WorldWideScience

Sample records for metal carbide fuels

  1. Processing of mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels for high temperature space nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2000-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for high performance, next generation space power and propulsion systems. These mixed carbides such as the pseudo-ternary, (U, Zr, Nb)C, hold significant promise because of their high melting points (typically greater than 3200 K), thermochemical stability in a hot hydrogen environment, and high thermal conductivity. However, insufficient test data exist under nuclear thermal propulsion conditions of temperature and hot hydrogen environment to fully evaluate their performance. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders while hypostoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.95 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold pressing, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce dense (low porosity), homogeneous, single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for space power and propulsion applications. .

  2. Review of the literature for dry reprocessing oxide, metal, and carbide fuel: The AIROX, RAHYD, and CARBOX pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, R.C.; Rhee, B.W. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Energy Systems Group

    1979-09-30

    The state of the art of dry processing oxide, carbide, and metal fuel has been determined through an extensive literature review. Dry processing in one of the most proliferation resistant fuel reprocessing technologies available to date, and is one of the few which can be exported to other countries. Feasibility has been established for oxide, carbide, and metal fuel on a laboratory scale, and large-scale experiments on oxide and carbide fuel have shown viability of the dry processing concept. A complete dry processing cycle has been demonstrated by multicycle processing-refabrication-reirradiation experiments on oxide fuel. Additional experimental work is necessary to: (1) demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for carbide and metal fuel, (2) optimize dry processing conditions, and (3) establish fission product behavior. Dry process waste management is easier than for an aqueous processing facility since wastes are primarily solids and gases. Waste treatment can be accomplished by techniques which have been, or are being, developed for aqueous plants.

  3. Surface science and electrochemical studies of metal-modified carbides for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Glenn

    Carbides of the early transition metals have emerged as low-cost catalysts that are active for a wide range of reactions. The surface chemistry of carbides can be altered by modifying the surface with small amounts of admetals. These metal-modified carbides can be effective replacements for Pt-based bimetallic systems, which suffer from the drawbacks of high cost and low thermal stability. In this dissertation, metal-modified carbides were studied for reactions with applications to renewable energy technologies. It is demonstrated that metal-modified carbides possess high activity for alcohol reforming and electrochemical hydrogen production. First, the surface chemistry of carbides towards alcohol decomposition is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and surface science experiments. The Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used to calculate the binding energies of alcohols and decomposition intermediates on metal-modified carbides. The calculated binding energies were then correlated to reforming activity determined experimentally using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the case of methanol decomposition, it was found that tungsten monocarbide (WC) selectively cleaved the C-O bond to produce methane. Upon modifying the surface with a single layer of metal such as Ni, Pt, or Rh, the selectivity shifted towards scission of the C-H bonds while leaving the C-O bond intact, producing carbon monoxide (CO) and H2. High resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to examine the bond breaking sequence as a function of temperature. From HREELS, it was shown that the surfaces followed an activity trend of Rh > Ni > Pt. The Au-modified WC surface possessed too low of a methanol binding energy, and molecular desorption of methanol was the most favorable pathway on this surface. Next, the ability of Rh-modified WC to break the C-C bond of C2 and C3 alcohols was demonstrated. HREELS showed that ethanol decomposed through an acetaldehyde

  4. Understanding of Electrochemical Mechanisms for CO2 Capture and Conversion into Hydrocarbon Fuels in Transition-Metal Carbides (MXenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Xingzhu; Ong, Wee-Jun; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Zhao, Xiujian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sun, Chenghua

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal (groups IV, V, VI) carbides (MXenes) with formulas M3C2 have been investigated as CO2 conversion catalysts with well-resolved density functional theory calculations. While MXenes from the group IV to VI series have demonstrated an active behavior for the capture of CO2, the Cr3C2 and Mo3C2 MXenes exhibit the most promising CO2 to CH4 selective conversion capabilities. Our results predicted the formation of OCHO(•) and HOCO(•) radical species in the early hydrogenation steps through spontaneous reactions. This provides atomic level insights into the computer-aided screening for high-performance catalysts and the understanding of electrochemical mechanisms for CO2 reduction to energy-rich hydrocarbon fuels, which is of fundamental significance to elucidate the elementary steps for CO2 fixation.

  5. Status of advanced carbide fuels: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis

    2002-01-01

    Solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, so called ternary carbide or tri-carbide fuels have great potential for applications in next generation advanced nuclear power reactors. Because of their high melting points, high thermal conductivity, improved resistance to hot hydrogen corrosion, and good fission product retention, these advanced nuclear fuels have great potential for high performance reactors with increased safety margins. Despite these many benefits, some concerns regarding carbide fuels include compatibility issues with coolant and/or cladding materials and their endurance under the extreme conditions associated with nuclear thermal propulsion. The status of these fuels is reviewed to characterize their performance for space nuclear power applications. Results of current investigations are presented and as well as future directions of study for these advanced nuclear fuels. .

  6. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  7. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  8. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  9. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  10. Metamagnetism of η-carbide-type transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, T.; Terazawa, S.; Umemoto, Y.; Tabata, Y.; Sato, K.; Kondo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-09-01

    η-carbide-type transition-metal compounds include the frustrated stella quadran-gula lattice. Due to characteristics of the lattice, we expect subtle transitions between frustrated and non-frustrated states. Here, we report metamagnetic transitions newly found in η-carbide-type compounds Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C and Co6W6C.

  11. CLAD CARBIDE NUCLEAR FUEL, THERMIONIC POWER, MODULES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The general objective is to evaluate a clad carbide emitter, thermionic power module which simulates nuclear reactor installation, design, and...performance. The module is an assembly of two series-connected converters with a single common cesium reservoir. The program goal is 500 hours

  12. Studies on the equation of state of mixed carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, M.; Mathews, C. K.; Rao, P. Bhaskar

    1989-12-01

    The equation of state of reactor fuels is required up to very high temperatures in order to assess the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCM). Though the mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium is a candidate fuel material for fast breeder reactors, much information is not available on its equation of state. This paper reports the results of our studies to obtain the equilibrium vapour pressures of uranium carbide and uranium-plutonium mixed carbide of varying compositions in the temperature range of 1300-9000 K. An extrapolation method based on the principles of equilibrium thermodynamics has been used as also the principle of corresponding states. The agreement between the different results are discussed and their implications in HCDA calculations brought out.

  13. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  15. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping; Fan, Hong Jin

    2016-05-01

    High-performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high-performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end.

  16. Yarlongite:A New Metallic Carbide Mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Nicheng; BAI Wenji; LI Guowu; XIONG Ming; FANG Qingsong; YANG Jingsui; MA Zhesheng; RONG He

    2009-01-01

    Yarlongite occurs in ophiolitic chromitite at the Luobusha mine(29°5'N 92°,5'E,about 200 km ESE of Lhasa),Qusum County,Shannan Prefecture,Tibet Autonomous Region,People'S Republic of China.Associated minerals are:diamond,moissanite,wiistite,iridium("osmiridium"), osmium("iridosmine"),periclase,chromite,native irun,native nickel,native chromium,forsterite. Cr-rich diopside,intermetallic compounds Ni-Fe-Cr,Ni-Cr,Cr-C,etc.Yariongite and its associated minerals were handpicked from a large heavy mineral sample of chromitite.The metallic carbides associated with yarlongite are cohenite,tongbaite,khamrabaevite and qusongite(IMA2007.034). Yarlongite occurs as irregular grains,with a size between 0.02 and 0.06 mm,steel-grey colour,H Mohs:5 1/2-6.Tenacity:brittle.Cleavage:{0 0 1}perfect.Fracture:conchoidal.Chemical formula: (Cr4Fe4Ni)∑9C4,or(Cr,Fe,Ni)∑9C4,Crystal system:Hexagonal,Space Group:P63/mc,a=18.839(2)A,C =4.4960(9)A,V=745.7(2)A3,Z=6,Density(calc.)=7.19 g/cm3(with simplified formula).Yarlongite has been approved as a new mineral by the CNMNC(IMA2007-035).Holotype material is deposited at the Geological Museum of China(No.M11650).

  17. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  18. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  19. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  20. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  1. Processing of solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for advanced space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis Warren

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and space nuclear power are two enabling technologies for the manned exploration of space and the development of research outposts in space and on other planets such as Mars. Advanced carbide nuclear fuels have been proposed for application in space nuclear power and propulsion systems. This study examined the processing technologies and optimal parameters necessary to fabricate samples of single phase, solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides. In particular, the pseudo-ternary carbide, UC-ZrC-NbC, system was examined with uranium metal mole fractions of 5% and 10% and corresponding uranium densities of 0.8 to 1.8 gU/cc. Efforts were directed to those methods that could produce simple geometry fuel elements or wafers such as those used to fabricate a Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel element and reactor core. Methods of cold uniaxial pressing, sintering by induction heating, and hot pressing by self-resistance heating were investigated. Solid solution, high density (low porosity) samples greater than 95% TD were processed by cold pressing at 150 MPa and sintering above 2600 K for times longer than 90 min. Some impurity oxide phases were noted in some samples attributed to residual gases in the furnace during processing. Also, some samples noted secondary phases of carbon and UC2 due to some hyperstoichiometric powder mixtures having carbon-to-metal ratios greater than one. In all, 33 mixed carbide samples were processed and analyzed with half bearing uranium as ternary carbides of UC-ZrC-NbC. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and density measurements were used to characterize samples. Samples were processed from powders of the refractory mono-carbides and UC/UC 2 or from powders of uranium hydride (UH3), graphite, and refractory metal carbides to produce hypostoichiometric mixed carbides. Samples processed from the constituent carbide powders and sintered at temperatures above the melting point of UC

  2. Metallicity of boron carbides at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekura, Haruhiko; Shirai, Koun; Yanase, Akira

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure of semiconducting boron carbide at high pressure has been theoretically investigated, because of interests in the positive pressure dependence of resistivity, in the gap closure, and in the phase transition. The most simplest form B12(CCC) is assumed. Under assumptions of hydrostatic pressure and neglecting finite-temperature effects, boron carbide is quite stable at high pressure. The crystal of boron carbide is stable at least until a pressure higher than previous experiments showed. The gap closure occurs only after p=600 GPa on the assumption of the original crystal symmetry. In the low pressure regime, the pressure dependence of the energy gap almost diminishes, which is an exceptional case for semiconductors, which could be one of reasons for the positive pressure dependence of resistivity. A monotonous increase in the apex angle of rhombohedron suggests that the covalent bond continues to increase. The C chain inserted in the main diagonal of rhombohedral structure is the chief reason of this stability.

  3. Ionisation Potentials of Metal Carbide Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Addicoat, M.; Gascooke, Jason; Buntine, Mark; Metha, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    Photo-Ionisation Efficiency (PIE) experiments have been performed on gas phase niobium and tantalum carbide clusters to determine their ionisation potentials (IPs). For TanCm (n = 3-4, m = 0-4) clusters an oscillatory behaviour is observed such that clusters with an odd number of carbon atoms have higher IPs and clusters with an even number of carbons have lower IPs. Excellent agreement is found with relative IPs calculated using density functional theory for the lowest energy structures, which are consistent with the development of a 2x2x2 face-centred nanocrystal. For the niobium carbide clusters we observe the species Nb4C5 and Nb4C6. Initial calculations suggest that these clusters contain carbon-carbon bonding. Interestingly, the stoichiometry for Nb4C6 is half that of a metcar, M8C12. Preliminary data will also be shown on bimetallic-carbide clusters.

  4. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport (NUWCDIVNPT), 1176 Howell Street, Building 1302/2, Newport, RI 02841 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L{sup -1} and 300 Wh kg{sup -1}, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis. (author)

  5. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S.

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L -1 and 300 Wh kg -1, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis.

  6. Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

    2001-02-01

    Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented. .

  7. The local structure of transition metal doped semiconducting boron carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing; Dowben, P A [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PO Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Luo Guangfu; Mei Waining [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0266 (United States); Kizilkaya, Orhan [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge LA 70806 (United States); Shepherd, Eric D; Brand, J I [College of Engineering, and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, N209 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th and Vine Streets, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2010-03-03

    Transition metal doped boron carbides produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of orthocarborane (closo-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) and 3d metal metallocenes were investigated by performing K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements. The 3d transition metal atom occupies one of the icosahedral boron or carbon atomic sites within the icosahedral cage. Good agreement was obtained between experiment and models for Mn, Fe and Co doping, based on the model structures of two adjoined vertex sharing carborane cages, each containing a transition metal. The local spin configurations of all the 3d transition metal doped boron carbides, Ti through Cu, are compared using cluster and/or icosahedral chain calculations, where the latter have periodic boundary conditions.

  8. SOLID SOLUTION CARBIDES ARE THE KEY FUELS FOR FUTURE NUCLEAR THERMAL PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion uses nuclear energy to directly heat a propellant (such as liquid hydrogen) to generate thrust for space transportation. In the 1960 s, the early Rover/Nuclear Engine for Rocket Propulsion Application (NERVA) program showed very encouraging test results for space nuclear propulsion but, in recent years, fuel research has been dismal. With NASA s renewed interest in long-term space exploration, fuel researchers are now revisiting the RoverMERVA findings, which indicated several problems with such fuels (such as erosion, chemical reaction of the fuel with propellant, fuel cracking, and cladding issues) that must be addressed. It is also well known that the higher the temperature reached by a propellant, the larger the thrust generated from the same weight of propellant. Better use of fuel and propellant requires development of fuels capable of reaching very high temperatures. Carbides have the highest melting points of any known material. Efforts are underway to develop carbide mixtures and solid solutions that contain uranium carbide, in order to achieve very high fuel temperatures. Binary solid solution carbides (U, Zr)C have proven to be very effective in this regard. Ternary carbides such as (U, Zr, X) carbides (where X represents Nb, Ta, W, and Hf) also hold great promise as fuel material, since the carbide mixtures in solid solution generate a very hard and tough compact material. This paper highlights past experience with early fuel materials and bi-carbides, technical problems associated with consolidation of the ingredients, and current techniques being developed to consolidate ternary carbides as fuel materials.

  9. Metallic fuels for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Porter, D. L.; Chang, Y. I.; Hayes, S. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Burkes, D. E.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Somers, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. This paper presents an evaluation of metallic alloy fuels. Early US fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high fissile density and compatibility with sodium. The goal of fast reactor fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. This will provide a mechanism for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels are candidates for this application, based on documented performance of metallic fast reactor fuels and the early results of tests currently being conducted in US and international transmutation fuel development programs.

  10. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated......, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers...

  11. Metallic fuel design development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Lee, B. O. and others

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual

  12. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  13. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-03-11

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts.

  14. Review on Sintering Process of WC-Co Cemented Carbide in Metal Injection Molding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathabrao, M.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview on sintering process of WC-Co cemented carbides in metal injection molding technology. Metal injection molding is an advanced and promising technology in producing cemented nanostructured carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal is known for its high hardness and wear resistance in various applications. Moreover, areas include fine grained materials, alternative binders, and alternative sintering techniques has been discussed in this paper.

  15. Trends in the chemical properties in early transition metal carbide surfaces: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitchin, J.R.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Barteau, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    are in excellent agreement with experimental values of lattice constants and bulk moduli. The adsorption of atomic hydrogen is used as a probe to compare the chemical properties of various carbide surfaces. Hydrogen adsorbs more strongly to the metal-terminated carbide surfaces than to the corresponding closest......-packed pure metal surfaces, due to the tensile strain induced in the carbide surfaces upon incorporation of carbon into the lattice. Hydrogen atoms were found to adsorb more weakly on carbide surfaces than on the corresponding closest-packed pure metal surfaces only when there were surface carbon atoms...

  16. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  17. A Study of Current Chopping Characteristics in Metal-Carbide Composite Contact Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kusano, Takashi; Okutomi, Tsutomu; Yokokura, Kunio; Homma, Mitsutaka

    To clarify the effect of carbides on current chopping characteristics chopping current was evaluated for various metalcarbide contact materials. As a result, it was found that the chopping current of metal-carbide contacts was related to the vapor pressure of metals and the work function of carbides. It was also found that the chopping current was reduced by the heat treatment when the melting point of contacts is lower than the temperature of heat teatment.

  18. First-principles study of transition metal carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connétable, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical properties of transition metal carbides compounds associated with the Nb-C, Ti-C, Mo-C and W-C alloys systems using first-principles calculations. The ground-state properties (lattice parameters, cohesive energies and magnetism) were analyzed and compared to the experimental and theoretical literature. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental findings concerning atomic positions and structures. Elastic properties, computed using a finite-differences approach, are then discussed in detail. To complete the work, their lattice dynamics properties (phonon spectra) were investigated. These results serve to establish that some structures, which are mechanically stable, are dynamically unstable.

  19. New method for synthesis of metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, R.; Folmer, J.S.; Kodambaka, S.K. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a novel synthesis method using a carbothermic reduction reaction of carbon coated precursors for producing high purity, submicron, non-agglomerated powders of metal carbide, metal nitride and metal boride systems. The authors also want to demonstrate the advantages of the process and provide information on the applicability of the process for synthesizing related advanced ceramic powders (e.g. SiC, WC, TiN, TiB{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). During the FY96 of the project, steps are taken to investigate the reaction mechanisms and phase evolution during the formation of TiC from carbon coated titania precursors and to produce submicron TiC powders with desired stoichiometries. Depending on the carbon content in the coated titania precursor, TiC powder was produced with different stoichiometries (different amount of oxygen and free carbon).

  20. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal-transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon-shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  1. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthold, W.P. [Barthold and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1984-08-01

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  2. Reaction-Forming Method for Producing Near Net-Shape Refractory Metal Carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisiano, Marc N.; Jakubenas, Kevin J.; Baranwal, Rita

    2004-07-20

    A method for reaction forming refractory metal carbides. The method involves the fabrication of a glassy carbon preform by casting an organic, resin-based liquid mixture into a mold and subsequently heat treating it in two steps, which cures and pyrolizes the resin resulting in a porous carbon preform. By varying the amounts of the constituents in the organic, resin-based liquid mixture, control over the density of the carbon preform is obtained. Control of the density and microstructure of the carbon preform allows for determination of the microstructure and properties of the refractory metal carbide material produced. The glassy carbon preform is placed on a bed of refractory metal or refractory metal--silicon alloy. The pieces are heated above the melting point of the metal or alloy. The molten metal wicks inside the porous carbon preform and reacts, forming the refractory metal carbide or refractory metal carbide plus a minor secondary phase.

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding with 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Alhabeb, Mohamed; Hatter, Christine B.; Anasori, Babak; Man Hong, Soon; Koo, Chong Min; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    Materials with good flexibility and high conductivity that can provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding with minimal thickness are highly desirable, especially if they can be easily processed into films. Two-dimensional metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, combine metallic conductivity and hydrophilic surfaces. Here, we demonstrate the potential of several MXenes and their polymer composites for EMI shielding. A 45-micrometer-thick Ti3C2Tx film exhibited EMI shielding effectiveness of 92 decibels (>50 decibels for a 2.5-micrometer film), which is the highest among synthetic materials of comparable thickness produced to date. This performance originates from the excellent electrical conductivity of Ti3C2Tx films (4600 Siemens per centimeter) and multiple internal reflections from Ti3C2Tx flakes in free-standing films. The mechanical flexibility and easy coating capability offered by MXenes and their composites enable them to shield surfaces of any shape while providing high EMI shielding efficiency.

  4. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR fuel element using zircaloy and silicon carbide claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Cardoso, Fabiano; Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela, E-mail: rochkhudson@ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The alloy composed of zirconium has been used effectively for over 50 years in claddings of nuclear fuel, especially for PWR type reactors. However, to increase fuel enrichment with the aim of raising the burning and maintaining the safety of nuclear plants is of great relevance the study of new materials that can replace safely and efficiently zircaloy cladding. Among several proposed material, silicon carbide (SiC) has a potential to replace zircaloy as fuel cladding material due to its high-temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity. In this paper, the goal is to expand the study with silicon carbide cladding, checking its behavior when submitted to an environment with boron, burnable poison rods, and temperature variations. Sensitivity calculation and the impact in multiplication factor to both claddings, zircaloy and silicon carbide, were performed during the burnup. The neutronic analysis was made using the SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code. (author)

  6. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas.

  7. Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Larry Lorin

    2001-01-01

    DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

  8. New catalysts for coal processing: Metal carbides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Ted Oyama; David F. Cox

    1999-12-03

    The subject of this research project was to investigate the catalytic properties of a new class of materials, transition metal carbides and nitrides, for treatment of coal liquid and petroleum feedstocks. The main objectives were: (1) preparation of catalysts in unsupported and supported form; (2) characterization of the materials; (3) evaluation of their catalytic properties in HDS and HDN; (4) measurement of the surface properties; and (5) observation of adsorbed species. All of the objectives were substantially carried out and the results will be described in detail below. The catalysts were transition metal carbides and nitrides spanning Groups 4--6 in the Periodic Table. They were chosen for study because initial work had shown they were promising materials for hydrotreating. The basic strategy was first to prepare the materials in unsupported form to identify the most promising catalyst, and then to synthesize a supported form of the material. Already work had been carried out on the synthesis of the Group VI compounds Mo{sub 2}C, Mo{sub 2}N, and WC, and new methods were developed for the Group V compounds VC and NbC. All the catalysts were then evaluated in a hydrotreating test at realistic conditions. It was found that the most active catalyst was Mo{sub 2}C, and further investigations of the material were carried out in supported form. A new technique was employed for the study of the bulk and surface properties of the catalysts, near edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), that fingerprinted the electronic structure of the materials. Finally, two new research direction were explored. Bimetallic alloys formed between two transition metals were prepared, resulting in catalysts having even higher activity than Mo{sub 2}C. The performance of the catalysts in hydrodechloration was also investigated.

  9. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  10. Synthesis and Processing of Ultra-High Temperature Metal Carbide and Metal Diboride Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Synthesis and Processing of Ultra-High Temperature Metal Carbide and Metal Diboride Nanocomposite Materials Final Performance Report Contract Number...sintered commercially-available powders. Each project is summarized below: Synthesis : Zirconium diboride and a zirconium diboride/tantalum diboride...mixture were synthesized by solution-based processing. Zirconium n-propoxide was refluxed with 2,4-pentanedione to form zirconium diketonate . This compound

  11. Co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen for a carbide-based fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreiro, Louis G.; Burke, A. Alan [Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Code 8231, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841 (United States); Dubois, Lily [Stonehill College, Department of Chemistry, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen from the hydrolysis of calcium carbide and calcium hydride was investigated as part of a unique carbide-based fuel system intended for high-temperature fuel cells. To gain better control of this highly energetic reaction, glycerin was used to coat the reactant particles to form slurry prior to their reaction with water. This process was shown to moderate the rate of gas production, as well as to provide a means for preparing slurry that could be pumped into the reactor vessel. It was also observed that the presence of calcium hydroxide, a by-product of hydrolysis, lowered the solubility of acetylene resulting in a higher initial flow rate due to less acetylene being dissolved in solution. However, the buildup of calcium hydroxide with time inhibited the hydrolysis of both calcium carbide and calcium hydride causing the acetylene and hydrogen flow rates to decrease. (author)

  12. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  13. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  14. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  15. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  16. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2017-01-17

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  17. An expeditious synthesis of early transition metal carbide nanoparticles on graphitic carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressnig, Debora; Moldovan, Simona; Ersen, Ovidiu; Beaunier, Patricia; Portehault, David; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    An expeditious synthesis of metal carbide nanoparticles onto various carbon supports is demonstrated. The procedure is versatile and readily yields TiC, VC, Mo2C and W2C nanoparticles on different types of carbons. The reaction is initiated at room temperature and proceeds within seconds. This novel synthetic route paves the way for a large variety of metal carbide-carbon nanocomposites that may be implemented in emerging nanotechnology fields.

  18. Effect of process parameters on induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide from tungsten metal powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten carbide deposit was made directly from tungsten metal powder through the reaction with methane in radio frequency induction plasma. Effect of major process parameters on the induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, water displacement method, and microhardness test. The results show that methane flow rate, powder feed rate, particle size, reaction chamber pressure and deposition distance have significant influences on the phase composition, density, and microhardness of the deposit. Extra carbon is necessary to ensure the complete conversion of tungsten metal into the carbide.

  19. Summary of the radiological assessment of the fuel cycle for a thorium-uranium carbide-fueled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Meyer, H.R.; Morse, L.E.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A large fraction of the potential fuel for nuclear power reactors employing fissionable materials exists as ores of thorium. In addition, certain characteristics of a fuel system based on breeding of the fissionable isotope {sup 233}U from thorium offer the possibility of a greater resistance to the diversion of fissionable material for the fabrication of nuclear weapons. This report consolidates into a single source the principal content of two previous reports which assess the radiological environmental impact of mining and milling of thorium ore and of the reprocessing and refabrication of spent FBR thorium-uranium carbide fuel.

  20. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  1. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (C.E.A.), Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC{sup R} process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  2. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Loss of Coolant Accident LWR Light Water Reactor MOX Mixed Oxide Fuel MTC Moderator Temperature Coefficient MWd/kgIHM Megawatt days per...working only with UO2 and UO2/PuO2 mixed oxide ( MOX ) fuels. 3.1 Studsvik Core Management Software CASMO-4E and SIMULATE-3 are the primary computational

  3. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  4. A Two-Dimensional, Finite-Difference Model of the Oxidation of a Uranium Carbide Fuel Pellet

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, J; Fairweather, M; Hanson, BC; Heggs, PJ

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of spent uranium carbide fuel, a candidate fuel for Generation IV nuclear reactors, is an important process in its potential reprocessing cycle. However, the oxidation of uranium carbide in air is highly exothermic. A model has therefore been developed to predict the temperature rise, as well as other useful information such as reaction completion times, under different reaction conditions in order to help in deriving safe oxidation conditions. Finite difference-methods are used...

  5. Sputter deposition of transition-metal carbide films — A critical review from a chemical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Ulf, E-mail: ulf.jansson@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden); Lewin, Erik [Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Empa (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Ångström, Uppsala Universitet (Sweden)

    2013-06-01

    Thin films based on transition-metal carbides exhibit many interesting physical and chemical properties making them attractive for a variety of applications. The most widely used method to produce metal carbide films with specific properties at reduced deposition temperatures is sputter deposition. A large number of papers in this field have been published during the last decades, showing that large variations in structure and properties can be obtained. This review will summarise the literature on sputter-deposited carbide films based on chemical aspects of the various elements in the films. By considering the chemical affinities (primarily towards carbon) and structural preferences of different elements, it is possible to understand trends in structure of binary transition-metal carbides and the ternary materials based on these carbides. These trends in chemical affinity and structure will also directly affect the growth process during sputter deposition. A fundamental chemical perspective of the transition-metal carbides and their alloying elements is essential to obtain control of the material structure (from the atomic level), and thereby its properties and performance. This review covers a wide range of materials: binary transition-metal carbides and their nanocomposites with amorphous carbon; the effect of alloying carbide-based materials with a third element (mainly elements from groups 3 through 14); as well as the amorphous binary and ternary materials from these elements deposited under specific conditions or at certain compositional ranges. Furthermore, the review will also emphasise important aspects regarding materials characterisation which may affect the interpretation of data such as beam-induced crystallisation and sputter-damage during surface analysis.

  6. Silicon carbide composite for light water reactor fuel assembly applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Ken; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2014-05-01

    The feasibility of using SiCf-SiCm composites in light water reactor (LWR) fuel designs was evaluated. The evaluation was motivated by the desire to improve fuel performance under normal and accident conditions. The Fukushima accident once again highlighted the need for improved fuel materials that can maintain fuel integrity to higher temperatures for longer periods of time. The review identified many benefits as well as issues in using the material. Issues perceived as presenting the biggest challenges to the concept were identified to be flux gradient induced differential volumetric swelling, fragmentation and thermal shock resistance. The oxidation of silicon and its release into the coolant as silica has been identified as an issue because existing plant systems have limited ability for its removal. Detailed evaluation using available literature data and testing as part of this evaluation effort have eliminated most of the major concerns. The evaluation identified Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) channel, BWR fuel water tube, and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) guide tube as feasible applications for SiC composite. A program has been initiated to resolve some of the remaining issues and to generate physical property data to support the design of commercial fuel components.

  7. Silicon carbide composite for light water reactor fuel assembly applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueh, Ken, E-mail: kyueh@epri.com [Fuel Reliability Program, EPRI, 1300 West WT Harris Blvd, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Terrani, Kurt A., E-mail: terranika@ornl.gov [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd. MS 6093, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The feasibility of using SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composites in light water reactor (LWR) fuel designs was evaluated. The evaluation was motivated by the desire to improve fuel performance under normal and accident conditions. The Fukushima accident once again highlighted the need for improved fuel materials that can maintain fuel integrity to higher temperatures for longer periods of time. The review identified many benefits as well as issues in using the material. Issues perceived as presenting the biggest challenges to the concept were identified to be flux gradient induced differential volumetric swelling, fragmentation and thermal shock resistance. The oxidation of silicon and its release into the coolant as silica has been identified as an issue because existing plant systems have limited ability for its removal. Detailed evaluation using available literature data and testing as part of this evaluation effort have eliminated most of the major concerns. The evaluation identified Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) channel, BWR fuel water tube, and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) guide tube as feasible applications for SiC composite. A program has been initiated to resolve some of the remaining issues and to generate physical property data to support the design of commercial fuel components.

  8. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985.

  9. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  10. Novel niobium carbide/carbon porous nanotube electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, Y.; Cavaliere, S.; Harkness, I. A.; Sharman, J. D. B.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.

    2017-09-01

    Niobium carbide/carbon nanotubular porous structures have been prepared using electrospinning and used as electrocatalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. They were functionalised with 3.1 nm Pt particles synthesised by a microwave-assisted polyol method and characterised for their electrochemical properties. The novel NbC-based electrocatalyst demonstrated electroactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction as well as greater stability over high potential cycling than a commercial carbon-based electrocatalyst. Pt/NbC/C was integrated at the cathode of a membrane electrode assembly and characterised in a single fuel cell showing promising activity and power density.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of transition metal carbides and their catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cheng

    Transition metal (both monometallic and bimetallic) carbides have been synthesized by an amine-metal oxide composite (AMOC) method. The composite reduces the diffusion distances among each element and allows the formation of carbides to take place as low as 610°C, which is significantly lower than traditional carbide synthesis methods (above 1500°C). Additionally, amines act not only as carbon sources and reducing agents, but also morphological templates which helps to make uniform transition metal carbide (TMC) nanocrystals with various shapes. Beyond morphology control, AMOC method can also help to synthesize multiple phases of monometallic carbides, which includes four phases of molybdenum carbides (alpha-MoC1-x, beta-Mo2C, eta-MoC, and gamma-MoC), two phases of tungsten carbides (W2C and WC), and three phases of chromium carbides (Cr3C2-x, Cr7C3, and Cr3C2). Molybdenum carbide has been proposed as a possible alternative to platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Previous studies were limited to only one phase, which is beta-Mo2C with an Fe 2N structure. Here, four molybdenum carbide materials including gamma-MoC with a WC type structure which was stabilized for the first time as a phase pure nanomaterial. Moreover, a wide range of magnetic iron-doped molybdenum carbide (Mo2-xFexC) nanomaterials were also synthesized, which exhibits a better HER activity to non-doped beta-Mo2C. A group of (CrxFe1-x)7C3 (0.2< x<1) solid solutions have also been synthesized for the first time as nanomaterials via AMOC method, which demonstrate excellent catalytic activities for both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Other carbides/nitrides made from AMOCs include WN1-x, Fe3C, Fe3-xN, Fe3Mo3C, N 2Mo3C, Ni3Mo3C, Ni6Mo 6C, and Mo0.5W0.5C.

  12. Effects of carbon on the stability and chemical performance of transition metal carbides: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Rodriguez, José A.

    2004-03-01

    Density functional theory was employed to study the stabilities and chemical activities of transition metal carbides. Here we take the well-known Mo carbides and Ti carbides as an example. Different kinds of structures including the bulk surfaces [Mo2C(001), MoC(001), and TiC(001)] and metcars [Mo8C12 and Ti8C12] are taken into consideration. Systematic studies show that by raising the C coordination number of the metal atoms in the carbides, in general the stability of the carbides increases (metcars are an exception since they include both high-coordinated and low-coordinated metal atoms.); at the same time, the chemical activities of the carbides decrease due to a downshift of the metal d-band center (ligand effect). Considering the better catalysts those that combine high stability and moderate chemical activity, our results suggest that the catalytic potential of Mo carbide systems should decrease in the following sequence: Mo8C12>Mo2C(001) or MoC(001)>pure Mo(110). In spite of having the largest C/Mo ratio, the metcar appears as the most attractive system. Our studies also indicate that the "magic" behavior of metcars is not unique for Mo carbides. Similar behavior is also observed for Ti carbides. This implies that nanoparticles like metcar species could exhibit better performances than the corresponding bulk metal carbides as catalysts.

  13. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  14. Reverse Microemulsion-mediated Synthesis of Monometallic and Bimetallic Early Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-11-27

    A reverse microemulsion is used to encapsulate monometallic or bimetallic early transition metal oxide nanoparticles in microporous silica shells. The silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles are then carburized in a methane/hydrogen atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal carbide nanoparticles. During the carburization process, the silica shells prevent the sintering of adjacent carbide nanoparticles while also preventing the deposition of excess surface carbon. Alternatively, the silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles can be nitridized in an ammonia atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal nitride nanoparticles. By adjusting the reverse microemulsion parameters, the thickness of the silica shells, and the carburization/nitridation conditions, the transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles can be tuned to various sizes, compositions, and crystal phases. After carburization or nitridation, the silica shells are then removed using either a room-temperature aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution or a 0.1 to 0.5 M NaOH solution at 40-60 °C. While the silica shells are dissolving, a high surface area support, such as carbon black, can be added to these solutions to obtain supported early transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles. If no high surface area support is added, then the nanoparticles can be stored as a nanodispersion or centrifuged to obtain a nanopowder.

  15. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications.

  16. Characterization of Transition Metal Carbide Layers Synthesized by Thermo-reactive Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mads Brink; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    Hard wear resistant surface layers of transition metal carbides can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes where interstitial elements from a steel substrate together with external sources of transition metals (Ti, V, Cr etc.) form hard carbide and/or nitride layers at the steel surface...... electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness testing. The study shows that porosityfree, homogenous and very hard surface layers can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes. The carbon availability of the substrate influences thickness of obtained layers, as Vanadis 6 tool steel...

  17. Oxidation induced ionization and reactions of metal carbide clusters (Nb, Zr, V, Ta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, H. T.; Kerns, K. P.; Bell, R. C.; Castleman, A. W.

    1997-11-01

    Following our recent report of the oxidation induced formation of Ti8C12+ (H.T. Deng, K.P. Kerns, and A.W. Castleman, Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 4862), the oxidation induced ionization of niobium and zirconium carbide clusters are studied using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a laser induced plasma reaction source. It was found that reactions of both of these neutral carbide clusters with dioxygen leads to formation of carbide ions. The ion product distributions show that zirconium carbide clusters mainly take the form of Met--Car cations, but niobium carbide clusters favor a cubic-like crystalline pattern. Furthermore, reactions of mass-selected NbxCy+ with dioxygen result in a sequential loss of C2 units from NbxCy+, and leads to formation of Nbx+ and NbxC+ depending on y being an even or odd number. However, NbxCy+ shows comparably low reactivity towards nitrous oxide through a single oxygen abstraction mechanism. In comparison with the reaction products of VxCy+ with dioxygen, the complementary information obtained in the present study suggests that the C2 unit is a basic building block for formation of small early transition metal carbide clusters. The oxidation induced ionization mechanisms are also discussed in relation with the stability, ionization potentials, and structures of the clusters.

  18. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  19. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  20. Unintentional carbide formation evidenced during high-vacuum magnetron sputtering of transition metal nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Carbide signatures are ubiquitous in the surface analyses of industrially sputter-deposited transition metal nitride thin films grown with carbon-less source materials in typical high-vacuum systems. We use high-energy-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy to reveal details of carbon temporal chemical state evolution, from carbide formed during film growth to adventitious carbon adsorbed upon contact with air. Using in-situ grown Al capping layers that protect the as-deposited transition metal nitride surfaces from oxidation, it is shown that the carbide forms during film growth rather than as a result of post deposition atmosphere exposure. The XPS signature of carbides is masked by the presence of adventitious carbon contamination, appearing as soon as samples are exposed to atmosphere, and eventually disappears after one week-long storage in lab atmosphere. The concentration of carbon assigned to carbide species varies from 0.28 at% for ZrN sample, to 0.25 and 0.11 at% for TiN and HfN, respectively. These findings are relevant for numerous applications, as unintentionally formed impurity phases may dramatically alter catalytic activity, charge transport and mechanical properties by offsetting the onset of thermally-induced phase transitions. Therefore, the chemical state of C impurities in PVD-grown films should be carefully investigated.

  1. A two-dimensional, finite-difference model of the oxidation of a uranium carbide fuel pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, James; Fairweather, Michael; Hanson, Bruce C.; Heggs, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation of spent uranium carbide fuel, a candidate fuel for Generation IV nuclear reactors, is an important process in its potential reprocessing cycle. However, the oxidation of uranium carbide in air is highly exothermic. A model has therefore been developed to predict the temperature rise, as well as other useful information such as reaction completion times, under different reaction conditions in order to help in deriving safe oxidation conditions. Finite difference-methods are used to model the heat and mass transfer processes occurring during the reaction in two dimensions and are coupled to kinetics found in the literature.

  2. Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

    2011-09-01

    The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

  3. Investigation of Fixed Points Exceeding 2500 °C Using Metal Carbide-Carbon Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Sakuma, F.

    2003-09-01

    The melting and freezing plateaus of four metal carbide-carbon (MC-C) eutectics, B4C-C, δ(Mo carbide)-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C eutectics were investigated by radiation thermometry for the first time. The observed melting temperatures were 2386 °C, 2583 °C, 2761 °C and 2883 °C, respectively. The plateau shapes of δ(Mo carbide)-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C eutectics are relatively flat compared to the quite rounded plateau shape of the B4C-C eutectic. The results indicate that MC-C eutectics can establish a new series of high-temperature fixed points above 2500 °C.

  4. Method of synthesizing bulk transition metal carbide, nitride and phosphide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Soon; Armstrong, Beth L; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-04-21

    A method for synthesizing catalyst beads of bulk transmission metal carbides, nitrides and phosphides is provided. The method includes providing an aqueous suspension of transition metal oxide particles in a gel forming base, dropping the suspension into an aqueous solution to form a gel bead matrix, heating the bead to remove the binder, and carburizing, nitriding or phosphiding the bead to form a transition metal carbide, nitride, or phosphide catalyst bead. The method can be tuned for control of porosity, mechanical strength, and dopant content of the beads. The produced catalyst beads are catalytically active, mechanically robust, and suitable for packed-bed reactor applications. The produced catalyst beads are suitable for biomass conversion, petrochemistry, petroleum refining, electrocatalysis, and other applications.

  5. Development and characterization of solid solution tri-carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2001-02-01

    Solid-solution, binary uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels have been shown to be capable of performing at high temperatures for nuclear thermal propulsion applications. More recently, tri-carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C1+x with less than 10% metal mole fraction uranium have been studied for their application in ultra-high temperature, high performance space nuclear power systems. These tri-carbide fuels require high processing temperatures greater than 2600 K owing to their high melting points in excess of 3600 K. This paper presents the results of recent studies involving hypostoichiometric, single-phase tri-carbide fuels. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. Scanning electron microscopy and xray diffraction were used to analyze samples. Liquid phase sintering with UC1+x at temperatures near 2700 K was shown to be instrumental in achieving good densification in hyper- and near-stoichiometric mixed carbides. Hypostoichiometric carbides require even higher processing temperatures greater than 2800 K in order to achieve liquid phase sintering with a UC liquid phase and good densification of the final solid solution, tri-carbide fuel. .

  6. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  7. Breeding performance of carbide and nitride fuels in 2000 MWe LMFBRs: a preliminary report. Part I. Assumptions, constraints and methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthold, W P

    1976-09-01

    The assumptions, constraints, and methodology used in the design and analysis of 2000 MWe LMFBRs using carbide and nitride fuel are presented. The assumptions used in the nuclear, thermal and mechanical designs are discussed together with geometry constraints, operational constraints, performance constraints, constraints coming from fabrication consideration and fuel bundle-duct interaction constraints. The basic calculational flow for system design studies is described, and the computer codes used in the analyses are briefly reviewed.

  8. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  9. Development of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Laboratory; Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Laboratory; Benson, Michael Timothy [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory; Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is also a need for a near zero-loss fabrication process and a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. The incorporation of Am and Np into the traditional U-20Pu-10Zr metallic fuel alloy was demonstrated in the US during the Integral Fast Reactor Program of the 1980’s and early 1990’s. However, the conventional counter gravity injection casting method performed under vacuum, previously used to fabricate these metallic fuel alloys, was not optimized for mitigating loss of the volatile Am constituent in the casting charge; as a result, approximately 40% of the Am casting charge failed to be incorporated into the as-cast fuel alloys. Fabrication development efforts of the past few years have pursued an optimized bottom-pour casting method to increase utilization of the melted charge to near 100%, and a differential pressure casting approach, performed under an argon overpressure, has been demonstrated to result in essentially no loss of Am due to volatilization during fabrication. In short, a path toward zero-loss fabrication of metallic fuels including minor actinides has been shown to be feasible. Irradiation testing of advanced metallic fuel alloys in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been underway since 2003. Testing in the ATR is performed inside of cadmium-shrouded positions to remove >99% of the thermal flux incident on the test fuels, resulting in an epi-thermal driven fuel test that is free from gross flux depression and producing an essentially prototypic radial temperature profile inside the fuel rodlets. To date, three irradiation test series (AFC-1,2,3) have been completed. Over 20 different metallic fuel alloys have been tested to burnups as high as 30% with constituent compositions of Pu up to 30%, Am up to 12%, Np up to 10%, and Zr between 10

  10. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  11. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  12. Friction and wear of metals with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide: Effect of shear strength of metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with spherical, single-crystal silicon carbide riders in contact with various metals and with metal riders in contact with silicon carbide flats. Results indicate that: (1) the friction force in the plowing of metal and (2) the groove height (corresponding to the volume of the groove) are related to the shear strength of the metal. That is, they decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. Grooves are formed in metals primarily from plastic deformation, with occasional metal removal. The relation between the groove width D and the load W can be expressed by W = kD, superscript n which satisfies Meyer's law.

