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Sample records for metal artifact reduction

  1. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  2. Metal artifact reduction method using metal streaks image subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Rizza D.; Cho, Seung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have been dedicated for metal artifact reduction (MAR); however, the methods are successful to varying degrees depending on situations. Sinogram in-painting, filtering, iterative method are some of the major categories of MAR. Each has its own merits and weaknesses. A combination of these methods or hybrid methods have also been developed to make use of the different benefits of two techniques and minimize the unfavorable results. Our method focuses on the in-paitning approach and a hybrid MAR described by Xia et al. Although in-painting scheme is an effective technique in reducing the primary metal artifacts, a major drawback is the reintroduction of new artifacts that can be caused by an inaccurate interpolation process. Furthermore, combining the segmented metal image to the corrected nonmetal image in the final step of a conventional inpainting approach causes an issue of incorrect metal pixel values. Our proposed method begins with a sinogram in-painting approach and ends with an image-based metal artifact reduction scheme. This work provides a simple, yet effective solution for reducing metal artifacts and acquiring the original metal pixel information. The proposed method demonstrated its effectiveness in a simulation setting. The proposed method showed image quality that is comparable to the standard MAR; however, quantitatively more accurate than the standard MAR

  3. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  4. Pacemaker-induced Metallic Artifacts in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Clinical Feasibility of Single Energy Metal Artifact Reduction Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Tomoya; Arai, Takehiro; Amanuma, Makoto; Sano, Tomonari; Ichiba, Masato; Ishizaka, Kazumasa; Sekine, Takako; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Morita, Hitomi; Takase, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with pacemaker suffers from metallic lead-induced artifacts, which often interfere with accurate assessment of coronary luminal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to assess a frequency of the lead-induced artifacts and artifact-suppression effect by the single energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) technique. Forty-one patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker were evaluated using a 320 multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Among them, 22 patients with motion-free full data reconstruction images were the final candidates. Images with and without the SMEAR technique were subjectively compared, and the degree of metallic artifacts was compared. On images without SEMAR, severe metallic artifacts were often observed in the right coronary artery (#1, #2, #3) and distal anterior descending branch (#8). These artifacts were effectively suppressed by SEMAR, and the luminal accessibility was significantly improved in #3 and #8. While pacemaker leads often cause metallic-induced artifacts, SEMAR technique reduced the artifacts and significantly improved the accessibility of coronary lumen in #3 and #8.

  5. Quantitative Comparison of Commercial and Non-Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques in Computed Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Dirk; van der Graaf, Emiel R.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Greuter, Marcel J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT). Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT)

  6. Metal artifacts in computed tomography for radiation therapy planning: dosimetric effects and impact of metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; De Man, Bruno; Verburg, Joost; Trofimov, Alexei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; Gjesteby, Lars; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-04-01

    A significant and increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy present with metal objects close to, or even within, the treatment area, resulting in artifacts in computed tomography (CT) imaging, which is the most commonly used imaging method for treatment planning in radiation therapy. In the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings in treatment of head-and-neck tumors, spinal stabilization implants in spinal or paraspinal treatment or hip replacements in prostate cancer treatments, the extreme photon absorption by the metal object leads to prominent image artifacts. Although current CT scanners include a series of correction steps for beam hardening, scattered radiation and noisy measurements, when metal implants exist within or close to the treatment area, these corrections do not suffice. CT metal artifacts affect negatively the treatment planning of radiation therapy either by causing difficulties to delineate the target volume or by reducing the dose calculation accuracy. Various metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods have been explored in terms of improvement of organ delineation and dose calculation in radiation therapy treatment planning, depending on the type of radiation treatment and location of the metal implant and treatment site. Including a brief description of the available CT MAR methods that have been applied in radiation therapy, this article attempts to provide a comprehensive review on the dosimetric effect of the presence of CT metal artifacts in treatment planning, as reported in the literature, and the potential improvement suggested by different MAR approaches. The impact of artifacts on the treatment planning and delivery accuracy is discussed in the context of different modalities, such as photon external beam, brachytherapy and particle therapy, as well as by type and location of metal implants.

  7. Metal artifact reduction in CT by identifying missing data hidden in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Choi, Jae Kyu; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Kyung Sang; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Ye, Jong Chul; Seo, Jin Keun

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing demand in the field of dental and medical radiography for effective metal artifact reduction (MAR) in computed tomography (CT) because artifact caused by metallic objects causes serious image degradation that obscures information regarding the teeth and/or other biological structures. This paper presents a new MAR method that uses the Laplacian operator to reveal background projection data hidden in regions containing data from metal. In the proposed method, we attempted to decompose the projection data into two parts: data from metal only (metal data), and background data in the absence of metal. Removing metal data from the projections enables us to perform sparsity-driven reconstruction of the metal component and subsequent removal of the metal artifact. The results of clinical experiments demonstrated that the proposed MAR algorithm improves image quality and increases the standard of 3D reconstruction images of the teeth and mandible.

  8. X-ray CT Metal Artifact Reduction Using Wavelet Domain L-0 Sparse Regularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of patients with metallic implants usually suffers from streaking metal artifacts. In this paper, we propose a new projection completion metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm by formulating the completion of missing projections as a regularized inverse

  9. Metal Artifact Reduction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpics, Mark; Johnson, Paul; Patel, Rakesh; Surucu, Murat; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a method for reducing metal artifacts, arising from dental fillings, on cone-beam computed tomography images. A projection interpolation algorithm is applied to cone-beam computed tomography images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings. This technique involves identifying metal regions in individual cone-beam computed tomography projections and interpolating the surrounding values to remove the metal from the projection data. Axial cone-beam computed tomography images are then reconstructed, resulting in a reduction in the streak artifacts produced by the metal. Both phantom and patient imaging data are used to evaluate this technique. The interpolation substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in all cases. Corrected images had fewer or no streak artifacts compared to their noncorrected counterparts. Quantitatively, regions of interest containing the artifacts showed reduced variance in the corrected images versus the uncorrected images. Average pixel values in regions of interest around the metal object were also closer in value to nonmetal regions after artifact reduction. Artifact correction tended to perform better on patient images with less complex metal objects versus those with multiple large dental fillings. The interpolation substitution is potentially an efficient and effective technique for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings on cone-beam computed tomography image. This technique may be effective in reducing such artifacts in patients with head and neck cancer receiving daily image-guided radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. 3D Prior Image Constrained Projection Completion for X-ray CT Metal Artifact Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    The presence of metallic implants in the body of patients undergoing X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations often results insevere streaking artifacts that degrade image quality. In this work, we propose a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for 2D fan-beam and 3D cone-beam CT based on

  11. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Balter, Peter A; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. (paper)

  12. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  13. Projection-based metal-artifact reduction for industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirkhanov, Artem; Heinzl, Christoph; Reiter, Michael; Kastner, Johann; Gröller, M Eduard

    2011-12-01

    Multi-material components, which contain metal parts surrounded by plastic materials, are highly interesting for inspection using industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography (3DXCT). Examples of this application scenario are connectors or housings with metal inlays in the electronic or automotive industry. A major problem of this type of components is the presence of metal, which causes streaking artifacts and distorts the surrounding media in the reconstructed volume. Streaking artifacts and dark-band artifacts around metal components significantly influence the material characterization (especially for the plastic components). In specific cases these artifacts even prevent a further analysis. Due to the nature and the different characteristics of artifacts, the development of an efficient artifact-reduction technique in reconstruction-space is rather complicated. In this paper we present a projection-space pipeline for metal-artifacts reduction. The proposed technique first segments the metal in the spatial domain of the reconstructed volume in order to separate it from the other materials. Then metal parts are forward-projected on the set of projections in a way that metal-projection regions are treated as voids. Subsequently the voids, which are left by the removed metal, are interpolated in the 2D projections. Finally, the metal is inserted back into the reconstructed 3D volume during the fusion stage. We present a visual analysis tool, allowing for interactive parameter estimation of the metal segmentation. The results of the proposed artifact-reduction technique are demonstrated on a test part as well as on real world components. For these specimens we achieve a significant reduction of metal artifacts, allowing an enhanced material characterization. © 2010 IEEE

  14. Spectral CT metal artifact reduction with an optimization-based reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Barber, Rina F.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2017-03-01

    Metal objects cause artifacts in computed tomography (CT) images. This work investigated the feasibility of a spectral CT method to reduce metal artifacts. Spectral CT acquisition combined with optimization-based reconstruction is proposed to reduce artifacts by modeling the physical effects that cause metal artifacts and by providing the flexibility to selectively remove corrupted spectral measurements in the spectral-sinogram space. The proposed Constrained `One-Step' Spectral CT Image Reconstruction (cOSSCIR) algorithm directly estimates the basis material maps while enforcing convex constraints. The incorporation of constraints on the reconstructed basis material maps is expected to mitigate undersampling effects that occur when corrupted data is excluded from reconstruction. The feasibility of the cOSSCIR algorithm to reduce metal artifacts was investigated through simulations of a pelvis phantom. The cOSSCIR algorithm was investigated with and without the use of a third basis material representing metal. The effects of excluding data corrupted by metal were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the proposed cOSSCIR algorithm reduced metal artifacts and improved CT number accuracy. For example, CT number error in a bright shading artifact region was reduced from 403 HU in the reference filtered backprojection reconstruction to 33 HU using the proposed algorithm in simulation. In the dark shading regions, the error was reduced from 1141 HU to 25 HU. Of the investigated approaches, decomposing the data into three basis material maps and excluding the corrupted data demonstrated the greatest reduction in metal artifacts.

  15. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  16. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by constrained optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2011-02-01

    The streak artifacts caused by metal implants have long been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. In this work, the authors propose an iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm based on constrained optimization. After the shape and location of metal objects in the image domain is determined automatically by the binary metal identification algorithm and the segmentation of "metal shadows" in projection domain is done, constrained optimization is used for image reconstruction. It minimizes a predefined function that reflects a priori knowledge of the image, subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data are within a specified tolerance of the available metal-shadow-excluded projection data, with image non-negativity enforced. The minimization problem is solved through the alternation of projection-onto-convex-sets and the steepest gradient descent of the objective function. The constrained optimization algorithm is evaluated with a penalized smoothness objective. The study shows that the proposed method is capable of significantly reducing metal artifacts, suppressing noise, and improving soft-tissue visibility. It outperforms the FBP-type methods and ART and EM methods and yields artifacts-free images. Constrained optimization is an effective way to deal with CT reconstruction with embedded metal objects. Although the method is presented in the context of metal artifacts, it is applicable to general "missing data" image reconstruction problems.

  17. Image-based metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography utilizing local anatomical similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Yang, Xiaofeng; Rosenfield, Jonathan; Elder, Eric; Dhabaan, Anees

    2017-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used in radiation therapy treatment planning in recent years. However, metal implants such as dental fillings and hip prostheses can cause severe bright and dark streaking artifacts in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. In this work, a metal artifact reduction method is proposed based on the intrinsic anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Neighboring CT slices from the same patient exhibit similar anatomical features. Exploiting this anatomical similarity, a gamma map is calculated as a weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error for each pixel in an artifact-corrupted CT image relative to a neighboring, artifactfree image. The minimum value in the gamma map for each pixel is used to identify an appropriate pixel from the artifact-free CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. With the proposed method, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 360 HU and 460 HU to 24 HU and 34 HU on head and pelvis CT images, respectively. Dose calculation accuracy also improved, as the dose difference was reduced from greater than 20% to less than 4%. Using 3%/3mm criteria, the gamma analysis failure rate was reduced from 23.25% to 0.02%. An image-based metal artifact reduction method is proposed that replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring CT slices free of metal artifacts. This method is shown to be capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, thereby improving HU and dose calculation accuracy.

  18. Spurious structures created by interpolation-based CT metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Buzug, T. M.

    2009-02-01

    Under normal circumstances the quality of images reconstructed with the classic FBP CT reconstruction algorithm is adequate for medical diagnosis. However, in some special cases the assumptions made by this method are not applicable because of non-linearities in the underlying physical imaging processes. Especially in the presence of metal implants in the field of view, effects like beam hardening, scatter and photon starvation result in serious streaking and banding artifacts around and between these objects. In order to reduce the artifacts, several different types of correction methods were introduced during the last two decades. In one of the most often used approaches, an interpolation scheme is used to replace all corrupted beam data in the shadow of the metal with artificially generated values. Although this leads to a reduction of the most severe artifacts, typically the results are far from being perfect. Instead of removing all artifacts, in most cases new streak artifacts are introduced. In the present work it is shown that the origin of these new artifacts is related to the loss of edge information of the objects by using surrogate data. The application of a more sophisticated artifact reduction method based on a segmentation of a preliminary reconstructed image decreases the number of newly introduced artifacts to a large degree. This is possible, because edge information between air and tissue recovered from the preliminary reconstruction can be included into the correction scheme. It is concluded that a restoration scheme without additionally information is not sufficient for a successful metal artifact reduction method.

  19. Deep learning methods for CT image-domain metal artifact reduction

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    Gjesteby, Lars; Yang, Qingsong; Xi, Yan; Shan, Hongming; Claus, Bernhard; Jin, Yannan; De Man, Bruno; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Artifacts resulting from metal objects have been a persistent problem in CT images over the last four decades. A common approach to overcome their effects is to replace corrupt projection data with values synthesized from an interpolation scheme or by reprojection of a prior image. State-of-the-art correction methods, such as the interpolation- and normalization-based algorithm NMAR, often do not produce clinically satisfactory results. Residual image artifacts remain in challenging cases and even new artifacts can be introduced by the interpolation scheme. Metal artifacts continue to be a major impediment, particularly in radiation and proton therapy planning as well as orthopedic imaging. A new solution to the long-standing metal artifact reduction (MAR) problem is deep learning, which has been successfully applied to medical image processing and analysis tasks. In this study, we combine a convolutional neural network (CNN) with the state-of-the-art NMAR algorithm to reduce metal streaks in critical image regions. Training data was synthesized from CT simulation scans of a phantom derived from real patient images. The CNN is able to map metal-corrupted images to artifact-free monoenergetic images to achieve additional correction on top of NMAR for improved image quality. Our results indicate that deep learning is a novel tool to address CT reconstruction challenges, and may enable more accurate tumor volume estimation for radiation therapy planning.

  20. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans

  1. Dual-energy-based metal segmentation for metal artifact reduction in dental computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Mohamed A A; Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hernandez, Daniel; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2018-02-01

    In a dental CT scan, the presence of dental fillings or dental implants generates severe metal artifacts that often compromise readability of the CT images. Many metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques have been introduced, but dental CT scans still suffer from severe metal artifacts particularly when multiple dental fillings or implants exist around the region of interest. The high attenuation coefficient of teeth often causes erroneous metal segmentation, compromising the MAR performance. We propose a metal segmentation method for a dental CT that is based on dual-energy imaging with a narrow energy gap. Unlike a conventional dual-energy CT, we acquire two projection data sets at two close tube voltages (80 and 90 kV p ), and then, we compute the difference image between the two projection images with an optimized weighting factor so as to maximize the contrast of the metal regions. We reconstruct CT images from the weighted difference image to identify the metal region with global thresholding. We forward project the identified metal region to designate metal trace on the projection image. We substitute the pixel values on the metal trace with the ones computed by the region filling method. The region filling in the metal trace removes high-intensity data made by the metallic objects from the projection image. We reconstruct final CT images from the region-filled projection image with the fusion-based approach. We have done imaging experiments on a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using a lab-built micro-CT and a commercial dental CT system. We have corrected the projection images of a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using the single-energy and dual-energy-based metal segmentation methods. The single-energy-based method often failed in correcting the metal artifacts on the slices on which tooth enamel exists. The dual-energy-based method showed better MAR performances in all cases regardless of the presence of tooth enamel on the slice of

  2. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction Technique for the Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K; Kuo, H; Ritter, J; Shen, J; Basavatia, A; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S; Tome, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a metal artifact reduction technique in depleting metal artifact and its application in improving dose calculation in External Radiation Therapy Planning. Methods: CIRS electron density phantom was scanned with and without steel drill bits placed in some plug holes. Meta artifact reduction software with Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) was used to remove metal artifacts for scanned image with metal. Hounsfield units of electron density plugs from artifact free reference image and MDT processed images were compared. To test the dose calculation improvement after the MDT processed images, clinically approved head and neck plan with manual dental artifact correction was tested. Patient images were exported and processed with MDT and plan was recalculated with new MDT image without manual correction. Dose profiles near the metal artifacts were compared. Results: The MDT used in this study effectively reduced the metal artifact caused by beam hardening and scatter. The windmill around the metal drill was greatly improved with smooth rounded view. Difference of the mean HU in each density plug between reference and MDT images were less than 10 HU in most of the plugs. Dose difference between original plan and MDT images were minimal. Conclusion: Most metal artifact reduction methods were developed for diagnostic improvement purpose. Hence Hounsfield unit accuracy was not rigorously tested before. In our test, MDT effectively eliminated metal artifacts with good HU reproduciblity. However, it can introduce new mild artifacts so the MDT images should be checked with original images

  3. Metal Artifact Reduction in Computed Tomography After Deep Brain Stimulation Electrode Placement Using Iterative Reconstructions.

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    Aissa, Joel; Boos, Johannes; Schleich, Christoph; Sedlmair, Martin; Krzymyk, Karl; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy of intraoperative computed tomography (CT) after deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode placement is limited due to artifacts induced by the metallic hardware, which can potentially mask intracranial postoperative complications. Different metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques have been introduced to reduce artifacts from metal hardware in CT. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a novel iterative MAR technique on image quality and diagnostic performance in the follow-up of patients with DBS electrode implementation surgery. Seventeen patients who had received routine intraoperative CT of the head after implantation of DBS electrodes between March 2015 and June 2015 were retrospectively included. Raw data of all patients were reconstructed with standard weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) and additionally with a novel iterative MAR algorithm. We quantified frequencies of density changes to assess quantitative artifact reduction. For evaluation of qualitative image quality, the visibility of numerous cerebral anatomic landmarks and the detectability of intracranial electrodes were scored according to a 4-point scale. Furthermore, artifact strength overall and adjacent to the electrodes was rated. Our results of quantitative artifact reduction showed that images reconstructed with iterative MAR (iMAR) contained significantly lower metal artifacts (overall low frequency values, 1608.6 ± 545.5; range, 375.5-3417.2) compared with the WFBP (overall low frequency values, 4487.3 ± 875.4; range, 2218.3-5783.5) reconstructed images (P < 0.004). Qualitative image analysis showed a significantly improved image quality for iMAR (overall anatomical landmarks, 2.49 ± 0.15; median, 3; range, 0-3; overall electrode characteristics, 2.35 ± 0.16; median, 2; range, 0-3; artifact characteristics, 2.16 ± 0.08; median, 2.5; range, 0-3) compared with WFBP (overall anatomical landmarks, 1.21 ± 0.64; median, 1; range, 0-3; overall electrode

  4. Post-processing sets of tilted CT volumes as a method for metal artifact reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhausen, Hendrik; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Söhn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Metal implants, surgical clips and other foreign bodies may cause ‘streaking’ or ‘star’ artifacts in computed tomography (CT) reconstructions, for example in the vicinity of dental restorations or hip implants. The deteriorated image quality complicates contouring and has an adverse effect on quantitative planning in external beam therapy. The potential to reduce artifacts by acquisition of tilted CT reconstructions from different angles of the same object was investigated. While each of those reconstructions still contained artifacts, they were not necessarily in the same place in each CT. By combining such CTs with complementary information, a reconstructed volume with less or even without artifacts was obtained. The most straightforward way to combine the co-registered volumes was to calculate the mean or median per voxel. The method was tested with a calibration phantom featuring a titanium insert, and with a human skull featuring multiple dental restorations made from gold and steel. The performance of the method was compared to established metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms. Dose reduction was tested. In a visual comparison, streaking artifacts were strongly reduced and details in the vicinity of metal foreign bodies became much more visible. In case of the calibration phantom, average bias in Hounsfield units was reduced by 94% and per-voxel-errors and noise were reduced by 83%. In case of the human skull, bias was reduced by 95% and noise was reduced by 94%. The performance of the method was visually superior and quantitatively compareable to established MAR algorithms. Dose reduction was viable. A simple post-processing method for MAR was described which required one or more complementary scans but did not rely on any a priori information. The method was computationally inexpensive. Performance of the method was quantitatively comparable to established algorithms and visually superior in a direct comparison. Dose reduction was demonstrated

  5. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara; Krauss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [de

  6. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jack W; Edic, Peter M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Torres, Andrew S; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration.

  7. Iterative metal artifact reduction for x-ray computed tomography using unmatched projector/backprojector pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Li, Lei; Cai, Ailong; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) is a major problem and a challenging issue in x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. Iterative reconstruction from sinograms unaffected by metals shows promising potential in detail recovery. This reconstruction has been the subject of much research in recent years. However, conventional iterative reconstruction methods easily introduce new artifacts around metal implants because of incomplete data reconstruction and inconsistencies in practical data acquisition. Hence, this work aims at developing a method to suppress newly introduced artifacts and improve the image quality around metal implants for the iterative MAR scheme. Methods: The proposed method consists of two steps based on the general iterative MAR framework. An uncorrected image is initially reconstructed, and the corresponding metal trace is obtained. The iterative reconstruction method is then used to reconstruct images from the unaffected sinogram. In the reconstruction step of this work, an iterative strategy utilizing unmatched projector/backprojector pairs is used. A ramp filter is introduced into the back-projection procedure to restrain the inconsistency components in low frequencies and generate more reliable images of the regions around metals. Furthermore, a constrained total variation (TV) minimization model is also incorporated to enhance efficiency. The proposed strategy is implemented based on an iterative FBP and an alternating direction minimization (ADM) scheme, respectively. The developed algorithms are referred to as “iFBP-TV” and “TV-FADM,” respectively. Two projection-completion-based MAR methods and three iterative MAR methods are performed simultaneously for comparison. Results: The proposed method performs reasonably on both simulation and real CT-scanned datasets. This approach could reduce streak metal artifacts effectively and avoid the mentioned effects in the vicinity of the metals. The improvements are evaluated by

  8. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Oncology Department, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Co circumflex te du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography by using analytical DBP-type algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates a common metal artifacts problem in X-ray computed tomography (CT). The artifacts in reconstructed image may render image non-diagnostic because of inaccuracy beam hardening correction from high attenuation objects, satisfactory image could not be reconstructed from projections with missing or distorted data. In traditionally analytical metal artifact reduction (MAR) method, firstly subtract the metallic object part of projection data from the original obtained projection, secondly complete the subtracted part in original projection by using various interpolating method, thirdly reconstruction from the interpolated projection by filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. The interpolation error occurred during the second step can make unrealistic assumptions about the missing data, leading to DC shift artifact in the reconstructed images. We proposed a differentiated back-projection (DBP) type MAR method by instead of FBP algorithm with DBP algorithm in third step. In FBP algorithm the interpolated projection will be filtered on each projection view angle before back-projection, as a result the interpolation error is propagated to whole projection. However, the property of DBP algorithm provide a chance to do filter after the back-projection in a Hilbert filter direction, as a result the interpolation error affection would be reduce and there is expectation on improving quality of reconstructed images. In other word, if we choose the DBP algorithm instead of the FBP algorithm, less contaminated projection data with interpolation error would be used in reconstruction. A simulation study was performed to evaluate the proposed method using a given phantom.

  11. Assessments of total hip replacements before and after revision surgery with use of computed tomography with metal artifact reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.D.; Fishman, E.K.; Kalender, W.A.; Magid, D.; Weiss, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic assessment of revision total hip replacements suffers from the inability to provide adequate information regarding bone stock loss. Even CT, with its transaxial orientation, is limited because of metal artifacts. Three metal artifact reduction techniques are available for CT: material-dependent imaging, planar reformation of image data, and missing projection data replacement. These techniques were used to evaluate preoperatively seven patients with revision total hip replacements, and postoperatively eight patients with primary total hip replacements. Despite significant artifacts on the routine transaxial images, the metal artifact-reduced images were of sufficient quality to provide pertinent clinical information in all cases

  12. Three-dimensional metal artifact reduction method for dental conebeam CT scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Katsumata, Atsushi; Ito, Koichi; Aoki, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    In dental treatments where metal is indispensable material and dental implants require precise structural measurements of teeth and bones, the ability of CT scanners to perform Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) is a very important yet unsolved problem. The increasing need for dental implants is raising the demand for a conebeam CT. In this paper, an MAR method of the Metal Erasing Method (MEM) is extended to three dimensions. Assuming that metals are completely opaque to X-ray, MEM reconstructs metals and other materials separately, then combines them afterward. 3D-MEM is not only more efficient but performs better than the repetition of MEM, because it identifies metals more precisely by utilizing the continuity of metals in the third dimension. Another important contribution of the research is the application of advanced binarization techniques for identifying metal-corrupted areas on projection images. Differential histogram techniques are applied to find an adequate threshold value. Whereas MEM needs to identify metals on a sinogram that covers the all rotation angles with a single threshold value, identifying metals on each projection image with an individual value is an important benefit of 3D-MEM. The threshold value varies per projection angle, especially by the influence of the spine and scull, that are objects outside of the field of view. The performance of 3D-MEM is examined using a subject who has as many as 12 pieces of complex metals in his teeth. It is shown that the metals are successfully identified and the grade of metal artifact has been considerably reduced.

  13. A novel forward projection-based metal artifact reduction method for flat-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Beister, Marcel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-01-01

    Metallic implants generate streak-like artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) reconstructed volumetric images. This study presents a novel method for reducing these disturbing artifacts by inserting discarded information into the original rawdata using a three-step correction procedure and working directly with each detector element. Computation times are minimized by completely implementing the correction process on graphics processing units (GPUs). First, the original volume is corrected using a three-dimensional interpolation scheme in the rawdata domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This metal artifact-reduced volume is then segmented into three materials, i.e. air, soft-tissue and bone, using a threshold-based algorithm. Subsequently, a forward projection of the obtained tissue-class model substitutes the missing or corrupted attenuation values directly for each flat detector element that contains attenuation values corresponding to metal parts, followed by a final reconstruction. Experiments using tissue-equivalent phantoms showed a significant reduction of metal artifacts (deviations of CT values after correction compared to measurements without metallic inserts reduced typically to below 20 HU, differences in image noise to below 5 HU) caused by the implants and no significant resolution losses even in areas close to the inserts. To cover a variety of different cases, cadaver measurements and clinical images in the knee, head and spine region were used to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of our method. A comparison to a three-dimensional interpolation correction showed that the new approach outperformed interpolation schemes. Correction times are minimized, and initial and corrected images are made available at almost the same time (12.7 s for the initial reconstruction, 46.2 s for the final corrected image compared to 114.1 s and 355.1 s on central processing units (CPUs)).

  14. Metal Artifact Reduction of CT Scans to Improve PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vos, Charlotte S; Arens, Anne I J; Hamill, James J; Hofmann, Christian; Panin, Vladimir Y; Meeuwis, Antoi P W; Visser, Eric P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, different metal artifact reduction methods have been developed for CT. These methods have only recently been introduced for PET/CT even though they could be beneficial for interpretation, segmentation, and quantification of the PET/CT images. In this study, phantom and patient scans were analyzed visually and quantitatively to measure the effect on PET images of iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) of CT data. Methods: The phantom consisted of 2 types of hip prostheses in a solution of 18 F-FDG and water. 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans of 14 patients with metal implants (either dental implants, hip prostheses, shoulder prostheses, or pedicle screws) and 68 Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen ( 68 Ga-PSMA) PET/CT scans of 7 patients with hip prostheses were scored by 2 experienced nuclear medicine physicians to analyze clinical relevance. For all patients, a lesion was located in the field of view of the metal implant. Phantom and patients were scanned in a PET/CT scanner. The standard low-dose CT scans were processed with the iMAR algorithm. The PET data were reconstructed using attenuation correction provided by both standard CT and iMAR-processed CT. Results: For the phantom scans, cold artifacts were visible on the PET image. There was a 30% deficit in 18 F-FDG concentration, which was restored by iMAR processing, indicating that metal artifacts on CT images induce quantification errors in PET data. The iMAR algorithm was useful for most patients. When iMAR was used, the confidence in interpretation increased or stayed the same, with an average improvement of 28% ± 20% (scored on a scale of 0%-100% confidence). The SUV increase or decrease depended on the type of metal artifact. The mean difference in absolute values of SUV mean of the lesions was 3.5% ± 3.3%. Conclusion: The iMAR algorithm increases the confidence of the interpretation of the PET/CT scan and influences the SUV. The added value of iMAR depends on the indication for the

  15. GPU-accelerated metal artifact reduction (MAR) in FD-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beister, M.; Prell, D.; Kyriakou, Y.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Metallic implants are responsible for various artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography visible as streaks and dark areas in the reconstructed volumetric images. In this paper a novel method for a fast reduction of these metal artifacts is presented using a three-step correction procedure to approximate the missing parts of the raw data. In addition to image quality aspects, this paper deals with the problem of high correction latencies by proposing a reconstruction and correction framework, that utilizes the massive computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs). An initial volume is reconstructed, followed by a 3-dimensional metal voxel segmentation algorithm. These metal voxels allow us to identify metal-influenced detector elements by using a simplified geometric forward projection. Consequently, these areas are corrected using a 3D interpolation scheme in the raw data domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This volume is then segmented into three materials with respect to bone structures using a threshold-based algorithm. A forward projection of the obtained tissueclass model substitutes missing or corrupted attenuation values for each detector element affected by metal and is followed by a final reconstruction. The entire process including the initial reconstruction, takes less than a minute (5123 volume with 496 projections of size 1240x960) and offers significant improvements of image quality. The method was evaluated with data from two FD-CT C-arm systems (Artis Zee and Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany).

  16. Evaluating applicability of metal artifact reduction algorithm for head and neck radiation treatment planning CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Sang Jun; Park, Jang Pil; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Suk Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is evaluation for the applicability of O-MAR(Metal artifact Reduction for Orthopedic Implants)(ver. 3.6.0, Philips, Netherlands) in head and neck radiation treatment planning CT with metal artifact created by dental implant. All of the in this study's CT images were scanned by Brilliance Big Bore CT(Philips, Netherlands) at 120 kVp, 2 mm sliced and Metal artifact reduced by O-MAR. To compare the original and reconstructed CT images worked on RTPS(Eclipse ver 10.0.42, Varian, USA). In order to test the basic performance of the O-MAR, The phantom was made to create metal artifact by dental implant and other phantoms used for without artifact images. To measure a difference of HU in with artifact images and without artifact images, homogeneous phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms were used with cerrobend rods. Each of images were compared a difference of HU in ROIs. And also, 1 case of patient's original CT image applied O-MAR and density corrected CT were evaluated for dose distributions with SNC Patient(Sun Nuclear Co., USA). In cases of head and neck phantom, the difference of dose distribution is appeared 99.8% gamma passing rate(criteria 2 mm / 2%) between original and CT images applied O-MAR. And 98.5% appeared in patient case, among original CT, O-MAR and density corrected CT. The difference of total dose distribution is less than 2% that appeared both phantom and patient case study. Though the dose deviations are little, there are still matters to discuss that the dose deviations are concentrated so locally. In this study, The quality of all images applied O-MAR was improved. Unexpectedly, Increase of max. HU was founded in air cavity of the O-MAR images compare to cavity of the original images and wrong corrections were appeared, too. The result of study assuming restrained case of O-MAR adapted to near skin and low density area, it appeared image distortion and artifact correction simultaneously. In O-MAR CT, air cavity area

  17. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  18. Iterative metal artifact reduction improves dose calculation accuracy. Phantom study with dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maerz, Manuel; Mittermair, Pia; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara [Regensburg University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artifacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which affect the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of the metal artifact reduction algorithm iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) in terms of correct representation of Hounsfield units (HU) and dose calculation accuracy. Heterogeneous phantoms consisting of different types of tissue equivalent material surrounding metallic dental implants were designed. Artifact-containing CT data of the phantoms were corrected using iMAR. Corrected and uncorrected CT data were compared to synthetic CT data to evaluate accuracy of HU reproduction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated in Oncentra v4.3 on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to Gafchromic trademark EBT3 films to assess accuracy of dose calculation. The use of iMAR increased the accuracy of HU reproduction. The average deviation of HU decreased from 1006 HU to 408 HU in areas including metal and from 283 HU to 33 HU in tissue areas excluding metal. Dose calculation accuracy could be significantly improved for all phantoms and plans: The mean passing rate for gamma evaluation with 3 % dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement increased from 90.6 % to 96.2 % if artifacts were corrected by iMAR. The application of iMAR allows metal artifacts to be removed to a great extent which leads to a significant increase in dose calculation accuracy. (orig.) [German] Metallische Implantate verursachen streifenfoermige Artefakte in CT-Bildern, welche die Dosisberechnung beeinflussen. In dieser Studie soll der Nutzen des iterativen Metall-Artefakt-Reduktions-Algorithmus iMAR hinsichtlich der Wiedergabetreue von Hounsfield-Werten (HU) und der Genauigkeit von Dosisberechnungen untersucht werden. Es wurden heterogene Phantome aus verschiedenen Arten gewebeaequivalenten Materials mit

  19. Analysis of metal artifact reduction tools for dental hardware in CT scans of the oral cavity: kVp, iterative reconstruction, dual-energy CT, metal artifact reduction software: does it make a difference?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crop, An de; Hoof, Tom van; Herde, Katharina d' ; Thierens, Hubert; Bacher, Klaus [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Gent (Belgium); Casselman, Jan; Vereecke, Elke; Bossu, Nicolas [AZ Sint Jan Bruges Ostend AV, Department of Radiology, Bruges (Belgium); Dierens, Melissa [Ghent University, Dental School, Unit for Oral and Maxillofacial Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Pamplona, Jaime [Hospital Lisboa Central, Department of Neuroradiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    Metal artifacts may negatively affect radiologic assessment in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate different metal artifact reduction techniques for metal artifacts induced by dental hardware in CT scans of the oral cavity. Clinical image quality was assessed using a Thiel-embalmed cadaver. A Catphan phantom and a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were used to evaluate physical-technical image quality parameters such as artifact area, artifact index (AI), and contrast detail (IQF{sub inv}). Metal cylinders were inserted in each phantom to create metal artifacts. CT images of both phantoms and the Thiel-embalmed cadaver were acquired on a multislice CT scanner using 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp; model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo); and synthesized monochromatic keV images with and without metal artifact reduction software (MARs). Four radiologists assessed the clinical image quality, using an image criteria score (ICS). Significant influence of increasing kVp and the use of Veo was found on clinical image quality (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014, respectively). Application of MARs resulted in a smaller artifact area (p < 0.05). However, MARs reconstructed images resulted in lower ICS. Of all investigated techniques, Veo shows to be most promising, with a significant improvement of both the clinical and physical-technical image quality without adversely affecting contrast detail. MARs reconstruction in CT images of the oral cavity to reduce dental hardware metallic artifacts is not sufficient and may even adversely influence the image quality. (orig.)

  20. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants

  1. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants.

  2. Exploring metal artifact reduction using dual-energy CT with pre-metal and post-metal implant cadaver comparison: are implant specific protocols needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Ruud H. H.; Donders, Johanna C. E.; Kloen, Peter; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Kleipool, Roeland P.; Maas, Mario; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2017-01-01

    To quantify and optimize metal artifact reduction using virtual monochromatic dual-energy CT for different metal implants compared to non-metal reference scans. Dual-energy CT scans of a pair of human cadaver limbs were acquired before and after implanting a titanium tibia plate, a stainless-steel

  3. Quantitative comparison of commercial and non-commercial metal artifact reduction techniques in computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Wagenaar

    Full Text Available Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT. Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT is freely available and able to reduce metal artifacts using reconstructed images. Although a comparison of the MDT to other MAR techniques exists, a comparison of commercially available MAR techniques is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the difference in effectiveness of the currently available MAR techniques of different scanners and the MDT technique.Three vendors were asked to use their preferential CT scanner for applying their MAR techniques. The scans were performed on a Philips Brilliance ICT 256 (S1, a GE Discovery CT 750 HD (S2 and a Siemens Somatom Definition AS Open (S3. The scans were made using an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan. Three amalgam dental implants were constructed and inserted between the phantom's teeth. The average absolute error (AAE was calculated for all reconstructions in the proximity of the amalgam implants.The commercial techniques reduced the AAE by 22.0±1.6%, 16.2±2.6% and 3.3±0.7% for S1 to S3 respectively. After applying the MDT to uncorrected scans of each scanner the AAE was reduced by 26.1±2.3%, 27.9±1.0% and 28.8±0.5% respectively. The difference in efficiency between the commercial techniques and the MDT was statistically significant for S2 (p=0.004 and S3 (p<0.001, but not for S1 (p=0.63.The effectiveness of MAR differs between vendors. S1 performed slightly better than S2 and both performed better than S3. Furthermore, for our phantom and outcome measure the MDT was more effective than the commercial MAR technique on all scanners.

  4. SU-C-206-03: Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Computed Tomography Based On Local Anatomical Similarity

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    Dong, X; Yang, X; Rosenfield, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A [Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal implants such as orthopedic hardware and dental fillings cause severe bright and dark streaking in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. Additionally, such artifacts negatively impact patient set-up in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, we propose a novel method for metal artifact reduction which utilizes the anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Methods: Neighboring CT slices show similar anatomy. Based on this anatomical similarity, the proposed method replaces corrupted CT pixels with pixels from adjacent, artifact-free slices. A gamma map, which is the weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error, is calculated for each pixel in the artifact-corrupted CT image. The minimum value in each pixel’s gamma map is used to identify a pixel from the adjacent CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. This replacement only occurs if the minimum value in a particular pixel’s gamma map is larger than a threshold. The proposed method was evaluated with clinical images. Results: Highly attenuating dental fillings and hip implants cause severe streaking artifacts on CT images. The proposed method eliminates the dark and bright streaking and improves the implant delineation and visibility. In particular, the image non-uniformity in the central region of interest was reduced from 1.88 and 1.01 to 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. Further, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 328 HU and 460 HU to 60 HU and 36 HU, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed metal artifact reduction method replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring slices that are free of metal artifacts. This method proved capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, improving HU accuracy and image detectability.

  5. SU-C-206-03: Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Computed Tomography Based On Local Anatomical Similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, X; Yang, X; Rosenfield, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal implants such as orthopedic hardware and dental fillings cause severe bright and dark streaking in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. Additionally, such artifacts negatively impact patient set-up in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, we propose a novel method for metal artifact reduction which utilizes the anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Methods: Neighboring CT slices show similar anatomy. Based on this anatomical similarity, the proposed method replaces corrupted CT pixels with pixels from adjacent, artifact-free slices. A gamma map, which is the weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error, is calculated for each pixel in the artifact-corrupted CT image. The minimum value in each pixel’s gamma map is used to identify a pixel from the adjacent CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. This replacement only occurs if the minimum value in a particular pixel’s gamma map is larger than a threshold. The proposed method was evaluated with clinical images. Results: Highly attenuating dental fillings and hip implants cause severe streaking artifacts on CT images. The proposed method eliminates the dark and bright streaking and improves the implant delineation and visibility. In particular, the image non-uniformity in the central region of interest was reduced from 1.88 and 1.01 to 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. Further, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 328 HU and 460 HU to 60 HU and 36 HU, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed metal artifact reduction method replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring slices that are free of metal artifacts. This method proved capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, improving HU accuracy and image detectability.

  6. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Radiation Oncology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali [Computed Tomography and Radiation Oncology Department, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, 757A Arnold Drive, Martinez, California 94553 (United States); Zeng, Chuan [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Krauss, Andreas [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, Forcheim 91301 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  7. Clinical Apply of Dual Energy CT (kVp switching) : A Novel Approach for MAR (Metal Artifact Reduction) Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Seong; Jeong, Jong Seong; Kim, Myeong Goo [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article was to measure and compare the value of the metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm by Dual energy(kVp switching) CT (Computed Tomography) for non using MAR and we introduced new variable Dual energy CT applications through a clinical scan. The used equipment was GE Discovery 750HD with Dual-Energy system(kVp switching). CT scan was performed on the neck and abdomen area subject for patients. Studies were from Dec 20 2010 to Feb 10 2011 and included 25 subject patients with prosthesis. We were measured the HU (Hounsfield Unit) and noise value at metal artifact appear(focal loss of signal and white streak artifact area) according to the using MAR algorithm. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired sample t-test. In patient subject case, the statistical difference of showing HU was p=0.01 and p=0.04 respectively. At maximum black hole artifact area and white streak artifact area according to the using MAR algorithm. However noise was p=0.05 and p=0.04 respectively; and not the affected black hole and white streak artifact area. Dual Energy CT with the MAR algorithm technique is useful reduce metal artifacts and could improve the diagnostic value in the diagnostic image evaluation of metallic implants area.

  8. MRI of spinal hardware: comparison of conventional T1-weighted sequence with a new metal artifact reduction sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.D.; Lee, M.J.; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L.; MacKay, A.; Xiang, Q.S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to compare diagnostic quality of MR images of patients with spinal hardware acquired using a conventional T1-weighted spin-echo sequence and a new metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS).Conclusion. The new MARS sequence effectively reduces the degree of tissue-obscuring artifact produced by spinal fixation hardware and subjectively improves image quality compared with the conventional T1-weighted spin-echo sequence. (orig.)

  9. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Christiansen, Rasmus Lübeck; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard; Bertelsen, Anders Smedegaard; Asmussen, Jon Thor; Gyldenkerne, Niels; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Johansen, Jørgen; Brink, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in H&N patients in terms of delineation consistency and dose calculation precision in radiation treatment planning. Tumor and OAR delineations were evaluated in planning CT scans of eleven oropharynx patients with streaking artifacts in the tumor region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were on average 22% (p metal artifacts for all structures. The average surface distance between contours of different observers improved using the MAR images for GTV and parotids (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01). The median volume receiving a dose difference larger than ±3% was 2.3 cm 3 (range 0-32 cm 3 ). Delineation of structures in the head and neck were affected by metal artifacts and volumes were generally larger and more consistent after reduction of metal artifacts, however, only small changes were observed in the dose calculations.

  10. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The γ pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  11. SU-F-J-74: High Z Geometric Integrity and Beam Hardening Artifact Assessment Using a Retrospective Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Reconstruction Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K; DiCostanzo, D; Gupta, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the efficacy of a retrospective metal artifact reduction (MAR) reconstruction algorithm for a commercial computed tomography (CT) scanner for radiation therapy purposes. Methods: High Z geometric integrity and artifact reduction analysis was performed with three phantoms using General Electric’s (GE) Discovery CT. The three phantoms included: a Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS) electron density phantom (Model 062) with a 6.5 mm diameter titanium rod insert, a custom spine phantom using Synthes Spine hardware submerged in water, and a dental phantom with various high Z fillings submerged in water. Each phantom was reconstructed using MAR and compared against the original scan. Furthermore, each scenario was tested using standard and extended Hounsfield Unit (HU) ranges. High Z geometric integrity was performed using the CIRS phantom, while the artifact reduction was performed using all three phantoms. Results: Geometric integrity of the 6.5 mm diameter rod was slightly overestimated for non-MAR scans for both standard and extended HU. With MAR reconstruction, the rod was underestimated for both standard and extended HU. For artifact reduction, the mean and standard deviation was compared in a volume of interest (VOI) in the surrounding material (water and water equivalent material, ∼0HU). Overall, the mean value of the VOI was closer to 0 HU for the MAR reconstruction compared to the non-MAR scan for most phantoms. Additionally, the standard deviations for all phantoms were greatly reduced using MAR reconstruction. Conclusion: GE’s MAR reconstruction algorithm improves image quality with the presence of high Z material with minimal degradation of its geometric integrity. High Z delineation can be carried out with proper contouring techniques. The effects of beam hardening artifacts are greatly reduced with MAR reconstruction. Tissue corrections due to these artifacts can be eliminated for simple high Z geometries and greatly

  12. View-Angle Tilting and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction for Artifact Reduction in MRI: Experimental Sequence Optimization for Orthopaedic Tumor Endoprostheses and Clinical Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available MRI plays a major role in follow-up of patients with malignant bone tumors. However, after limb salvage surgery, orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses might cause significant metal-induced susceptibility artifacts.To evaluate the benefit of view-angle tilting (VAT and slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC for MRI of large-sized orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses in an experimental model and to demonstrate clinical benefits for assessment of periprosthetic soft tissue abnormalities.In an experimental setting, tumor endoprostheses (n=4 were scanned at 1.5T with three versions of optimized high-bandwidth turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences: (i standard, (ii VAT and (iii combined VAT and SEMAC (VAT&SEMAC. Pulse sequences included coronal short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR, coronal T1-weighted (w, transverse T1-w and T2-w TSE sequences. For clinical evaluation, VAT&SEMAC was compared to conventional metal artifact-reducing MR sequences (conventional MR in n=25 patients with metal implants and clinical suspicion of tumor recurrence or infection. Diameters of artifacts were measured quantitatively. Qualitative parameters were assessed on a five-point scale (1=best, 5=worst: "image distortion", "artificial signal changes at the edges" and "diagnostic confidence". Imaging findings were correlated with pathology. T-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used for statistical analyses.The true size of the prostheses was overestimated on MRI (P<0.05. A significant reduction of artifacts was achieved by VAT (P<0.001 and VAT&SEMAC (P=0.003 compared to the standard group. Quantitative scores improved in the VAT and VAT&SEMAC group (P<0.05. On clinical MR images, artifact diameters were significantly reduced in the VAT&SEMAC-group as compared with the conventional-group (P<0.001. Distortion and artificial signal changes were reduced and diagnostic confidence improved (P<0.05. In two cases, tumor-recurrence, in ten cases infection and in thirteen cases other

  13. Metal artifact reduction using a patch-based reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly emerging as the main clinical tool for breast cancer screening. Although several reconstruction methods for DBT are described by the literature, one common issue is the interplane artifacts caused by out-of-focus features. For breasts containing highly attenuating features, such as surgical clips and large calcifications, the artifacts are even more apparent and can limit the detection and characterization of lesions by the radiologist. In this work, we propose a novel method of combining backprojected data into tomographic slices using a patch-based approach, commonly used in denoising. Preliminary tests were performed on a geometry phantom and on an anthropomorphic phantom containing metal inserts. The reconstructed images were compared to a commercial reconstruction solution. Qualitative assessment of the reconstructed images provides evidence that the proposed method reduces artifacts while maintaining low noise levels. Objective assessment supports the visual findings. The artifact spread function shows that the proposed method is capable of suppressing artifacts generated by highly attenuating features. The signal difference to noise ratio shows that the noise levels of the proposed and commercial methods are comparable, even though the commercial method applies post-processing filtering steps, which were not implemented on the proposed method. Thus, the proposed method can produce tomosynthesis reconstructions with reduced artifacts and low noise levels.

