence of LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans, AT Department Head Philippe Lebrun, Magnets and Superconductors (AT-MAS) Group Leader Lucio Rossi and Head of the AT-MAS Group's components centre Francesco Bertinelli. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the acc...

  17. Examination and Elimination of Defects in Cone Casting Made of Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzik E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the scope of existing cooperation with the Foundry of Cast Iron ZM “WSK Rzeszów” Ltd. there was carried out research work of microstructure and mechanical properties in the walls of a cone casting made of ductile cast iron. The particular attention was being put to the search of the potential brittle phases which have deleterious effect on ductility and dynamic properties of highly strained use of the casting prone to the potential risk of cracks during the highly strained use.

  18. Investigations of Protective Coatings for Castings of High-manganese Cast Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When cast steel castings are made in moulding sands on matrices of high-silica sand, which has a low fire resistance the problem of theso-called chemical penetration is distinctly visible. Whereas this effect appears to a small degree only when moulding sand matrices are of chromite, zircon or olivine sands. Therefore in case of making castings of high-manganese cast steel (e.g. Hadfield steel sands not containing free silica should be applied (e.g. olivine sand or in case of a high-silica matrix protective coatings for moulds and cores should be used. Two protective coatings, magnesite alcoholic (marked as coating 1 and coating 2 originated from different producers and intended for moulds for castings of the Hadfield steel, were selected for investigations. Examinations of the basic properties were performed for these coatings: viscosity, thermal analysis, sedimentation properties, wear resistance. In order to estimate the effectiveness of protective coatings the experimental castings were prepared. When applying coating 1, the surface quality of the casting was worse and traces of interaction between the casting material (cast steel and the coating were seen. When protective coating 2 was used none interactions were seen and the surface quality was better.

  19. Investigations of Protective Coatings for Castings of High-Manganese Cast Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available When cast steel castings are made in moulding sands on matrices of high-silica sand, which has a low fire resistance the problem of the so-called chemical penetration is distinctly visible. Whereas this effect appears to a small degree only when moulding sand matrices are of chromite, zircon or olivine sands. Therefore in case of making castings of high-manganese cast steel (e.g. Hadfield steel sands not containing free silica should be applied (e.g. olivine sand or in case of a high-silica matrix protective coatings for moulds and cores should be used. Two protective coatings, magnesite alcoholic (marked as coating 1 and coating 2 originated from different producers and intended for moulds for castings of the Hadfield steel, were selected for investigations. Examinations of the basic properties were performed for these coatings: viscosity, thermal analysis, sedimentation properties, wear resistance. In order to estimate the effectiveness of protective coatings the experimental castings were prepared. When applying coating 1, the surface quality of the casting was worse and traces of interaction between the casting material (cast steel and the coating were seen. When protective coating 2 was used none interactions were seen and the surface quality was better.

  20. Genetic structure of Rajaka caste and affinities with other caste populations of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatheesam, C; Babu, B V; Babu, M C

    1997-01-01

    The present study gives an account of the genetic structure in terms of distribution of a few genetic markers, viz., A1A2B0, Rh(D), G6PD deficiency and haemoglobin among the Rajaka caste population of Andhra Pradesh, India. The genetic relationships of the Rajaka caste with other Andhra caste populations were investigated in terms of genetic distance, i.e., Sq B (mn) of Balakrishnan and Sanghvi. Relatively lesser distance was established between the Rajaka and two Panchama castes. Also, the pattern of genetic distance corroborates the hierarchical order of the Hindu varna system.