  13. A Review of Carbide Fuel Corrosion for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Butt, Darryl P.

    1994-07-01

    At the operation conditions of interest in nuclear thermal propulsion reactors, carbide materials have been known to exhibit a number of life limiting phenomena. These include the formation of liquid, loss by vaporization, creep and corresponding gas flow restrictions, and local corrosion and fuel structure degradation due to excessive mechanical and/or thermal loading. In addition, the radiation environment in the reactor core can produce a substantial change in its local physical properties, which can produce high thermal stresses and corresponding stress fractures (cracking). Time-temperature history and cyclic operation of the nuclear reactor can also accelerate some of these processes. The University of New Mexico's Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, under NASA sponsorship has recently initiated a study to model the complicated hydrogen corrosion process. In support of this effort, an extensive review of the open literature was performed, and a technical expert workshop was conducted. This paper summarizes the results of this review.

  14. A new class of electrocatalysts for hydrogen production from water electrolysis: metal monolayers supported on low-cost transition metal carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Daniel V; Hunt, Sean T; Kimmel, Yannick C; Chen, Jingguang G

    2012-02-15

    This work explores the opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts by supporting monolayer (ML) amounts of precious metals on transition metal carbide substrates. The metal component includes platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and gold (Au); the low-cost carbide substrate includes tungsten carbides (WC and W(2)C) and molybdenum carbide (Mo(2)C). As a platform for these studies, single-phase carbide thin films with well-characterized surfaces have been synthesized, allowing for a direct comparison of the intrinsic HER activity of bare and Pt-modified carbide surfaces. It is found that WC and W(2)C are both excellent cathode support materials for ML Pt, exhibiting HER activities that are comparable to bulk Pt while displaying stable HER activity during chronopotentiometric HER measurements. The findings of excellent stability and HER activity of the ML Pt-WC and Pt-W(2)C surfaces may be explained by the similar bulk electronic properties of tungsten carbides to Pt, as is supported by density functional theory calculations. These results are further extended to other metal overlayers (Pd and Au) and supports (Mo(2)C), which demonstrate that the metal ML-supported transition metal carbide surfaces exhibit HER activity that is consistent with the well-known volcano relationship between activity and hydrogen binding energy. This work highlights the potential of using carbide materials to reduce the costs of hydrogen production from water electrolysis by serving as stable, low-cost supports for ML amounts of precious metals.

  15. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chunghao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Baney, Ronald H., E-mail: rbane@mse.ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-02-28

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO{sub 2} fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO{sub 2} surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  16. Low-temperature synthesis of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, James S.; Baney, Ronald H.

    2011-02-01

    A low temperature process of mixing different sizes of silicon carbide (SiC) particles with a polymer precursor was utilized to synthesize SiC pellets for potential use as inert matrix fuels (IMF) for light water reactors. The lower temperature process is required to prevent the reactions between SiC and the dispersed PuO 2 fuel material. The effect of the polymer content and the cold pressing pressure on the packing of SiC particles was investigated. The effect of mixing coarse and fine SiC particles on the density and the pore size distribution was also investigated. It was found that the density and pore size distribution can be tailored by controlling the SiC size compositions, polymer content and pressing pressure at room temperature. A possible mechanism has been proposed to explain the forming of the pores with respect to the geometric arrangement between SiC particles and the polymer precursor. SEM images showed that ceria (cerium oxide) which is a PuO 2 surrogate in this study, was well distributed in the pellet.

  17. Volatile species retention during metallic fuel casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, and although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Based on these results it is very probable that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  18. Casting Technology Development for SFR Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.T.; Oh, S.J.; Ryu, H.J.; Kim, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Kim, S.K.; Woo, Y.M.; Ko, Y.M.; Lee, C.B. [KAERI, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Fabrication technology of metallic fuel for sodium fast reactor (SFR) is being developed in Korea as a national mid- and long-term nuclear R and D program from 2007. The metallic fuel for SFR should be remotely fabricated under a radiation shielded environment such as a glove box or hot cell, because it contains long-lived minor actinides such as Np, Am and Cm. In order to design a reliable remote fabrication system, various casting techniques have been studied by using U-Zr and U-Zr-RE alloys as surrogate fuel material. Rare earth elements such as Ce or Nd were used as a surrogate for minor actinide elements or solid solution fission products. Macro-scale soundness, microstructures and compositional homogeneity of metallic fuel samples fabricated by vacuum-assisted injection casting, vacuum-assisted gravity casting, centrifugal atomization and continuous casting were compared. Although sound slugs of U-Zr metallic fuel of 4{approx}6 mm in diameter could be fabricated by vacuum-assisted injection casting or vacuum-assisted gravity casting, it was necessary to consider that vaporization of Am and volume of radioactive wastes such as crucibles and molds should be minimized. Effects of casting parameters on the volatile loss, and effects of coatings on the chemical reaction between metallic fuel and molds are discussed. Some methods to reduce the volatile Am loss and waste molds and crucibles will be proposed. Short rods of U-Zr or U-Zr-Ce fuel will be fabricated by the vacuum-assisted gravity casting technique for an irradiation test in the HANARO research reactor from 2010. (authors)

  19. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO; Difusion de plata a traves de carburo de silicio en combustibles nucleares microencapsulados TRISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E., E-mail: Felix.cancino@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Col. Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  20. High-temperature mass spectrometry - Vaporization of group 4-B metal carbides. [using Knudsen effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The high temperature vaporization of the metal-carbon systems TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC was studied by the Knudsen effusion - mass spectrometric method. For each system the metal dicarbide and tetracarbide molecular species were identified in the gas phase. Relative ion currents of the carbides and metals were measured as a function of temperature. Second- and third-law methods were used to determine enthalpies. Maximum values were established for the dissociation energies of the metal monocarbide molecules TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC. Thermodynamic functions used in the calculations are discussed in terms of assumed molecular structures and electronic contributions to the partition functions. The trends shown by the dissociation energies of the carbides of Group 4B are compared with those of neighboring groups and discussed in relation to the corresponding oxides and chemical bonding. The high temperature molecular beam inlet system and double focusing mass spectrometer are described.

  1. Non-noble metal fuel cell catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-01-01

    Written and edited by a group of top scientists and engineers in the field of fuel cell catalysts from both industry and academia, this book provides a complete overview of this hot topic. It covers the synthesis, characterization, activity validation and modeling of different non-noble metal and metalfree electrocatalysts for the reduction of oxygen, as well as their integration into acid or alkaline polymer exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and their performance validation, while also discussing those factors that will drive fuel cell commercialization. With its well-structured app

  2. A metallic superhard boron carbide: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengdong; Yang, Bingchao; Li, Zihe; Hu, Meng; Wang, Qianqian; Cui, Lin; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong

    2015-04-21

    A monoclinic BC3 phase (denoted M-BC3) has been predicted using first principles calculations. The M-BC3 structure is formed by alternately stacking sequences of metallic BC-layers and insulating C atom layers, thus, the structure exhibits two-dimensional conductivity. Its stability has been confirmed by our calculations of the total energy, elastic constants, and phonon frequencies. The pressure of phase transition from graphite-like BC3 to M-BC3 is calculated to be 9.3 GPa, and the theoretical Vickers hardness of M-BC3 is 43.8 GPa, this value indicates that the compound is a potentially superhard material. By comparing Raman spectral calculations of M-BC3 and previously proposed structures with the experimental data, we speculate that the experimentally synthesized BC3 crystal may simultaneously contain M-BC3 and Pmma-b phases.

  3. Dry Sliding Wear behaviour of Aluminium-Red mud- Tungsten Carbide Hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi Chinta, Neelima; Selvaraj, N.; Mahesh, V.

    2016-09-01

    Red mud is an industrial waste obtained during the processing of alumina by Bayer's process. An attempt has been made to utilize the solid waste by using it as the reinforcement material in metal matrix composites. Red mud received from NALCO has been subjected for sieve analysis and milled to 42 nanometers using high energy ball mill. Red mud is used as a reinforcement material in Pure Aluminium matrix composite at 2%, 4%, and 6% weight at 100 microns level as well as 42 nano meters along with 4%Tungsten carbide by weight. Micro and Nano structured red mud powders, Tungsten carbide powder and Aluminium is mixed in a V-Blender, compacted at a pressure of 40 bar and samples are prepared by conventional sintering with vacuum as medium. In this current work, dry sliding wear characteristics at normal and heat treatment conditions are investigated with optimal combination of Aluminium, Tungsten carbide and different weight fractions of micro and nano structured red mud powder.

  4. Thermal conductivity mapping of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on simulated fuel particles by time-domain thermoreflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Chiritescu, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Cahill, David G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings on spherical particles has been mapped using time-domain thermoreflectance. The thermal conductivities measured for pyrolytic carbon ranged between 3.4 and 13.5 W/m K. The effect of porosity, pore-size distribution, anisotropy, in-plane disorder and domain sizes is discussed. A thermal conductivity of 168 W/m K was obtained for SiC. Mapping of the thermal conductivity of coated fuel particles provides useful data for modeling fuel performance during the operation of nuclear reactors.

  5. Effect of oxygen and nitrogen impurities on the thermodynamic properties of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibaba, M.; Varamban, S. Vana; Mathews, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The mixed carbide fuel being developed as an alternative to the mixed oxide to fuel fast breeder reactors consists of uranium-plutonium monocarbide with an admixture of 10-20 vol% of the sesqui-carbide. The monocarbide phase contains oxygen and nitrogen as dissolved impurities. These impurities as well as the sesquicarbide phase affect the performance of the fuel. The quantities of interest in assessing the performance of the fuel are its carbon potential and the partial pressures of carbon monoxide and plutonium. Both carbon potential and CO pressures are important in clad carburisation, the latter being involved in a gas phase carburisation mechanism. In the present study the partial pressures of CO, Pu and N 2 as well as the carbon potential of the fuel have been calculated as a function of plutonium fraction, impurity (O, N) concentration, sesquicarbide content and temperature. Two different caculational methods were used — one based on a set of equilibrium relations between the co-existing phases and the other based on free energy minimisation employing the computer programme SOLGASMIX-PV. The results are presented graphically and trends in the values are discussed.

  6. Investigation of silver and iodine transport through silicon carbide layers prepared for nuclear fuel element cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, E.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hancke, J. J.; Barry, J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2011-03-01

    Transport of silver and iodine through polycrystalline SiC layers produced by PBMR (Pty) Ltd. for cladding of TRISO fuel kernels was investigated using Rutherford backscattering analysis and electron microscopy. Fluences of 2 × 10 16 Ag + cm -2 and 1 × 10 16 I + cm -2 were implanted at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C with an energy of 360 keV, producing an atomic density of approximately 1.5% at the projected ranges of about 100 nm. The broadening of the implantation profiles and the loss of diffusors through the front surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 1400 °C was determined. The results for room temperature implantations point to completely different transport mechanisms for silver and iodine in highly disordered silicon carbide. However, similar results are obtained for high temperature implantations, although iodine transport is much stronger influenced by lattice defects than is the case for silver. For both diffusors transport in well annealed samples can be described by Fickian grain boundary diffusion with no abnormal loss through the surface as would be expected from the presence of nano-pores and/or micro-cracks. At 1100 °C diffusion coefficients for silver and iodine are below our detection limit of 10 -21 m 2 s -1, while they increase into the 10 -20 m 2 s -1 range at 1300 °C.

  7. Carbide-forming groups IVB-VIB metals: a new territory in the periodic table for CVD growth of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhiyu; Fu, Lei; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2014-07-09

    Early transition metals, especially groups IVB-VIB metals, can form stable carbides, which are known to exhibit excellent "noble-metal-like" catalytic activities. We demonstrate herein the applications of groups IVB-VIB metals in graphene growth using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. Similar to the extensively studied Cu, Ni, and noble metals, these transition-metal foils facilitate the catalytic growth of single- to few-layer graphene. The most attractive advantage over the existing catalysts is their perfect control of layer thickness and uniformity with highly flexible experimental conditions by in situ converting the dissolved carbons into stable carbides to fully suppress the upward segregation/precipitation effect. The growth performance of graphene on these transition metals can be well explained by the periodic physicochemical properties of elements. Our work has disclosed a new territory of catalysts in the periodic table for graphene growth and is expected to trigger more interest in graphene research.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new carbon-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimize the loss of carbon, and retain fission products for many...

  9. A Review of Metal Injection Molding- Process, Optimization, Defects and Microwave Sintering on WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbudin, S. N. A.; Othman, M. H.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This article is about a review of optimization of metal injection molding and microwave sintering process on tungsten cemented carbide produce by metal injection molding process. In this study, the process parameters for the metal injection molding were optimized using Taguchi method. Taguchi methods have been used widely in engineering analysis to optimize the performance characteristics through the setting of design parameters. Microwave sintering is a process generally being used in powder metallurgy over the conventional method. It has typical characteristics such as accelerated heating rate, shortened processing cycle, high energy efficiency, fine and homogeneous microstructure, and enhanced mechanical performance, which is beneficial to prepare nanostructured cemented carbides in metal injection molding. Besides that, with an advanced and promising technology, metal injection molding has proven that can produce cemented carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been used widely in various applications due to its desirable combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Moreover, areas of study include common defects in metal injection molding and application of microwave sintering itself has been discussed in this paper.

  10. Advanced fuels modeling: Evaluating the steady-state performance of carbide fuel in helium-cooled reactors using FRAPCON 3.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Luther, Jr.

    Uranium carbide (UC) has long been considered a potential alternative to uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel, especially in the context of Gen IV gas-cooled reactors. It has shown promise because of its high uranium density, good irradiation stability, and especially high thermal conductivity. Despite its many benefits, UC is known to swell at a rate twice that of UO2. However, the swelling phenomenon is not well understood, and we are limited to a weak empirical understanding of the swelling mechanism. One suggested cladding for UC is silicon carbide (SiC), a ceramic that demonstrates a number of desirable properties. Among them are an increased corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and irradiation stability. However, with increased temperatures, SiC exhibits an extremely brittle nature. The brittle behavior of SiC is not fully understood and thus it is unknown how SiC would respond to the added stress of a swelling UC fuel. To better understand the interaction between these advanced materials, each has been implemented into FRAPCON, the preferred fuel performance code of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); additionally, the material properties for a helium coolant have been incorporated. The implementation of UC within FRAPCON required the development of material models that described not only the thermophysical properties of UC, such as thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, but also models for the swelling, densification, and fission gas release associated with the fuel's irradiation behavior. This research is intended to supplement ongoing analysis of the performance and behavior of uranium carbide and silicon carbide in a helium-cooled reactor.

  11. Fuel cells and the theory of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocciarelli, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metal theory is used to study the role of metal catalysts in electrocatalysis, with particular reference to alkaline hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. Use is made of a simple model, analogous to that used to interpret field emission in vacuum. Theoretical values for all the quantities in the Tafel equation are obtained in terms of bulk properties of the metal catalysts (such as free electron densities and Fermi level). The reasons why some processes are reversible (H-electrodes) and some irreversible (O-electrodes) are identified. Selection rules for desirable properties of catalytic materials are established.

  12. Structural and electronic studies of metal carbide clusterfullerene Sc2C2@Cs-C72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongqiang; Wang, Taishan; Wu, Jingyi; Feng, Lai; Xiang, Junfeng; Ma, Yihan; Zhang, Zhuxia; Jiang, Li; Shu, Chunying; Wang, Chunru

    2013-07-01

    We present a metal carbide clusterfullerene Sc2C2@Cs(10528)-C72, whose structure has been baffling for many years. A motional endohedral Sc2C2 cluster, special molecule geometry and electronic structure were found in Sc2C2@Cs(10528)-C72. The paramagnetic Sc2C2@Cs-C72 anion radical was successfully prepared by a chemical reduction method and hyperfine couplings in the ESR spectrum were observed.We present a metal carbide clusterfullerene Sc2C2@Cs(10528)-C72, whose structure has been baffling for many years. A motional endohedral Sc2C2 cluster, special molecule geometry and electronic structure were found in Sc2C2@Cs(10528)-C72. The paramagnetic Sc2C2@Cs-C72 anion radical was successfully prepared by a chemical reduction method and hyperfine couplings in the ESR spectrum were observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, HPLC chromatogram, and DFT calculations. CCDC 917712. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01739g

  13. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  14. Deterioration of yttria-stabilized zirconia by boron carbide alone or mixed with metallic or oxidized Fe, Cr, Zr mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, A., E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium); Ayrault, L., E-mail: laurent.ayrault@cea.fr [Institut de Radio-Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire/DPAM/SEMIC, Bât 702, CEN de Cadarache BP3, F-13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Clément, B. [Institut de Radio-Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire/DPAM/SEMIC, Bât 702, CEN de Cadarache BP3, F-13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of severe accident conditions (PHEBUS FPT3 test), different experiments were carried out on the interactions of 20% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and 20% ceria-stab zirconia with boron carbide or its oxidation products (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}): either tests under steam between 1230° and 1700 °C with B{sub 4}C alone or B{sub 4}C mixed with metals, either tests under Ar with boron oxide present in a mixture of iron and chromium oxides. In all cases an interaction was observed with formation of intergranular yttrium borate. At 1700 °C boron oxide is able to “pump out” the Y stabiliser from the YSZ grains but also some trace elements (Ca and Al) and to form a eutectic containing YBO{sub 3} and yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB). At the same time a substantial swelling (“bloating”) of the zirconia happens, qualitatively similar to the foaming of irradiated fuel in contact with a Zr-melt. In all samples the lowering of the Y (or Ce)-content in the YSZ grains is so sharp that in the interaction layers zirconia is no longer stabilized. This is important when YSZ is envisaged as simulant of UO{sub 2} or as inert matrix for Am-transmutation.

  15. Deterioration of yttria-stabilized zirconia by boron carbide alone or mixed with metallic or oxidized Fe, Cr, Zr mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, A.; Ayrault, L.; Clément, B.

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of severe accident conditions (PHEBUS FPT3 test), different experiments were carried out on the interactions of 20% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and 20% ceria-stab zirconia with boron carbide or its oxidation products (B2O3): either tests under steam between 1230° and 1700 °C with B4C alone or B4C mixed with metals, either tests under Ar with boron oxide present in a mixture of iron and chromium oxides. In all cases an interaction was observed with formation of intergranular yttrium borate. At 1700 °C boron oxide is able to “pump out” the Y stabiliser from the YSZ grains but also some trace elements (Ca and Al) and to form a eutectic containing YBO3 and yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB). At the same time a substantial swelling (“bloating”) of the zirconia happens, qualitatively similar to the foaming of irradiated fuel in contact with a Zr-melt. In all samples the lowering of the Y (or Ce)-content in the YSZ grains is so sharp that in the interaction layers zirconia is no longer stabilized. This is important when YSZ is envisaged as simulant of UO2 or as inert matrix for Am-transmutation.

  16. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  17. From Electronic Structure to Catalytic Activity: A Single Descriptor for Adsorption and Reactivity on Transition-Metal Carbides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, A.; Hellman, Anders; Ruberto, C.

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption and catalytic properties of the polar (111) surface of transition-metal carbides (TMC's) are investigated by density-functional theory. Atomic and molecular adsorption are rationalized with the concerted-coupling model, in which two types of TMC surface resonances (SR's) play key roles...

  18. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2016-02-24

    In this study, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M′2M′′C2 and M′2M′′2C3 – where M′ and M′′ are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M′ atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M′′ atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M′ atomic layers sandwich the middle M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. This finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.

  19. Ion-plasma erosion-resistant nanocoatings based on metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Aleksandrov, D. A.; Gorlov, D. S.

    2010-09-01

    The erosion, corrosion, and heat resistance of alloy/ion-plasma nanolayer coating compositions based on TiC and CrC carbides and TiN, CrN, ZrN, and AlN nitrides are studied. The effect of the nanolayer thickness, composition, and structure of the coatings based on the metal nitrides and carbides on the relative erosion resistance of alloy/coating compositions in a gas-abrasive quartz sand flux is studied at a sand grain size of 300-350 μm, abrasive supply rate of 200 g/min, and an angle of flux incidence of 20° (tangential flow) and 70° (near-head-on attack flow). It is shown that high erosion resistance is characteristic of 15-22 μm thick coatings that are produced by assisted deposition and consist of alternating TiN (70 nm) and CrN (70 nm) layers on a VT1-0 titanium alloy or TiC (70 nm) and CrC (70 nm) layers on an EP866 compressor steel.

  20. C-H Bond Activation by Early Transition Metal Carbide Cluster Anion MoC3 (-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Yu; Hu, Lianrui; Liu, Qing-Yu; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui; Yao, Jiannian

    2015-12-01

    Although early transition metal (ETM) carbides can activate CH bonds in condensed-phase systems, the electronic-level mechanism is unclear. Atomic clusters are ideal model systems for understanding the mechanisms of bond activation. For the first time, CH activation of a simple alkane (ethane) by an ETM carbide cluster anion (MoC3 (-) ) under thermal-collision conditions has been identified by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, and high-level quantum chemical calculations. Dehydrogenation and ethene elimination were observed in the reaction of MoC3 (-) with C2 H6 . The CH activation follows a mechanism of oxidative addition that is much more favorable in the carbon-stabilized low-spin ground electronic state than in the high-spin excited state. The reaction efficiency between the MoC3 (-) anion and C2 H6 is low (0.23±0.05) %. A comparison between the anionic and a highly efficient cationic reaction system (Pt(+) +C2 H6 ) was made. It turned out that the potential-energy surfaces for the entrance channels of the anionic and cationic reaction systems can be very different. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Development of Plasma-Sprayed Molybdenum Carbide-Based Anode Layers with Various Metal Oxides for SOFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.; Katikaneni, S. P.; Souentie, S.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Air plasma-sprayed (APS) coatings provide an ability to deposit a range of novel fuel cell materials at competitive costs. This work develops three separate types of composite anodes (Mo-Mo2C/Al2O3, Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2, Mo-Mo2C/TiO2) using a combination of APS process parameters on Hastelloy®X for application in intermediate temperature proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells. Commercially available carbide of molybdenum powder catalyst (Mo-Mo2C) and three metal oxides (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2) was used to prepare three separate composite feedstock powders to fabricate three different anodes. Each of the modified composition anode feedstock powders included a stoichiometric weight ratio of 0.8:0.2. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, nanoindentation, and conductivity. We report herein that three optimized anode layers of thicknesses between 200 and 300 µm and porosity as high as 20% for Mo-Mo2C/Al2O3 (250-µm thick) and Mo-Mo2C/TiO2 (300 µm thick) and 17% for Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2 (220-µm thick), controllable by a selection of the APS process parameters with no addition of sacrificial pore-forming material. The nanohardness results indicate the upper layers of the coatings have higher values than the subsurface layers in coatings with some effect of the deposition on the substrate. Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2 shows high electrical conductivity.

  2. Lattice vibrational properties of transition metal carbides (TiC, ZrC and HfC)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Upadhyaya; Ajay Kumar Singh; Atul Pandey; S N Pathak; A K Singh

    2005-02-01

    Lattice vibrational properties of transition metal carbides (TiC, ZrC and HfC) have been presented by including the effects of free-carrier doping and three-body interactions in the rigid shell model. The short-range overlap repulsion is operative up to the second neighbour ions. An excellent agreement has been obtained between theory and experiment for their phonon dispersion curves and Debye temperature variations. It is concluded that the contributions of free-carrier doping and three-body interactions are essential for the description of the lattice dynamics of these carbides.

  3. The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors fabricated on cubic silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Ohshima, T; Ishida, Y

    2003-01-01

    The n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated on cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) epitaxial layers grown on 3C-SiC substrates. The gate oxide of the MOSFETs was formed using pyrogenic oxidation at 1100 degC. The 3C-SiC MOSFETs showed enhancement type behaviors after annealing at 200degC for 30 min in argon atmosphere. The maximum value of the effective channel mobility of the 3C-SiC MOSFETs was 260cm sup 2 /V centre dot s. The leakage current of gate oxide was of a few tens of nA/cm sup 2 at an electric field range below 8.5 MV/cm, and breakdown began around 8.5MV/cm. (author)

  4. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  5. FORMATION MECHANISM OF TITANIUM CARBIDE CRYSTAL IN LASER SYNTHESIZED METAL-CERAMIC COMPOSITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    BAOSHUAI DU; ZHONGWEN. ZHANG; XINHONG WANG; ZENGDA ZOU

    2011-01-01

    In situ titanium carbide reinforced iron-based composite coating was deposited on mild carbon steel using laser surface engineering (LSE) with ferrotitanium and graphite as precursor. The microstructure and phase constituents of the deposited coating were characterized. Formation mechanism of titanium carbide crystal in the composite coating was elucidated by correlating the morphology of titanium carbide and the thermal cycle experienced by the precursor during the laser treatment. It was de...

  6. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il'yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  7. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Ilyashchenko, Dmitry Pavlovich; Karthev, Dmitry Sergeevich

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  8. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control.

  9. ROLE OF C AND P SITES ON THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF METAL CARBIDE AND PHOSPHIDES: FROM CLUSTERS TO SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; VINES, F.; LIU, P.; ILLAS, F.

    2007-07-01

    Transition metal carbides and phosphides have shown tremendous potential as highly active catalysts. At a microscopic level, it is not well understood how these new catalysts work. Their high activity is usually attributed to ligand or/and ensemble effects. Here, we review recent studies that examine the chemical activity of metal carbide and phosphides as a function of size, from clusters to extended surfaces, and metal/carbon or metal/phosphorous ratio. These studies reveal that the C and P sites in these compounds cannot be considered as simple spectators. They moderate the reactivity of the metal centers and provide bonding sites for adsorbates.

  10. A Study of the Metal Carbide-Carbon Peritectic Phase Transition for the Cr-C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zheng, W.; Sasajima, N.

    2007-12-01

    The authors recently reported the very first radiometric plateau observation of high-temperature fixed points of metal-carbide carbon peritectics. These act in a similar way to the metal (carbide)-carbon eutectic points in the sense that they can be used at high temperature without being contaminated by their graphite crucibles. The performance seems similar in terms of repeatability and plateau shape. The peritectic transition temperatures are close to the transition temperatures of some of the metal (carbide)-carbon eutectics. In this article, results of further study to understand the melting and freezing involved in these fixed points are reported, with the focus on the Cr3C2-C peritectic point. Difficulty in producing an ingot without voids was encountered. To overcome this, a filling technique that takes advantage of the capillary effect was devised. Plateau shapes and microstructures observed with electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) and back-scattered electron imaging (BSE) for various filling methods were compared. The observation of two fixed-point plateaux, one at the Cr3C2-C peritectic point and the other at a lower temperature of the Cr7C3-Cr3C2 eutectic point, correlates to the presence of two kinds of domains in the observed microstructure. The graphite crucible is shown to play an essential role in realizing peritectic plateaux of good quality.

  11. A review of liquid metal anode solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIYA TOLEUOVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC variant that uses liquid metal electrodes (anodes with the advantage of greater fuel tolerance and the ability to operate on solid fuel. Key features of the approach are discussed along with the technological and research challenges that need to be overcome for scale-up and commercialisation.

  12. Performance evaluation and characterization of metallic bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yue

    Bipolar plate and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are the two most repeated components of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack. Bipolar plates comprise more than 60% of the weight and account for 30% of the total cost of a fuel cell stack. The bipolar plates perform as current conductors between cells, provide conduits for reactant gases, facilitate water and thermal management through the cell, and constitute the backbone of a power stack. In addition, bipolar plates must have excellent corrosion resistance to withstand the highly corrosive environment inside the fuel cell, and they must maintain low interfacial contact resistance throughout the operation to achieve optimum power density output. Currently, commercial bipolar plates are made of graphite composites because of their relatively low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and high corrosion resistance. However, graphite composite's manufacturability, permeability, and durability for shock and vibration are unfavorable in comparison to metals. Therefore, metals have been considered as a replacement material for graphite composite bipolar plates. Since bipolar plates must possess the combined advantages of both metals and graphite composites in the fuel cell technology, various methods and techniques are being developed to combat metallic corrosion and eliminate the passive layer formed on the metal surface that causes unacceptable power reduction and possible fouling of the catalyst and the electrolyte. The main objective of this study was to explore the possibility of producing efficient, cost-effective and durable metallic bipolar plates that were capable of functioning in the highly corrosive fuel cell environment. Bulk materials such as Poco graphite, graphite composite, SS310, SS316, incoloy 800, titanium carbide and zirconium carbide were investigated as potential bipolar plate materials. In this work, different alloys and compositions of chromium carbide coatings on aluminum and SS316

  13. Effects of thermal treatment on the mechanical integrity of silicon carbide in HTR fuel up to 2200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohbeck, Nadia; Xiao, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Achieving inherent safety of the High Temperature Reactor relies on the exceptional performance of its fuel. The design foresees complete encapsulation of all fissionable material by layers of carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) forming the tristructural-isotropic fuel particle. Its mechanical integrity and ability to fully retain fission products even in the event of an accident is a vital safety concern. The present study investigates the effect of post-deposition annealing on the SiC coating at design-based accident temperatures and beyond. Therefore, samples of simulated fuel have been fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition and thermally treated in inert atmosphere up to 2200 °C. Nanoindentation and crush test measurements showed only minor reductions of elastic modulus and fracture strength up to 2000 °C. Substantial weight loss and crystal growth were observed at annealing temperatures of 2100 °C and above. Raman spectroscopy identified the formation of a multi-layered graphene film covering the SiC grains after annealing and scanning electron microscopy revealed significant porosity formation within the coating from 1800 °C onwards. These observations were attributed towards an evaporation-precipitation mechanism of SiC at very elevated temperatures that only slightly diminishes the hardness, elastic modulus or fracture strength, but might still be problematic in respect to fission product retention of the SiC layer.

  14. Viscosity Meaurement Technique for Metal Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Heng [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Metallic fuels have exceptional transient behavior, excellent thermal conductivity, and a more straightforward reprocessing path, which does not separate out pure plutonium from the process stream. Fabrication of fuel containing minor actinides and rare earth (RE) elements for irradiation tests, for instance, U-20Pu-3Am-2Np-1.0RE-15Zr samples at the Idaho National Laboratory, is generally done by melt casting in an inert atmosphere. For the design of a casting system and further scale up development, computational modeling of the casting process is needed to provide information on melt flow and solidification for process optimization. Therefore, there is a need for melt viscosity data, the most important melt property that controls the melt flow. The goal of the project was to develop a measurement technique that uses fully sealed melt sample with no Americium vapor loss to determine the viscosity of metallic melts and at temperatures relevant to the casting process. The specific objectives of the project were to: develop mathematical models to establish the principle of the measurement method, design and build a viscosity measurement prototype system based on the established principle, and calibrate the system and quantify the uncertainty range. The result of the project indicates that the oscillation cup technique is applicable for melt viscosity measurement. Detailed mathematical models of innovative sample ampoule designs were developed to not only determine melt viscosity, but also melt density under certain designs. Measurement uncertainties were analyzed and quantified. The result of this project can be used as the initial step toward the eventual goal of establishing a viscosity measurement system for radioactive melts.

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Metal carbide-carbon peritectic systems as high-temperature fixed points in thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.; Wang, Y.; Sasajima, N.

    2006-10-01

    WC-C, Cr3C2-C and Mn7C3-C peritectic systems were investigated for their potential of serving as high-temperature reference points in thermometry. Mixtures of high-purity graphite powder with W, Cr and Mn powder of 99.99%, 99.9% and 99.95% purity by mass, respectively, were placed in graphite blackbody crucibles and melting/freezing plateaus were observed by means of a radiation thermometer. The observed melting temperatures were 2749 °C (WC-C), 1826 °C (Cr3C2-C) and 1331 °C (Mn7C3-C), with a repeatability—in each case—of 0.02 K. The melting range for WC-C and Cr3C2-C peritectics was roughly 0.1 K. WC-C showed a flat freezing plateau that agreed with the melting plateau within the repeatability. The three fixed points are possible candidates, like the metal (carbide)-carbon eutectic fixed points, in the realization of an improved high-temperature scale above the copper point.

  16. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Process for Facile Electrosynthesis of Metal Carbides and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Chen, Chaoyi; Lu, Xionggang; Li, Shangshu; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu; Ding, Weizhong

    2017-02-01

    Metal carbides (MCs) and composites including TiC, SiC, TaC, ZrC, NbC, Ti5Si3/TiC, and Nb/Nb5Si3 have been directly electrosynthesized from their stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOs/C) mixture precursors by an innovative solid oxide membrane (SOM)-assisted electrochemical process. MOs/C mixture powders including TiO2/C, SiO2/C, Ta2O5/C, ZrO2/C, Nb2O5/C, TiO2/SiO2/C, Nb2O5/SiO2 were pressed to form porous pellets and then served as cathode precursors. A SOM-based anode, made from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based membrane, was used to control the electroreduction process. The SOM electrochemical process was performed at 1273 K (1000 °C) and 3.5 to 4.0 V in molten CaCl2. The oxygen component contained in the MOs/C precursors was gradually removed during electroreduction process, and thus, MOs/C can be directly converted into MCs and composites at the cathode. The reaction mechanism of the electroreduction process and the characteristics of the obtained MCs and composites products were systematically investigated. The results show that the electrosynthesis process typically involves compounding, electroreduction, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes. The products can be predesigned and controlled to form micro/nanostructured MCs and composites. Multicomponent multilayer composites (MMCs) have also been tried to electrosynthesize in this work. It is suggested that the SOM-assisted electroreduction process has great potential to be used for the facile and green synthesis of various MCs and composites.

  17. Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Process for Facile Electrosynthesis of Metal Carbides and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xingli; Chen, Chaoyi; Lu, Xionggang; Li, Shangshu; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu; Ding, Weizhong

    2016-09-01

    Metal carbides (MCs) and composites including TiC, SiC, TaC, ZrC, NbC, Ti5Si3/TiC, and Nb/Nb5Si3 have been directly electrosynthesized from their stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOs/C) mixture precursors by an innovative solid oxide membrane (SOM)-assisted electrochemical process. MOs/C mixture powders including TiO2/C, SiO2/C, Ta2O5/C, ZrO2/C, Nb2O5/C, TiO2/SiO2/C, Nb2O5/SiO2 were pressed to form porous pellets and then served as cathode precursors. A SOM-based anode, made from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based membrane, was used to control the electroreduction process. The SOM electrochemical process was performed at 1273 K (1000 °C) and 3.5 to 4.0 V in molten CaCl2. The oxygen component contained in the MOs/C precursors was gradually removed during electroreduction process, and thus, MOs/C can be directly converted into MCs and composites at the cathode. The reaction mechanism of the electroreduction process and the characteristics of the obtained MCs and composites products were systematically investigated. The results show that the electrosynthesis process typically involves compounding, electroreduction, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes. The products can be predesigned and controlled to form micro/nanostructured MCs and composites. Multicomponent multilayer composites (MMCs) have also been tried to electrosynthesize in this work. It is suggested that the SOM-assisted electroreduction process has great potential to be used for the facile and green synthesis of various MCs and composites.

  18. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, J.; Wolden, Colin

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo{sub 2}C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo{sub 2}C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo{sub 2}C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo{sub 2}C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo{sub 2}C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H{sub 2} flux of 238 SCFH/ft{sup 2} at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi. However, during testing of a Mo{sub 2}C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with the 2010 DOE target flux. Lastly, the Mo{sub 2}C/V composite

  19. Nanostructured Metal Carbides for Aprotic Li-O2 Batteries: New Insights into Interfacial Reactions and Cathode Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Harrison, Katharine; Zavadil, Kevin; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-06-18

    The development of nonaqueous Li-oxygen batteries, which relies on the reversible reaction of Li + O2 to give lithium peroxide (Li2O2), is challenged by several factors, not the least being the high charging voltage that results when carbon is typically employed as the cathode host. We report here on the remarkably low 3.2 V potential for Li2O2 oxidation on a passivated nanostructured metallic carbide (Mo2C), carbon-free cathode host. Online mass spectrometry coupled with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy unequivocally demonstrates that lithium peroxide is simultaneously oxidized together with the Li(x)MoO3-passivated conductive interface formed on the carbide, owing to their close redox potentials. The process rejuvenates the surface on each cycle upon electrochemical charge by releasing Li(x)MoO3 into the electrolyte, explaining the low charging potential.

  20. Metallic fuels: The EBR-II legacy and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Porter; Steven L. Hayes; J. Rory Kennedy

    2012-09-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) metallic fuel was qualified for high burnup to approximately 10 atomic per cent. Subsequently, the electrometallurgical treatment of this fuel was demonstrated. Advanced metallic fuels are now investigated for increased performance, including ultra-high burnup and actinide burning. Advances include additives to mitigate the fuel/cladding chemical interaction and uranium alloys that combine Mo, Ti and Zr to improve alloy performance. The impacts of the advances—on fabrication, waste streams, electrorefining, etc.—are found to be minimal and beneficial. Owing to extensive research literature and computational methods, only a modest effort is required to complete their development.

  1. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured titanium carbide for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Singh, Harwinder; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-04-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reaction of titanium and acetone at 800 °C. This method is relatively low temperature synthesis route. It can be used for large scale production of TiC. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA) techniques. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase TiC. XRD analysis confirmed that the particles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 13 nm. DTA analysis shows that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications.

  3. Transition metal carbides (WC, Mo2C, TaC, NbC) as potential electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at medium temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Simon; Nikiforov, Aleksey V.; Petrushina, Irina M.

    2015-01-01

    at medium temperatures (200-400 degrees C). By introducing a new setup which makes use of molten KH2PO4 as electrolyte, a model system for solid acid membrane electrolyser cells was obtained. Metal carbide coated wires prepared by a two-step oxidation carburization reaction of the metal wire surfaces were...

  4. Magnesium carbide synthesis from methane and magnesium oxide - a potential methodology for natural gas conversion to premium fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Diversification of the raw materials base for manufacturing premium fuels and chemicals offers U.S. and international consumers economic and strategic benefits. Extensive reserves of natural gas in the world provide a valuable source of clean gaseous fuel and chemical feedstock. Assuming the availability of suitable conversion processes, natural gas offers the prospect of improving flexibility in liquid fuels and chemicals manufacture, and thus, the opportunity to complement, supplement, or displace petroleum-based production as economic and strategic considerations require. The composition of natural gas varies from reservoir to reservoir but the principal hydrocarbon constituent is always methane (CH{sub 4}). With its high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, methane has the potential to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich products. However, methane is a very chemically stable molecule and, thus, is not readily transformed to other molecules or easily reformed to its elements (H{sub 2} and carbon). In many cases, further research is needed to augment selectivity to desired product(s), increase single-pass conversions, or improve economics (e.g. there have been estimates of $50/bbl or more for liquid products) before the full potential of these methodologies can be realized on a commercial scale. With the trade-off between gas conversion and product selectivity, a major challenge common to many of these technologies is to simultaneously achieve high methane single-pass conversions and high selectivity to desired products. Based on the results of the scoping runs, there appears to be strong indications that a breakthrough has finally been achieved in that synthesis of magnesium carbides from MgO and methane in the arc discharge reactor has been demonstrated.

  5. Characterization of Interface State in Silicon Carbide Metal Oxide Semiconductor Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Chieh

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has always been considered as an excellent material for high temperature and high power devices. Since SiC is the only compound semiconductor whose native oxide is silicon dioxide (SiO2), it puts SiC in a unique position. Although SiC metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) technology has made significant progress in recent years, there are still a number of issues to be overcome before more commercial SiC devices can enter the market. The prevailing issues surrounding SiC MOSFET devices are the low channel mobility, the low quality of the oxide layer and the high interface state density at the SiC/SiO2 interface. Consequently, there is a need for research to be performed in order to have a better understanding of the factors causing the poor SiC/SiO2 interface properties. In this work, we investigated the generation lifetime in SiC materials by using the pulsed metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitor method and measured the interface state density distribution at the SiC/SiO2 interface by using the conductance measurement and the high-low frequency capacitance technique. These measurement techniques have been performed on n-type and p-type SiC MOS capacitors. In the course of our investigation, we observed fast interface states at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in SiC MOS capacitors that underwent three different interface passivation processes, such states were detected in the nitrided samples but not observed in PSG-passivated samples. This result indicate that the lack of fast states at PSG-passivated interface is one of the main reasons for higher channel mobility in PSG MOSFETs. In addition, the effect of mobile ions in the oxide on the response time of interface states has been investigated. In the last chapter we propose additional methods of investigation that can help elucidate the origin of the particular interface states, enabling a more complete understanding of the SiC/SiO2 material system.

  6. Weld Joint Design for SFR Metallic Fuel Element Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Won; Kim, Soo Sung; Woo, Yoon Myeng; Kim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Ki Hwan; Yoon, Kyung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) system is among the six systems selected for Gen-IV promising systems and expected to become available for commercial introduction around 2030. In Korea, the R and D on SFR has been begun since 1997, as one of the national long-term nuclear R and D programs. The international collaborative research is under way on fuel developments within Advanced Fuel Project for Gen-IV SFR with the closed fuel cycle of full actinide recycling, while TRU bearing metallic fuel, U-TRU-Zr alloy fuel, was selected and is being developed. For the fabrication of SFR metallic fuel elements, the endplug welding is a crucial process. The sealing of endplug to cladding tube should be hermetically perfect to prevent a leakage of fission gases and to maintain a good reactor performance. In this study, the joint designs for endplug welding were investigated. For the irradiation test of SFR metallic fuel element, the TIG welding technique was adopted and the welding joint design was developed based on the welding conditions and parameters established. In order to make SFR metallic fuel elements, the weld joint design was developed based on the TIG welding technique.