  14. A fully 3D approach for metal artifact reduction in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, Bärbel; Weyers, Imke; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography imaging metal objects in the region of interest introduce inconsistencies during data acquisition. Reconstructing these data leads to an image in spatial domain including star-shaped or stripe-like artifacts. In order to enhance the quality of the resulting image the influence of the metal objects can be reduced. Here, a metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach is proposed that is based on a recomputation of the inconsistent projection data using a fully three-dimensional Fourier-based interpolation. The success of the projection space restoration depends sensitively on a sensible continuation of neighboring structures into the recomputed area. Fortunately, structural information of the entire data is inherently included in the Fourier space of the data. This can be used for a reasonable recomputation of the inconsistent projection data. Methods: The key step of the proposed MAR strategy is the recomputation of the inconsistent projection data based on an interpolation using nonequispaced fast Fourier transforms (NFFT). The NFFT interpolation can be applied in arbitrary dimension. The approach overcomes the problem of adequate neighborhood definitions on irregular grids, since this is inherently given through the usage of higher dimensional Fourier transforms. Here, applications up to the third interpolation dimension are presented and validated. Furthermore, prior knowledge may be included by an appropriate damping of the transform during the interpolation step. This MAR method is applicable on each angular view of a detector row, on two-dimensional projection data as well as on three-dimensional projection data, e.g., a set of sequential acquisitions at different spatial positions, projection data of a spiral acquisition, or cone-beam projection data. Results: Results of the novel MAR scheme based on one-, two-, and three-dimensional NFFT interpolations are presented. All results are compared in projection data space and spatial

  15. Changes realized from extended bit-depth and metal artifact reduction in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Chen, D.; Zhong, H.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: High-Z material in computed tomography (CT) yields metal artifacts that degrade image quality and may cause substantial errors in dose calculation. This study couples a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm with enhanced 16-bit depth (vs standard 12-bit) to quantify potential gains in image quality and dosimetry. Methods: Extended CT to electron density (CT-ED) curves were derived from a tissue characterization phantom with titanium and stainless steel inserts scanned at 90-140 kVp for 12- and 16-bit reconstructions. MAR was applied to sinogram data (Brilliance BigBore CT scanner, Philips Healthcare, v.3.5). Monte Carlo simulation (MC-SIM) was performed on a simulated double hip prostheses case (Cerrobend rods embedded in a pelvic phantom) using BEAMnrc/Dosxyz (400 000 0000 histories, 6X, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} beam traversing Cerrobend rod). A phantom study was also conducted using a stainless steel rod embedded in solid water, and dosimetric verification was performed with Gafchromic film analysis (absolute difference and gamma analysis, 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement) for plans calculated with Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA, Eclipse v11.0) to elucidate changes between 12- and 16-bit data. Three patients (bony metastases to the femur and humerus, and a prostate cancer case) with metal implants were reconstructed using both bit depths, with dose calculated using AAA and derived CT-ED curves. Planar dose distributions were assessed via matrix analyses and using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm. Results: For 12-bit images, CT numbers for titanium and stainless steel saturated at 3071 Hounsfield units (HU), whereas for 16-bit depth, mean CT numbers were much larger (e.g., titanium and stainless steel yielded HU of 8066.5 {+-} 56.6 and 13 588.5 {+-} 198.8 for 16-bit uncorrected scans at 120 kVp, respectively). MC-SIM was well-matched between 12- and 16-bit images except downstream of the Cerrobend rod, where 16-bit dose was {approx}6

  16. Metal Artifact Reduction for Polychromatic X-ray CT Based on a Beam-Hardening Corrector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Hwang, Dosik; Seo, Jin Keun

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method to correct beam hardening artifacts caused by the presence of metal in polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) without degrading the intact anatomical images. Metal artifacts due to beam-hardening, which are a consequence of X-ray beam polychromaticity, are becoming an increasingly important issue affecting CT scanning as medical implants become more common in a generally aging population. The associated higher-order beam-hardening factors can be corrected via analysis of the mismatch between measured sinogram data and the ideal forward projectors in CT reconstruction by considering the known geometry of high-attenuation objects. Without prior knowledge of the spectrum parameters or energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the proposed correction allows the background CT image (i.e., the image before its corruption by metal artifacts) to be extracted from the uncorrected CT image. Computer simulations and phantom experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method to alleviate beam hardening artifacts.

  17. CT of metal implants: reduction of artifacts using an extended CT scale technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, T M; Berning, W; Scherf, S; Joosten, U; Joist, A; Engelke, K; Daldrup-Link, H E

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to use an extended CT scale technique (ECTS) to reduce artifacts due to metal implants and to optimize CT imaging parameters for metal implants using an experimental model. Osteotomies were performed in 20 porcine femur specimens. One hundred cobalt-base screws and 24 steel plates were used for osteosynthesis in these specimens. Artificial lesions were produced in 50 screws, such as osteolysis near the screws (mimicking lysis due to infection, tumor, or loosening), displacement of the screws, as well as fractures of the screws. All specimens were examined using eight different CT protocols: four conventional (CCT) and four spiral (SCT) CT protocols with different milliampere-second values (130 and 480 mAs for CCT, 130 and 300 mAs for SCT), kilovolt potentials (120 and 140 kVp), and slice thicknesses (2 and 5 mm). The images were analyzed by three observers using a standard window (maximum window width 4,000 HU) and ECTS (maximum window width 40,000 HU). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed, and image quality was assessed according to a five level scale. Metal artifacts were significantly reduced using ECTS (p 0.05). ECTS improved imaging of metal implants. In this study, no significant effects of exposure dose and kilovolt potential were noted. Metal artifacts were more prominent using SCT than using CCT.

  18. Usefulness of metal artifact reduction with WARP technique at 1.5 and 3T MRI in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazik, Andrea; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Theysohn, Jens M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Landgraeber, Stefan; Schulte, Patrick [University Hospital Essen, Department of Orthopedics, Essen (Germany); Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-25

    To evaluate the usefulness of the metal artifact reduction technique ''WARP'' in the assessment of metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5 and 3T in the context of image quality and imaging speed. Nineteen patients (25 hip resurfacings) were randomized for 1.5 and 3T MRI, both including T1 and T2 turbo spin-echo as well as turbo inversion recovery magnitude sequences with and without view angle tilting and high bandwidth. Additional 3T sequences were acquired with a reduced number of averages and using the parallel acquisition technique for accelerating imaging speed. Artifact size (diameter, area), image quality (5-point scale) and delineation of anatomical structures were compared among the techniques, sequences and field strengths using the Wilcoxon sign-rank and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. At both field strengths, WARP showed significant superiority over standard sequences regarding image quality, artifact size and delineation of anatomical structures. At 3T, artifacts were larger compared to 1.5T without affecting diagnostic quality, and scanning time could be reduced by up to 64 % without quality degradation. WARP proved useful in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5T as well as 3T with better image quality surrounding the implants. At 3T imaging could be considerably accelerated without losing diagnostic quality. (orig.)

  19. Usefulness of metal artifact reduction with WARP technique at 1.5 and 3T MRI in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazik, Andrea; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Theysohn, Jens M.; Landgraeber, Stefan; Schulte, Patrick; Kraff, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the metal artifact reduction technique ''WARP'' in the assessment of metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5 and 3T in the context of image quality and imaging speed. Nineteen patients (25 hip resurfacings) were randomized for 1.5 and 3T MRI, both including T1 and T2 turbo spin-echo as well as turbo inversion recovery magnitude sequences with and without view angle tilting and high bandwidth. Additional 3T sequences were acquired with a reduced number of averages and using the parallel acquisition technique for accelerating imaging speed. Artifact size (diameter, area), image quality (5-point scale) and delineation of anatomical structures were compared among the techniques, sequences and field strengths using the Wilcoxon sign-rank and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. At both field strengths, WARP showed significant superiority over standard sequences regarding image quality, artifact size and delineation of anatomical structures. At 3T, artifacts were larger compared to 1.5T without affecting diagnostic quality, and scanning time could be reduced by up to 64 % without quality degradation. WARP proved useful in imaging metal-on-metal hip resurfacings at 1.5T as well as 3T with better image quality surrounding the implants. At 3T imaging could be considerably accelerated without losing diagnostic quality. (orig.)

  20. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwahofer, Andrea [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Clinical Center Vivantes, Neukoelln (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology; Baer, Esther [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology; Grossmann, J. Guenter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Sterzing, Florian [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ{sub Al} = 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}), titanium (ρ{sub Ti} = 4.5 g/cm{sup 3}), steel (ρ{sub steel} = 7.9 g/cm{sup 3}) and tungsten (ρ{sub W} = 19.3 g/cm{sup 3}) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV (Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ = 10 g/cm{sup 3}) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 ke

  1. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Clinical Center Vivantes, Neukoelln; Baer, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Kachelriess, Marc; Grossmann, J. Guenter; Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach; Sterzing, Florian; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2015-01-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al = 2.7 g/cm 3 ), titanium (ρ Ti = 4.5 g/cm 3 ), steel (ρ steel = 7.9 g/cm 3 ) and tungsten (ρ W = 19.3 g/cm 3 ) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV (Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ = 10 g/cm 3 ) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the

  2. [Metal artifact reduction in post-operative spinal imaging using image acquisition protocol in multidetector computed tomography scans. Cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Muñoz, L M; Alfonso Olmos, M; Villas Tomé, C

    2015-01-01

    In postoperative patients with metallic implants, CT scans can become less effective due to metal-related arti-facts. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific metal artifact reduction image protocol, in order to reduce the metal artifact caused by titanium pedicular screws in patients undergoing lumbar pathology by lumbar fusion. This enables surgeons to make an accurate diagnosis of the exact placement of inserted pedicle screws, making this the preferred image modality for assessing screw position after surgery. In the first part of the study, CT scans were performed on 23 patients (103 titanium alloy pedicle screws) undergoing a lumbar instrumented fusion for treatment for degenerative disease with a standard image acquisition protocol evaluating the possible overdimension caused by the artifact. In the second part, a prospective study was performed using 64-slice multide-tector-row computed tomography (MDCT) on 18 patients (104 titanium alloy pedicle screws) undergoing a lumbar instrumented fusion using a specific image acquisition protocol. Our results show that in the sequential CT scan group, mean overdimension (on each side) due to brightness was 1.045 mm (SD 0.45). In the 64-slice multichannel CT group, mean overdimension (on each side) due to brightness was 0.005 mm at the proximal part of the screw and 0.025 mm at the distal part of the screw.

  3. Advanced metal artifact reduction MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty implants: compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Jan; Thawait, Gaurav K. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fritz, Benjamin [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Raithel, Esther; Nittka, Mathias [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Gilson, Wesley D. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States); Mont, Michael A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Compressed sensing (CS) acceleration has been theorized for slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), but has not been shown to be feasible. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that CS-SEMAC is feasible for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants. Following prospective institutional review board approval, 22 subjects with metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants underwent 1.5 T MRI. We compared CS-SEMAC prototype, high-bandwidth TSE, and SEMAC sequences with acquisition times of 4-5, 4-5 and 10-12 min, respectively. Outcome measures included bone-implant interfaces, image quality, periprosthetic structures, artifact size, and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR). Using Friedman, repeated measures analysis of variances, and Cohen's weighted kappa tests, Bonferroni-corrected p-values of 0.005 and less were considered statistically significant. There was no statistical difference of outcomes measures of SEMAC and CS-SEMAC images. Visibility of implant-bone interfaces and pseudocapsule as well as fat suppression and metal reduction were ''adequate'' to ''good'' on CS-SEMAC and ''non-diagnostic'' to ''adequate'' on high-BW TSE (p < 0.001, respectively). SEMAC and CS-SEMAC showed mild blur and ripple artifacts. The metal artifact size was 63 % larger for high-BW TSE as compared to SEMAC and CS-SEMAC (p < 0.0001, respectively). CNRs were sufficiently high and statistically similar, with the exception of CNR of fluid and muscle and CNR of fluid and tendon, which were higher on intermediate-weighted high-BW TSE (p < 0.005, respectively). Compressed sensing acceleration enables the time-neutral use of SEMAC for MRI of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants when compared to high-BW TSE and image quality similar to conventional SEMAC. (orig.)

  4. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Stern, Steven E; Belzberg, Allan J; Fritz, Jan

    2017-07-01

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips.

  5. Follow-up CT and CT angiography after intracranial aneurysm clipping and coiling - improved image quality by iterative metal artifact reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bier, Georg; Hempel, Johann-Martin; Oergel, Anja; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Ernemann, Ulrike; Hennersdorf, Florian [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Bongers, Malte Niklas [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    This paper aims to evaluate a new iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for post-interventional evaluation of brain tissue and intracranial arteries. The data of 20 patients that underwent follow-up cranial CT and cranial CT angiography after clipping or coiling of an intracranial aneurysm was retrospectively analyzed. After the images were processed using a novel iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm, images with and without metal artifact reduction were qualitatively evaluated by two readers, using a five-point Likert scale. Moreover, artifact strength was quantitatively assessed in terms of CT attenuation and standard deviation alterations. The qualitative analysis yielded a significant increase in image quality (p = 0.0057) in iteratively processed images with substantial inter-observer agreement (k = 0.72), while the CTA image quality did not differ (p = 0.864) and even showed vessel contrast reduction in six cases (30%). The mean relative attenuation difference was 27% without metal artifact reduction vs. 11% for iterative metal artifact reduction images (p = 0.0003). The new iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm enhances non-enhanced CT image quality after clipping or coiling, but in CT-angiography images, the contrast of adjacent vessels can be compromised. (orig.)

  6. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...... derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Results: Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were...

  7. Digital tomosynthesis with metal artifact reduction for assessing cementless hip arthroplasty: a diagnostic cohort study of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao; Yang, Dejin; Guo, Shengjie; Tang, Jing; Liu, Jian; Wang, Dacheng; Zhou, Yixin [Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Fourth Clinical College of Peking University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    For postoperative imaging assessment of cementless hip arthroplasty, radiography and computed tomography (CT) were restricted by overlapping structures and metal artifacts, respectively. A new tomosynthesis with metal artifact reduction (TMAR) is introduced by using metal extraction and ordered subset-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction. This study investigated the effectiveness of TMAR in assessing fixation stability of cementless hip arthroplasty components. We prospectively included 48 consecutive patients scheduled for revision hip arthroplasty in our hospital, with 41 femoral and 35 acetabular cementless components available for evaluation. All patients took the three examinations of radiography, CT, and TMAR preoperatively, with intraoperative mechanical tests, and absence or presence of osteointegration on retrieved prosthesis as reference standards. Three senior surgeons and four junior surgeons evaluated these images independently with uniform criteria. For TMAR, 82 % diagnoses on the femoral side and 84 % diagnoses on the acetabular side were accurate. The corresponding values were 44 and 67 % for radiography, and 39 % and 74 % for CT. Senior surgeons had significantly higher accuracy than junior surgeons by radiography (p < 0.05), but not by TMAR or CT. By minimizing metal artifacts in the bone-implant interface and clearly depicting peri-implant trabecular structures, the TMAR technique improved the diagnostic accuracy of assessing fixation stability of cementless hip arthroplasty, and shortened the learning curve of less experienced surgeons. Level II, diagnostic cohort study. (orig.)

  8. Metal artifacts reduction using monochromatic images from spectral CT: Evaluation of pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang, E-mail: wangzhang227@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qian, Bangping, E-mail: qianbangping@163.com [Spine Service, Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Baoxin, E-mail: wangzhi68@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qin, Guochu, E-mail: qgc7605@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhou, Zhengyang, E-mail: zyzhou@nju.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qiu, Yong, E-mail: scoliosis2002@sina.com [Spine Service, Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Xizhao, E-mail: sunxizhaonj@163.com [Department of Radiology and Urology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, No. 321 Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: gobin10266@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of spectral CT in reducing metal artifacts caused by pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis. Materials and methods: Institutional review committee approval and written informed consents from patients were obtained. 18 scoliotic patients with a total of 228 pedicle screws who underwent spectral CT imaging were included in this study. Monochromatic image sets with and without the additional metal artifacts reduction software (MARS) correction were generated with photon energy at 65 keV and from 70 to 140 keV with 10 keV interval using the 80 kVp and 140 kVp projection sets. Polychromatic images corresponded to the conventional 140 kVp imaging were also generated from the same scan data as a control group. Both objective evaluation (screw width and quantitative artifacts index measurements) and subjective evaluation (depiction of pedicle screws, surrounding structures and their relationship) were performed. Results: Image quality of monochromatic images in the range from 110 to 140 keV (0.97 ± 0.28) was rated superior to the conventional polychromatic images (2.53 ± 0.54) and also better than monochromatic images with lower energy. Images of energy above 100 keV also give accurate measurement of the width of screws and relatively low artifacts index. The form of screws was slightly distorted in MARS reconstruction. Conclusions: Compared to conventional polychromatic images, monochromatic images acquired from dual-energy CT provided superior image quality with much reduced metal artifacts of pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis. Optimal energy range was found between 110 and 140 keV.

  9. Metal Artifact Reduction in Dental Computed Tomography Images Based on Sinogram Segmentation Using Curvelet Transform Followed by Hough Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Mehran; Mohammadi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT), the presence of metal objects in a patient's body produces streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. During the past decades, many different methods were proposed for the reduction or elimination of the streaking artifacts. When scanning a patient, the projection data affected by metal objects (missing projections) appear as regions with high intensities in the sinogram. In spiral fan beam CT, these regions are sinusoid-like curves on sinogram. During the first time, if the metal curves are detected carefully, then, they can be replaced by corresponding unaffected projections using other slices or opposite views; therefore, the CT slices regenerated by the modified sonogram will be imaged with high quality. In this paper, a new method of the segmentation of metal traces in spiral fan-beam CT sinogram is proposed. This method is based on a sinogram curve detection using a curvelet transform followed by 2D Hough transform. The initial enhancement of the sinogram using modified curvelet transform coefficients is performed by suppressing all the coefficients of one band and applying 2D Hough transform to detect more precisely metal curves. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method for the detection of metal curves in a sinogram, precision and recall metrics are calculated. Compared with other methods, the results show that the proposed method is capable of detecting metal curves, with better precision and good recovery.

  10. Metal Artifact Reduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging Around Arthroplasty Implants: The Negative Effect of Long Echo Trains on the Implant-Related Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neil M; de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Schon, Lew C; Fritz, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Long echo train length (ETL) is an often recommended but unproven technique to decrease metal artifacts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Therefore, we quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the effects of ETL on metal artifact on MRI scans using a cobalt-chromium-containing arthroplasty implant system. Using a total ankle arthroplasty system implanted into a human cadaver ankle and a clinical 1.5 T MRI system, turbo spin echo (TSE) pulse sequences were acquired with ETL ranging from 3 to 23 and receiver bandwidth (BW) from 100 to 750 Hz/pixel, whereas effective echo time and spatial resolution were controlled. A compressed sensing slice encoding for metal artifact correction TSE prototype pulse sequence was used as reference standard. End points included the total implant-related artifact area and implant-related signal void areas. Two raters evaluated the overall image quality and preference across varying BW and ETL. Two-factor analysis of variance, Friedman test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson correlation were used. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The total implant-related artifact area ranged from 0.119 for compressed sensing slice encoding for metal artifact correction (BW, 600 Hz/pixel; ETL, 3) to 0.265 for TSE (BW, 100 Hz/pixel; ETL, 23). Longer ETL significantly increases the total implant-related artifact area (P = 0.0004), whereas it decreased with increasing BW (P train length, but reduced with higher BW (P trains fail to reduce implant-related metal artifacts, but in fact cause degradation of image quality around the implant with resultant larger appearing total metal artifacts.

  11. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stern, Steven E. [Bond University, Bond Business School, Gold Coast, QLD (Australia); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-07-15

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan; Stern, Steven E.; Belzberg, Allan J.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  13. Exploring metal artifact reduction using dual-energy CT with pre-metal and post-metal implant cadaver comparison: are implant specific protocols needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenberg, Ruud H H; Donders, Johanna C E; Kloen, Peter; Beenen, Ludo F M; Kleipool, Roeland P; Maas, Mario; Streekstra, Geert J

    2017-08-25

    To quantify and optimize metal artifact reduction using virtual monochromatic dual-energy CT for different metal implants compared to non-metal reference scans. Dual-energy CT scans of a pair of human cadaver limbs were acquired before and after implanting a titanium tibia plate, a stainless-steel tibia plate and a titanium intramedullary nail respectively. Virtual monochromatic images were analyzed from 70 to 190 keV. Region-of-interest (ROI), used to determine fluctuations and inaccuracies in CT numbers of soft tissues and bone, were placed in muscle, fat, cortical bone and intramedullary tibia canal. The stainless-steel implant resulted in more pronounced metal artifacts compared to both titanium implants. CT number inaccuracies in 70 keV reference images were minimized at 130, 180 and 190 keV for the titanium tibia plate, stainless-steel tibia plate and titanium intramedullary nail respectively. Noise, measured as the standard deviation of pixels within a ROI, was minimized at 130, 150 and 140 keV for the titanium tibia plate, stainless-steel tibia plate and titanium intramedullary nail respectively. Tailoring dual-energy CT protocols using implant specific virtual monochromatic images minimizes fluctuations and inaccuracies in CT numbers in bone and soft tissues compared to non-metal reference scans.

  14. Evaluation of normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) in kVCT using MVCT prior images for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudel, M. R.; Mackenzie, M.; Rathee, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images.Methods: Tissue characterization phantoms containing bilateral steel inserts are used in all experiments. Two MVCT images, one without any metal artifact corrections and the other corrected using a modified iterative maximum likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT (IMPACT) are translated to pseudo-kVCT images. These are then used as prior images without tissue classification in an NMAR technique for correcting the experimental kVCT image. The IMPACT method in MVCT included an additional model for the pair/triplet production process and the energy dependent response of the MVCT detectors. An experimental kVCT image, without the metal inserts and reconstructed using the filtered back projection (FBP) method, is artificially patched with the known steel inserts to get a reference image. The regular NMAR image containing the steel inserts that uses tissue classified kVCT prior and the NMAR images reconstructed using MVCT priors are compared with the reference image for metal artifact reduction. The Eclipse treatment planning system is used to calculate radiotherapy dose distributions on the corrected images and on the reference image using the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm with 6 MV parallel opposed 5 × 10 cm 2 fields passing through the bilateral steel inserts, and the results are compared. Gafchromic film is used to measure the actual dose delivered in a plane perpendicular to the beams at the isocenter.Results: The streaking and shading in the NMAR image using tissue classifications are significantly reduced. However, the structures, including metal, are deformed. Some uniform regions appear to have eroded from one side. There is a large variation of attenuation values inside the metal inserts. Similar results are seen in commercially corrected image. Use

  15. Metal Artifact Reduction in X-ray Computed Tomography Using Computer-Aided Design Data of Implants as Prior Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Veikko; Kolditz, Daniel; Steiding, Christian; Kalender, Willi A

    2017-06-01

    The performance of metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods in x-ray computed tomography (CT) suffers from incorrect identification of metallic implants in the artifact-affected volumetric images. The aim of this study was to investigate potential improvements of state-of-the-art MAR methods by using prior information on geometry and material of the implant. The influence of a novel prior knowledge-based segmentation (PS) compared with threshold-based segmentation (TS) on 2 MAR methods (linear interpolation [LI] and normalized-MAR [NORMAR]) was investigated. The segmentation is the initial step of both MAR methods. Prior knowledge-based segmentation uses 3-dimensional registered computer-aided design (CAD) data as prior knowledge to estimate the correct position and orientation of the metallic objects. Threshold-based segmentation uses an adaptive threshold to identify metal. Subsequently, for LI and NORMAR, the selected voxels are projected into the raw data domain to mark metal areas. Attenuation values in these areas are replaced by different interpolation schemes followed by a second reconstruction. Finally, the previously selected metal voxels are replaced by the metal voxels determined by PS or TS in the initial reconstruction. First, we investigated in an elaborate phantom study if the knowledge of the exact implant shape extracted from the CAD data provided by the manufacturer of the implant can improve the MAR result. Second, the leg of a human cadaver was scanned using a clinical CT system before and after the implantation of an artificial knee joint. The results were compared regarding segmentation accuracy, CT number accuracy, and the restoration of distorted structures. The use of PS improved the efficacy of LI and NORMAR compared with TS. Artifacts caused by insufficient segmentation were reduced, and additional information was made available within the projection data. The estimation of the implant shape was more exact and not dependent on a threshold

  16. SU-E-T-396: Dosimetric Accuracy of Proton Therapy for Patients with Metal Implants in CT Scans Using Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) Artifacts Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Kantor, M; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Sahoo, N; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs. DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction

  17. Reduction of metal artifacts from hip prostheses on CT images of the pelvis: value of iterative reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsbach, Fabian; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Wanner, Guido A; Krauss, Andreas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2013-07-01

    To assess the value of iterative frequency split-normalized (IFS) metal artifact reduction (MAR) for computed tomography (CT) of hip prostheses. This study had institutional review board and local ethics committee approval. First, a hip phantom with steel and titanium prostheses that had inlays of water, fat, and contrast media in the pelvis was used to optimize the IFS algorithm. Second, 41 consecutive patients with hip prostheses who were undergoing CT were included. Data sets were reconstructed with filtered back projection, the IFS algorithm, and a linear interpolation MAR algorithm. Two blinded, independent readers evaluated axial, coronal, and sagittal CT reformations for overall image quality, image quality of pelvic organs, and assessment of pelvic abnormalities. CT attenuation and image noise were measured. Statistical analysis included the Friedman test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Levene test. Ex vivo experiments demonstrated an optimized IFS algorithm by using a threshold of 2200 HU with four iterations for both steel and titanium prostheses. Measurements of CT attenuation of the inlays were significantly (P algorithm for CT image reconstruction significantly reduces metal artifacts from hip prostheses, improves the reliability of CT number measurements, and improves the confidence for depicting pelvic abnormalities.

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in kVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Moti Raj, E-mail: mpaudel@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mackenzie, Marc [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fallone, B. Gino [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Rathee, Satyapal [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images of patients that are corrected by use of a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images: MVCT-NMAR. Methods and Materials: MVCT-NMAR was applied to images from 5 patients: 3 with dual hip prostheses, 1 with a single hip prosthesis, and 1 with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces and for radiation therapy dose calculations. They were compared against the corresponding images corrected by the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in a Phillips CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiation therapy. These improvements are significant, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in orthopedic metal artifact reduction corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. A large dose reduction was possible outside the planning target volume (eg, 59.2 Gy to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images were used in TomoTherapy treatment plans without directional blocks for a prostate cancer patient. Conclusions: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiation therapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for patients with metallic implants.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in kVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudel, Moti Raj; Mackenzie, Marc; Fallone, B. Gino; Rathee, Satyapal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images of patients that are corrected by use of a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images: MVCT-NMAR. Methods and Materials: MVCT-NMAR was applied to images from 5 patients: 3 with dual hip prostheses, 1 with a single hip prosthesis, and 1 with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces and for radiation therapy dose calculations. They were compared against the corresponding images corrected by the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in a Phillips CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiation therapy. These improvements are significant, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in orthopedic metal artifact reduction corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. A large dose reduction was possible outside the planning target volume (eg, 59.2 Gy to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images were used in TomoTherapy treatment plans without directional blocks for a prostate cancer patient. Conclusions: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiation therapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for patients with metallic implants

  20. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, S [Sharp Memorial Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  1. Metal artifact reduction software used with abdominopelvic dual-energy CT of patients with metal hip prostheses: assessment of image quality and clinical feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Chol; Chung, Yong Eun; Lee, Young Han; Park, Kwan Kyu; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang

    2014-10-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the feasibility of using Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) software for abdominopelvic dual-energy CT in patients with metal hip prostheses. This retrospective study included 33 patients (male-female ratio, 19:14; mean age, 63.7 years) who received total hip replacements and 20 patients who did not have metal prostheses as the control group. All of the patients underwent dual-energy CT. The quality of the images reconstructed using the MAR algorithm and of those reconstructed using the standard reconstruction was evaluated in terms of the visibility of the bladder wall, pelvic sidewall, rectal shelf, and bone-prosthesis interface and the overall diagnostic image quality with a 4-point scale. The mean and SD attenuation values in Hounsfield units were measured in the bladder, pelvic sidewall, and rectal shelf. For validation of the MAR interpolation algorithm, pelvis phantoms with small bladder "lesions" and metal hip prostheses were made, and images of the phantoms both with and without MAR reconstruction were evaluated. Image quality was significantly better with MAR reconstruction than without at all sites except the rectal shelf, where the image quality either had not changed or had worsened after MAR reconstruction. The mean attenuation value was changed after MAR reconstruction to its original expected value at the pelvic sidewall (p software with dual-energy CT decreases metal artifacts and increases diagnostic confidence in the assessment of the pelvic cavity but also introduces new artifacts that can obscure pelvic structures.

  2. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, M [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); currently at University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S [University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  3. SU-E-I-13: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Software On Computed Tomography (CT) Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new commercially available metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) imaging was evaluated with phantoms in the presence of metals. The goal was to assess the ability of the software to restore the CT number in the vicinity of the metals without impacting the image quality. Methods: A Catphan 504 was scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and the images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. Both datasets were analyzed with Image Owl QA software (Image Owl Inc, Greenwich, NY). CT number sensitometry, MTF, low contrast, uniformity, noise and spatial accuracy were compared for scans with and without MAR software. In addition, an in-house made phantom was scanned with and without a stainless steel insert at three different locations. The accuracy of the CT number and metal insert dimension were investigated as well. Results: Comparisons between scans with and without MAR algorithm on the Catphan phantom demonstrate similar results for image quality. However, noise was slightly higher for the MAR algorithm. Evaluation of the CT number at various locations of the in-house made phantom was also performed. The baseline HU, obtained from the scan without metal insert, was compared to scans with the stainless steel insert at 3 different locations. The HU difference between the baseline scan versus metal scan was improved when the MAR algorithm was applied. In addition, the physical diameter of the stainless steel rod was over-estimated by the MAR algorithm by 0.9 mm. Conclusion: This work indicates with the presence of metal in CT scans, the MAR algorithm is capable of providing a more accurate CT number without compromising the overall image quality. Future work will include the dosimetric impact on the MAR algorithm

  4. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  5. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  6. Planning and clinical studies of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations for head-and-neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kon, Hyuck Jun; Ye, Sung Joon [Interdisplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Lee, Jae Gi; Heo, Tae Min [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim Kyung Su [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Young Mi [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Callahan, Zachariah [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    In computed tomography (CT) images, the presence of high Z materials induces typical streak artifacts, called metal artifacts which can pervert CT Hounsfield numbers in the reconstructed images. These artifact-induced distortion of CT images can impact on the dose calculation based on the CT images. In the radiation therapy of Head-and-Neck cancer because of the concave-shaped target volumes, the complex anatomy, a lot of sensitive normal tissues and air cavity structures, it is important to get accurate CT images for dose calculation. But dental implant is common for H and N patients so that it is hard to get undistorted CT images. Moreover because dental implants are generally with the air cavity like oral cavity and nasal cavity in the same CT slice, they can make lots of distortion. In this study, we focused on evaluating the distortion on air cavity by the metal artifact and the effectiveness of the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) about the metal artifacts induced by the dental implant. The O-MAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT Hounsfield numbers and reducing noises. Thus, it can contribute to the entire radiation treatment planning process, especially for contouring/segmentation. Although there was no significant difference in dose distributions for most cases, the O-MAR correction was shown to have an impact on high dose regions in air cavity.

  7. Planning and clinical studies of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations for head-and-neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, Hyuck Jun; Ye, Sung Joon; Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min; Lee, Jae Gi; Heo, Tae Min; Kim Kyung Su; Chun, Young Mi; Callahan, Zachariah

    2013-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT) images, the presence of high Z materials induces typical streak artifacts, called metal artifacts which can pervert CT Hounsfield numbers in the reconstructed images. These artifact-induced distortion of CT images can impact on the dose calculation based on the CT images. In the radiation therapy of Head-and-Neck cancer because of the concave-shaped target volumes, the complex anatomy, a lot of sensitive normal tissues and air cavity structures, it is important to get accurate CT images for dose calculation. But dental implant is common for H and N patients so that it is hard to get undistorted CT images. Moreover because dental implants are generally with the air cavity like oral cavity and nasal cavity in the same CT slice, they can make lots of distortion. In this study, we focused on evaluating the distortion on air cavity by the metal artifact and the effectiveness of the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) about the metal artifacts induced by the dental implant. The O-MAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT Hounsfield numbers and reducing noises. Thus, it can contribute to the entire radiation treatment planning process, especially for contouring/segmentation. Although there was no significant difference in dose distributions for most cases, the O-MAR correction was shown to have an impact on high dose regions in air cavity

  8. SEMAC-VAT and MSVAT-SPACE sequence strategies for metal artifact reduction in 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Tao; Padua, Abraham; Goerner, Frank; Nittka, Mathias; Gugala, Zbigniew; Jadhav, Siddharth; Trelles, Miguel; Johnson, Raleigh F; Lindsey, Ronald W; Li, Xiaoming; Runge, Val M

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to correct for metallic artifacts. These techniques consisted of 3 2D techniques and one 3D technique. In 2D imaging the techniques View Angle Tilting (VAT), Slice Encoding for Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) and a technique that employed a combination of the first two (SEMAC-VAT) were evaluated. In 3D imaging the technique Multiple Slab acquisition with VAT based on a SPACE sequence was evaluated (MSVAT-SPACE). Agarose phantoms and tissue phantoms with two commonly used metal implants (stainless steel and titanium) as well as two volunteers with metal implants were imaged at 1.5T. All phantoms and volunteers were imaged using VAT, SEMAC, SEMAC-VAT and MSVAT-SPACE techniques, as well as 2D and 3D conventional imaging techniques. Each technique was optimized for different image contrast mechanisms. Artifact reduction was quantitatively assessed in the agarose phantoms by volumetric measurement. Image quality was qualitatively assessed by blinded reads employing two readers. Each reader independently viewed the tissue phantom images and in vivo human images. Statistical analysis was performed using a Friedman test, Wilcoxon test and weighted Cohen's kappa test. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, PD-weighted and STIR image contrasts were successfully implemented with the evaluated artifact reduction sequences in both the phantom experiments and in vivo images. For all evaluated image contrasts and both metal implants, a reduction in the volume of metal artifacts was seen when compared with 2D conventional acquisitions. The 2D metal artifact volumes on average were reduced by 49% ± 16%, 56% ± 15% and 63% ± 15% for VAT, SEMAC and SEMAC-VAT acquisitions respectively. When Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were applied the difference in metal artifact volume was found to be statistically significant when VAT, SEMAC and SEMAC-VAT were compared with the 2D conventional techniques. In 3D imaging on average

  9. SU-E-J-218: Evaluation of CT Images Created Using a New Metal Artifact Reduction Reconstruction Algorithm for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemkiewicz, J; Palmiotti, A; Miner, M; Stunja, L; Bergene, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Metal in patients creates streak artifacts in CT images. When used for radiation treatment planning, these artifacts make it difficult to identify internal structures and affects radiation dose calculations, which depend on HU numbers for inhomogeneity correction. This work quantitatively evaluates a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) CT image reconstruction algorithm (GE Healthcare CT-0521-04.13-EN-US DOC1381483) when metal is present. Methods: A Gammex Model 467 Tissue Characterization phantom was used. CT images were taken of this phantom on a GE Optima580RT CT scanner with and without steel and titanium plugs using both the standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms. HU values were compared pixel by pixel to determine if the MAR algorithm altered the HUs of normal tissues when no metal is present, and to evaluate the effect of using the MAR algorithm when metal is present. Also, CT images of patients with internal metal objects using standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms were compared. Results: Comparing the standard and MAR reconstructed images of the phantom without metal, 95.0% of pixels were within ±35 HU and 98.0% of pixels were within ±85 HU. Also, the MAR reconstruction algorithm showed significant improvement in maintaining HUs of non-metallic regions in the images taken of the phantom with metal. HU Gamma analysis (2%, 2mm) of metal vs. non-metal phantom imaging using standard reconstruction resulted in an 84.8% pass rate compared to 96.6% for the MAR reconstructed images. CT images of patients with metal show significant artifact reduction when reconstructed with the MAR algorithm. Conclusion: CT imaging using the MAR reconstruction algorithm provides improved visualization of internal anatomy and more accurate HUs when metal is present compared to the standard reconstruction algorithm. MAR reconstructed CT images provide qualitative and quantitative improvements over current reconstruction algorithms, thus improving radiation

  10. Improved image quality in abdominal CT in patients who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with small metal implants using a raw data-based metal artifact reduction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Negi, Noriyuki; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Sugihara, Naoki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2017-07-01

    To determine the value of a raw data-based metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for image quality improvement in abdominal CT for patients with small metal implants. Fifty-eight patients with small metal implants (3-15 mm in size) who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were imaged with CT. CT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection with and without SEMAR algorithm in axial and coronal planes. To evaluate metal artefact reduction, mean CT number (HU and SD) and artefact index (AI) values within the liver were calculated. Two readers independently evaluated image quality of the liver and pancreas and visualization of vasculature using a 5-point visual score. HU and AI values and image quality on images with and without SEMAR were compared using the paired Student's t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using linear-weighted κ test. Mean HU and AI on images with SEMAR was significantly lower than those without SEMAR (P small metal implants by reducing metallic artefacts. • SEMAR algorithm significantly reduces metallic artefacts from small implants in abdominal CT. • SEMAR can improve image quality of the liver in dynamic CECT. • Confidence visualization of hepatic vascular anatomies can also be improved by SEMAR.

  11. What Is the Natural History of "Asymptomatic" Pseudotumours in Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty? Minimum 4-Year Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence Magnetic Resonance Imaging Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Liow, Ming Han Lincoln; Dimitriou, Dimitris; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Freiberg, Andrew A; Rubash, Harry E

    2016-09-01

    Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MARS-MRI) is an important cross-sectional imaging modality in detection of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty (HA) pseudotumours. Potential evolution of pseudotumours detected by MARS-MRI in "asymptomatic" patients with MoMHA arthroplasty beyond 2 years remains largely unknown. The aims of this longitudinal study were to (1) determine the natural history of pseudotumours in "asymptomatic" MoMHA patients under MARS-MRI surveillance and (2) characterize MRI feature(s) associated with progressive pseudotumours. A total of 37 MoMHA (32 patients, mean 56 years old) with pseudotumours on MARS-MRI were evaluated longitudinally using a standardized MARS-MRI protocol. Serum cobalt and chromium levels, pseudotumour size, thickness of the cyst wall, and MRI signal intensity of the abnormality were recorded and analyzed. At minimum of 4-year follow-up (range 49-54 months), 4 Type II pseudotumours (11%) demonstrated MRI evidence of progression. Five Type I pseudotumours (14%) were found to have "regressed." No measurable MRI progression was detected in remaining patients (75%). MRI features associated with progressive pseudotumours included the presence of increased cystic wall thickness and "atypical" mixed fluid signal. MRI pseudotumour progression was not associated with metal ion levels. The natural history of type I cystic pseudotumours continues to be nonprogressive in most "asymptomatic" MoMHA patients at minimum 4 years, suggesting the importance of patient symptoms and MRI characteristic features in the clinical decision-making process. Routine follow-up MARS-MRI evaluation of "asymptomatic" patients with low-grade cystic pseudotumours in the absence of interval clinical changes may not be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved image quality in abdominal CT in patients who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with small metal implants using a raw data-based metal artifact reduction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Negi, Noriyuki [Kobe University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To determine the value of a raw data-based metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for image quality improvement in abdominal CT for patients with small metal implants. Fifty-eight patients with small metal implants (3-15 mm in size) who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were imaged with CT. CT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection with and without SEMAR algorithm in axial and coronal planes. To evaluate metal artefact reduction, mean CT number (HU and SD) and artefact index (AI) values within the liver were calculated. Two readers independently evaluated image quality of the liver and pancreas and visualization of vasculature using a 5-point visual score. HU and AI values and image quality on images with and without SEMAR were compared using the paired Student's t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using linear-weighted κ test. Mean HU and AI on images with SEMAR was significantly lower than those without SEMAR (P < 0.0001). Liver and pancreas image qualities and visualizations of vasculature were significantly improved on CT with SEMAR (P < 0.0001) with substantial or almost perfect agreement (0.62 ≤ κ ≤ 0.83). SEMAR can improve image quality in abdominal CT in patients with small metal implants by reducing metallic artefacts. (orig.)

  13. Metal artifact reduction in patients with dental implants using multispectral three-dimensional data acquisition for hybrid PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzinger, Jeanne M; Delso, Gaspar; Boss, Andreas; Porto, Miguel; Davison, Helen; von Schulthess, Gustav K; Huellner, Martin; Stolzmann, Paul; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Burger, Irene A

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) shows high potential for patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Dental implants can cause substantial artifacts in the oral cavity impairing diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, we evaluated new MRI sequences with multi-acquisition variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC SL) in comparison to conventional high-bandwidth techniques and in a second step showed the effect of artifact size on MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) with a simulation study. Twenty-five patients with dental implants prospectively underwent a trimodality PET/CT/MRI examination after informed consent was obtained under the approval of the local ethics committee. A conventional 3D gradient-echo sequence (LAVA-Flex) commonly used for MRI-based AC of PET (acquisition time of 14 s), a T1w fast spin-echo sequence with high bandwidth (acquisition time of 3.2 min), as well as MAVRIC SL sequence without and with increased phase acceleration (MAVRIC, acquisition time of 6 min; MAVRIC-fast, acquisition time of 3.5 min) were applied. The absolute and relative reduction of the signal void artifact was calculated for each implant and tested for statistical significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The effect of artifact size on PET AC was simulated in one case with a large tumor in the oral cavity. The relative difference of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the tumor was calculated for increasing artifact sizes centered over the second molar. The absolute reduction of signal void from LAVA-Flex sequences to the T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences was 416 mm(2) (range 4 to 2,010 mm(2)) to MAVRIC 481 mm(2) (range 12 to 2,288 mm(2)) and to MAVRIC-fast 486 mm(2) (range 39 to 2,209 mm(2)). The relative reduction in signal void was significantly improved for both MAVRIC and MAVRIC-fast compared to T1 FSE (-75%/-78% vs. -62%, p error for SUVmax was negligible for artifacts of 0.5-cm diameter (-0

  14. MO-DE-207A-10: One-Step CT Reconstruction for Metal Artifact Reduction by a Modification of Penalized Weighted Least-Squares (PWLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H; Chen, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal objects create severe artifacts in kilo-voltage (kV) CT image reconstructions due to the high attenuation coefficients of high atomic number objects. Most of the techniques devised to reduce this artifact utilize a two-step approach, which do not reliably yield the qualified reconstructed images. Thus, for accuracy and simplicity, this work presents a one-step reconstruction method based on a modified penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) technique. Methods: Existing techniques for metal artifact reduction mostly adopt a two-step approach, which conduct additional reconstruction with the modified projection data from the initial reconstruction. This procedure does not consistently perform well due to the uncertainties in manipulating the metal-contaminated projection data by thresholding and linear interpolation. This study proposes a one-step reconstruction process using a new PWLS operation with total-variation (TV) minimization, while not manipulating the projection. The PWLS for CT reconstruction has been investigated using a pre-defined weight, based on the variance of the projection datum at each detector bin. It works well when reconstructing CT images from metal-free projection data, which does not appropriately penalize metal-contaminated projection data. The proposed work defines the weight at each projection element under the assumption of a Poisson random variable. This small modification using element-wise penalization has a large impact in reducing metal artifacts. For evaluation, the proposed technique was assessed with two noisy, metal-contaminated digital phantoms, against the existing PWLS with TV minimization and the two-step approach. Result: The proposed PWLS with TV minimization greatly improved the metal artifact reduction, relative to the other techniques, by watching the results. Numerically, the new approach lowered the normalized root-mean-square error about 30 and 60% for the two cases, respectively, compared to the two

  15. Impact of metal artifact reduction software on image quality of gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy cerebral CT angiography after intracranial aneurysm clipping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunet, Vincent; Bernasconi, Martine; Hajdu, Steven David; Meuli, Reto Antoine; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Daniel, Roy Thomas [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2017-09-15

    We aimed to assess the impact of metal artifact reduction software (MARs) on image quality of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy (DE) cerebral CT angiography (CTA) after intracranial aneurysm clipping. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived patient written consent. From January 2013 to September 2016, single source DE cerebral CTA were performed in 45 patients (mean age: 60 ± 9 years, male 9) after intracranial aneurysm clipping and reconstructed with and without MARs. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise (CNR), and relative CNR (rCNR) ratios were calculated from attenuation values measured in the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA). Volume of clip and artifacts and relative clip blurring reduction (rCBR) ratios were also measured at each energy level with/without MARs. Variables were compared between GSI and GSI-MARs using the paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. MARs significantly reduced metal artifacts at all energy levels but 130 and 140 keV, regardless of clips' location and number. The optimal rCBR was obtained at 110 and 80 keV, respectively, on GSI and GSI-MARs images, with up to 96% rCNR increase on GSI-MARs images. The best compromise between metal artifact reduction and rCNR was obtained at 70-75 and 65-70 keV for GSI and GSI-MARs images, respectively, with up to 15% rCBR and rCNR increase on GSI-MARs images. MARs significantly reduces metal artifacts on DE cerebral CTA after intracranial aneurysm clipping regardless of clips' location and number. It may be used to reduce radiation dose while increasing CNR. (orig.)

