WorldWideScience

Sample records for metagenomic publication record

  1. Toward a standards-compliant genomic and metagenomic publication record.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrity, G.M.; Field, D.; Kyrpides, N.; Hirschman, L.; Sansone, S.A.; Angiuoli, S.; Cole, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Kolker, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Moran, M.A.; Ussery, D.; White, O.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, we are aware as a community of the growing need to manage the avalanche of genomic and metagenomic data, in addition to related data types like ribosomal RNA and barcode sequences, in a way that tightly integrates contextual data with traditional literature in a machine-readable way.

  2. Toward a Standards-Compliant Genomic and Metagenomic Publication Record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrity, G.; Field, D.; Kyrpides, N.; Hirschman, L.; Sansone, S-A.; Angiuoli, S.V.; Cole, J.; Glöckner, F.O.; Kolker, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Moran, M.A.; Ussery, D.; White, O.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, we are aware as a community of the growing need to manage the avalanche of genomic and metagenomic data, in addition to related data types like ribosomal RNA and barcode sequences, in a way that tightly integrates contextual data with traditional literature in a machine-readable way.

  3. MetaStorm: A Public Resource for Customizable Metagenomics Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Singh, Gargi; Heath, Lenwood S.; Pruden, Amy; Xiao, Weidong; Zhang, Liqing

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics is a trending research area, calling for the need to analyze large quantities of data generated from next generation DNA sequencing technologies. The need to store, retrieve, analyze, share, and visualize such data challenges current online computational systems. Interpretation and annotation of specific information is especially a challenge for metagenomic data sets derived from environmental samples, because current annotation systems only offer broad classification of microbial diversity and function. Moreover, existing resources are not configured to readily address common questions relevant to environmental systems. Here we developed a new online user-friendly metagenomic analysis server called MetaStorm (http://bench.cs.vt.edu/MetaStorm/), which facilitates customization of computational analysis for metagenomic data sets. Users can upload their own reference databases to tailor the metagenomics annotation to focus on various taxonomic and functional gene markers of interest. MetaStorm offers two major analysis pipelines: an assembly-based annotation pipeline and the standard read annotation pipeline used by existing web servers. These pipelines can be selected individually or together. Overall, MetaStorm provides enhanced interactive visualization to allow researchers to explore and manipulate taxonomy and functional annotation at various levels of resolution. PMID:27632579

  4. Toward a Standards-Compliant Genomic and Metagenomic Publication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrity, GM; Field, D; Kyrpides, N

    2008-01-01

    and related data types, we feel the scientific community would be best served by the immediate launch of a central repository of short, highly structured "Genome Notes" that must be standards compliant. This could be done in the context of an existing journal, but we also suggest the more radical solution...... of launching a new journal. Such a journal could be designed to cater to a wide range of standards-related content types that are not currently centralized in the published literature. It could also support the demand for centralizing aspects of the "gray literature" (documents developed by institutions...... or communities) such as the call by the GSC for a central repository of Standard Operating Procedures describing the genomic annotation pipelines of the major sequencing centers. We argue that such an "eJournal," published under the Open Access paradigm by the GSC, could be an attractive publishing forum...

  5. 22 CFR 212.21 - Public records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public records. 212.21 Section 212.21 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Information for Public Inspection and Copying § 212.21 Public records. In accordance with this subpart, USAID makes the following...

  6. RECORD MANAGEMENT IN THE NIGERIAN PUBLIC SECTOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    procurement records, property and fixed assets, registers, accounting records etc. With the use of public management theory, the paper analyzed issues of records and information management and the role it can play in administrative efficiency and success of. Freedom of Information Act 2011. Drawing experience from the.

  7. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  8. Consequences of failure to manage public sector financial records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article submits that without documentary evidence, the public has no means of holding the state accountable. In effect, public financial records provide an effective means by which the public discern and measure the full stature of their government. Keywords: financial records, Ghana, public financial management, ...