  7. Molybdenum carbide as alternative catalysts to precious metals for highly selective reduction of CO2 to CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porosoff, Marc D; Yang, Xiaofang; Boscoboinik, J Anibal; Chen, Jingguang G

    2014-06-23

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is expected to have negative effects on the global environment from its role in climate change and ocean acidification. Utilizing CO2 as a feedstock to make valuable chemicals is potentially more desirable than sequestration. A substantial reduction of CO2 levels requires a large-scale CO2 catalytic conversion process, which in turn requires the discovery of low-cost catalysts. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility of using the non-precious metal material molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) as an active and selective catalyst for CO2 conversion by H2.

  8. First principles study on the charge density and the bulk modulus of the transition metals and their carbides and nitrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Cheng-Bin; Li Ming-Kai; Yin Dong; Liu Fu-Qing; Fan Xiang-Jun

    2005-01-01

    A first principles study of the electronic properties and bulk modulus (B0) of the fcc and bcc transition metals,transition metal carbides and nitrides is presented. The calculations were performed by plane-wave pseudopotential method in the framework of the density functional theory with local density approximation. The density of states and the valence charge densities of these solids are plotted. The results show that B0 does not vary monotonically when the number of the valence d electrons increases. B0 reaches a maximum and then decreases for each of the four sorts of solids. It is related to the occupation of the bonding and anti-bonding states in the solid. The value of the valence charge density at the midpoint between the two nearest metal atoms tends to be proportional to B0.

  9. Novel fuel cell stack with coupled metal hydride containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Yan; Bu, Qingyuan; Guzy, Christopher J.; Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Air-cooled, self-humidifying hydrogen fuel cells are often used for backup and portable power sources, with a metal hydride used as the hydrogen storage material. To provide a stable hydrogen flow to the fuel cell stack, heat must be provided to the metal hydride. Conventionally, the heat released from the exothermic reaction of hydrogen and oxygen in the fuel cell stack to the exhaust air is used to heat a separate metal hydride container. In this case, the heat is only partially used instead of being more closely coupled because of the heat transfer resistances in the system. To achieve better heat integration, a novel scheme is proposed whereby hydrogen storage and single fuel cells are more closely coupled. Based on this idea, metal hydride containers in the form of cooling plates were assembled between each pair of cells in the stack so that the heat could be directly transferred to a metal hydride container of much larger surface-to-volume ratio than conventional separate containers. A heat coupled fuel cell portable power source with 10 cells and 11 metal hydride containers was constructed and the experimental results show that this scheme is beneficial for the heat management of fuel cell stack.

  10. Highly dispersed molybdenum carbide as non-noble electrocatalyst for PEM fuel cells: Performance for CO electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guil-Lopez, R.; Martinez-Huerta, M.V.; Pena, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Guillen-Villafuerte, O.; Pastor, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, E-38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    CO electrooxidation on nanocrystalline molybdenum carbide has been studied through CO stripping measurements using cyclic voltammetry. The active molybdenum carbide was obtained from the carbothermic reduction of really very small molybdenum oxide particles supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (CB). In order to obtain highly dispersed molybdenum carbide particles, low molybdenum loading and control of the carbothermic reduction conditions of CB-supported molybdenum oxide were employed to avoid Mo sintering during the carburization process. This work provides experimental evidence on the CO electrooxidation capability of the Mo carbide phase, which to the best of our knowledge is reported for the first time. The small particle size of carbide electrocatalyst exhibited better performance for CO electrooxidation than the commercial bulk molybdenum carbide sample. (author)

  11. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1978. [Advanced solvent extraction; accidents; pyrochemical; radwaste in metal matrix; waste migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M. J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R. E.

    1979-12-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported include development of centrifugal contactors for Purex processes. Tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl-n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as Thorex extractants. Dispersion of uranium and plutonium by fires, and mechanisms for subdividing and dispersing liquids and solids were reviewed. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program, a facility for testing containment materials is under construction; a flowsheet for carbide fuel processing has been designed and studies of carbide reactions in bismuth are underway; salt transport processes are being studied; process-size refractory metal vessels are being fabricated; the feasibility of AIROX reprocessing is being determined; the solubility of UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 2/ + fission products, and PuO/sub 2/ in molten alkali metal nitrates, has been investigated; a flowsheet was developed for reprocessing actinide oxides in molten salts; preparation of Th-U carbide from the oxide is being studied; new flowsheets based on the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process for reprocessing of spent uranium metal fuel have been prepared; the chloride volitility processing of thorium-based fuels is being studied; the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in KCl-LiCl-ThCl/sub 4/-Th is being studied; and a flowsheet for processing spent nuclear fuel in molten tin has been constructed. Leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms in a metal matrix were studied. Nine criteria for handling waste cladding hulls were established. Strontium and tin migration in glauconite columns was measured. Radioactive Sr in a stream of water moved through oolitic limestone as rapidly as water, but in a stream of water equilibrated with the limestone, Sr moved through the limestone one-tenth as fast. Migration of trace quantities of Cs and I through kaolinite was studied. 88 figures, 53 tables.

  12. Fabrication of particulate metal fuel for fast burner reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Lee, Sun Yong; Kim, Jong Hwan; Woo, Yoon Myung; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chan Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    U Zr metallic fuel for sodium cooled fast reactors is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, remote fabrication capability in a shielded hot cell should be prepared. Moreover, generation of long lived radioactive wastes and loss of volatile species should be minimized during the recycled fuel fabrication step. Therefore, innovative fuel concepts should be developed to address the fabrication challenges pertaining to TRU while maintaining good performances of metallic fuel. Particulate fuel concepts have already been proposed and tested at several experimental fast reactor systems and vipac ceramic fuel of RIAR, Russia is one of the examples. However, much less work has been reported for particulate metallic fuel development. Spherical uranium alloy particles with various diameters can be easily produced by the centrifugal atomization technique developed by KAERI. Using the atomized uranium and uranium zirconium alloy particles, we fabricated various kinds of powder pack, powder compacts and sintered pellets. The microstructures and properties of the powder pack and pellets are presented.

  13. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U Pu Zr metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hayes, S. L.; Hofman, G. L.; Yacout, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  14. The use of metal hydrides in fuel cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo V. Lototskyy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews state-of-the-art developments in hydrogen energy systems which integrate fuel cells with metal hydride-based hydrogen storage. The 187 reference papers included in this review provide an overview of all major publications in the field, as well as recent work by several of the authors of the review. The review contains four parts. The first part gives an overview of the existing types of fuel cells and outlines the potential of using metal hydride stores as a source of hydrogen fuel. The second part of the review considers the suitability and optimisation of different metal hydrides based on their energy efficient thermal integration with fuel cells. The performances of metal hydrides are considered from the viewpoint of the reversible heat driven interaction of the metal hydrides with gaseous H2. Efficiencies of hydrogen and heat exchange in hydrogen stores to control H2 charge/discharge flow rates are the focus of the third section of the review and are considered together with metal hydride – fuel cell system integration issues and the corresponding engineering solutions. Finally, the last section of the review describes specific hydrogen-fuelled systems presented in the available reference data.

  15. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  16. Bioelectrochemical metal recovery with microbial fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenas Motos, Pau

    2017-01-01

    This thesis aims to explain the metal recovery through the study of their components using Copper as a model compound of the heavy metals. Different electrochemical cells distribution and sizes were used to improve efficiency and current density. Two different electron donors were tested, acetate as

  17. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Conghua [TreadStone Technologies, Inc.

    2013-05-30

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  18. Studies on PEM Fuel Cell Noble Metal Catalyst Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Skou, Eivind Morten

    . Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) is commonly considered as the heart of cell system [2]. Degradation of the noble metal catalysts in MEAs especially Three-Phase-Boundary (TPB) is a key factor directly influencing fuel cell durability. In this work, electrochemical degradation of Pt and Pt/Ru alloy were......Incredibly vast advance has been achieved in fuel cell technology regarding to catalyst efficiency, improvement of electrolyte conductivity and optimization of cell system. With breathtakingly accelerating progress, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) is the most promising and most widely...

  19. Ignition of Metal Powders in Combustion Products of Model Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-13

    y AD/A-001 172 IGNITION OF METAL POWDERS IN COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF MODEL FUEL A. K. Klyauzov, et al Foreign Technology...S. Air Force UNCLASSIFIED »b. s»ouc » "I»0«T TITLE IGNITION OF METAL POWDERS IN COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF MODEL FUEL f* OCJCPIPTIVK NOTKI (Typ* o...report mnd Inclumiv «**»••) Translation S »UTMö«I|I ( Firn tSSS», rnlddl* Inltlml, faar .tarna; A. K. Klyauzov, M. M. Arsh, et al 6

  20. Temperature and burnup correlated fuel-cladding chemical interaction in U-10ZR metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, William J.

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors and provide a number of advantages over other fuel types considering their fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Resistance to cladding "breach" and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the nuclear power plant primary coolant system is a key performance parameter for a nuclear fuel system. In metallic fuel, FCCI weakens the cladding, especially at high power-high temperature operation, contributing to fuel pin breach. Empirical relationships for FCCI have been developed from a large body of data collected from in-pile (EBR-II) and out-of-pile experiments [1]. However, these relationships are unreliable in predicting FCCI outside the range of EBR-II experimental data. This dissertation examines new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of prototypic length metallic fuel irradiations performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The fuel in these assemblies operated a temperature and burnup conditions similar to that in EBR-II but with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. Comparing FCCI formation data from FFTF and EBR-II provides new insight into FCCI formation kinetics. A model is developed combining both production and diffusion of lanthanides to the fuel-cladding interface and subsequent reaction with the cladding. The model allows these phenomena to be influenced by fuel burnup (lanthanide concentrations) and operating temperature. Parameters in the model are adjusted to reproduce measured FCCI layer thicknesses from EBR-II and FFTF. The model predicts that, under appropriate conditions, rate of FCCI formation can be controlled by either fission product transport or by the reaction rate of the interaction species at the fuel-cladding interface. This dissertation will help forward the design of metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full

  1. Tungsten carbide modified high surface area carbon as fuel cell catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minhua; Merzougui, Belabbes; Shoemaker, Krista; Stolar, Laura; Protsailo, Lesia; Mellinger, Zachary J.; Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m 2 g -1) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  2. Nanophase modification of the superficial layer of cast iron during the interaction of the melt with a carbide-forming metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Xu, Yunhua; Zhong, Lisheng; Zhao, Nana

    2016-11-01

    In the present publication, we report on the results of a study of the structural-phase state of the superficial layer of cast iron formed as a result of an interaction of cast-iron melt with a plate of carbide-forming Ta metal. It is found that, as a result of the interaction, in the superficial layer of cast iron there forms a cermet-type heterophase structure with nanocrystalline carbide phase. The influence of the formed heterophase structure on the physical properties of the superficial layer of cast iron is demonstrated.

  3. Effect of stress ratio and frequency on fatigue crack growth rate of 2618 aluminium alloy silicon carbide metal matrix composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirbhay Singh; Ram Khelawan; G N Mathur

    2001-04-01

    Effect of stress ratio and frequency on the fatigue crack propagation of 2618 aluminium alloy–silicon carbide composite were investigated at ambient temperature. With the first set of specimens, the fatigue crack growth rates were studied at three frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz at a stress ratio of 0.1 whereas the effects of stress ratios of 0.1, 0.25 and 0.50 were studied with the second set of specimens. The study showed that the fatigue crack propagation behaviour of this metal matrix composite was influenced to an appreciable extent by the stress ratio, but not by the fatigue frequencies used in this investigation.

  4. Prediction of the quantum spin Hall effect in monolayers of transition-metal carbides MC (M = Ti, Zr, Hf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liujiang; Shao, Bin; Shi, Wujun; Sun, Yan; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We report the existence of the quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) in monolayers of transition-metal carbides MC (M = Zr, Hf). Under ambient conditions, the ZrC monolayer exhibits QSHE with an energy gap of 54 meV, in which topological helical edge states exist. Enhanced d xy -d xy interaction induces band inversion, resulting in nontrivial topological features. By applying in-plane strain, the HfC monolayer can be tuned from a trivial insulator to a quantum spin Hall insulator with an energy gap of 170 meV, three times that of the ZrC monolayer. The strong stability of MC monolayers provides a new platform for QSHE and spintronic applications.

  5. Fuel upgrading and reforming with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods for separating hydrocarbons on an internal combustion powered vehicle via one or more metal organic frameworks are disclosed. Systems and methods can further include utilizing separated hydrocarbons and exhaust to generate hydrogen gas for use as fuel. In one aspect, a method for separating hydrocarbons can include contacting a first component containing a first metal organic framework with a flow of hydrocarbons and separating hydrocarbons by size. In certain embodiments, the hydrocarbons can include alkanes.

  6. Fuel upgrading and reforming with metal organic framework

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods for separating hydrocarbons on an internal combustion powered vehicle via one or more metal organic frameworks are disclosed. Systems and methods can further include utilizing separated hydrocarbons and exhaust to generate hydrogen gas for use as fuel. In one aspect, a method for separating hydrocarbons can include contacting a first component containing a first metal organic framework with a flow of hydrocarbons and separating hydrocarbons by size. In certain embodiments, the hydrocarbons can include alkanes.

  7. Metal Nanoshells for Enhanced Solar-to-Fuel Photocatalytic Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    presence of metal nanoshells can absorb the solar energy in the IR range. However, the broad absorption of metal nanoshells also covered the visible...solar to heat), and photosynthesis (solar to fuel). In the latter technology, artificial photosynthesis mimics natural photosynthesis by converting...high enough to reduce water. (AgIn)xZnyS2x+y solid solution, derived from ZnS is a narrower band gap semiconductor. The absorption of the solid

  8. Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen is the main fuel for all types of fuel cells except direct methanol fuel cells. Hydrogen can be generated from all manner of fossil fuels, including coal, natural gas, diesel, gasoline, other hydrocarbons, and oxygenates (e.g., methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.). Impurities in the fuel can cause significant performance problems and sulfur, in particular, can decrease the cell performance of fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In the SOFC, the high (800-1000°C) operating temperature yields advantages (e.g., internal fuel reforming) and disadvantages (e.g., material selection and degradation problems). Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of the SOFC from ~1000 ºC to ~750 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

  9. Ion intercalation into two-dimensional transition-metal carbides: global screening for new high-capacity battery materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Christopher; Islam, M Saiful

    2014-11-19

    Two-dimensional transition metal carbides (termed MXenes) are a new family of compounds generating considerable interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Intercalation of ions into MXenes has recently been demonstrated with good electrochemical performance, making them viable electrode materials for rechargeable batteries. Here we have performed global screening of the capacity and voltage for a variety of intercalation ions (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+)) into a large number of M2C-based compounds (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta) with F-, H-, O-, and OH-functionalized surfaces using density functional theory methods. In terms of gravimetric capacity a greater amount of Li(+) or Mg(2+) can be intercalated into an MXene than Na(+) or K(+), which is related to the size of the intercalating ion. Variation of the surface functional group and transition metal species can significantly affect the voltage and capacity of an MXene, with oxygen termination leading to the highest capacity. The most promising group of M2C materials in terms of anode voltage and gravimetric capacity (>400 mAh/g) are compounds containing light transition metals (e.g., Sc, Ti, V, and Cr) with nonfunctionalized or O-terminated surfaces. The results presented here provide valuable insights into exploring a rich variety of high-capacity MXenes for potential battery applications.

  10. Metal Containing Polymers as Fuel Cell Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-30

    AWARDED: Petroleum Research Fund on metal nitrenes National Institutes of Health on model photosynthetic systems National Aeronautics and Spare...chair: Chemistry, AtlAnta linviersity) PUBLICATIONS: J. L. Reed, F. Wang and F. Basolo, "Coordinated Nitrene Formation by the Photolysis of...Reactions of Azidopentaamineiridium (III) Ion. Nitrene Path." idid., 95, 7998 (1974). J. L. Reed, H. 0. Gafney and F. Basolo, "Photochemical Reactions of

  11. CARBON REMOVAL FROM METALLIC SILICON BY CARBIDE SETTLING FOR SOLAR GRADE SILICON PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Ramos Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of solar energy is growing sharply in the past years. The most used material for solar cells is high-purity silicon produced by refining low-purity silicon. With the increasing demand for photovoltaic components, new refining processes have been investigated. Carbon is one of the impurities to be removed and one possible removing technique is based on the settling of silicon carbide particles. Settling tests were carried out at 1,500°C during one and six hours. Results show that differences in settling time do not affect carbon removal significantly and that the carbon contents after settling are still higher than that required by standards for solar grade silicon (43 ppm. Results from this work and from literature show that settling is not a feasible processing step for carbon removal to the level needed for photovoltaic applications.

  12. Thermodynamic treatment of noble metal fission products in nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, M. H.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2007-06-01

    Based on a critical evaluation of the literature, a comprehensive thermodynamic model has been developed for the complete quinary system involving the noble metal fission products in nuclear fuel: Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc. This treatment was based on the foundation of ten binary systems and an interpolation scheme. The thermodynamic model has been demonstrated to fit the available experimental data for the ternary sub-systems. This work can be used with other models for potentially non-stoichiometric UO 2+ x containing fission products, as well as data for other phases, to assess the chemical form of fission products in irradiated fuel material.

  13. Advanced Ceramics for Use as Fuel Element Materials in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Allen, Lee R.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent start (October 2011) of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Program, there is renewed interest in developing advanced ceramics for use as fuel element materials in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems. Three classes of fuel element materials are being considered under the NCPS Program: (a) graphite composites - consisting of coated graphite elements containing uranium carbide (or mixed carbide), (b) cermets (ceramic/metallic composites) - consisting of refractory metal elements containing uranium oxide, and (c) advanced carbides consisting of ceramic elements fabricated from uranium carbide and one or more refractory metal carbides [1]. The current development effort aims to advance the technology originally developed and demonstrated under Project Rover (1955-1973) for the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) [2].

  14. Metallic materials in solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Joseph Quadakkers

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Cr alloys with variations in chromium content and additions of different elements were studied for potential application in intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC. Recently, a new type of FeCrMn(Ti/La based ferritic steels has been developed to be used as construction material for SOFC interconnects. In the present paper, the long term oxidation resistance of this class of steels in both air and simulated anode gas will be discussed and compared with the behaviour of a number of commercial available ferritic steels. Besides, in-situ studies were carried out to characterize the high temperature conductivity of the oxide scales formed under these conditions. Main emphasis will be put on the growth and adherence of the oxide scales formed during exposure, their contact resistance at service temperature as well as their interaction with various perovskite type contact materials. Additionally, parameters and protection methods in respect to the volatilization of chromia based oxide scales will be illustrated.

  15. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Bock Lee; Jin Sik Cheon; Sung Ho Kim; Jeong-Yong Park; Hyung-Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU)–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochem...

  16. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  17. Development of Melting Crucible Materials of Metallic Fuel Slug for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. H.; Lee, C. T.; Oh, S. J.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, C. B.; Ko, Y. M.; Woo, W. M

    2010-01-15

    The fabrication process of metallic fuel for SFR(sodium fast reactor) of Generation-IV candidate reactors is composed of the fabrication of fuel pin, fuel rod, and fuel assembly. The key technology of the fabrication process for SFR can be referred to the fabrication technology of fuel pin. As SFR fuel contains MA(minor actinide) elements proceeding the recycling of actinide elements, it is so important to extinguish MA during irradiation in SFR, included in nuclear fuel through collection of volatile MA elements during fabrication of fuel pin. Hence, it is an imminent circumstance to develop the fabrication process of fuel pin. This report is an state-of art report related to the characteristics of irradiation performance for U-Zr-Pu metallic fuel, and the apparatus and the technology of conventional injection casting process. In addition, to overcome the drawbacks of the conventional injection casting and the U-Zr-Pu fuel, new fabrication technologies such as the gravity casting process, the casting of fuel pin to metal-barrier mold, the fabrication of particulate metallic fuel utilizing centrifugal atomization is surveyed and summarized. The development of new U-10Mo-X metallic fuel as nuclear fuel having a single phase in the temperature range between 550 and 950 .deg. C, reducing the re-distribution of the fuel elements and improving the compatibility between fuel and cladding, is also surveyed and summarized.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; Eklund, Per; Gogotsi, Yury; Rosen, Johanna; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented for select MXenes-a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Herein we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, sbnd O, sbnd OH and sbnd F, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. From XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.

  19. Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Metal-Matrix Composites Reinforced with Silicon Carbide Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia E. Ares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the study of the effect of directional heat extraction on the silicon-carbide (SiC distribution in zinc-aluminum matrix composites (MMCs and on the columnar-to-equiaxed (CET position in directionally solidified samples. To this end, a ZA-27 alloy matrix was reinforced with ceramic particles of SiC and vertically directionally solidified. The cooling rates, temperature gradients, and interphase velocities were then measured, and their influence on the solidification microstructure of the MMCs was analyzed. The recalescence detected and measured during the equiaxed transition was of the order of 3.5°C to 1.1°C. The values of the temperature gradients reached a minimum during the CET and were even negative in most cases (between −3.89 K and 0.06 K. The interphase velocities varied between 0.07 mm/s and 0.44 mm/s at the transition. Also, the presence of ceramic particles in ZA-27 alloys affected the thermodynamic local conditions and the kinetics of nucleation, producing a finer microstructure.

  20. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon nitride to metal and silicon carbide to metal for advanced heat engine applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D.; Kim, H. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Kim, K. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (US). Div. of Engineering

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Nitride to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal for Advanced Heat Engine Applications. A general methodology was developed to optimize the joint geometry and material systems for 650{degrees}C applications. Failure criteria were derived to predict the fracture of the braze and ceramic. Extensive finite element analyses (FEA) were performed to examine various joint geometries and to evaluate the affect of different interlayers on the residual stress state. Also, material systems composed of coating materials, interlayers, and braze alloys were developed for the program based on the chemical stability and strength of the joints during processing, and service. The FEA results were compared with experiments using two methods: (1) an idealized strength relationship of the ceramic, and (2) a probabilistic analysis of the ceramic strength (NASA CARES). The results showed that the measured strength of the joint reached 30--80% of the strength predicted by FEA. Also, potential high-temperature braze alloys were developed and evaluated for the high-temperature application of ceramic-metal joints. 38 tabs, 29 figs, 20 refs.

  1. Thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near-infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir F.

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of uranium and plutonium carbides under extreme conditions is essential for designing a new metallic fuel materials for next generation of a nuclear reactor. The present work is devoted to the study of the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting/freezing temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and normal total emissivity are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range. It is shown that the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of uranium carbide have a slight difference during liquid-to-solid transition. Unlike UC, such a difference between these functions have not been established for plutonium carbide. The calculated values for the normal total emissivity of uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting temperatures is in good agreement with experimental data. The obtained results allow to calculate the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides for any size of samples. Based on the model of Hagen-Rubens and the Wiedemann-Franz law, a new method to determine the thermal conductivity of metals and carbides at the melting points is proposed.

  2. Poor mid-term survival of the low-carbide metal-on-metal Zweymüller-plus total hip arthroplasty system: a concise follow-up, at a minimum of ten years, of a previous report*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilis; Korovessis, Panagiotis

    2013-03-20

    Between 1994 and 1999, 217 metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties with a low-carbide bearing surface were performed with use of the cementless Zweymüller SL-Plus stem and the Bicon-Plus threaded cup in 194 consecutive patients. After a minimum follow-up of ten years, 181 living patients (203 hips) were available for evaluation. The revision rate after an average of twelve years was 18% (thirty-six hips in thirty-six patients were revised). The main reason for revision was aseptic loosening of one or both components. The probability of survival of the stem at fifteen years was 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65% to 86%). The probability of survival of the cup was 80% (95% CI, 62% to 90%). These high failure rates at mid-term follow-up led us to abandon the use of low-carbide metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty components.

  3. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  4. ON feasibility of using nitride and metallic fuel in the MBIR reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Eliseev

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the MBIR reactor, involving advanced dense fuel types, have shown that nitride fuel does not make it possible to achieve the required neutron flux value, while metallic fuel provides for the required neutron flux (practically the same as MOX fuel and a high dpa rate but requires modified temperature conditions of irradiation. The specific neutronic properties of these fuel types, as compared to the standard MOX fuel, have also been identified.

  5. High-Performance Metal/Carbide Composites with Far-From-Equilibrium Compositions and Controlled Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liangfa; O’Neil, Morgan; Erturun, Veysel; Benitez, Rogelio; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Karaman, Ibrahim; Radovic, Miladin

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of extending existing metal-ceramic composites to those with the compositions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium is examined. A current and pressure-assisted, rapid infiltration is proposed to fabricate composites, consisting of reactive metallic and ceramic phases with controlled microstructure and tunable properties. An aluminum (Al) alloy/Ti2AlC composite is selected as an example of the far-from-equilibrium systems to fabricate, because Ti2AlC exists only in a narrow region of the Ti-Al-C phase diagram and readily reacts with Al. This kind of reactive systems challenges conventional methods for successfully processing corresponding metal-ceramic composites. Al alloy/Ti2AlC composites with controlled microstructures, various volume ratios of constituents (40/60 and 27/73) and metallic phase sizes (42–83 μm, 77–276 μm, and 167–545 μm), are obtained using the Ti2AlC foams with different pore structures as preforms for molten metal (Al alloy) infiltration. The resulting composites are lightweight and display exceptional mechanical properties at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These structures achieve a compressive strength that is 10 times higher than the yield strength of the corresponding peak-aged Al alloy at ambient temperature and 14 times higher at 400 °C. Possible strengthening mechanisms are described, and further strategies for improving properties of those composites are proposed.

  6. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  7. High-Performance Metal/Carbide Composites with Far-From-Equilibrium Compositions and Controlled Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Liangfa; O’Neil, Morgan; Erturun, Veysel; Benitez, Rogelio; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Karaman, Ibrahim; Radovic, Miladin

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extending existing metal-ceramic composites to those with the compositions that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium is examined. A current and pressure-assisted, rapid infiltration is proposed to fabricate composites, consisting of reactive metallic and ceramic phases with controlled microstructure and tunable properties. An aluminum (Al) alloy/Ti2AlC composite is selected as an example of the far-from-equilibrium systems to fabricate, because Ti2AlC exists only in a narrow...

  8. Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Industrial Technology Institute, Roorkee (India)

    2007-09-15

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

  9. Vacuum Brazing of WC-8Co Cemented Carbides to Carbon Steel Using Pure Cu and Ag-28Cu as Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, G. W.; Tao, J. N.; Shao, H. C.; Fu, H.; Pan, T. Z.; Qiao, G. J.

    2017-02-01

    The wetting and spreading behavior of commercial pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy on WC-8Co cemented carbide were investigated by the sessile drop technique. The contact angle of both systems obviously decreases with moderately increasing the wetting temperature. Vacuum brazing of the WC-8Co cemented carbide to SAE1045 steel using the pure Cu or Ag-28Cu as filler metal was further carried out based on the wetting results. The interfacial interactions and joint mechanical behavior involving microhardness, shear strength and fracture were analyzed and discussed. An obvious Fe-Cu-Co transition layer is detected at the WC-8Co/Cu interface, while no obvious reaction layer is observed at the whole WC-8Co/Ag-28Cu/SAE1045 brazing seam. The microhardness values of the two interlayers and the steel substrate near the two interlayers increase more or less, while those of WC-8Co cemented carbide substrates adjacent to the two interlayers decrease. The WC-8Co/SAE1045 joints using pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy as filler metals obtain average shear strength values of about 172 and 136 MPa, and both of the joint fractures occur in the interlayers.

  10. Vacuum Brazing of WC-8Co Cemented Carbides to Carbon Steel Using Pure Cu and Ag-28Cu as Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, G. W.; Tao, J. N.; Shao, H. C.; Fu, H.; Pan, T. Z.; Qiao, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The wetting and spreading behavior of commercial pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy on WC-8Co cemented carbide were investigated by the sessile drop technique. The contact angle of both systems obviously decreases with moderately increasing the wetting temperature. Vacuum brazing of the WC-8Co cemented carbide to SAE1045 steel using the pure Cu or Ag-28Cu as filler metal was further carried out based on the wetting results. The interfacial interactions and joint mechanical behavior involving microhardness, shear strength and fracture were analyzed and discussed. An obvious Fe-Cu-Co transition layer is detected at the WC-8Co/Cu interface, while no obvious reaction layer is observed at the whole WC-8Co/Ag-28Cu/SAE1045 brazing seam. The microhardness values of the two interlayers and the steel substrate near the two interlayers increase more or less, while those of WC-8Co cemented carbide substrates adjacent to the two interlayers decrease. The WC-8Co/SAE1045 joints using pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy as filler metals obtain average shear strength values of about 172 and 136 MPa, and both of the joint fractures occur in the interlayers.

  11. Synthesis of metal-polymer nanocomposites for fuel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes Lima, Ricardo Jose

    Metal particles have long been of interest as fuel and fuel additives for propellants and explosives because their high-density energy. In general, their volumetric energy density is higher as compared to conventional hydrocarbon-based fuel. This advantage is clearly beneficial for volume-limited rocket propulsion systems, in which the most important parameter is the density-based specific impulse. It is widely known that the reactivity of metal particles increases when particle size decreases. Significant improvements in combustion behaviors of propellant have been attributed to the use of nanosize metal particles, for example faster burning rates and shorter ignition delay time. For this reason the application of nanosize particles as fuel could be preferable than large particles. However, several difficulties limit the use of ultrafine particles in fuel applications and propellants. Most of them are attributed to the oxide layer formation on the particles that prevents good combustion performance. In boron applications, practical difficulties such as poor ignition and combustion performance, have so far limited extensive use of boron for fuel applications. Indications are that application of non-oxide coatings on particles protects them against premature oxidation and enhances their combustion properties. A number of methods have been proposed to coat metal particles with a variety of organic compounds or other metals. Common applications provides coatings of saturated hydrocarbons or fatty acids, such as oleic acid as a means to passivation the particles. Recently, high-energy ball milling, in combination with chemical reactions, was applied to fabricate nanostructured metal particles coated with organic compounds. One of the advantages of this technique is that the passivation be integrated into the production of particles as a single step. For example, the reactive milling of boron in oleic acid solution showed an improved reactivity of as-milled powders

  12. Perspectives on the metallic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wei-zhong; YAN Mi

    2004-01-01

    The various stages and progress in the development of interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) over the last two decades are reviewed. The criteria for the application of materials as interconnects are highlighted. Interconnects based on lanthanum chromite ceramics demonstrate many inherent drawbacks and therefore are only useful for SOFCs operating around 1000 ℃. The advance in the research of anode-supported flat SOFCs facilitates the replacement of ceramic interconnects with metallic ones due to their significantly lowered working temperature. Besides, interconnects made of metals or alloys offer many advantages as compared to their ceramic counterpart. The oxidation response and thermal expansion behaviors of various prospective metallic interconnects are examined and evaluated. The minimization of contact resistance to achieve desired and reliable stack performance during their projected lifetime still remains a highly challenging issue with metallic interconnects. Inexpensive coating materials and techniques may play a key role in pro moting the commercialization of SOFC stack whose interconnects are constructed of some current commercially available alloys. Alternatively, development of new metallic materials that are capable of forming stable oxide scales with sluggish growth rate and sufficient electrical conductivity is called for.

  13. A precious-metal free micro fuel cell accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretthauer, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, integrated fuel cell (FC) type primary and secondary batteries attracted a great deal of attention as integrated on-chip power sources due to their high theoretical power densities. Unfortunately, the costs of these devices have been rather high. This is partially due to the involved clean-room processes, but also due to the fact that these devices generally rely on expensive precious-metals such as Pd and Pt. Therefore we developed a novel integrated FC type accumulator that is based on non-precious-metals only. The key component of the presented accumulator is its alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane that allows not only the usage of a low-cost AB5 type hydrogen storage electrode, but also the usage of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 as a precious-metal free bifunctional catalyst for the air-breathing electrode. Additionally the presented design requires only comparatively few cleanroom processes which further reduces the overall production costs. Although abdicating precious-metals, the presented accumulator shows an open circuit voltage of 0.81 V and a maximum power density of 0.66 mW cm-2 which is comparable or even superior to former precious-metal based cells.

  14. New processing methods to produce silicon carbide and beryllium oxide inert matrix and enhanced thermal conductivity oxide fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, K. H.; Fourcade, J.; Lee, S.-G.; Solomon, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    For inert matrix fuels, SiC and BeO represent two possible matrix phase compounds that exhibit very high thermal conductivity, high melting points, low neutron absorption, and reasonably high radiation stability. BeO is chemically compatible with UO2, PuO2 and Zircaloy to very high temperatures, but SiC reacts with all three at somewhat lower temperatures. We have developed the Polymer Impregnation and Pyrolysis or PIP method, making use of a commercial SiC polymeric precursor, to consolidate both particulate fuels like 'TRISO' microsphere fuels, and to impregnate UO2 fuels with pure stoichiometric SiC to improve their thermal conductivity. This method was employed to fabricate Enhanced Conductivity Oxide fuels, or ECO fuels with 5-10 vol.% of the high conductivity phase, and with 50 vol.% for TRISO dispersion fuels. For ECO fuels, a new 'slug/bisque' method of fabricating the UO2 fuel granules was necessary to produce sintered fuel with open pore structures, allowing almost complete impregnation of the continuous SiC phase. The advantages of the PIP process are that it is a non-damaging consolidation process for particulates (TRU, UC or TRISO microspheres), forms a continuous, pure β-SiC phase at temperatures as low as 1573 K, and allows the maximum in fissile atom density. However, several PIP impregnation cycles and high crystallization temperatures are necessary to obtain high thermal conductivity SiC. For producing IMF fuels using the PIP process, the fissile PuC and/or TRU actinides can be added in small concentrations along with SiC 'filler particles' and consolidated with the SiC precursor for either open or closed fuel cycles. For BeO, a second approach was developed for ECO fuels that involves a 'co-sintering' route to produce high density fuels with a continuous BeO phase of 5-10 vol.%. Special granulation and mixing techniques were developed, but only one normal sintering cycle is required. For BeO matrix IMF fuels, PuO2 granules and TRU actinides or

  15. Fully-Coupled Metallic Fuel Performance Simulations using BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-27

    This document is a set of slides intended to accompany a talk at a meeting. The first topic taken up is zirconium redistribution. The rod edge Zr increase is evidently due to the Soret term and temperature gradient. Then metallic fission gas release modeling is considered. Based on a GRSIS/FEAST model, the approach of generating fission gas in the fuel matrix is described. A sensitivity study on parameters is presented, including sodium bond & diffusion coefficient sensitivity along with dt sensitivity. Finally, results of some coupled simulations are shown, with ideas about future work.

  16. Water–gas shift catalysis over transition metals supported on molybdenum carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiwalya, Sabnis D; Cui, Yanran; Akatay, M. Cem; Shekhar, Mayank; Lee, Wen-Sheng; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    We report here that WGS rates per total surface area at 120 degrees C, 7% CO, 22% H2O, 8.5% CO2, 37% H-2 for Pt, Au, Pd and Ni supported over MO2C were 4-8 times higher than those of the commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. In agreement with previous literature, the WGS rate per total moles of Pt over Pt/MO2C at 120 degrees C has been shown to be higher than on any Pt/Metal oxide catalyst. We have made use of systematic changes in the apparent kinetic parameters with various admetals (decrease in apparent CO order and apparent activation energy and increase in apparent H2O order compared to unpromoted MO2C) to conclude that the function of the rate-promoting admetals is to enhance the relative surface concentration of the adsorbed CO, thereby leading to a promotion in the WGS rate per total surface area of the catalyst. Temperature programmed desorption of CO was used to show that the CO adsorption properties of MO2C were modified by the various admetals by creating new metallic sites. In situ X-ray absorption on Pt and Au and STEM-EELS experiments showed that the supported Au nanoparticles over MO2C decrease in average particle size from similar to 9 nm to 3 nm after a 600 degrees C carburization pretreatment. Pt was also shown to have assumed a stable structure at 600 degrees C in the form of a Pt-Mo alloy. We suggest that MO2C can be used to synthesize thermally robust supported metal catalysts.

  17. Persistent Luminescence Hole-Type Materials by Design: Transition-Metal-Doped Carbon Allotrope and Carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bingyan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Rulong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Li, Liang

    2016-03-02

    Electron traps play a crucial role in a wide variety of compounds of persistent luminescence (PL) materials. However, little attention has been placed on the hole-trap-type PL materials. In this study, a novel hole-dominated persistent luminescence (PL) mechanism is predicted. The mechanism is validated in the night pearl diamond (NPD) composed of lonsdaleite with ultralong persistent luminescence (PL) (more than 72 h). The computed band structures suggest that the Fe ion dopant in lonsdaleite is responsible for the luminescence of NPD due to the desired defect levels within the band gap for electronic transition. Other possible impurity defects in lonsdaleite, such as K, Ca, Mg, Zn, or Tl dopants, or C vacancy can also serve as the hole-trap centers to enhance the PL. Among other 3d transition-metal-ion dopants considered, Cr and Mn ions are predicted to give rise to PL property. The predicted PL mechanism via transition-metal doping of lonsdaleite offers an exciting opportunity for engineering new PL materials by design.

  18. Electronic, thermal, and superconducting properties of metal nitrides (MN) and metal carbides (MC) (M=V, Nb, Ta) compounds by first principles studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhashree, G.; Sankar, S.; Krithiga, R. [Anna Univ., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India). Condensed Matter Lab.

    2015-07-01

    Structural, electronic, and superconducting properties of carbides and nitrides of vanadium (V), niobium (Nb), and tantalum (Ta) (group V transition elements) have been studied by computing their electronic band structure characteristics. The electronic band structure calculations have been carried out based on the density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) by using the tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method. The NaCl-type cubic structures of MN and MC (M=V, Nb, Ta) compounds have been confirmed from the electronic total energy minimum of these compounds. The ground state properties, such as equilibrium lattice constant (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B), and Wigner-Seitz radius (S{sub 0}) are determined and compared with available data. The electronic density of states reveals the metallic nature of the chosen materials. The electronic specific heat coefficient, Debye temperature, and superconducting transition temperature obtained from the band structure results are found to agree well with the earlier reported literature.

  19. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-10-26

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

  20. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare these materials lead to bulk or micron size powder which limits their use in reactions in particular in catalytic applications. Attempts toward the production of transition metal carbide and nitride nanoparticles in a sustainable, simple and cheap manner have been rapidly increasing. In this thesis, a new approach was presented to prepare nano-scale transition metal carbides and nitrides of group IV-VI with a size as small as 3 nm through the reaction of transition metal precursor with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) that not only provides confined spaces for nanoparticles formation but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the transition metal precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2, and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The results indicated that different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen by changing the reaction temperatures. Two forms of tantalum nitride, namely TaN and Ta3N5, were selectively formed under N2 and NH3 flow, respectively. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen where high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide

  1. The coloring problem in the solid-state metal boride carbide ScB{sub 2}C{sub 2}. A theoretical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassoued, Souheila [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques; Universite Kasdi Merbah-Ouargla (Algeria). Faculte des Mathematiques et des Sciences de la Matiere; Boucher, Benoit [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik Fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Boutarfaia, Ahmed [Universite Kasdi Merbah-Ouargla (Algeria). Faculte des Mathematiques et des Sciences de la Matiere; Gautier, Regis; Halet, Jean-Francois [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of the layered ternary metal boride carbide ScB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, the structure of which consists of B/C layers made of fused five- and seven-membered rings alternating with scandium sheets, are analyzed. In particular, the respective positions of the B and C atoms (the so-called coloring problem) are tackled using density functional theory, quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and electron localizability indicator calculations. Results reveal that (i) the most stable coloring minimizes the number of B-B and C-C contacts and maximizes the number of boron atoms in the heptagons, (ii) the compound is metallic in character, and (iii) rather important covalent bonding occurs between the metallic sheets and the boron-carbon network.