  16. Impact of metal artifact reduction software on image quality of gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy cerebral CT angiography after intracranial aneurysm clipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunet, Vincent; Bernasconi, Martine; Hajdu, Steven David; Meuli, Reto Antoine; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of metal artifact reduction software (MARs) on image quality of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy (DE) cerebral CT angiography (CTA) after intracranial aneurysm clipping. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived patient written consent. From January 2013 to September 2016, single source DE cerebral CTA were performed in 45 patients (mean age: 60 ± 9 years, male 9) after intracranial aneurysm clipping and reconstructed with and without MARs. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise (CNR), and relative CNR (rCNR) ratios were calculated from attenuation values measured in the internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA). Volume of clip and artifacts and relative clip blurring reduction (rCBR) ratios were also measured at each energy level with/without MARs. Variables were compared between GSI and GSI-MARs using the paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. MARs significantly reduced metal artifacts at all energy levels but 130 and 140 keV, regardless of clips' location and number. The optimal rCBR was obtained at 110 and 80 keV, respectively, on GSI and GSI-MARs images, with up to 96% rCNR increase on GSI-MARs images. The best compromise between metal artifact reduction and rCNR was obtained at 70-75 and 65-70 keV for GSI and GSI-MARs images, respectively, with up to 15% rCBR and rCNR increase on GSI-MARs images. MARs significantly reduces metal artifacts on DE cerebral CTA after intracranial aneurysm clipping regardless of clips' location and number. It may be used to reduce radiation dose while increasing CNR. (orig.)

  17. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications

  18. Reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in computed tomography angiography: assessment of the utility of model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Kato, Ayumi [Tottori Municipal Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yonago (Japan); Sakamoto, Makoto; Kurosaki, Masamichi [Tottori University, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the value of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in carotid CT angiography (CTA). Thirty-seven patients with dental hardware who underwent carotid CTA were included. CTA was performed with a GE Discovery CT750 HD scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR, and MBIR. We measured the standard deviation at the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery that was affected most by dental metal artifacts (SD{sub 1}) and the standard deviation at the common carotid artery that was not affected by the artifact (SD{sub 2}). We calculated the artifact index (AI) as follows: AI = [(SD{sub 1})2 - (SD{sub 2})2]1/2 and compared each AI for FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Visual assessment of the internal carotid artery was also performed by two neuroradiologists using a five-point scale for each axial and reconstructed sagittal image. The inter-observer agreement was analyzed using weighted kappa analysis. MBIR significantly improved AI compared with FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each). We found no significant difference in AI between FBP and ASIR (p = 0.502). The visual score of MBIR was significantly better than those of FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each), whereas the scores of ASIR were the same as those of FBP. Kappa values indicated good inter-observer agreements in all reconstructed images (0.747-0.778). MBIR resulted in a significant reduction in artifact from dental hardware in carotid CTA. (orig.)

  19. Effect of metal artifact reduction software on image quality of C-arm cone-beam computed tomography during intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamauchi, Keita; Asano, Takahiko; Otani, Katharina; Iwama, Toru

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the drawback that image quality is degraded by artifacts caused by implanted metal objects. We evaluated whether metal artifact reduction (MAR) prototype software can improve the subjective image quality of CBCT images of patients with intracranial aneurysms treated with coils or clips. Materials and methods Forty-four patients with intracranial aneurysms implanted with coils (40 patients) or clips (four patients) underwent one CBCT scan from which uncorrected and MAR-corrected CBCT image datasets were reconstructed. Three blinded readers evaluated the image quality of the image sets using a four-point scale (1: Excellent, 2: Good, 3: Poor, 4: Bad). The median scores of the three readers of uncorrected and MAR-corrected images were compared with the paired Wilcoxon signed-rank and inter-reader agreement of change scores was assessed by weighted kappa statistics. The readers also recorded new clinical findings, such as intracranial hemorrhage, air, or surrounding anatomical structures on MAR-corrected images. Results The image quality of MAR-corrected CBCT images was significantly improved compared with the uncorrected CBCT image ( p software improved image quality of CBCT images degraded by metal artifacts.

  20. SU-F-J-175: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithms in Computed Tomography and Their Application to Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, H; Rangaraj, D; Kim, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-Z (metal) implants in CT scans cause significant streak-like artifacts in the reconstructed dataset. This results in both inaccurate CT Hounsfield units for the tissue as well as obscuration of the target and organs at risk (OARs) for radiation therapy planning. Herein we analyze two metal artifact reduction algorithms: GE’s Smart MAR and a Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) for geometric and Hounsfield Unit (HU) accuracy. Methods: A CT-to-electron density phantom, with multiple inserts of various densities and a custom Cerrobend insert (Zeff=76.8), is utilized in this continuing study. The phantom is scanned without metal (baseline) and again with the metal insert. Using one set of projection data, reconstructed CT volumes are created with filtered-back-projection (FBP) and the MAR and the MDT algorithms. Regions-of-Interest (ROIs) are evaluated for each insert for HU accuracy; the metal insert’s Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM) is used to evaluate the geometric accuracy. Streak severity is quantified with an HU error metric over the phantom volume. Results: The original FBP reconstruction has a Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE) of 57.55 HU (STD=29.19, range=−145.8 to +79.2) compared to baseline. The MAR reconstruction has a RMSE of 20.98 HU (STD=13.92, range=−18.3 to +61.7). The MDT reconstruction has a RMSE of 10.05 HU (STD=10.5, range=−14.8 to +18.6). FWHM for baseline=162.05; FBP=161.84 (−0.13%); MAR=162.36 (+0.19%); MDT=162.99 (+0.58%). Streak severity metric for FBP=19.73 (22.659% bad pixels); MAR=8.743 (9.538% bad); MDT=4.899 (5.303% bad). Conclusion: Image quality, in terms of HU accuracy, in the presence of high-Z metal objects in CT scans is improved by metal artifact reduction reconstruction algorithms. The MDT algorithm had the highest HU value accuracy (RMSE=10.05 HU) and best streak severity metric, but scored the worst in terms of geometric accuracy. Qualitatively, the MAR and MDT algorithms increased detectability of inserts

  1. SU-E-I-75: Evaluation of An Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (O-MAR) Algorithm On Patients with Spinal Prostheses Near Spinal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z; Xia, P; Djemil, T; Klahr, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm on CT image quality and dose calculation for patients with spinal prostheses near spinal tumors. Methods: A CT electron density phantom was scanned twice: with tissue-simulating inserts only, and with a titanium insert replacing solid water. A patient plan was mapped to the phantom images in two ways: with the titanium inside or outside of the spinal tumor. Pinnacle and Eclipse were used to evaluate the dosimetric effects of O-MAR on 12-bit and 16-bit CT data, respectively. CT images from five patients with spinal prostheses were reconstructed with and without O-MAR. Two observers assessed the image quality improvement from O-MAR. Both pencil beam and Monte Carlo dose calculation in iPlan were used for the patient study. The percentage differences between non-OMAR and O-MAR datasets were calculated for PTV-min, PTV-max, PTV-mean, PTV-V100, PTV-D90, OAR-V10Gy, OAR-max, and OAR-D0.1cc. Results: O-MAR improved image quality but did not significantly affect the dose distributions and DVHs for both 12-bit and 16- bit CT phantom data. All five patient cases demonstrated some degree of image quality improvement from O-MAR, ranging from small to large metal artifact reduction. For pencil beam, the largest discrepancy was observed for OARV-10Gy at 5.4%, while the other seven parameters were ≤0.6%. For Monte Carlo, the differences between non-O-MAR and O-MAR datasets were ≤3.0%. Conclusion: Both phantom and patient studies indicated that O-MAR can substantially reduce metal artifacts on CT images, allowing better visualization of the anatomical structures and metal objects. The dosimetric impact of O-MAR was insignificant regardless of the metal location, image bit-depth, and dose calculation algorithm. O-MAR corrected images are recommended for radiation treatment planning on patients with spinal prostheses because of the improved image quality and no need to modify

  2. Total hip prosthesis CT with single-energy projection-based metallic artifact reduction: impact on the visualization of specific periprosthetic soft tissue structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto [CHU-Nancy, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); UMR, S 947, Universite de Lorraine, IADI, Nancy (France); Meyer, Jean-Baptiste; Raymond, Ariane; Blum, Alain [CHU-Nancy, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Baumann, Cedric [CHU-Nancy, Service d' Epidemiologie et Evaluation Cliniques, Nancy (France); Sirveaux, Francois [Service de Chirurgie Traumatologique et Orthopedique, Nancy (France); Coudane, Henry [CHU-Nancy, Service de Chirurgie Traumatologique et Arthroscopique de l' Appareil Locomoteur (ATOL), Nancy (France)

    2014-09-15

    To compare the image quality of CT with iterative reconstruction alone and in association with projection-based single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) for the visualization of specific periarticular soft tissue structures in patients with hip prostheses. CT studies from 48 consecutive patients with a hip prosthesis (24 unilateral and 24 bilateral) were retrospectively reconstructed using two different methods: iterative reconstruction (IR) alone and IR associated with SEMAR. The influence of metallic artifacts on the identification of various periarticular structures was evaluated subjectively by two readers. The image quality was compared in patients with unilateral and bilateral prostheses. Visualization of periprosthetic soft tissue was significantly improved by the SEMAR algorithm (p < 0.0001). When SEMAR was associated with IR, the gluteus minimus and medius tendons, obturator internus muscle, prostate/uterus and bladder could be seen with medium or high confidence. There were no significant differences in image quality between patients with unilateral or bilateral prosthesis when SEMAR was used (p > 0.2). This algorithm increased the detection of periarticular masses by 30 %. SEMAR significantly improves the image quality of periarticular soft-tissue structures in patients with hip prostheses. (orig.)

  3. Artifacts Quantification of Metal Implants in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, I. N.; Vlachopoulos, G. F.; Maris, T. G.; Costaridou, L. I.

    2017-11-01

    The presence of materials with different magnetic properties, such as metal implants, causes distortion of the magnetic field locally, resulting in signal voids and pile ups, i.e. susceptibility artifacts in MRI. Quantitative and unbiased measurement of the artifact is prerequisite for optimization of acquisition parameters. In this study an image gradient based segmentation method is proposed for susceptibility artifact quantification. The method captures abrupt signal alterations by calculation of the image gradient. Then the artifact is quantified in terms of its extent by an automated cross entropy thresholding method as image area percentage. The proposed method for artifact quantification was tested in phantoms containing two orthopedic implants with significantly different magnetic permeabilities. The method was compared against a method proposed in the literature, considered as a reference, demonstrating moderate to good correlation (Spearman’s rho = 0.62 and 0.802 in case of titanium and stainless steel implants). The automated character of the proposed quantification method seems promising towards MRI acquisition parameter optimization.

  4. Metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Eiji; Okuyama, Koichiro; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Hongo, Michio; Sato, Kozo; Sashi, Ryuji; Ishikawa, Eijiro.

    1995-01-01

    Seven metallic implants with different content of magnetic materials were compared in terms of the degree of MRI artifact. The degree of artifact well correlated with the total content of iron and cobalt than the total content of ferromagnets (iron, cobalt, nickel). No significant difference was observed regarding artifact among 4 titanium alloys containing very small amount of ferromagnet (0.058%-2.5%). Pedicle screws were made from different alloys in the same shape. Those screws were inserted into the swine vertebrae and artifact was evaluated by MRI. The degree of artifact was SUS316 (stainless steel)>MP-35N (cobalt alloy)>Ti-6AI-4V (titanium alloy), 1.5 Tesla>0.5 Tesla as for magnetic intensity, and T2 (gradient echo)>T2 (long SE)>proton density>T1 as for exposure condition. The condition of the site screw was inserted in the vertebral canal was detectable by T1-weighted images of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy in 0.5 Tesla and T1-weighted images of titanium alloy in 1.5 Tesla. (S.Y)

  5. Low-dose CT imaging of a total hip arthroplasty phantom using model-based iterative reconstruction and orthopedic metal artifact reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellenberg, R.H.H.; Streekstra, G.J.; Maas, M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boomsma, M.F.; Osch, J.A.C. van [Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Vlassenbroek, A. [Philips Medical Systems, Brussels (Belgium); Milles, J. [Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Edens, M.A. [Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Slump, C.H. [University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    To compare quantitative measures of image quality, in terms of CT number accuracy, noise, signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), at different dose levels with filtered-back-projection (FBP), iterative reconstruction (IR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) alone and in combination with orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) in a total hip arthroplasty (THA) phantom. Scans were acquired from high- to low-dose (CTDI{sub vol}: 40.0, 32.0, 24.0, 16.0, 8.0, and 4.0 mGy) at 120- and 140- kVp. Images were reconstructed using FBP, IR (iDose{sup 4} level 2, 4, and 6) and MBIR (IMR, level 1, 2, and 3) with and without O-MAR. CT number accuracy in Hounsfield Units (HU), noise or standard deviation, SNRs, and CNRs were analyzed. The IMR technique showed lower noise levels (p < 0.01), higher SNRs (p < 0.001) and CNRs (p < 0.001) compared with FBP and iDose{sup 4} in all acquisitions from high- to low-dose with constant CT numbers. O-MAR reduced noise (p < 0.01) and improved SNRs (p < 0.01) and CNRs (p < 0.001) while improving CT number accuracy only at a low dose. At the low dose of 4.0 mGy, IMR level 1, 2, and 3 showed 83%, 89%, and 95% lower noise values, a factor 6.0, 9.2, and 17.9 higher SNRs, and 5.7, 8.8, and 18.2 higher CNRs compared with FBP respectively. Based on quantitative analysis of CT number accuracy, noise values, SNRs, and CNRs, we conclude that the combined use of IMR and O-MAR enables a reduction in radiation dose of 83% compared with FBP and iDose{sup 4} in the CT imaging of a THA phantom. (orig.)

  6. Metal artifact suppression in megavoltage computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, L. John; Rogers, Myron; Salomons, Greg; Kerr, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging associated with the development of image guided radiation therapy. It is clear that MVCT can provide good image quality for patient setup verification with soft tissue contrast much better than noted in conventional megavoltage portal imaging. In addition, it has been observed that MVCT images exhibit considerably reduced artifacts surrounding metal implants (e.g., surgical clips, hip implants, dental fillings) compared to conventional diagnostic CT images (kVCT). When encountered, these artifacts greatly limit the usefulness of kVCT images, and a variety of solutions have been proposed to remove the artifacts, but these have met with only partial success. In this paper, we investigate the potential for CT imaging in regions surrounding metal implants using high-energy photons from a Cobalt-60 source and from a 4 MV linear accelerator. MVCT and kVCT images of contrast phantoms and a phantom containing a hip prosthesis are compared and analysed. We show that MVCT scans provide good fidelity for CT number quantification in the high-density regions of the images, and in the regions immediately adjacent to the metal implants. They also provide structural details within the high-density inserts and implants. Calculations will show that practical clinical MVCT imaging, able to detect 3% contrast objects, should be achievable with doses of about 2.5cGy. This suggests that MVCT not only has a role in radiotherapy treatment planning and guidance, but may also be indicated for surgical guidance and follow-up in regions where metal implants cannot be avoided.

  7. Removal of high signal artifact (marching metal artifact) by the magnetic substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Mori, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    During this project, we evaluated methods to prevent high-signal artifact (marching metal artifact) that are caused by magnetic substance. Marching metal artifact is caused by the resonance frequency created by magnetic substance. Phase encoding and frequency encoding are often switched to minimize the influence that marching metal artifact have on the image. However, this method will only change the position at which marching metal artifact occur. It does not have the ability to completely prevent marching metal artifact. Our research illustrated that marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the strength of the slice selective gradient field at the 90 deg RF pulse and 180 deg RF pulse. In other words, marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the frequency bandwidth for the 90 deg RF pulse and 180 deg RF pulse. The incorporation of the phase correct option in the device used for our research (SIGNA LX and SIGNA CV/i) results in different slice selective gradient field strengths at the 90 deg RF pulse and the 180 deg RF pulse. This indicates that the use of phase correction enables marching metal artifact to be prevented. (author)

  8. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  9. Reduction of dark-band-like metal artifacts caused by dental implant bodies using hypothetical monoenergetic imaging after dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Ike, Makiko; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Goto, Tazuko K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of hypothetical monoenergetic images after dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for assessment of the bone encircling dental implant bodies. Seventy-two axial images of implantation sites clipped out from image data scanned using DECT in dual-energy mode were used. Subjective assessment on reduction of dark-band-like artifacts (R-DBAs) and diagnosability of adjacent bone condition (D-ABC) in 3 sets of DECT images-a fused image set (DE120) and 2 sets of hypothetical monoenergetic images (ME100, ME190)-was performed and the results were statistically analyzed. With regards to R-DBAs and D-ABC, significant differences among DE120, ME100, and ME190 were observed. The ME100 and ME190 images revealed more artifact reduction and diagnosability than those of DE120. DECT imaging followed by hypothetical monoenergetic image construction can cause R-DBAs and increase D-ABC and may be potentially used for the evaluation of postoperative changes in the bone encircling implant bodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  11. Evaluation of metal artifacts in clinical MR images of patients with total hip arthroplasty using different metal artifact-reducing sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gunilla M; Lundin, Björn; von Schewelov, Thord; Müller, Markus F; Ekberg, Olle; Månsson, Sven

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the distortion and artifact area of metal in MR images and to compare artifact reduction using different metal artifact-reducing sequences in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) and non-MoM total hip prostheses. Thirty-six MoM and 15 non-MoM prostheses were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using T1-weighted (T1-w) sequences: turbo spin echo (TSE) high-readout bandwidth (hiBW), T1-w; TSE view angle tilting (VAT), T1-w; TSE VAT + slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC); short tau inversion recovery (STIR) hiBW or matched RF pulses (mRFp). Distortion was quantified using a new method measuring the acetabular roof angle (ARA). The artifact area was defined in the mid-coronal plane of the artifact. The T1 VAT + SEMAC sequence showed the least distortion compared to T1 VAT and T1-hiBW (150°, 127° and 102°, p < 0.001, in MoM; 152°, 143° and 128°, p ≤ 0.014, in non-MoM). The artifact area was smaller in MoM prostheses using the T1 VAT sequence compared to T1 hiBW and T1 VAT + SEMAC (2506 mm(2), 3160 mm(2) and 3214 mm(2), p < 0.001) and smaller in non-MoM prostheses using T1 VAT compared to T1-hiBW (4296 mm(2) and 4831 mm(2), p = 0.041). STIR-mRFp substantially reduced the artifact size compared with STIR-hiBW (MoM 4559 mm(2) and 6323 mm(2); non-MoM 5625 mm(2) and 8764 mm(2), p < 0.001). Metal artifacts in MR imaging examinations of hip prostheses can be evaluated for distortion using a distortion angle (ARA) and the degree of signal artifact as determined by measuring the largest cross-sectional artifact area. T1 VAT + SEMAC showed the least distortion; T1 VAT and STIR-mRFp were most efficient for reduction of the artifact area.

  12. SU-G-IeP2-03: Comparison of Dose Calculation On MAR (metal Artifact Reduction) and Non-MAR Datasets for Pelvic Patients with Hip Prosthesis and Head and Neck Patients with Dental Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K [BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, BC (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) was previously evaluated with phantoms demonstrating the algorithm is capable of reducing metal artifacts without affecting the overall image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact when calculating with CT datasets reconstructed with and without MAR software. Methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients with dental fillings and four pelvic cancer patients with hip prosthesis were scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. 6MV IMRT and VMAT plans were calculated with AAA on the MAR dataset until all constraints met our clinic’s guidelines. Contours from the MAR dataset were copied to the non-MAR dataset. Next, dose calculation on the non-MAR dataset was performed using the same field arrangements and fluence as the MAR plan. Conformality index, D99% and V100% to PTV were compared between MAR and non-MAR plans. Results: Differences between MAR and non-MAR plans were evaluated. For head and neck plans, the largest variations in conformality index, D99% and V100% were −3.8%, −0.9% and −2.1% respectively whereas for pelvic plans, the biggest discrepancies were −32.7%, −0.4% and -33.5% respectively. The dosimetric impact from hip prosthesis is greater because it produces more artifacts compared to dental fillings. Coverage to PTV can increase or decrease depending on the artifacts since dark streaks reduce the HU whereas bright streaks increase the HU. In the majority of the cases, PTV dose in the non-MAR plans is higher than MAR plans. Conclusion: With the presence of metals, MAR algorithm can allow more accurate delineation of targets and OARs. Dose difference between MAR and non-MAR plans depends on the proximity of the organ to the high density material, the streaking artifacts and the beam arrangements of the plan.

  13. SU-G-IeP2-03: Comparison of Dose Calculation On MAR (metal Artifact Reduction) and Non-MAR Datasets for Pelvic Patients with Hip Prosthesis and Head and Neck Patients with Dental Filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) was previously evaluated with phantoms demonstrating the algorithm is capable of reducing metal artifacts without affecting the overall image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the dosimetric impact when calculating with CT datasets reconstructed with and without MAR software. Methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients with dental fillings and four pelvic cancer patients with hip prosthesis were scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner. Images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. 6MV IMRT and VMAT plans were calculated with AAA on the MAR dataset until all constraints met our clinic’s guidelines. Contours from the MAR dataset were copied to the non-MAR dataset. Next, dose calculation on the non-MAR dataset was performed using the same field arrangements and fluence as the MAR plan. Conformality index, D99% and V100% to PTV were compared between MAR and non-MAR plans. Results: Differences between MAR and non-MAR plans were evaluated. For head and neck plans, the largest variations in conformality index, D99% and V100% were −3.8%, −0.9% and −2.1% respectively whereas for pelvic plans, the biggest discrepancies were −32.7%, −0.4% and -33.5% respectively. The dosimetric impact from hip prosthesis is greater because it produces more artifacts compared to dental fillings. Coverage to PTV can increase or decrease depending on the artifacts since dark streaks reduce the HU whereas bright streaks increase the HU. In the majority of the cases, PTV dose in the non-MAR plans is higher than MAR plans. Conclusion: With the presence of metals, MAR algorithm can allow more accurate delineation of targets and OARs. Dose difference between MAR and non-MAR plans depends on the proximity of the organ to the high density material, the streaking artifacts and the beam arrangements of the plan.

  14. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob S.; Frikel, Jürgen; Sporring, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance to sample is derived and verified numerically and with experimental data. The model accurately describes the arising variable-truncation artifacts across simulated variations of the experimental setup. Three variable-truncation artifact-reduction methods are proposed, all aimed at addressing sinogram discontinuities that are shown to be the source of the streaks. The ‘reduction to limited angle’ (RLA) method simply keeps only non-truncated projections; the ‘detector-directed smoothing’ (DDS) method smooths the discontinuities; while the ‘reflexive boundary condition’ (RBC) method enforces a zero derivative at the discontinuities. Experimental results using both simulated and real data show that the proposed methods effectively reduce variable-truncation artifacts. The RBC method is found to provide the best artifact reduction and preservation of image features using both visual and quantitative assessment. The analysis and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x-ray tomography experiments.

  15. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias; Scholz, Bernhard; Royalty, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Scholz, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany); Royalty, Kevin [Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative assessment of an MR technique for reducing metal artifact: application to spin-echo imaging in a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.; Janzen, D.L.; Munk, P.L.; McGowen, A.; MacKay, A.; Xiang, Q.S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To quantify image artifact reduction using a new technique (MARS - metal artifact reduction sequence) in vitro.Design. Coronal T1-weighted MR images were obtained through two metal phantoms (titanium/chromium-cobalt and stainless steel femoral prostheses) immersed in water. Comparison of artifact volume was made with images obtained using conventional and modified (MARS) T1-weighted sequences. Signal intensity values outside a range of ±40% the average signal intensity for water were considered artifact and segmented into low or high signal artifact categories. Considering the arbitrary selection of this threshold value, volumetric calculations of artifact were also evaluated at ±50%, 60%, 70%, and 80% the mean signal for water.Results. Conventional T1-weighted images produced 87% more low signal artifact and 212% more high signal artifact compared with the MARS modified T1-weighted images of the stainless steel prosthesis. Conventional T1-weighted images of the titanium prosthesis produced 84% more low signal artifact and 211% more high signal artifact than the MARS modified sequence. The level of artifact reduction was essentially uniform for the various threshold levels tested and was greatest at ±20% the global signal intensity average for water.Conclusion. The MARS technique reduces the volume of image signal artifact produced by stainless steel and titanium/chromium-cobalt femoral prostheses on T1-weighted spin-echo images in a tissue phantom model. (orig.)

  18. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Frikel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered backproj......Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered...... backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance...... and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x...

  19. Prior image constrained compressed sensing metal artifact reduction (PICCS-MAR): 2D and 3D image quality improvement with hip prostheses at CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannas, Peter; Li, Yinsheng; Motosugi, Utaroh; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Lubner, Meghan; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of the prior-image-constrained-compressed-sensing-based metal-artefact-reduction (PICCS-MAR) algorithm on streak artefact reduction and 2D and 3D-image quality improvement in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) undergoing CT colonography (CTC). PICCS-MAR was applied to filtered-back-projection (FBP)-reconstructed DICOM CTC-images in 52 patients with THA (unilateral, n = 30; bilateral, n = 22). For FBP and PICCS-MAR series, ROI-measurements of CT-numbers were obtained at predefined levels for fat, muscle, air, and the most severe artefact. Two radiologists independently reviewed 2D and 3D CTC-images and graded artefacts and image quality using a five-point-scale (1 = severe streak/no-diagnostic confidence, 5 = no streak/excellent image-quality, high-confidence). Results were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney-tests. Streak artefacts and image quality scores for FBP versus PICCS-MAR 2D-images (median: 1 vs. 3 and 2 vs. 3, respectively) and 3D images (median: 2 vs. 4 and 3 vs. 4, respectively) showed significant improvement after PICCS-MAR (all P < 0.001). PICCS-MAR significantly improved the accuracy of mean CT numbers for fat, muscle and the area with the most severe artefact (all P < 0.001). PICCS-MAR substantially reduces streak artefacts related to THA on DICOM images, thereby enhancing visualization of anatomy on 2D and 3D CTC images and increasing diagnostic confidence. (orig.)

  20. Material-Dependent Implant Artifact Reduction Using SEMAC-VAT and MAVRIC: A Prospective MRI Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Jud, Lukas; Luechinger, Roger; Nanz, Daniel; Andreisek, Gustav; Runge, Val M; Kozerke, Sebastian; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degree of artifact reduction in magnetic resonance imaging achieved with slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) in combination with view angle tilting (VAT) and multiacquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) for standard contrast weightings and different metallic materials. Four identically shaped rods made of the most commonly used prosthetic materials (stainless steel, SS; titanium, Ti; cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, CoCr; and oxidized zirconium, oxZi) were scanned at 3 T. In addition to conventional fast spin-echo sequences, metal artifact reduction sequences (SEMAC-VAT and MAVRIC) with varying degrees of artifact suppression were applied at different contrast weightings (T1w, T2w, PDw). Two independent readers measured in-plane and through-plane artifacts in a standardized manner. In addition, theoretical frequency-offset and frequency-offset-gradient maps were calculated. Interobserver agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.86-0.99). Stainless steel caused the greatest artifacts, followed by CoCr, Ti, and oxZi regardless of the imaging sequence. While for Ti and oxZi rods scanning with weak SEMAC-VAT showed some advantage, for SS and CoCr, higher modes of SEMAC-VAT or MAVRIC were necessary to achieve artifact reduction. MAVRIC achieved better artifact reduction than SEMAC-VAT at the cost of longer acquisition times. Simulations matched well with the apparent geometry of the frequency-offset maps. For Ti and oxZi implants, weak SEMAC-VAT may be preferred as it is faster and produces less artifact than conventional fast spin-echo. Medium or strong SEMAC-VAT or MAVRIC modes are necessary for significant artifact reduction for SS and CoCr implants.

  1. Influence of metallic artifact filtering on MEG signals for source localization during interictal epileptiform activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical intractable epilepsy is a common condition that affects 40% of epileptic patients that generally have to undergo resective surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been increasingly used to identify the epileptogenic foci through equivalent current dipole (ECD) modeling, one of the most accepted methods to obtain an accurate localization of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Modeling requires that MEG signals are adequately preprocessed to reduce interferences, a task that has been greatly improved by the use of blind source separation (BSS) methods. MEG recordings are highly sensitive to metallic interferences originated inside the head by implanted intracranial electrodes, dental prosthesis, etc and also coming from external sources such as pacemakers or vagal stimulators. To reduce these artifacts, a BSS-based fully automatic procedure was recently developed and validated, showing an effective reduction of metallic artifacts in simulated and real signals (Migliorelli et al 2015 J. Neural Eng. 12 046001). The main objective of this study was to evaluate its effects in the detection of IEDs and ECD modeling of patients with focal epilepsy and metallic interference. Approach. A comparison between the resulting positions of ECDs was performed: without removing metallic interference; rejecting only channels with large metallic artifacts; and after BSS-based reduction. Measures of dispersion and distance of ECDs were defined to analyze the results. Main results. The relationship between the artifact-to-signal ratio and ECD fitting showed that higher values of metallic interference produced highly scattered dipoles. Results revealed a significant reduction on dispersion using the BSS-based reduction procedure, yielding feasible locations of ECDs in contrast to the other two approaches. Significance. The automatic BSS-based method can be applied to MEG datasets affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step to improve the localization of

  2. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal-Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Anaële; Wörle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L(-1), and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid as sole metal chelator. The production of metal-oxalates can be used in the restoration and conservation of archeological and modern metal artifacts. The production of copper oxalates was confirmed directly using metallic pieces (both archeological and modern). The conversion of corrosion products into copper oxalates was demonstrated as well. In order to assess whether the capability of B. bassiana to produce metal-oxalates could be applied to other metals, iron and silver were tested as well. Iron appears to be directly sequestered in the wall of the fungal hyphae forming oxalates. However, the formation of a homogeneous layer on the object is not yet optimal. On silver, a co-precipitation of copper and silver oxalates occurred. As this greenish patina would not be acceptable on silver objects, silver reduction was explored as a tarnishing remediation. First experiments showed the transformation of silver nitrate into nanoparticles of elemental silver by an unknown extracellular mechanism. The production of copper oxalates is immediately applicable for the conservation of copper-based artifacts. For iron and silver this is not yet the case. However, the vast ability of B. bassiana to transform toxic metals using different immobilization mechanisms seems to offer considerable possibilities for industrial applications, such as the bioremediation of contaminated soils or the green synthesis of chemicals.

  3. Interslice leakage artifact reduction technique for simultaneous multislice acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Stephen F; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Bhat, Himanshu; Wald, Lawrence L; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-07-01

    Controlled aliasing techniques for simultaneously acquired echo-planar imaging slices have been shown to significantly increase the temporal efficiency for both diffusion-weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. The "slice-GRAPPA" (SG) method has been widely used to reconstruct such data. We investigate robust optimization techniques for SG to ensure image reconstruction accuracy through a reduction of leakage artifacts. Split SG is proposed as an alternative kernel optimization method. The performance of Split SG is compared to standard SG using data collected on a spherical phantom and in vivo on two subjects at 3 T. Slice-accelerated and nonaccelerated data were collected for a spin-echo diffusion-weighted acquisition. Signal leakage metrics and time-series SNR were used to quantify the performance of the kernel fitting approaches. The Split SG optimization strategy significantly reduces leakage artifacts for both phantom and in vivo acquisitions. In addition, a significant boost in time-series SNR for in vivo diffusion-weighted acquisitions with in-plane 2× and slice 3× accelerations was observed with the Split SG approach. By minimizing the influence of leakage artifacts during the training of SG kernels, we have significantly improved reconstruction accuracy. Our robust kernel fitting strategy should enable better reconstruction accuracy and higher slice-acceleration across many applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Fox, Tim [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Dhabaan, Anees, E-mail: anees.dhabaan@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  5. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts

  6. A study on a pedicle-screw-based reduction method for artificially reduced artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is a quantitative analysis of the degree of the reduction of the artifacts that are induced by pedicle screws through the application of the recently developed iterative metallic artifact reduction (I MAR) software. Screw-type implants that are composed of 4.5 g/cm3 titanium (Ti) with an approximate average computed tomography (CT) value of 6500 Hounsfield units (HUs) that are used for the treatment of spinal diseases were placed in paraffin, a tissueequivalent material, and then dried. After the insertion, the scanning conditions were fixed as 120 kVp and 250 mA using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) (Enlarge, Siemens, Germany). The slice thickness and the increment were set at the fields of view (FOVs) of 3 mm and 120 mm, respectively; the pitch is 0.8; the rotation time is 1 s; and the I MAR software was applied to the raw data of the acquired images to compare the CT-value changes of the posterior images. When the I MAR software was applied to animal vertebrae, it was possible to reduce the 65.7% image loss of the black-hole-effect image through the application of the I MAR software. When the I MAR image loss (%) was compared with the white-streak-effect image, the high-intensity image type with the white-streak effect could be reduced by 91.34% through the application of the I MAR software. In conclusion, a metal artifact that is due to a high-density material can be reduced more effectively when the I MAR algorithm is applied compared with that from the application of the conventional MAR algorithm. The I MAR can provide information on the various tissues that form around the artifact and the reduced metal structures, which can be helpful for radiologists and clinicians in their determination of an accurate diagnosis.

  7. Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

  8. Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT Images of Al-Steel-Perspex Specimens Mimicking a Hip Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhogarhia, Manish; Munshi, P.; Lukose, Sijo; Subramanian, M. P.; Muralidhar, C.

    2008-09-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a relatively new technique developed in the late 1970's, which enables the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure of objects. Beam hardening caused by the polychromatic spectrum is an important problem in X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). It leads to various artifacts in reconstruction images and reduces image quality. In the present work we are considering the Artifact Reduction in Total Hip Prosthesis CT Scan which is a problem of medical imaging. We are trying to reduce the cupping artifact induced by beam hardening as well as metal artifact as they exist in the CT scan of a human hip after the femur is replaced by a metal implant. The correction method for beam hardening used here is based on a previous work. Simulation study for the present problem includes a phantom consisting of mild steel, aluminium and perspex mimicking the photon attenuation properties of a hum hip cross section with metal implant.

  9. Deep learning methods to guide CT image reconstruction and reduce metal artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesteby, Lars; Yang, Qingsong; Xi, Yan; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Ge

    2017-03-01

    The rapidly-rising field of machine learning, including deep learning, has inspired applications across many disciplines. In medical imaging, deep learning has been primarily used for image processing and analysis. In this paper, we integrate a convolutional neural network (CNN) into the computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction process. Our first task is to monitor the quality of CT images during iterative reconstruction and decide when to stop the process according to an intelligent numerical observer instead of using a traditional stopping rule, such as a fixed error threshold or a maximum number of iterations. After training on ground truth images, the CNN was successful in guiding an iterative reconstruction process to yield high-quality images. Our second task is to improve a sinogram to correct for artifacts caused by metal objects. A large number of interpolation and normalization-based schemes were introduced for metal artifact reduction (MAR) over the past four decades. The NMAR algorithm is considered a state-of-the-art method, although residual errors often remain in the reconstructed images, especially in cases of multiple metal objects. Here we merge NMAR with deep learning in the projection domain to achieve additional correction in critical image regions. Our results indicate that deep learning can be a viable tool to address CT reconstruction challenges.

  10. A standardized evaluation of artifacts from metallic compounds during fast MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kataoka, Miyoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Metallic compounds present in the oral and maxillofacial regions (OMR) cause large artifacts during MR scanning. We quantitatively assessed these artifacts embedded within a phantom according to standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). MATERIALS AND METHO...

  11. Experimental study on metal artifacts caused by dental materials in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitani, Tomio; Yotsui, Yoritaka; Koseki, Yonoshin

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance images (MRI) caused by 14 dental crowns made of NiCr alloy. Three MRI sequences (fast spin echo (FSE)-3D, FSE-2D and spin echo (SE)-2D) were taken of anterior and posterior cast crowns combined in various arrangements. We observed the shape and volume of the resulting metallic artifacts using multi-planer and three-dimensional reconstructions from the slice data. The metallic artifacts were divided into three signal intensities: high, intermediate and low. The shape of the crown, which was in the center of the artifact, could be detected in the area of low signal intensity. An area of high signal intensity existed only in the frequency direction of the metallic crowns in the slice data. An area of intermediate signal intensity extended widely vertically and horizontally. The high signal intensity area increased in volume as the number of crowns increased. (author)

  12. Clinical observation of metal artifacts on magnetic resonance images of oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi; Takeishi, Hiroshi; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narabayashi, Isamu

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effect of metal materials used in prosthodontics on the clarity of clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images of the oral and maxillofacial regions in 37 patients. Excluded were patients who had undergone surgery in either region, patients with deciduous teeth, patients with a space-occupying lesion, i.e., an inflammatory change or a malignant process, and patients for whom images were affected by motion artifacts. The patients had all undergone orthopantomography, though none received dental treatment in the period between the MR imaging and orthopantomography study. T1- and T2- weighted axial images were used. There were no apparent differences between T1- and T2- weighted images in artifacts caused by metal prosthodontics, whereas artifacts caused by metal crowns were severe in comparison to those caused by metal inlays. In the lateral and apex portions of the tongue, when more than four crowns were present, artifacts had a marked influence on the image, and diagnosis could not be made. Moreover, in the upper and lower alveolus, the presence of two crowns had a similar effect, precluding diagnosis. However, in the antrum, mandibular body, and mental regions, metal artifacts had less of an effect on the images compared to that of metal artifacts in the alveolus region. (author)

  13. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of photoplethysmographic artifact reduction for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew J.; Smith, Peter R.

    1999-01-01

    Motion artefact corruption of pulse oximeter output, causing both measurement inaccuracies and false alarm conditions, is a primary restriction in the current clinical practice and future applications of this useful technique. Artefact reduction in photoplethysmography (PPG), and therefore by application in pulse oximetry, is demonstrated using a novel non-linear methodology recently proposed by the authors. The significance of these processed PPG signals for pulse oximetry measurement is discussed, with particular attention to the normalization inherent in the artefact reduction process. Quantitative experimental investigation of the performance of PPG artefact reduction is then utilized to evaluate this technology for application to pulse oximetry. While the successfully demonstrated reduction of severe artefacts may widen the applicability of all PPG technologies and decrease the occurrence of pulse oximeter false alarms, the observed reduction of slight artefacts suggests that many such effects may go unnoticed in clinical practice. The signal processing and output averaging used in most commercial oximeters can incorporate these artefact errors into the output, while masking the true PPG signal corruption. It is therefore suggested that PPG artefact reduction should be incorporated into conventional pulse oximetry measurement, even in the absence of end-user artefact problems.

  15. Evaluation of Metallic Artifacts Caused by Nonpenetrating Titanium Clips in Postoperative Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Seguchi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Takuya; Chiba, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takatoshi; Nagm, Alhusain; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Nonpenetrating titanium clips create no suture holes and thereby reduce cerebrospinal fluid leakage after dural closure. However, no data exist regarding metallic artifacts caused by these clips during postoperative neuroimaging. We aimed to evaluate clip-related artifacts on postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images of 17 patients who underwent spinal surgery. A phantom study evaluated the size of metallic artifacts, and a clinical study evaluated the quality of postoperative spinal MR images. Both 1.5-T studies used T1-weighted and T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences. The phantom study compared clip and artifact size for 10 clips. Artifacts were defined as signal voids surrounded by high signal amplitude that followed the clip shape. In the clinical study, 2 neurosurgeons assessed 22 images from 17 patients of the spinal cord, cauda equina, and paravertebral muscles adjacent to the nonpenetrating titanium clips, using 5-point scales. Mean metallic artifact sizes were 4.82 ± 0.16 mm (T1) and 4.66 ± 0.25 mm (T2; P < 0.001 vs. control). The former and latter were respectively 207% and 200% larger than the clip size. Both readers graded spinal cord and paravertebral muscles images as 3 or 4, indicating very good image quality regardless of clip-related artifacts, with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.99 and 0.98, respectively). Metallic artifacts caused by nonpenetrating titanium clips were 200% larger than the actual clip but did not affect spinal cord and extradural tissue visualization. The use of these clips for closing the spinal dura mater does not alter postoperative radiologic evaluation quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of images containing metal artifacts in dual energy CT with reconstruction MARs; Avaliacao da qualidade de imagem com artefatos metalicos em tomografia computadorizada de dupla energia com reconstrucao em MARs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Giordana Salvi de; Garcia, Guilherme Ribeiro; Toschi, Luis Felipe Silva; Feldman, Carlos Jader, E-mail: felipetoschi@sidiltda.com.br [Servico de Investigacao Diagnostica por Imagem Ltda, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the artifact term is applied to any discrepancy between the CT numbers in the reconstructed image and the true values of the object attenuation coefficient. This study aims to evaluate the reduction of artifacts in computed tomography dual energy using MARs reconstruction algorithm (Metal Artifact Reduction Software). There were made two acquisitions of images in the GE Discovery CTHD 750 CT scanner, in normal mode at 120 kV and spectral mode in 80kV - 140kV and analyzed uniformity, noise and linearity of the number of CT. A similar behavior was observed in both techniques. Regarding the reconstruction MARs performed only in spectral mode, was obtained satisfactory a result in the reduction of metal artifacts in function to the field of view, where with the decrease of the same has the greatest reduction in artifacts. (author)

  17. Andean Ores, Bronze Artifacts, and Lead Isotopes: Constraints on Metal Sources in Their Geological Context

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Andrew W.; Lechtman, Heather Nan

    2014-01-01

    With a focus on bronze production in the south-central Andes during the Middle Horizon, this study reports the first archaeological use of lead isotope analysis to investigate metallic ores and metal artifacts in the Andean zone of South America. Because the vast majority of metal deposits in the Andean cordillera formed in a convergent plate boundary setting, lead isotope compositions of most Andean ore sources are not unique. Lead isotope ratios of central and south-central Andean ores defi...

  18. An evaluation on magnetic resonance imaging of the metallic artifacts, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikumoto, Yoshiaki; Tomura, Kiminori

    1990-01-01

    This report evaluates a variety of dental materials with respect to MR imaging artifacts in vitro. The increasing use of MR imaging as a clinical method necessitates a study of artifacts that may appear on these images. A wide variety of metallic materials are used in the dentistry and some can potentially cause distortion of MR images. MR imaging was performed using a superconductive magnetom of 1.5 Tesra (Magnetom; Simens). Imaging was obtained with the use of a single 4-mm thick slice two-dimensional Fourier transform rapid technique. Pulse sequence was obtained by Flash method at flip angle=90, echo delay (TE)=10 ms, repetition time (TR)=400 ms. The following results were obtained; Titanium, gold and high nickel content dental materials produced no discernible artifacts. Stainless steel alloys caused major imaging artifacts. (author)

  19. Carbothermic reduction of refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.D.

    1976-01-01

    The reduction of stable refractory metal oxides by carbon is generally unacceptable since the product is usually contaminated with carbides. The carbide formation may be avoided by selecting a solvent metal to dissolve the reactive metal as it is produced and reduce its chemical activity below that required for carbide formation. This approach has been successfully applied to the oxides of Si, Zr, Ti, Al, Mg, and U. In the case where a volatile suboxide, a carbonyl reaction, or a volatile metal occur, the use of the solvent metal appears satisfactory to limit the loss of material at low pressures. In several solute--solvent systems, vacuum evaporation is used to strip the solvent metal from the alloy to give the pure metal

  20. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires

  1. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  2. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Jalil; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Babaei Hemmaty, Yasamin; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Results Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. Conclusion With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires. PMID:26389058

  3. Generation of hybrid sinograms for the recovery of kV-CT images with metal artifacts for helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dongwon; Youn, Hanbean; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this study is to restore kilovoltage computed tomography (kV-CT) images which are disfigured by patients’ metal prostheses. By generating a hybrid sinogram that is a combination of kV and megavoltage (MV) projection data, the authors suggest a novel metal artifact-reduction (MAR) method that retains the image quality to match that of kV-CT and simultaneously restores the information of metal prostheses lost due to photon starvation. Methods: CT projection data contain information about attenuation coefficients and the total length of the attenuation. By normalizing raw kV projections with their own total lengths of attenuation, mean attenuation projections were obtained. In the same manner, mean density projections of MV-CT were obtained by the normalization of MV projections resulting from the forward projection of density-calibrated MV-CT images with the geometric parameters of the kV-CT device. To generate the hybrid sinogram, metal-affected signals of the kV sinogram were identified and replaced by the corresponding signals of the MV sinogram following a density calibration step with kV data. Filtered backprojection was implemented to reconstruct the hybrid CT image. To validate the authors’ approach, they simulated four different scenarios for three heads and one pelvis using metallic rod inserts within a cylindrical phantom. Five inserts describing human body elements were also included in the phantom. The authors compared the image qualities among the kV, MV, and hybrid CT images by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the densities of all inserts, and the spatial resolution. In addition, the MAR performance was compared among three existing MAR methods and the authors’ hybrid method. Finally, for clinical trials, the authors produced hybrid images of three patients having dental metal prostheses to compare their MAR performances with those of the kV, MV, and three existing MAR

  4. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Linetskiy, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2008), s. 715-723 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : metallic dental materials * dental alloys * amalgams * MR imaging * magnetic susceptibility * electric conductivity * image artifact Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2008

  5. The experimental quantitative study of spectral CT imaging in reducing the metal artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoli; Feng Weihua; Dong Cheng; Chen Haisong; Cao Huizhi; Xu Wenjian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of spectral CT in reducing artifacts caused by metallic implants. Methods: Porcine lumbar spines were chosen as anthropomorphic phantom. The model was examined before and after implanting the titanic nail into the second and fourth lumbar vertebral body using gemstone spectral CT protocol and standard 120 kVp spectra. Specific post-processing technique was applied to generate 11 kinds of images of monochromatic energy and Metal Artifacts Reducing system (MARs) with the interval of 10 keV ranging from 40-140 keV. The image quality was compared subjectively between 120 kVp group and GSI group after implantation. Three regions of interest based on distances along the most pronounced artifact were chosen and marked as ROI near , ROI mid , ROI far successively. Artifacts parameters including CT value and SD value were measured. The CT value of different ROIs were compared with LSD and Bonferroni test. Contrast-to-noise ratio and artifacts index were calculated. An optimal range of keV was determined according to artifacts index. Results: Image quality of' Gemstone spectra images was rated superior to the standard images. An optimized spectrum of keV based on artifacts index was from 80 keV to 100 keV. For ROI near , CT value was (80.25±16.00) HU and (30.10±10.45) HU respectively in group Mono before implantation and group Mono + MARs after implantation. The differences were significant (Z= 2.978, P mid and ROI far , CT value was (63.21±6.61) HU and (54.84±10.60) HU, (76.54±9.07) HU and (73.20±5.39) HU respectively. There was no significant differences (t=0.530, P>0.05; t=0.822, P>0.05). Conclusion: Metal artifacts could be reduced effectively at the site 3 cm away from implants using gemstone spectral CT. An accurate CT value of surrounding tissue can be obtained. (authors)

  6. Total Variation-Based Reduction of Streak Artifacts, Ring Artifacts and Noise in 3D Reconstruction from Optical Projection Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2015), s. 1602-1615 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * microscopy * artifacts * total variation * data mismatch Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  7. Reduction of breathing irregularity-related motion artifacts in low-pitch spiral 4D CT by optimized projection binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Hofmann, Christian; Mücke, Eike; Gauer, Tobias

    2017-06-19

    Respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) is the basis of radiotherapy treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Current clinical 4D CT images suffer, however, from artifacts due to unfulfilled assumptions concerning breathing pattern regularity. We propose and evaluate modifications to existing low-pitch spiral 4D CT reconstruction protocols to counteract respective artifacts. The proposed advanced reconstruction (AR) approach consists of two steps that build on each other: (1) statistical analysis of the breathing signal recorded during CT data acquisition and extraction of a patient-specific reference breathing cycle for projection binning; (2) incorporation of an artifact measure into the reconstruction. 4D CT data of 30 patients were reconstructed by standard phase- and local amplitude-based reconstruction (PB, LAB) and compared with images obtained by AR. The number of artifacts was evaluated and artifact statistics correlated to breathing curve characteristics. AR reduced the number of 4D CT artifacts by 31% and 27% compared to PB and LAB; the reduction was most pronounced for irregular breathing curves. We described a two-step optimization of low-pitch spiral 4D CT reconstruction to reduce artifacts in the presence of breathing irregularity and illustrated that the modifications to existing reconstruction solutions are effective in terms of artifact reduction.