  9. 22 CFR 1304.3 - Records available to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... this part. These records include, but are not limited to, the annual report that MCC submits to...) Public Reading room. (1) Records that are required to be maintained by MCC shall be available for public inspection and copying at 875 Fifteenth Street, NW., Washington, DC 20005. Reading room records created on or...

  10. 22 CFR 214.37 - Public access to committee records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public access to committee records. 214.37 Section 214.37 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.37 Public access to committee records. Records maintained in...

  11. Managing public records in Zimbabwe: the road to good governance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing public records in Zimbabwe: the road to good governance, accountability, transparency and effective service delivery. ... The overall results showed that public service delivery is at risk due to inadequate records management practices in the public sector. To that effect, an improved working relationship between ...

  12. The metagenomic telescope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Szalkai

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies led to the discovery of numerous new microbe species in diverse environmental samples. Some of the new species contain genes never encountered before. Some of these genes encode proteins with novel functions, and some of these genes encode proteins that perform some well-known function in a novel way. A tool, named the Metagenomic Telescope, is described here that applies artificial intelligence methods, and seems to be capable of identifying new protein functions even in the well-studied model organisms. As a proof-of-principle demonstration of the Metagenomic Telescope, we considered DNA repair enzymes in the present work. First we identified proteins in DNA repair in well-known organisms (i.e., proteins in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair and DNA break repair; next we applied multiple alignments and then built hidden Markov profiles for each protein separately, across well-researched organisms; next, using public depositories of metagenomes, originating from extreme environments, we identified DNA repair genes in the samples. While the phylogenetic classification of the metagenomic samples are not typically available, we hypothesized that some very special DNA repair strategies need to be applied in bacteria and Archaea living in those extreme circumstances. It is a difficult task to evaluate the results obtained from mostly unknown species; therefore we applied again the hidden Markov profiling: for the identified DNA repair genes in the extreme metagenomes, we prepared new hidden Markov profiles (for each genes separately, subsequent to a cluster analysis; and we searched for similarities to those profiles in model organisms. We have found well known DNA repair proteins, numerous proteins with unknown functions, and also proteins with known, but different functions in the model organisms.

  13. 39 CFR 3004.10 - Public records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...), and other papers seeking Commission action; (2) Financial, statistical and other reports to the... authorized for release or publication by that office, the Commission, or the Member of Congress involved. (i... courts, or clerks of court. (k) The Commission's administrative and operating manuals as issued. ...

  14. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of electronic records management appears to be a serious challenge in the public health sector of Limpopo Province, South Africa, which sacrifices quality of health care. The ob-jective of this study was to establish how electronic records were managed and the current medi-cal recordkeeping practice.

  15. Exploring neighborhoods in the metagenome universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßhauer, Kathrin P; Klingenberg, Heiner; Lingner, Thomas; Meinicke, Peter

    2014-07-14

    The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis.

  16. Exploring Neighborhoods in the Metagenome Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßhauer, Kathrin P.; Klingenberg, Heiner; Lingner, Thomas; Meinicke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The variety of metagenomes in current databases provides a rapidly growing source of information for comparative studies. However, the quantity and quality of supplementary metadata is still lagging behind. It is therefore important to be able to identify related metagenomes by means of the available sequence data alone. We have studied efficient sequence-based methods for large-scale identification of similar metagenomes within a database retrieval context. In a broad comparison of different profiling methods we found that vector-based distance measures are well-suitable for the detection of metagenomic neighbors. Our evaluation on more than 1700 publicly available metagenomes indicates that for a query metagenome from a particular habitat on average nine out of ten nearest neighbors represent the same habitat category independent of the utilized profiling method or distance measure. While for well-defined labels a neighborhood accuracy of 100% can be achieved, in general the neighbor detection is severely affected by a natural overlap of manually annotated categories. In addition, we present results of a novel visualization method that is able to reflect the similarity of metagenomes in a 2D scatter plot. The visualization method shows a similarly high accuracy in the reduced space as compared with the high-dimensional profile space. Our study suggests that for inspection of metagenome neighborhoods the profiling methods and distance measures can be chosen to provide a convenient interpretation of results in terms of the underlying features. Furthermore, supplementary metadata of metagenome samples in the future needs to comply with readily available ontologies for fine-grained and standardized annotation. To make profile-based k-nearest-neighbor search and the 2D-visualization of the metagenome universe available to the research community, we included the proposed methods in our CoMet-Universe server for comparative metagenome analysis. PMID:25026170