  2. Influence of gas environment on synthesis of silicon carbide and some carbides and carbonitrides of d-group transition metals through reaction between metal powders and amorphous carbon powders in a solar furnace at P.S.A. (plataforma solar de Almeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, D.; Rodriguez, J. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, PSA, Centro Europeo de Ensayos de Energia Solar, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Tabernas (Spain); Guerra Rosa, L.; Cruz Fernandes, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IST, Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais, Lisboa (Portugal); Shohoji, N. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, INETI, Instituto de Materiais e Tecnologias de Producao, Dept. de Tecnologias de Producao, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-03-01

    Refractory carbides and carbonitrides including silicon carbide SiC, tungsten carbide WC, titanium carbide TiC{sub x} (0.5metal powders and amorphous carbon powders through heating in a solar furnace under controlled atmosphere (Ar or N{sub 2}). Under irradiation of the solar energy flux 1,350 kW/m{sup 2} (ca. 1650 deg C in terms of measured temperature) for 30 min in Ar atmosphere, Si, W and Ti were converted to SiC, WC and TiC{sub x}, respectively. By the similar reaction undertaken in N{sub 2} atmosphere, Si and W were converted to SiC and WC, respectively, but carbonitride TiC{sub x}N{sub y} formed from Ti. No special influence of atmosphere was detected on the WC formation, but conversion to SiC from Si was somewhat retarded in N{sub 2} atmosphere. In either Ar or N{sub 2} atmosphere, progress of graphitization of amorphous carbon was not detectable by X-ray diffraction analysis in the reaction with Si and Ti but graphitization of amorphous carbon appeared to be significantly accelerated in the reaction with W. (authors)

  3. Synthesis, characterization and thermoelectric properties of metal borides, boron carbides and carbaborides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und thermoelektrische Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride, Borcarbide und Carbaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersoy, Murat

    2015-07-06

    This work reports on the solid state synthesis and structural and thermoelectrical characterization of hexaborides (CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}), diboride dicarbides (CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), a carbaboride (NaB{sub 5}C) and composites of boron carbide. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction methods and Rietveld refinements based on structure models from literature. Most of the compounds were densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. As high-temperature thermoelectric properties the Seebeck coefficients, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusivities and heat capacities were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. ZT values as high as 0.5 at 1273 K were obtained for n-type conducting EuB{sub 6}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction also confirmed its thermal stability. The solid solutions Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} and Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) are also n-type but did not show better ZT values for the ternary compounds compared to the binaries, but for CaB{sub 6} the values of the figure of merit (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were significantly increased (ca. 50 %) compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. Sodium carbaboride, NaB{sub 5}C, was found to be the first p-type thermoelectric material that crystallizes with the hexaboride-structure type. Seebeck coefficients of ca. 80 μV . K{sup -1} were obtained. Cerium diboride dicarbide, CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, and lanthanum diboride dicarbide, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, are metallic. Both compounds were used as model compounds to develop compacting strategies for such layered borides. Densities obtained at 50 MPa were determined to be higher than 90 %. A new synthesis route using single source precursors that contain boron and carbon was developed to open the access to new metal-doped boron carbides. It was possible to obtain boron carbide, but metal-doping could not be

  4. Electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell system for seasonal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Lund, P.D.; Tolonen, J.S. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Engineering Physics and Mathematics Dept., Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    A small-scale seasonal energy storage system, comprising an electrolyser, metal hydride hydrogen store and fuel cell, has been studied. According to the feasibility study, solid polymer electrolysers and fuel cells are the best options for the electrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell energy storage systems. A round-trip efficiency of 30% has already been demonstrated, and the next target is to reach a round-trip efficiency close to 40%. The electyrolyser-metal hydride-fuel cell systems are suitable for small-scale self-sufficient applications in which high volumetric capacity is needed and safety aspects are appreciated. (Author)

  5. Developing scandium and zirconium containing aluminum boron carbide metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jing

    The study presented in this thesis focuses on developing castable, precipitation-strengthened Al--B4C metal matrix composites (MMCs) for high temperature applications. In the first part, B4C plates were immersed in liquid aluminum alloyed with Sc, Zr and Ti to investigate the interfacial reactions between B4C and liquid aluminum The influences of Sc, Zr and Ti on the interfacial microstructure in terms of individual and combined additions were examined. Results reveal that all three elements reacted with B4C and formed interfacial layers that acted as a diffusion barrier to limit the decomposition of B4C in liquid aluminum. The interfacial reactions and the reaction products in each system were identified. With the combined addition of Sc, Zr and Ti, most of the Ti was found to enrich at the interface, which not only offered appropriate protection of the B4C but also reduced the consumption of Sc and Zr at the interface. In the second part, Sc and Zr were introduced into Al-15vol.% B 4C composites presaturated by Ti, and eight experimental composites with different Sc and Zr levels were prepared via a conventional casting technique. It was found that Sc was involved in the interfacial reactions with B 4C that partially consume Sc. The Sc addition yielded considerable precipitation strengthening in the as-cast and peak aged conditions. To achieve an equivalent strengthening effect of Sc in binary Al-Sc alloys, approximately double the amount of Sc is required in Al-B4C composites. On the contrary, no major Zr reaction products were found at the interfaces and the major part of Zr remained in the matrix for the precipitation strengthening. The combination of Sc and Zr enhanced sthe precipitation strengthening. Two kinds of nanoscale precipitates, Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr), were found in the as-cast microstructure and contributed to the increase in the matrix hardness. In the third part, all the experimental composites were isothermally aged at 300, 350, 400 and 450

  6. N-Reactor (U-metal) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Larry Lorin

    2000-05-01

    DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into nine characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments, and total fuel and fissile mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. Additionally, the criticality analysis will also require data to support design of the canister internals, thermal, and radiation shielding. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and provide in a concise format, material and information/data needed to perform supporting analyses to qualify N-Reactor fuels for acceptance into the designated repository. The N Reactor fuels incorporate zirconium cladding and uranium metal with unique fabrication details in terms of physical size, and method of construction. The fuel construction and post-irradiation handling have created attendant issues relative to cladding failure in the underwater storage environment. These fuels were comprised of low-enriched metal (0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235U) that were originally intended to generate weapons-grade plutonium for national defense. Modifications in subsequent fuel design and changes in the mode of reactor operation in later years were focused more toward power production.

  7. Combustion Front Dynamics in the Combustion Synthesis of Refractory Metal Carbides and Di-borides using Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong,J.; Larson, E.; Waide, P.; Frahm, R.

    2006-01-01

    A compact diffraction-reaction chamber, using a 2-inch photodiode array detector, has been employed to investigate the chemical dynamics at the combustion front of a selected series of refractory metal carbides and di-borides from their constituent element reactants as well as binary products from B4C as a reactant. These systems are denoted as (i) M + C {yields} MC; (ii) M + 2B {yields} MB{sub 2}; and (iii) 3M + B{sub 4}C {yields} 2MB{sub 2} + MC, where M = Ti, Zr, Nb, Hf or Ta. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction using intense synchrotron radiation at frame rates up to 10 frames s{sup -1} (or 100 ms frame{sup -1}) was employed. The combustion reactions were found to complete within 200-400 ms. In contrast to the Ta + C {yields} TaC combustion system studied earlier, in which a discernible intermediate sub-carbide phase was first formed, reacted further and disappeared to yield the final TaC product, no intermediate sub-carbide or sub-boride was detected in the current systems. Combustion for the Ti, Zr and Hf systems involved a liquid phase, in which the adiabatic temperatures T{sub ad} are well above the melting points of the respective reactant metals and have a typical combustion front velocity of 5-6 mm s{sup -1}. The Nb and Ta systems have lower T{sub ad}, involving no liquid phase. These are truly solid combustion systems and have a lower combustion front velocity of 1-2 mm s{sup -1}. The current study opens up a new avenue to chemical dynamics and macrokinetic investigations of high-temperature solid-state reactions.

  8. Thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of uranium and plutonium carbides under extreme conditions is essential for designing a new metallic fuel materials for next generation of a nuclear reactor. The present work is devoted to the study of the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting/freezing temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and normal total emissivity are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range. It is shown that the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of uranium carbide have a slight difference during liquid-to-solid transition. Unlike UC, such a difference between these ...

  9. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  10. Pressure and temperature effects on NaCl-type transition metal carbide from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai Zhangyin, E-mail: zhangyinz@sina.co [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low-Dimensional Materials and School of Physics and Electronic Electrical Engineering, Huaiyin Normal University, Huaian 223300 (China); Peng Ju; Zuo Fen; Ma Chunlin; Cheng Ju; Chen Guibin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low-Dimensional Materials and School of Physics and Electronic Electrical Engineering, Huaiyin Normal University, Huaian 223300 (China); Chen Dong [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The structural and thermal properties of titanium carbide at high temperatures and high pressures are investigated using the ultrasoft pseudopotentials within the generalized gradient approximation in the framework of first-principles. The bulk ground-state characters such as lattice constants, Poisson's ratios, elastic constants, shear moduli and Young's moduli are calculated. It shows that the elastic constants of the titanium carbide crystal are well consistent with the experimental data under ambient conditions. The bulk modulus of titanium carbide as a function of applied temperature is presented. Besides, the phonon dispersion curves of TiC are obtained along the main symmetry directions. The calculated phonon density of states suggests that the motion of C atoms is confined to optic branches while the vibrations of Ti atoms belong to acoustic branches. To complete the fundamental characteristics of this crystal we have investigated the coefficients of thermal expansion, isochoric heat capacities and elastic moduli of titanium carbide in the whole temperature range from 0 to 2000 K and pressure range from 0 to 45 GPa. These results are in favourable agreement with previous theoretical works and the existing experimental data.

  11. The electrical characteristics of a 4H-silicon carbide metal-insulator-semiconductor structure with Al2O3 as the gate dielectric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li; Yang Yin-Tang; Ma Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    A 4H-silicon carbide metal-insulator-semiconductor structure with ultra-thin Al2O3 as the gate dielectric,deposited by atomic layer deposition on the epitaxial layer of a 4H-SiC (0001) 8(0)N-/N+ substrate,has been fabricated.The experimental results indicate that the prepared ultra-thin Al2O3 gate dielectric exhibits good physical and electrical characteristics,including a high breakdown electrical field of 25 MV/cm,excellent interface properties (1 × 1014 cm-2)and low gate-leakage current (IG =1 × 10-3 A/cm-2(o)Eox =8 MV/cm).Analysis of the current conduction mechanism on the deposited Al2O3 gate dielectric was also systematically performed.The confirmed conduction mechanisms consisted of Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling,the Frenkel-Poole mechanism,direct tunneling and Schottky emission,and the dominant current conduction mechanism depends on the applied electrical field.When the gate leakage current mechanism is dominated by FN tunneling,the barrier height of SiC/Al2O3 is 1.4 eV,which can meet the requirements of silicon carbide metal-insulator-semiconductor transistor devices.

  12. Report on FY16 Low-dose Metal Fuel Irradiation and PIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, Philip D.

    2016-09-01

    This report gives an overview of the efforts into the low-dose metal fuel irradiation and PIE as part of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) milestone M3FT-16OR020303031. The current status of the FCT and FCRP irradiation campaigns are given including a description of the materials that have been irradiated, analysis of the passive temperature monitors, and the initial PIE efforts of the fuel samples.

  13. A metallic interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Diane Mildred

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrochemically converts the chemical energy of reaction into electrical energy. The commercial success of planar, SOFC stack technology has a number of challenges, one of which is the interconnect that electrically and physically connects the cathode of one cell to the anode of an adjacent cell in the SOFC stack and in addition, separates the anodic and cathodic gases. An SOFC stack operating at intermediate temperatures, between 600°C and 800°C, can utilize a metallic alloy as an interconnect material. Since the interconnect of an SOFC stack must operate in both air and fuel environments, the oxidation kinetics, adherence and electronic resistance of the oxide scales formed on commercial alloys were investigated in air and wet hydrogen under thermal cycling conditions to 800°C. The alloy, Haynes 230, exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics and the lowest area-specific resistance as a function of oxidation time of all the alloys in air at 800°C. However, the area-specific resistance of the oxide scale formed on Haynes 230 in wet hydrogen was unacceptably high after only 500 hours of oxidation, which was attributed to the high resistivity of Cr2O3 in a reducing atmosphere. A study of the electrical conductivity of the minor phase manganese chromite, MnXCr3-XO4, in the oxide scale of Haynes 230, revealed that a composition closer to Mn2CrO4 had significantly higher electrical conductivity than that closer to MnCr 2O4. Haynes 230 was coated with Mn to form a phase closer to the Mn2CrO4 composition for application on the fuel side of the interconnect. U.S. Patent No. 6,054,231 is pending. Although coating a metallic alloy is inexpensive, the stringent economic requirements of SOFC stack technology required an alloy without coating for production applications. As no commercially available alloy, among the 41 alloys investigated, performed to the specifications required, a new alloy was created and designated DME-A2. The oxide scale

  14. Nano-molybdenum carbide/carbon nanotubes composite as bifunctional anode catalyst for high-performance Escherichia coli-based microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqiong; Li, Bin; Cui, Dan; Xiang, Xingde; Li, Weishan

    2014-01-15

    A novel electrode, carbon felt-supported nano-molybdenum carbide (Mo2C)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite, was developed as platinum-free anode of high performance microbial fuel cell (MFC). The Mo2C/CNTs composite was synthesized by using the microwave-assisted method with Mo(CO)6 as a single source precursor and characterized by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The activity of the composite as anode electrocatalyst of MFC based on Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and cell discharge test. It is found that the carbon felt electrode with 16.7 wt% Mo Mo2C/CNTs composite exhibits a comparable electrocatalytic activity to that with 20 wt% platinum as anode electrocatalyst. The superior performance of the developed platinum-free electrode can be ascribed to the bifunctional electrocatalysis of Mo2C/CNTs for the conversion of organic substrates into electricity through bacteria. The composite facilitates the formation of biofilm, which is necessary for the electron transfer via c-type cytochrome and nanowires. On the other hand, the composite exhibits the electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hydrogen, which is the common metabolite of E. coli.

  15. Atomic and molecular adsorption on transition-metal carbide (111) surfaces from density-functional theory: a trend study of surface electronic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Ruberto, C.; Lundqvist, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    This study explores atomic and molecular adsorption on a number of early transition-metal carbides (TMCs) in NaCl structure by means of density-functional theory calculations. The investigated substrates are the TM-terminated TMC(111) surfaces, of interest because of the presence of different types......, surface relaxations, Bader charges, and surface-localized densities of states (DOSs). Detailed comparisons between surface and bulk DOSs reveal the existence of transition-metal localized SRs (TMSRs) in the pseudogap and of several C-localized SRs (CSRs) in the upper valence band on all considered TMC(111......C, delta-MoC, TaC, and WC (in NaCl structure) and the adsorbates H, B, C, N, O, F, NH, NH2, and NH3. Trends in adsorption strength are explained in terms of surface electronic factors, by correlating the calculated adsorption-energy values with the calculated surface electronic structures. The results...

  16. The friction and wear of metals and binary alloys in contact with an abrasive grit of single-crystal silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various metals and iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with single-crystal silicon carbide riders. Results indicate that the coefficient of friction and groove height (corresponding to the wear volume) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. The coefficient of friction and groove height generally decrease with an increase in solute content of binary alloys. A separate correlation exists between the solute to iron atomic radius ratio and the decreasing rates of change of coefficient of friction and groove height with increasing solute content. These rates of change are minimum at a solute to iron radius ratio of unity. They increase as the atomic ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity. The correlations indicate that atomic size is an important parameter in controlling friction and wear of alloys.

  17. Metal sorbents for high temperature mercury capture from fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Poulston; Evan J. Granite; Henry W. Pennline; Christina R. Myers; Dennis P. Stanko; Hugh Hamilton; Liz Rowsell; Andrew W.J. Smith; Thomas Ilkenhans; Wilson Chu [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    We have determined the effect of a pre-sulphiding treatment on the Hg removal capacities of Pt and Pd supported on alumina at a range of different metal loadings from 2 to 9wt% using Hg vapour in a simulated fuel gas feed. In the temperature range studied (204-288{sup o}C) Pd proved far superior to Pt for Hg removal and the sulphur pre-treatment led to a considerable increase in the Hg adsorption capacity. The Hg removal capacity for Pd increased with metal loading though decreased with sorbent temperature. A shift in the 2 Theta position of the Pd XRD diffraction peak from 82.1 to 79.5{sup o} after Hg adsorption at 204{sup o}C in the absence of a sulphur pre-treatment was consistent with the formation of a solid solution of Hg in Pd, with the sulphur pre-treatment the Pd related XRD peaks occur at even lower 2 Theta position suggesting a different Pd-Hg phase is formed. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  19. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bucknor, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  20. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  1. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  2. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  3. Effects of surface oxygen on charge storage in high surface area early transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djire, Abdoulaye; Ajenifujah, Olabode T.; Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Rasmussen, Paul; Thompson, Levi T.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surface oxygen on the physical and electrochemical properties of high surface area Mo, V and W carbides and nitrides has been investigated. These materials hold promise for use in supercapacitors and other electrochemical conversion devices. The carbides and nitrides were synthesized using a temperature programmed reaction method and passivated to avoid bulk oxidation on exposure to air. The passivated materials were activated in 0.3 mol dm-3 NaOH solution to remove the oxygen-rich passivation layer. This activation resulted in significant changes in the electrochemical stabilities and capacitances. The surface areas for the Mo and W-based materials were higher after activation, with the effect ranging from an 11% increase for Mo2N to a 208% increase for W2C. An increase in pore volume and mesopore density was also observed for most of the materials. Interestingly, the VC and W2C, which were electrochemically unstable in acidic electrolyte in their passivated form, were stable after activation. The capacitances of all of the materials were increased after activation with the effect ranging from 48% for Mo2N to a 79% increase for (α + β)-Mo2C. This activation process could be used to improve the performance of carbide and nitride-based supercapacitor electrode materials.

  4. The basic research on the CDA initiation phase for a metallic fuel FBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Go; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Kawada, Ken-ichi; Niwa, Hazime

    1998-03-01

    A metallic fuel with novel design has received great deal of interest recently as an option of advanced fuel to be substituted MOX fuel, however, the behavior at the transient has not been studied in many aspects. Therefore, for the purpose to show the basic tendency of the behavior and released energy at CDA (core disruptive accident) for a metallic fuel FBR and to prepare the basic knowledge for consideration of the adoption of the advanced fuel, Tohoku University and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have made a joint research entitled. (1) Target and Results of analysis: The accident initiator considered is a LOF accident with ATWS. The LOF analysis was performed for a metallic fuel 600 MWe homogeneous two region core at the beginning of cycle, both for an ordinary metallic fuel core and for a metallic fuel core with ZrH pins. It was necessary mainly to change the constants of input parameters to apply the code for the analysis of a metallic fueled reactor. These changes were made by assuming appropriate models. Basic LOF cases and all blackout case that assumed using electromagnetic pumps were analyzed. The results show that the basic LOF cases for a metallic fuel core and all the cases for a metallic fuel core with ZrH pins could be avoided to become prompt-critical, and mildly transfer to the transient phase. (2) Improvement of CDA initiation phase analysis code: At present, it is difficult for the code to adapt to the large material movement to in the core at the transient. Therefore, the nuclear calculation model in the code was improved by using the adiabatic space dependent kinetics. The results of a sample case, that is a metallic fueled core at the beginning of cycle, show this improvement is appropriate. (3) Conclusion: The behavior at CDA of a metallic fueled core of a fast reactor was analyzed using the CDA initiation phase analysis code and the knowledge of the important characteristics at the CDA initiation phase was obtained

  5. Carbide Identification in Different Regions of a Thin Metal Film Covering on an HPHT As-Grown Diamond Single Crystal from Ni-Mn-C System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin; CUI Jian-Jun; LI Mu-Sen; LI Cheng-Mei; CHU Fu-Min; FENG Li-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ Diamond single crystals were synthesized in the presence of Ni-Mn catalyst under high temperature and high pressure (HPHT). A thin metal film covering on as-grown diamond formed during diamond growth was examined using transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that phase compositions of the region near the as-grown diamond are different from those of other regions in the film. We found γ-(Ni,Mn) solid solution, diamond, Ni3C and Mn23C6 in the region near the as-grown diamond, while graphite, Mn7C3 and γ-(Ni,Mn) could be found in other regions of the film. The relationship between the diamond growth and the carbides in the film was analysed briefly. It is suggested that the carbon source for diamond growth should be closely related to the decomposition of carbides in the region near the diamond single crystal at HPHT, not being directly from that of the graphite structure.

  6. Experimental Specifications for the Liquidus and the Solidus temperature of the Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. O.; Cho, C. H.; Lee, Y. B.; Ryu, H. J

    2008-01-15

    There are some phenomenological uncertainties for partial or whole core melting of Sodium-cooled fast reactor with the metal fuel. Especially, the major phenomenology to be experimentally resolved is the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above-core and below-core structures and possibly in inter-subassembly spaces. For suspect to these phenomenological uncertainties, we are required to understand characteristic behavior of molten fuel. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling that is one of the technical issue for safety of Gen IV SFR is an essential condition to solve the problem of in vessel retention of the core debris. For these sequences, experimental data for liquidus/solidus temperature and mobilization temperature of metal fuel are required essentially. In this study, review of the technical status on the liquidus/solidus temperature of metal fuel was carried out to investigate the behavior of liquidus/solidus/relocation of metal fuel. Also, the experimental specifications for the liquidus/solidus temperature of metal fuel were established.

  7. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  8. Studies on PEM Fuel Cell Noble Metal Catalyst Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Incredibly vast advance has been achieved in fuel cell technology regarding to catalyst efficiency, improvement of electrolyte conductivity and optimization of cell system. With breathtakingly accelerating progress, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) is the most promising and most widely...

  9. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, R I; Dayman, K J; Landsberger, S; Biegalski, S R; Soderquist, C Z; Casella, A J; Brady Raap, M C; Schwantes, J M

    2015-04-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared.

  10. Doped Graphene as Non-Metallic Catalyst for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana MARINOIU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aiming a commercial development of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC, a low cost, sustainable and high performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR with capability to replace/reduce rare metals, are high desirable. In this paper, we present a class of doped graphene, namely iodinated graphene with highly ORR electrochemical performances, synthesized by using the electrophilic substitution method. The prepared samples were characterized by different techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy XPS, Raman spectroscopy, surface area measurement by BET method, that revealed the structure and morphology. The most highly iodinated graphene was tested in a single cell by measuring the cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical performances were evaluated and compared with a typical PEMFC configuration, when a single cathodic peak at 0.2 V with a current density of – 3.67 mA cm-2 for the Pt/C electrode was obtained. The best electrochemical performances in terms of electrochemical active area, was obtained for a new concept of cathode composed from Pt/C – iodine doped graphene, when a well-defined peak centred at 0.23 V with a current density of approx. – 9.1 mA cm-2 was obtained, indicating a high catalytic activity for ORR.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.16216

  11. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  12. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  13. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  14. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at.% burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low melting points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). A model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  15. Metal-Element Compounds of Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium as Pyrotechnic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-04

    1-11 1 METAL-ELEMENT COMPOUNDS OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM , AND HAFNIUM AS PYROTECHNIC FUELS Anthony P. Shaw,* Rajendra K. Sadangi, Jay C...have started to explore the pyrotechnic properties of other inorganic compounds, particularly those of titanium, zirconium , and hafnium. The...The group 4 metals—titanium, zirconium , and hafnium—are potent pyrotechnic fuels. However, the metals themselves are often pyrophoric as fine

  16. The performance of 3500 MWth homogeneous and heterogeneous metal fueled core designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, R.; Yang, Shi-tien

    1987-11-01

    Performance parameters are calculated for a representative 3500 MWth homogeneous and a heterogeneous metal fueled reactor design. The equilibrium cycle neutronic characteristics, safety coefficients, control system requirements, and control rod worths are evaluated. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both configurations are also compared. The heavy metal fuel loading requirements and neutronic performance characteristics are also evaluated for the uranium startup option. 14 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Determination of a Jet Fuel Metal Deactivator by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Paul C. Hayes, Jr. Fuels Branch...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) High Performance Liquid Chromatography absorbance...SYMBOL HPLC High Performance Liquid Chromatography P-4 jet propulsion fuel, wide-boiling range, conforming to MIL-T-5624L MDA metal deactivator,

  18. Simulation of the impact of 3-D porosity distribution in metallic U-10Zr fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Di; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Stan, Marius; Bauer, Theodore H.; Wright, Arthur E.

    2014-05-01

    Evolution of porosity generated in metallic U-Zr fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactors leads to changes in fuel properties and impacts important phenomena such as heat transport and constituent redistribution. The porosity is generated as a result of the accumulation of fission gases and is affected by the possible bond sodium infiltration into the fuel. Typically, the impact of porosity development on properties, such as thermal conductivity, is accounted for through empirical correlations that are dependent on porosity and infiltrated sodium fractions. Currently available simulation tools make it possible to take into account fuel 3-D porosity distributions, potentially eliminating the need for such correlations. This development allows for a more realistic representation of the porosity evolution in metallic fuel and creates a framework for truly mechanistic fuel development models. In this work, COMSOL multi-physics simulation platform is used to model 3-D porosity distributions and simulate heat transport in metallic U-10Zr fuel. Available experimental data regarding microstructural evolution of fuel that was irradiated in EBR-II and associated phase stability information are used to guide the simulation. The impact of changes in porosity characteristics on material properties is estimated and the results are compared with calculated temperature distributions. The simulations demonstrate the developed capability and importance of accounting for detailed porosity distribution features for accurate fuel performance evaluation.

  19. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  20. Research Situation and Application Prospects of Laser Cladding Metal-based Titanium Carbide Reinforced Coating%激光熔覆金属基碳化钛强化涂层的研究现状及应用前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺长林; 陈少克; 周中河; 陈琼雁; 舒俊

    2013-01-01

    介绍了激光熔覆金属基碳化钛的研究现状和应用进展.分别从直接熔覆碳化钛、原位合成碳化钛增强相及稀土对碳化钛增强相的改性作用三个方面介绍了其研究进展.从碳化钛的物理、化学性能出发,介绍了不同熔覆方法、不同熔覆粉末、不同基体对熔覆层组织和性能的影响.%The laser cladding metal based titanium carbide research present status and application development were introduced.The research progress from three respects separately:direct cladding titanium carbide,synthesis titanium carbide reinforcing phase,rare earth's modification on titanium carbide reinforced phase was introduced.From the physical and chemical properties of titanium carbide,the effects of cladding methods,cladding powders and substrates on the microstructure and properties of the cladding layer were introduced.

  1. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ki-Hwan Kim; Jong-Hwan Kim; Seok-Jin Oh; Jung-Won Lee; Ho-Jin Lee; Chan-Bock Lee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr...

  2. Metal membrane-type 25-kW methanol fuel processor for fuel-cell hybrid vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaesung; Lee, Seok-Min; Chang, Hyuksang

    A 25-kW on-board methanol fuel processor has been developed. It consists of a methanol steam reformer, which converts methanol to hydrogen-rich gas mixture, and two metal membrane modules, which clean-up the gas mixture to high-purity hydrogen. It produces hydrogen at rates up to 25 N m 3/h and the purity of the product hydrogen is over 99.9995% with a CO content of less than 1 ppm. In this fuel processor, the operating condition of the reformer and the metal membrane modules is nearly the same, so that operation is simple and the overall system construction is compact by eliminating the extensive temperature control of the intermediate gas streams. The recovery of hydrogen in the metal membrane units is maintained at 70-75% by the control of the pressure in the system, and the remaining 25-30% hydrogen is recycled to a catalytic combustion zone to supply heat for the methanol steam-reforming reaction. The thermal efficiency of the fuel processor is about 75% and the inlet air pressure is as low as 4 psi. The fuel processor is currently being integrated with 25-kW polymer electrolyte membrane fuel-cell (PEMFC) stack developed by the Hyundai Motor Company. The stack exhibits the same performance as those with pure hydrogen, which proves that the maximum power output as well as the minimum stack degradation is possible with this fuel processor. This fuel-cell 'engine' is to be installed in a hybrid passenger vehicle for road testing.

  3. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  4. High performance metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells with Gd-doped ceria barrier layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Nielsen, Jimmi; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells are believed to have commercial advantages compared to conventional anode (Ni–YSZ) supported cells, with the metal-supported cells having lower material costs, increased tolerance to mechanical and thermal stresses, and lower operational temperatures. The im...

  5. Manufacturing and characterization of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow Tullmar, Peter; Hjelm, Johan; Klemensø, Trine

    2011-01-01

    A metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell design offers competitive advantages, for example reduced material costs and improved robustness. This paper reports the performance and stability of a recently developed metal-supported cell design, based on a novel cermet anode, on a 25cm2 (1cm2/16cm2 act...

  6. Fuel cell life improved by metallic sinter activation after electrode assembly welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Technique improves the service life of fuel cell electrodes. The welding is done before the metallic sinter is activated by depositing finely divided metal within the sinter structure from a solution with corrosion inhibiting ions. The activator solution flows through the porous sinter while attached to the backup plate.

  7. Simplified process for leaching precious metals from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ); Matlin, Ramail (Berkeley Heights, NJ)

    2009-12-22

    The membrane electrode assemblies of fuel cells are recycled to recover the catalyst precious metals from the assemblies. The assemblies are cryogenically embrittled and pulverized to form a powder. The pulverized assemblies are then mixed with a surfactant to form a paste which is contacted with an acid solution to leach precious metals from the pulverized membranes.

  8. Anodic dissolution of irradiated metallic fuels in LiCl-KCl melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T.; Kato, T.; Rodrigues, A.; Ougier, M.; Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Electrorefining is the main step in pyro-process of spent nuclear fuels, where actinides are recovered and separated from fission products. In the present study, electrorefining of irradiated metallic fuels called METAPHIX-1 (U-19 wt%Pu-10 wt%Zr alloy irradiated at PHENIX reactor, approximate maximum burn-up 2.5 at%) was performed. A major focus was on minimization of Zr co-dissolution from spent metallic fuels to reduce the burden to the pyro-process. Based on the ICP-MS analysis results and the SEM-EDX observations, the anodic dissolution behavior of the irradiated metallic fuels and the mass balances of actinides and fission products during the electrorefining were evaluated.

  9. Anodic dissolution of irradiated metallic fuels in LiCl–KCl melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, T., E-mail: m-tsuyo@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Kato, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Rodrigues, A.; Ougier, M. [Joint Research Center–Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC–ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Komaeshi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.-P. [Joint Research Center–Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC–ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Electrorefining is the main step in pyro-process of spent nuclear fuels, where actinides are recovered and separated from fission products. In the present study, electrorefining of irradiated metallic fuels called METAPHIX-1 (U–19 wt%Pu–10 wt%Zr alloy irradiated at PHENIX reactor, approximate maximum burn-up 2.5 at%) was performed. A major focus was on minimization of Zr co-dissolution from spent metallic fuels to reduce the burden to the pyro-process. Based on the ICP-MS analysis results and the SEM–EDX observations, the anodic dissolution behavior of the irradiated metallic fuels and the mass balances of actinides and fission products during the electrorefining were evaluated.

  10. Nanotextured metal copper substrates as powerful and long-lasting fuel cell anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filanovsky, Boris; Granot, Eran; Dirawi, Rawi; Presman, Igor; Kuras, Iliya; Patolsky, Fernando

    2011-04-13

    Fuel cells (FCs) are promising electrochemical devices that convert chemical energy of fuels directly into electrical energy. We present a new anode material based on nanotextured metal copper for fuel cell applications. We have demonstrated that low-cost copper catalyst anodes act as highly efficient and ultra-long-lasting materials for the direct electro-oxidation of ammonia-borane and additional amine derivatives. High power densities of ca. 1W·cm(-2) (ca. -1 V vs Ag/AgCl at 1 A) are readily achieved at room temperature. We fabricate fuel cell devices based on our nanotextured Cu anodes in combination with commercial air cathodes.

  11. Nuclear Rocket Ceramic Metal Fuel Fabrication Using Tungsten Powder Coating and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. W.; Tucker, D. S.; Hone, L.; Cook, S.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is an enabling technology for crewed Mars missions. An investigation was conducted to evaluate spark plasma sintering (SPS) as a method to produce tungsten-depleted uranium dioxide (W-dUO2) fuel material when employing fuel particles that were tungsten powder coated. Ceramic metal fuel wafers were produced from a blend of W-60vol% dUO2 powder that was sintered via SPS. The maximum sintering temperatures were varied from 1,600 to 1,850 C while applying a 50-MPa axial load. Wafers exhibited high density (>95% of theoretical) and a uniform microstructure (fuel particles uniformly dispersed throughout tungsten matrix).

  12. Benchmark experiment for physics parameters of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, S.; Oigawa, H.; Sakurai, T.; Nemoto, T.; Okajima, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-09-01

    The calculated prediction for reactor physics parameters in a metallic-fueled LMFBR was tested using the benchmark experiments performed at FCA. The reactivity feedback parameters such as sodium void worth, Doppler reactivity worth and {sup 238}U-capture-to-{sup 239}Pu -fission ratio have been measured. The fuel expansion reactivity has also measured. Direct comparison with the results from similar oxide fuel assembly was made. Analysis was done with the JENDL-2 cross section library and JENDL-3.2. Prediction of reactor physics parameters with JENDL-3.2 in the metallic-fueled core agreed reasonably well with the measured values and showed similar trend to the results in the oxide fuel core. (author)

  13. A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core for high outlet-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamadate, Megumi; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Sugino, Kazuteru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2003-03-01

    A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core was performed. The new core concept studied here has low radial power peaking by applying three regions core configuration with different diameters of fuel pins and the same enrichment of plutonium. The core reveals constant radial power distribution during nominal power operation, which gives the advantage of low cladding maximum temperature or high core outlet temperature with a cladding limit temperature. The core thermal hydraulic design shows that a core outlet temperature as high as that of the oxide fuel core is feasible even in the application of metal fuel pins, which have a lower cladding limit temperature than oxide fuel pins. The core concept is possible to have additional attractiveness such as high breeding ratio, high burnup, and long-term operation cycle due to its high internal conversion ratio. (author)

  14. Application of Ceramic Bond Coating for Reusable Melting Crucible of Metallic Fuel Slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Ko, Young-Mo; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki-Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel slugs of the driver fuel assembly have been fabricated by injection casting of the fuel alloys under a vacuum state or an inert atmosphere. Traditionally, metal fuel such as a U-Zr alloy system for SFR has been melted in slurry-coated graphite crucibles and cast in slurry-coated quartz tube molds to prevent melt/material interactions. Reactive coatings and porous coatings can be a source of melt contaminations, and fuel losses, respectively. Ceramic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TaC coating materials showed no penetration in the protective layer after a melt dipping test. However, the ceramic coating materials showed separations in the coating interface between the substrate and coating layer, or between the coating layer and fuel melt after the dipping test. All plasma-spray coated methods maintained a sound coating state after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr melt. A single coating Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(150) layer and double coating layer of TaC(50)-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100), showed a sound state or little penetration in the protective layer after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE melt. Injection casting experiments of U-10wt.%Zr and U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been performed to investigate the feasibility of a reusable crucible of the metal fuel slugs. U–10wt.%Zr and U–10wt.%Zr–5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been soundly fabricated without significant interactions of the graphite crucibles. Thus, the ceramic plasma-spray coatings are thought to be promising candidate coating methods for a reusable graphite crucible to fabricate metal fuel slugs.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Laboratories

    2012-06-27

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  16. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  17. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  18. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Bastidas, David

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects....

  19. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  20. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)); Bagley, K.Q. (AEA Reactor Services, Risley (United Kingdom)); Crittenden, G.C. (AEA Reactor Services, Dounreay (United Kingdom)); Dievoet, J. van (Belgonucleaire, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-09-01

    The first fast breeder eactors, constructed in the 1945-1960 time period, used metallic fuels composed of uranium, plutonium, or their alloys. They were chosen because most existing reactor operating experience had been obtained on metallic fuels and because they provided the highest breeding ratios. Difficulties in obtaining adequate dimensional stability in metallic fuel elements under conditions of high fuel burnup led in the 1960s to the virtual worldwide choice of ceramic fuels. Although ceramic fuels provide lower breeding performance, this objective is no longer an important consideration in most national programs. Mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide became the ceramic fuel that has received the widest use. The more advanced ceramic fuels, mixed uranium and plutonium carbides and nitrides, continue under development. More recently, metal fuel elements of improved design have joined ceramic fuels in achieving goal burnups of 15 to 20 percent. Low-swelling fuel cladding alloys have also been continuously developed to deal with the unexpected problem of void formation in stainless steels subjected to fast neutron irradiation, a phenomenon first observed in the 1960s. (orig.)

  1. Measurements of Total Hemispherical Emissivity of Several Stably Oxidized Nickel-Titanium Carbide Cemented Hard Metals from 600 F to 1,600 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, William R.; Casey, F. W., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    The total hemispherical emissivity of several nickel-titanium carbide cemented hard metals have been measured over a temperature range from 600 F to l,600 F. A variety of cemented hard metals were obtained from the Kennametal Corporation. A brief discussion of the apparatus employed and the procedures used for this investigation is included. The results of the tests of specimens in the as-received and polished states indicate a nearly constant emissivity for each material tested over the temperature range considered and only slight differences in emissivity values for the different materials. Values obtained on the stably oxidized specimens range from 0.90 to 0.94 at 6000 F and o.88 to 0.92 at 1,600 F for the as-received specimens and from 0.82 to 0.89 at 600 F and 0.85 to 0.87 at 1,600 F for the polished specimens. The surface analysis of the oxidized materials as obtained by X-ray diffraction methods and metallographic techniques are presented as an aid to reproducing the surface on which these measurements were made.

  2. Constituent Redistribution in U-Zr Metallic Fuel Using the Advanced Fuel Performance Code BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Previous work done by Galloway, et. al. on EBR-II ternary (U-Pu-Zr) fuel constituent redistribution yielded accurate simulation data for the limited data sets of Zr redistribution. The data sets included EPMA scans of two different irradiated rods. First, T179, which was irradiated to 1.9 at% burnup, was analyzed. Second, DP16, which was irradiated to 11 at% burnup, was analyzed. One set of parameters that most accurately represented the zirconium profiles for both experiments was determined. Since the binary fuel (U-Zr) has previously been used as the driver fuel for sodium fast reactors (SFR) as well as being the likely driver fuel if a new SFR is constructed, this same process has been initiated on the binary fuel form. From limited binary EPMA scans as well as other fuel characterization techniques, it has been observed that zirconium redistribution also occurs in the binary fuel, albeit at a reduced rate compared to observation in the ternary fuel, as noted by Kim et. al. While the rate of redistribution has been observed to be slower, numerous metallographs of U-Zr fuel show distinct zone formations.

  3. Review of the Technical Status on the Liquidus and the Solidus temperature of the Metallic Fuel for Liquid Metal Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, C. H.; Lee, B. O.; Jeong, H. Y.; Lee, Y. B

    2007-09-15

    There are some phenomenological uncertainties for partial or whole core melting of Sodium-cooled fast reactor with the metal fuel. Especially, the major phenomenology to be experimentally resolved is the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above-core and below-core structures and possibly in inter-subassembly spaces. For suspect to these phenomenological uncertainties, we are required to understand characteristic behavior of molten fuel. Also, proof of the capacity of the debris bed cooling that is one of the technical issue for safety of Gen IV SFR is an essential condition to solve the problem of in-vessel retention of the core debris. For these sequences, experimental data for liquidus/solidus temperature and mobilization temperature of metal fuel are required essentially. In this study, review of the technical status on the liquidus/solidus temperature of metal fuel was carried out to investigate the behavior of liquidus/solidus/relocation of metal fuel.

  4. Volatile Elements Retention During Injection Casting of Metallic Fuel Slug for a Recycling Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kuk, Seoung-Woo; Keum, Chang-Woon; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The as-cast fuels prepared by injection casting were sound and the internal integrities were found to be satisfactory through gamma-ray radiography. U and Zr were uniform throughout the matrix of the slug, and the impurities, i.e., oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, satisfied the specification of the total impurities of less than 2000 ppm. The losses of the volatile Mn were effectively controlled using argon over pressures, and dynamic pumping for a period of time before injection showed no detrimental effect on the Mn loss by vaporization. This result suggests that volatile minor actinide-bearing fuels for SFRs can be prepared by improved injection methods. A practical process of metallic fuel fabrication for an SFR needs to be cost efficient, suitable for remote operation, and capable of mass production while reducing the amount of radioactive waste. Injection casting was chosen as the most promising technique, and this technique has been applied to fuel slug fabrication for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) driver and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel pins. Because of the simplistic nature of the process and equipment, compared to other processes examined, this process has been successfully used in a remote operation environment for fueling of the EBR-II reactor. In this study, several injection casting methods were applied in order to prepare metallic fuel for an fast reactor that control the transport of volatile elements during fuel melting and casting. Mn was selected as a surrogate alloy since it possesses a total vapor pressure equivalent to that of a volatile minor actinide-bearing fuel. U.10Zr and U.10Zr.5Mn (wt%) metallic fuels were injection cast under various casting conditions and their soundness was characterized.

  5. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting...... of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  6. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  7. Characterization of Irradiated Metal Waste from the Pyrometallurgical Treatment of Used EBR-II Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; K.C. Marsden; W.M. McCartin; S.M. Frank; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; T.S. Yoo; D. Vaden; D.G. Cummings; K.J. Bateman; J. J. Giglio; T. P. O' Holleran; P. A. Hahn; M. N. Patterson

    2013-03-01

    As part of the pyrometallurgical treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel, a metal waste stream is generated consisting primarily of cladding hulls laden with fission products noble to the electrorefining process. Consolidation by melting at high temperature [1873 K (1600 degrees C)] has been developed to sequester the noble metal fission products (Zr, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Te, and Pd) which remain in the iron-based cladding hulls. Zirconium from the uranium fuel alloy (U-10Zr) is also deposited on the hulls and forms Fe-Zr intermetallics which incorporate the noble metals as well as residual actinides during processing. Hence, Zr has been chosen as the primary indicator for consistency of the metal waste. Recently, the first production-scale metal waste ingot was generated and sampled to monitor Zr content for Fe-Zr intermetallic phase formation and validation of processing conditions. Chemical assay of the metal waste ingot revealed a homogeneous distribution of the noble metal fission products as well as the primary fuel constituents U and Zr. Microstructural characterization of the ingot confirmed the immobilization of the noble metals in the Fe-Zr intermetallic phase.

  8. Metallic Hydrogen: The Most Powerful Rocket Fuel Yet To Exist

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Cole, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metast...

  9. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data.