  8. Inter-slice Leakage Artifact Reduction Technique for Simultaneous Multi-Slice Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Stephen F.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Bhat, Himanshu; Wang, Dingxin; Wald, Lawrence L.; Setsompop, Kawin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Controlled aliasing techniques for simultaneously acquired EPI slices have been shown to significantly increase the temporal efficiency for both diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fMRI studies. The “slice-GRAPPA” (SG) method has been widely used to reconstruct such data. We investigate robust optimization techniques for SG to ensure image reconstruction accuracy through a reduction of leakage artifacts. Methods Split slice-GRAPPA (SP-SG) is proposed as an alternative kernel optimization method. The performance of SP-SG is compared to standard SG using data collected on a spherical phantom and in-vivo on two subjects at 3T. Slice accelerated and non-accelerated data were collected for a spin-echo diffusion weighted acquisition. Signal leakage metrics and time-series SNR were used to quantify the performance of the kernel fitting approaches. Results The SP-SG optimization strategy significantly reduces leakage artifacts for both phantom and in-vivo acquisitions. In addition, a significant boost in time-series SNR for in-vivo diffusion weighted acquisitions with in-plane 2× and slice 3× accelerations was observed with the SP-SG approach. Conclusion By minimizing the influence of leakage artifacts during the training of slice-GRAPPA kernels, we have significantly improved reconstruction accuracy. Our robust kernel fitting strategy should enable better reconstruction accuracy and higher slice-acceleration across many applications. PMID:23963964

  9. Reduction of motion artifact in pulse oximetry by smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan-ting

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulse oximeter, a medical device capable of measuring blood oxygen saturation (SpO2, has been shown to be a valuable device for monitoring patients in critical conditions. In order to incorporate the technique into a wearable device which can be used in ambulatory settings, the influence of motion artifacts on the estimated SpO2 must be reduced. This study investigates the use of the smoothed psuedo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD for the reduction of motion artifacts affecting pulse oximetry. Methods The SPWVD approach is compared with two techniques currently used in this field, i.e. the weighted moving average (WMA and the fast Fourier transform (FFT approaches. SpO2 and pulse rate were estimated from a photoplethysmographic (PPG signal recorded when subject is in a resting position as well as in the act of performing four types of motions: horizontal and vertical movements of the hand, and bending and pressing motions of the finger. For each condition, 24 sets of PPG signals collected from 6 subjects, each of 30 seconds, were studied with reference to the PPG signal recorded simultaneously from the subject's other hand, which was stationary at all times. Results and Discussion The SPWVD approach shows significant improvement (p Conclusion The results suggested that the SPWVD approach could potentially be used to reduce motion artifact on wearable pulse oximeters.

  10. Inspection about the corrosion of metallic archaeological artifacts in ground. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Shingo

    2002-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-base archaeological artifacts, which were dug out in Iyomai-7 (Chitose-shi, Hokkaido) and Izumo-Ooyashiro-Keidai (Taisha-machi, Shimane-ken) sites, was investigated by using X-ray CT, XRD, atomic absorption spectroscopy and EDX techniques. While the artifacts such as swords in Iyomai-7 site had been buried in the ground for 400-500 years, metallic iron remained in the swords and the corrosion amounts were estimated to be 2-5 mm. Several artifacts were investigated among a lot of iron rings and nails buried beside huge pillars of the ancient shrine. Those artifacts had been in ground for 730-750 years. The corrosion amounts were estimated to be 3-5 mm. As the both soil environments are supposed to be oxidizing, the outer oxide layers of all species are composed of goethite and soil. Further, it was clarified that perfectly corroded ones had hollow structures. In this study, the sampling method of species, the corrosion environmental factors, and the corrosion kinetic models were also evaluated. (author)

  11. Online Reduction of Artifacts in EEG of Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Using Reference Layer Adaptive Filtering (RLAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyrl, David; Krausz, Gunther; Koschutnig, Karl; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow us to study the active human brain from two perspectives concurrently. Signal processing based artifact reduction techniques are mandatory for this, however, to obtain reasonable EEG quality in simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Current artifact reduction techniques like average artifact subtraction (AAS), typically become less effective when artifact reduction has to be performed on-the-fly. We thus present and evaluate a new technique to improve EEG quality online. This technique adds up with online AAS and combines a prototype EEG-cap for reference recordings of artifacts, with online adaptive filtering and is named reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF). We found online AAS + RLAF to be highly effective in improving EEG quality. Online AAS + RLAF outperformed online AAS and did so in particular online in terms of the chosen performance metrics, these being specifically alpha rhythm amplitude ratio between closed and opened eyes (3-45% improvement), signal-to-noise-ratio of visual evoked potentials (VEP) (25-63% improvement), and VEPs variability (16-44% improvement). Further, we found that EEG quality after online AAS + RLAF is occasionally even comparable with the offline variant of AAS at a 3T MRI scanner. In conclusion RLAF is a very effective add-on tool to enable high quality EEG in simultaneous EEG-fMRI experiments, even when online artifact reduction is necessary.

  12. Performances of low-dose dual-energy CT in reducing artifacts from implanted metallic orthopedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Rome (Italy); De Waure, Chiara; Calabro, Giovanna Elisa [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Research Centre for Health Technology Assessment, Department of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Rome (Italy); Finkenstaedt, Tim [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the performances of dose-reduced dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in decreasing metallic artifacts from orthopedic devices compared with dose-neutral DECT, dose-neutral single-energy computed tomography (SECT), and dose-reduced SECT. Thirty implants in 20 consecutive cadavers underwent both SECT and DECT at three fixed CT dose indexes (CTDI): 20.0, 10.0, and 5.0 mGy. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV, and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. In each group, the image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visually rating and by measuring the maximum streak artifact respectively. The comparison between SECT and OPTkeV evaluated overall within all groups showed a significant difference (p <0.001), with OPTkeV images providing better images. Comparing OPTkeV with the other DECT images, a significant difference was shown (p <0.001), with OPTkeV and 130-keV images providing the qualitatively best results. The OPTkeV images of 5.0-mGy acquisitions provided percentages of images with scores 1 and 2 of 36 % and 30 % respectively, compared with 0 % and 33.3 % of the corresponding SECT images of 10- and 20-mGy acquisitions. Moreover, DECT reconstructions at the OPTkeV of the low-dose group showed higher CT numbers than the SECT images of dose groups 1 and 2. This study demonstrates that low-dose DECT permits a reduction of artifacts due to metallic implants to be obtained in a similar manner to neutral-dose DECT and better than reduced or neutral-dose SECT. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of some ancient metal and clay artifacts by the radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugrul, B.; Sungur, F.; Mericboyu, Y.; Yildiz, F.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray radiography and betagraphy which are applied on different archaeological artifacts have been given including some general information about the technique. A study was realized on a chunk of beads and a disc which can not be noticed by visual inspection, clustered together. The x-ray radiography of the cluster disclosed that the disc has cuneiform script on it which is assigned to the period of Assyrian King Shalmaneser I. The other two studies were realized on the metal artifacts an armour and latch. Furthermore, betagraphy was applied an armour cloth. X-ray radiography was applied on tablets in spite of the limitations of the technique. Further infotmation were obtained about on enveloped letter tablets. Therefore, the radiographic evaluation can be easy and nondestructively which is impossible otherwise. (author)

  14. Photoplethysmograph signal reconstruction based on a novel motion artifact detection-reduction approach. Part II: Motion and noise artifact removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, S M A; Dao, Duy K; Chong, Jo Woon; McManus, David; Darling, Chad; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new method to reconstruct motion and noise artifact (MNA) contaminated photoplethysmogram (PPG) data. A method to detect MNA corrupted data is provided in a companion paper. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on an iterative motion artifact removal (IMAR) approach, which utilizes the singular spectral analysis algorithm to remove MNA artifacts so that the most accurate estimates of uncorrupted heart rates (HRs) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) values recorded by a pulse oximeter can be derived. Using both computer simulations and three different experimental data sets, we show that the proposed IMAR approach can reliably reconstruct MNA corrupted data segments, as the estimated HR and SpO2 values do not significantly deviate from the uncorrupted reference measurements. Comparison of the accuracy of reconstruction of the MNA corrupted data segments between our IMAR approach and the time-domain independent component analysis (TD-ICA) is made for all data sets as the latter method has been shown to provide good performance. For simulated data, there were no significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 values starting from 10 dB down to -15 dB for both white and colored noise contaminated PPG data using IMAR; for TD-ICA, significant differences were observed starting at 10 dB. Two experimental PPG data sets were created with contrived MNA by having subjects perform random forehead and rapid side-to-side finger movements show that; the performance of the IMAR approach on these data sets was quite accurate as non-significant differences in the reconstructed HR and SpO2 were found compared to non-contaminated reference values, in most subjects. In comparison, the accuracy of the TD-ICA was poor as there were significant differences in reconstructed HR and SpO2 values in most subjects. For non-contrived MNA corrupted PPG data, which were collected with subjects performing walking and stair climbing tasks, the IMAR significantly

  15. Determination of reduction yield of lithium metal reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kyu; Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Taek Jin; Jee, Kwang Young

    2004-01-01

    Metal reduction of spent oxide fuel is the first step for the effective storage of spent fuel in Korea as well as transmutation purpose of long-lived radio-nuclides. During the reduction of uranium oxide by lithium metal to uranium metal, lithium oxide is stoichiometrically produced. By determining the concentration of lithium oxide in lithium chloride, we can estimate that how much uranium oxide is converted to uranium metal. Previous method to determine the lithium oxide concentration in lithium chloride is tedious and timing consuming. This paper describe the on-line monitoring method of lithium oxide during the reduction process

  16. MRI Artifacts of a Metallic Stent Derived From a Human Aorta Specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M. E.; Flores, P.; Marrufo, O.; Hidalgo, S. S.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proved to be a useful technique to get images of the whole body. However, the presence of ferromagnetic material can cause susceptibility artifacts, which result from microscopic gradients that occur near the boundaries between areas displaying different magnetic susceptibility. These gradients cause dephasing of spins and frequency shifts in the surrounding tissues. Intravoxel dephasing and spatial mis-registration can degrade image quality. An aorta with a metallic stent was preserved in formaldehyde at 10% inside acrylic cylinders and used to obtain MR images. We tested pulsed spin echo and gradient echo sequences to improve image quality. All experiments were performed on a 7T/21 cm Varian system (Varian, Inc, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with Direct Drive technology and a 16-rung birdcage coil transceiver. The presence of metallic stents produces a lack of signal that might give falsely reassuring appearances within the vessel lumen.

  17. Reduction of motion artifacts for PET imaging by respiratory correlated dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K.-S.; Chen, T.-J.; Chang, C.-C.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L.-C.; Liu, R.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Organ motion caused by respiration is a major challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This work proposes a technique to reduce smearing in PET imaging caused by respiratory motion. Dynamic scanning at 1 frame/s is used. A point source, used as a marker, is attached to the object's abdomen during the scan. The source position in the projection view moves with respiratory motion and can be used to represent the respiratory phase within the time interval in which each frame data are acquired. One hundred and twenty frames are obtained for each study. The range of the positions of the marker is divided into four groups, representing different respiratory phases. The frames in which the organ positions (phases) are the same summed to produce a static sub-sinogram. Each sub-sinogram then undergoes regular image reconstruction to yield a motion-free image. The technique is applied to one volunteer under both free and coached breathing conditions. A parameter called the volume reduction factor is adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of this motion-reduction technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed technique effectively reduces motion artifacts in the image. Coached breathing yields better results than free breathing condition. The advantages of this method are that (1) the scanning time remains the same; (2) free breathing is allowed during the acquisition of the image; and (3) no user intervention is required

  18. Ring artifact reduction in synchrotron x-ray tomography through helical acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Daniël M.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2018-03-01

    In synchrotron x-ray tomography, systematic defects in certain detector elements can result in arc-shaped artifacts in the final reconstructed image of the scanned sample. These ring artifacts are commonly found in many applications of synchrotron tomography, and can make it difficult or impossible to use the reconstructed image in further analyses. The severity of ring artifacts is often reduced in practice by applying pre-processing on the acquired data, or post-processing on the reconstructed image. However, such additional processing steps can introduce additional artifacts as well, and rely on specific choices of hyperparameter values. In this paper, a different approach to reducing the severity of ring artifacts is introduced: a helical acquisition mode. By moving the sample parallel to the rotation axis during the experiment, the sample is detected at different detector positions in each projection, reducing the effect of systematic errors in detector elements. Alternatively, helical acquisition can be viewed as a way to transform ring artifacts to helix-like artifacts in the reconstructed volume, reducing their severity. We show that data acquired with the proposed mode can be transformed to data acquired with a virtual circular trajectory, enabling further processing of the data with existing software packages for circular data. Results for both simulated data and experimental data show that the proposed method is able to significantly reduce ring artifacts in practice, even compared with popular existing methods, without introducing additional artifacts.

  19. Reduction of Flow Artifacts by Using Partial Saturation in RF-Spoiled Gradient-Echo Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Misung; Hargreaves, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-spoiled gradient-echo imaging provides a signal intensity close to pure T1 contrast by using spoiler gradients and RF phase cycling to eliminate net transverse magnetization. Generally, spins require many RF excitations to reach a steady-state magnetization level; therefore, when unsaturated flowing spins enter the imaging slab, they can cause undesirable signal enhancement and generate image artifacts. These artifacts can be reduced by partially saturating an outer slab u...

  20. Evaluation of MRI artifacts caused by metallic dental implants and classification of the dental materials in use

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk jr., Zenon; Bartušek, Karel; Hubálková, H.; Bachorec, T.; Starčuková, Jana; Krupa, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2006), s. 24-27 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : magnetic resonance imaging * artifacts * metallic implants * dental alloys * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Protection of Metal Artifacts with the Formation of Metal?Oxalates Complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Ana?le; W?rle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal–oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L−1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid a...

  2. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  3. Origin of the radio frequency pulse artifact in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording: rectification at the carbon-metal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Michiro; Pinus, Boris I; Pinus, Alexander B; Constable, R Todd

    2007-09-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalograph-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) recording has become an important tool for investigating spatiotemporal properties of brain events, such as epilepsy, evoked brain responses, and changes in brain rhythms. Reduction of noise in EEG signals during fMRI recording is crucial for acquiring high-quality EEG-fMRI data. The main source of the noise includes the gradient artifact, the radio frequency (RF) pulse artifact, and the cardiac pulse artifact. Since the RF pulse artifact is relatively small in amplitude, little attention has been paid to this artifact, and its origin is not well understood. However, the amplitude of the RF pulse artifact fluctuates randomly even if a very high EEG sampling rate is used, making it more salient than the gradient artifact after postprocessing for noise removal. In this paper, we investigate the cause of the RF pulse artifact in EEG systems that use carbon wires.

  4. SU-E-I-62: Reduction of Susceptibility Artifacts by Increasing the Bandwidth (BW) and Echo Train Length (ETL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Boci, N; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Glotsos, D; Oikonomou, G; Bakas, A; Roka, V; Cavouras, D; Lavdas, E [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Attika (Greece); Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A [Animus Kyanoys Larissas Hospital, Larissa, Thessaly (Greece); Chatzivasileiou, V; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa, Thessaly (Greece); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Stathakis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this present study is to increase bandwidth (BW) and echo train length (ETL) in Proton Density Turbo Spin Echo (PD TSE) sequences with and without fat saturation (FS) as well as in Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude sequences (TIRM) in order to assess whether these sequences are capable of reducing susceptibility artifacts. Methods: We compared 1) TIRM coronal (COR) with the same sequence with increased both BW and ETL 2) Conventional PD TSE sagittal (SAG) with FS with an increased BW 3) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with an increased BW 4) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with increased both BW and ETL. A quantitative analysis was performed to measure the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis was performed by two radiologists in order to evaluate the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and fat suppression. The depiction of cartilage, menisci, muscles, tendons and bone marrow were also qualitatively analyzed. Results: The quantitative analysis found that the modified TIRM sequence is significantly superior to the conventional one regarding the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. In the qualitative analysis, the modified TIRM sequence was superior to the corresponding conventional one in eight characteristics out of ten that were analyzed. The modified PD TSE with FS was superior to the corresponding conventional one regarding the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and depiction of bone marrow and cartilage while achieving effective fat saturation. The modified PD TSE sequence without FS with a high (H) BW was found to be superior corresponding to the conventional one in the case of cartilage. Conclusion: Consequently, TIRM sequence with an increased BW and ETL is proposed for producing images of high quality and modified PD TSE with H BW for smaller metals, especially when FS is used.

  5. SU-E-I-62: Reduction of Susceptibility Artifacts by Increasing the Bandwidth (BW) and Echo Train Length (ETL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, P; Boci, N; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Glotsos, D; Oikonomou, G; Bakas, A; Roka, V; Cavouras, D; Lavdas, E; Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A; Chatzivasileiou, V; Batsikas, G; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this present study is to increase bandwidth (BW) and echo train length (ETL) in Proton Density Turbo Spin Echo (PD TSE) sequences with and without fat saturation (FS) as well as in Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude sequences (TIRM) in order to assess whether these sequences are capable of reducing susceptibility artifacts. Methods: We compared 1) TIRM coronal (COR) with the same sequence with increased both BW and ETL 2) Conventional PD TSE sagittal (SAG) with FS with an increased BW 3) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with an increased BW 4) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with increased both BW and ETL. A quantitative analysis was performed to measure the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis was performed by two radiologists in order to evaluate the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and fat suppression. The depiction of cartilage, menisci, muscles, tendons and bone marrow were also qualitatively analyzed. Results: The quantitative analysis found that the modified TIRM sequence is significantly superior to the conventional one regarding the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. In the qualitative analysis, the modified TIRM sequence was superior to the corresponding conventional one in eight characteristics out of ten that were analyzed. The modified PD TSE with FS was superior to the corresponding conventional one regarding the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and depiction of bone marrow and cartilage while achieving effective fat saturation. The modified PD TSE sequence without FS with a high (H) BW was found to be superior corresponding to the conventional one in the case of cartilage. Conclusion: Consequently, TIRM sequence with an increased BW and ETL is proposed for producing images of high quality and modified PD TSE with H BW for smaller metals, especially when FS is used

  6. Artifact reduction of compressed images and video combining adaptive fuzzy filtering and directional anisotropic diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Forchhammer, Søren; Korhonen, Jari

    2011-01-01

    and ringing artifacts, we have applied directional anisotropic diffusion. Besides that, the selection of the adaptive threshold parameter for the diffusion coefficient has also improved the performance of the algorithm. Experimental results on JPEG compressed images as well as MJPEG and H.264 compressed......Fuzzy filtering is one of the recently developed methods for reducing distortion in compressed images and video. In this paper, we combine the powerful anisotropic diffusion equations with fuzzy filtering in order to reduce the impact of artifacts. Based on the directional nature of the blocking...

  7. Reduction of image artifacts in three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents results of in vivo studies on the effect of refractive index-matching media on image artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human skin. These artifacts present as streaks of artificially low backscatter and displacement or distortion of features. They are primarily caused by refraction and scattering of the OCT light beam at the skin surface. The impact of the application of glycerol and ultrasound gel is assessed on both novel skin-mimicking phantoms and in vivo human skin, including assessment of the epidermal thickening caused by the media. Based on our findings, recommendations are given for optimal OCT imaging of skin in vivo.

  8. Development of a unique phantom to assess dose error of metal artifact in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Young; Kang, Sang Won; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Woo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Yeon [Dept. of Pediatrics and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The artifacts not only blur the CT images and lead to inaccuracies in diagnosis, but also make the delineation of anatomical structures intractable, which is important in image-guided intervention procedures. These artifacts obscure the underlying anatomy, leading to uncertainty in the delineation of the target volumes and compromising the integrity of the density representation that is crucial for accurate dose calculation. Because head and neck cancer patients tend to be over the age of 50 years, they constitute a group likely to have dental prostheses. This kind of side effects considerably disturbs the therapeutic procedure. Radiation scatter from high atomic number (Z) materials is established to cause both soft tissue and bony complications in the oral cavity, making scattered radiation an important factor in head and neck region radiotherapy planning. In this study, we carried out theoretical analysis of the metal artifact, that is, streak artifact and dark artifact, and also critical analysis of dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of head and neck cancer patients with the genuine teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. The phantom provides a unique and useful tool in head and neck dosimetry research. It can be used in the development of new imaging instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, and image processing and reconstruction methods.

  9. Artifact Reduction of Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Using a Short-Echo Phase Mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Y.; Monma, M.; Kohno, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is utilized in magnetic resonance (MR) venography and other applications, but can include artifacts caused by the phase-masking process. Purpose: To demonstrate risks of filter processes used in making phase masks for SWI, and to propose a simple method for reducing artifacts. Material and Methods: Phase linearity related to echo time (TE) was evaluated for the original phase and high-pass-filtered phase using a CuSO 4 -doped water phantom. Effect of filter size of the Hanning window and background homogeneity were also evaluated in a phantom study. Use of a phase mask generated by data with differing magnitudes of TE was attempted in a human study. Shorter TE was used for making the phase mask, and the number of multiplications was increased. As short and long TEs were necessary simultaneously for phase mask and T2* contrast, a dual-echo technique was used. Results: Linearity of TE and phase value collapsed, and an unexpected negative phase appeared in the high-pass-filtered phase. Using a short-TE phase mask, phase-aliasing artifacts were reduced and visibility of deep veins was equivalent to that under conventional methods with an increased number of multiplications. Conclusion: Use of a short-echo phase mask in SWI is useful for reducing artifacts

  10. Characterization and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic signals from a wrist-worn device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tauţan, A.M.; Young, A.; Wentink, E.; Wieringa, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    Methods for analyzing various motion artifacts in photoplethysmography (PPG) signals, recorded by a wristworn device are reported. The analysis looks both at intrinsic PPG signal properties, through standard deviation, skew and kurtosis, but also at its relationship to five possible motion reference

  11. Usefulness of IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging in reducing metallic artifacts in the postoperative ankles with metallic hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Bin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Young Koo; Jeon, Chan Hong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prospectively compare the effectiveness of iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL), T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE), and spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MR imaging to frequency selective fat suppression (FSFS) protocols for minimizing metallic artifacts in postoperative ankles with metallic hardware. The T2-weighted and SPGR imaging with IDEAL and FSFS were performed on 21 ankles of 21 patients with metallic hardware. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently analyzed techniques for visualization of ankle ligaments and articular cartilage, uniformity of fat saturation, and relative size of the metallic artifacts. A paired t test was used for statistical comparisons of MR images between IDEAL and FSFS groups. IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR images enabled significantly improved visualization of articular cartilage (p < 0.05), the size of metallic artifact (p < 0.05), and the uniformity of fat saturation (p < 0.05). However, no significant improvement was found in the visibility of ligaments. IDEAL T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging effectively reduces the degree of tissue-obscuring artifacts produced by fixation hardware in ankle joints and improves image quality compared to FSFS T2-weighted FSE and SPGR imaging. However, visibility of ligaments was not improved using IDEAL imaging. (orig.)

  12. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  13. The 'sonaja del Petamuti': microstructural analysis of this pre hispanic metallic artifact of tarascan origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco V, F.; Torres M, L.; Mendoza A, D.; Juarez G, F.; Macias G, A.; Rodriguez L, V.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the Archaeological Project 'Cuenca de Cuitzeo', several archaeological diggings were performed at the Tarascan ceremonial of Huandacareo, Michoacan, Mexico. During this work was discovered an offering with several metal artifacts of Pre hispanic origin, between them was found a ring of barrel shaped (rattle) with twelve bells joined by means of a twisted copper tread, which has been used this study. This work presents its characterization by means of scanning electron microscopy, metallography, elemental chemical analysis and X-ray radiography. The aim of the study was to determine the process of manufacture to find if the bells were welded or cast in one peace by the lost wax method. It was possible to determine the presence of grainy bumpy textures over plain and irregular surface of the object. Metallographs in selected spots of the object were accomplished by a replication method. Also, some radiograph were take to find if a solder of different density to X rays was detected. The elemental chemical composition shows the presence of Cu, O, C, Si, and P as mayor and minor elements. Besides traces of Al, Cl, Ca, K, As, Fe and M were detected. (Author)

  14. Reduction of dental metallic artefacts in CT: Value of a newly developed algorithm for metal artefact reduction (O-MAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidoh, M.; Nakaura, T.; Nakamura, S.; Tokuyasu, S.; Osakabe, H.; Harada, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the image quality of O-MAR (Metal Artifact Reduction for Orthopedic Implants) for dental metal artefact reduction. Materials and methods: This prospective study received institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained. Thirty patients who had dental implants or dental fillings were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) images were obtained through the oral cavity and neck during the portal venous phase. The system reconstructed the O-MAR-processed images in addition to the uncorrected images. CT attenuation and image noise of the soft tissue of the oral cavity were compared between the O-MAR and the uncorrected images. Qualitative analysis was undertaken between the two image groups. Results: The image noise of the O-MAR images was significantly lower than that of the uncorrected images (p < 0.01). O-MAR offered plausible attenuations of soft tissue compared with non-O-MAR. Better qualitative scores were obtained in the streaking artefacts and the degree of depiction of the oral cavity with O-MAR compared with non-O-MAR. Conclusion: O-MAR enables the depiction of structures in areas in which this was not previously possible due to dental metallic artefacts in qualitative image analysis. O-MAR images may have a supplementary role in addition to uncorrected images in oral diagnosis

  15. SU-E-I-22: Metal Artifact Correction Using KV and Selective MV Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, A; Zhu, L; Star-Lack, J; Fahrig, R

    2012-06-01

    To improve the image quality of radiotherapy planning CTs for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kV projection data with selectively acquired MV data that does not suffer from photon starvation. Using both imaging systems that are available on current radiotherapy devices, streaking artifacts are avoided and the soft tissue contrast is restored, even in areas where the kV photons do not contribute any information. This enables a better delineation of structures of interest in planning CT images for patients with metal objects. An algorithm for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imagers of a radiotherapy device is presented in this work. It only requires selective MV imaging with the high energy X-rays being collimated onto the metal implants, ensuring that the patient dose does not increase significantly. The algorithm can cope with non-identical geometries of the two imagers and is based on stitching together kV and MV sinograms by estimating a ratio between them. A numerical head phantom with two dental fillings and two soft tissue patterns was used to quantitatively evaluate the proposed hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A structural similarity index (SSIM) with respect to the ground truth data was computed for two ROIs. Realistic, polychromatic spectra were used for both imagers with 120 keV(p) and 6 MeV(p). The patient dose was limited to about 6 cGy for both acquisitions combined. The reconstruction results yield visually as well as objectively better results (SSIM=74.8%) than a simple sinogram interpolation of the kV data (SSIM=69.7%) or a reconstruction from the original data (SSIM=17.9%). We have successfully implemented a new reconstruction method for hybrid kV-MV cone beam CT reconstruction that enables a better planning of radiotherapy treatments for patients with metal implants without compromising their safety. This work was funded by NIH grant 1R01CA138426-01A1. © 2012 American Association of

  16. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  17. Reduction of flow artifacts by using partial saturation in RF-spoiled gradient-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misung; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2011-05-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-spoiled gradient-echo imaging provides a signal intensity close to pure T(1) contrast by using spoiler gradients and RF phase cycling to eliminate net transverse magnetization. Generally, spins require many RF excitations to reach a steady-state magnetization level; therefore, when unsaturated flowing spins enter the imaging slab, they can cause undesirable signal enhancement and generate image artifacts. These artifacts can be reduced by partially saturating an outer slab upstream to drive the longitudinal magnetization close to the steady state, while the partially saturated spins generate no signal until they enter the imaging slab. In this work, magnetization evolution of flowing spins in RF-spoiled gradient-echo sequences with and without partial saturation was simulated using the Bloch equations. Next, the simulations were validated by phantom and in vivo experiments. For phantom experiments, a pulsatile flow phantom was used to test partial saturation for a range of flip angles and relaxation times. For in vivo experiments, the technique was used to image the carotid arteries, abdominal aorta, and femoral arteries of normal volunteers. All experiments demonstrated that partial saturation can provide consistent T(1) contrast across the slab while reducing inflow artifacts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Reduction of respiratory motion artifacts for free-breathing whole-heart coronary MRA by weighted iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Christoph; Piccini, Davide; Grimm, Robert; Hutter, Jana; Hornegger, Joachim; Zenge, Michael O

    2015-05-01

    To combine weighted iterative reconstruction with self-navigated free-breathing coronary magnetic resonance angiography for retrospective reduction of respiratory motion artifacts. One-dimensional self-navigation was improved for robust respiratory motion detection and the consistency of the acquired data was estimated on the detected motion. Based on the data consistency, the data fidelity term of iterative reconstruction was weighted to reduce the effects of respiratory motion. In vivo experiments were performed in 14 healthy volunteers and the resulting image quality of the proposed method was compared to a navigator-gated reference in terms of acquisition time, vessel length, and sharpness. Although the sampling pattern of the proposed method contained 60% more samples with respect to the reference, the scan efficiency was improved from 39.5 ± 10.1% to 55.1 ± 9.1%. The improved self-navigation showed a high correlation to the standard navigator signal and the described weighting efficiently reduced respiratory motion artifacts. Overall, the average image quality of the proposed method was comparable to the navigator-gated reference. Self-navigated coronary magnetic resonance angiography was successfully combined with weighted iterative reconstruction to reduce the total acquisition time and efficiently suppress respiratory motion artifacts. The simplicity of the experimental setup and the promising image quality are encouraging toward future clinical evaluation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Reduction of UF4 to U metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, I.S.; Kim, J.H.; Min, B.T.; Whang, S.C.; Im, K.S.

    1983-01-01

    The operating conditions for the production of uranium metal by reduction of UFsub(4) with magnesium powder have been thoroughly investigated using the reactor 1 Kg nominal capacity. UFsub(4) powders which were produced from the conversion plant in KAERI are used and MgFsub(2), by-product of the reduction, are used as liner after pulverizing. 95% of average yield of uranium metal are obtained with 6% excess of magnesium powder in size of -πo + 50 mesh and its density is 18.5 g/cc, and furthermore the yield is increased when mafnesium powders are used after washed with trichloro-ethylene and dried. (Author)

  20. Reduction of irregular breathing artifacts in respiration-correlated CT images using a respiratory motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertanto, Agung; Zhang, Qinghui; Hu, Yu-Chi; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Rimner, Andreas; Mageras, Gig S

    2012-06-01

    Respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) images produced with commonly used phase-based sorting of CT slices often exhibit discontinuity artifacts between CT slices, caused by cycle-to-cycle amplitude variations in respiration. Sorting based on the displacement of the respiratory signal yields slices at more consistent respiratory motion states and hence reduces artifacts, but missing image data (gaps) may occur. The authors report on the application of a respiratory motion model to produce an RCCT image set with reduced artifacts and without missing data. Input data consist of CT slices from a cine CT scan acquired while recording respiration by monitoring abdominal displacement. The model-based generation of RCCT images consists of four processing steps: (1) displacement-based sorting of CT slices to form volume images at 10 motion states over the cycle; (2) selection of a reference image without gaps and deformable registration between the reference image and each of the remaining images; (3) generation of the motion model by applying a principal component analysis to establish a relationship between displacement field and respiration signal at each motion state; (4) application of the motion model to deform the reference image into images at the 9 other motion states. Deformable image registration uses a modified fast free-form algorithm that excludes zero-intensity voxels, caused by missing data, from the image similarity term in the minimization function. In each iteration of the minimization, the displacement field in the gap regions is linearly interpolated from nearest neighbor nonzero intensity slices. Evaluation of the model-based RCCT examines three types of image sets: cine scans of a physical phantom programmed to move according to a patient respiratory signal, NURBS-based cardiac torso (NCAT) software phantom, and patient thoracic scans. Comparison in physical motion phantom shows that object distortion caused by variable motion amplitude in phase

  1. Applications of Dual-Energy Computed Tomography for Artifact Reduction in the Head, Neck, and Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Eric; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2017-08-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) uses a polychromatic energy beam to offer superb anatomic detail of the head and spine. However, technical challenges remain that can degrade the diagnostic image quality of these examinations. Dual-energy CT analyzes the changes in attenuation of soft tissues at different energy levels, from which different reconstructions can be made to yield the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio, reduce beam-hardening artifact, or evaluate tissue composition. In this article, selective applications of the dual energy CT technique are discussed, highlighting a powerful tool in the diagnostic CT evaluation of the head, neck, and spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2pi to pi plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the pi range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2pi] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan pn(AF) by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans pn(P) from the same perfusion examination (typically N approximately 30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n = 1, ..., N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans pn(V) from the artificial full scan pn(AF). A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images fn(P), fn(AF), and fn(V). Subtracting the virtual partial scan image fn(V) from the artificial full scan image fn(AF) yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: fn(C) = fn(P) - fn(V) + fn(AF), where fn(C) is the corrected image. The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference values. The improvement in the root mean square errors between the full and the partial scans with respect to the errors between the full and the corrected scans is

  3. Noise Reduction Potential of Cellular Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hinze

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rising numbers of flights and aircrafts cause increasing aircraft noise, resulting in the development of various approaches to change this trend. One approach is the application of metallic liners in the hot gas path of aero-engines. At temperatures of up to 600 °C only metallic or ceramic structures can be used. Due to fatigue loading and the notch effect of the pores, mechanical properties of porous metals are superior to the ones of ceramic structures. Consequently, cellular metals like metallic foams, sintered metals, or sintered metal felts are most promising materials. However, acoustic absorption depends highly on pore morphology and porosity. Therefore, both parameters must be characterized precisely to analyze the correlation between morphology and noise reduction performance. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between pore morphology and acoustic absorption performance. The absorber materials are characterized using image processing based on two dimensional microscopy images. The sound absorption properties are measured using an impedance tube. Finally, the correlation of acoustic behavior, pore morphology, and porosity is outlined.

  4. Simultaneous Reduction in Noise and Cross-Contamination Artifacts for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Dual-energy CT imaging tends to suffer from much lower signal-to-noise ratio than single-energy CT. In this paper, we propose an improved anticorrelated noise reduction (ACNR method without causing cross-contamination artifacts. Methods. The proposed algorithm diffuses both basis material density images (e.g., water and iodine at the same time using a novel correlated diffusion algorithm. The algorithm has been compared to the original ACNR algorithm in a contrast-enhanced, IRB-approved patient study. Material density accuracy and noise reduction are quantitatively evaluated by the percent density error and the percent noise reduction. Results. Both algorithms have significantly reduced the noises of basis material density images in all cases. The average percent noise reduction is 69.3% and 66.5% with the ACNR algorithm and the proposed algorithm, respectively. However, the ACNR algorithm alters the original material density by an average of 13% (or 2.18 mg/cc with a maximum of 58.7% (or 8.97 mg/cc in this study. This is evident in the water density images as massive cross-contaminations are seen in all five clinical cases. On the contrary, the proposed algorithm only changes the mean density by 2.4% (or 0.69 mg/cc with a maximum of 7.6% (or 1.31 mg/cc. The cross-contamination artifacts are significantly minimized or absent with the proposed algorithm. Conclusion. The proposed algorithm can significantly reduce image noise present in basis material density images from dual-energy CT imaging, with minimized cross-contaminations compared to the ACNR algorithm.

  5. The reduction of motion artifacts in digital subtraction angiography by geometrical image transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.M.; Pickens, D.R.; Mandava, V.R.; Grefenstette, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with the problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes a technique for determining an optimal transformation. The authors employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. They choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process they use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. They present the experimental results of the application of their registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom, and for clinical images

  6. Analysis of copper-based metallic artifacts by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascock, M.D.; Spalding, T.G.; Biers, J.C.; Cornman, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Non-destructive analysis of the major elements in copper-alloyed artifacts by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis is reported. Copper, zinc, tin and lead were measured in several ancient Roman, Greek and Iranian objects. Good agreement was found in comparison with analysis of similar objects by destructive methods. (author)

  7. Closed-Loop Control of Humidification for Artifact Reduction in Capacitive ECG Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Lennart; Eilebrecht, Benjamin; Weyer, Soren; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Recording biosignals without the need for direct skin contact offers new opportunities for ubiquitous health monitoring. Electrodes with capacitive coupling have been shown to be suitable for the monitoring of electrical potentials on the body surface, in particular ECG. However, due to triboelectric charge generation and motion artifacts, signal and thus diagnostic quality is inferior to galvanic coupling. Active closed-loop humidification of capacitive electrodes is proposed in this work as a new concept to improve signal quality. A capacitive ECG recording system integrated into a common car seat is presented. It can regulate the micro climate at the interface of electrode and patient by actively dispensing water vapour and monitoring humidity in a closed-loop approach. As a regenerative water reservoir, silica gel is used. The system was evaluated with respect to subjective and objective ECG signal quality. Active humidification was found to have a significant positive effect in case of previously poor quality. Also, it had no diminishing effect in case of already good signal quality.

  8. Low-Gain, Low-Noise Integrated Neuronal Amplifier for Implantable Artifact-Reduction Recording System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Benazzouz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain neuroprostheses for neuromodulation are being designed to monitor the neural activity of the brain in the vicinity of the region being stimulated using a single macro-electrode. Using a single macro-electrode, recent neuromodulation studies show that recording systems with a low gain neuronal amplifier and successive amplifier stages can reduce or reject stimulation artifacts. These systems were made with off-the-shelf components that are not amendable for future implant design. A low-gain, low-noise integrated neuronal amplifier (NA with the capability of recording local field potentials (LFP and spike activity is presented. In vitro and in vivo characterizations of the tissue/electrode interface, with equivalent impedance as an electrical model for recording in the LFP band using macro-electrodes for rodents, contribute to the NA design constraints. The NA occupies 0.15 mm2 and dissipates 6.73 µW, and was fabricated using a 0.35 µm CMOS process. Test-bench validation indicates that the NA provides a mid-band gain of 20 dB and achieves a low input-referred noise of 4 µVRMS. Ability of the NA to perform spike recording in test-bench experiments is presented. Additionally, an awake and freely moving rodent setup was used to illustrate the integrated NA ability to record LFPs, paving the pathway for future implantable systems for neuromodulation.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcuková, Jana; Starcuk, Zenon; Hubálková, Hana; Linetskiy, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dental materials vary significantly in MR-relevant material parameters-magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity, and that knowledge of these parameters may be used to estimate the quality of MR imaging in the presence of devices made of such materials. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts were evaluated for 45 standardized cylindrical samples of dental alloys and amalgams. Magnetic susceptibility was determined by fitting the phase of gradient-echo MR images to numerically modeled data. Electrical conductivity was determined by standard electrotechnical measurements. Artifact sizes were measured in spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) images at 1.5T according to the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials. It has been confirmed that dental materials differ considerably in their magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts. For typical dental devices, magnetic susceptibility differences were found of little clinical importance for diagnostic SE/GE imaging of the neck and brain, but significant for orofacial imaging. Short-TE GE imaging has been found possible even in very close distances from dental devices made of amalgams, precious alloys and titanium alloys. Nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium artifacts were found still acceptable, but large restorations of aluminum bronzes may preclude imaging of the orofacial region. The influence of electrical conductivity on the artifact size was found negligible. MR imaging is possible even close to dental devices if they are made of dental materials with low magnetic susceptibility. Not all materials in current use meet this requirement.

  10. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: an algorithm to reduce metal artifacts from dental implants in Dixon-based attenuation map generation using a multiacquisition variable-resonance image combination sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Irene A; Wurnig, Moritz C; Becker, Anton S; Kenkel, David; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Boss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to implement an algorithm modifying Dixon-based MR imaging datasets for attenuation correction in hybrid PET/MR imaging with a multiacquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) sequence to reduce metal artifacts. After ethics approval, in 8 oncologic patients with dental implants data were acquired in a trimodality setup with PET/CT and MR imaging. The protocol included a whole-body 3-dimensional dual gradient-echo sequence (Dixon) used for MR imaging-based PET attenuation correction and a high-resolution MAVRIC sequence, applied in the oral area compromised by dental implants. An algorithm was implemented correcting the Dixon-based μ maps using the MAVRIC in areas of Dixon signal voids. The artifact size of the corrected μ maps was compared with the uncorrected MR imaging μ maps. The algorithm was robust in all patients. There was a significant reduction in mean artifact size of 70.5% between uncorrected and corrected μ maps from 697 ± 589 mm(2) to 202 ± 119 mm(2) (P = 0.016). The proposed algorithm could improve MR imaging-based attenuation correction in critical areas, when standard attenuation correction is hampered by metal artifacts, using a MAVRIC. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  12. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  13. Reduction of respiratory ghosting motion artifacts in conventional two-dimensional multi-slice Cartesian turbo spin-echo: which k-space filling order is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuuji; Yoneyama, Masami; Nakamura, Masanobu; Takemura, Atsushi

    2018-03-07

    The two-dimensional Cartesian turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence is widely used in routine clinical studies, but it is sensitive to respiratory motion. We investigated the k-space orders in Cartesian TSE that can effectively reduce motion artifacts. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between k-space order and degree of motion artifacts using a moving phantom. We compared the degree of motion artifacts between linear and asymmetric k-space orders. The actual spacing of ghost artifacts in the asymmetric order was doubled compared with that in the linear order in the free-breathing situation. The asymmetric order clearly showed less sensitivity to incomplete breath-hold at the latter half of the imaging period. Because of the actual number of partitions of the k-space and the temporal filling order, the asymmetric k-space order of Cartesian TSE was superior to the linear k-space order for reduction of ghosting motion artifacts.

  14. Reduction of ring artifacts in CBCT: Detection and correction of pixel gain variations in flat panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altunbas, Cem; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In using flat panel detectors (FPD) for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), pixel gain variations may lead to structured nonuniformities in projections and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Such gain variations can be caused by change in detector entrance exposure levels or beam hardening, and they are not accounted by conventional flat field correction methods. In this work, the authors presented a method to identify isolated pixel clusters that exhibit gain variations and proposed a pixel gain correction (PGC) method to suppress both beam hardening and exposure level dependent gain variations. Methods: To modulate both beam spectrum and entrance exposure, flood field FPD projections were acquired using beam filters with varying thicknesses. “Ideal” pixel values were estimated by performing polynomial fits in both raw and flat field corrected projections. Residuals were calculated by taking the difference between measured and ideal pixel values to identify clustered image and FPD artifacts in flat field corrected and raw images, respectively. To correct clustered image artifacts, the ratio of ideal to measured pixel values in filtered images were utilized as pixel-specific gain correction factors, referred as PGC method, and they were tabulated as a function of pixel value in a look-up table. Results: 0.035% of detector pixels lead to clustered image artifacts in flat field corrected projections, where 80% of these pixels were traced back and linked to artifacts in the FPD. The performance of PGC method was tested in variety of imaging conditions and phantoms. The PGC method reduced clustered image artifacts and fixed pattern noise in projections, and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Conclusions: Clustered projection image artifacts that lead to ring artifacts in CBCT can be better identified with our artifact detection approach. When compared to the conventional flat field correction method, the proposed PGC method enables characterization of nonlinear

  15. Fast Fourier-based simulation of off-resonance artifacts in steady-state gradient echo MRI applied to metal object localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Frank; Bouwman, Job G; Braškute, I; Viergever, Max A; Seevinck, PR

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To accelerate simulation of off-resonance artifacts in steady-state gradient echo MRI by using fast Fourier transforms and demonstrate its applicability to metal object localization. THEORY AND METHODS: By exploiting the repetitive nature of steady-state pulse sequences it is possible to

  16. SU-E-J-58: Dosimetric Verification of Metal Artifact Effects: Comparison of Dose Distributions Affected by Patient Teeth and Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Kang, S; Lee, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Pediatrics and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford (United States); Park, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Research Institute of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Daejeon Sun Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Implant-supported dentures seem particularly appropriate for the predicament of becoming edentulous and cancer patients are no exceptions. As the number of people having dental implants increased in different ages, critical dosimetric verification of metal artifact effects are required for the more accurate head and neck radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical analysis of the metal(streak and dark) artifact, and to evaluate dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of patients with the patient teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. Methods: The phantom comprises cylinder which is shaped to simulate the anatomical structures of a human head and neck. Through applying various clinical cases, made phantom which is closely allied to human. Developed phantom can verify two classes: (i)closed mouth (ii)opened mouth. RapidArc plans of 4 cases were created in the Eclipse planning system. Total dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions is prescribed to the whole planning target volume (PTV) using 6MV photon beams. Acuros XB (AXB) advanced dose calculation algorithm, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and progressive resolution optimizer were used in dose optimization and calculation. Results: In closed and opened mouth phantom, because dark artifacts formed extensively around the metal implants, dose variation was relatively higher than that of streak artifacts. As the PTV was delineated on the dark regions or large streak artifact regions, maximum 7.8% dose error and average 3.2% difference was observed. The averaged minimum dose to the PTV predicted by AAA was about 5.6% higher and OARs doses are also 5.2% higher compared to AXB. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that AXB dose calculation involving high-density materials is more accurate than AAA calculation, and AXB was superior to AAA in dose predictions beyond dark artifact/air cavity portion when compared against the measurements.