  17. Public Service Reform, Accountability and Records Management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Well-established records management systems in public sector organisations may force public servants to be accountable, transparent and have high integrity in their decisions and actions. Improved quality and availability of information provides the foundation of improving service delivery, which is the prime objective of ...

  18. Public Participation: Lessons from the Case Study Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beierle, Thomas C.; Cayford, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Public participation has received increasing attention in environmental policy making world wide. Yet research has been inadequate to answer fundamental questions about how successful past programs have been, what factors lead to success, and where efforts to improve public involvement should focus. To address these questions, we examine the case study record of public participation efforts in the United States over the last 30 years. We evaluate the success of numerous examples of public participation in environmental decision making and identify the factors that lead to success. The paper deals with a number of themes, including: The extent to which participation can incorporate public values into decision making, improve the substantive quality of decisions, reduce conflict, increase trust in institutions, and educate and inform the public; What can be expected from different approaches to public participation, such as public meetings, advisory committees, and mediation; The relative importance of the participatory process vs. the context in which participation takes place; Procedural features of particular importance; and The relationship between participation and implementation. The paper provides general results that can be used to guide the improvement of public participation programs, support assessment of innovative methods, and advance the theoretical understanding of public participation

  19. Marketing and public programming in records and archives at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recommended thatRAMD uses the modern information communication technologies to develop its own website through which archival information about its materials and resources could be uploaded for the general public's easy accessibility. Keywords: archives, marketing, marketing mix, outreach, records, advocacy, ...

  20. Public Sector Financial Records Management: A Panacea for Good ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is aimed at evaluating the importance of financial records keeping in achieving good governance with emphasis on public sector organizations. It draws on experience from Nigeria and some other African countries. We found out that despite efforts to institute comprehensive programmes of financial and structural ...

  1. Management of Records in Public Secondary Schools of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigated management of records in public secondary schools of Lagos State, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique with questionnaire, observation and interview methods were usedfor data collection through ten research assistants. 257 school managers (principals) were randomly sampledfrom a ...

  2. Preserving South Africa's Paper Trail and Making Public Records ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... inadequate preservation programmes and limited conservation education, limited resources for conservation activities, and weak organisational structure and funding of archival institutions in South Africa in general. The study concluded that unless the existing situation is reversed, access to public records and archives in ...

  3. Role of Public Archivists and Records Managers in Governance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on findings and recommendations in a doctoral thesis concerning the correlation between governance, the management of public sector records and the Western World agenda to eradicate poverty and embark on sustainable development undertakings. The geographical focus of this article, like the ...

  4. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, H.

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Metagenomics at Grass Roots. Sudeshna ... benefit human health, agriculture, and ecosystemfunctions. This article provides a brief history of technicaladvances in metagenomics, including DNA sequencing methods,and some case studies.