  10. Ca2LiC3H: a new complex carbide hydride phase grown in metal flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David A; Zaikina, Julia V; Lovingood, Derek D; Gedris, Thomas E; Latturner, Susan E

    2010-12-15

    The reaction of carbon and CaH2 in a calcium/lithium flux mixture produces crystals of the new compound Ca2LiC3H. This phase forms with a new structure type in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (a = 6.8236(1) Å, c = 3.7518(1) Å, Z = 2, R1 = 0.0151). This is a stuffed variant of the Cs2(NH2)N3 structure, containing hydride anions in octahedral sites; the structure determination by single-crystal X-ray diffraction surprisingly allowed the hydrogen to be detected. The Ca2LiC3H structure also features the rarely seen C3(4-) carbide anion; the protolysis reaction of this compound with ammonium chloride produces C3H4. The electronic properties of Ca2LiC3H were studied by quantum-chemical calculations including band structure and electron localization function (ELF) analysis; the phase is a charge-balanced semiconductor with a calculated band gap of 0.48 eV. This is in agreement with (7)Li, (13)C, and (1)H MAS NMR data, which show resonances in the ionic region instead of the Knight shifted region. ELF analysis of the theoretical nonhydrided Ca2LiC3 structure confirms the ability of these calculations to properly locate hydrides and supports the structural model based on X-ray diffraction data.

  11. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... of phosphates were systematically reviewed including solid acids or alkali hydrogen phosphates, pyrophosphates, and rare earth metal phosphates. Demonstration of the fuel cell technology based on solid acid proton conductor CsH2PO4 has inspired the active research in the area. Based on the literature survey...

  12. Ultra-rapid processing of refractory carbides; 20 s synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Simon R; Kingman, Sam; Gregory, Duncan H

    2007-02-21

    The microwave synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo(2)C, from carbon and either molybdenum metal or the trioxide has been achieved on unprecedented timescales; Ex- and in-situ characterisation reveals key information as to how the reaction proceeds.

  13. Modeling of Gap Closure in Uranium-Zirconium Alloy Metal Fuel - A Test Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Turner, John A [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    Uranium based binary and ternary alloy fuel is a possible candidate for advanced fast spectrum reactors with long refueling intervals and reduced liner heat rating [1]. An important metal fuel issue that can impact the fuel performance is the fuel-cladding gap closure, and fuel axial growth. The dimensional change in the fuel during irradiation is due to a superposition of the thermal expansion of the fuel due to heating, volumetric changes due to possible phase transformations that occur during heating and the swelling due to fission gas retention. The volumetric changes due to phase transformation depend both on the thermodynamics of the alloy system and the kinetics of phase change reactions that occur at the operating temperature. The nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles that contributes to fuel swelling is also influenced by the local fuel chemistry and the microstructure. Once the fuel expands and contacts the clad, expansion in the radial direction is constrained by the clad, and the overall deformation of the fuel clad assembly depends upon the dynamics of the contact problem. The neutronics portion of the problem is also inherently coupled with microstructural evolution in terms of constituent redistribution and phase transformation. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems have been defined with increasing complexity with the objective of capturing the fuel-clad interaction in complex fuels subjected to a wide range of irradiation and temperature conditions. The abstract, if short, is inserted here before the introduction section. If the abstract is long, it should be inserted with the front material and page numbered as such, then this page would begin with the introduction section.

  14. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  15. Improvement of reactivity coefficients of metallic fuel LMFBR by adding moderating material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, K. E-mail: ktsuji@omega.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Iwasaki, T.; Hirakawa, N.; Osugi, T.; Okajima, S.; Andoh, M

    2001-06-01

    For a metallic fuel liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied a core concept for improving the Doppler coefficient and the sodium void reactivity without much sacrificing the breeding ratio and the burnup reactivity loss. In the concept, several ordinary fuel pins in all fuel assemblies of a core are substituted by pins containing only zirconium hydride (ZrH). A parametric survey for the ZrH fraction from about 1 to about 5% was performed in this study to investigate the reactivity coefficients and the associated demerits in order to search the optimum fraction of ZrH. The metallic fuel core containing about 3% of ZrH showed the good results for all parameters. Following the parametric study, the effect of hydrogenous material in a metallic fuel core was experimentally confirmed. Doppler reactivity, sodium void reactivity and sample reactivity worths of plutonium and B{sub 4}C were measured in a series of critical experiment at FCA of JAERI. The experimental results showed that the hydrogenous material significantly improved the Doppler and the sodium void reactivities. Analysis of experimental results was performed to check the applicability of the present design codes for a fast reactor with hydrogenous materials.

  16. Economic Viability of Metallic Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Fuel in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates whether SFR metallic nuclear fuel can be economical. To make this determination, the cost of SFCF (SFR fuel cycle facilities was estimated, and the break-even point of the manufacturing cost of SFR metallic nuclear fuel for direct disposal option was then calculated. As a result of the cost estimation, the levelized unit cost (LUC for SFCF was calculated to be 5,311 $/kgHM, and the break-even point was calculated to be $5,267/kgHM. Therefore, the cost difference between LUC and the break-even point is not only small but is also within the relevant range of the uncertainty level of Class 3 in accordance with a generic cost estimate classification matrix of AACE (the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering. This means it is very difficult to judge the economical feasibility of SFR metallic nuclear fuel because as of today there are no commercial facilities in Korea or the world. The economic feasibility of SFR metallic nuclear fuel, however, will be enhanced if the mass production of SFCF becomes possible in the future.

  17. Current liquid metal cooled fast reactor concepts: use of the dry reprocess fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Jeong, C. J.; Yang, M. S

    2003-03-01

    Recent Liquid metal cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) concepts are reviewed for investigating the potential usability of the Dry Reprocess Fuel (DRF). The LFRs have been categorized into two different types: the sodium cooled and the lead cooled systems. In each category, overall design and engineering concepts are collected which includes those of S-PRISM, AFR300, STAR, ENHS and more. Specially, the nuclear fuel types which can be used in these LFRs, have been summarized and their thermal, physical and neutronic characteristics are tabulated. This study does not suggest the best-matching LFR for the DRF, but shows good possibility that the DRF fuel can be used in future LFRs.

  18. An evaluation of the metal fuel core performance for commercial FBR requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Neutronic and thermal hydraulic design studies are conducted on the 3,900 MWt and 800 MWt metal fuel fast breeder reactor (FBR) cores that achieve a high burnup of 150 GWd/t, which is considered to be one of the goals of future commercial FBRs. The results show that a large-scale metal fuel core with a homogeneous configuration is a promising design for future commercial FBRs from the view point of economics, core safety, effective use of uranium resources and reduction of environmental load. In small-scale high-burnup cores, a radial heterogeneous design that can improve neutronic performance and safety parameters is suitable. (author)

  19. Fission product release phenomena during core melt accidents in metal fueled heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, P G; Hyder, M L; Monson, P R; Randolph, H W [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Hagrman, D L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); McClure, P R; Leonard, M T [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)

    1990-01-01

    The phenomena that determine fission product release rates from a core melting accident in a metal-fueled, heavy water reactor are described in this paper. This information is obtained from the analysis of the current metal fuel experimental data base and from the results of analytical calculations. Experimental programs in place at the Savannah River Site are described that will provide information to resolve uncertainties in the data base. The results of the experiments will be incorporated into new severe accident computer codes recently developed for this reactor design. 47 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  1. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  2. Graphene supported non-precious metal-macrocycle catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells are promising alternative energy devices owing to their high efficiency and eco-friendliness. While platinum is generally used as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in a typical fuel cell, limited reserves and prohibitively high costs limit its future use. The development of non-precious and durable metal catalysts is being constantly conceived. Graphene has been widely used as a substrate for metal catalysts due to its unique properties, thus improving stability and ORR activities. In this feature, we present an overview on the electrochemical characteristics of graphene supported non-precious metal containing macrocycle catalysts that include metal porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives. Suggested research and future development directions are discussed.

  3. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the development of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.

  4. Optimisation of composite metallic fuel for minor actinide transmutation in an accelerator-driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenhove, W.; Sobolev, V.; Maschek, W.

    2011-09-01

    A potential option for neutralization of minor actinides (MA) accumulated in spent nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) is their transmutation in dedicated accelerator-driven systems (ADS). A promising fuel candidate dedicated to MA transmutation is a CERMET composite with Mo metal matrix and (Pu, Np, Am, Cm)O 2-x fuel particles. Results of optimisation studies of the CERMET fuel targeting to increasing the MA transmutation efficiency of the EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) core are presented. In the adopted strategy of MA burning the plutonium (Pu) balance of the core is minimized, allowing a reduction in the reactivity swing and the peak power form-factor deviation and an extension of the cycle duration. The MA/Pu ratio is used as a variable for the fuel optimisation studies. The efficiency of MA transmutation is close to the foreseen theoretical value of 42 kg TW -1 h -1 when level of Pu in the actinide mixture is about 40 wt.%. The obtained results are compared with the reference case of the EFIT core loaded with the composite CERCER fuel, where fuel particles are incorporated in a ceramic magnesia matrix. The results of this study offer additional information for the EFIT fuel selection.

  5. Investigation of Reactivity Feedback Mechanism of Axial and Radial Expansion Effect of Metal-Fueled Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Chi-Woong; Jeong, Tae-Kyung; Ha, Gi-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The major inherent reactivity feedback models for a ceramic fuel used in a conventional light water reactor are Doppler feedback and moderator feedback. The metal fuel has these two reactivity feedback mechanisms previously mentioned. In addition, the metal fuel has two more reactivity feedback models related to the thermal expansion phenomena of the metal fuel. Since the metal fuel has a good capability to expand according to the temperature changes of the core, two more feedback mechanisms exist. These additional two feedback mechanism are important to the inherent safety of metal fuel and can make metal-fueled SFR safer than oxide-fueled SFR. These phenomena have already been applied to safety analysis on design extended condition. In this study, the effect of these characteristics on power control capability was examined through a simple load change operation. The axial expansion mechanism is induced from the change of the fuel temperature according to the change of the power level of PGSFR. When the power increases, the fuel temperatures in the metal fuel will increase and then the reactivity will decrease due to the axial elongation of the metal fuel. To evaluate the expansion effect, 2 cases were simulated with the same scenario by using MMS-LMR code developed at KAERI. The first simulation was to analyze the change of the reactor power according to the change of BOP power without the reactivity feedback model of the axial and radial expansion of the core during the power transient event. That is to say, the core had only two reactivity feedback mechanism of Doppler and coolant temperature.

  6. An evaluation of sodium void reactivity for metal fuel FBR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Yokoo, Takeshi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    2000-07-01

    The sodium void reactivity in metal fuel FBR cores has been evaluated by a detailed method which takes into account the neutron streaming effects in the fuel subassemblies and the neutron transport corrections in whole-core systems. The neutron streaming effects caused by the heterogeneity of the fuel element structure or the coolant paths were evaluated on the basis of Benoist's anisotropic diffusion coefficient. We clarified that the sodium void reactivity is worth less than $8, even in the 1,000 MWe or 1,500 MWe-class large-scale cores. Further, we also found that, in the case of 1,500 MWe metal fuel FBRs recycling a few percent of minor actinide elements (MA), the sodium void reactivity does not exceed $10 with a suitable design that eliminates the upper and lower axial blankets. These results show that these metal fuel FBRs satisfy the safety criterion ($8-10) for avoiding the prompt criticality in the HCDA events. However, MA enrichment should be controlled to less than about two per cent, when the axial blanket is loaded to gain higher breeding performance. (author)

  7. Investigation of Novel Electrocatalysts for Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Ru:GDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmy; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical performance and stability of the planar metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (MS-SOFC) with two different electrocatalytically active materials, namely, Ni:GDC and Ru:GDC were investigated. Ru:GDC with an ASR of 0.322 Ωcm2 performed better than Ni:GDC with an ASR of 0.453 Ωc...

  8. Development and analysis of a metal-fueled accelerator-driven burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lypsch, F. [Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology, Juelich GmbH (Germany); Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the safety characteristics of an accelerator driven metal fueled fast system to a critical core on a consistent basis to determine how these characteristics are affected solely by subcritically of the system. To accomplish this an accelerator proton beam/tungsten neutron source model is surrounded by a subcritical blanket using metallic fuel and sodium as coolant. The consequences of typical accident transients, namely unprotected transient overpower (TOP), loss of heat sink (LOHS), and loss of flow (LOP) were calculated for the hybrid system and compared to corresponding results for a metal-fueled fast reactor. Results indicate that the subcritical system exhibits superior performance for TOP (reactivity-induced) transits; however, only in the critical system are reactivity feedbacks able to cause passive shutdown in the LOHS ad LOP events. Therefore, for a full spectrum of accident initiators considered, the overall safety behavior of accelerator-driven metal-fueled systems can neither be concluded to be worse nor to be better than advanced reactor designs which rely on passive safety features.

  9. Development and analysis of a metal-fueled accelerator-driven burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lypsch, F.; Hill, R. N.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the safety characteristics of an accelerator driven metal-fueled fast system to a critical core on a consistent basis to determine how these characteristics are affected solely by subcriticality of the system. To accomplish this, an accelerator proton beam/tungsten neutron source model is surrounded by a subcritical blanket using metallic fuel and sodium as coolant. The consequences of typical accident transients, namely unprotected transient overpower (TOP), loss of heat sink (LOHS), and loss of flow (LOF) were calculated for the hybrid system and compared to corresponding results for a metal-fueled fast reactor. Results indicate that the subcritical system exhibits superior performance for TOP (reactivity-induced) transients; however, only in the critical system are reactivity feedbacks able to cause passive shutdown in the LOHS and LOF events. Therefore, for a full spectrum of accident initiators considered, the overall safety behavior of accelerator-driven metal-fueled systems can neither be concluded to be worse nor to be better than advanced reactor designs which rely on passive safety features.

  10. High performance metal/air fuel cells. Part 1. General review. [Li, Al, Ca, Cd, Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. F.

    1977-08-15

    Metal/air fuel cells are reviewed in terms of their potential application in electric vehicles. Attention is focused on those metals (light alkali and alkaline earth metals, and aluminum) which, in combination with oxygen, have theoretical energy densities (2--13 kWh/kg-metal) exceeding that of gasoline (utilized in automobiles at 2--3 kWh/kg). Lithium and aluminum have yielded 8- and 4 kWh/kg, respectively, in laboratory experimental cells. The slurry Zn/air system achieves 0.85 kWh/kg-Zn in prototype vehicle cells and is reviewed for comparison. Calcium can probably yield 1.8 kWh/kg-Ca, but its potential as a fuel has not yet been fully explored. The remaining metals appear to be unsuitable for use in aqueous electrolyte fuel cells. The discharge characteristics of lithium, aluminum, and (possibly) calcium/air cells indicate the potential for electric vehicles of the highway performance and minimum range (300 miles) of subcompact automobiles, rapid refueling for unlimited range extension, and the storage in the fuel cell of sufficient metal for ranges in excess of 1000 miles. Barriers to the concept are the economic necessity of recycling cell reaction products (except in the case of calcium), the expansion or creation of vast metal production industries, and the change-over of existing service station infrastructures to allow electric vehicle servicing. The energy efficiency of a transportation system using aluminum was estimated using data on the current aluminum production industry. The total estimated cost of ownership and operation of an aluminum/air cell was 3.0--3.6 cents/km. The relative rarity of lithium would complicate its use. 6 tables.

  11. Metal Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan

    2006-04-01

    Interconnect development is identified by the US Department of energy as a key technical area requiring focused research to meet the performance and cost goals under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance initiative. In the Phase I SECA Core Technology Program, Ceramatec investigated a commercial ferritic stainless steel composition for oxidation resistance properties by measuring the weight gain when exposed to air at the fuel cell operating temperature. A pre-treatment process that results in a dense, adherent scale was found to reduce the oxide scale growth rate significantly. A process for coating the surface of the alloy in order to reduce the in-plane resistance and potentially inhibit chromium oxide evaporation was also identified. The combination of treatments provided a very low resistance through the scale. The resistance measured was as low as 10 milliohm-cm2 at 750 C in air. The oxide scale was also found to be stable in humidified air at 750 C. The resistance value was stable over several thermal cycles. A similar treatment and coating for the fuel side of the interconnect also showed an exceptionally low resistance of one milliohm-cm2 in humidified hydrogen at 750 c, and was stable through multiple thermal cycles. Measurement of interconnect resistance when it was exposed to both air and humidified hydrogen on opposite sides also showed low, stable resistance after additional modification to the pre-treatment process. Resistance stacks, using an interconnect stack with realistic gas flows, also provided favorable results. Chromium evaporation issue however requires testing of fuel stacks and was outside of the scope of this project. based on results to-date, the alloy selection and the treatment processes appear to be well suited for SOFC interconnect application.

  12. Nanostructure of metallic particles in light water reactor used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C., E-mail: edgar.buck@pnnl.gov; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the noble metal particles that form in UO{sub 2} reactor fuels. • The composition of the particles was highly variable with low levels of uranium and plutonium present in the particles. • This nano-structure may play an important role in the behavior of nuclear fuels under accident conditions. - Abstract: An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the metallic (Mo–Tc–Ru–Rh–Pd) particles that are known to form during irradiated in light water nuclear reactor fuels. This structure points possible high catalytic reactivity through the occurrence of a very high surface area as well as defect sites. We have analyzed separated metallic particles from dissolved high burn-up spent nuclear fuel using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The larger particles vary in diameter between ∼10 and ∼300 nm and possess a hexagonally close packed epsilon-ruthenium structure. These particles are not always single crystals but often consist of much smaller crystallites on the order of 1–3 nm in diameter with evidence suggesting the occurrence of some amorphous regions. It is possible that neutron irradiation and fission product recoils generated the unusual small crystallite size. The composition of the metallic particles was variable with low levels of uranium present in some of the particles. We hypothesize that the uranium may have induced the formation of the amorphous (or frustrated) metal structure. This unique nano-structure may play an important role in the environmental behavior of nuclear fuels.

  13. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO2-PuO2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium reactors

  14. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium

  15. The measurement of silver diffusivity in zirconium carbide to study the release behavior of 110mAg in the ZrC TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Young-Ki; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-03-01

    The tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel has been developed and used for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). It provides a unique robustness of the first barrier for the fission products. The TRISO fuel particle has typically consisted of a UO2 or UCO kernel, surrounded by successive layers of porous carbon, dense inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and dense outer pyrocarbon. During operation, however, the SiC layer has been known to release radioactive silver 110mAg which makes maintenance more difficult and thus costly. Zirconium carbide has been considered as a promising alternative to the SiC fission product barrier. ZrC exhibits high temperature stability and possibly possesses superior Pd resistance, while the retention properties especially for silver have not been adequately studied. To help elucidate the diffusive behavior of silver in the ZrC coating of the TRISO-coated particle, a new diffusion experimental technique, called the encapsulating source method, has been developed by constructing a constant source diffusion couple between ZrC and Ag gas originated from Zr-Ag solid solution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and optical methods were used to analyze the diffusion couple annealed at 1500 °C. The resultant diffusion coefficient of Ag in single-crystalline ZrC0.84 at 1500 °C was experimentally determined to be about 2.8 (±1.2) × 10-17 m2/s.

  16. The measurement of silver diffusivity in zirconium carbide to study the release behavior of {sup 110m}Ag in the ZrC TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Young-Ki, E-mail: deltag@naver.com; Allen, Todd R., E-mail: allen@engr.wisc.edu

    2016-03-15

    The tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel has been developed and used for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). It provides a unique robustness of the first barrier for the fission products. The TRISO fuel particle has typically consisted of a UO{sub 2} or UCO kernel, surrounded by successive layers of porous carbon, dense inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and dense outer pyrocarbon. During operation, however, the SiC layer has been known to release radioactive silver {sup 110m}Ag which makes maintenance more difficult and thus costly. Zirconium carbide has been considered as a promising alternative to the SiC fission product barrier. ZrC exhibits high temperature stability and possibly possesses superior Pd resistance, while the retention properties especially for silver have not been adequately studied. To help elucidate the diffusive behavior of silver in the ZrC coating of the TRISO-coated particle, a new diffusion experimental technique, called the encapsulating source method, has been developed by constructing a constant source diffusion couple between ZrC and Ag gas originated from Zr–Ag solid solution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and optical methods were used to analyze the diffusion couple annealed at 1500 °C. The resultant diffusion coefficient of Ag in single-crystalline ZrC{sub 0.84} at 1500 °C was experimentally determined to be about 2.8 (±1.2) × 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}/s. - Highlights: • Developed new diffusion experimental method in lieu of problematic existing method. • Measured concentration profiles of Ag in ZrC after diffusion annealing. • Firstly determined diffusion coefficient of Ag in ZrC at 1500 °C.

  17. Nanostructure of Metallic Particles in Light Water Reactor Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcnamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The extraordinary nano-structure of metallic particles in light water reactor fuels points to possible high reactivity through increased surface area and a high concentration of high energy defect sites. We have analyzed the metallic epsilon particles from a high burn-up fuel from a boiling water reactor using transmission electron microscopy and have observed a much finer nanostructure in these particles than has been reported previously. The individual round particles that varying in size between ~20 and ~50 nm appear to consist of individual crystallites on the order of 2-3 nm in diameter. It is likely that in-reactor irradiation induce displacement cascades results in the formation of the nano-structure. The composition of these metallic phases is variable yet the structure of the material is consistent with the hexagonal close packed structure of epsilon-ruthenium. These findings suggest that unusual catalytic behavior of these materials might be expected, particularly under accident conditions.

  18. Modeling of point defects and rare gas incorporation in uranium mono-carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, A.; Van Brutzel, L.

    2007-02-01

    An embedded atom method (EAM) potential has been established for uranium mono-carbide. This EAM potential was fitted on structural properties of metallic uranium and uranium mono-carbide. The formation energies of point defects, as well as activation energies for self migration, have been evaluated in order to cross-check the suitability of the potential. Assuming that the carbon vacancies are the main defects in uranium mono-carbide compounds, the migration paths and energies are consistent with experimental data selected by Catlow[C.R.A. Catlow, J. Nucl. Mater. 60 (1976) 151]. The insertion and migration energies for He, Kr and Xe have also been evaluated with available inter-atomic potentials [H.H. Andersen, P. Sigmund, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 38 (1965) 238]. Results show that the most stable defect configuration for rare gases is within uranium vacancies. The migration energy of an interstitial Xe is 0.5 eV, in agreement with the experimental value of 0.5 eV [Hj. Matzke, Science of advanced LMFBR fuels, Solid State Physics, Chemistry and Technology of Carbides, Nitrides and Carbonitrides of Uranium and Plutonium, North-Holland, 1986].

  19. [Application of gypsum-bonded investment containing niobium carbide on casting of alloy for metal-ceramic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, S; Ban, S; Hasegawa, J; Hayashi, S; Iiyama, K; Yamamura, Y

    1990-07-01

    Experimental gypsum-bonded investments containing 0.5-5.0 wt% NbC were prepared by mechanical mixing of each powder. Setting and thermal expansion measurement, compressive strength and casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloy for metal-ceramic restoration were investigated. Analysis of NbC during heating was carried out by X-ray diffraction, TG-DTA and SEM. NbC was oxidized to Nb2O5 with a volume change between 300-600 degrees C, as in the following equation: 2NbC + 4 1/2O2----Nb2O5 + 2CO2 The theoretical volume of 1/2Nb2O5 calculated from the lattice constants according to JCPDS file was approximately 4 times larger than that of NbC. The experimental investments of 70 wt% cristobalite and 30 wt% gypsum containing 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt% NbC showed large thermal expansion of 7.0, 10.0 and 13.0% respectively. The investment containing 2.0 wt% NbC showed nearly the same casting accuracy for Ni-Cr alloys for metal-ceramic restoration as the commercial phosphate-bonded investment.

  20. Amorphous metallic alloys for oxygen reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Huerta, R.; Guerra-Martinez, I.; Lopez, J.S. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Mexico City (Mexico). Lab. de Electroquimica; Pierna, A.R. [Basque Country Univ., San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Solorza-Feria, O. [Inst. Politenico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) represent an important, environmentally clean energy source. This has motivated extensive research on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of novel and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for the direct four-electron transfer process to water formation. Studies have shown that amorphous alloyed compounds can be used as electrode materials in electrochemical energy conversion devices. Their use in PEMFCs can optimize the electrocatalyst loading in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, amorphous metallic PtSn, PtRu and PtRuSn alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling and used as cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulphuric acid and in a single PEM fuel cell. Two different powder morphologies were observed before and after the chemical activation in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the ORR on the amorphous catalysts were investigated. The study showed that the amorphous metallic PtSn electrocatalyst was the most active of the 3 electrodes for the cathodic reaction. Fuel cell experiments were conducted at various temperatures at 30 psi for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and at 34 psi for oxygen (O{sub 2}). MEAs made of Nafion 115 and amorphous metallic PtSn dispersed on carbon powder in a PEMFC had a power density of 156 mW per cm{sup 2} at 0.43V and 80 degrees C. 12 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  1. Statistical model for combustion of high-metal magnesium-based hydro-reactive fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Jian-Xin; Han Chao; Xia Zhi-Xun; Huang Li-Ya; Huang Xu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and analytically the combustion behavior of a high-metal magnesium-based hydro-reactive fuel under high temperature gaseous atmosphere.The fuel studied in this paper contains 73% magnesium powders.An experimental system is designed and experimeuts are carried out in both argon and water vapor atmospheres.It is found that the burning surface temperature of the fuel is higher in water vapor than that in argon and both of them are higher than the melting point of magnesium,which indicates the molten state of magnesium particles in the burning surface of the fuel.Based on physical considerations and experimental results,a mathematical one-dimensional model is formulated to describe the combustion behavior of the high-metal magnesium-based hydro-reactive fuel.The model enables the evaluation of the burning surface temperature,the burning rate and the flame standoff distance each as a function of chamber pressure and water vapor concentration.The results predicted by the model show that the burning rate and the surface temperature increase when the chamber pressure and the water vapor concentration increase,which are in agreement with the observed experimental trends.

  2. Metal hydride and pyrophoric fuel additives for dicyclopentadiene based hybrid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shark, Steven C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of reactive energetic fuel additives that have the potential to increase the combustion performance of hybrid rocket propellants in terms of solid fuel regression rate and combustion efficiency. Additives that can augment the combustion flame zone in a hybrid rocket motor by means of increased energy feedback to the fuel grain surface are of great interest. Metal hydrides have large volumetric hydrogen densities, which gives these materials high performance potential as fuel additives in terms of specifc impulse. The excess hydrogen and corresponding base metal may also cause an increase in the hybrid rocket solid fuel regression rate. Pyrophoric additives also have potential to increase the solid fuel regression rate by reacting more readily near the burning fuel surface providing rapid energy feedback. An experimental performance evaluation of metal hydride fuel additives for hybrid rocket motor propulsion systems is examined in this study. Hypergolic ignition droplet tests and an accelerated aging study revealed the protection capabilities of Dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) as a fuel binder, and the ability for unaided ignition. Static hybrid rocket motor experiments were conducted using DCPD as the fuel. Sodium borohydride (NabH4) and aluminum hydride (AlH3) were examined as fuel additives. Ninety percent rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) was used as the oxidizer. In this study, the sensitivity of solid fuel regression rate and characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency to total fuel grain port mass flux and particle loading is examined. These results were compared to HTPB combustion performance as a baseline. Chamber pressure histories revealed steady motor operation in most tests, with reduced ignition delays when using NabH4 as a fuel additive. The addition of NabH4 and AlH3 produced up to a 47% and 85% increase in regression rate over neat DCPD, respectively. For all test conditions examined C* efficiency ranges

  3. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

    2005-06-01

    Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

  4. Application of fuel cell for pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, H.; Ju, W. J.; Jho, E. H.; Nam, K.

    2015-12-01

    Once pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste reacts with water and air it produces acid mine drainage (AMD) and leads to the other environmental problems such as contamination of surrounding soils. Pyrite is the major source of AMD and it can be controlled using a biological-electrochemical dissolution method. By enhancing the dissolution of pyrite using fuel cell technology, not only mining waste be beneficially utilized but also be treated at the same time by. As pyrite-containing mining waste is oxidized in the anode of the fuel cell, electrons and protons are generated, and electrons moves through an external load to cathode reducing oxygen to water while protons migrate to cathode through a proton exchange membrane. Iron-oxidizing bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which can utilize Fe as an electron donor promotes pyrite dissolution and hence enhances electrochemical dissolution of pyrite from mining waste. In this study mining waste from a zinc mine in Korea containing 17 wt% pyrite and 9% As was utilized as a fuel for the fuel cell inoculated with A. ferrooxidans. Electrochemically dissolved As content and chemically dissolved As content was compared. With the initial pH of 3.5 at 23℃, the dissolved As concentration increased (from 4.0 to 13 mg/L after 20 d) in the fuel cell, while it kept decreased in the chemical reactor (from 12 to 0.43 mg/L after 20 d). The fuel cell produced 0.09 V of open circuit voltage with the maximum power density of 0.84 mW/m2. Dissolution of As from mining waste was enhanced through electrochemical reaction. Application of fuel cell technology is a novel treatment method for pyrite and heavy metals containing mining waste, and this method is beneficial for mining environment as well as local community of mining areas.

  5. Preliminary Study of Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor with Heterogen Percentage of Uranium–Plutonium Carbide based fuel and 300 MWt Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clief Pattipawaej, Sandro; Su’ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary design study of GFR with helium gas-cooled has been performed. In this study used natural uranium and plutonium results LWR waste as fuel. Fuel with a small percentage of plutonium are arranged on the inside of the core area, and the fuel with a greater percentage set on the outside of the core area. The configuration of such fuel is deliberately set to increase breeding in this part of the central core and reduce the leakage of neutrons on the outer side of the core, in order to get long-lived reactor with a small reactivity. Configuration of fuel as it is also useful to generate a peak power reactors with relatively low in both the direction of axial or radial. Optimization has been done to fuel fraction 45.0% was found that the reactor may be operating in more than 10 year time with excess reactivity less than 1%.

  6. Metal based gas diffusion layers for enhanced fuel cell performance at high current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nabeel; Van Steen, Eric; Tanaka, Shiro; Levecque, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer strongly influences the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A major drawback of current carbon fiber based GDLs is the non-controlled variation in porosity resulting in a random micro-structure. Moreover, when subjected to compression these materials show significant reduction in porosity and permeability leading to water management problems and mass transfer losses within the fuel cell. This study investigated the use of uniform perforated metal sheets as GDLs in conjunction with microchannel flowfields. A metal sheet design with a pitch of 110 μm and a hole diameter of 60 μm in combination with an MPL showed superior performance in the high current density region compared to a commercially available carbon paper based GDL in a single cell environment. Fuel cell testing with different oxidants (air, heliox and oxygen) indicate that the metal sheet offers both superior diffusion and reduced flooding in comparison to the carbon based GDL. The presence of the MPL has been found to be critical to the functionality of the metal sheet suggesting that the MPL design may represent an important optimisation parameter for further improvements in performance.

  7. Carbide Transformations in Tempering of Complexly Alloyed White Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, K. N.; Gorlenko, D. A.; Zavalishchin, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    Variation of the chemical composition of all phases and structural components (metallic matrix, eutectic and secondary carbides) in complexly alloyed cast iron is studied after crystallization and different variants of tempering. It is shown that several groups of secondary carbides may be distinguished according to their morphology and chemical composition.

  8. Atomic and molecular adsorption on transition-metal carbide (111) surfaces from density-functional theory: a trend study of surface electronic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, A; Ruberto, C; Lundqvist, B I

    2010-09-22

    This study explores atomic and molecular adsorption on a number of early transition-metal carbides (TMCs) in NaCl structure by means of density-functional theory calculations. The investigated substrates are the TM-terminated TMC(111) surfaces, of interest because of the presence of different types of surface resonances (SRs) on them and because of their technological importance in growth processes. Also, TM compounds have shown potential in catalysis applications. Trend studies are conducted with respect to both period and group in the periodic table, choosing the substrates ScC, TiC, VC, ZrC, NbC, δ-MoC, TaC, and WC (in NaCl structure) and the adsorbates H, B, C, N, O, F, NH, NH(2), and NH(3). Trends in adsorption strength are explained in terms of surface electronic factors, by correlating the calculated adsorption-energy values with the calculated surface electronic structures. The results are rationalized by use of a concerted-coupling model (CCM), which has previously been applied successfully to the description of adsorption on TiC(111) and TiN(111) surfaces (Ruberto et al 2007 Solid State Commun. 141 48). First, the clean TMC(111) surfaces are characterized by calculating surface energies, surface relaxations, Bader charges, and surface-localized densities of states (DOSs). Detailed comparisons between surface and bulk DOSs reveal the existence of transition-metal localized SRs (TMSRs) in the pseudogap and of several C-localized SRs (CSRs) in the upper valence band on all considered TMC(111) surfaces. The spatial extent and the dangling bond nature of these SRs are supported by real-space analyses of the calculated Kohn-Sham wavefunctions. Then, atomic and molecular adsorption energies, geometries, and charge transfers are presented. An analysis of the adsorbate-induced changes in surface DOSs reveals a presence of both adsorbate-TMSR and adsorbate-CSRs interactions, of varying strengths depending on the surface and the adsorbate. These variations are

  9. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ˜15-20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  10. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  11. Metallic Nickel Hydroxide Nanosheets Give Superior Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Urea for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojiao; Dou, Xinyu; Dai, Jun; An, Xingda; Guo, Yuqiao; Zhang, Lidong; Tao, Shi; Zhao, Jiyin; Chu, Wangsheng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-09-26

    The direct urea fuel cell (DUFC) is an important but challenging renewable energy production technology, it offers great promise for energy-sustainable developments and mitigating water contamination. However, DUFCs still suffer from the sluggish kinetics of the urea oxidation reaction (UOR) owing to a 6 e(-) transfer process, which poses a severe hindrance to their practical use. Herein, taking β-Ni(OH)2 nanosheets as the proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated a surface-chemistry strategy to achieve metallic Ni(OH)2 nanosheets by engineering their electronic structure, representing a first metallic configuration of transition-metal hydroxides. Surface sulfur incorporation successfully brings synergetic effects of more exposed active sites, good wetting behavior, and effective electron transport, giving rise to greatly enhanced performance for UOR. Metallic nanosheets exhibited a much higher current density, smaller onset potential and stronger durability.

  12. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 μm, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

  13. Magnetron sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria diffusion barriers for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Steffen; Klemensø, Trine; Christensen, Bjarke H.

    2014-01-01

    Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale setup and implemented as barrier layers between the cathode and electrolyte in metal-based solid oxide fuel cells consisting of a metal support, an electrolyte of ZrO2 co-doped with Sc2O3...... and substrate bias voltage. A GDC layer thickness of 0.6 μm is found to effectively block Sr diffusion when bias voltage and deposition temperature is tuned to promote dense coatings. The adatom mobility has a large influence on the film density. Low temperature and bias voltage result in underdense column...

  14. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  15. Silicon Carbide Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-standing silicon carbide shapes are produced by passing a properly diluted stream of a reactant gas, for example methyltrichlorosilane, into a...reaction chamber housing a thin walled, hollow graphite body heated to 1300-1500C. After the graphite body is sufficiently coated with silicon carbide , the...graphite body is fired, converting the graphite to gaseous CO2 and CO and leaving a silicon carbide shaped article remaining.

  16. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  17. Facile and gram-scale synthesis of metal-free catalysts: toward realistic applications for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-02

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  18. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzler, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-01

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW-1 in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  19. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzler, Brian P; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-06

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW(-1) in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  20. Review of Phenomenological Models for the Initial Phase HCDA Analysis in a Metal-Fueled Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Ki Rim; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Suk, Soo Dong

    2009-03-15

    The safety aspects of the KALIMER design results from the advanced safety performance characteristics of its ternary alloy metallic fuel. The superior thermal, mechanical, and neutronic performance of the metal-fueled core assures inherent safety response to unprotected and multiple fault accidents which are HCDA initiating events. HCDA has received great attentions because of its significant consequence, leading to substantial core disruption, although its probability of occurrence is very low. The SAS4A code provides an integrated quantitative framework for examining the phenomenological behaviors under HCDA conditions. Various phenomenological models such as prefailure characterization, transient pin response, margins to cladding failure, axial in-pin fuel relocation prior to cladding breach, and molten fuel relocation after cladding breach are required for the HCDA analysis. The important mechanisms which introduce negative reactivity during HCDA are fuel extrusion and in-pin fuel relocation, and structural feedback through thermal-mechanical neutronic effects. This report describes the safety performance characteristics of the metal fuel as observed in ex-pile and in-pile tests, and describes associated theoretical models employed into the SAS4A HCDA analysis code. Most of such tests and experiments, and development of theoretical models have been performed for the IFR program by ANL. This report provides a phenomenological basis for gaining an understanding of the metal fuel performance characteristics that obtained from expile experiments and in-pile tests. This report will provide insight and direction for planning HCDA experiments and developing theoretical models in Korea later.

  1. Results of High-Temperature Heating Test for Irradiated Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June-Hyung; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Oon; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Yoo, Boung-Ok; Jung, Yang-Hong; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The U and Pu constituents in the fuel, however, tend to interact metallurgically with iron-based claddings at elevated temperatures during nominal steady-state operating conditions and off-normal reactor events. In particular, if the temperature is raised above the eutectic temperature of metallic fuel, e.g., in an off-normal reactor event, the fuel can form a mixture of liquid and solid phases that may promote further cladding interaction. Such fuel-cladding chemical interaction, in conjunction with fission gas pressure loading, can potentially shorten fuel pin lifetime and eventually cause cladding breach. In this work, microstructure observation results through microscope, SEM and EPMA are reported for the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slugs with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test. Also, the measured eutectic penetration rate is compared with the prediction value by the existing eutectic penetration correlation being used for design and modelling purposes. Microstructure of the irradiated U-10Zr and U-10Zr-5Ce fuel slug with T92 cladding after high-temperature heating test were investigated through the microscope, SEM and EPMA. Also, the measured maximum eutectic penetration rate along cladding direction was compared with the prediction value by existing eutectic penetration correlation. In the case of U-10Zr/T92 specimen, migration phenomena of U, Zr, and Fe as well as Nd lanthanide fission product were observed at the eutectic melting region. The measured penetration rate was almost similar to prediction value by existing eutectic penetration rate correlation.

  2. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  3. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of Silicon–Carbide (SiC) particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite including interphase are carried out for different microstructures and particle volume fractions of the composites. A program is developed...

  4. Optimizing fuel cell parts by using 3D screen printed metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studnitzky, Thomas [Fraunhofer-Institue for Manufacturing and Advanced Materials, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Powder Metallurgy and Composite Materials; Strauss, Alexander [Centre for Fuel Cell Technology, Duisburg (Germany). Dept. of Microsystems

    2010-07-01

    Miniature fuel cells have the potential to extend the runtime of various portable applications. In this context, sufficient energy densities have to be achieved within a stack in order to build fuel cell systems competitive to established battery technologies. Metallic bipolar plates composed of stainless steels permit the construction of thin and mechanically robust cells. Moreover the utilisation of the presented manufacturing method enables a new freedom in design of Bipolar Plates and their integrated flow field structures for future improvements of cell efficiency. In this study different miniature PEM fuel cells have been designed and tested. Bases for their construction are micro structured plates composed of 316L stainless steel. This design can include very fine walls down to 60 {mu}m as well as undercuts, which is impossible with other manufacturing methods. These designs were adapted by Fraunhofer IFAM for the screen printing process. As a first result a proof of concept has been established for 3D screen printing as a method for the manufacturing of fuel cell bipolar elements. To this end, a modified screen printing process is used to manufacture 3-dimensional parts layer-on-layer by depositing a suitable metallic powder which is mixed with a binder. The resulting green parts might include closed channels and channel wall thicknesses may reach 80 {mu}m or less. The green parts are debindered and sintered in order to obtain purely metallic structures. The manufactured bipolar plates show promising electric behaviour. In the current state of the project, bipolar plates with undercuts and new materials combinations are in the centre of the investigations. (orig.)

  5. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Paul Chin; Dr. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts; Professor James J. Spivey; Mr. Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Dr. James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Dr. Richard W. Rice

    2002-12-31

    Several different catalytic reactions must be carried out in order to convert hydrocarbons (or alcohols) into hydrogen for use as a fuel for polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Each reaction in the fuel-processing sequence has a different set of characteristics, which influences the type of catalyst support that should be used for that particular reaction. A wide range of supports are being evaluated for the various reactions in the fuel-processing scheme, including porous and non-porous particles, ceramic and metal straight-channel monoliths, and ceramic and metal monolithic foams. These different types of support have distinctly different transport characteristics. The best choice of support for a given reaction will depend on the design constraints for the system, e.g., allowable pressure drop, and on the characteristics of the reaction for which the catalyst is being designed. Three of the most important reaction characteristics are the intrinsic reaction rate, the exothermicity/endothermicity of the reaction, and the nature of the reaction network, e.g., whether more than one reaction takes place and, in the case of multiple reactions, the configuration of the network. Isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to study the surface intermediates. The preferential oxidation of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen (PROX) is an important final step in most fuel processor designs. Data on the behavior of straight-channel monoliths and foam monolith supports will be presented to illustrate some of the factors involved in choosing a support for this reaction.

  6. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross......-metallic inclusions and the crack initiation. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the carbide size distributions of the micro-clean and conventional grades.Also, the distribution of the fractured carbides was found to be the same regardless of steel type, manufacturing method or location on the specimen....