  17. The Relationship between Heavy Metal and Rap Music and Adolescent Turmoil: Real or Artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Took, Kevin J.; Weiss, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Investigated association between 87 adolescents' music preferences and psychosocial turmoil. Adolescents who preferred heavy metal and rap music had higher incidence of below-average school grades, school behavior problems, sexual activity, drug and alcohol use, and arrests. When gender was controlled, only below-average school grades and history…

  18. Significant Artifact Reduction at 1.5T and 3T MRI by the Use of a Cochlear Implant with Removable Magnet: An Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franca; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Leidolt, Lars; Vischer, Mattheus; Weder, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco D

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are standard treatment for postlingually deafened individuals and prelingually deafened children. This human cadaver study evaluated diagnostic usefulness, image quality and artifacts in 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance (MR) brain scans after CI with a removable magnet. Three criteria (diagnostic usefulness, image quality, artifacts) were assessed at 1.5T and 3T in five cadaver heads with CI. The brain magnetic resonance scans were performed with and without the magnet in situ. The criteria were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists, with focus on image distortion and limitation of the diagnostic value of the acquired MR images. MR images with the magnet in situ were all compromised by artifacts caused by the CI. After removal of the magnet, MR scans showed an unequivocal artifact reduction with significant improvement of the image quality and diagnostic usefulness, both at 1.5T and 3T. Visibility of the brain stem, cerebellopontine angle, and parieto-occipital lobe ipsilateral to the CI increased significantly after magnet removal. The results indicate the possible advantages for 1.5T and 3T MR scanning of the brain in CI carriers with removable magnets. Our findings support use of CIs with removable magnets, especially in patients with chronic intracranial pathologies.

  19. Reduction of peristalsis-related gastrointestinal streak artifacts with dual-energy CT: a patient and phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, Sebastian; Lambert, Jack W; Wang, Zhen Jane; Sun, Yuxin; Gould, Robert G; Zagoria, Ronald J; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the ability of rapid-kV switching (rs) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to reduce peristalsis-related streak artifact. rsDECT images of 100 consecutive patients (48 male, 52 female, mean age 57 years) were retrospectively evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Image reconstructions included virtual monochromatic 70 and 120 keV images, as well as iodine(-water) and water(-iodine) material decomposition images. We recorded the presence and severity of artifacts qualitatively (4-point scale) and quantitatively [iodine/water concentrations, Hounsfield units, gray scale values (GY)] and compared to corresponding unaffected reference tissue. Similar measures were obtained in DECT images of a peristalsis phantom. Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests were used to compare results between different image reconstructions. Peristalsis-related streak artifacts were found in 49 (49%) of the DECT examinations. Artifacts were significantly more severe in 70, 120, and water(-iodine) images than in iodine(-water) images (qualitative readout P peristalsis DECT phantom study. Peristalsis-related streak artifacts seen in 70, 120 keV, and water(-iodine) images are substantially reduced in iodine(-water) images at rsDECT.

  20. Inspection about the corrosion of metallic archaeological artifacts in ground. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Shingo

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of iron-based archaeological remains, which were dug out in six relics in Aomori-ken and Izumotaisya-keidai-iseki, were analyzed mainly with using X-ray CT. Several samples were cut and investigated on the details of metals and oxide films. The soils were also analyzed on redox-potential, resistance, chemical contents, and others. The results indicate that metal remains in 7/14 samples. The corrosion amounts of objects of Aomori-ken were estimated to be from 1 to 4 mm during 400-1000 years. The environments were supposed to be oxidizing. On the other hands, it is supposed that two objects in Izumotaisya-keidai-iseki were in a reducing condition. The corrosion amounts were 0.5-2 mm. Furthermore, the corrosion behavior of the cast gas-pipe, which had been buried for about 130 years, were evaluated. By analyzing analysis data of soil, the environment is estimated to be weak oxidizing, and the maximum graphitic corrosion depth was about 7 mm. (author)

  1. Reduction of U3O8 to U by a metallic reductant, Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Mok Hur; Sun-Seok Hong; Hansoo Lee

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of U 3 O 8 was investigated for the recycling of spent oxide fuel from a commercial nuclear power plant. The possible reduction methods were proposed and compared. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, Li metal was selected as a reductant. The optimum reaction temperature for the reduction of U 3 O 8 was investigated at the wider reaction temperature range. The adverse oxidation of U metal by Li 2 O at 1,000 deg C was experimentally verified. Ellingham diagram was constructed to investigate the extent of the uranium oxides reduction when the reaction was carried out above melting point of U metal. (author)

  2. A real-time artifact reduction algorithm based on precise threshold during short-separation optical probe insertion in neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During neurosurgery, an optical probe has been used to guide the micro-electrode, which is punctured into the globus pallidus (GP to create a lesion that can relieve the cardinal symptoms. Accurate target localization is the key factor to affect the treatment. However, considering the scattering nature of the tissue, the “look ahead distance (LAD” of optical probe makes the boundary between the different tissues blurred and difficult to be distinguished, which is defined as artifact. Thus, it is highly desirable to reduce the artifact caused by LAD. In this paper, a real-time algorithm based on precise threshold was proposed to eliminate the artifact. The value of the threshold was determined by the maximum error of the measurement system during the calibration procession automatically. Then, the measured data was processed sequentially only based on the threshold and the former data. Moreover, 100μm double-fiber probe and two-layer and multi-layer phantom models were utilized to validate the precision of the algorithm. The error of the algorithm is one puncture step, which was proved in the theory and experiment. It was concluded that the present method could reduce the artifact caused by LAD and make the real boundary sharper and less blurred in real-time. It might be potentially used for the neurosurgery navigation.

  3. Metallization of uranium oxide powders by lithium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. S.; Seo, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments on the reduction of uranium oxide powders into metal by lithium were performed in order to determine the equipment setup and optimum operation conditions. The method of filtration using the porous magnesia filter was introduced to recover uranium metal powders produced. Based on the laboratory scale experimental results, mock-up scale (20 kg U/batch) metallizer was designed and made. The applicability to the metallization process was estimated with respect to the thermal stability of the porous magnesia filter in the high temperature molten salt, the filtration of the fine uranium metal powders, and the operability of the equipment

  4. SU-C-207-04: Reconstruction Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Cone Beam CT Using a Treatment Couch Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasio, G; Hu, E; Zhou, J; Lee, M; Yi, B [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: to mitigate artifacts induced by the presence of the RT treatment couch in on-board CBCT and improve image quality Methods: a model of a Varian IGRT couch is constructed using a CBCT scan of the couch in air. The model is used to generate a set of forward projections (FP) of the treatment couch at specified gantry angles. The model couch forward projections are then used to process CBCT scan projections which contain the couch in addition to the scan object (Catphan phantom), in order to remove the attenuation component of the couch at any given gantry angle. Prior to pre-processing with the model FP, the Catphan projection data is normalized to an air scan with bowtie filter. The filtered Catphan projections are used to reconstruct the CBCT with an in-house FDK algorithm. The artifact reduction in the processed CBCT scan is assessed visually, and the image quality improvement is measured with the CNR over a few selected ROIs of the Catphan modules. Results: Sufficient match between the forward projected data and the x-ray projections is achieved to allow filtering in attenuation space. Visual improvement of the couch induced artifacts is achieved, with a moderate expense of CNR. Conclusion: Couch model-based correction of CBCT projection data has a potential for qualitative improvement of clinical CBCT scans, without requiring position specific correction data. The technique could be used to produce models of other artifact inducing devices, such as immobilization boards, and reduce their impact on patient CBCT images.

  5. Universality in Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysis on Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we extend the activity volcano for oxygen reduction from the face-centered cubic (fcc) metal (111) facet to the (100) facet. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the recent findings of constant scaling between OOH* and OH* holds on the fcc metal (100) facet, as...

  6. Metal artefact reduction for accurate tumour delineation in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, David Gergely; Rechner, Laura A; Appelt, Ane L

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Two techniques for metal artefact reduction for computed tomography were studied in order to identify their impact on tumour delineation in radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using specially designed phantoms containing metal implants (dental, spine and hip) as well...

  7. Mystery of an artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugrul, B.

    1987-01-01

    A chunk of metals and beads clustered together had been found in the city of Ashur in East Anatolia. Over the years, the environmental effects to which these burried artifacts are exposed,fused them together. The x-ray radiography of the cluster disclosed a major part of a disc with cuneiform script on it. By reading of cuneiform script from the radiograph, it was disclosed that the disc belongs to the period of Assyrian King Shalmaneser I (1274-1245 B.C.). The age of the chuck and the other artifacts which were found near the chunk could be decided. (author)

  8. [Trial of artifact reduction in body diffusion weighted imaging development and basic examination of "TRacking Only Navigator"(TRON method)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Tomohiko; Takahara, Tarou; Ogino, Tetsuo; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Honda, Masatoshi; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Kajihara, Nao; Usui, Keisuke; Muro, Isao; Imai, Yutaka

    2008-09-20

    In recent years, the utility of body diffusion weighted imaging as represented by diffusion weighted whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS), the DWIBS method, is very high. However, there was a problem in the DWIBS method involving the artifact corresponding to the distance of the diaphragm. To provide a solution, the respiratory trigger (RT) method and the navigator echo method were used together. A problem was that scan time extended to the compensation and did not predict the extension rate, although both artifacts were reduced. If we used only navigator real time slice tracking (NRST) from the findings obtained by the DWIBS method, we presumed the artifacts would be ameliorable without the extension of scan time. Thus, the TRacking Only Navigator (TRON) method was developed, and a basic examination was carried out for the liver. An important feature of the TRON method is the lack of the navigator gating window (NGW) and addition of the method of linear interpolation prior to NRST. The method required the passing speed and the distance from the volunteer's diaphragm. The estimated error from the 2D-selective RF pulse (2DSRP) of the TRON method to slice excitation was calculated. The condition of 2D SRP, which did not influence the accuracy of NRST, was required by the movement phantom. The volunteer was scanned, and the evaluation and actual scan time of the image quality were compared with the RT and DWIBS methods. Diaphragm displacement speed and the quantity of displacement were determined in the head and foot directions, and the result was 9 mm/sec, and 15 mm. The estimated error was within 2.5 mm in b-factor 1000 sec/mm(2). The FA of 2DSRP was 15 degrees, and the navigator echo length was 120 mm, which was excellent. In the TRON method, the accuracy of NRST was steady because of line interpolation. The TRON method obtained image quality equal to that of the RT method with the b-factor in the volunteer scanning at short actual

  9. Trial of artifact reduction in body diffusion weighted imaging development and basic examination of 'TRacking Only Navigator' (TRON method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Tomohiko; Takahara, Tarou; Ogino, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the utility of body diffusion weighted imaging as represented by diffusion weighted whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS), the DWIBS method, is very high. However, there was a problem in the DWIBS method involving the artifact corresponding to the distance of the diaphragm. To provide a solution, the respiratory trigger (RT) method and the navigator echo method were used together. A problem was that scan time extended to the compensation and did not predict the extension rate, although both artifacts were reduced. If we used only navigator real time slice tracking (NRST) from the findings obtained by the DWIBS method, we presumed the artifacts would be ameliorable without the extension of scan time. Thus, the TRacking Only Navigator (TRON) method was developed, and a basic examination was carried out for the liver. An important feature of the TRON method is the lack of the navigator gating window (NGW) and addition of the method of linear interpolation prior to NRST. The method required the passing speed and the distance from the volunteer's diaphragm. The estimated error from the 2D-selective RF pulse (2DSRP) of the TRON method to slice excitation was calculated. The condition of 2D SRP, which did not influence the accuracy of NRST, was required by the movement phantom. The volunteer was scanned, and the evaluation and actual scan time of the image quality were compared with the RT and DWIBS methods. Diaphragm displacement speed and the quantity of displacement were determined in the head and foot directions, and the result was 9 mm/sec, and 15 mm. The estimated error was within 2.5 mm in b-factor 1000 sec/mm 2 . The FA of 2DSRP was 15 degrees, and the navigator echo length was 120 mm, which was excellent. In the TRON method, the accuracy of NRST was steady because of line interpolation. The TRON method obtained image quality equal to that of the RT method with the b-factor in the volunteer scanning at short actual

  10. Effect of subcutaneous butylscopolamine administration in the reduction of peristaltic artifacts in 1.5-T MR fast abdominal examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, Rosa; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Molla, Enrique; Arana, Estanislao; Ronchera-Oms, Crisanto L.

    2003-01-01

    In abdominal MR imaging, ghost artifacts from noncyclic bowel movements can reduce the quality of the images. Although pharmacologic suppression of motion is effective, no study has being conducted to analyze the influence of drug motion suppression on fast breath-hold 1.5-T examinations of the upper abdomen. A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted in 50 patients. Patients were randomly distributed into two groups: The control group received only an oral solution, whereas the other group received the oral solution plus a subcutaneous injection of 20 mg of butylscopolamine 10 min before the MR examination. Breath-hold T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) MR images were obtained in a 1.5-T superconductive unit. Quantitative image analysis was performed with region-of-interest (ROI) measurements of the signal intensity of the liver and in background air anterior and lateral to the patient. A qualitative analysis of the subjective quality of the T1-weighted images was also done, and the adverse reactions were registered. The groups were homogeneous regarding age, gender, and weight distribution. No significant differences in the signal intensity of the liver and in the incoherent noise measurements were found between the two groups. Gastrointestinal noise showed significant differences between groups, with lower values for the butylscopolamine group compared with the control group. There was also a statistically significant difference in the image quality between groups, and optimal studies were only found in the butylscopolamine group, where most patients had a good-quality evaluation. Regarding adverse events, there were non-significant differences between groups. In conclusion, administration of an antiperistaltic agent to reduce the movements of the gastrointestinal tract diminishes the motion artifacts generated on MR imaging of the abdomen, even at high field strength and with fast imaging sequences. Images of the upper abdomen obtained

  11. A Low Cost Metal-Free Vascular Access Mini-Port for Artifact Free Imaging and Repeated Injections in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Small injection ports for mice are increasingly used for drug testing or when administering contrast agents. Commercially available mini-ports are expensive single-use items that cause imaging-artifacts. We developed and tested an artifact-free, low-cost, vascular access mini-port (VAMP for mice.Leakage testing of the VAMP was conducted with high speed bolus injections of different contrast agents. VAMP-induced artifacts were assessed using a micro-CT and a small animal MRI (9.4T scanner ex vivo. Repeated contrast administration was performed in vivo.With the VAMP there was no evidence of leakage with repeated punctures, high speed bolus contrast injections, and drawing of blood samples. In contrast to the tested commercially available ports, the VAMP did not cause artifacts with MRI or CT imaging.The VAMP is an alternative to commercially available mini-ports and has useful applications in animal research involving imaging procedures and contrast agent testing.

  12. Leidenfrost point reduction on micropatterned metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Cerro, Daniel Arnaldo; Marín, Alvaro G; Römer, Gertwillem R B E; Pathiraj, B; Lohse, Detlef; Huis in 't Veld, Albertus J

    2012-10-23

    Droplets are able to levitate when deposited over a hot surface exceeding a critical temperature. This is known as the Leidenfrost effect. This phenomenon occurs when the surface is heated above the so-called Leidenfrost point (LFP), above which the vapor film between the droplet and hot surface is able to levitate the droplet. Such a critical temperature depends on several factors. One of the most studied parameters has been the surface roughness. Almost all of the experimental studies in the literature have concluded that the LFP increases with the roughness. According to these results, it seems that the roughness is detrimental for the stability of the vapor film. In contrast with these results, we present here a micropatterned surface that significantly reduces the LFP. The temperature increase, relative to the boiling point, required to reach the LFP is 70% lower than that on the flat surface. The reasons for such an effect are qualitatively and quantitatively discussed with a simple semiempirical model. This result can be relevant to save energy in applications that take advantage of the Leidenfrost effect for drop control or drag reduction.

  13. Nonprecious Metal Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Heterogeneous Aqueous Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirth, Andrew A; Varnell, Jason A; DiAscro, Angela M

    2018-01-31

    A comprehensive review of recent advances in the field of oxygen reduction electrocatalysis utilizing nonprecious metal (NPM) catalysts is presented. Progress in the synthesis and characterization of pyrolyzed catalysts, based primarily on the transition metals Fe and Co with sources of N and C, is summarized. Several synthetic strategies to improve the catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. Recent work to explain the active-site structures and the ORR mechanism on pyrolyzed NPM catalysts is discussed. Additionally, the recent application of Cu-based catalysts for the ORR is reviewed. Suggestions and direction for future research to develop and understand NPM catalysts with enhanced ORR activity are provided.

  14. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound : comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, M.; Jaeger, M.; Frenz, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts.

  15. MOTION ARTIFACT REDUCTION IN FUNCTIONAL NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY SIGNALS BY AUTOREGRESSIVE MOVING AVERAGE MODELING BASED KALMAN FILTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHDI AMIAN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is a technique that is used for noninvasive measurement of the oxyhemoglobin (HbO2 and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb concentrations in the brain tissue. Since the ratio of the concentration of these two agents is correlated with the neuronal activity, fNIRS can be used for the monitoring and quantifying the cortical activity. The portability of fNIRS makes it a good candidate for studies involving subject's movement. The fNIRS measurements, however, are sensitive to artifacts generated by subject's head motion. This makes fNIRS signals less effective in such applications. In this paper, the autoregressive moving average (ARMA modeling of the fNIRS signal is proposed for state-space representation of the signal which is then fed to the Kalman filter for estimating the motionless signal from motion corrupted signal. Results are compared to the autoregressive model (AR based approach, which has been done previously, and show that the ARMA models outperform AR models. We attribute it to the richer structure, containing more terms indeed, of ARMA than AR. We show that the signal to noise ratio (SNR is about 2 dB higher for ARMA based method.

  16. Prospective navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement for the reduction of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonel, H; Frei, K A; Raio, L; Meyer-Wittkopf, M; Remonda, L; Wiest, R

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroimaging quality and accuracy of prospective real-time navigator-echo acquisition correction versus untriggered intrauterine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Twenty women in whom fetal motion artifacts compromised the neuroimaging quality of fetal MRI taken during the 28.7 +/- 4 week of pregnancy below diagnostic levels were additionally investigated using a navigator-triggered half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo-spin echo (HASTE) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two blinded readers applying a rating scale from 1 (not diagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Diagnostic criteria included depiction of the germinal matrix, grey and white matter, CSF, brain stem and cerebellum. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) in the white matter and germinal zone were quantitatively evaluated. Imaging quality improved in 18/20 patients using the navigator echo technique (2.4 +/- 0.58 vs. 3.65 +/- 0.73 SD, p < 0.01 for all evaluation criteria). In 2/20 patients fetal movement severely impaired image quality in conventional and navigated HASTE. Navigator-echo imaging revealed additional structural brain abnormalities and confirmed diagnosis in 8/20 patients. The accuracy improved from 50% to 90%. Average SDNR increased from 0.7 +/- 7.27 to 19.83 +/- 15.71 (p < 0.01). Navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement is a reliable technique that can deliver diagnostic fetal MR image quality despite vigorous fetal movement.

  17. Efficient concomitant and remanence field artifact reduction in ultra-low-field MRI using a frequency-space formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Vesanen, Panu T; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri; Chern, I-Liang; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-03-01

    For ultra-low-field MRI, the spatial-encoding magnetic fields generated by gradient coils can have strong concomitant fields leading to prominent image distortion. Additionally, using superconducting magnet to pre-polarize magnetization can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of ultra-low-field MRI. Yet the spatially inhomogeneous remanence field due to the permanently trapped flux inside a superconducting pre-polarizing coil modulates magnetization and causes further image distortion. We propose a two-stage frequency-space (f-x) formulation to accurately describe the dynamics of spatially-encoded magnetization under the influence of concomitant and remanence fields, which allows for correcting image distortion due to concomitant and remanence fields. Our method is computationally efficient as it uses a combination of the fast Fourier transform algorithm and a linear equation solver. With sufficiently dense discretization in solving the linear equation, the performance of this f-x method was found to be stable among different choices of the regularization parameter and the regularization matrix. We present this method together with numerical simulations and experimental data to demonstrate how concomitant and remanence field artifacts in ultra-low-field MRI can be corrected efficiently. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. MR imaging with metal artifact-reducing sequences and gadolinium contrast agent in a case-control study of periprosthetic abnormalities in patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gunilla M.; Mueller, Markus F.; Ekberg, Olle [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Maansson, Sven [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Schewelov, Thord von [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Malmoe (Sweden); Nittka, Mathias [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Lundin, Bjoern [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To apply and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metal artifact reducing sequences (MARS) including subtraction imaging after contrast application in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periprosthetic abnormalities, as well as their relation with pain and risk factors. Fifty-two MoM prostheses (35 cases with pain and or risk factors, and 17 controls) in 47 patients were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using MARS: turbo spin echo (TSE) with high readout bandwidth with and without view angle tilting (VAT), TSE with VAT and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) with matched RF pulses, and post-contrast imaging. The relations of MRI findings to pain and risk factors were analyzed and in five revised hips findings from operation, histology, and MRI were compared. TSE VAT detected the highest number of osteolyses. Soft tissue mass, effusion, and capsular thickening were common, whereas osteolysis in acetabulum and femur were less frequent. Contrast enhancement occurred in bone, synovia, joint capsule, and the periphery of soft tissue mass. There was no significant relation between MRI findings and pain or risk factors. MARS and gadolinium subtraction imaging are useful for evaluation of complications to MoM prosthesis. TSE VAT had the highest sensitivity for osteolysis. Contrast enhancement might indicate activation of aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Pain, small head, or steep prosthesis inclination angle are not useful predictors of periprosthetic abnormalities, and wide indications for MR follow-up are warranted. (orig.)

  19. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  20. Prospective navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement for the reduction of artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonel, H.; Frei, K.A.; Raio, L.; Meyer-Wittkopf, M.; Remonda, L.; Wiest, R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroimaging quality and accuracy of prospective real-time navigator-echo acquisition correction versus untriggered intrauterine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Twenty women in whom fetal motion artifacts compromised the neuroimaging quality of fetal MRI taken during the 28.7 ± 4 week of pregnancy below diagnostic levels were additionally investigated using a navigator-triggered half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo-spin echo (HASTE) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two blinded readers applying a rating scale from 1 (not diagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Diagnostic criteria included depiction of the germinal matrix, grey and white matter, CSF, brain stem and cerebellum. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) in the white matter and germinal zone were quantitatively evaluated. Imaging quality improved in 18/20 patients using the navigator echo technique (2.4 ± 0.58 vs. 3.65 ± 0.73 SD, p < 0.01 for all evaluation criteria). In 2/20 patients fetal movement severely impaired image quality in conventional and navigated HASTE. Navigator-echo imaging revealed additional structural brain abnormalities and confirmed diagnosis in 8/20 patients. The accuracy improved from 50% to 90%. Average SDNR increased from 0.7 ± 7.27 to 19.83 ± 15.71 (p < 0.01). Navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement is a reliable technique that can deliver diagnostic fetal MR image quality despite vigorous fetal movement. (orig.)

  1. Prospective navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement for the reduction of artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonel, H. [University Hospital Berne-Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Frei, K.A.; Raio, L.; Meyer-Wittkopf, M. [University of Berne, Women' s' Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Remonda, L.; Wiest, R. [University of Berne, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology (DIN), Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroimaging quality and accuracy of prospective real-time navigator-echo acquisition correction versus untriggered intrauterine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Twenty women in whom fetal motion artifacts compromised the neuroimaging quality of fetal MRI taken during the 28.7 {+-} 4 week of pregnancy below diagnostic levels were additionally investigated using a navigator-triggered half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo-spin echo (HASTE) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two blinded readers applying a rating scale from 1 (not diagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Diagnostic criteria included depiction of the germinal matrix, grey and white matter, CSF, brain stem and cerebellum. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) in the white matter and germinal zone were quantitatively evaluated. Imaging quality improved in 18/20 patients using the navigator echo technique (2.4 {+-} 0.58 vs. 3.65 {+-} 0.73 SD, p < 0.01 for all evaluation criteria). In 2/20 patients fetal movement severely impaired image quality in conventional and navigated HASTE. Navigator-echo imaging revealed additional structural brain abnormalities and confirmed diagnosis in 8/20 patients. The accuracy improved from 50% to 90%. Average SDNR increased from 0.7 {+-} 7.27 to 19.83 {+-} 15.71 (p < 0.01). Navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement is a reliable technique that can deliver diagnostic fetal MR image quality despite vigorous fetal movement. (orig.)

  2. Laser-induced metal reduction from liquid electrolyte precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Choi, Choljin

    2013-11-01

    A special sort of laser methods such as direct writing of metal and thin film deposition from liquid precursors was developed for the surface processing and the localized metallization of different kinds of materials. Laser radiation initiates the chemical reaction resulted in the reduction of the metal complexes to the metals in the liquid electrolyte, followed by the metal deposition on the substrate with a high degree of the adhesion. In this study, continuous wave of Ar+ laser generated in multiwave regime with laser power from 5 to 500 mW was chosen for the Copper reduction and deposition on SiO2 substrate. In order to investigate the effect of salt precursors on the properties of the deposited structures, two kinds of electrolyte solution were prepared on the base of CuSO4 and CuCl2. It was shown that metal deposition can be initiated at the laser power of 50 mW. The width of the deposits was found to be substantially dependent on the applied laser power. Deposits were revealed as conductive layers and the resistance of the layers depends strongly on the solution temperature and the salt precursor.

  3. Oxygen reduction and evolution at single-metal active sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J.I.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2013-01-01

    overpotentials and is made of precious materials. A possible solution is the use of non-noble electrocatalysts with single-metal active sites. Here, on the basis of DFT calculations of adsorbed intermediates and a thermodynamic analysis, we compare the oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) activities...... of functionalized graphitic materials and gas-phase porphyrins with late transition metals. We find that both kinds of materials follow approximately the same activity trends, and active sites with transition metals from groups 7 to 9 may be good ORR and OER electrocatalysts. However, spin analyses show more...... flexibility in the possible oxidation states of the metal atoms in solid electrocatalysts, while in porphyrins they must be +2. These observations reveal that the catalytic activity of these materials is mainly due to nearest-neighbor interactions. Based on this, we propose that this class of electrocatalysts...

  4. Metal artefact reduction in gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy CT with and without metal artefact reduction software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun; Suh, Jin-Suck; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2012-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy CT (DECT) with/without metal artefact reduction software (MARs). The DECTs were performed using fast kV-switching GSI between 80 and 140 kV. The CT data were retro-reconstructed with/without MARs, by different displayed fields-of-view (DFOV), and with synthesised monochromatic energy in the range 40-140 keV. A phantom study of size and CT numbers was performed in a titanium plate and a stainless steel plate. A clinical study was performed in 26 patients with metallic hardware. All images were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the visualisation of periprosthetic regions and the severity of beam-hardening artefacts by using a five-point scale. The GSI-MARs reconstruction can markedly reduce the metal-related artefacts, and the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition and DFOV. The spectral CT numbers of the prosthesis and periprosthetic regions showed different patterns on stainless steel and titanium plates. Dual-energy CT with GSI-MARs can reduce metal-related artefacts and improve the delineation of the prosthesis and periprosthetic region. We should be cautious when using GSI-MARs because the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition, energy (in keV) and DFOV. The metallic composition and size should be considered in metallic imaging with GSI-MARs reconstruction. circle Metal-related artefacts can be troublesome on musculoskeletal computed tomography (CT). circle Gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) with dual-energy CT (DECT) offers a novel solution circle GSI and metallic artefact reduction software (GSI-MAR) can markedly reduce these artefacts. circle However image quality is influenced by the prosthesis composition and other parameters. circle We should be aware about potential overcorrection when using GSI-MARs. (orig.)

  5. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  6. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyzed by Noble Metal Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenghua Tang; Wen Wu; Kai Wang

    2018-01-01

    Highly-efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been extensively investigated for the development of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts suffer from high price, limited accessibility of Pt, sluggish reaction kinetics, as well as undesirable long-term durability. Engineering ultra-small noble metal clusters with high surface-to-volume ratios and robust stabilities for ORR represents a new avenue. After a simple introduction ...

  7. Protection of metal artifacts with the formation of metal–oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Edith; Cario, Sylvie; Simon, Anaële; Wörle, Marie; Mazzeo, Rocco; Junier, Pilar; Job, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid a...

  8. Sulfate Reduction Remediation of a Metals Plume Through Organic Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory testing and a field-scale demonstration for the sulfate reduction remediation of an acidic/metals/sulfate groundwater plume at the Savannah River Site has been conducted. The laboratory testing consisted of the use of anaerobic microcosms to test the viability of three organic substrates to promote microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Based upon the laboratory testing, soybean oil and sodium lactate were selected for injection during the subsequent field-scale demonstration. The field-scale demonstration is currently ongoing. Approximately 825 gallons (3,123 L) of soybean oil and 225 gallons (852 L) of 60 percent sodium lactate have been injected into an existing well system within the plume. Since the injections, sulfate concentrations in the injection zone have significantly decreased, sulfate-reducing bacteria concentrations have significantly increased, the pH has increased, the Eh has decreased, and the concentrations of many metals have decreased. Microbially mediated sulfate reduction has been successfully promoted for the remediation of the acidic/metals/sulfate plume by the injection of soybean oil and sodium lactate within the plume

  9. Thermal simulation of the magnesium thermal of metallic uranium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, W.A.; Saliba-Silva, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Metallic uranium production is vital to fabricate fuel elements for nuclear research reactors and to produce radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Metallic uranium is got via magnesiothermal reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is carried out inside a closed graphite crucible inserted in a metallic reactor adequately sealed without any outside contact. The assembled set is gradually heated up inside a pit furnace up to reach the reaction ignition temperature (between 600-650 deg C). The optimization of the reactive system depends on the mathematical modeling using simulation by finite elements and computational calculation with specialized programs. In this way, the reactants' thermal behavior is forecast until they reach the ignition temperature. The optimization of the uranium production reaction is based on minimization of thermal losses using better the exo thermal reaction heat. As lower the thermal losses, as higher would be the heat amount to raise the temperature of reaction products. This promotes the adequate melting of uranium and slag, so allowing better metal/slag separation with higher metallic yield. This work shows how the mathematical simulation is made and supplies some preliminary results. (author)

  10. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyzed by Noble Metal Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly-efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR have been extensively investigated for the development of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. The state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts suffer from high price, limited accessibility of Pt, sluggish reaction kinetics, as well as undesirable long-term durability. Engineering ultra-small noble metal clusters with high surface-to-volume ratios and robust stabilities for ORR represents a new avenue. After a simple introduction regarding the significance of ORR and the recent development of noble metal clusters, the general ORR mechanism in both acidic and basic media is firstly discussed. Subsequently, we will summarize the recent efforts employing Pt, Au, Ag, Pd and Ru clusters, as well as the alloyed bi-metallic clusters for acquiring highly efficient catalysts to enhance both the activity and stability of ORR. Molecular noble metal clusters with definitive composition to reveal the relevant ORR mechanism will be particularly highlighted. Finally, the current challenges, the future outlook, as well as the perspectives in this booming field will be proposed, featuring the great opportunities and potentials to engineering noble metal clusters as highly-efficient and durable cathodic catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  11. 1,4-Dihydroxy fatty acids: Artifacts by reduction of di- and polyunsaturated fatty acids with sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemt, Simone; Spiteller, Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to detect lipid peroxidation products in human blood plasma, samples were treated with NaBH4 to reduce the reactive hydroperoxides to hydroxy compounds. After saponification of the lipids, the free fatty acid fraction obtained by extraction was methylated and separated by TLC. The fractions containing polar compounds were trimethylsilylated and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Mass spectra allowed us to detect previously unknown 1,4-dihydroxy fatty acids due to their typical fragmentation pattern. If the reduction was carried out with NaBD4 instead of NaBH4, incorporation of two deuterium atoms was observed (appropriate mass shift). The two oxygen atoms of the hydroxyl groups were incorporated from air as shown by an experiment in 18O2 atmosphere. The reaction required the presence of free acids, indicating that BH3 was liberated, added to a 1,4-pentadiene system, and finally produced 1,4-diols by air oxidation.

  12. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations...... of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  13. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I 2 ) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF 4 , spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area

  14. Recording and analysis of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) with MED-EL cochlear implants and different artifact reduction strategies in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2010-08-15

    Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) are used in auditory research to evaluate the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulation. Animal preparations are typically used for the recording. With the introduction of a new generation of cochlear implants, however it is possible to record the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulation in humans as well, which is used in the clinic to test whether the implant works properly and whether the auditory nerve is responsive. Currently, ECAPs are used to estimate thresholds for speech processor programs. In addition, ECAPs recordings allow new research to be addressed, e.g., to evaluate enhanced electrical stimulation patterns. Research platforms are required to test user-defined stimuli and algorithms for the ECAPs analysis. Clinical fitting software that records ECAPs is not flexible enough for this purpose. To enable a larger group of scientists to pursue research in this field, we introduce a flexible setup that allows to change stimulation and recording parameters. ECAP recording and analysis software was developed in Matlab (The Mathworks, Inc.) for standard PC, using a National instruments (PCI-6533, National Instruments, Austin, TX) card and a Research Interface Box 2 (RIB2, Department of Ion Physics and Applied Physics at the University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria) for MED-EL cochlear implants. ECAP recordings of a human subject with three different artifact reduction methods (alternating, Miller modified masker-probe, triphasic pulses) are presented and compared. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Periodic additive noises reduction in 3D images used in building of voxel phantoms through an efficient implementation of the 3D FFT: zipper artifacts filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Leal Neto, Viriato

    2009-01-01

    The anthropomorphic models used in computational dosimetry are predominantly build from scanning CT (Computed Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) image stacks obtained of patients or volunteers. The building of these stacks (usually called of voxel phantoms or tomography phantoms) requires computer processing to be used in an exposure computational model. Noises present in these stacks can be confused with significant structures. In a 3D image with periodic additive noise in the frequency domain, the noise is fully added to its central slice. The discrete Fourier transform is the fundamental mathematical tool that allows the switch of the spatial domain for the frequency domain, and vice versa. The FFT (fast Fourier transform) algorithm is an ideal computational tool for this switch in domain with efficiency. This paper presents a new methodology for implementation in managed C++ language (Microsoft Visual Studio R .NET) of the fast Fourier transform of 3D digital images (FFT3D) using, essentially, the trigonometric recombination. The reduction of periodic additive noise consists in filtering only the central slice of 3D image in the frequency domain and transforms it back into the spatial domain through the inverse FFT3D. An example of application of this method it is the zipper artifacts filtering in images of MRI. These processes were implemented in the software DIP (Digital Image Processing). (author)

  16. Volume Reduction of Decommissioning Radioactive Burnable and Metal Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Choi, Y. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    A large quantity of radioactive waste was generated during the decommissioning projects. For the purpose of the volume reduction and clearance for decommissioning wastes from decommissioning projects, the incineration and high melting technology has been selected for the decommissioning wastes treatment. The volume reduction of the combustible wastes through the incineration technologies has merits from the view point of a decrease in the amount of waste to be disposed of resulting in a reduction of the disposal cost. Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. The incineration technology is an effective treatment method that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Incinerator burns waste at high temperature. Incineration of a mixture of chemically hazardous and radioactive materials, known as 'mixed waste,' has two principal goals: to reduce the volume and total chemical toxicity of the waste. Incineration itself does not destroy the metals or reduce the radioactivity of the waste. A proven melting technology is currently used for low-level waste (LLW) at several facilities worldwide. These facilities use melting as a means of processing LLW for unrestricted release of the metal or for recycling within the nuclear sector. About 16.4 tons of decommissioning combustible waste has been treated using Oxygen Enriched incineration. The incineration facility operated quite smoothly through the analysis major critical parameters of off-gas

  17. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E; Scheinost, Andreas C; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the (35)SO(4)(2-) radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that approximately 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems.

  18. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  19. Two-photon-induced reduction of metal ions for fabricating three-dimensional electrically conductive metallic microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuo; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2006-02-01

    We developed techniques for fabricating three-dimensional metallic microstructures using two-photon-induced metal-ion reduction. In this process, ions in a metal-ion aqueous solution were directly reduced by a tightly focused femtosecond pulsed laser to fabricate arbitrary three-dimensional structures. A self-standing metallic microstructure with high electrical conductivity was demonstrated.

  20. The effect of metal artifacts on the identification of vertical root fractures using different fields of view in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Haghanifar, Sina; Madani, Zahrasadat; Bijani, Ali; Nabavi, Zeynab Sadat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of metal artifacts on the accurate diagnosis of root fractures using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with large and small/limited fields of view (FOVs). Forty extracted molar and premolar teeth were collected. Access canals were made in all teeth using a rotary system. In half of the teeth, fractures were created by the application of mild pressure with a hammer. The teeth were then randomly put into a wax rim on an acryl base designed in the shape of a mandible. CBCT scans were obtained using a Newtom 5G system with FOVs of 18 cm×16 cm and 6 cm×6 cm. A metal pin was then placed into each tooth, and CBCT imaging was again performed using the same fields of view. All scans were evaluated by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios (positive and negative) were calculated. The maximum levels of sensitivity and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) were observed in small volume CBCT scans of teeth without pins. The highest negative predictive value was found in the small-volume group without pins, whereas the positive predictive value was 100% in all groups except the large-volume group with pins

  1. The effect of metal artifacts on the identification of vertical root fractures using different fields of view in cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Haghanifar, Sina; Madani, Zahrasadat; Bijani, Ali; Nabavi, Zeynab Sadat [Babol University of Medical Science, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of metal artifacts on the accurate diagnosis of root fractures using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with large and small/limited fields of view (FOVs). Forty extracted molar and premolar teeth were collected. Access canals were made in all teeth using a rotary system. In half of the teeth, fractures were created by the application of mild pressure with a hammer. The teeth were then randomly put into a wax rim on an acryl base designed in the shape of a mandible. CBCT scans were obtained using a Newtom 5G system with FOVs of 18 cm×16 cm and 6 cm×6 cm. A metal pin was then placed into each tooth, and CBCT imaging was again performed using the same fields of view. All scans were evaluated by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios (positive and negative) were calculated. The maximum levels of sensitivity and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) were observed in small volume CBCT scans of teeth without pins. The highest negative predictive value was found in the small-volume group without pins, whereas the positive predictive value was 100% in all groups except the large-volume group with pins.

  2. Artifacts in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Whan; Kim, Jung Min; Jeong, Hoi Woun

    2015-01-01

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments

  3. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  4. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    artifacts influence the use of others. Understanding this interplay becomes more and more essential for interaction design as our artifact ecologies grow. This paper continues a recent discourse on artifact ecologies. Through interviews with iPhone users, we demonstrate that relationships between artifacts...

  5. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  6. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  7. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  8. Metal halide reduction with molten sodium/potassium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining a desired metal, selected from the group consisting of titanium, aluminium, iron, manganese, hafnium, zirconium, tantalum, vanadium, uranium and tungsten, which comprises reacting a halide of the desired metal with an alkali metal reducing agent at temperature at which the reducing agent is molten, in order to produce the desired metal and halide of the metal reducing agent

  9. Metal and Metal Oxide Interactions and Their Catalytic Consequences for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qingying; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Li, Jingkun; Liang, Wentao; Meng, Guangnan [ULVAC Technologies, Inc., 401; Che, Haiying [Shanghai; Zhang, Shiming [Shanghai; Ma, Zi-Feng [Shanghai; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Many industrial catalysts are composed of metal particles supported on metal oxides (MMO). It is known that the catalytic activity of MMO materials is governed by metal and metal oxide interactions (MMOI), but how to optimize MMO systems via manipulation of MMOI remains unclear, due primarily to the ambiguous nature of MMOI. Herein, we develop a Pt/NbOx/C system with tunable structural and electronic properties via a modified arc plasma deposition method. We unravel the nature of MMOI by characterizing this system under reactive conditions utilizing combined electrochemical, microscopy, and in situ spectroscopy. We show that Pt interacts with the Nb in unsaturated NbOx owing to the oxygen deficiency in the MMO interface, whereas Pt interacts with the O in nearly saturated NbOx, and further interacts with Nb when the oxygen atoms penetrate into the Pt cluster at elevated potentials. While the Pt–Nb interactions do not benefit the inherent activity of Pt toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the Pt–O interactions improve the ORR activity by shortening the Pt–Pt bond distance. Pt donates electrons to NbOx in both Pt–Nb and Pt–O cases. The resultant electron efficiency stabilizes low-coordinated Pt sites, hereby stabilizing small Pt particles. This determines the two characteristic features of MMO systems: dispersion of small metal particles and high catalytic durability. These findings contribute to our understandings of MMO catalytic systems.

  10. Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal Artefact Reduction using Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) Algorithm and Dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguda, Edcer Jerecho

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the standard diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of a patient's medical condition. In comparison to other imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT is a fast acquisition imaging device with higher spatial resolution and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for bony structures. CT images are presented through a gray scale of independent values in Hounsfield units (HU). High HU-valued materials represent higher density. High density materials, such as metal, tend to erroneously increase the HU values around it due to reconstruction software limitations. This problem of increased HU values due to metal presence is referred to as metal artefacts. Hip prostheses, dental fillings, aneurysm clips, and spinal clips are a few examples of metal objects that are of clinical relevance. These implants create artefacts such as beam hardening and photon starvation that distort CT images and degrade image quality. This is of great significance because the distortions may cause improper evaluation of images and inaccurate dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Different algorithms are being developed to reduce these artefacts for better image quality for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, very limited information is available about the effect of artefact correction on dose calculation accuracy. This research study evaluates the dosimetric effect of metal artefact reduction algorithms on severe artefacts on CT images. This study uses Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based MAR algorithm, projection-based Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithm, and the Dual-Energy method. Materials and Methods: The Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based and SMART Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithms are metal artefact reduction protocols embedded in two different CT scanner models by General Electric (GE), and the Dual-Energy Imaging Method was developed at Duke University. All three

  11. Effect of the dose and route of administration of butylscopolamine on the reduction of the artifacts associated with intestinal peristalsis in abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Ronchera-Oms, C.

    1999-01-01

    To compare the effect of the route of administration (intravenous and oral) and the dose (40 mg and 80 mg) of butylscopolamine, determining its efficacy in reducing the noise associated with gastrointestinal movement in magnetic resonance (MR) images and the incidence and severity of associated adverse reactions. The present prospective, controlled, double-blind study included 80 patients who underwent abdominal MR. All the patients were given oral, high-density barium sulfate and were divided randomly into 4 groups of 20 patients each: a control group and 3 groups treated with 40 mg or 80 mg of oral butylscopolamine or 40 mg of intravenous butylscopolamine. Both the barium and the oral solutions were administered 25 to 30 minutes before the examination. the MR images were obtained with a STIR sequence (1487/100/44), and qualitative analysis of the noise was carried out using regions of interest situated in the background. The gastrointestinal noise was defined both by the mean and the standard deviation of the signal intensity of the air front of an behind the patient. The standard deviation of the air beside the patient was determined to confirm the absence of variations in noise inherent to MR. The adverse reactions to MR after 2 hours (immediate) and one day (late) were recorded. There were no significant differences among the groups with respect to sex, age or time interval between administration of the oral solution and the start of the sequence. The noise inherent to MR was not significantly different from one group to another (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p=0.71). Both the mean and the standard deviation of the intensity of the air situated in anteroposterior phase-encoding direction were significantly lower in the butylscopolamine groups than in the control group (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p=0.008). The most marked reduction was observed after the oral dose of 80 mg, followed by intravenous injection of 40 mg and the oral dose of 40 mg. Adverse reaction

  12. Metal-free” catalytic oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom- doped graphene is caused by trace metal impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2013-12-16

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of high industrial importance. There is a large body of literature showing that metal-based catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. Co, Mn, Fe or hybrid Mn/Co-based nanoparticles) supported on graphene act as efficient catalysts for the ORR. A significant research effort is also directed to the so-called “metal-free” oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene surfaces. While such studies of the ORR on nonmetallic heteroatom-doped graphene are advertised as “metal-free” there is typically no sufficient effort to characterize the doped materials to verify that they are indeed free of any trace metal. Here we argue that the claimed “metal-free” electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction on heteroatom-doped graphene is caused by metallic impurities present within the graphene materials.

  13. Nanostructured nonprecious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-20

    Platinum-based catalysts represent a state of the art in the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) from the point of view of their activity and durability in harnessing the chemical energy via direct electrochemical conversion. However, because platinum is both expensive and scarce, its widespread implementation in such clean energy applications is limited. Recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of high-performance nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) make replacement of Pt in ORR electrocatalysts with earth-abundant elements, such as Fe, Co, N, and C, a realistic possibility. In this Account, we discuss how we can obtain highly promising M-N-C (M: Fe and/or Co) catalysts by simultaneously heat-treating precursors of nitrogen, carbon, and transition metals at 800-1000 °C. The activity and durability of resulting catalysts depend greatly on the selection of precursors and synthesis chemistry. In addition, they correlate quite well with the catalyst nanostructure. While chemists have presented no conclusive description of the active catalytic site for this class of NPMCs, they have developed a designed approach to making active and durable materials, focusing on the catalyst nanostructure. The approach consists of nitrogen doping, in situ carbon graphitization, and the usage of graphitic structures (possibly graphene and graphene oxides) as carbon precursors. Various forms of nitrogen, particularly pyridinic and quaternary, can act as n-type carbon dopants in the M-N-C catalysts, assisting in the formation of disordered carbon nanostructures and donating electrons to the carbon. The CNx structures are likely a crucial part of the ORR active site(s). Noteworthy, the ORR activity is not necessarily governed by the amount of nitrogen, but by how the nitrogen is incorporated into the nanostructures. Apart from the possibility of a direct participation in the active site, the transition metal often plays an important role in the in situ formation of various

  14. Aerosol reduction/expansion synthesis (A-RES) for zero valent metal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Soliman, Haytham

    2016-04-12

    Various embodiments provide methods of forming zero valent metal particles using an aerosol-reductive/expansion synthesis (A-RES) process. In one embodiment, an aerosol stream including metal precursor compound(s) and chemical agent(s) that produces reducing gases upon thermal decomposition can be introduced into a heated inert atmosphere of a RES reactor to form zero valent metal particles corresponding to metals used for the metal precursor compound(s).