  6. Distribution and classification of Serine β-lactamases in Brazilian Hospital Sewage and Other Environmental Metagenomes deposited in Public Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Fróes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available β-lactam is the most used antibiotic class in the clinical area and it acts on blocking the bacteria cell wall synthesis, causing cell death. However, some bacteria have evolved resistance to these antibiotics mainly due the production of enzymes known as β-lactamases. Hospital sewage is an important source of dispersion of multidrug-resistant bacteria in rivers and oceans. In this work, we used next-generation DNA sequencing to explore the diversity and dissemination of serine β-lactamases in two hospital sewage from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (South -SZ- and North Zone -NZ, presenting different profiles, and to compare them with public environmental data available. Also, we propose a Hidden-Markov-Model approach to screen potential serine β-lactamases genes (in public environments samples and generated hospital sewage data, exploring its evolutionary relationships. Due to the high variability in β-lactamases, we used a position-specific scoring matrix search method (RPS-BLAST against conserved domain database profiles (CDD, Pfam, and COG followed by visual inspection to detect conserved motifs, to increase the reliability of the results and remove possible false positives. We were able to identify novel β-lactamases from Brazilian hospital sewage and to estimate relative abundance of its types. The highest relative abundance found in SZ was the Class A (50%, while Class D is predominant in NZ (55%. CfxA (65% and ACC (47% types were the most abundant genes detected in SZ, while in NZ the most frequent were OXA-10 (32%, CfxA (28%, ACC (21%, CEPA (20% and FOX (19%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed β-lactamases from Brazilian hospital sewage grouped in the same clade and close to sequences belonging to Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes groups, but distant from potential β-lactamases screened from public environmental data, that grouped closer to β-lactamases of Proteobacteria. Our results demonstrated that HMM-based approach identified homologs of

  7. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... experience in respect of partial performances. (ii) Aggregate Tuning Hour Option—(A) Non-Music Programming... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 262.3 Section 262.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and...

  8. 14 CFR 1206.800 - Failure to release records to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failure to release records to the public. 1206.800 Section 1206.800 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Failure To Release Records to the Public § 1206.800...

  9. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metagenomics is a robust, interdisciplinary approach for studyingmicrobial community composition, function, and dynamics.It typically involves a core of molecular biology, microbiology,ecology, statistics, and computational biology. Excitingoutcomes anticipated from these studies include unravelingof complex interactions ...

  10. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  11. A primer on metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Wooley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics is a discipline that enables the genomic study of uncultured microorganisms. Faster, cheaper sequencing technologies and the ability to sequence uncultured microbes sampled directly from their habitats are expanding and transforming our view of the microbial world. Distilling meaningful information from the millions of new genomic sequences presents a serious challenge to bioinformaticians. In cultured microbes, the genomic data come from a single clone, making sequence assembly and annotation tractable. In metagenomics, the data come from heterogeneous microbial communities, sometimes containing more than 10,000 species, with the sequence data being noisy and partial. From sampling, to assembly, to gene calling and function prediction, bioinformatics faces new demands in interpreting voluminous, noisy, and often partial sequence data. Although metagenomics is a relative newcomer to science, the past few years have seen an explosion in computational methods applied to metagenomic-based research. It is therefore not within the scope of this article to provide an exhaustive review. Rather, we provide here a concise yet comprehensive introduction to the current computational requirements presented by metagenomics, and review the recent progress made. We also note whether there is software that implements any of the methods presented here, and briefly review its utility. Nevertheless, it would be useful if readers of this article would avail themselves of the comment section provided by this journal, and relate their own experiences. Finally, the last section of this article provides a few representative studies illustrating different facets of recent scientific discoveries made using metagenomics.

  12. Metagenomes provide valuable comparative information on soil microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Stenbæk, Jonas; Santos, Susana S.

    2016-01-01

    , providing microbiologists with substantial amounts of accessible information. We took advantage of public metagenomes in order to investigate microeukaryote communities in a well characterized grassland soil. The data gathered allowed the evaluation of several factors impacting the community structure...... has been identified. Our analyses suggest that publicly available metagenome data can provide valuable information on soil microeukaryotes for comparative purposes when handled appropriately, complementing the current view provided by ribosomal amplicon sequencing methods....

  13. Archival legislation and the management of public sector Records in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mpho ngoepe

    the records management and archives administration act as a guiding principle to custodians and users of records and archives. Furthermore, the article discusses archives legislation in. Zambia and its role in the control and preservation of records of enduring value. The article points out that the National Archives Act does ...