  7. The Recovery of the Metal Insulation Cable in the Instrumentation of Nuclear Fuel Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang Young; Ahn, Sung Ho; Sim, Bong Sik; Lee, Chul Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Mineral-insulated (MI) cables are widely used to prolong the instrumentation cable of instruments such as a thermocouple (TC), linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and self-powered neutron detector (SPND), which are used to measure various irradiation characteristics of nuclear fuels and materials. MI cables are expected to be helpful for instrumentation of nuclear fuel and material irradiation because of their high electrical insulation, heat resistance and mechanical strength. The MI cable used to extend thermocouple wires is classified as the following: 1) For common metal types of thermocouples, the thermocouple extension wire is of substantially the same composition as the corresponding thermocouple type and it can offer advantages in cost or mechanical properties when used for the connection between a thermocouple and instruments. 2) For noble metal types of thermocouples, the thermocouple compensation wire is an entirely different alloy formulated to match the noble metal characteristics, which is necessary due to the high cost of noble metals. During the installation of an instrument, an MI cable damaged by impact must be recovered because it is difficult to change the entire thermocouple. And for MI cable recovery, it is necessary to develop the instrumentation technology of FTL. This paper described the experimental results of MI cable recovery, which consists of a removal test of the MI cable sheath and a joining test of the compensation of the wire and MI cable/ wire/compensation wire and sheath of MI cable/bushing, for carrying out irradiation tests of nuclear fuel and materials in the FTL facility of HANARO

  8. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  9. Enhancements to BISON U-Zr Metallic Fuel X447 Example Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    As development of a metallic fuel modeling capability in BISON has progressed, the need for an example problem used as a comparison basis was observed. Collaborative work between researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) then proceeded to determine a viable rod to use as the basis and create a BISON input deck utilizing as many metallic fuel models as feasible. The basis chosen was what would be considered a generic rod from subassembly X447, an assembly irradiated in EBR-II towards the end of its operating life, heavily based on reported data for fuel pin DP11. Thus, the approach was adopted to use flow characteristics from subassembly X447 as a basis for the convective heat transfer solution, power history and axial power profiles that are representative of rod DP11 from subassembly X447. The rod simulated is a U-10Zr wt% (U-22.5Zr at%) composition. A 2D-RZ mesh would be used to capture axial thermal hydraulic effects, axial swelling and stress-strain calculations over the full length of the rod. After initial work was invested, a refinement of the various models and input parameters was conducted to ensure consistency between operator-declared conditions, model input requirements and those represented in the example problem. This report serves as a synopsis of the enhancements and refinements to the example problem conducted throughout the 2016 fiscal year.

  10. Adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from fuel by metal-organic frameworks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyang; Wang; Zhiguo; Sun; Linghao; Kong; Gang; Li

    2013-01-01

    The adsorptive denitrogenation from fuels over three metal-organic frameworks(MIL-96(Al),MIL-53(Al)and MIL-101(Cr))was studied by batch adsorption experiments.Four nitrogen-containing compounds(NCCs)pyridine,pyrrole,quinoline and indole were used as model NCCs in fuels to study the adsorption mechanism.The physicochemical properties of the adsorbents were characterized by XRD,N2physical adsorption,FT-IR spectrum and Hammett indicator method.The metal-organic frameworks(MOFs),especially the MIL-101(Cr)containing Lewis acid sites as well as high specific surface area,can adsorb large quantities of NCCs from fuels.In addition,the adsorptive capacity over MIL-101(Cr)will be different for NCCs with different basicity.The stronger basicity of the NCC is,the more it can be absorbed over MIL-101(Cr).Furthermore,pore size and shape also affect the adsorption capacity for a given adsorbate,which can be proved by the adsorption over MIL-53(Al)and MIL-96(Al).The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir equation can be used to describe kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process,respectively.Finally,the regeneration of the used adsorbent has been conducted successfully by just washing it with ethanol.

  11. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X-ray...

  12. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    Metal-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are developed as a durable and cost-effective alternative to the state-of-the-art cermet SOFCs. This novel technology offers new opportunities but also new challenges. One of them is corrosion of the metallic support, which will decrease the long-ter...

  13. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın

    2011-07-01

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  14. Benchmark physics experiment of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA. 2; Experiments of FCA assembly XVI-1 and their analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Susumu; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Akio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Osugi, Toshitaka; Satoh, Kunio; Hayasaka, Katsuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Bando, Masaru

    1993-10-01

    An availability of data and method for a design of metallic-fueled LMFBR is examined by using the experiment results of FCA assembly XVI-1. Experiment included criticality and reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, sodium void, fuel shifting and fuel expansion. Reaction rate ratios, sample worth and control rod worth were also measured. Analysis was made by using three-dimensional diffusion calculations and JENDL-2 cross sections. Predictions of assembly XVI-1 reactor physics parameters agree reasonably well with the measured values, but for some reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, large zone sodium void and fuel shifting further improvement of calculation method was need. (author).

  15. Carbon nanotubes paste sensor modified with bismuth film for determination of metallic ions in ethanol fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Augusto Gorla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study an anodic stripping voltammetric method using a bismuth film modified carbon nanotubes paste electrode for simultaneous determination of metals Zn2+, Cd2+and Pb2+in ethanol fuel is described. The metallic ions were preconcentrated on the bismuth film in the time and deposition potential of 500 s and -1.2 V and the stripping step was carried out by square wave voltammetry (frequency of 15 Hz, pulse amplitude of 25 mV and potential step of 5 mV. Acetate buffer at 0.1 mol L-1concentration and pH 4.5 was used as support electrolyte. The method showed linearity including the analytical blank up to 48.39 ?g L-1 for the metals and the obtained limits of detection were 3.36, 0.32 and 0.47 ?g L-1for Zn2+, Cd2+and Pb2+, respectively. The proposed method was applied in ethanol fuel samples.

  16. Thermal Transport in Refractory Carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal energy transport mechanisms in titanium carbide and zirconium carbide have been studied. Several compositions of vanadium carbide alloyed...with titanium carbide were used. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity exceeded the values computed using the classical value for L in

  17. Review: Perspectives on the metallic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUWei-zhong; YANMi

    2004-01-01

    The various stages and progress in the development of interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs )over the last two decades are reviewed. The criteria for the application of materials as interconnects are highlighted. Interconnects based on lanthanum chromite ceramics demonstrate many inherent drawbacks and therefore are only useful for SOFCs operating around 1000℃. The advance in the research of anode-supported flat SOFCs facilitates the replacement of ceramic interconnects with metallic ones due to their significantly lowered working temperature. Besides, interconnects made of metals or alloys offer many advantages as compared to their ceramic counterpart. The oxidation response and thermal expansion behaviors of various prospective metallic interconnects are examined and evaluated. The minimization of contact resistance to achieve desired and reliable stack performance during their projected lifetime still remains a highly challenging issue with metallic interconnects. Inexpensive coating materials and techniques may play a key role in promoting the commercialization of SOFC stack whose interconnects are constructed of some current commercially available alloys. Alternatively, development of new metallic materials that are capable of forming stable oxide scales with sluggish growth rate and sufficient electrical conductivity is called for.

  18. Metal ferrite oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Fan, Yueying

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a metal ferrite oxygen carrier for the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The metal ferrite oxygen carrier comprises MFe.sub.xO.sub.y on an inert support, where MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is a chemical composition and M is one of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Co, Mn, and combinations thereof. For example, MFe.sub.xO.sub.y may be one of MgFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, SrFe.sub.2O.sub.4, BaFe.sub.2O.sub.4, CoFe.sub.2O.sub.4, MnFeO.sub.3, and combinations thereof. The MFe.sub.xO.sub.y is supported on an inert support. The inert support disperses the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y oxides to avoid agglomeration and improve performance stability. In an embodiment, the inert support comprises from about 5 wt. % to about 60 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier and the MFe.sub.xO.sub.y comprises at least 30 wt. % of the metal ferrite oxygen carrier. The metal ferrite oxygen carriers disclosed display improved reduction rates over Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and improved oxidation rates over CuO.

  19. Tool flank wear model and parametric optimization in end milling of metal matrix composite using carbide tool: Response surface methodology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokiadass

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly automated CNC end milling machines in manufacturing industry requires reliable model for prediction of tool flank wear. This model later can be used to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax according to the process parameters. In this investigation an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax of carbide tools while machining LM25 Al/SiCp incorporating the process parameters such as spindle speed (N, feed rate (f, depth of cut (d and various % wt. of silicon carbide (S. Response surface methodology (RSM was applied to optimizing the end milling process parameters to attain the minimum tool flank wear. Predicted values obtained from the developed model and experimental results are compared, and error <5 percent is observed. In addition, it is concluded that the flank wear increases with the increase of SiCp percentage weight in the MMC.

  20. Function of all-metal separators for waste fuels. Phase 1; Funktion av allmetallseparatorer foer avfallsbraenslen. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacoby, Juergen; Wrangensten, Lars

    2004-08-01

    Various waste incineration facilities, which use different types of waste fuels, have difficulties with a high content of non-magnetic metal, especially aluminum in their fuels. Aluminum may melt on the grate and can lead to corrosion or fouling in the furnace. Additionally, a high content of aluminum in the flyash may cause difficulties in terms of storage or further use of the ash as e.g. construction material. The industrial demand for efficient separators for non-magnetic metals from a fuel stream is rather large. There is however some uncertainty in the performance and efficiency of metal separators. Two types of separators can be found, the first type is called eddy current separator, the other type is based upon a metal detector with a sorting unit in the form of a chute or similar afterwards. An eddy current separator consists of a fast rotating drum containing several permanent magnets with alternating polarity. Due to the rotation, the change in the magnetic field induces eddy currents in conducting materials. The eddy currents cause a force in non-magnetic metal, the Lorentz force, which repels the material away from the rotating drum while all other material follows the systems flow direction. Systems equipped with a metal detector activate a mechanical sorting device, separate chute or air nozzles, when a metal particle is detected. In contrast to eddy current separators all types of metals can be detected and sorted out by systems based on metal detector. Several technical solutions for metal separation supplied by various manufacturers are described in the report. The companies have been asked to supply product information on the working principle, technical data, efficiency and limits for different types of metals. Two reference power plants have been visited and their experiences with all-metal separators are described. Haendeloeverket in Norrkoeping uses eddy current separators for separation of non-magnetic metals from household waste

  1. An analysis of harmful factors to storage stability of the reduced metallic fuel produced by the advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, J. S.; You, G. S.; Cho, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, J. C.; Seo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Seo, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This study was performed for the selection of alloying elements to make the metallic fuel alloys having a good stability to oxidation. Harmful factors on oxidation were also analyzed. Several basic properties such as microstructure, immiscibility, thermal and fission product effects were surveyed. The oxidation properties of metal uranium and uranium alloys were also studied. The results from this study are applicable to the selection of the alloying elements to stabilize the reduced uranium metal in the 2nd year research in phase 2, and also do an important role to increase the storage temperature. 29 refs., 37 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  2. Mirror Surface Grinding of Steel Bonded Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The steel bonded carbide, a composite material, is very difficult to be machined to a fine finish mirror surface. In this paper, an electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding with metallic bond super-hard abrasive wheel was developed for grinding steel bonded carbide GT35. Factors affecting ELID grinding performance were analyzed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Based on the analysis of AFM topography of the fine ground mirror surface of the steel bonded carbide, a schematic diagram of the mechanism of micro-removal of the ground surface was described. The AFM topography also shows that the hard brittle carbide particles, on the surface of steel bonded carbide, were machined out by ductile cutting. Since the grinding cracks in the ground surface are due to temperature gradient, temperature distribution in the grinding area was analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Experimental results indicate that a good mirror surface with Ra<0.02pm can be obtained by the developed ELID grinding system.

  3. A Review of Metallic Bipolar Plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Materials and Fabrication Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Karimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane fuel cell offers an exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. Bipolar plates have been fabricated primarily from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to developing cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Two different classes of materials have attracted attention: metals and composites. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current research being carried out on metallic bipolar plates, covering materials and fabrication methods.

  4. Neutronic assessment of liquid-metal cooled fast reactors using thorium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilarski, Stevan [Electricite de France R et D, 1 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau 91406 Orsay (France)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term sustainability of atomic fission energy will require the development of new types of reactors, able to exceed the limits of the existing ones in terms of optimal use of natural resources, which clearly necessitates breeding of fissile material. In this context, fast reactors using uranium-plutonium fuel are the most mature solution from an industrial viewpoint. In addition to the obvious interest in terms of fuel resources, there is a major incentive to consider the use of the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as an alternative to the traditional {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle for fast reactors: it is an effective way of addressing the safety issue of the highly positive void reactivity effect, which is a well-known problem for liquid-metal cooled fast reactors of commercial size [1]. This work investigates the performance of liquid-metal cooled fast reactors in {sup 232}Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle and draws a comparison with the traditional {sup 238}U-{sup 239}Pu cycle. Four coolants have been considered: Na, Pb, Mg(17%at.)-Pb and Li(17%at.)-Pb; a simulation of their use in cores ranging from 700 MWth to 3600 MWth has been performed in two-dimensional diffusion theory using the European system of codes ERANOS [2,3] developed at CEA. The performance parameters such as the breeding ratio have been computed for each concept, alongside safety-related parameters: the delayed neutron fraction, the cycle reactivity swing, the Doppler constant and other thermal feedbacks. More specifically, the issue of void reactivity is studied in detail using perturbation theory. These calculations are performed at equilibrium fuel composition and are complemented by the study of the initial fuel loading at start-up which is a mixture of {sup 232}Th-{sup 239}Pu. The isotopic composition of the fissile corresponds to the plutonium available from French reactors in 2035. The conclusions of this work are that near-zero to large negative void reactivity effects can be achieved in

  5. PREPARATION OF B-MODIFICATION SILICON CARBIDE ALLOYED WITH VARIOUS IMPURITIES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The beta-modification of silicon carbide can be obtained by any of the following methods: (1) synthesis from silicon and carbon (graphite) at 1400...certain metals, a process based on the substantial temperature variation of the solubility of silicon carbide in fused metals; beta-SiC is obtained in

  6. Enhanced Endosomal Escape by Light-Fueled Liquid-Metal Transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Lin, Yiliang; Chen, Zhaowei; Hu, Quanyin; Liu, Yang; Yu, Shuangjiang; Gao, Wei; Dickey, Michael D; Gu, Zhen

    2017-04-12

    Effective endosomal escape remains as the "holy grail" for endocytosis-based intracellular drug delivery. To date, most of the endosomal escape strategies rely on small molecules, cationic polymers, or pore-forming proteins, which are often limited by the systemic toxicity and lack of specificity. We describe here a light-fueled liquid-metal transformer for effective endosomal escape-facilitated cargo delivery via a chemical-mechanical process. The nanoscale transformer can be prepared by a simple approach of sonicating a low-toxicity liquid-metal. When coated with graphene quantum dots (GQDs), the resulting nanospheres demonstrate the ability to absorb and convert photoenergy to drive the simultaneous phase separation and morphological transformation of the inner liquid-metal core. The morphological transformation from nanospheres to hollow nanorods with a remarkable change of aspect ratio can physically disrupt the endosomal membrane to promote endosomal escape of payloads. This metal-based nanotransformer equipped with GQDs provides a new strategy for facilitating effective endosomal escape to achieve spatiotemporally controlled drug delivery with enhanced efficacy.

  7. Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

  8. Benzene hydrogenation catalysed by molybdenum carbide supported on Y zeolite; Hidrogenacao de benzeno catalisada por especies do tipo carbeto de molibdenio suportado em zeolita Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Angela Sanches; Faro Junior, Arnaldo da Costa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Fisico-Quimica]. E-mail: asrocha@iq.ufrj.br; farojr@iq.ufrj.br; Silva, Victor Teixeira da [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: dasilva@aquarius.ime.eb.br

    2003-07-01

    Besides increasingly severe environmental legislation that limits the amount of aromatic hydrocarbons present in diesel fuels , improvement of the cetane number stimulates the development of hydrodesaromatization (HDA) catalysts. The present work investigates zeolite-supported molybdenum carbide catalysts , as an alternative for deep HDA. The transition metal carbides display catalytic activity similar to that of the noble metals catalysts used for this purpose, but they show larger thiotolerance, and have a lower price. Molybdenum carbide supported on Y zeolite with different silica/alumina ratios (SAR) and sodium contents were prepared starting from Mo(CO){sub 6} adsorbed on the zeolites and decomposed under different gaseous atmospheres, at high temperatures. The obtained materials were tested in benzene hydrogenation at 90 deg C, showing significant activity at atmospheric pressure, which characterizes the formation of carbides species. Strong dependence of the activity of the catalysts was also observed in relation to SAR and to the quantity of sodium of the zeolite supports. FTIR results show that the presence of protons in the zeolites dis favors the formation active molybdenum species. (author)

  9. An alternative solution for heavy liquid metal cooled reactors fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale Di Maio, Damiano, E-mail: damiano.vitaledimaio@uniroma1.it [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Cretara, Luca; Giannetti, Fabio [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Peluso, Vincenzo [“ENEA”, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Gandini, Augusto [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy); Manni, Fabio [“SRS Engineering Design S.r.l.”, Vicolo delle Palle 25-25/b, 00186 Rome (Italy); Caruso, Gianfranco [“SAPIENZA” University of Rome – DIAEE, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, 244, 00186 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new fuel assembly locking system for heavy metal cooled reactor is proposed. • Neutronic, mechanical and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the system behavior have been performed. • A comparison with other solutions has been presented. - Abstract: In the coming future, the electric energy production from nuclear power plants will be provided by both thermal reactors and fast reactors. In order to have a sustainable energy production through fission reactors, fast reactors should provide an increasing contribution to the total electricity production from nuclear power plants. Fast reactors have to achieve economic and technical targets of Generation IV. Among these reactors, Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) and Lead cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs) have the greatest possibility to be developed as industrial power plants within few decades. Both SFRs and LFRs require a great R and D effort to overcome some open issues which affect the present designs (e.g. sodium-water reaction for the SFRs, erosion/corrosion for LFRs, etc.). The present paper is mainly focused on LFR fuel assembly (FA) design: issues linked with the high coolant density of lead or lead–bismuth eutectic cooled reactors have been investigated and an innovative solution for the core mechanical design is here proposed and analyzed. The solution, which foresees cylindrical fuel assemblies and exploits the buoyancy force due to the lead high density, allows to simplify the FAs locking system, to reduce their length and could lead to a more uniform neutron flux distribution.

  10. RF Plasma Torch System for Metal Matrix Composite Production in Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holik, Eddie, III

    2007-10-01

    For the first time in 30 years, plans are afoot to build new fission power plants in the US. It is timely to develop technology that could improve the safety and efficiency of new reactors. A program of development for advanced fuel cycles and Generation IV reactors is underway. The path to greater efficiency is to increase the core operating temperature. That places particular challenges to the cladding tubes that contain the fission fuel. A promising material for this purpose is a metal matrix composite (MMC) in which ceramic fibers are bonded within a high-strength steel matrix, much like fiberglass. Current MMC technology lacks the ability to effectively bond traditional high-temperature alloys to ceramic strands. The purpose of this project is to design an rf plasma torch system to use titanium as a buffer between the ceramic fibers and the refractory outer material. The design and methods of using an rf plasma torch to produce a non-equilibrium phase reaction to bond together the MMC will be discussed. The effects of having a long lived fuel cladding in the design of future reactors will also be discussed.

  11. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on the Durability of a Light-Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R. L.; Toops, T.; Wereszczak, A. A.; Fox, E. E.; Lance, M. J.; Cavataio, G.; Dobson, D.; Warner, J.; Brezny, R.; Nguyen, K.; Brookshear, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. A set of diesel engine production exhaust systems was aged to 150,000 miles. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ultralow sulfur diesel containing no measureable metals, B20 (a common biodiesel blend) containing sodium, B20 containing potassium, and B20 containing calcium, which were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to ASTM D6751. Analysis included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing, bench-flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and measurement of thermo-mechanical properties of the DPFs. EPMA imaging found that the sodium and potassium penetrated into the washcoat, while calcium remained on the surface. Bench-flow reactor experiments were used to measure the standard nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion, ammonia storage, and ammonia oxidation for each of the aged SCR catalysts. Vehicle emissions tests were conducted with each of the aged catalyst systems using a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle successfully passed the 0.2 gram/mile NOx emission standard with each of the four aged exhaust systems.

  12. Investigation on heavy liquid metal cooling of ADS fuel pin assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litfin, K.; Batta, A.; Class, A. G.; Wetzel, Th.; Stieglitz, R.

    2011-08-01

    In the framework of accelerator driven sub-critical reactor systems heavy liquid metals are considered as coolant for the reactor core and the spallation target. In particular lead or lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) exhibit efficient heat removal properties and high production rate of neutrons. However, the excellent heat conductivity of LBE-flows expressed by a low molecular Prandtl number of the order 10 -2 requires improved modeling of the turbulent heat transfer. Although various models for thermal hydraulics of LBE flows are existing, validated heat transfer correlations for ADS-relevant conditions are still missing. In order to validate the sub-channel codes and computational fluid dynamics codes used to design fuel assemblies, the comparison with experimental data is inevitable. Therefore, an experimental program composed of three major experiments, a single electrically heated rod, a 19-pin hexagonal water rod bundle and a LBE rod bundle, has been initiated at the Karlsruhe Liquid metal Laboratory (KALLA) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, in order to quantify and separate the individual phenomena occurring in the momentum and energy transfer of a fuel assembly.

  13. Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-Ni-Al based cemented carbides developed for engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Edmilson O.; Santos, Julio N. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Mecanica; Klein, Aloisio N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2011-11-15

    In this paper the influence of the Ni binder metal and Al as an additional alloying element on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-based cemented carbides processed by conventional powder metallurgy was studied. Microstructural examinations of the cemented carbides with 3 and 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal indicated the presence of a very low and evenly distributed porosity as well as the presence of islands of metal binder in the microstructure. With the cemented carbide with 7 wt.% of Al in the metal binder, the presence of brittle needle-like regions was observed. The WC particles inside these regions were rounded and had a larger mean free path. Vickers hardness and flexural strength tests indicated that the cemented carbide WC-Ni - Al with addition of 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal presented bulk hardness similar to the conventional WC-Co cemented carbides as well as superior flexure strength and fracture toughness. (orig.)

  15. Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Dual Metal- and Nitrogen-Doped Carbon as Efficient and Robust Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts for Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haolin; Cai, Shichang; Xie, Shilei; Wang, Zhengbang; Tong, Yexiang; Pan, Mu; Lu, Xihong

    2016-02-01

    A new class of dual metal and N doped carbon catalysts with well-defined porous structure derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed as a high-performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Furthermore, the microbial fuel cell (MFC) device based on the as-prepared Ni/Co and N codoped carbon as air cathode catalyst achieves a maximum power density of 4335.6 mW m(-2) and excellent durability.

  16. Developments of metallic fuel materials - A study on the electrorefining of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Young Hyun; Lee, Eung Cho; Ahn, Chong Kwan; Son, Sung Ho; Ban, Jang Ho; Lee, Jae Hun; Lee, Won Joon; Ha, Youn Chul; Woo, Dong Hun [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The uranium deposited from the liquid cadmium anode by electrotransport through molten KCI-LiCl eutectic electrolyte to low carbon steel cathode above 0.15 V, and the morphology of deposits was dendritic below 0.9 V. When the neodymium was added as a impurity, the cathode contaminated by neodymium above 0.7 V and pure uranium deposit about 99.5% was obtained at 0.5 V. The activity coefficient of metallic neodymium in liquid cadmium was 1.485 * 10{sub -7} at 500 deg C. When the zirconium added as impure element, Zr Cl{sub 4} existed less than 0.01 wt% in electrolyte and in the electrorefined deposit, regardlessly to the initial UC L{sub 3} concentration in electrolyte the purity of uranium was 99.98 wt.% and in this system, the proper initial UC l{sub 3} concentration was 3 mol%, 4 mol%. The solubility of U O{sub 2} is extremely low at 1123K in KF-LiF-NaF. In case of using Al oxygen trap, its solubility reaches 10 times compared with previous experiment. 27 refs., 18 tabs., 25 figs., 5 ills. (author)

  17. Metal cask RT-5000 for the dry storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyov, A.I.; Kazeev, V.G.; Krayev, V.S.; Shcherbina, A.N.; Churikov, Y.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    Presentation of new-type cask, developed at RFNC-VNIITF, is in the article. The prototype model of the shipping cask was subjected to tests imitating normal shipment conditions (free fall, pressing, and impact) and to tests imitating emergency situation during shipment (a drop from the 9-m height onto a pin is replaced by acceleration of the shipping cask at a guide rail of the rocket-catapult installation (RCI), a 1-m drop onto a pin, heat tests a 30-minutes fire at the temperature of for 8500 C, submergence to the depth of 15 and 200 meters). After each test the hermeticity preservation is examined. Parallel with the real testing, a mathematical simulation of physical processes induced by the corresponding tests was conducted at the RFNC-VNIITF. The required parameters obtained from the tests are used to calibrate the calculation methods. As a result it has been possible to obtain a good agreement between the results of calculations and experiments; this will allow the mathematic simulation to be used wider. The advantage of the RT-5000 metal cask in comparison with metal-concrete analogs are as follows: SFA are placed into the RT-5000 entirely without cutting into two bunches of fuel elements; the expensive hot doom is not required for automatic cutting the SFA and for loading the bunches of fuel elements into intermediate cases; the possibility remains to transport the RT-5000 without reloading SFA after 50-year storage, although this is a problem for the metal-concrete casks.

  18. Evaluation of an EMITEC resistively heated metal monolith catalytic converter on two M100 neat methanol-fueled vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Gregory K.; Schaefer, Ronald M.

    1992-12-01

    The report describes the evaluation of a resistively heated catalyst system on two different methanol fueled vehicles. The EMITEC catalyst consisted of a compact resistively heated metal monolith in front of a larger conventional main converter. The EMITEC catalyst was evaluated on two neat methanol-fueled vehicles, a 1981 Volkswagen Rabbit and a 1988 Toyota Corolla. Emission testing was conducted over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) CVS-75 test cycle. The emissions of primary interest were cold start methanol (unburned fuel), carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde.

  19. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  20. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  1. Microbial fuel cell driving electrokinetic remediation of toxic metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibul, Nuzahat; Hu, Yi; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-11-15

    An investigation of the feasibility of in-situ electrokinetic remediation for toxic metal contaminated soil driven by microbial fuel cell (MFC) is presented. Results revealed that the weak electricity generated from MFC could power the electrokinetic remediation effectively. The metal removal efficiency and its influence on soil physiological properties were also investigated. With the electricity generated through the oxidation of organics in soils by microorganisms, the metals in the soils would mitigate from the anode to the cathode. The concentrations of Cd and Pb in the soils increased gradually through the anode to the cathode regions after remediation. After about 143days and 108 days' operation, the removal efficiencies of 31.0% and 44.1% for Cd and Pb at the anode region could be achieved, respectively. Soil properties such as pH and soil conductivity were also significantly redistributed from the anode to the cathode regions. The study shows that the MFC driving electrokinetic remediation technology is cost-effective and environmental friendly, with a promising application in soil remediation.

  2. Interaction of coal-derived synthesis gas impurities with solid oxide fuel cell metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Cramer, Carolyn N.

    Oxidation-resistant alloys find use as interconnect materials, heat exchangers, and gas supply tubing in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, especially when operated at temperatures below ∼800 °C. If fueled with synthesis gas derived from coal or biomass, such metallic components could be exposed to impurities contained in those fuel sources. In this study, coupons of ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and SS 441, austenitic nickel-chromium superalloy Inconel 600, and an alumina-forming high nickel alloy alumel were exposed to synthesis gas containing ≤2 ppm phosphorus, arsenic and antimony, and reaction products were tested. Crofer 22 APU coupons coated with a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protective layer were also evaluated. Phosphorus was found to be the most reactive. On Crofer 22 APU, the (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 passivation layer reacted to form an Mn-P-O product, predicted to be manganese phosphate from thermochemical calculations, and Cr 2O 3. On SS 441, reaction of phosphorus with (Mn,Cr) 3O 4 led to the formation of manganese phosphate as well as an Fe-P product, predicted from thermochemical calculations to be Fe 3P. Minimal interactions with antimony or arsenic in synthesis gas were limited to Fe-Sb and Fe-As solid solution formation. Though not intended for use on the anode side, a (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel coating on Crofer 22 APU reacted with phosphorus in synthesis gas to produce products consistent with Mn 3(PO 4) 2 and Co 2P. A thin Cr 2O 3 passivation layer on Inconel 600 did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides and arsenides and of iron phosphides and arsenides, though no reaction with Cr 2O 3 was apparent. On alumel, an Al 2O 3 passivation layer rich in Ni did not prevent the formation of nickel phosphides, arsenides, and antimonides, though no reaction with Al 2O 3 occurred. This work shows that unprotected metallic components of an SOFC stack and system can provide a sink for P, As and Sb impurities that may be present in fuel gases, and thus complicate

  3. Influence of carbonation under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas on the leachability of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Xiong, Zhuo; Tian, Chong; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-09-01

    Due to the high cost of pure CO2, carbonation of MSWI fly ash has not been fully developed. It is essential to select a kind of reaction gas with rich CO2 instead of pure CO2. The CO2 uptake and leaching toxicity of heavy metals in three typical types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated with simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas under different reaction temperatures, which was compared with both pure CO2 and simulated air combustion flue gas. The CO2 uptake under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas were similar to that of pure CO2. The leaching concentration of heavy metals in all MSWI fly ash samples, especially in ash from Changzhou, China (CZ), decreased after carbonation. Specifically, the leached Pb concentration of the CZ MSWI fly ash decreased 92% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, 95% under pure CO2 atmosphere and 84% under the air combustion flue gas. After carbonation, the leaching concentration of Pb was below the Chinese legal limit. The leaching concentration of Zn from CZ sample decreased 69% under oxy-fuel combustion flue gas, which of Cu, As, Cr and Hg decreased 25%, 33%, 11% and 21%, respectively. In the other two samples of Xuzhou, China (XZ) and Wuhan, China (WH), the leaching characteristics of heavy metals were similar to the CZ sample. The speciation of heavy metals was largely changed from the exchangeable to carbonated fraction because of the carbonation reaction under simulated oxy-fuel combustion flue gas. After carbonation reaction, most of heavy metals bound in carbonates became more stable and leached less. Therefore, oxy-fuel combustion flue gas could be a low-cost source for carbonation of MSWI fly ash. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological processes for environmental control of effluent streams in the nuclear fuel cycle. [Denitrification; removal of heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumate, II, S E; Hancher, C W; Strandberg, G W; Scott, C D

    1978-01-01

    Nitrates and radioactive heavy metals need to be removed from aqueous effluent streams in the fuel cycle. Biological methods are being developed for reducing nitrate or nitrite to N/sub 2/ gas and for decreasing dissolved metal concentration to less than 1 g/m/sup 3/. Fluidized-bed denitrification bioreactors are being tested. Removal of uranium from solution by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied. (DLC)

  5. Complex plasmochemical processing of solid fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Messerle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology of complex plasmaochemical processing of solid fuel by Ecibastuz bituminous and Turgay brown coals is presented. Thermodynamic and experimental study of the technology was fulfilled. Use of this technology allows producing of synthesis gas from organic mass of coal and valuable components (technical silicon, ferrosilicon, aluminum and silicon carbide and microelements of rare metals: uranium, molybdenum, vanadium etc. from mineral mass of coal. Produced a high-calorific synthesis gas can be used for methanol synthesis, as high-grade reducing gas instead of coke, as well as energy gas in thermal power plants.

  6. Design principles for oxygen-reduction activity on perovskite oxide catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntivich, Jin; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Goodenough, John B; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-06-12

    The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to σ-orbital (e(g)) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the σ orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O(2)(2-)/OH(-) displacement and OH(-) regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

  7. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    Abstract The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important potential comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The irradiations were the beginning tests to qualify U-10wt%Zr as a driver fuel for FFTF. The FFTF core, with a 91.4 cm tall fuel column and a chopped cosine neutron flux profile, operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in previous EBR-II experiments that had a 32-cm height core. The MFF-3 and MFF-5 qualification assemblies operated in FFTF to >10 at% burnup, and performed very well with no cladding breaches. The MFF-3 assembly operated to 13.8 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 643°C, and the MFF-5 assembly operated to 10.1 at% burnup with a peak inner cladding temperature of 651°C. Because of the very high operating temperatures for both the fuel and the cladding, data from the MFF assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment, which experienced two pin breaches. The X447 breaches were strongly influenced by a large amount of fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). The MFF pins benefitted from different axial locations of high burnup and peak cladding temperature, which helped to reduce interdiffusion between rare earth fission products and stainless steel cladding. Post-irradiation examination evidence illustrates this advantage. Comparing other performance data of the long MFF pins to prior EBR-II test data, the MFF fuel inside the cladding grew less axially, and the gas release data did not reveal a definitive difference.

  8. A Mechanistic Source Term Calculation for a Metal Fuel Sodium Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James

    2017-06-26

    A mechanistic source term (MST) calculation attempts to realistically assess the transport and release of radionuclides from a reactor system to the environment during a specific accident sequence. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has repeatedly stated its expectation that advanced reactor vendors will utilize an MST during the U.S. reactor licensing process. As part of a project to examine possible impediments to sodium fast reactor (SFR) licensing in the U.S., an analysis was conducted regarding the current capabilities to perform an MST for a metal fuel SFR. The purpose of the project was to identify and prioritize any gaps in current computational tools, and the associated database, for the accurate assessment of an MST. The results of the study demonstrate that an SFR MST is possible with current tools and data, but several gaps exist that may lead to possibly unacceptable levels of uncertainty, depending on the goals of the MST analysis.

  9. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. Coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation

    El uso de interconectores metálicos en pilas de combustible de óxido sólido (SOFC en sustitución de materiales cerámicos ha sido posible gracias a la investigación y desarrollo de nuevos materiales metálicos. Inicialmente, el uso de interconectores metálicos fue limitado, debido a la elevada temperatura de trabajo, ocasionando de forma rápida la degradación del material, lo que impedía que fuesen una alternativa. A medida que la temperatura de trabajo de las SOFC descendió, el uso de interconectores metálicos demostró ser una buena alternativa, dado que son más fáciles de fabricar y más baratos que los interconectores cerámicos. Sin embargo, los interconectores metálicos continúan degradándose a pesar de descender la temperatura a la que operan las SOFC y, asimismo, los productos de corrosión favorecen las pérdidas eléctricas de la pila de combustible. Recubrimientos de níquel, cromo, aluminio, zinc, manganeso, itrio y lantano entre el interconector y los electrodos reduce dichas pérdidas eléctricas.

  11. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    OpenAIRE

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich

    2015-01-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the...

  12. Highly stable precious metal-free cathode catalyst for fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexey; Workman, Michael J.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; McCool, Geoffrey; McKinney, Sam; Romero, Henry; Halevi, Barr; Stephenson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst engineered for stability has been synthesized using the sacrificial support method (SSM). This catalyst was comprehensively characterized by physiochemical analyses and tested for performance and durability in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). This catalyst, belonging to the family of Fe-N-C materials, is easily scalable and can be manufactured in batches up to 200 g. The fuel cell durability tests were performed in a single cell configuration at realistic operating conditions of 0.65 V, 1.25 atmgauge air, and 90% RH for 100 h. In-depth characterization of surface chemistry and morphology of the catalyst layer before and after durability tests were performed. The failure modes of the PGM-free electrodes were derived from structure-to-property correlations. It is suggested that under constant voltage operation, the performance loss results from degradation of the electrode pore structure, while under carbon corrosion accelerated test protocols the failure mode is catalyst corrosion.

  13. An anisotropic numerical model for thermal hydraulic analyses: application to liquid metal flow in fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitillo, F.; Vitale Di Maio, D.; Galati, C.; Caruso, G.

    2015-11-01

    A CFD analysis has been carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of liquid metal coolant in a fuel assembly of triangular lattice. In order to obtain fast and accurate results, the isotropic two-equation RANS approach is often used in nuclear engineering applications. A different approach is provided by Non-Linear Eddy Viscosity Models (NLEVM), which try to take into account anisotropic effects by a nonlinear formulation of the Reynolds stress tensor. This approach is very promising, as it results in a very good numerical behavior and in a potentially better fluid flow description than classical isotropic models. An Anisotropic Shear Stress Transport (ASST) model, implemented into a commercial software, has been applied in previous studies, showing very trustful results for a large variety of flows and applications. In the paper, the ASST model has been used to perform an analysis of the fluid flow inside the fuel assembly of the ALFRED lead cooled fast reactor. Then, a comparison between the results of wall-resolved conjugated heat transfer computations and the results of a decoupled analysis using a suitable thermal wall-function previously implemented into the solver has been performed and presented.

  14. A Mechanistic Reliability Assessment of RVACS and Metal Fuel Inherent Reactivity Feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Passerini, Stefano; Grelle, Austin

    2017-09-24

    GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) participated in a two year collaboration to modernize and update the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for the PRISM sodium fast reactor. At a high level, the primary outcome of the project was the development of a next-generation PRA that is intended to enable risk-informed prioritization of safety- and reliability-focused research and development. A central Argonne task during this project was a reliability assessment of passive safety systems, which included the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) and the inherent reactivity feedbacks of the metal fuel core. Both systems were examined utilizing a methodology derived from the Reliability Method for Passive Safety Functions (RMPS), with an emphasis on developing success criteria based on mechanistic system modeling while also maintaining consistency with the Fuel Damage Categories (FDCs) of the mechanistic source term assessment. This paper provides an overview of the reliability analyses of both systems, including highlights of the FMEAs, the construction of best-estimate models, uncertain parameter screening and propagation, and the quantification of system failure probability. In particular, special focus is given to the methodologies to perform the analysis of uncertainty propagation and the determination of the likelihood of violating FDC limits. Additionally, important lessons learned are also reviewed, such as optimal sampling methodologies for the discovery of low likelihood failure events and strategies for the combined treatment of aleatory and epistemic uncertainties.

  15. Literature review on metallic fuel source term for sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Nam Duk; Bae, Moo Hoon; Shin, An Dong; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Source term is defined as the release of radionuclides from the fuel and coolant into the containment, and subsequently to the environment, following a severe accident where a significant portion of the reactor core has melted. Of the many issues associated with the development and deployment of SFRs, one of high regulatory importance is the source term to be used in the siting of the reactor. Apart from assessing the radiological consequences for siting, it is also important for designing filtering systems and even reactor components. Overly conservative source term for light water reactor, TID 14844 demands for very fast closure of main steam isolation valves, rapid startup of emergency diesels, and safety systems designed to mitigate gaseous iodine. In spite of this importance, most of the knowledge we have for SFR source term comes from the research performed before 1980s. Moreover, majority of the work on metallic fuels was done during the late 1950's through the 1960's. This paper reviews and summarizes the main characteristics of SFR source terms based on the available literatures.

  16. Oxidation behavior of various metallic alloys for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.L.; Lee, S. [National Central Univ., Chung-li, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Wang, J.Y. [National Dong Hwa Univ., Hualien, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Lee, R.Y. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan, Taiwan (China)

    2007-07-01

    Interconnect is an important component in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) as it functions to structurally and electrically bridge several sequentially stacked unit cells. Each of them contains an electrolyte, an anode and a cathode. Oxidation of interconnect is anticipated, since the SOFC system operates at high temperature and oxygen is supplied for chemical reaction with hydrogen or hydro-carbon compound fuel in order to output electricity. Therefore, any favorable candidate alloy for interconnect should be oxidation resistant so that only a very thin layer of it is allowed to form if there is any. Only in compliance to this requirement, electrical conducting can be maintained to assure system current flow after long period of operation. This paper presented an examination and analysis of ten metallic alloys, all containing comparable amount of chromium (Cr) that were subjected to oxidation treatment in hot air environment for various periods of time. The resulted oxide scale was then studied with microstructure analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was concluded that oxide scale thickness grew with time in a parabolic relationship for all the examined alloys. 9 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. Compacted and Sintered Microstructure Depending on Uranium Powder Size in Zr-U Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chang Gun; Jun, Hyun-Joon; Ju, Jung Hwan; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Hyung Lae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In case of the uranium (U) and zirconium (Zr) powders which have been utilized for the production of a metallic fuel in the various nuclear applications, the homogenous distribution of U powders in the Zr-U pellet has influenced significantly on the nuclear fuel performance. The inhomogeneity in a powder process was changed by various intricate factors, e.g. powder size, shape, distribution and so on. Particularly, the U inhomogeneity in the Zr-U pellets occurs by segregation derived from the great gaps of densities between Zr and U during compaction of the mixed powders. In this study, the relationship between powder size and homogeneity was investigated by using the different-sized U powders. The microstructure in Zr-U pellets reveals more homogeneity when the weight ration of Zr and U powders are close to 1. In addition, homogeneous pellets which were produced by fine U powders have higher density because the homogeneity affects the alloying reaction during sintering and the densification behavior of pore induced by powder size.

  18. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Xiaogang; Ma Wenhui; Zhou Yang; Liu Dachun; Yang Bin; Dai Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and gr...

  19. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  20. A novel Ni/ceria-based anode for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek-Wöckner, Veronika A.; Opitz, Alexander K.; Brandner, Marco; Mathé, Jörg; Bram, Martin

    2016-10-01

    For optimization of ageing behavior, electrochemical performance, and sulfur tolerance of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells a new anode concept is introduced, which is based on a Ni/GDC cermet replacing the established Ni/YSZ anodes. In the present work optimized processing parameters compatible with MSC substrates are specified by doing sintering studies on pressed bulk specimen and on real porous anode structures. The electrochemical performance of the Ni/GDC anodes was characterized by means of symmetrical electrolyte supported model-type cells. In this study, three main objectives are pursued. Firstly, the effective technical realization of the Ni/GDC concept is demonstrated. Secondly, the electrochemical behavior of Ni/GDC porous anodes is characterized by impedance spectroscopy and compared with the current standard Ni/YSZ anode. Further, a qualitative comparison of the sulfur poisoning behavior of both anode types is presented. Thirdly, preliminary results of a successful implementation of the Ni/GDC cermet into a metal-supported single cell are presented.