  15. Computed Tomographic Artifacts in Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Watanabe, Plauto Christopher Aranha; Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to present 4 cases and to undertake a systematic review on the current knowledge of the impact of cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) artifacts on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up. The MEDLINE (PubMed) database was searched for the period from February 2004 to February 2017, for studies on the impact of CBCT artifacts on surgical planning of oral and maxillofacial surgeries. The PRISMA statement was followed during data assessment and extraction. As a result, data extraction included information regarding: the use of CBCT to plan or follow-up oral and maxillofacial surgeries, presence and type identification of a CBCT artifact, and details on the impact of artifacts on image quality and/or surgical planning. Four cases were selected to illustrate the topic. The search strategy yielded 408 publications in MEDLINE (PubMed). An initial screening of the publications was performed using abstracts and key words. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 11 studies were finally identified as eligible to be discussed. Studies revealed 3 main types of artifact: beam hardening, streak, and motion artifacts. Most of the studies suggest that artifacts significantly affect oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up, despite of allowing for identification of metal projectiles in cases of maxillofacial trauma. CBCT artifacts have a significant impact on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up.

  16. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  17. Graphene layer encapsulated metal nanoparticles as a new type of non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Zhong, Lijie; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2016-01-01

    Cheap and efficient non-precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction have been a focus of research in the field of low-temperature fuel cells. This review is devoted to a brief summary of the recent work on a new type of catalysts, i.e., the graphene layer encapsulated metal nanoparticles...

  18. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO 2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li 2 O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  19. Controllable reductive method for synthesizing metal-containing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Ji-Won; Jung, Hyunsung; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Duty, Chad E.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran Chandra; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Armstrong, Beth Louise; Smith, Sean Campbell; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Love, Lonnie J.

    2018-03-06

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal-containing particles, the method comprising subjecting an aqueous solution comprising a metal salt, E.sub.h, lowering reducing agent, pH adjusting agent, and water to conditions that maintain the E.sub.h value of the solution within the bounds of an E.sub.h-pH stability field corresponding to the composition of the metal-containing particles to be produced, and producing said metal-containing particles in said aqueous solution at a selected E.sub.h value within the bounds of said E.sub.h-pH stability field. The invention is also directed to the resulting metal-containing particles as well as devices in which they are incorporated.

  20. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  1. Artifact-reduced imaging of biopsy needles with 2D multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hans; Hargreaves, Brian A; Daniel, Bruce L

    2017-12-29

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guidance for biopsy procedures requires high intrinsic soft-tissue contrast. However, artifacts induced by the metallic needle can reduce its localization and require low-susceptibility needle materials with poorer cutting performance. In a proof of concept, we demonstrate the feasibility of 2D multispectral imaging (2DMSI) for both needle tracking and for needle artifact reduction for more precise needle localization and to enable the usage of needle materials with higher susceptibility. We applied 2DMSI for imaging of MR-compatible biopsy needles, conventional stainless-steel needles, and mixed-material needles and compared it to conventional techniques. In addition, we exploited intrinsic off-resonance information for passive needle tracking. 2DMSI achieved a stronger reduction of the needle artifact compared to conventional techniques. For the mixed-material needles, the artifact was reduced to a level below that for MR-compatible needles with conventional imaging. The passive tracking also improved the ability to pinpoint the needle. 2DMSI is promising for both needle tracking and artifact-reduced imaging of biopsy needles for a more precise needle localization. 2DMSI may be particularly promising for needles inducing large distortions or for targeting of small lesions. In addition, it may enable the use of needle materials with higher susceptibility and potentially better sampling performance. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...

  3. Silver and gold nanoparticles in plants: sites for the reduction to metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Isabel R; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2011-06-01

    Induced formation of metal nanoparticles in living plants is poorly understood. The sites for the reduction of Ag(+) and Au(3+) to Ag(0) and Au(0) metal nanoparticles in vivo in plants were investigated in order to better understand the mechanism of the reduction processes. Brassica juncea was grown hydroponically, followed by growth in solutions of AgNO(3), [Ag(NH(3))(2)]NO(3) or HAuCl(4). Harvested plants were sectioned and studied by transmission electron microscopy. Total metal content was analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The chemical state of the metals was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Nanoparticles of Ag(0) and Au(0) were found in leaves, stem, roots and cell walls of the plants at a concentration of 0.40% Ag and 0.44% Au in the leaves. Particles which were approximately spherical were formed with sizes of 2-100 nm. The sites of the most abundant reduction of metal salts to nanoparticles were the chloroplasts, regions of high reducing sugar (glucose and fructose) content. We propose that these sugars are responsible for the reduction of these metals and other metal salts with reduction potentials over +0.16 V and that the amount of reducing sugar present or produced determines the quantity of metal nanoparticles that may be formed.

  4. Metal cation uptake and reduction kinetics in microalgal cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kare, Anudeep

    This work was conducted to create a bio synthetic process for production of sustainable Nano materials, such as Noble metal nanoparticles with the use of living organisms as catalysts. Dactylococcus, Coelastrella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are the different species of algae used through which the Au and Ag nanoparticles are extracted. Under the appropriate bioprocess conditions phototrophic algal cell cultures can catalyze the conversion of soluble metal cations, such as trivalent gold cation (Au+3), to metallic gold nanoparticles (Au0 NP) and silver cation (Ag+) to metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag0 NP). The primary objective of this experiment is to identify the rate-limiting kinetics such as, mixing, biological, pH and so forth to see whether a scalable process can be proposed for production of these high valued materials. It is proposed in the literature that the reducing power required to drive this reaction is derived from the electron flux produced in the algae's photosynthetic apparatus. However, due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about the transport and kinetics, and therefore the bottlenecks and key process parameters, there is currently no scalable, controllable phototrophic system has been developed for the production of metallic nanoparticles.

  5. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  6. Recovery of Multi-Metallic Components from Bottom Ash by Smelting Reduction Under Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arup Kumar; Sinha, Om Prakash

    2016-02-01

    A new concept for maintaining inert atmosphere with high temperature ~1973 K (1700 °C) inside the furnace during smelting reduction was described, in which recovery of metallic values from wastes was done in the presence of metal bath which acts as a solvent. Nitrogen plasma arc was generated by passing current and nitrogen gas through a hollow graphite electrode. In this way, the heat for reduction reactions and melting of metal and slag phases under inert atmosphere was maintained. The mixture of bottom ash and carbonaceous reducing agent was fed in the form of pellets near the plasma zone above the liquid iron bath, used for the absorption of reduced metals after reduction of oxides present in the wastes. Percent recovery of metallic values and different consumption parameters were calculated. It was observed that aluminum, iron, and silicon could be recovered effectively from the wastes.

  7. A Universal Method to Engineer Metal Oxide-Metal-Carbon Interface for Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lin; Zha, Dace; Ruan, Yunjun; Li, Zhishan; Ao, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Jiang, Jianjun; Chen, Hao Ming; Chiang, Wei-Hung; Chen, Jun; Wang, Chundong

    2018-03-27

    Oxygen is the most abundant element in the Earth's crust. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is also the most important reaction in life processes and energy converting/storage systems. Developing techniques toward high-efficiency ORR remains highly desired and a challenge. Here, we report a N-doped carbon (NC) encapsulated CeO 2 /Co interfacial hollow structure (CeO 2 -Co-NC) via a generalized strategy for largely increased oxygen species adsorption and improved ORR activities. First, the metallic Co nanoparticles not only provide high conductivity but also serve as electron donors to largely create oxygen vacancies in CeO 2 . Second, the outer carbon layer can effectively protect cobalt from oxidation and dissociation in alkaline media and as well imparts its higher ORR activity. In the meanwhile, the electronic interactions between CeO 2 and Co in the CeO 2 /Co interface are unveiled theoretically by density functional theory calculations to justify the increased oxygen absorption for ORR activity improvement. The reported CeO 2 -Co-NC hollow nanospheres not only exhibit decent ORR performance with a high onset potential (922 mV vs RHE), half-wave potential (797 mV vs RHE), and small Tafel slope (60 mV dec -1 ) comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts but also possess long-term stability with a negative shift of only 7 mV of the half-wave potential after 2000 cycles and strong tolerance against methanol. This work represents a solid step toward high-efficient oxygen reduction.

  8. Trends in oxygen reduction and methanol activation on transition metal chalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We use density functional theory calculations to study the oxygen reduction reaction and methanol activation on selenium and sulfur-containing transition metal surfaces. With ruthenium selenium as a starting point, we study the effect of the chalcogen on the activity, selectivity and stability...... of the catalyst. Ruthenium surfaces with moderate content of selenium are calculated active for the oxygen reduction reaction, and insensitive to methanol. A significant upper limit for the activity of transition metal chalcogenides is estimated....

  9. Reduction of metallic coil artefacts in computed tomography body imaging: effects of a new single-energy metal artefact reduction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Ikeda, Osamu; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Hirai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawano, Takayuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Life Sciences Research, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We evaluated the effect of a single-energy metal artefact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for metallic coil artefact reduction in body imaging. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed in 30 patients with metallic coils (10 men, 20 women; mean age, 67.9 ± 11 years). Non-SEMAR images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction alone, and SEMAR images were reconstructed with the iterative reconstruction plus SEMAR algorithms. We compared image noise around metallic coils and the maximum diameters of artefacts from coils between the non-SEMAR and SEMAR images. Two radiologists visually evaluated the metallic coil artefacts utilizing a four-point scale: 1 = extensive; 2 = strong; 3 = mild; 4 = minimal artefacts. The image noise and maximum diameters of the artefacts of the SEMAR images were significantly lower than those of the non-SEMAR images (65.1 ± 33.0 HU vs. 29.7 ± 10.3 HU; 163.9 ± 54.8 mm vs. 10.3 ± 19.0 mm, respectively; P < 0.001). Better visual scores were obtained with the SEMAR technique (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.0, P < 0.001). The SEMAR algorithm significantly reduced artefacts caused by metallic coils compared with the non-SEMAR algorithm. This technique can potentially increase CT performance for the evaluation of post-coil embolization complications. (orig.)

  10. Obscuring the ancient artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugrul, B.

    1987-01-01

    Radiography is a non-destructive method which is preferable for ancient artifacts. X-rays, gama rays, beta rays and neutrons can be used for radiography. Differences of them and application materials can be different. In this study, the radiographic techniques are determined with application parameters according to materials of the artifacts, and some interesting examples are given. Therefore, investigation of the artifacts can be realized for definition of physical properties, manufacturing techniques and quality controls of them easily by the application of the radiography. (author)

  11. Low temperature plasma metallurgy. Reduction of metals in plasma reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eliáš, M.; Frgala, Z.; Kudrle, V.; Janča, J.; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2004), s. 91-97 ISSN 1203-8407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasmachemistry reduction, tungsten, hydrogen plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2002

  12. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction of sputter deposited mixed metal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, L.C.; Holzheuter, I.B.; Nucara, M.C.; Dignam, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Sputter-deposited films of silver with lead, manganese and nickel have been studied as possible oxygen reduction electrocatalysts using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disc studies, steady-state polarization and Auger analysis. In general, the Ag-Pb and Ag-Mn films display superior electrocatalytic activity for O 2 reduction, while the Ag-Ni films' performance is inferior to that of pure Ag. For the Ag-Pb films, which show the highest electrocatalytic activity, the mixed metal films display oxidation-reduction behavior which is not simply a superposition of that of the separate metals, and suggests a mechanism for the improved behavior

  13. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  14. High-throughput synthesis of mixed-metal electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jingfu; Dettelbach, Kevan E.; Li, Tengfei; Salvatore, Danielle A.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of CO 2 as a feedstock requires fundamental breakthroughs in catalyst design. The efficiencies and activities of pure metal electrodes towards the CO 2 reduction reaction are established, but the corresponding data on mixed-metal systems are not as well developed. In this study we show that the near-infrared driven decomposition (NIRDD) of solution-deposited films of metal salts and subsequent electrochemical reduction offers the unique opportunity to form an array of mixed-metal electrocatalyst coatings with excellent control of the metal stoichiometries. This synthetic method enabled us to develop an empirical structure-property correlation to help inform the development of optimized CO 2 catalyst compositions. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Disintegration and size reduction of slags and metals after melt refining of contaminated metallic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    Melting under an oxidizing slag is an attractive method of decontaminating and reducing the volume of radioactively contaminated metal scrap. The contaminants are concentrated in a relatively small volume of slag, which leaves the metal essentially clean. A potential method of permanently disposing of the resulting slags (and metals if necessary) is emplacing them into deep shale by grout hydrofracture. Suspension in grout mixtures requires that the slag and metal be granular. The feasibility of size-reducing slags and disintegrating metals and subsequently incorporating both into grout mixtures was demonstrated. Various types of slags were crushed with a small jaw crusher into particles smaller than 3 mm. Several metals were also melted and water-blasted into coarse metal powder or shot ranging in size from 0.05 to 3 mm. A simple low-pressure water atomizer having a multiple nozzle with a converging-line jet stream was developed and used for this purpose. No significant slag dust and steam were generated during slag crushing and liquid-metal water-blasting tests, indicating that contamination can be well contained within the system. The crushed slags and the coarse metal powders were suspendable in group fluids, which indicates probable disposability by shale hydrofracture. The granulation of slags and metals facilitates their containment, transport, and storage

  16. Water-Induced Dimensionality Reduction in Metal-Halide Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Turedi, Bekir

    2018-03-30

    Metal-halide perovskite materials are highly attractive materials for optoelectronic applications. However, the instability of perovskite materials caused by moisture and heat-induced degradation impairs future prospects of using these materials. Here we employ water to directly transform films of the three-dimensional (3D) perovskite CsPbBr3 to stable two-dimensional (2D) perovskite-related CsPb2Br5. A sequential dissolution-recrystallization process governs this water induced transformation under PbBr2 rich condition. We find that these post-synthesized 2D perovskite-related material films exhibit excellent stability against humidity and high photoluminescence quantum yield. We believe that our results provide a new synthetic method to generate stable 2D perovskite-related materials that could be applicable for light emitting device applications.

  17. Small cell experiments for electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides to uranium metal using fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Adcock, P.W.; Coroneos, A.C.; Hendrix, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was proposed for the preparation of uranium metal feed for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. A laboratory cell of 25-cm ID was operated to obtain additional information in areas important to design and operation of a pilot plant cell. Reproducible test results and useful operating and control procedures were demonstrated. About 20 kg of uranium metal of acceptable purity were prepared. A good supply of dissolved UO 2 feed at the anode is the most important controlling requirement for efficient cell operation. A large fraction of the cell current is nonproductive in that it does not produce a metal product nor consume carbon anodes. All useful test conditions gave some reduction of UF 4 to produce CF 4 in addition to the reduction of UO 2 , but the fraction of metal from the reduction of UF 4 can be decreased by increasing the concentration of dissolved UO 2 . Operation of large continuous cells would probably be limited to current efficiencies of less than 60 pct, and more than 20 pct of the metal would result from the reduction of UF 4

  18. The electrodeposition and rare earths reduction in the molten salt actinides recovery systems using liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, J-B.; Lee, J-H.; Kwon, S-W.; Ahn, B-G.; Woo, M-S.; Lee, B-J.; Kim, E-H.; Park, H-S.; Yoo, J-H.

    2005-01-01

    A pyrochemical partitioning system uses liquid metals such as cadmium and bismuth in order to recover the actinide metals from a molten salt mixture containing rare earth fission product metals. The liquid metals play roles as a cathode in the electrowinning or an extracting phase in the reductive extraction operation. The product resulting from the above operations is metal-cadmium or-bismuth alloy, which should contain the rare earth element amounts as low as possible for a transmutation purpose. In this study, the electrodeposition behaviours of uranium and lanthanide elements such as La, Ce and Nd were investigated for solid molybdenum and liquid cadmium electrodes in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Electrochemical methods used are a cyclic voltammetry (CV) and a chronopotentiometry for monitoring the salt phase and recovering the metals, respectively. The CV graphs for monitoring the oxidizing agent CdCl 2 in the salt phase were obtained. These show a time dependently disappearance of the oxidizing agent corresponding to the formation of UCl 3 by inserting the uranium metal into the salt. Also, a sequential oxidation technique which is added at a controlled amount of the oxidizing agents into the salt phase was applied. It was found that this method is feasible for the selective reduction of the rare earths content in liquid metal alloys. (author)

  19. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  20. Coordination chemistry insights into the role of alkali metal promoters in dinitrogen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Gannon P; Holland, Patrick L

    2017-05-15

    The Haber-Bosch process is a major contributor to fixed nitrogen that supports the world's nutritional needs and is one of the largest-scale industrial processes known. It has also served as a testing ground for chemists' understanding of surface chemistry. Thus, it is significant that the most thoroughly developed catalysts for N 2 reduction use potassium as an electronic promoter. In this review, we discuss the literature on alkali metal cations as promoters for N 2 reduction, in the context of the growing knowledge about cooperative interactions between N 2 , transition metals, and alkali metals in coordination compounds. Because the structures and properties are easier to characterize in these compounds, they give useful information on alkali metal interactions with N 2 . Here, we review a variety of interactions, with emphasis on recent work on iron complexes by the authors. Finally, we draw conclusions about the nature of these interactions and areas for future research.

  1. Chemical Principles Revisited: Artifacts and the Electromotive Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relevant to the study of archeology and specifically to the history of man's use of metals. Gives reasons why most significant artifacts found by archeologists are made of gold instead of iron. (CS)

  2. Trends in oxygen reduction and methanol activation on transition metal chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Norskov, Jens K.; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxygen electro-reduction reaction on chalcogen-containing transition metal surfaces. → Evaluation of catalytic performance with density functional theory. → Ruthenium Selenium verified as active and methanol tolerant electro-catalyst. → Water boils at -10000 K. - Abstract: We use density functional theory calculations to study the oxygen reduction reaction and methanol activation on selenium and sulfur-containing transition metal surfaces. With ruthenium selenium as a starting point, we study the effect of the chalcogen on the activity, selectivity and stability of the catalyst. Ruthenium surfaces with moderate content of selenium are calculated active for the oxygen reduction reaction, and insensitive to methanol. A significant upper limit for the activity of transition metal chalcogenides is estimated.

  3. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heußer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ritschl, Ludwig [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, 90451 Nürnberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  4. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data

  5. Thermal convection of liquid metal in the titanium reduction reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimurazov, A.; Frick, P.; Stefani, F.

    2017-06-01

    The structure of the convective flow of molten magnesium in a metallothermic titanium reduction reactor has been studied numerically in a three-dimensional non-stationary formulation with conjugated heat transfer between liquid magnesium and solids (steel walls of the cavity and titanium block). A nonuniform computational mesh with a total of 3.7 million grid points was used. The Large Eddy Simulation technique was applied to take into account the turbulence in the liquid phase. The instantaneous and average characteristics of the process and the velocity and temperature pulsation fields are analyzed. The simulations have been performed for three specific heating regimes: with furnace heaters operating at full power, with furnace heaters switched on at the bottom of the vessel only, and with switched-off furnace heaters. It is shown that the localization of the cooling zone can completely reorganize the structure of the large-scale flow. Therefore, by changing heating regimes, it is possible to influence the flow structure for the purpose of creating the most favorable conditions for the reaction. It is also shown that the presence of the titanium block strongly affects the flow structure.

  6. Evidence for single metal two electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; McInnes, Eric J L; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen T

    2017-12-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido complex in a reaction that satisfies all criteria of a single-metal two-electron oxidative addition. Thermolysis of this complex promotes extrusion of azobenzene, where H-/D-isotopic labelling finds no isotopomer cross-over and the non-reactivity of a nitrene-trap suggests that nitrenes are not generated and thus a reductive elimination has occurred. Though not optimally balanced in this case, this work presents evidence that classical d-block redox chemistry can be performed reversibly by f-block metals, and that uranium can thus mimic elementary transition metal reactivity, which may lead to the discovery of new f-block catalysis.

  7. Three-dimensional metallic micro/nanostructures fabricated by two-photon-induced reduction of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takuo; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2006-08-01

    We report on a technique that enables to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) metallic microstructures by means of two photon- induced metal-ion reduction. A femtosecond near-infrared laser is focused by a high-NA objective lens into a metal-ion aqueous solution. Due to the nonlinear nature of the two-photon absorption (TPA) process, metal-ions are directly reduced only at the focused spot. By scanning the laser beam spot in three dimensions, we can directly obtain arbitrary 3D metallic structures. To fabricate silver and gold structures, we use a 0.2-M aqueous solution of silver nitrate (AgNO 3) and a 0.24-M aqueous solution of tetra chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4), respectively. We demonstrate the fabrication of a continuous and electrically conductive silver wire whose minimum width is 400 nm. Electrical measurement shows that the resistivity of the fabricated silver wire is 5.30 × 10 -8 Ωm, which is only 3.3 times larger than that of bulk silver (1.62 × 10 -8 Ωm). We also discuss the resolution of our technique in terms of ions diffusion based on the Fick's first law and the mobility of metal-ions in aqueous solution. Moreover, the realization of a selfstanding 3D silver microstructures on the substrates are demonstrated. This method will become a promising technique for fabricating 3D plasmonic micro/nano structures with arbitrary shape.

  8. Assessment of Soft Vane and Metal Foam Engine Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hughes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative fan-noise reduction concepts developed by NASA are presented - soft vanes and over-the-rotor metal foam liners. Design methodologies are described for each concept. Soft vanes are outlet guide vanes with internal, resonant chambers that communicate with the exterior aeroacoustic environment via a porous surface. They provide acoustic absorption via viscous losses generated by interaction of unsteady flows with the internal solid structure. Over-the-rotor metal foam liners installed at or near the fan rotor axial plane provide rotor noise absorption. Both concepts also provide pressure-release surfaces that potentially inhibit noise generation. Several configurations for both concepts are evaluated with a normal incidence tube, and the results are used to guide designs for implementation in two NASA fan rigs. For soft vanes, approximately 1 to 2 dB of broadband inlet and aft-radiated fan noise reduction is achieved. For over-the-rotor metal foam liners, up to 3 dB of fan noise reduction is measured in the low-speed fan rig, but minimal reduction is measured in the high-speed fan rig. These metal foam liner results are compared with a static engine test, in which inlet sound power level reductions up to 5 dB were measured. Brief plans for further development are also provided.

  9. Molecular polypyridine-based metal complexes as catalysts for the reduction of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgrishi, Noémie; Chambers, Matthew B; Wang, Xia; Fontecave, Marc

    2017-02-06

    Polypyridyl transition metal complexes represent one of the more thoroughly studied classes of molecular catalysts towards CO 2 reduction to date. Initial reports in the 1980s began with an emphasis on 2nd and 3rd row late transition metals, but more recently the focus has shifted towards earlier metals and base metals. Polypyridyl platforms have proven quite versatile and amenable to studying various parameters that govern product distribution for CO 2 reduction. However, open questions remain regarding the key mechanistic steps that govern product selectivity and efficiency. Polypyridyl complexes have also been immobilized through a variety of methods to afford active catalytic materials for CO 2 reductions. While still an emerging field, materials incorporating molecular catalysts represent a promising strategy for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices capable of CO 2 reduction. In general, this class of compounds remains the most promising for the continued development of molecular systems for CO 2 reduction and an inspiration for the design of related non-polypyridyl catalysts.

  10. Reductive metalation of the uranyl oxo-groups with main Group-, d- and f-block metals

    OpenAIRE

    Zegke, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the reductive functionalisation of the uranyl(VI) dication by metalation of the uranyl oxo-groups (O=UVI=O), using reductants from Group I, Group II, Group IV, Group XII and Group XIII as well as from the lanthanide and actinide series of the periodic table. Chapter 1 introduces uranium and nuclear waste, and gives an introduction into uranium(V) chemistry. It further compares the chemistry of uranyl(V) to neptunyl(V), with a specific focus on solid sta...

  11. Simultaneous reduction and nitrogen functionalization of graphene oxide using lemon for metal-free oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Halima; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Cho, Sung; Jeon, Seungwon

    2017-12-01

    Inspire by the vision of finding a simple and green method for simultaneous reduction and nitrogen (N)-functionalization of graphene oxide (GO), a N-rich reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been synthesized through a facile and ecofriendly hydrothermal strategy while most of the existing methods are involving with multiple steps and highly toxic reducing agents that are harmful to human health and environment. In this paper, the simultaneous reduction and N-functionalization of GO using as available lemon juice (denoted as Lem-rGO) for metal-free electrocatalysis towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is described. The proposed method is based on the reduction of GO using of the reducing and the N-precursor capability of ascorbic acid and citric acid as well as the nitrogenous compounds, respectively, that containing in lemon juice. The resultant Lem-rGO has higher reduction degree, higher specific surface area and better crystalline nature with N-incorporation than that of well investigated ascorbic acid and citric acid treated rGO. As a result, it shows better ORR electrocatalytic activity in respect to the improved onset potential, electron transfer rate and kinetics than those typical rGO catalysts. Moreover, it shows a significant tolerance to the anodic fuels and durability than the Pt/C during ORR.

  12. Reduction of titanium dioxide and other metal oxides by electro-deoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fray, Derek J.

    2003-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and other reactive metal compounds are reduced by more reactive metals to form pure metals. These, are expensive and time consuming processes which makes these metals very expensive. Many of these metals and alloys have excellent properties, high strength, low density and very good corrosion resistance, but their use is restricted by its high cost. Electro-deoxidation is a very simple technique where an oxide is made cathodic in a fused salt of an alkaline earth chloride. By applying a voltage, below the decomposition potential of the salt, it has been found that the cathodic reaction is the ionization of oxygen from the oxide to leave a pure metal, rather than the reduction of the ion alkaline earth ion element. Laboratory experiments have shown that this approach can be applied to the reduction of a large number of metal oxides. Another important observation is that when a mixture of oxides is used as the cathode, the product is an alloy of uniform composition. This is a considerable advantage for many alloys that are difficult to prepare using conventional technology. (Original)

  13. Boosting catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles for 4-nitrophenol reduction: Modification of metal naoparticles with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jyun-Guo; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Cheng-Ju [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Lung, E-mail: tsengwl@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The choice of capping ligand determines catalytic activity of metal nanocatalysts. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles electrostatically interact with 4-NP and BH4{sup −}. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles have good recyclability and large scalability. • PDDA-capped Pd nanoparticles show the highest rate constant and activity parameter. - Abstract: Most of the previously reported studies have focused on the change in the size, morphology, and composition of metal nanocatalysts for improving their catalytic activity. Herein, we report poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) [PDDA]-stabilized nanoparticles (NPs) of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) as highly active and efficient catalysts for hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4. PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs possessed similar particle size and same facet with citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, making this study to investigate the inter-relationship between catalytic activity and surface ligand without the consideration of the effects of particle size and facet. Compared to citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs exhibited excellent pH and salt stability. PDDA could serve as an electron acceptor for metal NPs to produce the net positive charges on the metal surface, which provide strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged nitrophenolate and borohydride ions. The activity parameter and rate constant of PDDA-stabilized metal NPs were higher than those of citrate-capped metal NPs. Compared to the previously reported Pd nanomaterials for the catalysis of NaBH4-mediated reduction of 4-NP, PDDA-stabilized Pd NPs exhibited the extremely high activity parameter (195 s{sup −1} g{sup −1}) and provided excellent scalability and reusability.

  14. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  15. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  16. Activity and selectivity control in reductive amination of butyraldehyde over noble metal catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodis, E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Muller, T.E.; Pestman, R.; Lercher, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Approaches to control selectivity and activity in the catalytic reductive amination of butyraldehyde with ammonia over carbon supported noble metal catalysts (Ru, Rh, Pd, and Pt) were explored. Detailed analysis of the reaction network shows that the Schiff base N-[butylidene]butan-1-amine is the

  17. Method for Synthesizing Metal Nanowires in Anodic Alumina Membranes Using Solid State Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Inesta, Maria M (Inventor); Feliciano, Jennie (Inventor); Quinones-Fontalvo, Leonel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The invention proposes a novel method for the fabrication of regular arrays of MNWs using solid-state reduction (SSR). Using this method copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and palladium (Pd) nanowire (NWs) arrays were synthesized using anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) as templates. Depending on the metal loading used the NWs reached different diameters.

  18. Simulation of Tracer Dose Reduction in 18F-FDG PET/MRI: Effects on Oncologic Reading, Image Quality, and Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Schmidt, Holger; Kunz, Julia; Küstner, Thomas; Gatidis, Sergios; Nikolaou, Konstantin; la Fougère, Christian; Schwenzer, Nina

    2017-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of stepwise-reduced doses on objective and subjective image parameters and on oncologic readings in whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/MRI. Methods: We retrospectively simulated the stepwise reduction of 18 F-FDG doses of 19 patients (mean age ± SD, 50.9 ± 11.7 y; mean body mass index ± SD, 22.8 ± 3.2 kg/m 2 ) who received a whole-body PET/MRI examination from 3 to 0.5 MBq/kg of body weight (kgBW) in intervals of 0.25. Objective imaging parameters were assessed by measuring the SUV and coefficient of variation in different regions (aorta, liver, spleen, kidney, small bowel, lumbar vertebra, psoas muscle, urinary bladder) as well as the noise-equivalent counting rates in each bed position. Subjective image quality was evaluated with a masked reading of each simulated PET compared with the dose of 2 MBq/kgBW. Oncologic reading was performed first according to PERCIST in each dose and second by defining malignant lesions in doses of 2 MBq/kgBW and the maximum dose image (gold standard). The diagnostic confidence of each lesion was measured using a Likert scale. Results: With decreasing doses, regions in the mid abdomen showed a stronger decrease of SUV mean and noise-equivalent counting rates than regions in the upper abdomen (SUV mean , -45% and -15% on average in the small bowel and the liver, respectively). The coefficient of variation showed a nonlinear increase, pronounced below 1.5 MBq/kgBW. Subjective image quality was stable over a range between 1.25 and 2.75 MBq/kgBW compared with 2 MBq/kgBW. However, large photopenic areas in the mid abdomen were observed in 2 patients. In the PERCIST reading, target lesions were above the liver threshold with a stable SUV peak in all cases down to 2 MBq/kgBW. Eighty-six of 90 lesions were identified correctly with a dose of 2 MBq/kgBW; Likert scores did not differ significantly. Conclusion: A reduction of doses in 18 F-FDG PET/MRI might be possible down to 2 MBq/kgBW in oncologic

  19. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    needs to support such development through concepts and methods. This leads to a methodological approach that focuses on new artifacts to supplement and substitute existing artifacts. Through a design case, we develop the methodological approach and illustrate how the human–artifact model can be applied...... to analyze present artifacts and to design future ones. The model is used to structure such analysis and to reason about findings while providing leverage from activity theoretical insights on mediation, dialectics, and levels of activity....

  20. Improved Accuracy of Density Functional Theory Calculations for CO2 Reduction and Metal-Air Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rune; Hansen, Heine Anton; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-01-01

    , Nano Lett., 14, 1016 (2014) [6] J. Wellendorff, K. T. Lundgaard, A. Møgelhøj, V. Petzold, D. D. Landis, J. K. Nørskov, T. Bligaard, and K. W. Jacobsen, Phys. Rev. B, 85, 235149 (2012) Figure 1: Calculated enthalpies of reaction from CO2 to CH3OH (x axis) and HCOOH (y axis). Functional variations.......e. the electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 and metal-air batteries. In theoretical studies of electrocatalytic CO2 reduction, calculated DFT-level enthalpies of reaction for CO2reduction to various products are significantly different from experimental values[1-3]. In theoretical studies of metal-air battery reactions...... through first principle methods. Ensembles generated using a Bayesian error estimation functional, in this case the BEEF-vdW functional[6], are used for the error identification. The ensembles, which consist of perturbations of the main van der Waals density functional, can be generated at low...

  1. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...... and the emergence of the technological community involved in designing and manufacturing computer chips. The community is structured in a way that reflects the underlying physical nature silicon and the numerous other materials and chemicals involved. But it also reflects the human agency of defining new projects......, of visioning the liberation from atoms, of committing to travel many detours in the labyrinths of development, and of perceiving and exploring the affordance that new technologies hide. Some of these characteristics are analyzed empirically in a case study of designing a chip for a digitalized hearing...

  2. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    the possible configurations of the system (for example, by counting the number of components in a certain state). We motivate our methodology with a case study of the LMAC protocol for wireless sensor networks. In particular, we investigate the accuracy of a recently proposed high-level model of LMAC......When analysing the performance of a complex system, we typically build abstract models that are small enough to analyse, but still capture the relevant details of the system. But it is difficult to know whether the model accurately describes the real system, or if its behaviour is due to modelling...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  3. Evaluation of efficacy of metal artefact reduction technique using contrast media in Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusob, Diana; Zukhi, Jihan; Aziz Tajuddin, Abd; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of metal artefact reduction using contrasts media in Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. A water-based abdomen phantom of diameter 32 cm (adult body size) was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. Three different contrast agents (iodine, barium and gadolinium) were filled in small PMMA tubes and placed inside a water-based PMMA adult abdomen phantom. The orthopedic metal screw was placed in each small PMMA tube separately. These two types of orthopedic metal screw (stainless steel and titanium alloy) were scanned separately. The orthopedic metal crews were scanned with single-energy CT at 120 kV and dual-energy CT at fast kV-switching between 80 kV and 140 kV. The scan modes were set automatically using the current modulation care4Dose setting and the scans were set at different pitch and slice thickness. The use of the contrast media technique on orthopedic metal screws were optimised by using pitch = 0.60 mm, and slice thickness = 5.0 mm. The use contrast media can reduce the metal streaking artefacts on CT image, enhance the CT images surrounding the implants, and it has potential use in improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artefacts. These results are valuable for imaging protocol optimisation in clinical applications.

  4. Metal porphyrin intercalated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite utilized for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a simple and facile self-assembly method to successfully fabricate cationic metal porphyrin –MtTMPyP (Mt= Cobalt (II, Manganese (III, or Iron (III; TMPyP = 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl porphyrin intercalated into the layer of graphene oxide (GO by the cooperative effects of electrostatic and π–π stacking interaction between positively charged metal porphyrin and negatively charged GO sheets. Followed by reduction with hydrazine vapor, a series of novel 2D MtTMPyP/rGOn were fabricated. The as-prepared 2D hybrids were fully characterized and tested as non-noble metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in an alkaline medium. The MtTMPyP/rGOn hybrids, especially CoTMPyP/rGO5, demonstrated an improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR and a number of exchanged electrons close to 4-electron reaction, increased stability and excellent tolerance to methanol, showing a potential alternative catalyst for ORR in fuel cells and air batteries. Keywords: Metal porphyrin, Reduced graphene oxide, Intercalation, Oxygen reduction reaction, Catalyst

  5. Development of metallic uranium recovery technology from uranium oxide by Li reduction and electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kawabe, Akihiro; Yuda, Ryouichi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Reiko; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yahata, Hidetsugu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop technology for pre-treatment of oxide fuel reprocessing through pyroprocess. In the pre-treatment process, it is necessary to reduce actinide oxide to metallic form. This paper outlines some experimental results of uranium oxide reduction and recovery of refined metallic uranium in electrorefining. Both uranium oxide granules and pellets were used for the experiments. Uranium oxide granules was completely reduced by lithium in several hours at 650degC. Reduced uranium pellets by about 70% provided a simulation of partial reduction for the process flow design. Almost all adherent residues of Li and Li 2 O were successfully washed out with fresh LiCl salt. During electrorefining, metallic uranium deposited on the iron cathode as expected. The recovery efficiencies of metallic uranium from reduced uranium oxide granules and from pellets were about 90% and 50%, respectively. The mass balance data provided the technical bases of Li reduction and refining process flow for design. (author)

  6. Optimization of metal artefact reduction (MAR) sequences for MRI of total hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, A.P., E-mail: andoni.toms@nnuh.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Trust, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom); Smith-Bateman, C.; Malcolm, P.N.; Cahir, J. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Trust, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7UY (United Kingdom); Graves, M. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To describe the relative contribution of matrix size and bandwidth to artefact reduction in order to define optimal sequence parameters for metal artefact reduction (MAR) sequences for MRI of total hip prostheses. Methods and materials: A phantom was created using a Charnley total hip replacement. Mid-coronal T1-weighted (echo time 12 ms, repetition time 400 ms) images through the prosthesis were acquired with increasing bandwidths (150, 300, 454, 592, and 781 Hz/pixel) and increasing matrixes of 128, 256, 384, 512, 640, and 768 pixels square. Signal loss from the prosthesis and susceptibility artefact was segmented using an automated tool. Results: Over 90% of the achievable reduction in artefacts was obtained with matrixes of 256 x 256 or greater and a receiver bandwidth of approximately 400 Hz/pixel or greater. Thereafter increasing the receiver bandwidth or matrix had little impact on reducing susceptibility artefacts. Increasing the bandwidth produced a relative fall in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of between 49 and 56% for a given matrix, but, in practice, the image quality was still satisfactory even with the highest bandwidth and largest matrix sizes. The acquisition time increased linearly with increasing matrix parameters. Conclusion: Over 90% of the achievable metal artefact reduction can be realized with mid-range matrices and receiver bandwidths on a clinical 1.5 T system. The loss of SNR from increasing receiver bandwidth, is preferable to long acquisition times, and therefore, should be the main tool for reducing metal artefact.

  7. Molecular analyis of rates of metal reductions and metabolic state of Geobacter species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-01-01

    This project began with the simple goal of trying to understand the diversity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms that might be found in subsurface environments. It ended with a sophisticated understanding not only of what microorganisms are important for metal reduction in uranium-contaminated subsurface environments, but also their physiological status during in situ uranium bioremediation. These findings have provided unprecedented insight into uranium bioremediation and the methods by which this process might be optimized. A brief summary of the major accomplishments of the project is given.

  8. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  9. Reduction of the radiofrequency heating of metallic devices using a dual-drive birdcage coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Turk, Esra Abaci; Oto, Cagdas; Algin, Oktay; Atalar, Ergin

    2013-03-01

    In this work, it is demonstrated that a dual-drive birdcage coil can be used to reduce the radiofrequency heating of metallic devices during magnetic resonance imaging. By controlling the excitation currents of the two channels of a birdcage coil, the radiofrequency current that is induced near the lead tip could be set to zero. To monitor the current, the image artifacts near the lead tips were measured. The electric field distribution was controlled using a dual-drive birdcage coil. With this method, the lead currents and the lead tip temperatures were reduced substantially [4.9 °C using quadrature excitation], as demonstrated by phantom and animal experiments. The homogeneity of the flip angle distribution was preserved, as shown by volunteer experiments. The normalized root-mean-square error of the flip angle distribution was less than 10% for all excitations. The average specific absorption rate increased as a trade-off for using different excitation patterns. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dental amalgam artifact: Adverse impact on tumor visualization and proton beam treatment planning in oral and oropharyngeal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick; Sandison, George; Dang, Quang; Johnson, Bart; Wong, Tony; Parvathaneni, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and impact of dental filling artifacts on the definition of clinical target volume (CTV) for oropharyngeal/oral cavity cancers receiving radiation therapy. We performed phantom proton beam dosimetric analyses using a low-density composite filling to investigate artifact reduction and dose distribution. We reviewed oral cavity/oropharynx radiation treatment plans between 2010 and 2012. Plans were evaluated for artifacts and impact on CTV visualization. We constructed a head and neck phantom, obtaining planning computed tomography images at baseline (native tooth) and for each filling (composite and metal amalgam) interchanged into a tooth adjacent to the tumor. We performed uniform scanning proton plans with each filling, evaluating for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and overall dose distribution. A total of 110 treatment plans were reviewed (71 oropharynx, 39 oral cavity). Artifacts were identified in 81 plans (73.6%), including 53 oropharynx (74.6%) and 28 oral cavity (71.8%). Artifacts obscured the CTV in 77 cases (95%), including 49 of 53 oropharynx cases (92.5%) and all 28 oral cavity cases. On phantom testing, the metal amalgam obscured the tumor while the composite did not. Hounsfield unit (HU) values (range, mean) for the tumor were: baseline (-484.0 to 700.0 HU, 104 HU), composite (-728.5 to 1038.0 HU, 105 HU), metal amalgam (-1023.0 to 807.0 HU, 90.74 HU). The percent of planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose of the PTV was baseline (100%), composite (100%), and metal amalgam (92.3%). PTV dose ranges were baseline (98%-106%), composite (98%-107%), and metal amalgam (66%-111%). PTV coverage and dose distributions of the composite and native tooth plans were identical. A high incidence of artifacts was found on the planning scans of oral/oropharyngeal cancer patients, adversely impacting CTV visualization. In our phantom model, metal amalgam impacted tumor and tissue density. The PTV was underdosed with

  11. Evaluation of mechanical properties in metal wire mesh supported selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajath, S.; Siddaraju, C.; Nandakishora, Y.; Roy, Sukumar

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate certain specific mechanical properties of certain stainless steel wire mesh supported Selective catalytic reduction catalysts structures wherein the physical properties of the metal wire mesh and also its surface treatments played vital role thereby influencing the mechanical properties. As the adhesion between the stainless steel wire mesh and the catalyst material determines the bond strength and the erosion resistance of catalyst structures, surface modifications of the metal- wire mesh structure in order to facilitate the interface bonding is therefore very important to realize enhanced level of mechanical properties. One way to enhance such adhesion properties, the stainless steel wire mesh is treated with the various acids, i.e., chromic acid, phosphoric acid including certain mineral acids and combination of all those in various molar ratios that could generate surface active groups on metal surface that promotes good interface structure between the metal- wire mesh and metal oxide-based catalyst material and then the stainless steel wire mesh is dipped in the glass powder slurry containing some amount of organic binder. As a result of which the said catalyst material adheres to the metal-wire mesh surface more effectively that improves the erosion profile of supported catalysts structure including bond strength.

  12. Multispectral diffusion-weighted imaging near metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kevin M; Bhave, Sampada; Gaddipati, Ajeet; Hargreaves, Brian A; Gui, Dawei; Peters, Robert; Bedi, Meena; Mannem, Rajeev; Kaushik, S Sivaram

    2018-02-01

    The need for diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI) near metallic implants is becoming increasingly relevant for a variety of clinical diagnostic applications. Conventional DWI methods are significantly hindered by metal-induced image artifacts. A novel approach relying on multispectral susceptibility artifact reduction techniques is presented to address this unmet need. DWI near metal implants is achieved through a combination of several advanced MRI acquisition technologies. Previously described approaches to Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill spin-echo train DWI sequences using the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction are combined with multispectral-imaging metal artifact reduction principles to provide DWI with substantially reduced artifact levels. The presented methods are applied to limited sets of slices over areas of sarcoma risk near six implanted devices. Using the presented methods, DWI assessment without bulk image distortions is demonstrated in the immediate vicinity of metallic interfaces. In one subject, the apparent diffusion coefficient was reduced in a region of suspected sarcoma directly adjacent to fixation hardware. An initial demonstration of minimal-artifact multispectral DWI in the near vicinity of metallic hardware is described and successfully demonstrated on clinical subjects. Magn Reson Med 79:987-993, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  14. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T; Inwood, David W; Leach, Andrew S; Whalley, Penny S; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-22

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  15. Procedure for Matrix Effect Reduction in Metal Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eshaikh, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    A procedure for matrix effect reduction is proposed to enhance the precision of quantitative analysis of metal alloys using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This procedure is based on a number of successive steps in order to correct the signal fluctuations caused by plasma interaction and the matrix effect. The first step is the selection of optimum parameter settings of the detection system, such as laser power, delay time, and focal distance. The second step is the estimation of the absolute or relative values of impurities on the basis of the internal standard calibration. The third step is the analysis of the metal basis of the alloy used as an internal standard, which requires spectrum averaging, whole integral spectrum normalization, and self-absorption correction. Three sets of metal-based alloys (aluminum, steel, and copper) are used in this investigation as reference standards for calibration and validation. Successive improvements of the quality of calibration curves are observed during the proposed procedure.

  16. A theoretical evaluation of possible transition metal electro-catalysts for N2 reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skulason, Egill; Bligaard, Thomas; Gudmundsdottir, Sigrıdur

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the possibility of forming ammonia electrochemically at ambient temperature and pressure are presented. Density functional theory calculations were used in combination with the computational standard hydrogen electrode to calculate the free energy profile for the reduction...... of N2 admolecules and N adatoms on several close-packed and stepped transition metal surfaces in contact with an acidic electrolyte. Trends in the catalytic activity were calculated for a range of transition metal surfaces and applied potentials under the assumption that the activation energy barrier...... scales with the free energy difference in each elementary step. The most active surfaces, on top of the volcano diagrams, are Mo, Fe, Rh, and Ru, but hydrogen gas formation will be a competing reaction reducing the faradaic efficiency for ammonia production. Since the early transition metal surfaces...

  17. Metal-free carbon-carbon bond-forming reductive coupling between boronic acids and tosylhydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barluenga, José; Tomás-Gamasa, María; Aznar, Fernando; Valdés, Carlos

    2009-09-01

    The formation of carbon-carbon bonds is a fundamental transformation in organic synthesis. In spite of the myriad methods available, advantageous methodologies in terms of selectivity, availability of starting materials, operational simplicity, functional-group tolerance, environmental sustainability and economy are in constant demand. In this context, the development of new cross-coupling reactions that use catalysts based on inexpensive and non-toxic metals is attracting increasing attention. Similarly, efficient processes that do not require a metal catalyst are of extraordinary interest. Here, we report a new and efficient metal-free carbon-carbon bond-forming coupling between tosylhydrazones and boronic acids. This reaction is very general and functional-group tolerant. As the required tosylhydrazones are easily generated from carbonyl compounds, it can be seen as a reductive coupling of carbonyls, a process of high synthetic relevance that requires several steps using other methodologies.