  14. Metagenomics and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Rafati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteria are a group of microorganisms which in contrast to their diversity in nature, only very few of them can be grown and isolated in the current standard laboratories. Metagenomics as a new field of research, during the last decade has worked on clarification of the genomes of the non-cultured microbes and researchers around the world with serious study of this group of bacteria, looking for new compounds such as new antibiotics, anti-cancer agents, new enzymes and biomolecules. Methods: This article is reviews study which with study of Texts and Internet and handy browsing of key words from reliable scientific resources and sites amongst: Google Scholar, Pub med, Science direct, Sid and Scopus in the years 2000 to 2013 were collected and studied. Results: The data collection instrument in the study includes all printed metagenomics related texts. Although, nowadays metagenomics is used to screen samples but now as a perfect technique beside the medium application and other traditional techniques will have better position. The highest usage of metagenomics is in clinical cases where with conventional techniques can't be discovered microbial reasons. So for tests and analyze information need to skilled scientists. Conclusion: This paper focuses on some of the latest achievements of Metagenomics and its application in new drugs, detection of enzymes, potential of biotechnology and environment.

  15. Challenges and opportunities of airborne metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. 77 FR 7184 - Public Availability of the National Archives and Records Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Archives and... Administration. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: In...), the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is publishing this notice to advise the public...

  17. Managing public records in Zimbabwe: the road to good governance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MARIA

    governance process. In this regard, records management can be labeled the road to accountability, transparency, good governance and improved service delivery. The concept of .... created records that were meant to be eventually transferred to the .... money through the paying of 'civil servants' who are nonexistent.

  18. Record management in the Nigerian public sector and freedom of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of records and information management in the fight against corruption and promotion of good governance, transparency and accountability cannot be overstated; the three cannot be achieved without available, accurate and accessible records and information. To demonstrate transparency and ...

  19. 77 FR 74182 - Records Governing Off-the-Record Communications; Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    .... CP11-515-000 12-6-12 Thomas Salamone 3. CP11-515-000 12-6-12 Michael Mojica \\1\\ Exempt 1. CP13-8-000 11...-000 12-4-12 Kate Valdez \\1\\ Email record. \\2\\ Phone record. \\3\\ Email record. \\4\\ Hons. Rob Kane and...

  20. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  2. 21 CFR 20.120 - Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Public Reading Rooms. 20.120 Section 20.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....120 Records available in Food and Drug Administration Public Reading Rooms. (a) The Food and Drug Administration operates two public reading rooms. The Freedom of Information Staff's Public Reading Room is...

  3. High throughput whole rumen metagenome profiling using untargeted massively parallel sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Elizabeth M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of microorganism communities in the rumen of cattle (Bos taurus is of great interest because of possible links to economically or environmentally important traits, such as feed conversion efficiency or methane emission levels. The resolution of studies investigating this variation may be improved by utilizing untargeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS, that is, sequencing without targeted amplification of genes. The objective of this study was to develop a method which used MPS to generate “rumen metagenome profiles”, and to investigate if these profiles were repeatable among samples taken from the same cow. Given faecal samples are much easier to obtain than rumen fluid samples; we also investigated whether rumen metagenome profiles were predictive of faecal metagenome profiles. Results Rather than focusing on individual organisms within the rumen, our method used MPS data to generate quantitative rumen micro-biome profiles, regardless of taxonomic classifications. The method requires a previously assembled reference metagenome. A number of such reference metagenomes were considered, including two rumen derived metagenomes, a human faecal microflora metagenome and a reference metagenome made up of publically available prokaryote sequences. Sequence reads from each test sample were aligned to these references. The “rumen metagenome profile” was generated from the number of the reads that aligned to each contig in the database. We used this method to test the hypothesis that rumen fluid microbial community profiles vary more between cows than within multiple samples from the same cow. Rumen fluid samples were taken from three cows, at three locations within the rumen. DNA from the samples was sequenced on the Illumina GAIIx. When the reads were aligned to a rumen metagenome reference, the rumen metagenome profiles were repeatable (P  Conclusions We have presented a simple and high throughput method of