  1. One pot electrochemical synthesis of polymer/CNT/metal nanoparticles for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Zhu, Jingyi; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Nanomaterials center Team

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become a key player in the design of materials for energy applications. They gained their popularity in industrial and scientific research due to their unique properties like excellent conductivity, high surface area, etc. Here we used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to synthesize two types of CNTs namely, helically coiled CNTs and vertically aligned CNTs. These CNTs were subsequently used to make composites with conducting polymers and metal nanoparticles. One pot electrochemical synthesis was designed to electropolymerize aniline, pyrrole etc. on the surface of the electrode with simultaneous deposition of platinum and gold metal nanoparticles, and CNTs in the polymer matrix. The as synthesized composite materials were characterized with scanning electron microscope for surface morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis for functionality. These were used to study electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and ethanol for alkaline fuel cell applications. Electrodes fabricated from these composites not only showed good kinetics but also exhibited excellent stability. Uniqueness of this composite lies in its simple two step synthesis and it doesn't involve any surfactants unlike conventional chemical synthesis routes.

  2. Biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production: A novel approach in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy, E-mail: saravana732@gmail.com [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China); MubarakAli, Davoodbasha [Microbial Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Division of Bioengineering, College of Life Science and Bioengineering, Incheon National University, Songdo 406772, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Kathiresan, Kandasamy [Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, Nooruddin [Department of Microbiology, School of Lifesciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, Naiyf S. [Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chen, Jie, E-mail: jiechen59@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Trichoderma sp., showed an abilities to synthesis of AgNPs and AuNPs with an excellent stability. • AuNPs significantly enhanced the bioelectricity production by MFC of anaerobic fermentation as catalyst. • Maximum bioelectricity production was optimized and obtained the voltage of 432.80 mA using RSM. - Abstract: The present work aimed to use the biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cell (MFC) approach under anaerobic condition. Silver and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using Trichoderma sp. Particle size and cystallinity were measured by X-ray diffraction revealed the crystalline structure with average size of 36.17 nm. Electron microscopic studies showed spherical shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and cubical shaped AuNPs with size ranges from 50 to 150 nm. The concentration of biogenic metallic nanoparticles as catalyst for enhanced bioelectricity generations and estimated by response surface methodology (RSM) and found at the greatest of 342.80 mA under optimized conditions are time interval, temperature, nanoparticles used as 63 h, 28 ± 2.0 °C, 22.54 mg l{sup −1} (AgNPs) and 25.62 mg l{sup −1} (AuNPs) in a batch reactor. AuNPs acted as an excellent catalyst to enhance the bioelectricity production. This novel technique could be used for eco-friendly, economically feasible and facile electricity production.

  3. Metal-organic frameworks for removal of Xe and Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K; Strachan, Denis

    2012-08-01

    Removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from process off-gases containing 400 ppm Xe, 40 ppm Kr, 78% N(2), 21% O(2), 0.9% Ar, 0.03% CO(2), and so forth using adsorption was demonstrated for the first time. Two well-known metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and Ni/DOBDC, which both have unsaturated metal centers but different pore morphologies, were selected as novel adsorbents. Results of an activated carbon were also included for comparison. The Ni/DOBDC has higher Xe/Kr selectivities than those of the activated carbon and the HKUST-1. In addition, results show that the Ni/DOBDC and HKUST-1 can adsorb substantial amounts of Xe and Kr even when they are mixed in air. Moreover, the Ni/DOBDC can successfully separate 400 ppm Xe from 40 ppm Kr and air containing O(2), N(2), and CO(2) with a Xe/Ke selectivity of 7.3 as indicated by our breakthrough results. This shows a promising future for MOFs in radioactive nuclide separations from spent fuels.

  4. Study on Doppler coefficient for metallic fuel fast reactor added hydrogeneous moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuhumi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Osugi, Toshitaka; Okajima, Shigeaki; Andoh, Masaki; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Mukaiyama, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    A series of mock-up experiments for moderator added metallic fast reactor core was carried out at FCA to obtain the experimental verification for improvement of reactivity coefficients. Softened neutron spectrum increases Doppler effect by a factor of 2, and flatter adjoint neutron spectrum decreases Na void effect by a factor of 0.6 when hydrogen to heavy metal atomic number ratio is increased from 0.02 to 0.13. The experimental results are analyzed with SLALOM and CITATION-FBR, which is the standard design code system for a fast reactor at JAERI, and SRAC95 and CITATION-FBR. The present code system gives generally good agreement with the experimental results, especially by the use of the latter, the dependence of the Doppler effect to the hydrogen to fuel element atomic number density ratio is disappeared. Therefore, it looks possible to use the present code system for the conceptual design of a fast reactor system with hydrogeneous materials. (author)

  5. Standard guide for pyrophoricity/combustibility testing in support of pyrophoricity analyses of metallic uranium spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers testing protocols for testing the pyrophoricity/combustibility characteristics of metallic uranium-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The testing will provide basic data for input into more detailed computer codes or analyses of thermal, chemical, and mechanical SNF responses. These analyses would support the engineered barrier system (EBS) design bases and safety assessment of extended interim storage facilities and final disposal in a geologic repository. The testing also could provide data related to licensing requirements for the design and operation of a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS) or independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). 1.2 This guide describes testing of metallic uranium and metallic uranium-based SNF in support of transportation (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR71), interim storage (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR72), and geologic repository disposal (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR60/63). The testing described ...

  6. Fuel rich and fuel lean catalytic combustion of the stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames over noble metal disc burners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S. Zakhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic combustion of stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 disc burners situated in the combustion domain under both fuel-rich and fuel-lean conditions was experimentally studied. Commercial LPG fuel having an average composition of: 23% propane, 76% butane, and 1% pentane was used. The thermal structure of these catalytic flames developed over Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 burners were examined via measuring the mean temperature distribution in the radial direction at different axial locations along the flames. Under-fuel-rich condition the flames operated over Pt catalytic disc attained high temperature values in order to express the progress of combustion and were found to achieve higher activity as compared to the flames developed over Pd catalytic disc. These two types of catalytic flames demonstrated an increase in the reaction rate with the downstream axial distance and hence, an increase in the flame temperatures was associated with partial oxidation towards CO due to the lack of oxygen. However, under fuel-lean conditions the catalytic flame over Pd catalyst recorded comparatively higher temperatures within the flame core in the near region of the main reaction zone than over Pt disc burner. These two catalytic flames over Pt and Pd disc burners showed complete oxidation to CO2 since the catalytic surface is covered by more rich oxygen under the fuel-lean condition.

  7. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the major specifications of the fabrication technique influence the content of titanium carbide and free carbon in the end product.

  8. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  9. A study on the production of titanium carbide nano-powder in the nanostate and its properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaeva, L. S.; Rudneva, S. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma synthesis of titanium carbide nano-powder in the conditions close to industrial was studied. Titanium carbide TiC is a wear- and corrosion-resistant, hard, chemically inert material, demanded in various fields for the production of hard alloys, metal- ceramic tools, heat-resistant products, protective metal coatings. New perspectives for application titanium carbide in the nanostate can be found in the field of alloys modification with different composition and destination.

  10. Feasibility study of fluxless brazing cemented carbides to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Sievers, N.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important brazing processes is the joints between cemented carbides and steel for the tool industry such as in rotary drill hammers or saw blades. Even though this technique has already been used for several decades, defects in the joint can still occur and lead to quality loss. Mostly, the joining process is facilitated by induction heating and the use of a flux to enhance the wetting of the filler alloy on the surface of the steel and cemented carbide in an ambient atmosphere. However, although the use of flux enables successful joining, it also generates voids within the joint, which reduces the strength of the connection while the chemicals within the flux are toxic and polluting. In this feasibility study, a fluxless brazing process is used to examine the joint between cemented carbides and steel for the first time. For this, ultrasound is applied during induction heating to enable the wetting between the liquid filler metal and the surfaces of the cemented carbide and steel. The ultrasound generates cavitations within the liquid filler metal, which remove the oxides from the surface. Several filler metals such as a silver based alloy Ag449, pure Zn, and an AlSi-alloy were used to reduce the brazing temperature and to lower the thermal residual stresses within the joint. As a result, every filler metal successfully wetted both materials and led to a dense connection. The ultrasound has to be applied carefully to prevent a damage of the cemented carbide. In this regard, it was observed that single grains of the cemented carbide broke out and remained in the joint. This positive result of brazing cemented carbides to steel without a flux but using ultrasound, allows future studies to focus on the shear strength of these joints as well as the behavior of the thermally induced residual stresses.

  11. Characterization of Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The various electrical and structural measurement techniques for silicon carbide are described. The electrical measurements include conductivity, resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, doping energy levels, and lifetime. The structural measurements include polytype determination and crystalline perfection. Both bulk and epitaxial films are included.

  12. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  13. Effect of central metal ions of analogous metal-organic frameworks on the adsorptive removal of benzothiophene from a model fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-09-15

    Liquid phase adsorption of benzothiophene (BT) has been studied over CuCl₂-loaded analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal-benzenedicarboxylates (Me-BDCs, Me: Al, Cr and V), to understand the effect of central metal ions on the adsorptive removal of BT from a model fuel. Among the central metal ions (Al(3+), Cr(3+) and V(3+)) of the Me-BDCs only V(3+) was oxidized by the loaded CuCl₂ (or Cu(2+)) at ambient condition resulting in V(4+) and Cu(+) species. Different from the CuCl₂-loaded Al- and Cr-BDCs, the CuCl₂/V-BDC adsorbed BT remarkably well compared to the virgin V-BDCs which suggests a specific favorable interaction (π-complexation) between the obtained Cu(+) in the CuCl₂/V-BDC and BT.

  14. Influence of a doping by Al stainless steel on kinetics and character of interaction with the metallic nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nuclear fuel is a perspective kind of fuel for fast reactors. In this paper we conducted a study of the interaction between uranium-molybdenum alloy and ferritic- martensitic steels with additions of aluminum at a temperature of 700 ° C for 25 hours. The rate constants of the interaction layer growth at 700 °C is about 2.8.10-14 m2/s. It is established that doping Al stainless steel leads to decrease in interaction with uranium-molybdenum alloys. The phase composition of the interaction layer is determined.

  15. Studies on metal catalysts and carbon materials for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaixia

    As a potential candidate for an environmentally benign and highly efficient electric power generation technology, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are now attracting great interest for various applications. The main objective of this project has been to investigate the interfacial interaction of Pt nanoparticles with their carbon supports, so as to determine ways to optimise the catalyst electrode and to increase its catalytic activity, thereby enhancing PEM fuel cell performance. We first studied the interfacial interaction (leading to adhesion) of Pt nanoparticles evaporated onto untreated and Ar+-treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces, with, respectively, low and high surface defect densities; HOPG was used as a model for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon fibers. We found that those Pt nanoparticles have very weak interactions with their pristine carbon material supports, with no evidence of compound formation between them. Our analysis, however, indicated that the adhesion of Pt nanoparticles to their supports can be enhanced, using ion beams, plasmas, or other treatments to establish defects on the carbon substrate surface. In addition, by using multicomponent XPS analysis with symmetric lineshapes for each Pt4f spectral component (4f7/2,5/2), we attributed the component peaks to the existence of (i) surface oxidation on the platinum nanoparticles, and different electronic configurations of (ii) surface and (iii) bulk Pt atoms. One way of enhancing strong adhesion between them is by chemical functionalization of the support. Using mixed H2SO4/HNO3 acid treatments, we have characterized the surface chemistry of functionalized carbon fiber paper by combining infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, to give new insights into the often-used oxidation of graphene-containing materials. We have, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of transient O-, N- and S-containing species during the oxidation process, as well as

  16. Development and Characterization of the Bonding and Integration Technologies Needed for Fabricating Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig,Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding technology, titanium interlayers (coatings and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness, and processing time were investigated. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases. In the diffusion bonds, an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner interlayers of pure titanium and/or longer processing times resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Nondestructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  17. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  18. Silicon carbide high performance optics: a cost-effective, flexible fabrication process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, John M.; Rashed, Abuagela; Plummer, Ronald; Bray, Don; Gates, Rob L.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Ferber, Matt K.; Kirkland, Tim

    2001-12-01

    Silicon carbide may well be the best known material for the manufacture of high performance optical components. This material offers many advantages over glasses and metals that have historically been used in high performance optical systems. A combination of extremely high specific stiffness (E/r), high thermal conductivity and outstanding dimensional stability make silicon carbide superior overall to beryllium and low-expansion glass ceramics. A major impediment to wide use of silicon carbide in optical systems has been the cost associated with preliminary shaping and final finishing of silicon carbide. Because silicon carbide is an extremely hard and strong material, precision machining can only be done with expensive diamond tooling on very stiff high quality machine tools. Near-net-shape slip casting of silicon carbide can greatly reduce the cost of silicon carbide mirror substrates but this process still requires significant diamond grinding of the cast components. The process described here begins by machining the component from all special type of graphite. This graphite can rapidly be machined with conventional multi-axis CNC machine tools to achieve any level of complexity and lightweighting required. The graphite is then directly converted completely to silicon carbide with very small and very predictable dimensional change. After conversion to silicon carbide the optical surface is coated with very fine grain CVD silicon carbide which is easily polished to extreme smoothness. Details of the fabrication process are described and photos and performance specifications of an eight-inch elliptical demonstration mirror are provided.

  19. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  20. Life prediction of coated and uncoated metallic interconnect for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. N.; Sun, X.; Stephens, E.; Khaleel, M. A.

    In this paper, we present an integrated experimental and modeling methodology in predicting the life of coated and uncoated metallic interconnect (IC) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The ultimate goal is to provide cell designer and manufacture with a predictive methodology such that the life of the IC system can be managed and optimized through different coating thickness to meet the overall cell designed life. Crofer 22 APU is used as the example IC material system. The life of coated and uncoated Crofer 22 APU under isothermal cooling was predicted by comparing the predicted interfacial strength and the interfacial stresses induced by the cooling process from the operating temperature to room temperature, together with the measured oxide scale growth kinetics. It was found that the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and the Crofer 22 APU substrate decreases with the growth of the oxide scale, and that the interfacial strength for the oxide scale/spinel coating interface is much higher than that of the oxide scale/Crofer 22 APU substrate interface. As expected, the predicted life of the coated Crofer 22 APU is significantly longer than that of the uncoated Crofer 22 APU.

  1. A High Power Density, High Efficiency Hydrogen-Chlorine Regenerative Fuel Cell with a Low Precious Metal Content Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Huskinson, Brian; Rugolo, Jason; Mondal, Sujit K.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the performance of a hydrogen-chlorine electrochemical cell with a chlorine electrode employing a low precious metal content alloy oxide electrocatalyst for the chlorine electrode: (Ru_0.09Co_0.91)_3O_4. The cell employs a commercial hydrogen fuel cell electrode and transports protons through a Nafion membrane in both galvanic and electrolytic mode. The peak galvanic power density exceeds 1 W cm^-2, which is twice previous literature values. The precious metal loading of the chlorin...

  2. Negative bias-and-temperature stress-assisted activation of oxygen-vacancy hole traps in 4H-silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettisserry, D. P., E-mail: deva@umd.edu, E-mail: neil@umd.edu; Goldsman, N., E-mail: deva@umd.edu, E-mail: neil@umd.edu; Akturk, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lelis, A. J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We use hybrid-functional density functional theory-based Charge Transition Levels (CTLs) to study the electrical activity of near-interfacial oxygen vacancies located in the oxide side of 4H-Silicon Carbide (4H-SiC) power Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). Based on the “amorphousness” of their local atomic environment, oxygen vacancies are shown to introduce their CTLs either within (permanently electrically active) or outside of (electrically inactive) the 4H-SiC bandgap. The “permanently electrically active” centers are likely to cause threshold voltage (V{sub th}) instability at room temperature. On the other hand, we show that the “electrically inactive” defects could be transformed into various “electrically active” configurations under simultaneous application of negative bias and high temperature stresses. Based on this observation, we present a model for plausible oxygen vacancy defects that could be responsible for the recently observed excessive worsening of V{sub th} instability in 4H-SiC power MOSFETs under high temperature-and-gate bias stress. This model could also explain the recent electrically detected magnetic resonance observations in 4H-SiC MOSFETs.

  3. The life of some metallic uranium based fuel elements; Duree de vie de quelques combustibles a base d'uranium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J.A.; Englander, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Description of some theoretical and experimental data concerning the design and most economic preparation of metallic uranium based fuel elements, which are intended to produce an energy of 3 kW days/g of uranium in a thermal reactor, at a sufficiently high mean temperature. Experimental results obtained by testing by analogy or by actually trying out fuel elements obtained by alloying uranium with other metals in proportions such that the resistance to deformation of the alloy produced is much higher than that of pure metallic uranium and that the thermal utilisation factor is only slightly different from that of the uranium. (author) [French] Description de quelques donnees theoriques et experimentales concernant la conception et la preparation la plus economique d'elements combustibles a base d'uranium metallique naturel, destines a degager dans un reacteur thermique une energie de l'ordre de 3 kWj/g d'uranium a une temperature moyenne suffisamment elevee. Resultats experimentaux acquis par tests analogiques ou reels sur combustibles obtenus par alliage de l'uranium avec des elements metalliques en proportions telles que la resistance a la deformation soit bien superieure a celle de l'uranium metal pur et que le facteur propre d'utilisation thermique n ne soit que peu affecte. (auteur)

  4. Optimization of fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies for transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon cathode catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna K. Dombrovskis; Cathrin Prestel; Anders E. C. Palmqvist

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon (TM-OMC) materials were recently shown to be efficient polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts. The structure and properties of these catalysts are largely different from conventional catalyst materials, thus rendering membrane electrode assembly (MEA) preparation parameters developed for conventional catalysts not useful for applications of TM-OMC catalysts. This necessitates development of a methodology to incorporate...

  5. On the effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trummer, Martin; Nilsson, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2008-08-01

    Radiation induced oxidative dissolution of UO 2 is a key process for the safety assessment of future geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. This process is expected to govern the rate of radionuclide release to the biosphere. In this work, we have studied the catalytic effects of fission product noble metal inclusions on the kinetics of radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The experimental studies were performed using UO 2 pellets containing 0%, 0.1%, 1% and 3% Pd as a model for spent nuclear fuel. H 2O 2 was used as a model for radiolytical oxidants (previous studies have shown that H 2O 2 is the most important oxidant in such systems). The pellets were immersed in aqueous solution containing H 2O 2 and HCO3- and the consumption of H 2O 2 and the dissolution of uranium were analyzed as a function of H 2 pressure (0-40 bar). The noble metal inclusions were found to catalyze oxidation of UO 2 as well as reduction of surface bound oxidized UO 2 by H 2. In both cases the rate of the process increases with increasing Pd content. The reduction process was found to be close to diffusion controlled. This process can fully account for the inhibiting effect of H 2 observed in several studies on spent nuclear fuel dissolution.

  6. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scheele, Randall D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-23

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (~70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550°C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400°C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  7. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  8. A review of composite and metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Materials, fabrication, and material selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate (BP) is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. BPs have primarily been fabricated from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to develop the cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Recently, two different classes of materials have been attracted attention: metals and composite materials. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current researches being carried out on the metallic and composite BPs, covering materials and fabrication methods. In this research, the phenomenon of ionic contamination due to the release of the corrosion products of metallic BP and relative impact on the durability as well as performance of PEM fuel cells is extensively investigated. Furthermore, in this paper, upon several effective parameters on commercialization of PEM fuel cells, such as stack cost, weight, volume, durability, strength, ohmic resistance, and ionic contamination, a material selection is performed among the most common BPs currently being used. This material selection is conducted by using Simple Additive Weighting Method (SAWM).

  9. Production of LEU Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Irradiation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; McMurray, Jake W [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded inside a SiC matrix. This fuel inherently possesses multiple barriers to fission product release, namely the various coating layers in the TRISO fuel particle as well as the dense SiC matrix that hosts these particles. This coupled with the excellent oxidation resistance of the SiC matrix and the SiC coating layer in the TRISO particle designate this concept as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). The FCM fuel takes advantage of uranium nitride kernels instead of oxide or oxide-carbide kernels used in high temperature gas reactors to enhance heavy metal loading in the highly moderated LWRs. Production of these kernels with appropriate density, coating layer development to produce UN TRISO particles, and consolidation of these particles inside a SiC matrix have been codified thanks to significant R&D supported by US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program. Also, surrogate FCM pellets (pellets with zirconia instead of uranium-bearing kernels) have been neutron irradiated and the stability of the matrix and coating layer under LWR irradiation conditions have been established. Currently the focus is on production of LEU (7.3% U-235 enrichment) FCM pellets to be utilized for irradiation testing. The irradiation is planned at INL s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is a critical step in development of this fuel concept to establish the ability of this fuel to retain fission products under prototypical irradiation conditions.

  10. Measurements of reaction rate ratios as indexes of breeding performance in mock-up cores of FCA simulating metallic-fueled LMFBR and MOX-fueled LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Nemoto, Tatsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kobayashi, Keiji; Unesaki, Hironobu

    1999-08-01

    Measurements and analysis for reaction rate ratio of {sup 238}U capture to {sup 239}Pu fission (C8/F9) and that of {sup 238}U capture to {sup 235}U fission (C8/F5), which are important as indexes of breeding behavior of a fast breeder reactor, were made at Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The measurements were made by a foil activation technique at two assemblies simulating metallic-fueled liquid metal fast breeder reactor and an assembly simulating a MOX-fueled one. The analysis was made based on JENDL3.2 nuclear data file. Calculation to experiment ratios of C8/F9 and C8/F5 were 0.99-1.02 and 1.0-1.03 respectively. Furthermore, the {sup 238}U capture rate and the {sup 235}U fission rate were measured in a thermal neutron standard field in Heavy Water Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor to verify accuracy of the present foil activation technique itself and to confirm these C/E values. (author)

  11. A proposal of benchmark calculation on reactor physics for metallic fueled and MOX fueled LMFBR based upon mack-up experiment at FCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Susumu; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okajima, Shigeaki; Andoh, Masaki; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Kato, Yuichi; Osugi, Toshitaka [Dept. of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    In order to assess the validity of the cross section library for fast reactor physics, a set of benchmark calculation is proposed. The benchmark calculation is based upon mock-up experiments at three FCA cores with various compositions of central test regions, two of which were mock-ups of metallic fueled LMFBR's, and the other was a mock-up of a mixed oxide fueled LMFBR. One of the metallic cores included enriched uranium in the test region, while the others did not. Physics parameters to be calculated are criticality, reaction rate ratios, plutonium and B{sub 4}C sample worth, sodium void reactivity worth, and Doppler reactivity worth of {sup 238}U. Homogenized atomic number densities and various correction factors are given so that anyone can easily perform diffusion calculation in two-dimensional RZ-model and compare the results with the experiments. The validity of the correction factors are proved by changing the calculation method and used nuclear data file. (author)

  12. Solid-state formation of titanium carbide and molybdenum carbide as contacts for carbon-containing semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, W. P.; Detavernier, C.; van Meirhaeghe, R. L.; Kellock, A. J.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-03-01

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin Ti or Mo films and C substrates. Titanium carbide (TiC) was previously reported as a contact material to diamond and carbon nanotubes. However, the present study shows two disadvantages for the solid-state reaction of Ti and C. First, because Ti reacts readily with oxygen, a capping layer should be included to enable carbide formation. Second, the TiC phase can exist over a wide range of composition (about 10%, i.e., from Ti0.5C0.5 to Ti0.6C0.4), leading to significant variations in the properties of the material formed. The study of the Mo-C system suggests that molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) is a promising alternative, since the phase shows a lower resistivity (about 45% lower than for TiC), the carbide forms below 900 °C, and its formation is less sensitive to oxidation as compared with the Ti-C system. The measured resistivity for Mo2C is ρ=59 μΩ cm, and from kinetic studies an activation energy for Mo2C formation of Ea=3.15+/-0.15 eV was obtained.

  13. Structural evolution of zirconium carbide under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, D.; Dollé, M.; Simeone, D.; Baldinozzi, G.; Thomé, L.

    2008-02-01

    Zirconium carbide is one of the candidate materials to be used for some fuel components of the high temperature nuclear reactors planned in the frame of the Gen-IV project. Few data exist regarding its behaviour under irradiation. We have irradiated ZrC samples at room temperature with slow heavy ions (4 MeV Au, fluence from 10 11 to 5 × 10 15 cm -2) in order to simulate neutron irradiations. Grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis have been performed in order to study the microstructural evolution of the material versus ion fluence. A high sensitivity to oxidation is observed with the formation of zirconia precipitates during the ion irradiations. Three damage stages are observed. At low fluence (high micro-strains appear together with small faulted dislocation loops. At the highest fluence (>10 14 cm -2), the micro-strains saturate and the loops coalesce to form a dense dislocation network. No other structural modification is observed. The material shows a moderate cell parameter increase, corresponding to a 0.6 vol.% swelling, which saturates around 10 14 ions/cm 2, i.e., a few Zr dpa. As a result, in spite of a strong covalent bonding component, ZrC seems to have a behaviour under irradiation close to cubic metals.

  14. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  15. Characterization of silicon carbide coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Olayyan, Yousif Abdullah

    The lifetime of light water reactor (LWR) fuels is limited by the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding in the high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. As the thickness of the oxide layer increases, stresses build up in the oxide layer due to density differences between the oxide and the zirconium metal which lead to degradation and spallation of the oxide layer. The main objective of this research is to form protective coatings on the Zircaloy clad to prevent or at least slow the oxidation which can allow higher burnup of the fuel resulting in major benefits in plant safety and economics. Silicon carbide was identified as a candidate protective coating to reduce the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding. Silicon carbide coatings were deposited on Zircaloy substrates using plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) and were found to be amorphous as determined by X-ray analysis. Since the adhesion of the films to the substrate was the most important property of a coating, scratch tests were used to assess the adhesion. The effects of different parameters on the test results including residual stresses, plastic deformation and friction between the stylus and the surface are discussed. Critical loads, characterized by continuous delamination of the SiC coatings deposited on Zircaloy-4, occurred at 0.5--2.5 N. The experimental results indicated that all SiC coatings used in this project, without exception, showed an adhesive failure when tested by scratch and indentation tests. Plastic deformation of the substrate due to compressive stresses induced by the scratch stylus caused flaking of the films at the interface, which was attributed to the low interfacial toughness. The effects of film thickness and substrate surface treatment on the quality and adhesion of SiC coatings were studied in detail. Thick films (5mum) exhibited extensive cracking. The scratch tests indicated higher adhesion with intermediate substrate surface

  16. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  17. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  18. A methodology for investigating new nonprecious metal catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susac, D; Sode, A; Zhu, L; Wong, P C; Teo, M; Bizzotto, D; Mitchell, K A R; Parsons, R R; Campbell, S A

    2006-06-08

    This paper reports an approach to investigate metal-chalcogen materials as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The methodology is illustrated with reference to Co-Se thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a glassy-carbon substrate. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used, in parallel with electrochemical activity and stability measurements, to assess how the electrochemical performance relates to chemical composition. It is shown that Co-Se thin films with varying Se are active for oxygen reduction, although the open circuit potential (OCP) is lower than for Pt. A kinetically controlled process is observed in the potential range 0.5-0.7 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode) for the thin-film catalysts studied. An initial exposure of the thin-film samples to an acid environment served as a pretreatment, which modified surface composition prior to activity measurements with the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. Based on the SAM characterization before and after electrochemical tests, all surfaces demonstrating activity are dominated by chalcogen. XRD shows that the thin films have nanocrystalline character that is based on a Co(1-x)Se phase. Parallel studies on Co-Se powder supported on XC72R carbon show comparable OCP, Tafel region, and structural phase as for the thin-film model catalysts. A comparison for ORR activity has also been made between this Co-Se powder and a commercial Pt catalyst.

  19. Enhancing Metal-Support Interactions by Molybdenum Carbide: An Efficient Strategy toward the Chemoselective Hydrogenation of α,β-Unsaturated Aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sina; Shao, Zheng-Jiang; Shu, Yijin; Shi, Zhangping; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Gao, Qingsheng; Hu, Peijun; Tang, Yi

    2016-04-11

    Metal-support interactions are desired to optimize the catalytic turnover on metals. Herein, the enhanced interactions by using a Mo2C nanowires support were utilized to modify the charge density of an Ir surface, accomplishing the selective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes on negatively charged Ir(δ-) species. The combined experimental and theoretical investigations showed that the Ir(δ-) species derive from the higher work function of Ir (vs. Mo2C) and the consequently electron transfer. In crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, Ir/Mo2C delivered a crotyl alcohol selectivity as high as 80%, outperforming those of counterparts (Mo2C was highlighted by its higher selectivity as well as the better activity. Additionally, the efficacy for various substrates further verified our Ir/Mo2C system to be competitive for chemoselective hydrogenation.

  20. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémier, S.; Inagaki, K.; Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P.; Ogata, T.; Ohta, H.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15-20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel.

  1. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  2. A complementary and synergistic effect of Fe-Zn binary metal oxide in the process of high-temperature fuel gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁斯灏; 吴幼青

    1996-01-01

    57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the evolution of Fe-Zn binary metal oxide sorbent in the process of high-temperature fuel gas desulfurization. The results of phase analyses show that Fe-Zn binary metal oxide sorbent is rapidly reduced in hot fuel gas and decomposed to new phases of highly dispersed microcrystalline elemental iron and zinc oxide, both of which become the active desulfurization constituents. A complementary and synergistic effect between active iron acting as a high sulfur capacity constituent and active zinc oxide acting as a deep refining desulfurization constituent exists in this type of sorbent for hot fuel gas desulfurization.

  3. Comparative Study of Alternative Fuel Icing Inhibitor Additive Properties & Chemical Analysis of Metal Speciation in Aviation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Occupational Safety and Health AOAC Association of Official Agricultural Chemists APHA American Public Health Association Cu(II)AcAc Copper(II...Metal Catalysis in Gasoline Gum Formation. Oil and Gas Journal , 38, 97-101. Fenn, J., Mann, M., Meng, C., Wong, S., Whitehouse, C. (1989...and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Journal of Chromatographic Science, 38. Taylor, D., Synovec, R. (1994). Liquid Chromatographic

  4. An ex-situ and in-situ evaluation of carbides as potential electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Erich

    One of the most prominent challenges facing the commercialization of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of its electrocatalyst components, particularly the anode. The anode typically requires a high loading of precious metal electrocatalyst (Pt-Ru) to obtain a useful amount of electrical energy from the electrooxidation of methanol (CH3OH). The complete electrooxidation of methanol on these catalysts produces strongly adsorbed CO on the surface, which reduces the activity of Pt. The presence of Ru in these electrocatalysts assists with the decomposition of H2O to more efficiently remove the poisoning CO species as CO2(g). The primary disadvantage of these electrocatalyst components is the scarcity and consequently high price of both Pt and Ru. A series of surface science studies ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) have identified molybdenum and tungsten carbide materials as potential alternative DMFC anode electrocatalysts. Both of these materials demonstrated activity towards the decomposition of methanol and water molecules. The purpose of this research was to extend these investigations by the synthesis and characterization of more realistic carbide materials. This was accomplished by a combination of surface science and electrochemical experiments. The electrochemical studies were performed both in-situ and ex-situ in order to better address the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" that often separate findings in UHV studies from results in more realistic environments. Thin film surfaces of molybdenum carbide could be produced on various carbon substrates in a vacuum system by physical vapor deposition (PVD). When modified with low coverages of Pt, MoC phase molybdenum carbides were found to be more active towards the electrooxidation of hydrogen in an acidic electrolyte than Ptmodified carbon substrates in cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies. These surfaces demonstrated a limited range of electrochemical stability in this acid solution. Mo2C surfaces have

  5. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

    2012-07-01

    In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more

  6. Investigation of Novel Electrocatalysts for Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Ru:GDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Nielsen, Jimmi; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2015-01-01

    Even though solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have a high potential with respect to efficiency and fuel flexibility they are not yet competitive in terms of cost and durability with conventional chemical energy conversion technologies. The potential cost reduction can be achieved through the develop...

  7. A Study of Cr3C2-Based HVOF- and HVAF-Sprayed Coatings: Microstructure and Carbide Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Honkanen, M.; Vippola, M.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2017-08-01

    The research on high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF)-sprayed Cr3C2-based materials has mostly focused on conventional Cr3C2-25NiCr composition. In this paper, two alternative compositions (Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb and Cr3C2-37WC-18NiCoCrFe) were sprayed with high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and HVAF spray processes to evaluate the material behavior during spraying and to provide characterization of the microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings. For comparison, coatings from the Cr3C2-25NiCr composition were sprayed with both processes. Spray diagnostics were carried out to obtain average particle velocity and temperature for each material and process combinations. The measured average in-flight particle data were 1800 °C and 700 m/s for HVOF process, and 1450 °C and 900 m/s for HVAF process. Characterization of the coating microstructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the carbon content of the feedstock powders and sprayed coatings was measured with carbon analyzer. The results show that carbide rebounding or selective deposition of particles with higher metal matrix content is the dominating reason for carbide loss during HVAF spraying, while carbide dissolution is an additional source for the HVOF spraying. Higher particle velocities and controlled temperature measured for the HVAF process produced dense coatings with improved toughness and more homogenous coating structure.

  8. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  9. Methane Activation by Tantalum Carbide Cluster Anions Ta2C4().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Fang; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Zi-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; Ning, Chuan-Gang; He, Sheng-Gui

    2017-02-02

    Methane activation by transition metals is of fundamental interest and practical importance, as this process is extensively involved in the natural gas conversion to fuels and value-added chemicals. While single-metal centers have been well recognized as active sites for methane activation, the active center composed of two or more metal atoms is rarely addressed and the detailed reaction mechanism remains unclear. Here, by using state-of-the-art time-of-flight mass spectrometry, cryogenic anion photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations, the cooperation of the two Ta atoms in a dinuclear carbide cluster Ta2C4(-) for methane activation has been identified. The C-H bond activation takes place predominantly around one Ta atom in the initial stage of the reaction and the second Ta atom accepts the delivered H atom from the C-H bond cleavage. The well-resolved vibrational spectra of the cryogenically cooled anions agree well with theoretical simulations, allowing the clear characterization of the structure of Ta2C4(-) cluster. The reactivity comparison between Ta2C4(-) cluster and the carbon-less analogues (Ta2C3(-) and Ta2C2(-)) demonstrated that the cooperative effect of the two metal atoms can be well tuned by the carbon ligands in terms of methane activation and transformation.

  10. A concise design o the irradiation of U-10Zr metallic fuel at a very low burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hai Bing; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yong; Qian, Dazhi; Ma, Jimin; Leng, Jun; Huo, Hyoung; Wang, Shaohua [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    In order to investigate the swelling behavior and fuel–cladding interaction mechanism of U–10Zr alloy metallic fuel at very low burnup, an irradiation experiment was concisely designed and conducted on the China Mianyang Research Reactor. Two types of irradiation samples were designed for studying free swelling without restraint and the fuel–cladding interaction mechanism. A new bonding material, namely, pure aluminum powder, was used to fill the gap between the fuel slug and sample shell for reducing thermal resistance and allowing the expansion of the fuel slug. In this paper, the concise irradiation rig design is introduced, and the neutronic and thermal–hydraulic analyses, which were carried out mainly using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) and FLUENT codes, are presented. Out-of-pile tests were conducted prior to irradiation to verify the manufacturing quality and hydraulic performance of the rig. Nondestructive postirradiation examinations using cold neutron radiography technology were conducted to check fuel cladding integrity and swelling behavior. The results of the preliminary examinations confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the design.

  11. Catalytic carbide formation at aluminium-carbon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, B.; Rabenberg, L.; Ohuchi, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the reaction of several monolayer-thick films of aluminum with glassy carbon substrates are presented. The influence of molecular oxygen and water vapor on the rate of reaction is examined. It is concluded that water vapor catalyzed the formation of aluminum carbide from aluminum and carbon by forming active sites which weakened carbon-carbon bonds at the glassy carbon surface, thus assisting their cleavage. The rate of carbide formation for undosed and molecular oxygen-dosed examples was less as neither metallic aluminum nor oxygen-formed alumina could bond to the carbon atom with sufficient strength to dissociate it quickly.

  12. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Principle, challenges, and recent progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) have been recognized as a significant power source in future energy systems based on hydrogen. The current PEMFC technology features the employment of acidic polymer electrolytes which, albeit superior to electrolyte solutions, have intrinsically limited the catalysts to noble metals, fundamentally preventing PEMFC from widespread deployment. An effective solution to this problem is to develop fuel cells based on alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEFC), which not only enable the use of non-precious metal catalysts but also avoid the carbonate-precipitate issue which has been troubling the conventional alkaline fuel cells (AFC). This feature article introduces the principle of APEFC, the challenges, and our research progress, and focuses on strategies for developing key materials, including high-performance alkaline polyelectrolytes and stable non-precious metal catalysts. For alkaline polymer electrolytes, high ionic conductivity and satisfactory mechanical property are difficult to be balanced, therefore polymer cross-linking is an ultimate strategy. For non-precious metal catalysts, it is urgent to improve the catalytic activity and stability. New materials, such as transition-metal complexes, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, and metal carbides, would become applicable in APEFC.

  13. Effects of heavy metals (Fe3+/Cr6+) on low-level energy generation in a microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparanga, A. R.; Balatbat, A. S.; Tayo, L.

    2017-06-01

    A dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa as biocatalyst to facilitate substrate conversion and, consequently, low-level energy generation. To simulate a wastewater situation with BOD and heavy metals contamination, glucose and Fe3+ and Cr6+ were used as substrate and heavy-metal spikes, respectively. The effects of varying substrate concentrations (150 ppm, 300 ppm, 600 ppm) and heavy metal loads (10 ppm, 50 ppm, 100 ppm) on overall power generation were evaluated. The presence of Cr6+ in the anode compartment decreased the potential from 565 to 201 mV (i.e., lowest value achieved at highest Cr6+ concentration of 300 ppm). On the other hand, replacing Cr6+ with Fe3+ as electron acceptor resulted in substantial increase in measured potential (i.e., from 565 to 703 mV). Increasing glucose concentrations resulted in longer time to reach constant open circuit voltage. A maximum potential of 606 mV was achieved at 1200 ppm glucose. Incorporating Pseudomonas aeruginosa increased the potential from 256 to 592 mV. On the basis of these results, a microbial fuel cell feeding on wastewater can be an important potential technology for generating low-level energy

  14. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  15. Efficient solar-driven synthesis, carbon capture, and desalinization, STEP: solar thermal electrochemical production of fuels, metals, bleach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, S

    2011-12-15

    STEP (solar thermal electrochemical production) theory is derived and experimentally verified for the electrosynthesis of energetic molecules at solar energy efficiency greater than any photovoltaic conversion efficiency. In STEP the efficient formation of metals, fuels, chlorine, and carbon capture is driven by solar thermal heated endothermic electrolyses of concentrated reactants occuring at a voltage below that of the room temperature energy stored in the products. One example is CO(2) , which is reduced to either fuels or storable carbon at a solar efficiency of over 50% due to a synergy of efficient solar thermal absorption and electrochemical conversion at high temperature and reactant concentration. CO(2) -free production of iron by STEP, from iron ore, occurs via Fe(III) in molten carbonate. Water is efficiently split to hydrogen by molten hydroxide electrolysis, and chlorine, sodium, and magnesium from molten chlorides. A pathway is provided for the STEP decrease of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels to pre-industial age levels in 10 years.

  16. Emissions from a Diesel Engine using Fe-based Fuel Additives and a Sintered Metal Filtration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Hummer, Jon A.; Stachulak, Jozef S.; Miller, Arthur; Patts, Larry D.; Cauda, Emanuele G.

    2015-01-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of Fe-containing fuel additives on aerosols emitted by a diesel engine retrofitted with a sintered metal filter (SMF) system. Emission measurements performed upstream and downstream of the SMF system were compared, for cases when the engine was fueled with neat ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and with ULSD treated with two formulations of additives containing Fe-based catalysts. The effects were assessed for four steady-state engine operating conditions and one transient cycle. The results showed that the SMF system reduced the average total number and surface area concentrations of aerosols by more than 100-fold. The total mass and elemental carbon results confirmed that the SMF system was indeed very effective in the removal of diesel aerosols. When added at the recommended concentrations (30 p.p.m. of iron), the tested additives had minor adverse impacts on the number, surface area, and mass concentrations of filter-out (FOut) aerosols. For one of the test cases, the additives may have contributed to measurable concentrations of engine-out (EOut) nucleation mode aerosols. The additives had only a minor impact on the concentration and size distribution of volatile and semi-volatile FOut aerosols. Metal analysis showed that the introduction of Fe with the additives substantially increased Fe concentration in the EOut, but the SMF system was effective in removal of Fe-containing aerosols. The FOut Fe concentrations for all three tested fuels were found to be much lower than the corresponding EOut Fe concentrations for the case of untreated ULSD fuel. The results support recommendations that these additives should not be used in diesel engines unless they are equipped with exhaust filtration systems. Since the tested SMF system was found to be very efficient in removing Fe introduced by the additives, the use of these additives should not result in a measurable increase in emissions of de novo generated

  17. Emissions from a Diesel Engine using Fe-based Fuel Additives and a Sintered Metal Filtration System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D; Hummer, Jon A; Stachulak, Jozef S; Miller, Arthur; Patts, Larry D; Cauda, Emanuele G

    2016-03-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to assess the effects of Fe-containing fuel additives on aerosols emitted by a diesel engine retrofitted with a sintered metal filter (SMF) system. Emission measurements performed upstream and downstream of the SMF system were compared, for cases when the engine was fueled with neat ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and with ULSD treated with two formulations of additives containing Fe-based catalysts. The effects were assessed for four steady-state engine operating conditions and one transient cycle. The results showed that the SMF system reduced the average total number and surface area concentrations of aerosols by more than 100-fold. The total mass and elemental carbon results confirmed that the SMF system was indeed very effective in the removal of diesel aerosols. When added at the recommended concentrations (30 p.p.m. of iron), the tested additives had minor adverse impacts on the number, surface area, and mass concentrations of filter-out (FOut) aerosols. For one of the test cases, the additives may have contributed to measurable concentrations of engine-out (EOut) nucleation mode aerosols. The additives had only a minor impact on the concentration and size distribution of volatile and semi-volatile FOut aerosols. Metal analysis showed that the introduction of Fe with the additives substantially increased Fe concentration in the EOut, but the SMF system was effective in removal of Fe-containing aerosols. The FOut Fe concentrations for all three tested fuels were found to be much lower than the corresponding EOut Fe concentrations for the case of untreated ULSD fuel. The results support recommendations that these additives should not be used in diesel engines unless they are equipped with exhaust filtration systems. Since the tested SMF system was found to be very efficient in removing Fe introduced by the additives, the use of these additives should not result in a measurable increase in emissions of de novo generated

  18. Physical Properties of the NbC Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Gustavo Di Vernieri Cuppari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides are interesting materials with a singular combination of properties, such as high melting points, high hardness, good transport properties and relatively low costs, which makes them excellent candidates for several technological applications. The possible applications of NbC carbide remained unexplored as it was in the past expensive and available in limited volumes. In order to guide investigations of the applicability of NbC, a deeper understanding of the physical properties of this carbide is fundamental. In this review paper, key physical properties of NbC are compiled with emphasis on its chemical bonding, a careful description of the C-Nb phase diagram, the phases formed and the crystal structures. Thermal properties are discussed and correlated with the intrinsic and extrinsic features of NbC. Finally, elastic properties are discussed.