  18. Aqueous reductive amination using a dendritic metal catalyst in a dialysis bag

    OpenAIRE

    Willemsen, J.S.; Hest, J.C.M. van; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Water-soluble dendritic iridium catalysts were synthesized by attaching a reactive metal complex to DAB-Am dendrimers via an adapted asymmetric bipyridine ligand. These dendritic catalysts were applied in the aqueous reductive amination of valine while contained in a dialysis bag. Comparable conversions were observed as for the noncompartmentalized counterparts, albeit with somewhat longer reaction times. These results clearly show that the encapsulated catalyst system is suitable to ...

  19. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine...... interactions between one or many users with one or many artifacts. Case studies from a recently run workshop on product sound design are examined....

  20. Electrochemical reduction of CO2on graphene supported transition metals - towards single atom catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haiying; Jagvaral, Yesukhei

    2017-05-10

    In this study, we have investigated the use of single metal atoms supported on defective graphene as catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of CO 2 using the first-principles approach and the computational hydrogen electrode model. Reaction pathways to produce a variety of C 1 products CO, HCOOH, HCHO, CH 3 OH and CH 4 have been studied in detail for five representative transition metals Ag, Cu, Pd, Pt, and Co. Different pathways were revealed in contrast to those found for metallic crystalline surfaces and nanoparticles. These single atom catalysts have demonstrated a general improvement in rate limiting potentials to generate C 1 hydrocarbons. They also show distinct differences in terms of their efficiency and selectivity in CO 2 reduction, which can be correlated with their elemental properties as a function of their group number in the periodic table. Six best candidates for CH 4 production are identified by conducting computational screening of 28 d-block transition metals. Ag has the lowest overpotential (0.73 V), and is followed by Zn, Ni, Pd, Pt and Ru with overpotentials all below 1 V. Cu in the supported single atom form shows a strong preference towards producing CH 3 OH with an overpotential of 0.68 V well below the value of 1.04 V for producing CH 4 .

  1. Metal artefact reduction for a dental cone beam CT image using image segmentation and backprojection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Khotanlou, Hassan; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Due to low dose delivery and fast scanning, the dental Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is the latest technology being implanted for a range of dental imaging. The presence of metallic objects including amalgam or gold fillings in the mouth produces an intuitive image for human jaws. The feasibility of a fast and accurate approach for metal artefact reduction for dental CBCT is investigated. The current study investigates the metal artefact reduction using image segmentation and modification of several sinigrams. In order to reduce metal effects such as beam hardening, streak artefact and intense noises, the application of several algorithms is evaluated. The proposed method includes three stages: preprocessing, reconstruction and post-processing. In the pre-processing stage, in order to reduce the noise level, several phase and frequency filters were applied. At the second stage, based on the specific sinogram achieved for each segment, spline interpolation and weighting backprojection filters were applied to reconstruct the original image. A three-dimensional filter was then applied on reconstructed images, to improve the image quality. Results showed that compared to other available filters, standard frequency filters have a significant influence in the preprocessing stage (ΔHU = 48 ± 6). In addition, with the streak artefact, the probability of beam hardening artefact increases. t e post-processing stage, the application of three-dimensional filters improves the quality of reconstructed images (See Fig. I). Conclusion The proposed method reduces metal artefacts especially where there are more than one metal implanted in the region of interest.

  2. PETRA, MSVAT-SPACE and SEMAC sequences for metal artefact reduction in dental MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Heil, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin; Prager, Marcel; Heiland, Sabine; Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Rammelsberg, Peter; Nittka, Mathias; Grodzki, David

    2017-01-01

    Dental MRI is often impaired by artefacts due to metallic dental materials. Several sequences were developed to reduce susceptibility artefacts. Here, we evaluated a set of sequences for artefact reduction for dental MRI for the first time. Artefact volume, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality were assessed on a 3-T MRI for pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), multiple-slab acquisition with view angle tilting gradient, based on a sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequence (MSVAT-SPACE), slice-encoding for metal-artefact correction (SEMAC) and compared to a standard SPACE and a standard turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Field-of-view and acquisition times were chosen to enable in vivo application. Two implant-supported prostheses were tested (porcelain fused to metal non-precious alloy and monolithic zirconia). Smallest artefact was measured for TSE sequences with no difference between the standard TSE and the SEMAC. MSVAT-SPACE reduced artefacts about 56% compared to the standard SPACE. Effect of the PETRA was dependent on sample used. Image quality and SNR were comparable for all sequences except PETRA, which yielded poor results. There is no benefit in terms of artefact reduction for SEMAC compared to standard TSE. Usage of MSVAT-SPACE is advantageous since artefacts are reduced and higher resolution is achieved. (orig.)

  3. PETRA, MSVAT-SPACE and SEMAC sequences for metal artefact reduction in dental MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Heil, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Prager, Marcel; Heiland, Sabine [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Section of Experimental Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Rammelsberg, Peter [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Prosthodontics, Heidelberg (Germany); Nittka, Mathias; Grodzki, David [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Dental MRI is often impaired by artefacts due to metallic dental materials. Several sequences were developed to reduce susceptibility artefacts. Here, we evaluated a set of sequences for artefact reduction for dental MRI for the first time. Artefact volume, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality were assessed on a 3-T MRI for pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), multiple-slab acquisition with view angle tilting gradient, based on a sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequence (MSVAT-SPACE), slice-encoding for metal-artefact correction (SEMAC) and compared to a standard SPACE and a standard turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Field-of-view and acquisition times were chosen to enable in vivo application. Two implant-supported prostheses were tested (porcelain fused to metal non-precious alloy and monolithic zirconia). Smallest artefact was measured for TSE sequences with no difference between the standard TSE and the SEMAC. MSVAT-SPACE reduced artefacts about 56% compared to the standard SPACE. Effect of the PETRA was dependent on sample used. Image quality and SNR were comparable for all sequences except PETRA, which yielded poor results. There is no benefit in terms of artefact reduction for SEMAC compared to standard TSE. Usage of MSVAT-SPACE is advantageous since artefacts are reduced and higher resolution is achieved. (orig.)

  4. Topotactic Solid-State Metal Hydride Reductions of Sr2MnO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernden, Bradley C; Lussier, Joey A; Bieringer, Mario

    2015-05-04

    We report novel details regarding the reactivity and mechanism of the solid-state topotactic reduction of Sr2MnO4 using a series of solid-state metal hydrides. Comprehensive details describing the active reducing species are reported and comments on the reductive mechanism are provided, where it is shown that more than one electron is being donated by H(-). Commonly used solid-state hydrides LiH, NaH, and CaH2, were characterized in terms of reducing power. In addition the unexplored solid-state hydrides MgH2, SrH2, and BaH2 are evaluated as potential solid-state reductants and characterized in terms of their reductive reactivities. These 6 group I and II metal hydrides show the following trend in terms of reactivity: MgH2 < SrH2 < LiH ≈ CaH2 ≈ BaH2 < NaH. The order of the reductants are discussed in terms of metal electronegativity and bond strengths. NaH and the novel use of SrH2 allowed for targeted synthesis of reduced Sr2MnO(4-x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.37) phases. The enhanced control during synthesis demonstrated by this soft chemistry approach has allowed for a more comprehensive and systematic evaluation of Sr2MnO(4-x) phases than previously reported phases prepared by high temperature methods. Sr2MnO3.63(1) has for the first time been shown to be monoclinic by powder X-ray diffraction and the oxidative monoclinic to tetragonal transition occurs at 450 °C.

  5. Preparation of Direct Reduction Sponge Iron (DRI) Using Pyrite Cinder Containing Nonferrous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Tiejun; Long, Hongming; Di, Zhanxia; Meng, Qingmin; Wang, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Pyrite cinder is a solid waste generated by the sulfuric acid industry and is considered environmentally hazardous. It contains abundant iron, such as Fe2O3 and Fe3O4, and nonferrous metals, such as zinc, lead and copper. In order to try and recycle this material as a source of Fe units, preparation of direct reduction iron (DRI) using pyrite cinder was investigated by coal-based grate rotary kiln process. This process includes chloridizing and reduction roasting. The results show that 97 % lead was removed after the chloridizing process. Copper was only detached in chloridizing process with the removal rate of 78.49 %. Furthermore, the removal of zinc was carried out in both chloridizing and reduction process, and the removal rate of 96.76 % was achieved after reduction roasting. The final product representing a metallization degree of 93.36 % with compressive strength of 1,198 N/pellet was obtained after the oxidized pellets were reduced at 1,050 °C for 80 min.

  6. Monitoring the Electrolytic Reduction Process of Metal Oxide in the LiCl Molten Salt at 650 . deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In kyu; Hong, Soon Seok; Jung, Myoung Soo; Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo

    2010-01-01

    During the electrolytic reduction process of metal oxides, metal oxides are reduced in the cathode basket and oxide ions are oxidized at a platinum anode. Basically the oxide concentration in the bulk should be maintained to be constant during the reduction process, but slow diffusion rate of oxide ions from metal oxide particles to the salt medium results in decreasing the oxide ion concentration. When a high current density is applied for the reduction, lowered lithium oxide concentration causes the platinum anode to be dissolved. To accomplish the reduction of metal oxides without serious damage of platinum anode, monitoring the lithium oxide concentration is very important. For in-situ monitoring the oxide concentration during the reduction, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry(CA) were applied

  7. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  8. Direct reduction of uranium oxide(U3O8) by Li metal and U-metal(Fe, Ni) alloy formation in molten LiCl medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Tack Jin; Choi, In Kyu; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2004-01-01

    Molten salt based electrochemical processes are proposed as a promising method for the future nuclear programs and more specifically for spent fuel processing. The lithium reduction has been introduced to convert actinide oxides into corresponding actinide metal by using lithium metal as a reductant in molten LiCl medium. We have applied similar lab-scale experiments to reduce uranium oxide in an effort to gain additional information on rates and mechanisms

  9. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deligianni, X. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology; Bieri, O. [University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland). Div. of Radiological Physics; Elke, R. [Orthomerian, Basel (Switzerland); Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T. [Merian Iselin Klinik, Basel (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiology

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm{sup 3} ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  10. Optimization of scan time in MRI for total hip prostheses. SEMAC tailoring for prosthetic implants containing different types of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deligianni, X.; Wischer, T.; Egelhof, T.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of soft tissues after total hip arthroplasty is of clinical interest for the diagnosis of various pathologies that are usually invisible with other imaging modalities. As a result, considerable effort has been put into the development of metal artifact reduction MRI strategies, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC). Generally, the degree of metal artifact reduction with SEMAC directly relates to the overall time spent for acquisition, but there is no specific consensus about the most efficient sequence setup depending on the implant material. The aim of this article is to suggest material-tailored SEMAC protocol settings. Five of the most common total hip prostheses (1. Revision prosthesis (S-Rom), 2. Titanium alloy, 3. Mueller type (CoNiCRMo alloy), 4. Old Charnley prosthesis (Exeter/Stryker), 5. MS-30 stem (stainless-steel)) were scanned on a 1.5 T MRI clinical scanner with a SEMAC sequence with a range of artifact-resolving slice encoding steps (SES: 2 - 23) along the slice direction (yielding a total variable scan time ranging from 1 to 10 min). The reduction of the artifact volume in comparison with maximal artifact suppression was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively in order to establish a recommended number of steps for each case. The number of SES that reduced the artifact volume below approximately 300 mm 3 ranged from 3 to 13, depending on the material. Our results showed that although 3 SES steps can be sufficient for artifact reduction for titanium prostheses, at least 11 SES should be used for prostheses made of materials such as certain alloys of stainless steel. Tailoring SES to the implant material and to the desired degree of metal artifact reduction represents a simple tool for workflow optimization of SEMAC imaging near total hip arthroplasty in a clinical setting.

  11. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants : a phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harnish, Roy; Prevrhal, Sven; Alavi, Abass; Zaidi, Habib; Lang, Thomas F.

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom

  12. Iterative metal artefact reduction (MAR) in postsurgical chest CT: comparison of three iMAR-algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Joel; Boos, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino Morris; Heinzler, Niklas; Krzymyk, Karl; Sedlmair, Martin; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of three novel iterative metal artefact (iMAR) algorithms on image quality and artefact degree in chest CT of patients with a variety of thoracic metallic implants. 27 postsurgical patients with thoracic implants who underwent clinical chest CT between March and May 2015 in clinical routine were retrospectively included. Images were retrospectively reconstructed with standard weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) and with three iMAR algorithms (iMAR-Algo1 = Cardiac algorithm, iMAR-Algo2 = Pacemaker algorithm and iMAR-Algo3 = ThoracicCoils algorithm). The subjective and objective image quality was assessed. Averaged over all artefacts, artefact degree was significantly lower for the iMAR-Algo1 (58.9 ± 48.5 HU), iMAR-Algo2 (52.7 ± 46.8 HU) and the iMAR-Algo3 (51.9 ± 46.1 HU) compared with WFBP (91.6 ± 81.6 HU, p algorithms, respectively. iMAR-Algo2 and iMAR-Algo3 reconstructions decreased mild and moderate artefacts compared with WFBP and iMAR-Algo1 (p algorithms led to a significant reduction of metal artefacts and increase in overall image quality compared with WFBP in chest CT of patients with metallic implants in subjective and objective analysis. The iMARAlgo2 and iMARAlgo3 were best for mild artefacts. IMARAlgo1 was superior for severe artefacts. Advances in knowledge: Iterative MAR led to significant artefact reduction and increase image-quality compared with WFBP in CT after implementation of thoracic devices. Adjusting iMAR-algorithms to patients' metallic implants can help to improve image quality in CT.

  13. Complete reduction of high-density UO2 to metallic U in molten Li2O-LiCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Jeong

    2017-10-01

    The large size and high density of spent fuel pellets make it difficult to use the pellets directly in electrolytic reduction (also called as oxide reduction, OR) for pyroprocessing owing to the slow diffusion of molten Li2O-LiCl salt electrolyte into the pellets. In this study, we investigated complete OR of high-density UO2 to metallic U without any remaining UO2. Only partial reductions near the surface of high-density UO2 pellets were observed under operation conditions employing fast electrolysis rate that allowed previously complete reduction of low-density UO2 pellets. Complete reduction of high-density UO2 pellets was observed at fast electrolysis rate when the pellet size was reduced. The complete reduction of high-density UO2 pellets without size reduction was achieved at slow electrolysis rate, which allowed sufficient chemical reduction of UO2 with the lithium metal generated by the cathode reaction.

  14. WE-G-217A-01: Fast Recovery Driven Equilibrium with Automated Switching to Avoid Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, H; Bernstein, M

    2012-06-01

    To reduce image artifacts from the unnecessary use of driven- equilibrium. Driven-equilibrium methods known as fast recovery, RESTORE, or DRIVE enable reduction of repetition time (TR) and hence acquisition time in RARE (FSE or TSE) imaging by applying additional RF pulses following each echotrain to accelerate T1 recovery. Fast recovery (FR) techniques are most useful when TR is less than 4*T1. For neuroimaging, the benefit of FR diminishes as TR increases beyond ∼3s. In regions of rapid susceptibility change such as near metallic implants, FR techniques can introduce artifact because the magnetization is not properly rephased when the FR pulses are applied. In our clinical practice we observe that technologists frequently adjust TR over a range of 2-5s on a patient- specific basis to minimize scan time. We do not observe, however, that technologists reliably disable FR when TR is long enough, introducing possible artifacts. An FR-FSE pulse sequence was modified to automatically disable the FR feature whenever TR exceeded a user-defined threshold (TR0). Under IRB approval, a healthy volunteer was scanned with the sequence using TRs ranging from 1-5s, and TR0=900ms or 6s. Contrast- to-noise measurements were made between CSF, gray matter and white matter for each dataset. The volunteer study shows decreasing benefit of FR as TRs increase beyond 3s. A patient with bilateral auditory brainstem implants scanned with and without FR demonstrates FR-induced artifacts. We demonstrate an FR-FSE pulse sequence that automatically disables fast-recovery whenever TR exceeds an operator- selected threshold. The pulse sequence avoids unnecessary artifacts in regions of rapid susceptibility changes, while retaining the advantages of FR when TRartifacts introduced by FR, and the benefits of automatically avoiding unnecessary use of FR. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Inspection about the corrosion of metallic archaeological artifacts in ground (4). Document prepared by other institute, based on the trust contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Shingo

    2004-01-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate non-destructively the corroded states of iron-based archaeological remains, as they are fully covered by thick rust formed under ground during a long period over a hundred years. The purpose of this study is to estimate the corrosion amounts of such remains with using X-ray CT and summarize the longevity of iron in soil. Eight remains dug out at seven relics were analyzed. The burial periods in soil were estimated to be from 1000 to 1700 years. Metallic iron remained in six remains, and the corrosion amounts were figured out to be from 1 to 3 mm in these periods. In addition, the soil environments of relics were analyzed, and the relation between corrosion behaviors and environmental factors was discussed. The rust was composed of outer goethite and inner magnetite layers in normally oxidizing conditions. On the other hand, a few samples were buried in slightly oxidizing environments, and these were covered by magnetite single layers. The corrosion amount of remains in such an environment was small compared to the others. (author)

  16. Transition metal-depleted graphenes for electrochemical applications via reduction of CO₂ by lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Sofer, Zdenek; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2014-04-24

    Graphene has immense potential for future applications in the electrochemical field, such as in supercapacitors, fuel cells, batteries, or sensors. Graphene materials for such applications are typically fabricated through a top-down approach towards oxidation of graphite to graphite oxide, with consequent exfoliation/reduction to yield reduced graphenes. Such a method allows the manufacture of graphenes in gram/kilogram quantities. However, graphenes prepared by this method can contain residual metallic impurities from graphite which dominate the electrochemical properties of the graphene formed. This dominance hampers their electrochemical application. The fabrication of transition metal-depleted graphene is described, using ultrapure CO₂ (with benefits of low cost and easy availability) and elemental lithium by means of reduction of CO₂ to graphene. This preparation method produces graphene of high purity with electrochemical behavior that is not dominated by any residual transition metal impurities which would dramatically alter its electrochemical properties. Wide application of such methodology in industry and research laboratories is foreseen, especially where graphene is used for electrochemical devices. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Reduction Behaviors of Iron, Vanadium and Titanium Oxides in Smelting of Vanadium Titanomagnetite Metallized Pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Lu; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Fuqiang; Xie, Xiaolin; Tang, Minjun

    2017-09-01

    The complicated reduction behaviors of iron, vanadium and titanium oxides must be accurately controlled for the successful smelting of vanadium titanomagnetite. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the binary basicity, MgO content, smelting temperature, duration and reductants on the reduction of iron, vanadium and titanium oxides during the electric furnace smelting of vanadium titanomagnetite metallized pellets. The results demonstrate that the recovery ratios of both iron and vanadium increase as the binary basicity increases from 0.9 to 1.2, whereas the reduction of titanium oxides is mitigated when the basicity is maintained at 1.1. Compared to its weak effect on the recovery ratio of iron, increasing MgO content improves the vanadium recovery ratio. A low content of titanium in molten iron is obtained when the MgO content in the slag is lower than 11%, whereas the titanium content in the molten iron increases as the MgO content increases further. Moreover, the iron and vanadium recovery ratios, and the Ti content in the molten iron, increase with increasing smelting temperature, duration and reductant content.

  18. Autocatalytic surface reduction and its role in controlling seed-mediated growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tung-Han; Zhou, Shan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Xia, Younan

    2017-12-26

    The growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals typically involves an autocatalytic process, in which the salt precursor adsorbs onto the surface of a growing nanocrystal, followed by chemical reduction to atoms for their incorporation into the nanocrystal. Despite its universal role in the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals, it is still poorly understood and controlled in terms of kinetics. Through the use of well-defined nanocrystals as seeds, including those with different types of facets, sizes, and internal twin structure, here we quantitatively analyze the kinetics of autocatalytic surface reduction in an effort to control the evolution of nanocrystals into predictable shapes. Our kinetic measurements demonstrate that the activation energy barrier to autocatalytic surface reduction is highly dependent on both the type of facet and the presence of twin boundary, corresponding to distinctive growth patterns and products. Interestingly, the autocatalytic process is effective not only in eliminating homogeneous nucleation but also in activating and sustaining the growth of octahedral nanocrystals. This work represents a major step forward toward achieving a quantitative understanding and control of the autocatalytic process involved in the synthesis of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

  19. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  20. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  1. Computational simulation studies of the reduction process of UF4 to metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Wesden de Almeida

    2011-01-01

    The production of metallic uranium is essential for production of fuel elements for using in nuclear reactors manufacturing of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. In IPEN, metallic uranium is produced by magnesiothermical reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is performed in a closed graphite crucible inserted in a sealed metal reactor and no contact with the outside environment. The set is gradually heated in an oven pit, until it reaches the ignition temperature of the reaction (between 600-650 degree C). The modeling of the heating profile of the system can be made using simulation programs by finite element method. Through the thermal profiles in the load, we can have a notion of heating period required for the reaction to occur, allowing the identification of the same group in a greater or smaller yield in metallic uranium production. Thermal properties of UF 4 are estimated, obtaining thermal conductivity and heat capacity using the Flash Laser Method, and for the load UF 4 + Mg, either. The results are compared to laboratory tests to simulate the primary production process. (author)

  2. Determination of uranium and plutonium in metal conversion products from electrolytic reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Heon; Suh, Moo Yul; Joe, Kih Soo; Sohn, Se Chul; Jee, Kwang Young; Kim, Won Ho

    2005-01-01

    Chemical characterization of process materials is required for the optimization of an electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. A study on the determination of fissile materials in the uranium metal products containing corrosion products, fission products and residual process materials has been performed by controlled-potential coulometric titration which is well known in the field of nuclear science and technology. Interference of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg (corrosion products), Nd (fission product) and LiCl molten salt (residual process material) on the determination of uranium and plutonium, and the necessity of plutonium separation prior to the titration are discussed in detail. Under the analytical condition established already, their recovery yields are evaluated along with analytical reliability

  3. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography caused by dental materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klinke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. METHODS: Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. RESULTS: In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. SIGNIFICANCE: Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images.

  4. Automatic BSS-based filtering of metallic interference in MEG recordings: definition and validation using simulated signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Objective. One of the principal drawbacks of magnetoencephalography (MEG) is its high sensitivity to metallic artifacts, which come from implanted intracranial electrodes and dental ferromagnetic prosthesis and produce a high distortion that masks cerebral activity. The aim of this study was to develop an automatic algorithm based on blind source separation (BSS) techniques to remove metallic artifacts from MEG signals. Approach. Three methods were evaluated: AMUSE, a second-order technique; and INFOMAX and FastICA, both based on high-order statistics. Simulated signals consisting of real artifact-free data mixed with real metallic artifacts were generated to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of BSS and the subsequent interference reduction. A completely automatic detection of metallic-related components was proposed, exploiting the known characteristics of the metallic interference: regularity and low frequency content. Main results. The automatic procedure was applied to the simulated datasets and the three methods exhibited different performances. Results indicated that AMUSE preserved and consequently recovered more brain activity than INFOMAX and FastICA. Normalized mean squared error for AMUSE decomposition remained below 2%, allowing an effective removal of artifactual components. Significance. To date, the performance of automatic artifact reduction has not been evaluated in MEG recordings. The proposed methodology is based on an automatic algorithm that provides an effective interference removal. This approach can be applied to any MEG dataset affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step, allowing further analysis of unusable or poor quality data.

  5. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroud, A.M.

    1970-01-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-IIα and II-β. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer α. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2α and 2β, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 α-alcohol more stable than the 2β, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 β epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17α and 17β alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17β alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [fr

  6. Metal-Organic-Framework-Mediated Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Riming

    2018-04-11

    A nitrogen-doped carbon was synthesized through the pyrolysis of the well-known metal-organic framework ZIF-8, followed by a subsequent acid treatment, and has been applied as a catalyst in the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. The resulting electrode shows Faradaic efficiencies to carbon monoxide as high as ∼78%, with hydrogen being the only byproduct. The pyrolysis temperature determines the amount and the accessibility of N species in the carbon electrode, in which pyridinic-N and quaternary-N species play key roles in the selective formation of carbon monoxide.

  7. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2005-06-01

    Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species The overarching goal of this 3-year project is to explore uranium reduction in Anaeromyxobacter species. Specifically, we explore the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, design molecular biology tools to detect and quantify Anaeromyxobacter in pure cultures, consortia, and environmental samples, assess their diversity, distribution, and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites, and attempt the isolation of additional Anaeromyxobacter species from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student with fellowship, no charges to NABIR project), Ivy Thomson (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project), and Ryan Wagner (''Special Topics'' bioinformatics undergraduate student, no charges to NABIR project). Exploratory MALDI-TOF MS experiments for the specific detection of Anaeromyxobacter species were performed by Kerry Preston (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project).

  8. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by the Facultative Anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans SP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Chris A.; Obraztsova, Anna Y.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor were obtained from sediments of Salt Pond, a coastal marine basin near Woods Hole, Mass. A pure culture of a facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducer was isolated, and 16S rRNA analysis demonstrated that this organism was most closely related to Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This organism, designated strain SP1, can grow by coupling the oxidation of acetate or H2 to the reduction of a variety of electron acceptors, including Fe(III), Mn(IV), Cr(VI), and the humic substance analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, but not sulfate. To our knowledge, this is the first mesophilic facultative anaerobe reported to couple acetate oxidation to dissimilatory metal reduction. PMID:10653716

  9. A pseudo-discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (PDART) prior image-based suppression of high density artifacts in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Rizza; Park, Miran; Wi, Sunhee; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-12-21

    We propose a hybrid metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach for computed tomography (CT) that is computationally more efficient than a fully iterative reconstruction method, but at the same time achieves superior image quality to the interpolation-based in-painting techniques. Our proposed MAR method, an image-based artifact subtraction approach, utilizes an intermediate prior image reconstructed via PDART to recover the background information underlying the high density objects. For comparison, prior images generated by total-variation minimization (TVM) algorithm, as a realization of fully iterative approach, were also utilized as intermediate images. From the simulation and real experimental results, it has been shown that PDART drastically accelerates the reconstruction to an acceptable quality of prior images. Incorporating PDART-reconstructed prior images in the proposed MAR scheme achieved higher quality images than those by a conventional in-painting method. Furthermore, the results were comparable to the fully iterative MAR that uses high-quality TVM prior images. - Highlights: • An accelerated reconstruction method, PDART, is proposed for exterior problems. • With a few iterations, soft prior image was reconstructed from the exterior data. • PDART framework has enabled an efficient hybrid metal artifact reduction in CT.

  10. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F.; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  11. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  12. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  13. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfiffner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

  14. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...

  15. Clinical evaluation of TOF versus non-TOF on PET artifacts in simultaneous PET/MR: a dual centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Ahn, Sangtae [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wiesinger, Florian [GE Global Research, Muenchen (Germany); Khalighi, M.M.; Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States); Levin, Craig S. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Stanford, CA (United States); Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Huellner, Martin [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Our objective was to determine clinically the value of time-of-flight (TOF) information in reducing PET artifacts and improving PET image quality and accuracy in simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanning. A total 65 patients who underwent a comparative scan in a simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanner were included. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed, clinically examined, compared and scored. PET imaging artifacts were categorized as large or small implant-related artifacts, as dental implant-related artifacts, and as implant-unrelated artifacts. Differences in image quality, especially those related to (implant) artifacts, were assessed using a scale ranging from 0 (no artifact) to 4 (severe artifact). A total of 87 image artifacts were found and evaluated. Four patients had large and eight patients small implant-related artifacts, 27 patients had dental implants/fillings, and 48 patients had implant-unrelated artifacts. The average score was 1.14 ± 0.82 for non-TOF PET images and 0.53 ± 0.66 for TOF images (p < 0.01) indicating that artifacts were less noticeable when TOF information was included. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts are significantly mitigated with integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. The impact is predominantly seen in patients with significant artifacts due to metal implants. (orig.)

  16. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  17. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell R.; O' Brien, Kendall E. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hansen, Michael S. [National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P < 0.05). Quality ratings favored the optimized GRE cine. Similarly, the average metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P < 0.05), and quality ratings favored the optimized TSE imaging. Imaging sequences tailored to minimize metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static

  18. MR Imaging with Metal-suppression Sequences for Evaluation of Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Brett S; Weinberg, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Metallic artifact at orthopedic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging continues to be an important problem, particularly in the realm of total joint arthroplasty. Complications often follow total joint arthroplasty and can be expected for a small percentage of all implanted devices. Postoperative complications involve not only osseous structures but also adjacent soft tissues-a highly problematic area at MR imaging because of artifacts from metallic prostheses. Without special considerations, susceptibility artifacts from ferromagnetic implants can unacceptably degrade image quality. Common artifacts include in-plane distortions (signal loss and signal pileup), poor or absent fat suppression, geometric distortion, and through-section distortion. Basic methods to reduce metallic artifacts include use of spin-echo or fast spin-echo sequences with long echo train lengths, short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences for fat suppression, a high bandwidth, thin section selection, and an increased matrix. With care and attention to the alloy type (eg, titanium, cobalt-chromium, stainless steel), orientation of the implant, and magnetic field strength, as well as use of proprietary and nonproprietary metal-suppression techniques, previously nondiagnostic studies can yield key diagnostic information. Specifically, sequences such as the metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS), WARP (Siemens Healthcare, Munich, Germany), slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), and multiacquisition with variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC) can be optimized to reveal pathologic conditions previously hidden by periprosthetic artifacts. Complications of total joint arthroplasty that can be evaluated by using MR imaging with metal-suppression sequences include pseudotumoral conditions such as metallosis and particle disease, infection, aseptic prosthesis loosening, tendon injury, and muscle injury. ©RSNA, 2015.

  19. Prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm in flat panel computed tomography - evaluation in patients undergoing transarterial hepatic radioembolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamie, Qeumars Mustafa; Kobe, Adrian Raoul; Mietzsch, Leif; Manhart, Michael; Puippe, Gilbert Dominique; Pfammatter, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of an on-site prototype metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm in cone-beam CT-catheter-arteriography (CBCT-CA) in patients undergoing transarterial radioembolisation (RE) of hepatic masses. Ethical board approved retrospective study of 29 patients (mean 63.7±13.7 years, 11 female), including 16 patients with arterial metallic coils, undergoing CBCT-CA (8s scan, 200 degrees rotation, 397 projections). Image reconstructions with and without prototype MAR algorithm were evaluated quantitatively (streak-artefact attenuation changes) and qualitatively (visibility of hepatic parenchyma and vessels) in near- (3cm) of artefact sources (metallic coils and catheters). Quantitative and qualitative measurements of uncorrected and MAR corrected images and different artefact sources were compared RESULTS: Quantitative evaluation showed significant reduction of near- and far-field streak-artefacts with MAR for both artefact sources (p0.05). Inhomogeneities of attenuation values were significantly higher for metallic coils compared to catheters (pprototype MAR algorithm improves image quality in proximity of metallic coil and catheter artefacts. • Metal objects cause artefacts in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. • These artefacts can be corrected by metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithms. • Corrected images show significantly better visibility of nearby hepatic vessels and tissue. • Better visibility may facilitate image interpretation, save time and radiation exposure.

  20. Recent Advances in Transition-Metal-Mediated Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction: From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Da-Ming

    2017-12-01

    Global climate change and increasing demands for clean energy have brought intensive interest in the search for proper electrocatalysts in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to higher value carbon products such as hydrocarbons. Recently, transition-metal-centered molecules or organic frameworks have been reported to show outstanding electrocatalytic activity in the liquid phase. Their d-orbital electrons are believed to be one of the key factors to capture and convert CO2 molecules to value-added low-carbon fuels. In this review, recent advances in electrocatalytic CO2 reduction have been summarized based on the targeted products, ranging from homogeneous reactions to heterogeneous ones. Their advantages and fallbacks have been pointed out and the existing challenges, especially with respect to the practical and industrial application are addressed.

  1. Topotactic reduction yielding black titanium oxide nanostructures as metallic electronic conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaka, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Detailed analyses of reduced, single crystal, rutile-type TiO(2) via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are reported which reveal that the reduction proceeds topotactically via interstitial diffusion of Ti ions at low temperature, around 350 °C. This important finding encouraged the production of various nanostructured reduced titanium oxides from TiO(2) precursors with morphology retention, and in the process, the synthesis of black titanium oxide nanorods using TiO(2) nanorods was demonstrated. Interestingly, as opposed to the semiconductive behavior of Ti(2)O(3) synthesized at high temperature, topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3) exhibits metallic electrical resistance, and the value at room temperature is quite low (topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3). This work shows that topotactically reduced titanium oxides can have fascinating properties as well as nanostructures.

  2. Recent Advances in Transition-Metal-Mediated Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction: From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change and increasing demands for clean energy have brought intensive interest in the search for proper electrocatalysts in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2 to higher value carbon products such as hydrocarbons. Recently, transition-metal-centered molecules or organic frameworks have been reported to show outstanding electrocatalytic activity in the liquid phase. Their d-orbital electrons are believed to be one of the key factors to capture and convert CO2 molecules to value-added low-carbon fuels. In this review, recent advances in electrocatalytic CO2 reduction have been summarized based on the targeted products, ranging from homogeneous reactions to heterogeneous ones. Their advantages and fallbacks have been pointed out and the existing challenges, especially with respect to the practical and industrial application are addressed.

  3. Bifunctional metal-free catalysis of mesoporous noble carbons for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaushi, Ken; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick; Antonietti, Markus

    2015-04-13

    Electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are key reactions in lithium-oxygen batteries (LOBs) being a promising candidate to store renewable energies due to their high specific energy. However current development on LOBs is suffering from unsuitable catalysts. In particular, carbon-based catalysts were found to perform poorly in this system. Here, we show that metal-free mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbons (meso-NdCs) offer highly promising performances in both ORR and OER; they act as bifunctional catalysts, and can be synthesized by a very simple method. The efficient electrocatalytic activity of ORR and OER was used in a LOB cell during discharge and charge, respectively, and the present system showed a lower overpotential comparable to metal-based catalysts in LOB system. Thus, we demonstrate that meso-NdCs act as a new and affordable candidate for the efficient bifunctional oxygen catalysis, therefore can be applied to many energy-related applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out with noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO2 and MnO2) as catalysts, respectively. However, these metal-based catalysts often suffer from multiple disadvantages, including high cost, low selectivity, poor stability and detrimental environmental effects. Here, we describe a mesoporous carbon foam co-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus that has a large surface area of ˜1,663 m2 g-1 and good electrocatalytic properties for both ORR and OER. This material was fabricated using a scalable, one-step process involving the pyrolysis of a polyaniline aerogel synthesized in the presence of phytic acid. We then tested the suitability of this N,P-doped carbon foam as an air electrode for primary and rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Primary batteries demonstrated an open-circuit potential of 1.48 V, a specific capacity of 735 mAh gZn-1 (corresponding to an energy density of 835 Wh kgZn-1), a peak power density of 55 mW cm-2, and stable operation for 240 h after mechanical recharging. Two-electrode rechargeable batteries could be cycled stably for 180 cycles at 2 mA cm-2. We also examine the activity of our carbon foam for both OER and ORR independently, in a three-electrode configuration, and discuss ways in which the Zn-air battery can be further improved. Finally, our density functional theory calculations reveal that the N,P co-doping and graphene edge effects are essential for the bifunctional electrocatalytic activity of our material.

  5. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  6. Volume reduction of low-level contaminated metal waste by melting: selection of method and conceptual plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.; Mateer, R.S.

    1978-06-01

    A review of the literature and prior experience led to selection of induction melting as the most promising method for volume reduction of low-level transuranic contaminated metal waste. The literature indicates that melting with the appropriate slags significantly lowers the total contamination level of the metals by preferentially concentrating contaminants in the smaller volume of slag. Surface contamination not removed to the slag is diluted in the ingot and is contained uniformly in the metal. This dilution and decontamination offers the potential of lower cost disposal such as shallow burial rather than placement in a national repository. A processing plan is proposed as a model for economic analysis of the collection and volume reduction of contaminated metals. Further development is required to demonstrate feasibility of the plan

  7. NOx reduction over metal-ion exchanged novel zeolite under lean conditions. Activity and hydrothermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbiah, Ayyappan; Gujar, Amit; Price, Geoffrey L.; Cho, Byong K.; Blint, Richard J.; Yie, Jae E.

    2003-01-01

    Zeolite SUZ-4 was synthesized and tested for its hydrothermal stability using a standard aging procedure coupled with NMR spectroscopy, and was identified as a promising support for lean-NO x catalysts for high temperature applications. Various metals such as Cu, Ag, Fe, Co were ion exchanged onto the SUZ-4 zeolite, and their catalytic activity for NO/NO x conversion was measured in the presence of excess oxygen using ethylene as the reducing agent. Among the metal-ions exchanged, copper proved to be the best metal cation for lean-NO x catalysis with the optimum level of exchange at 29-42%. The optimized, fresh Cu/SUZ-4 catalyst achieved 70-80% of NO/NO x conversion activity over a wide range of temperature from 350 to 600C with the maximum conversion temperature at 450C. The presence of H 2 O and SO 2 reduced the NO/NO x conversion by about 30% of the fresh Cu/SUZ-4 catalyst due possibly to the blocking of active sites for NO/NO x adsorption. Substitution of gasoline vapor for ethylene as the reductant improved the NO x reduction activity of the fresh Cu/SUZ-4 catalyst at high temperatures above 350C. Aging the Cu/SUZ-4 catalyst resulted in a slight shift of activity profile toward higher temperatures, yielding an increase of NO conversion by 16% and a decrease of NO x conversion by 15% at 525C. The effect of H 2 O and SO 2 on the aged catalyst was to reduce the NO activity by 20% and NO x activity by 30% at 500C. The effect of space velocity change was not significant except in the low temperature range where the reaction light-off occurs. Adsorption/desorption measurements indicate that aging Cu/SUZ-4 results in partial migration/agglomeration of Cu particles in the pores thereby reducing the NO/NO x activity. Overall, the NO x conversion efficiency of Cu/SUZ-4, for both fresh and aged, is much better than the benchmark Cu/ZSM-5 in the presence of H 2 O and/or SO 2

  8. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpers Charles N

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5. The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1 preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2 stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3 reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures.

  9. Supporting palladium metal on gold nanoparticles improves its catalysis for nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhao, Zhun; Velazquez, Juan C; Pretzer, Lori A; Heck, Kimberly N; Wong, Michael S

    2014-01-07

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) anions are often found in groundwater and surface water as contaminants globally, especially in agricultural areas due to nitrate-rich fertilizer use. One popular approach to studying the removal of nitrite/nitrate from water has been their degradation to dinitrogen via Pd-based reduction catalysis. However, little progress has been made towards understanding how the catalyst structure can improve activity. Focusing on the catalytic reduction of nitrite in this study, we report that Au NPs supporting Pd metal ("Pd-on-Au NPs") show catalytic activity that varies with volcano-shape dependence on Pd surface coverage. At room temperature, in CO2-buffered water, and under H2 headspace, the NPs were maximally active at a Pd surface coverage of 80%, with a first-order rate constant (k(cat) = 576 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)) that was 15x and 7.5x higher than monometallic Pd NPs (~4 nm; 40 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)) and Pd/Al2O3 (1 wt% Pd; 76 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)), respectively. Accounting only for surface Pd atoms, these NPs (576 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)) were 3.6x and 1.6x higher than monometallic Pd NPs (160 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)) and Pd/Al2O3 (361 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)). These NPs retained ~98% of catalytic activity at a chloride concentration of 1 mM, whereas Pd/Al2O3 lost ~50%. The Pd-on-Au nanostructure is a promising approach to improve the catalytic reduction process for nitrite and, with further development, also for nitrate anions.

  10. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Single site porphyrine-like structures advantages over metals for selective electrochemical CO2 reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Alexander; Ju, Wen; Varela, Ana Sofia

    2017-01-01

    the competing Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). The single metal site in a porphyrine-like structure requires an ontop site binding of hydrogen, compared to the hollow site binding of hydrogen on a metal catalyst surface. The difference in binding site structure gives a fundamental energy-shift in the scaling......Currently, no catalysts are completely selective for the electrochemical CO2 Reduction Reaction (CO2RR). Based on trends in density functional theory calculations of reaction intermediates we find that the single metal site in a porphyrine-like structure has a simple advantage of limiting...

  12. Graphene hydrogels with embedded metal nanoparticles as efficient catalysts in 4-nitrophenol reduction and methylene blue decolorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żelechowska Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of the graphene hydrogels with three different metallic nanoparticles, that is Au, Ag and Cu, respectively is presented. Synthesized in a one-pot approach graphene hydrogels with embedded metallic nanoparticles were tested as heterogeneous catalysts in a model reaction of 4-nitrophenol reduction. The highest activity was obtained for graphene hydrogel with Cu nanoparticles and additional reaction of methylene blued degradation was evaluated using this system. The obtained outstanding catalytic activity arises from the synergistic effect of graphene and metallic nanoparticles. The hydrogel form of the catalyst benefits in the easiness in separation from the reaction mixture (for example using tweezers and reusability.

  13. Sequential separation of transuranic elements and fission products from uranium metal ingots in electrolytic reduction process of spent PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Heon Lee; Kih Soo Joe; Won Ho Kim; Euo Chang Jung; Kwang Yong Jee

    2009-01-01

    A sequential separation procedure has been developed for the determination of transuranic elements and fission products in uranium metal ingot samples from an electrolytic reduction process for a metallization of uranium dioxide to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt at 650 deg C. Pu, Np and U were separated using anion-exchange and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatography. Cs, Sr, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Zr and Mo were separated in several groups from Am and Cm using TBP and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) extraction chromatography. Effect of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg, which were corrosion products formed through the process, on the separation of the analytes was investigated in detail. The validity of the separation procedure was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the stable metals and 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am and 244 Cm added to a synthetic uranium metal ingot dissolved solution. (author)

  14. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-07

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions.

  15. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flache, Lucie, E-mail: Lucie.Flache@bio.uni-giessen.de [Mammalian Ecology Group, Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Ekschmitt, Klemens [Animal Ecology, Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Kierdorf, Uwe [Department of Biology, University of Hildesheim, Universitätsplatz 1, D-31141 Hildesheim (Germany); Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander [Institute of Soil Science and Soil Conservation, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Encarnação, Jorge A. [Mammalian Ecology Group, Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats. - Highlights: • Changes in metal exposure of bats due to remediation measure are documented. • Bats are suitable bioindicators of metal pollution. • Bat hair is a useful monitoring unit in such studies.

  16. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flache, Lucie; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Kierdorf, Uwe; Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Encarnação, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats. - Highlights: • Changes in metal exposure of bats due to remediation measure are documented. • Bats are suitable bioindicators of metal pollution. • Bat hair is a useful monitoring unit in such studies.

  17. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfiffner, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Löffler, Frank [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ritalahti, Kirsti [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sayler, Gary [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Layton, Alice [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hettich, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The overall goal for this funded project was to develop and exploit environmental metaproteomics tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U speciation at U-contaminated sites, correlate metaproteomics profiles with geochemical parameters and U(VI) reduction activity (or lack thereof), elucidate mechanisms contributing to U(VI) reduction, and provide remediation project managers with additional information to make science-based site management decisions for achieving cleanup goals more efficiently. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the microbiology contribution to metal and radionuclide reduction, the cellular components, pathway(s), and mechanisms involved in U trans-formation remain poorly understood. Recent advances in (meta)proteomics technology enable detailed studies of complex samples, including environmental samples, which differ between sites and even show considerable variability within the same site (e.g., the Oak Ridge IFRC site). Additionally, site-specific geochemical conditions affect microbial activity and function, suggesting generalized assessment and interpretations may not suffice. This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past few years. Field-related analyses used Oak Ridge IFRC field ground water samples from locations where slow-release substrate biostimulation has been implemented to accelerate in situ U(VI) reduction rates. Our overarching hypothesis was that the metabolic signature in environmental samples, as deciphered by the metaproteome measurements, would show a relationship with U(VI) reduction activity. Since metaproteomic and metagenomic characterizations were computationally challenging and time-consuming, we used a tiered approach that combines database mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements, phylogenetic

  18. Comparison and Combination of Dual-Energy- and Iterative-Based Metal Artefact Reduction on Hip Prosthesis and Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Malte N; Schabel, Christoph; Thomas, Christoph; Raupach, Rainer; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    To compare and combine dual-energy based and iterative metal artefact reduction on hip prosthesis and dental implants in CT. A total of 46 patients (women:50%,mean age:63±15years) with dental implants or hip prostheses (n = 30/20) were included and examined with a second-generation Dual Source Scanner. 120kV equivalent mixed-images were derived from reconstructions of the 100/Sn140kV source images using no metal artefact reduction (NOMAR) and iterative metal artefact reduction (IMAR). We then generated monoenergetic extrapolations at 130keV from source images without IMAR (DEMAR) or from source images with IMAR, (IMAR+DEMAR). The degree of metal artefact was quantified for NOMAR, IMAR, DEMAR and IMAR+DEMAR using a Fourier-based method and subjectively rated on a five point Likert scale by two independent readers. In subjects with hip prosthesis, DEMAR and IMAR resulted in significantly reduced artefacts compared to standard reconstructions (33% vs. 56%; for DEMAR and IMAR; respectively, pdental implants only IMAR showed a significant reduction of artefacts whereas DEMAR did not (71%, vs. 8% pprosthesis: 47%, dental implants 18%; both pdental implants, compared to a dual energy based method. The combination of DE-source images with IMAR and subsequent monoenergetic extrapolation provides an incremental benefit compared to both single methods.

  19. Synthesis of 2-Alkenylquinoline by Reductive Olefination of Quinoline N-Oxide under Metal-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hong; Liu, Yuanhong; Zhao, Peng; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    Synthesis of 2-alkenylquinoline by reductive olefination of quinoline N-oxide under metal-free conditions is disclosed. Practically, the reaction could be performed with quinoline as starting material via a one-pot, two-step process. A possible mechanism is proposed that involves a sequential 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and acid-assisted ring opening followed by a dehydration process.