  19. Wear resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, W.; Siebert, S.; Huth, S. [Lehrstuhl Werkstofftechnik, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Niobium, like titanium and vanadium, forms superhard MC carbides that remain relatively pure in technical alloys on account of their low solubility for other metallic alloying elements. However, because they have a greater hardness than the precipitated chromium carbides commonly used in wear-resistant alloys, they are suitable as alternative hard phases. This contribution deals with new wear-resistant steels and casting alloys containing niobium carbide. These include a secondary hardening hardfacing alloy, a composite casting alloy for wear applications at elevated temperatures, a white cast iron as well as two variants of a corrosion-resistant cold-work tool steel produced by melt metallurgy and by powder metallurgy. A heat-resistant casting alloy is also discussed. Based on equilibrium calculations the microstructures developing during production of the alloys are analysed, and the results are discussed with respect to important properties such as abrasive wear and corrosion resistance. (orig.)

  20. Role of metal/silicon semiconductor contact engineering for enhanced output current in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-11-25

    We show that contact engineering plays an important role to extract the maximum performance from energy harvesters like microbial fuel cells (MFCs). We experimented with Schottky and Ohmic methods of fabricating contact areas on silicon in an MFC contact material study. We utilized the industry standard contact material, aluminum, as well as a metal, whose silicide has recently been recognized for its improved performance in smallest scale integration requirements, cobalt. Our study shows that improvements in contact engineering are not only important for device engineering but also for microsystems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2009-11-11

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 degrees C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface.

  2. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  3. Technology of Iron Carbide Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bahgat

    2006-01-01

    Iron carbides are very promising metallurgical products and can be used for steelmaking process, where it plays as an alternative raw material with significant economic advantages. Also it has many other applications,e.g. catalysts, magnets, sensors. The present review investigates the different properties and uses of the iron carbides. The commercial production and the different varieties for the iron carbides synthesis (gaseous carburization, mechanochemical synthesis, laser pyrolysis, plasma pyrolysis, chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation) were reviewed. Also the effect of different factors on the carburization process like gas composition, raw material, temperature, reaction time, catalyst presence and sulfur addition was indicated.

  4. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  5. Plasmon-enhanced Solar Fuel Production with Gold-metal Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Law, Matt; Zhang, Jingdong

    Harnessing sunlight to drive chemical reactions for energy storage is an important element in the transitiontowards green and sustainable technologies. Solar fuel production using semiconductor nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely studied but suffer from poor utilization of the solar spectrum and...

  6. A Phenomenological Study on the Synergistic Role of Precious Metals and the Support in the Steam Reforming of Logistic Fuels on Monometal Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Majeed Azad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clean power source utilizing vast logistic fuel reserves (jet fuels, diesel, and coal would be the main driver in the 21st century for high efficiency. Fuel processors are required to convert these fuels into hydrogen-rich reformate for extended periods in the presence of sulfur, and deliver hydrogen with little or no sulfur to the fuel cell stack. However, the jet and other logistic fuels are invariably sulfur-laden. Sulfur poisons and deactivates the reforming catalyst and therefore, to facilitate continuous uninterrupted operation of logistic fuel processors, robust sulfur-tolerant catalysts ought to be developed. New noble metal-supported ceria-based sulfur-tolerant nanocatalysts were developed and thoroughly characterized. In this paper, the performance of single metal-supported catalysts in the steam-reforming of kerosene, with 260 ppm sulfur is highlighted. It was found that ruthenium-based formulation provided an excellent balance between hydrogen production and stability towards sulfur, while palladium-based catalyst exhibited rapid and steady deactivation due to the highest propensity to sulfur poisoning. The rhodium supported system was found to be most attractive in terms of high hydrogen yield and long-term stability. A mechanistic correlation between the role of the nature of the precious metal and the support for generating clean desulfurized H2-rich reformate is discussed.

  7. Development of Novel Non-Pt Group Metal Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukerjee, Sanjeev [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Atanassov, Plamen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barton, Scott [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Dale, Nilesh [Nissan Technical Center North America (NTCNA), Farmington Hills, MI (United States); Halevi, Bar [Pajarito Powder LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The objective of this multi-institutional effort was to comprehensively pursue the goal of eliminating noble metal (Pt group metals, PGM) from the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrode thereby providing a quantum leap in lowering the overall PGM loading in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). The overall project scope encompassed (a) comprehensive materials discovery effort, (b) a concomitant effort to scale up these materials with very high ( ±5%) reproducibility, both intra and inter, (c) understanding mass transport in porous medium both in gas diffusion and micro-porous layers for enhanced areal activity, (d) understanding mechanistic aspects of active site structure and ORR electrocatalytic pathway. Overall project milestones and metrics were (a) first phase effort based on performance in oxygen where the project’s Go/No-Go decision point milestone of 100 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V (internal resistance-free, iR-free) at 80°C, pure H2/O2, with 1.5 bar total pressure was met. Subsequently, the principle objectives were to (a) transition the project from H2/O2 to H2/Air with slated target of exceeding 30 mA/cm2 @ 0.8 V, 2.5 bar total pressure and an end of the project target of 1 A/cm2 @ 0.4 V (same total pressure), both under 100% relative humidity. The target for catalyst material scale up was to achieve 100 g batch size at the end of the program. This scale up target had a quality control milestone of less than 5% variation of activity measured with H2/Air (2.5 bar total pressure) at 0.8 V. In addition, the project also aimed at arriving at a unified understanding of the nature of active sites in these catalysts as well as some preliminary understanding of the mechanistic pathway. Also addressed is the development of an integrated method for determination of mass transport parameters using a combination of Helox experiments and modeling of the gas

  8. Optimization of a microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using recycled scrap metals as a cost-effective cathode material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Olivier; Tan, Zi; Shen, Yujia; Ng, How Y

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is still hindered by the prohibitive cost of cathode material, especially when platinum is used to catalyze oxygen reduction. In this study, recycled scrap metals could be used efficiently as cathode material in a specially-designed MFC. In terms of raw power, the scrap metals ranked as follows: W/Co > Cu/Ni > Inconel 718 > carpenter alloy; however, in terms of cost and long term stability, Inconel 718 was the preferred choice. Treatment performance--assessed on real and synthetic wastewater--was considerably improved either by filling the anode compartment with carbon granules or by operating the MFC in full-loop mode. The latter option allowed reaching 99.7% acetate removal while generating a maximum power of 36 W m(-3) at an acetate concentration of 2535 mg L(-1). Under these conditions, the energy produced by the system averaged 0.1 kWh m(-3) of wastewater treated.

  9. Development of alternative low-cost and durable metallic bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, A.C.; Kilicay, O. [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Bipolar plates account for significant portion of the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). This study discussed the design of a high corrosion-resistance metallic bipolar plate as an alternative to the porous graphite bipolar plates currently used in PEMFCs. A literature review of bipolar plate materials and flow field design configurations was conducted. Metallic candidate materials and flow field configurations were identified. Computer-aided design (CAD) models were then development in order to design the software programs used to machine the bipolar plates in 3 different materials. The machined bipolar plates are now being integrated with state-of-the-art membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and sealants into single- and 3-cell stacks. The results of some performance, durability, and degradation mechanism analyses were presented.

  10. Growth of diamond layers on diamond and cBN seeds using iron carbide under high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Li Xun; Hao Zhao Yin; LiuPeng; Li Musen; Zou Guang Tian; Cheng Shu Yu; Cheng Kai Jia

    2002-01-01

    Iron carbide without any graphite was studied under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT); diamond layers were obtained both on diamond and on cubic boron nitride seeds at 5.5 GPa and 1700-1750 K. The results showed that transition-metal carbide was the main intermediate in the course of the transformation from graphite to diamond under HPHT.

  11. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  12. Ballistic Evaluation of rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor with Tungsten Carbide and Titanium Carbide Facing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-12-01

    LABORATORIES BALLISTIC EVALUATION OF ROLLED HMtOGE14EOUS STEEL ASWKR f VITH TUNGSTEN CARBIDE AND TITANIUM CARBIDE FACING (U) TECHNICAL REPORT NO. WAL...carbide steel and titanium carbide steel composite armor when attacked by cal. .40 H19B WC cores, cal. .0 AP W2 projectiles, ZOIN fragment simulating...determine the effectiveness of tungsten car- bide (WC) and titanium carbide (TIC) facing on steel armor for the defeat of steel and tungsten carbide

  13. Impacts of burnup-dependent swelling of metallic fuel on the performance of a compact breed-and-burn fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Heo, Woong; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The U-Zr or U-TRU-Zr cylindrical metallic fuel slug used in fast reactors is known to swell significantly and to grow during irradiation. In neutronics simulations of metallic-fueled fast reactors, it is assumed that the slug has swollen and contacted cladding, and the bonding sodium has been removed from the fuel region. In this research, a realistic burnup-dependent fuel-swelling simulation was performed using Monte Carlo code McCARD for a single-batch compact sodium-cooled breed-and-burn reactor by considering the fuel-swelling behavior reported from the irradiation test results in EBR-II. The impacts of the realistic burnup-dependent fuel swelling are identified in terms of the reactor neutronics performance, such as core lifetime, conversion ratio, axial power distribution, and local burnup distributions. It was found that axial fuel growth significantly deteriorated the neutron economy of a breed-and-burn reactor and consequently impaired its neutronics performance. The bonding sodium also impaired neutron economy, because it stayed longer in the blanket region until the fuel slug reached 2% burnup.

  14. Self-sustained reduction of multiple metals in a microbial fuel cell-microbial electrolysis cell hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Yining; Liu, Bingchuan; Luan, Hongwei; Vadas, Timothy; Guo, Wanqian; Ding, Jie; Li, Baikun

    2015-09-01

    A self-sustained hybrid bioelectrochemical system consisting of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was developed to reduce multiple metals simultaneously by utilizing different reaction potentials. Three heavy metals representing spontaneous reaction (chromium, Cr) and unspontaneous reaction (lead, Pb and nickel, Ni) were selected in this batch-mode study. The maximum power density of the MFC achieved 189.4 mW m(-2), and the energy recovery relative to the energy storage circuit (ESC) was ∼ 450%. At the initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1), the average reduction rate of Cr(VI) was 30.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), Pb(II) 32.7 mg L(-1) d(-1), and Ni(II) 8.9 mg L(-1) d(-1). An electrochemical model was developed to predict the change of metal concentration over time. The power output of the MFC was sufficient to meet the requirement of the ESC and MEC, and the "self-sustained metal reduction" was achieved in this hybrid system.

  15. Numerical evaluation of micro-structural parameters of porous supports in metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Brandstätter, Wilhelm; Weber, André

    2015-01-01

    Metallic supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are considered as a durable and cost effective alternative to the state-of-the-art ceramic supported cell designs. In order to understand the mass and charge transport in the metal-support of this new type of cell a novel technique involving X-ray tomography and micro-structural modelling is presented in this work. The simulation technique comprises a novel treatment of the boundary conditions, which leads to more accurate effective transport parameters compared to those, which can be achieved with the conventional homogenisation procedures. Furthermore, the porosity distribution in the metal-support was determined, which provided information about the inhomogeneous nature of the material. In addition to that, transport parameters for two identified, different dense layers of the metal-support are evaluated separately. The results of the evaluation show three significant findings. Firstly, that the effective transport parameters are up to a factor of 20 lower compared to other SOFC anodes. Secondly, that the micro-structure can have regions, which are much denser, especially the first 100 μm of the interface between gas-channel and support-structure. Thirdly, that the calculation of the transport parameters depends on the correct application of boundary conditions.

  16. Spinel-based coatings for metal supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Elena; Neagu, Dragos; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Metal supports and metal supported half cells developed at DTU are used for the study of a solution infiltration approach to form protective coatings on porous metal scaffolds. The metal particles in the anode layer, and sometimes even in the support may undergo oxidation in realistic operating...... conditions leading to severe cell degradation. Here, a controlled oxidation of the porous metal substrate and infiltration of Mn and/or Ce nitrate solutions are applied for in situ formation of protective coatings. Our approach consists of scavenging the FeCr oxides formed during the controlled oxidation...... into a continuous and well adhered coating. The effectiveness of coatings is the result of composition and structure, but also of the microstructure and surface characteristics of the metal scaffolds....

  17. Metal Nanoshells for Plasmonically Enhanced Solar-to-Fuel Photocatalytic Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04/16/2013 – 04/15/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metal Nanoshells for Plasmonically Enhanced Solar-to...following experiments, the core-shell of nanoshell @SiO2, as well as the nanostructure of photocatalyst, were further investigated. Solar energy in the...visible-light range is expected to be absorbed by the photocatalyst first without any interference from the metal nanoshells . The presence of metal

  18. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10to20mA/cm2. The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150mA/cm2, respectively.

  19. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively.

  20. Reduction of Pt Usage in Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts Using Carbon Nanotubes and Non-Pt Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Nakamura; Y. Nagashima; T. Yamazaki; T. Matsumoto; E. Yoo

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The high-priced and limited Pt constitutes a high barrier to commercialization of fuel cells. Pt is essential for the electrode catalyst of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). A reduction in Pt usage is one of the key requirements for the commercialization of fuel cells for use in everyday life, because of its high price and limited availability, and the difficulty of finding suitable substitutes. Non-Pt fuel cell catalysts will decrease the demand for Pt by PEFCs, enabling more Pt to be available for use in other essential products, and make fuel cells more popular[1]. The cheaper Mo2C is known to possess similar catalytic activities and electronic structures to Pt[2]. Carbon black (CB) is widely used as the support for Pt nanoparticles. However, we found that when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rather than CB are used as the support, the performance is improved, especially below 600 mA/cm2[3,4]. Here, we show that a combination of Mo2C catalyst and carbon nanotubes in the anode provides performance as high as half that of the current PEFCs with Pt catalysts below 600mA/cm2.

  1. Examination of the chemical composition of irradiated zirconium based fuel claddings at the metal/oxide interface by TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, S.; Bart, G.; Jakob, A.

    2010-04-01

    Detailed post-irradiation examinations have been performed at PSI on three fuel rods with differing cladding materials revealing different corrosion behaviour. The rods had been irradiated for 3-5 cycles at Gösgen nuclear power plant (pressurised water reactor), Switzerland. As zirconium corrosion is proceeding at the metal/oxide interface, extended micro-structural analyses were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), expecting to possibly reveal phenomena explaining the varying corrosion resistance. This paper reports on the distribution of oxygen at the metal/oxide interface examined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in TEM, while other micro-structural investigations have been published earlier [1]. In order to get some statistical confidence in the analyses, three neighbouring TEM samples of each cladding variant were studied. The oxygen concentration profiles of the three alloys (i.e. low-tin Zircaloy-4, Zr2.5%Nb and extra low-tin (Sn 0.56%)) both in the oxide and metal close to the metal/oxide interface are compared. The results of the examinations show the composition of the oxide in the vicinity of the interface to be sub-stoichiometric for all three materials, indicating an oxide layer adjacent to the interface, with diffusion-controlled access of oxygen to the metal/oxide interface. The metallic parts show highest oxygen concentrations at the metal/oxide interface which are reduced towards the bulk metal, pointing towards the expected second diffusion-controlled process leading to α-Zr (O). Based on the experimental results values for the diffusion coefficients in the range of 0.8-6.0 × 10 -20 m 2 s -1 are estimated for the oxygen dissolution process, the diffusion coefficient in Zircaloy-4 being six times higher than for the other two less corroding alloys. This finding is in contradiction with the present assumptions about the corrosion mechanism, and confirms the expected but not so far reported diffusion controlled

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE AT THE INTERFACE OF TITANIUM CARBIDE AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Dian-hong; Wu Xing-fang; Lu Hua; N.Froumin; M.Polak

    2000-01-01

    Microstructure at the interface of titanium carbide and nickelaluminides in the samples obtained by infiltration of molten Ni3Al alloyhas studied by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an analyticaltransmission electron microscopy (ATEM) with an energy dispersivespectrometer (EDS). It is found that the morphology at the interfacesbetween hard phase skeleton of TiC{0.7 and metallic phases depends on theratio of Ti/C in carbide. Some periodic zigzag fringes are observed ata smooth interface between metallic phase and carbides in the sampleof Ni3Al/TiC0.7. The results of analysis using EDS show that Ti inTiC0.7 carbide is easier than that in TiC0.9 to dissolve into the moltenalloy during solid-liquid reaction. The formation of this periodic zigzagfringe,which may be a growth zone of a new Ti-Ni-Al phase,in the interfaceof TiC0.7/Ni3Al would occur during the initial stage of solidification.

  3. Carbon nanofiber layers on metal and carbon substrates : PEM fuel cell and microreactor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco Benito, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation of CNF layers on flat and porous substrates and their application as catalyst supports for chemical and electrochemical gas‐liquidsolid (G‐L‐S) catalytic reactions. Metal nanoparticles growing CNFs on flat metal substrates at 600°C are easily formed from NiO, in

  4. Evaluation of Metals (Al, Fe, Zn) in Alternative Fuels by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in Two Electrode Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yon Kyun [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwnagyang (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Geun Woong; Kim, Hee San [Hongik University, Chochiwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Many kinds of alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, methanol, and natural gas have been developed in order to overcome the limited deposits in fossil fuels. In some cases, the alternative fuels have been reported to cause degrade materials. The corrosion rates of metals were measured by immersion test, a kind of time consuming test because low conductivity of these fuels was not allowed to employ electrochemical tests. With twin two-electrode cell newly designed for the study, however, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test was successfully applied to evaluation of the corrosion resistance (R{sub p}) of zinc, iron, aluminum, and its alloys in an oxidized biodiesel and gasoline/ethanol solutions and the corrosion resistance from EIS was compared with the corrosion rate from immersion test. In biodiesel, R{sub p} increased in the order of zinc, iron, and aluminum, which agreed with the corrosion resistance measured from immersion test. In addition, on aluminum showing the best corrosion resistance (R{sub p}), the effect of magnesium as an alloying element was evaluated in gasoline/ethanol solutions as well as the oxidized biodiesel. R{sub p} increased with addition of magnesium in gasoline/ethanol solutions containing chloride and the oxidized biodiesel. In the mean while, in gasoline/ethanol solutions containing formic acid, Al-Mg alloy added 1% magnesium had the highest R{sub p} and the further addition of magnesium decreased R{sub p}. It can be explained with the fact that the addition of more than 1% magnesium increases the passive current density of Al-Mg alloys.

  5. SULFUR-RESISTANT BIMETALLIC NOBLE METAL CATALYSTS FOR AROMATIC HYDROGENATION OF DIESEL FUEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Y zeolite supporting noble metal catalysts, as the important industrial catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation, have received increasing attention in recent years. Pd-M/Y bimetallic catalysts, where M is non-noble metal element, were prepared to investigate the effects of the addition of a second metal. Pd-M/Y catalysts were evaluated under the following conditions: H2 pressure 4.2 MPa, MHSV 4.0 h-1, sulfur content in feed 3000 μg/g. The microreactor results indicated that the second metal remarkably affects the hydrogenation activity of Pd/Y catalysts. Among them, Cr and W improve the sulfur resistance of Pd/Y, but La, Mn, Mo and Ag make the sulfur resistance worse and the second metals have no evident influence on product selectivity and acidic properties of the catalysts.

  6. Diffusion and Creep in Niobium Carbide as a Function of Temperature and Carbon Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-05

    I AD-AOa 857 NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV RALEIGH DEPT OF ENGINEERIN- ETC F/6 7/2 I DIFFUSION AND CREEP IN NIOBIUM CARBIDE AS A FUN4CTION OF TEM4PERA...relationship is givet, by Q/TIM 36ca]/K where Tm is the absolute melting point of the metal. Using Tm = 3873K for niobium carbide , the Q is found to be...Davis, "Hot Isosttic Pressing of Niobium Carbide ," to be submitted J. Mat. Sc. and Eng. *Referred Publications IV. Particinatinq_ Scientific Personnel 1

  7. Increasing the recovery of heavy metal ions using two microbial fuel cells operating in parallel with no power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Jing; Wang, Zhao; Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using an intermittent connection period without power output. Connecting two MFCs in parallel improved the voltage output of both MFCs until the voltage stabilized. Electric energy was accumulated in two MFCs containing heavy metal ions copper, zinc, and cadmium as electron acceptors by connection in parallel for several hours. The system was then switched to discharge mode with single MFCs with a 1000-Ω resistor connected between anode and cathode. This method successfully achieved highly efficient removal of heavy metal ions. Even when the anolyte was run in sequencing batch mode, the insufficient voltage and power needed to recover heavy metals from the cathode of MFCs can be complemented by the developed method. The average removal ratio of heavy metal ions in sequencing batch mode was 67 % after 10 h. When the discharge time was 20 h, the removal ratios of zinc, copper, and cadmium were 91.5, 86.7, and 83.57 %, respectively; the average removal ratio of these ions after 20 h was only 52.1 % for the control group. Therefore, the average removal efficiency of heavy metal ions increased by 1.75 times using the electrons stored from the bacteria under the open-circuit conditions in parallel mode. Electrochemical impedance data showed that the anode had lower solution resistance and polarization resistance in the parallel stage than as a single MFC, and capacitance increased with the length of time in parallel.

  8. Creep behaviour of porous metal supports for solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccaccini, Dino; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    a significant role affecting the creep behaviour of the metal supports, in particular the stress exponent. The variation of the elastic modulus as function of temperature and oxidation conditions was also determined by a high temperature impulse excitation technique. Additionally nano-indentation testing...... was performed in the metal oxide interface to elucidate the mechanical properties of the oxide scales and qualitative information about the oxide scale-metal interfacial bonding. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Laser deposition of Inconel 625/tungsten carbide composite coatings by powder and wire feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Abioye, Taiwo E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing global demand to extend the life span of down-hole drilling tools in order to improve operation effectiveness and efficiency of oil and gas production. Laser cladding of tungsten carbide/Ni-based alloy metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings is currently being utilised for this purpose. However, the effect of tungsten carbide dissolution on the corrosion performance of the MMC coatings has not been completely understood. In this work, a study was carried out in which lase...

  10. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Amado Paz, José Manuel; Tobar Vidal, María José; YAÑEZ CASAL, ARMANDO JOSE; Amigó Borrás, Vicente; Candel Bou, Juan Jose

    2011-01-01

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nomi...

  11. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  12. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  13. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, M., E-mail: Marialuisa.Gentile@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd{sub 3}Si and SiO{sub 2} phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd{sub 2}Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO{sub 2} phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiC{sub x}O{sub y} phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  14. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  15. Alkali activation of recovered fuel-biofuel fly ash from fluidised-bed combustion: Stabilisation/solidification of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliniemi, Juho; Pesonen, Janne; Tiainen, Minna; Illikainen, Mirja

    2015-09-01

    Recovered fuel-biofuel fly ash from a fluidized bed boiler was alkali-activated and granulated with a sodium-silicate solution in order to immobilise the heavy metals it contains. The effect of blast-furnace slag and metakaolin as co-binders were studied. Leaching standard EN 12457-3 was applied to evaluate the immobilisation potential. The results showed that Ba, Pb and Zn were effectively immobilised. However, there was increased leaching after alkali activation for As, Cu, Mo, Sb and V. The co-binders had minimal or even negative effect on the immobilisation. One exception was found for Cr, in which the slag decreased leaching, and one was found for Cu, in which the slag increased leaching. A sequential leaching procedure was utilized to gain a deeper understanding of the immobilisation mechanism. By using a sequential leaching procedure it is possible fractionate elements into watersoluble, acid-soluble, easily-reduced and oxidisable fractions, yielding a total 'bioavailable' amount that is potentially hazardous for the environment. It was found that the total bioavailable amount was lower following alkali activation for all heavy metals, although the water-soluble fraction was higher for some metals. Evidence from leaching tests suggests the immobilisation mechanism was chemical retention, or trapping inside the alkali activation reaction products, rather than physical retention, adsorption or precipitation as hydroxides.

  16. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  17. Break-down of Losses in High Performing Metal-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromp, Alexander; Nielsen, Jimmi; Blennow Tullmar, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    present the results of performance and stability improvements for a metal supported cell developed within the European project METSOFC and the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation. The cells consist of a porous metal backbone, a metal / zirconia cermet anode and a 10ScYSZ electrolyte, cofired...... in hydrogen. The electrochemically active parts were applied by infiltrating CGO-Ni precursor solution into the porous metal and anode backbone and screenprinting (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3-based cathodes. To prevent a solid state reaction between cathode and zirconia electrolyte, CGO buffer layers were applied...... in between cathode and electrolyte. The detailed electrochemical characterization by means of impedance spectroscopy and a subsequent data analysis by the distribution of relaxation times enabled us to separate the different loss contributions in the cell. Based on an appropriate equivalent circuit model...

  18. A study of metal distribution from lignite fuels using trees as biological monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawidis, T; Chettri, M K; Papaioannou, A; Zachariadis, G; Stratis, J

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of five metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Fe, Zn) were determined in tree leaves collected from an area with large coal-fired plants in Ptolemais, Macedonia, Greece. The analyses were carried out with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mean heavy metal content in the tree leaves is, in descending order, Fe>Mn>Zn>Cu>Cd. In Populus nigra and Salix babylonica the dense piled leaves and the widespread root system are the reasons for high heavy metal uptake. Conifer trees Pinus nigra and Juniperus arizona, which have a rough leaf surface, also had elevated concentrations. Leaves with a smooth surface were less contaminated. The presence of one metal within leaf cells may reduce the uptake or toxicity of other metals. Fruits accumulated less heavy metal than the corresponding leaves. The most damaged areas are those in the direct vicinity of the coal power plants, and the rate of damage caused in the environment is affected by the main wind direction. All sampling sites in Ptolemais basin are generally more or less polluted when compared with the control site.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  20. Conductivity measurements of molten metal oxide electrolytes and their evaluation in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    2011-12-01

    Since Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC) technology is in a beginning stage, emphasis should be laid on addressing the fundamental aspects. A molten electrolyte is required to facilitate ionic contact between solid carbon fuel and electrolyte in a DCFC Three different metal oxide electrolytes (Bi2O3 , V2O5, and TeO2) have been chosen based on their ability to form stable liquids in air at higher temperatures. Conductivity data beyond their melting points was not readily available for most of the metal oxides. Conductivity studies concerning the above mentioned molten metal oxides have been thoroughly investigated in this study. A four probe measurement method using an AC milliohm-meter at 1 KHz validated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to acquire the conductivity data because of its accuracy when compared to two probe measurement widely used in literature. Also, a DC ohmmeter was used to check whether these metal oxides exhibit electronic conductivity. Experimental results corresponding to the accuracy of DC ohmmeter showed that, it accurately detected the electronic component of the electrolyte. These conductivity studies revealed that the molten oxide electrolytes exhibit high ionic conductivity, in particular, beyond their melting points. Of all the three metal oxides, Bi2O 3 demonstrated high ionic conductivity but with minor stability issues under CO2 environment. Under CO2 environment Bi 2O3 showed a slight decrease in the conductivity. EDX analysis revealed an increase in carbon content by 50 percent per one mole of bismuth which can be attributed to possible carbonate formation. V2O 5 exhibited lower ionic conductivity when compared to Bi2O 3 but had the advantage of lower cost and higher abundance. Also, the higher volumetric expansion of V2O5 upon cooling from its melting point i.e. 690°C caused the alumina crucible containing the metal oxide to break leading to leakage problems. Investigating further, quartz was found to be the best

  1. Advanced fast reactor fuels program. Second annual progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.D. (comp.)

    1978-12-01

    Results of steady-state (EBR-II) irradiation testing, off-normal irradiation design and testing, fuel-cladding compatibility, and chemical stability of uranium--plutonium carbide and nitride fuels are presented.

  2. Nerva fuel nondestructive evaluation and characterization equipment and facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is one of the technologies that the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has identified as essential for a manned mission to Mars. A base or prior work is available upon which to build in the development of nuclear rockets. From 1955 to 1973, the U.S Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sponsored development and testing of a nuclear rocket engine under Project Rover. The rocket engine, called the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), used a graphite fuel element incorporating coated particle fuel. Much of the NERVA development and manufacturing work was performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This paper gives a general review of that work in the area of nondestructive evaluation and characterization. Emphasis is placed on two key characteristics: uranium content and distribution and thickness profile of metal carbide coatings deposited in the gas passage holes.

  3. Synthesis of Mo and W carbide and nitride nanoparticles via a simple "urea glass" route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Cristina; Erpen, Christian; Yao, Weitang; Antonietti, Markus

    2008-12-01

    A simple, inexpensive, and versatile route for the synthesis of metal nitrides and carbides (such as Mo2N, Mo2C, W2N and WC) nanoparticles was set up. For the first time, metal carbides were obtained using urea as carbon-source. MoCl5 and WCl4 are in a first step contacted with alcohols and an appropriate amount of urea to form a polymer-like, glassy phase, which acts as the starting product for further conversions. Just by heating this phase it was possible to prepare either molybdenum and tungsten nitrides or carbides simply by changing the metal precursor/urea molar ratio. In this procedure, urea plays a double role as a nitrogen/carbon source and stabilizing agent (necessary for the nanoparticle dispersion). Molybdenum and tungsten nitride and carbides synthesized are almost pure and highly crystalline. Sizes estimated by WAXS range around 20 and 4 nm in diameter for Mo and W nitrides or carbides, respectively. The specific surface area was found between 10 and 80 m2/g, depending on the metal and the initial ratio of metal precursor to urea.

  4. Optimization of fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies for transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon cathode catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna K. Dombrovskis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon (TM-OMC materials were recently shown to be efficient polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC catalysts. The structure and properties of these catalysts are largely different from conventional catalyst materials, thus rendering membrane electrode assembly (MEA preparation parameters developed for conventional catalysts not useful for applications of TM-OMC catalysts. This necessitates development of a methodology to incorporate TM-OMC catalysts in the MEA. Here, an efficient method for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalyst materials for PEMFC is developed including effects of catalyst/ionomer loading and catalyst/ionomer-mixing and application procedures. An optimized protocol for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalysts is described.

  5. Optimization of fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies for transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon cathode catalysts a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovskis, Johanna K.; Prestel, Cathrin; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon (TM-OMC) materials were recently shown to be efficient polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts. The structure and properties of these catalysts are largely different from conventional catalyst materials, thus rendering membrane electrode assembly (MEA) preparation parameters developed for conventional catalysts not useful for applications of TM-OMC catalysts. This necessitates development of a methodology to incorporate TM-OMC catalysts in the MEA. Here, an efficient method for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalyst materials for PEMFC is developed including effects of catalyst/ionomer loading and catalyst/ionomer-mixing and application procedures. An optimized protocol for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalysts is described.

  6. Effect of Fuel Content and Particle Size Distribution of Oxidiser on Ignition of Metal-Based Pyrotechnic Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Dugam

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Influence of boron content in boron-based pyrotechnic composition and particle size distribution of oxidiser, i.e., KNO3 in boron-based pyrotechnic composition is examined by subjecting these to various tests. Study on boron-based pyrotechnic compositions reveals that compositions with 20, 25 and 30 parts by weight of boron are promising igniter compositions wrt their calorimetric values, pressure maximum, ignition delay, etc. However, from sensitivity point of view, the composition with 30 parts of boron is more safe to handle, manufacture and use. From the study of particle size distribution of KNO3 in Mg- based pyrotechnic compositions, it is observed that the composition with wider particle size distribution of oxidiser gives better packing density for their binary miJQ with metal fuel, which in turn gives lower ignition delay and ignition temperature.

  7. Exploratory Design of a Reactor/Fuel Cycle Using Spent Nuclear Fuel Without Conventional Reprocessing - 13579

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, Timothy C.; Schleicher, Robert W.; Rawls, John D. [General Atomics 3550 General Atomics Court San Diego, CA 92130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    General Atomics has started design of a waste to energy nuclear reactor (EM2) that can use light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This effort addresses two problems: using an advanced small reactor with long core life to reduce nuclear energy overnight cost and providing a disposal path for LWR SNF. LWR SNF is re-fabricated into new EM2 fuel using a dry voloxidation process modeled on AIROX/ OREOX processes which remove some of the fission products but no heavy metals. By not removing all of the fission products the fuel remains self-protecting. By not separating heavy metals, the process remains proliferation resistant. Implementation of Energy Multiplier Module (EM2) fuel cycle will provide low cost nuclear energy while providing a long term LWR SNF disposition path which is important for LWR waste confidence. With LWR waste confidence recent impacts on reactor licensing, an alternate disposition path is highly relevant. Centered on a reactor operating at 250 MWe, the compact electricity generating system design maximizes site flexibility with truck transport of all system components and available dry cooling features that removes the need to be located near a body of water. A high temperature system using helium coolant, electricity is efficiently produced using an asynchronous high-speed gas turbine while the LWR SNF is converted to fission products. Reactor design features such as vented fuel and silicon carbide cladding support reactor operation for decades between refueling, with improved fuel utilization. Beyond the reactor, the fuel cycle is designed so that subsequent generations of EM2 reactor fuel will use the previous EM2 discharge, providing its own waste confidence plus eliminating the need for enrichment after the first generation. Additional LWR SNF is added at each re-fabrication to replace the removed fission products. The fuel cycle uses a dry voloxidation process for both the initial LWR SNF re-fabrication and later for EM2

  8. Noble metal nanowires incorporated Nafion {sup registered} membranes for reduction of methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Z.X.; Liao, S.J.; Zeng, J.H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Shi, J.Y. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-09-15

    We electrodeposited noble metal (palladium, platinum) nanowires into the hydrophilic pores of Nafion membrane for mitigating the problem of methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The DMFC performance result shows that the composite membranes yield lower rate of methanol crossover and better cell performance than the pure Nafion {sup registered} membrane. At low current densities, the Pd nanowire incorporated Nafion membrane shows the best performance. In comparison, the highest performance is achieved at higher current densities with the Pt nanowire modified Nafion membrane. Based on the above findings, we suggest that for the Pd nanowire incorporated Nafion membrane, the mechanism for the suppression of the methanol crossover is mainly the blocking effect due to the 'narrowed' hydrophilic channels in Nafion membrane. For the Pt nanowire modified Nafion membrane, the mechanism includes both increasing the membrane tortuosity and so-called 'on-way consumption' of methanol on the Pt nanowires deposited into the Nafion membrane when the fuel cell is discharging. (author)

  9. Thermal coupling potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with metal hydride tanks: Thermodynamic and design considerations towards integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiotis, Andreas G.; Kainourgiakis, Michael E.; Kosmidis, Lefteris I.; Charalambopoulou, Georgia C.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2014-12-01

    We study the thermal coupling potential between a high temperature metal hydride (MH) tank and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) aiming towards the design of an efficient integrated system, where the thermal power produced during normal SOFC operation is redirected towards the MH tank in order to maintain H2 desorption without the use of external heating sources. Based on principles of thermodynamics, we calculate the energy balance in the SOFC/MH system and derive analytical expressions for both the thermal power produced during SOFC operation and the corresponding thermal power required for H2 desorption, as a function of the operating temperature, efficiency and fuel utilization ratio in the SOFC, and the MH enthalpy of desorption in the tank. Based on these calculations, we propose an integrated SOFC/MH design where heat is transferred primarily by radiation to the tank in order to maintain steady-state desorption conditions. We develop a mathematical model for this particular design that accounts for heat/mass transfer and desorption kinetics in the tank, and solve for the dynamics of the system assuming MgH2 as a storage material. Our results focus primarily on tank operating conditions, such as pressure, temperature and H2 saturation profiles vs operation time.

  10. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells with impregnated SrFe0.75Mo0.25O3 cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yucun; Meng, Xie; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Junliang; Wang, Shaorong; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication in reducing atmospheres of SrFe0.75Mo0.25O3 (SFMO)-8 mol%Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) composites by impregnating Sr2+-, Fe3+- and Mo7O246--containing solutions into the porous YSZ backbones, which would find important applications as cathodes for co-fired metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells. X-ray diffraction examination shows that as-synthesized infiltrates consist of perovskite SFMO oxides and metallic Fe. In situ oxidation during the fuel cell operation eliminates metallic Fe, and SFMO oxides become the predominant component with some minor SrMoO4 impurities. Impedance measurements on symmetric cathode fuel cells show that such impregnated SFMO-YSZ composites exhibit low polarization resistances in air, e.g., 0.06 Ω cm2 at 800 °C. Metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells, consisting of porous 430L stainless steel substrates, Ni-YSZ active anodes, YSZ electrolytes and impregnated SFMO-YSZ composite cathodes, are fabricated using tape casting, tape lamination, co-sintering and solution impregnation techniques, and show maximum power densities of 438 mW cm-2 at 800 °C and 221 mW cm-2 at 700 °C.

  11. A Phenomenological Study on the Synergistic Role of Precious Metals in the Steam Reforming of Logistic Fuels on Bimetal-Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Majeed Azad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel processors are required to convert sulfur-laden logistic fuels into hydrogen-rich reformate and deliver to the fuel cell stack with little or no sulfur. Since sulfur poisons and deactivates the reforming catalyst, robust sulfur-tolerant catalysts ought to be developed. In this paper, the development, characterization and evaluation of a series of reforming catalysts containing two noble metals (with total metal loading not exceeding 1 weight percent supported on nanoscale ceria for the steam-reforming of kerosene is reported. Due to inherent synergy, a bimetallic catalyst is superior to its monometallic analog, for the same level of loading. The choice of noble metal combination in the bimetallic formulations plays a vital and meaningful role in their performance. Presence of ruthenium and/or rhodium in formulations containing palladium showed improved sulfur tolerance and significant enhancement in their catalytic activity and stability. Rhodium was responsible for higher hydrogen yields in the logistic fuel reformate. Duration of steady hydrogen production was higher in the case of RhPd (75 h than for RuPd (68 h; hydrogen generation was stable over the longest period (88 h with RuRh containing no Pd. A mechanistic correlation between the characteristic role of precious metals in the presence of each other is discussed.

  12. A New Process for Hot Metal Production at Low Fuel Rate - Phase 1 Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wei-Kao Lu

    2006-02-01

    The project is part of the continuing effort by the North American steel industry to develop a coal-based, cokeless process for hot metal production. The objective of Phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of designing and constructing a pilot scale facility with the capacity of 42,000 mtpy of direct reduced iron (DRI) with 95% metallization. The primary effort is performed by Bricmont, Inc., an international engineering firm, under the supervision of McMaster University. The study focused on the Paired Straight Hearth furnace concept developed previously by McMaster University, The American Iron and Steel Institute and the US Department of Energy.

  13. Determination of thorium in plutonium-thorium oxides and carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    Thorium is determined in (PuTh)C and (PuTh)O/sub 2/ by complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) following separation on anion-exchange resin. Carbides are first oxidized by ignition in air at about 800/sup 0/C. Oxide or oxidized carbide samples are dissolved in acids by the sealed-reflux technique or by heating in beakers. The plutonium is selectively sorbed from the 12M hydrochloric acid solution of the fuel on a Bio-Rad AG1-X2 anion-exchange resin column, and the eluted thorium is titrated with EDTA using xylenol orange as the indicator. The average recovery of thorium in 20 samples is 99.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.07%.

  14. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  15. Metal Oxide-Supported Platinum Overlayers as Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity and stability of n=(1, 2, 3) platinum layers supported on a number of rutile metal oxides (MO2; M=Ti, Sn, Ta, Nb, Hf and Zr). A suitable oxide support can alleviate the problem of carbon corrosion and platinum dissolution in Pt/C catalysts. Moreover, it can increase t...

  16. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  17. Novel Metal Oxide Support with Water Activation Ability for Use in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingjing; WEI Ang; ZHAO Xiaohui; ZHANG Shuyong

    2009-01-01

    A new principle for designing catalyst supports with water activation ability was proposed.According to this principle,stabilized nickel(+3)oxides with different dopants were tested as possible support and promoter for Pt catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells.It was found that the chemical and electrochemical stabilities of these novel supports in acidic solution were sufficient.The support doped with Ai(+3)has catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation while that doped with Co(+3)can improve both activity and poisoning tolerance of the Pt catalyst.

  18. Development of a gasket seal for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This report gives details of the development of a compressive gasket sealing solution suitable for Ceres Power third generation solid oxide fuel cells (3G-SOFC) operating between 500-600{sup o}C, and the development of computer model of a Ceres Power stack and its gasket layers. The 3G-SOFC gasket sealing material, stack development, and validation of the model are discussed along with commercialisation of the gasket and the evaluation and costing of mass manufacture of the new material.

  19. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  20. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.