  20. In-situ metal precipitation in a zinc-aerobic, sandy aquifer by means of biological sulfate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, G.M.C.M.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The applicability of in situ metal precipitation (ISMP) based on bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with molasses as carbon source was tested for the immobilization of a zinc plume in an aquifer with highly unsuitable initial conditions (high Eh, low pH, low organic matter content, and low sulfate

  1. A study on the reduction of uranium oxide to uranium metal in LiCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Hur, J. M.; Lee, W. K.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Research for the analysis on a metallization process of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li molten salt was carried out. Effect of a concentration of Li 2 O on the metallization process was also studied. The new concept, electrochemical reduction of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt was proposed. The concept is based on the integrated process of metallization of UO 2 with simultaneous electrochemical reduction of Li 2 O which is recycled in a closed system. In a LiCl-Li molten salt system, U 3 O 8 whose conversion ratio to U turns out to be 97.1%, showed a better metallization characteristic than UO 2 . It is verified that electrochemically reduced Li is well deposited on the UO 2 powder cathode through a porous magnesia filter in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. In that process Li 2 O was from by the reduction process of UO 2 to U. This electrochemical reduction process showed good results to covert UO 2 to U

  2. Design of Laccase-Metal Organic Framework-Based Bioelectrodes for Biocatalytic Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Snehangshu; Sene, Saad; Mousty, Christine; Serre, Christian; Chaussé, Annie; Legrand, Ludovic; Steunou, Nathalie

    2016-08-10

    Laccase in combination with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as a mediator is a well-known bioelectrocatalyst for the 4-electron oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The present work deals with the first exploitation of mesoporous iron(III) trimesate-based metal organic frameworks (MOF) MIL-100(Fe) (MIL stands for materials from Institut Lavoisier) as a new and efficient immobilization matrix of laccase for the building up of biocathodes for ORR. First, the immobilization of ABTS in the pores of the MOF was studied by combining micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and N2 porosimetry. The ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-based modified electrode presents excellent properties in terms of charge transfer kinetics and ionic conductivity as well as a very stable and reproducible electrochemical response, showing that MIL-100(Fe) provides a suitable and stabilizing microenvironment for electroactive ABTS molecules. In a second step, laccase was further immobilized on the MIL-100(Fe)-ABTS matrix. The Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-CIE bioelectrode presents a high electrocatalytic current density of oxygen reduction and a reproducible electrochemical response characterized by a high stability over a long period of time (3 weeks). These results constitute a significant advance in the field of laccase-based bioelectrocatalysts for ORR. According to our work, it appears that the high catalytic efficiency of Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe) for ORR may result from a synergy of chemical and catalytic properties of MIL-100(Fe) and laccase.

  3. Improved artifact rejection and isolation of compound action potentials by means of digital subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I; Shizgal, P

    1989-12-01

    When recording compound action potentials (CAPs) elicited by stimulating near the recording site, it may prove difficult to distinguish the CAP from the shock artifact because of their overlap in time. This problem is compounded when a pair of stimulation pulses is delivered because the CAP elicited by the test pulse (T pulse) may be partially superimposed on the artifact and response elicited by the conditioning pulse (C pulse) as well as on the T pulse artifact. Methods based on digital subtraction were used to address these problems. A record was obtained with the C-T interval adjusted to be slightly less than the absolute refractory period so that the T pulse would fail to elicit a CAP. A record consisting of a C pulse artifact and response was subtracted from this record to yield a 'pure' shock artifact. In principle, subtracting this 'artifact-only' record from records obtained with single pulses removes the shock artifact and yields a 'pure' response. An extension of this method was used to isolate T pulse responses from the C pulse artifact, C pulse response, and T pulse artifact. These methods proved effective in improving the isolation of the CAPs of interest from other features of the raw records. Limitations of the techniques and their complementarity with other methods of artifact reduction are discussed.

  4. Prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm in flat panel computed tomography - evaluation in patients undergoing transarterial hepatic radioembolisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamie, Qeumars Mustafa; Kobe, Adrian Raoul; Mietzsch, Leif; Puippe, Gilbert Dominique; Pfammatter, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman; Manhart, Michael

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of an on-site prototype metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm in cone-beam CT-catheter-arteriography (CBCT-CA) in patients undergoing transarterial radioembolisation (RE) of hepatic masses. Ethical board approved retrospective study of 29 patients (mean 63.7±13.7 years, 11 female), including 16 patients with arterial metallic coils, undergoing CBCT-CA (8s scan, 200 degrees rotation, 397 projections). Image reconstructions with and without prototype MAR algorithm were evaluated quantitatively (streak-artefact attenuation changes) and qualitatively (visibility of hepatic parenchyma and vessels) in near- (<1cm) and far-field (>3cm) of artefact sources (metallic coils and catheters). Quantitative and qualitative measurements of uncorrected and MAR corrected images and different artefact sources were compared Quantitative evaluation showed significant reduction of near- and far-field streak-artefacts with MAR for both artefact sources (p<0.001), while remaining stable for unaffected organs (all p>0.05). Inhomogeneities of attenuation values were significantly higher for metallic coils compared to catheters (p<0.001) and decreased significantly for both after MAR (p<0.001). Qualitative image scores were significantly improved after MAR (all p<0.003) with by trend higher artefact degrees for metallic coils compared to catheters. In patients undergoing CBCT-CA for transarterial RE, prototype MAR algorithm improves image quality in proximity of metallic coil and catheter artefacts. (orig.)

  5. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S.D.; Li, S.X.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl - 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  6. Prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm in flat panel computed tomography - evaluation in patients undergoing transarterial hepatic radioembolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamie, Qeumars Mustafa; Kobe, Adrian Raoul; Mietzsch, Leif; Puippe, Gilbert Dominique; Pfammatter, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Manhart, Michael [Imaging Concepts, HC AT IN IMC, Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Advanced Therapies, Innovation, Forchheim (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the effect of an on-site prototype metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm in cone-beam CT-catheter-arteriography (CBCT-CA) in patients undergoing transarterial radioembolisation (RE) of hepatic masses. Ethical board approved retrospective study of 29 patients (mean 63.7±13.7 years, 11 female), including 16 patients with arterial metallic coils, undergoing CBCT-CA (8s scan, 200 degrees rotation, 397 projections). Image reconstructions with and without prototype MAR algorithm were evaluated quantitatively (streak-artefact attenuation changes) and qualitatively (visibility of hepatic parenchyma and vessels) in near- (<1cm) and far-field (>3cm) of artefact sources (metallic coils and catheters). Quantitative and qualitative measurements of uncorrected and MAR corrected images and different artefact sources were compared Quantitative evaluation showed significant reduction of near- and far-field streak-artefacts with MAR for both artefact sources (p<0.001), while remaining stable for unaffected organs (all p>0.05). Inhomogeneities of attenuation values were significantly higher for metallic coils compared to catheters (p<0.001) and decreased significantly for both after MAR (p<0.001). Qualitative image scores were significantly improved after MAR (all p<0.003) with by trend higher artefact degrees for metallic coils compared to catheters. In patients undergoing CBCT-CA for transarterial RE, prototype MAR algorithm improves image quality in proximity of metallic coil and catheter artefacts. (orig.)

  7. [Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts of five common dental materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yisheng; Yu, Risheng

    2015-06-01

    To compare five materials commonly used in dentistry, including three types of metals and two types of ceramics, by using different sequences of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strengths (0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T). Three types of metals and two types of ceramics that were fabricated into the same size and thickness as an incisor crown were placed in a plastic tank filled with saline. The crowns were scanned using an magnetic resonance (MR) machine at 0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T field strengths. The TlWI and T2WI images were obtained. The differences of various materials in different artifacts of field MR scans were determined. The zirconia crown presented no significant artifacts when scanned under the three types of MRI field strengths. The artifacts of casting ceramic were minimal. All dental precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain, and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy showed varying degrees of artifacts under the three MRI field strengths. Zirconia and casting ceramics present almost no or faint artifacts. By contrast, precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy display MRI artifacts. The artifact area increase with increasing magnetic field.

  8. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  9. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  10. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene on Transition Metal Substrates as Efficient Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Oxygen Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Si; Liu, Nanshu; Wang, Zhiyu; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-07-12

    Composites of transition metal and carbon-based materials are promising bifunctional catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), and are widely used in rechargeable metal-air batteries. However, the mechanism of their enhanced bicatalytic activities remains elusive. Herein, we construct N-doped graphene supported by Co(111) and Fe(110) substrates as bifunctional catalysts for ORR and OER in alkaline media. First-principles calculations show that these heterostructures possess a large number of active sites for ORR and OER with overpotentials comparable to those of noble metal benchmark catalysts. The catalytic activity is modulated by the coupling strength between graphene and the metal substrates, as well as the charge distribution in the graphitic sheet, which is delicately mediated by N dopants. These theoretical results uncover the key parameters that govern the bicatalytic properties of hybrid materials and help prescribe the principles for designing multifunctional electrocatalysts of high performance.

  11. Historical Artifact Collection at the East Tennessee Technology Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.; Wood, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally built during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Known as the K-25 Site, its primary mission was to enrich uranium for use in atomic weapons. During the Cold War, the site's mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle spent fuel. In the 1980's, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process and production ceased. The emphasis of the mission for the ETTP was then changed to environmental management and restoration operation. Beginning in the 1990's, re-industrialization (conversion of under-utilized government facilities for use by the private sector) became a major mission at the ETTP. These activities involve cleaning and demolishing facilities. Decommission and demolition (D and D) of facilities at the ETTP or Manhattan Project K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) presented significant challenges complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that was negotiated with the stakeholders. Development of a process to identify, record and preserve the artifacts and the cooperation of several agencies and contractors were critical to completing the collection of the artifacts without impacting the D and D project schedule. Additional challenges included contaminated and classified artifacts, entry to facilities with hazardous conditions, schedule pressures and funding for collection and permanent storage. A process was developed to achieve compliance with the requirements of the NHPA. The NHPA requirements and implementing instruments at the ETTP as well as the process developed to preserve significant Manhattan Project era artifacts at the ETTP will be discussed. Implementation of the artifact collection process is also summarized. The challenge of complying with the

  12. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging

  13. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesize nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite

  14. Dislocation and spontaneous reduction of the femoral implant against the femoral neck in an infected metal on metal hip resurfacing with complex collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, Bernhard, E-mail: Bernhard.Tins@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY 107 AG (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Metal on metal resurfacing hip implants are known to have complications unique to this type of implant. The case presented adds a further previously not described complication, the dislocation and spontaneous reduction of the pin of the femoral component against the femoral neck. The radiographic and CT findings are demonstrated. The dislocation was aided by bone loss due to an infection with a large periarticular collection. Periarticular collections in hip resurfacings are often due to a hypersensitivity type reaction to metal debris. However in the case presented it was due to infection. MRI was not able to discern the infection from a sterile collection. CT demonstrated bone loss and periosteal reaction suggestive of infection. In addition calcification of the pseudocapsule was seen, this is not a recognized feature of sterile collections.

  15. Ross filter pairs for metal artefact reduction in x-ray tomography: a case study based on imaging and segmentation of metallic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Abbey, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Ross filter pairs have recently been demonstrated as a highly effective means of producing quasi-monoenergetic beams from polychromatic X-ray sources. They have found applications in both X-ray spectroscopy and for elemental separation in X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Here we explore whether they could be applied to the problem of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for applications in medical imaging. Metal artefacts are a common problem in X-ray imaging of metal implants embedded in bone and soft tissue. A number of data post-processing approaches to MAR have been proposed in the literature, however these can be time-consuming and sometimes have limited efficacy. Here we describe and demonstrate an alternative approach based on beam conditioning using Ross filter pairs. This approach obviates the need for any complex post-processing of the data and enables MAR and segmentation from the surrounding tissue by exploiting the absorption edge contrast of the implant.

  16. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  17. Off-resonance suppression for multispectral MR imaging near metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, J Chiel; van Yperen, Gert H; Blume, Ulrike A; Bos, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Metal artifact reduction in MRI within clinically feasible scan-times without through-plane aliasing. Existing metal artifact reduction techniques include view angle tilting (VAT), which resolves in-plane distortions, and multispectral imaging (MSI) techniques, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) and multi-acquisition with variable resonances image combination (MAVRIC), that further reduce image distortions, but significantly increase scan-time. Scan-time depends on anatomy size and anticipated total spectral content of the signal. Signals outside the anticipated spatial region may cause through-plane back-folding. Off-resonance suppression (ORS), using different gradient amplitudes for excitation and refocusing, is proposed to provide well-defined spatial-spectral selectivity in MSI to allow scan-time reduction and flexibility of scan-orientation. Comparisons of MSI techniques with and without ORS were made in phantom and volunteer experiments. Off-resonance suppressed SEMAC (ORS-SEMAC) and outer-region suppressed MAVRIC (ORS-MAVRIC) required limited through-plane phase encoding steps compared with original MSI. Whereas SEMAC (scan time: 5'46") and MAVRIC (4'12") suffered from through-plane aliasing, ORS-SEMAC and ORS-MAVRIC allowed alias-free imaging in the same scan-times. ORS can be used in MSI to limit the selected spatial-spectral region and contribute to metal artifact reduction in clinically feasible scan-times while avoiding slice aliasing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Visibility of Temporal Artifacts in Stereo 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohwan Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The temporal protocols used in stereoscopic 3D (S3D displays have many parameters that affect the visibility of temporal artifacts. Flicker is visible at low presentation rates. Motion artifacts—judder, edge banding, and edge blur—are salient at low capture rates. Different stereoscopic techniques can introduce distortions in apparent depth. For example, temporal interlacing (i.e., alternating presentation to the two eyes can cause depth distortions for objects moving horizontally across the screen. Spatial interlacing (i.e., presenting information to the two eyes simultaneously, but with alternate pixel rows going to different eyes avoids depth distortions, but causes a reduction in effect spatial resolution. We performed a psychophysical experiment to measure perceptual thresholds for three temporal artifacts in S3D displays: flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortions. We used a stereoscope consisting of two CRTs running at 200 Hz. A high-precision synchronizer drove the two CRTs thereby allowing us to simulate a wide variety of S3D display protocols accurately. We measured the visibility of the three artifacts while varying presentation rate, capture rate, object contrast, and object velocity. We tested both temporal- and spatial-interlacing protocols. From the results, we developed a perceptual model of artifact visibility in S3D displays.

  19. Application of a chronoamperometric measurement to the on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction for uranium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tack-Jin; Cho, Young-Hwan; Choi, In-Kyu; Kang, Jun-Gill; Song, Kyuseok; Jee, Kwang-Yong

    2008-04-01

    Both a potentiometric and a chronoamperometric electrochemical technique have been applied in an attempt to develop an efficient method for an on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at a high-temperature in a molten salt medium. As a result of this study, it was concluded that the chronoamperometric method provided a simple and effective way for a direct on-line monitoring measurement of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at 650 °C by the measuring electrical currents dependency on a variation of the reduction time for the reaction. A potentiometric method, by adopting a homemade oxide ion selective electrode made of ZrO 2 stabilized by a Y 2O 3 doping, however, was found to be inappropriate for an on-line monitoring of the reduction reaction of uranium oxide in the presence of lithium metal due to an abnormal behavior of the adopted electrodes. The observed experimental results were discussed in detail by comparing them with previously published experimental data.

  20. Application of a chronoamperometric measurement to the on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction for uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tack-Jin; Cho, Young-Hwan; Choi, In-Kyu; Kang, Jun-Gill; Song, Kyuseok; Jee, Kwang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    Both a potentiometric and a chronoamperometric electrochemical technique have been applied in an attempt to develop an efficient method for an on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at a high-temperature in a molten salt medium. As a result of this study, it was concluded that the chronoamperometric method provided a simple and effective way for a direct on-line monitoring measurement of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at 650 o C by the measuring electrical currents dependency on a variation of the reduction time for the reaction. A potentiometric method, by adopting a homemade oxide ion selective electrode made of ZrO 2 stabilized by a Y 2 O 3 doping, however, was found to be inappropriate for an on-line monitoring of the reduction reaction of uranium oxide in the presence of lithium metal due to an abnormal behavior of the adopted electrodes. The observed experimental results were discussed in detail by comparing them with previously published experimental data

  1. Artifacts as Authoritative Actors in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Virginie; Kelchtermans, Geert; Vermeir, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Educational reforms are often translated in and implemented through artifacts. Although research has frequently treated artifacts as merely functional, more recent work acknowledges the complex relationship between material artifacts and human/organizational behavior. This article aims at disentangling this relationship in order to deepen our…

  2. Streak artifacts in dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, K.; Kormano, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments with a body phantom during dynamic CT scanning with the Somatom 2 CT scanner indicate that the periodic streak artifacts seen on the anterior part of the liver in patients are caused by peristalsis of the stomach and resulting motion of the air fluid level. Therefore, the attenuation values of the anterior portion of the liver artifactually oscillate around the baseline value during the dynamic series of scans. This artifact is produced by a change in the position of the stomach air fluid level and is dependent on the direction of tube rotation. The mean of the artifactually oscillating attenuation readings is close to the mean density but usually useless in dynamic CT because the attenuation values change so rapidly in the dynamic phase that averaging measurements also will cause errors. (Auth.)

  3. Inter-deriving Semantic Artifacts for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    .e., big-step operational semantics) specified in Abadi and Cardelli's monograph. This abstract machine therefore embodies the soundness of Abadi and Cardelli's reduction semantics and natural semantics relative to each other. To move closer to actual implementations, which use environments rather than......We present a new abstract machine for Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects. What is special about this semantic artifact (i.e., man-made construct) is that is mechanically corresponds to both the reduction semantics (i.e., small-step operational semantics) and the natural semantics (i...... actual substitutions, we then represent object methods as closures and in the same inter-derivational spirit, we present three new semantic artifacts: a reduction semantics for a version of Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects with explicit substitutions, an environment-based abstract machine...

  4. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  5. Reduction of heavy metals in residues from the dismantling of waste electrical and electronic equipment before incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Hu, Li-Fang; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-05-15

    Residues disposal from the dismantling of waste electrical and electronic equipment are challenging because of the large waste volumes, degradation-resistance, low density and high heavy metal content. Incineration is advantageous for treating these residues but high heavy metal contents may exist in incinerator input and output streams. We have developed and studied a specialized heavy metal reduction process, which includes sieving and washing for treating residues before incineration. The preferable screen aperture for sieving was found to be 2.36mm (8 meshes) in this study; using this screen aperture resulted in the removal of approximately 47.2% Cu, 65.9% Zn, 26.5% Pb, 55.4% Ni and 58.8% Cd from the residues. Subsequent washing further reduces the heavy metal content in the residues larger than 2.36mm, with preferable conditions being 400rpm rotation speed, 5min washing duration and liquid-to-solid ratio of 25:1. The highest cumulative removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni and Cd after sieving and washing reached 81.1%, 61.4%, 75.8%, 97.2% and 72.7%, respectively. The combined sieving and washing process is environmentally friendly, can be used for the removal of heavy metals from the residues and has benefits in terms of heavy metal recycling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metallic reductant-free synthesis of α-substituted propionic acid derivatives through hydrocarboxylation of alkenes with a formate salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Jun; Miyama, Ko; Zhu, Chuan; Iwasawa, Nobuharu

    2017-04-04

    A PGeP-pincer palladium-catalyzed hydrocarboxylation of styrenes to obtain pharmaceutically important α-arylpropionic acid derivatives was achieved using a formate salt as both a reductant and a CO 2 source. The reaction was also applicable to vinylsulfone and acrylates. Isotope labeling experiments demonstrated that a CO 2 -recycling mechanism is operative through generation and reaction of a benzylpalladium complex as a carbon nucleophile. This protocol has realized a mild and atom economical CO 2 -fixation reaction without the necessity of using strong metallic reductants.

  7. Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor); Fultz, Brent (Inventor); Witham, Charles K. (Inventor); Bowman, Robert C. (Inventor); Hightower, Adrian (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  8. Reduction of front-metallization grid shading in concentrator cells through laser micro-grooved cover glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Linares, Pablo; Voarino, Philippe; Besson, Pierre; Baudrit, Mathieu; Dominguez, César; Dellea, Olivier; Fugier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Concentrator solar cell front-grid metallizations are designed so that the trade-off between series resistance and shading factor (SF) is optimized for a particular irradiance. High concentrator photovoltaics (CPV) typically requires a metallic electrode pattern that covers up to 10% of the cell surface. The shading effect produced by this front electrode results in a significant reduction in short-circuit current (I SC ) and hence, in a significant efficiency loss. In this work we present a cover glass (originally meant to protect the cell surface) that is laser-grooved with a micrometric pattern that redirects the incident solar light towards interfinger regions and away from the metallic electrodes, where they would be wasted in terms of photovoltaic generation. Quantum efficiency (QE) and current (I)-voltage (V) characterization under concentration validate the proof-of-concept, showing great potential for CPV applications

  9. Reduction of front-metallization grid shading in concentrator cells through laser micro-grooved cover glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Linares, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.garcia-linares@cea.fr; Voarino, Philippe; Besson, Pierre; Baudrit, Mathieu [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Dominguez, César [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque à Concentration, INES, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Dellea, Olivier; Fugier, Pascal [CEA-LITEN, Laboratoire de Surfaces Nanostructurées, Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-28

    Concentrator solar cell front-grid metallizations are designed so that the trade-off between series resistance and shading factor (SF) is optimized for a particular irradiance. High concentrator photovoltaics (CPV) typically requires a metallic electrode pattern that covers up to 10% of the cell surface. The shading effect produced by this front electrode results in a significant reduction in short-circuit current (I{sub SC}) and hence, in a significant efficiency loss. In this work we present a cover glass (originally meant to protect the cell surface) that is laser-grooved with a micrometric pattern that redirects the incident solar light towards interfinger regions and away from the metallic electrodes, where they would be wasted in terms of photovoltaic generation. Quantum efficiency (QE) and current (I)-voltage (V) characterization under concentration validate the proof-of-concept, showing great potential for CPV applications.

  10. Efficient Process for Direct Atomic Layer Deposition of Metallic Cu Thin Films Based on an Organic Reductant

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Tripurari S.; Karppinen, Maarit

    2017-01-01

    The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013) / ERC Grant Agreement n. 339478. Acronym LAYERENG-HYBMAT. | openaire: EC/FP7/339478/EU//LAYERENG-HYBMAT We report a promising approach to use an organic reductant for in situ atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metallic copper films. The process is based on sequentially pulsed precursors copper acetyl acetonate (acac), water, and h...

  11. Continuous-flow synthesis of primary amines: Metal-free reduction of aliphatic and aromatic nitro derivatives with trichlorosilane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Porta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The metal-free reduction of nitro compounds to amines mediated by trichlorosilane was successfully performed for the first time under continuous-flow conditions. Aromatic as well as aliphatic nitro derivatives were converted to the corresponding primary amines in high yields and very short reaction times with no need for purification. The methodology was also extended to the synthesis of two synthetically relevant intermediates (precursors of baclofen and boscalid.

  12. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    would like to replace ‘art’ with ‘type’, in a search for the idea­typemachines of our time.We would be most honored if you would join us in our pursuit.”In the hopes of launching a non­dogmatic effort to discover the idea­type­machines of our time, a conference was held in Copenhagen in 2010, where...... uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes art.’ (Sol LeWitt, ‘Paragraph on Conceptual art’, in Artforum, 1967.)We would like to draw on Sol LeWitt’s vision and then we...

  13. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    CONCEPTUAL TYPE: TYPE LED BY IDEAS 26/10/12“Where are the idealistic fonts, the artsy fonts, the non fonts, the political fonts, the funny fonts, the difficult fonts, the fonts that don’t look like fonts, the fonts that are frontiers of new beliefs? We would like to focus on the ideas and concepts...... behind type. Rather than ushering in our examination about type by asking who it was that created it and what it looks like, we want to ring in this new decade by asking why we create type and what it means.‘In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. When an artist...... designers and theorists convened to discuss the current status of typedesign with a point of departurein what was proposed on the invitation quoted above. The conference attracted more than 500 graphic designers, type designers and theorists from all over Europeand the large turnout and the huge interest...

  14. Self-sustained reduction of multiple metals in a microbial fuel cell-microbial electrolysis cell hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Yining; Liu, Bingchuan; Luan, Hongwei; Vadas, Timothy; Guo, Wanqian; Ding, Jie; Li, Baikun

    2015-09-01

    A self-sustained hybrid bioelectrochemical system consisting of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was developed to reduce multiple metals simultaneously by utilizing different reaction potentials. Three heavy metals representing spontaneous reaction (chromium, Cr) and unspontaneous reaction (lead, Pb and nickel, Ni) were selected in this batch-mode study. The maximum power density of the MFC achieved 189.4 mW m(-2), and the energy recovery relative to the energy storage circuit (ESC) was ∼ 450%. At the initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1), the average reduction rate of Cr(VI) was 30.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), Pb(II) 32.7 mg L(-1) d(-1), and Ni(II) 8.9 mg L(-1) d(-1). An electrochemical model was developed to predict the change of metal concentration over time. The power output of the MFC was sufficient to meet the requirement of the ESC and MEC, and the "self-sustained metal reduction" was achieved in this hybrid system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Metal and alloy nanoparticles by amine-borane reduction of metal salts by solid-phase synthesis: atom economy and green process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Udishnu; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2012-12-03

    A new solid state synthetic route has been developed toward metal and bimetallic alloy nanoparticles from metal salts employing amine-boranes as the reducing agent. During the reduction, amine-borane plays a dual role: acts as a reducing agent and reduces the metal salts to their elemental form and simultaneously generates a stabilizing agent in situ which controls the growth of the particles and stabilizes them in the nanosize regime. Employing different amine-boranes with differing reducing ability (ammonia borane (AB), dimethylamine borane (DMAB), and triethylamine borane (TMAB)) was found to have a profound effect on the particle size and the size distribution. Usage of AB as the reducing agent provided the smallest possible size with best size distribution. Employment of TMAB also afforded similar results; however, when DMAB was used as the reducing agent it resulted in larger sized nanoparticles that are polydisperse too. In the AB mediated reduction, BNH(x) polymer generated in situ acts as a capping agent whereas, the complexing amine of the other amine-boranes (DMAB and TMAB) play the same role. Employing the solid state route described herein, monometallic Au, Ag, Cu, Pd, and Ir and bimetallic CuAg and CuAu alloy nanoparticles of <10 nm were successfully prepared. Nucleation and growth processes that control the size and the size distribution of the resulting nanoparticles have been elucidated in these systems.

  16. Organic reductants based leaching: A sustainable process for the recovery of valuable metals from spent lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangping; Guo, Chunxiu; Ma, Hongrui; Li, Jiazhu; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Ling; Kang, Duozhi

    2018-01-20

    It is significant to recover metal values from spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) for the alleviation or prevention of potential risks towards environmental pollution and public health, as well as for the conservation of valuable metals. Herein a hydrometallurgical process was proposed to explore the possibility for the leaching of different metals from waste cathodic materials (LiCoO 2 ) of spent LIBs using organics as reductant in sulfuric acid medium. According to the leaching results, about 98% Co and 96% Li can be leached under the optimal experimental conditions of reaction temperature - 95 °C, reaction time - 120 min, reductive agent dosage - 0.4 g/g, slurry density - 25 g/L, concentration of sulfuric acid-3 mol/L in H 2 SO 4  + glucose leaching system. Similar results (96% Co and 100% Li) can be obtained in H 2 SO 4  + sucrose leaching system under optimized leaching conditions. Despite a complete leaching of Li (∼100%), only 54% Co can be dissolved in the H 2 SO 4  + cellulose leaching system under optimized leaching conditions. Finally, different characterization methods, including UV-Vis, FT-IR, SEM and XRD, were employed for the tentative exploration of reductive leaching reactions using organic as reductant in sulfuric acid medium. All the leaching and characterization results confirm that both glucose and sucrose are effective reductants during leaching, while cellulose should be further degraded to organics with low molecular weights to achieve a satisfactory leaching performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang-Hoon, Kim; Hardzman, Christina; Davis, John k.; Hutcheson, Rachel; Broderick, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-09-27

    Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

  18. Engineering MerR for Sequestration and MerA for Reduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, Anne O.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to alter a metalloregulatory protein (MerR) so that it would bind other toxic metals or radionuclides with similar affinity so that the engineered protein itself and/or bacteria expressing it could be deployed in the environment to specifically sequester such metals and (2) to alter the mercuric reductase, MerA, to reduce radionuclides and render them less mobile. Both projects had a basic science component. In the first case, such information about MerR illuminates how proteins discriminate very similar metals/elements. In the second case, information about MerA reveals the criteria for transmission of reducing equivalents from NADPH to redox-active metals. The work involved genetic engineering of all or parts of both proteins and examination of their resultant properties both in vivo and in vitro, the latter with biochemical and biophysical tools including equilibrium and non-equilibrium dialysis, XAFS, NMR, x-ray crystallography, and titration calorimetry. We defined the basis for metal specificity in MerR, devised a bacterial strain that sequesters Hg while growing, characterized gold reduction by MerA and the role of the metallochaperone domain of MerA, and determined the 3-D structure of MerB, the organomercurial lyase.

  19. Evaluation of MRI artifacts at 3 Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Kirin; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics. Thirty-eight cosmetics (16, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 10, eye shadows; 1, lip gloss; 1, body lotion; 1, body glitter, and 1, hair loss concealer) underwent evaluation for MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla. The cosmetics were applied a copper-sulfate-filled, phantom and initially assessed using a "screening" gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequence. Of the 38 different cosmetics, 14 (37%) exhibited artifacts. For these 14 cosmetics, additional characterization of artifacts was performed using a GRE pulse sequence. A qualitative scale was applied to characterize the artifact size. Artifacts were observed, as follows: 2, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 3, eye shadows; 1, hair loss concealer. Artifact size ranged from small (eye shadow) to very large (hair loss concealer) and tended to be associated with the presence of iron oxide or other metal-based ingredient. Commonly used cosmetics caused artifacts that may create issues if the area of interest is the same as where the cosmetic was applied or if its presence was unknown, thus, potentially causing it to be construed as pathology. Therefore, these findings have important implications for patients referred for MRI examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction of methanol crossover by thin cracked metal barriers at the interface between membrane and electrode in direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjun; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Hwang, Wonchan; Cho, Yong-Hun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2017-09-01

    This work reports the successful reduction in methanol crossover by creating a thin cracked metal barrier at the interface between a Nafion® membrane and an electrode in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The cracks are generated by simple mechanical stretching of a metal deposited Nafion® membrane as a result of the elastic mismatch between the two attached surfaces. The cracked metal barriers with varying strains (∼0.5 and ∼1.0) are investigated and successfully incorporated into the DMFC. Remarkably, the membrane electrode assembly with the thin metal crack exhibits comparable ohmic resistance as well as reduction of methanol crossover, which enhanced the device performance.

  1. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  2. Essential Layers, Artifacts, and Dependencies of Enterprise Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Robert; Fischer, Ronny

    2007-01-01

    After a period where implementation speed was more important than integration, consistency and reduction of complexity, architectural considerations have become a key issue of information management in recent years again. Enterprise architecture is widely accepted as an essential mechanism for ensuring agility and consistency, compliance and efficiency. Although standards like TOGAF and FEAF have developed, however, there is no common agreement on which architecture layers, which artifact typ...

  3. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading to sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.

  4. Survey on the artifacts of magnetic resonance imaging in the maxillo-facial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, Masahiro; Okayosi, Tetsuo; Sakamoto, Fumihiko; Furuhasi, Kaiji; Wakuta, Kazunari; Ohba, Takeshi; Morikawa, Masao; Han, Dongwei

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as a valuable method for evaluating and diagnosing various diseases in medical and dental area. On the other hand, dental magnetic attachments have been applied as one of the most suitable retainers of removable prostheses. The dental magnetic attachment is an advanced procedure for the restoration, whereas the dental magnetic attachment is one of the causes of MRI artifacts and/or distortions. In this study the results obtained by a survey in general hospitals on MRI artifacts caused by dental metals, especially dental magnetic attachments, are reported. The results obtained were as follows; MRI artifacts are experienced in most hospitals. Most radiologists did not regard the effect of the magnetic alloy as the cause, although they thought dental metals in oral cavity were the main cause of MRI artifact. Although about a half of radiologist were aware of the presence of the magnetic attachments, few of them had little experience in taking pictures of the patients with magnetic attachment or magnetic keepers by using MRI. Even when dental metals and magnetic keepers in oral cavity were considered to produce the MRI artifacts, none of radiologists asked dentists to remove them. They tried to solve the trouble of MRI artifacts by themselves. Prothodontists should give much more information about the dental magnetic attachment to radiologists and medical doctors in addition to improving the magnetic attachment and investigating materials to minimize the effect on MRI. (author)

  5. Exposure artifacts in raster scanned equalization radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewes, D.B.; Vogelstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    The image artifacts characteristic of a scanning chest radiographic system are reviewed. The technique employs a pulsed beam of radiation swept in an overlapping raster pattern that can result in severe ripple and scan line artifacts with improper scanning parameters. A one-dimensional treatment of the scanner geometry shows that the artifacts can be eliminated when the beam width is an integral multiple of interpulse spacing. An extension to a two-dimensional analysis indicates that with the collimator geometries employed, artifact-free images are not possible with a fixed x-ray frequency but can be achieved when a variable frequency source is used. A treatment of the sensitivity for artifact formation shows that with proper choice of scanning parameters sizable errors in beam width can be tolerated without significant artifact formation

  6. Spent lithium-ion battery recycling - Reductive ammonia leaching of metals from cathode scrap by sodium sulphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohong; Gao, Wenfang; Zhang, Xihua; He, Mingming; Lin, Xiao; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries has attracted wide attention because of their high content of valuable and hazardous metals. One of the difficulties for effective metal recovery is the separation of different metals from the solution after leaching. In this research, a full hydrometallurgical process is developed to selectively recover valuable metals (Ni, Co and Li) from cathode scrap of spent lithium ion batteries. By introducing ammonia-ammonium sulphate as the leaching solution and sodium sulphite as the reductant, the total selectivity of Ni, Co and Li in the first-step leaching solution is more than 98.6% while it for Mn is only 1.36%. In detail understanding of the selective leaching process is carried out by investigating the effects of parameters such as leaching reagent composition, leaching time (0-480min), agitation speed (200-700rpm), pulp density (10-50g/L) and temperature (323-353K). It was found that Mn is primarily reduced from Mn 4+ into Mn 2+ into the solution as [Formula: see text] while it subsequently precipitates out into the residue in the form of (NH 4 ) 2 Mn(SO 3 ) 2 ·H 2 O. Ni, Co and Li are leached and remain in the solution either as metallic ion or amine complexes. The optimised leaching conditions can be further obtained and the leaching kinetics is found to be chemical reaction control under current leaching conditions. As a result, this research is potentially beneficial for further optimisation of the spent lithium ion battery recycling process after incorporating with metal extraction from the leaching solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of materials selection on metals reduction in propylene glycol methyl ether acetate, PGMEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezarian, Majid; Geiger, Bob

    2016-03-01

    The trend in microelectronics fabrication is to produce nano-features measuring down to 10 nm and finer. The PPT levels of organic and inorganic contaminants in the photoresist, solvent and cleaning solutions are becoming a major processing variable affecting the process capability and defectivity. The photoresist usually contains gels, metals, and particulates that could interfere with the lithography process and cause microbridging defects. Nano filters of 5 nm polypropylene, 5 nm polyethylene, and 10 nm natural nylon were used to filter propylene glycol methyl ether acetate PGMEA containing 50 ppb of Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb. All filters were effective in removing trivalent Al, Cr, and Fe metals indicating the mechanism for their removal as mechanical sieving. However, the nylon was also very effective in removing the divalent metals showing adsorptive properties. Furthermore, the metal removal of the nylon membrane was studied as a function of surface chemistry. Natural and charged 40 nm nylon membranes were tested and found that charged nylon is more effective for metal removal.

  8. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 1 Ball Aerospace – 2875 Presidential Drive , Fairborn, Ohio 45324 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science...electroencephalogram (EEG) is a positive indicator of mental workload. However, EEG signals are easily affected by artifacts . An artifact mediation

  9. Greek "red mud" residue: a study of microwave reductive roasting followed by magnetic separation for a metallic iron recovery process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samouhos, Michail; Taxiarchou, Maria; Tsakiridis, Petros E; Potiriadis, Konstantinos

    2013-06-15

    The present research work is focused on the development of an alternative microwave reductive roasting process of red mud using lignite (30.15 wt.%Cfix), followed by wet magnetic separation, in order to produce a raw material suitable for sponge or cast iron production. The reduction degree of iron was controlled by both the reductive agent content and the microwave heating time. The reduction followed the Fe₂O₃ → Fe₃O₄ → FeO → Fe sequence. The dielectric constants [real (ε') and imaginary (ε″) permittivities] of red mud-lignite mixture were determined at 2.45 GHz, in the temperature range of 25-1100 °C. The effect of parameters such as temperature, intensity of reducing conditions, intensity of magnetic field and dispersing agent addition rate on the result of both processes was investigated. The phase's transformations in reduction process with microwave heating were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in combination with thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The microstructural and morphological characterization of the produced calcines was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At the optimum conditions a magnetic concentrate with total iron concentration of 35.15 and 69.3 wt.% metallization degree was obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbothermic Reduction Reactions at the Metal-Slag Interface in Ti-Bearing Slag from a Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zu; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Liu, Zheng-Jian; Du, Cheng-Bo

    2017-11-01

    Carbothermic reduction reactions at the metal-slag interface and the mechanisms of iron loss during the smelting of vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite in a blast furnace are still not clear as a result of the limited ability to observe the high-temperature zone of a blast furnace. The chemical composition of a Ti-bearing slag was determined by x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction. The interfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The interfacial chemical reactions were deduced based on the characterization results and on the thermodynamic calculations performed using Factsage 6.4. The results indicated that the forms of iron in the slag were iron droplets wetted by Ti(C x , N1- x ), mechanically separated by iron and iron oxide. The different forms possessed unique characteristics and were formed by different mechanisms. Iron droplets wetted by Ti(C x , N1- x ) were generated through a series of interfacial reactions between TiO2 in the slag and [C] and [N] in the metal. Iron droplets without attached Ti(C x , N1- x ) were mainly located on the edges of pores and were attributed to the reduction of Fe x O in the slag. Insufficient reduction of iron-bearing minerals made it difficult for iron droplets to aggregate and separate from the slag, which created an Fe x O-enriched zone.

  11. Understanding activity and selectivity of metal-nitrogen-doped carbon catalysts for electrochemical reduction of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Wen; Bagger, Alexander; Hao, Guang-Ping; Varela, Ana Sofia; Sinev, Ilya; Bon, Volodymyr; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Kaskel, Stefan; Rossmeisl, Jan; Strasser, Peter

    2017-10-16

    Direct electrochemical reduction of CO 2 to fuels and chemicals using renewable electricity has attracted significant attention partly due to the fundamental challenges related to reactivity and selectivity, and partly due to its importance for industrial CO 2 -consuming gas diffusion cathodes. Here, we present advances in the understanding of trends in the CO 2 to CO electrocatalysis of metal- and nitrogen-doped porous carbons containing catalytically active M-N x moieties (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). We investigate their intrinsic catalytic reactivity, CO turnover frequencies, CO faradaic efficiencies and demonstrate that Fe-N-C and especially Ni-N-C catalysts rival Au- and Ag-based catalysts. We model the catalytically active M-N x moieties using density functional theory and correlate the theoretical binding energies with the experiments to give reactivity-selectivity descriptors. This gives an atomic-scale mechanistic understanding of potential-dependent CO and hydrocarbon selectivity from the M-N x moieties and it provides predictive guidelines for the rational design of selective carbon-based CO 2 reduction catalysts.Inexpensive and selective electrocatalysts for CO 2 reduction hold promise for sustainable fuel production. Here, the authors report N-coordinated, non-noble metal-doped porous carbons as efficient and selective electrocatalysts for CO 2 to CO conversion.

  12. Artifacts in MR angiography of the intracranial vessels using the 3D TOF and 3D PC techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To classify artifacts and to assess their frequency in magnetic resonance angiography of intracranial vessels using three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast techniques. One hundred and eleven patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease were imaged on a 1.5T superconducting magnetic resonance machine employing three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiographic techniques. We retrospectively reviewed the artifacts in three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography of the intracranial circulatory system, comparing them with routine spin-echo magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography source images, and partially with conventional angiography. Artifacts in magnetic resonance angiography were classified as flow-related, and flow-unrealted, by patient, hardware, magnetic resonance angiography acquisition and postprocessing techniques. Type and frequency of flow-related artifacts included saturation artifact (100%), dephasing artifact (100%), phase-encoding ghost artifact (97%), turbulence artifact (14%) and flow displacement artifact (5%) on three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography, and phase aliasing artifact (2%) on three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Type and frequency of flow-unrelated artifacts included stair-step artifact (100%) by three- dimensional reconstruction process, magnetic susceptibility artifact by carotid canal (69%) and metal (4%), maximum intensity projection artifact (30%) by maximum intensity projection algorithm, and motion artifact by respiration (20%) and voluntary movement (8%); these were seen on both time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Paramagnetic substance artifact by fat and paranasal sinus mucosa (100%), hematoma (14%) and gadolinium (5%) were seen on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. In three- dimensional time-of-flight and

  13. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D; Willett, F; Memberg, W D; Murphy, B; Walter, B; Sweet, J; Miller, J; Hochberg, L R; Kirsch, R F; Ajiboye, A B

    2018-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and almost completely restored iBCI decoding

  14. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Willett, F.; Memberg, W. D.; Murphy, B.; Walter, B.; Sweet, J.; Miller, J.; Hochberg, L. R.; Kirsch, R. F.; Ajiboye, A. B.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. Approach. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Main results. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. Significance. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and

  15. Electrochemical CO2 and CO reduction on metal-functionalized porphyrin-like graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Vanin, Marco; Karamad, Mohammedreza

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrin-like metal-functionalized graphene structures have been investigated as possible catalysts for CO2 and CO reduction to methane or methanol. The late transition metals (Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, Co, Rh, Ir, Fe, Ru, Os) and some p (B, Al, Ga) and s (Mg) metals comprised the center of the po...... from CO, featuring an overpotential of 0.22 V. Additionally, we have also examined the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reaction, and in their case, too, Rh-porphyrin turned out to be the best catalyst with an overpotential of 0.15 V. © 2013 American Chemical Society....... of the porphyrin ring. A clear difference in catalytic properties compared to extended metal surfaces was observed owing to a different electronic nature of the active site. The preference to bind hydrogen, however, becomes a major obstacle in the reaction path. A possible solution to this problem is to reduce CO...... instead of CO2. Volcano plots were constructed on the basis of scaling relations of reaction intermediates, and from these plots the reaction steps with the highest overpotentials were deduced. The Rh-porphyrin-like functionalized graphene was identified as the most active catalyst for producing methanol...

  16. Three dimensional metal/N-doped nanoplate carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction, the reason for using a layered nanoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh Ghotbi, Mohammad; Javanmard, Arash; Soleimani, Hassan

    2018-02-21

    A layered nanoreactor (zinc hydroxide gallate/nitrate nanohybrid) has been designed as a nano-vessel to confine the gallate/nitrate reaction inside zinc hydroxide layers for production of metal/nitrogen-doped carbon catalysts. Metals (Fe 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ) doped and bare zinc hydroxide nitrates (ZHN) were synthesized as the α-phase hydroxide hosts. By an incomplete ion-exchange process, nitrate anions between the layers of the hosts were then partially replaced by the gallate anions to produce the layered nanoreactors. Under heat-treatment, the reaction between the remaining un-exchanged nitrate anions and the organic moiety inside the basal spacing of each nanohybrid plate resulted in obtaining highly porous 3D metal/nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets. These catalysts were then used as extremely efficient electrocatalysts for catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This study is intended to show the way to get maximum electrocatalytic activity of the metal/N-doped carbon catalysts toward the ORR. This exceptionally high ORR performance originates from the increased available surface, the best pore size range and the uniform distribution of the active sites in the produced catalysts, all provided by the use of new idea of the layered nanoreactor.

  17. A study on the electrolytic reduction of U3O8 to uranium metal in LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Heo, J. M.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    New electrolytic reduction technology was proposed that is based on the intregration of metallization of U 3 O 8 and Li 2 O electrowinning. In this electrolytic reduction reaction, electrolytically reduced Li deposits on cathode and simultaneously reacts with uranium oxide to produce uranium metal showing more than 99% conversion. For the verification of process feasibility, the experiments to obtain basic data on the metallization of uranium oxide, materials for cathode and anode electrode, the characteristics of closed recycle of Li 2 O and mass transfer were carried out. This evolutionary electrolytic reduction technology would give benefits over the conventional Li-reduction process improving economic viability such as: avoidance of handling of chemically active Li-LiCl molten salt, increase of metallization yield, and simplification of process

  18. Adaptive motion compensation without blocking artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriberry, Timothy B.

    2015-03-01

    The Block Matching Algorithms used in most popular video codec standards introduce blocking artifacts which must be removed via residual coding or deblocking filters. Alternative transform stages that do not cause blocking artifacts, such as lapped transforms or wavelets, require motion compensation methods that do not produce blocking artifacts, since they are expensive to remove. We design a new Overlapped Block Motion Compensation (OBMC) scheme that avoids these artifacts while allowing adaptive blending window sizes. This has the potential to show significant visual quality improvements over traditional OBMC.

  19. Reduction of Injection Pressure for Thin Walled Molding using the Laser Metal Sintered Mold

    OpenAIRE

    米山, 猛; 内藤, 圭亮; 阿部, 諭; 宮丸, 充

    2010-01-01

    Using milling combined laser metal sintering, porous surface has been fabricated on the thin walled cavity closed by the surrounded thick cavity in the injection mold. Resin flows into the cavity of 2mm thick at first around the thin part and then flows into the thin cavity of 0.2mm thick with 11mm square by packing pressure. The packing pressure for filling the thin part was compared among laser metal sintered mold with or without porous surface, steel mold with or without porous block. The ...

  20. Density functional studies of functionalized graphitic materials with late transition metals for oxygen reduction reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallejo, Federico Calle; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Reaction (OER). Spin analyses suggest that the oxidation state of those elements in the active sites should in general be +2. Moreover, our results verify that the adsorption behavior of transition metals is not intrinsic, since it can be severely altered by changes in the local geometry of the active site......) at the cathode. In this contribution, on the basis of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that graphitic materials with active sites composed of 4 nitrogen atoms and transition metal atoms belonging to groups 7 to 9 in the periodic table are active towards ORR, and also towards Oxygen Evolution...