  4. Tentacle: distributed quantification of genes in metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulund, Fredrik; Sjögren, Anders; Kristiansson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In metagenomics, microbial communities are sequenced at increasingly high resolution, generating datasets with billions of DNA fragments. Novel methods that can efficiently process the growing volumes of sequence data are necessary for the accurate analysis and interpretation of existing and upcoming metagenomes. Here we present Tentacle, which is a novel framework that uses distributed computational resources for gene quantification in metagenomes. Tentacle is implemented using a dynamic master-worker approach in which DNA fragments are streamed via a network and processed in parallel on worker nodes. Tentacle is modular, extensible, and comes with support for six commonly used sequence aligners. It is easy to adapt Tentacle to different applications in metagenomics and easy to integrate into existing workflows. Evaluations show that Tentacle scales very well with increasing computing resources. We illustrate the versatility of Tentacle on three different use cases. Tentacle is written for Linux in Python 2.7 and is published as open source under the GNU General Public License (v3). Documentation, tutorials, installation instructions, and the source code are freely available online at: http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/tentacle.

  5. Clustering metagenomic sequences with interpolated Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley David R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of environmental DNA (often called metagenomics has shown tremendous potential to uncover the vast number of unknown microbes that cannot be cultured and sequenced by traditional methods. Because the output from metagenomic sequencing is a large set of reads of unknown origin, clustering reads together that were sequenced from the same species is a crucial analysis step. Many effective approaches to this task rely on sequenced genomes in public databases, but these genomes are a highly biased sample that is not necessarily representative of environments interesting to many metagenomics projects. Results We present SCIMM (Sequence Clustering with Interpolated Markov Models, an unsupervised sequence clustering method. SCIMM achieves greater clustering accuracy than previous unsupervised approaches. We examine the limitations of unsupervised learning on complex datasets, and suggest a hybrid of SCIMM and supervised learning method Phymm called PHYSCIMM that performs better when evolutionarily close training genomes are available. Conclusions SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are highly accurate methods to cluster metagenomic sequences. SCIMM operates entirely unsupervised, making it ideal for environments containing mostly novel microbes. PHYSCIMM uses supervised learning to improve clustering in environments containing microbial strains from well-characterized genera. SCIMM and PHYSCIMM are available open source from http://www.cbcb.umd.edu/software/scimm.

  6. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metagenomics is a robust, interdisciplinary approach for study- ing microbial community composition, function, and dynam- ics. It typically involves a core of molecular biology, micro- biology, ecology, statistics, and computational biology. Excit- ing outcomes anticipated from these studies include unrav- eling of complex ...

  7. Metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with Santa Barbara seep oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Erik R; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; Foster, Brian; Copeland, Alexander; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Pati, Amrita; Jansson, Janet R; Gilbert, Jack A; Tringe, Susannah Green; Lorenson, Thomas D; Hess, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with natural oils seeping into the Pacific Ocean offshore the coast of Santa Barbara (California, USA) were determined to complement already existing metagenomes generated from microbial communities associated with hydrocarbons that pollute the marine ecosystem. This genomics resource article is the first of two publications reporting a total of four new metagenomes from oils that seep into the Santa Barbara Channel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Organising Public Records to Achieve Service Delivery: The Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    propagating the use of functional subject file plan by governmental bodies. Therefore, this article presents a perspective on the approach being taken by the National Archives and Records Service of South Africa in assisting government departments to classify their business information to achieve accountability and service ...

  9. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngulup

    Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling methods were applied to select participants for inter- ... e-records management legal and administrative requirement; and accurately documented policies, standard .... agement. Documents processing is a core in business processes because it is the main source.

  10. 39 CFR 3000.735-502 - Public record of ex parte communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... communication; the substance of the communication; and the relationship of the communication to a particular... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public record of ex parte communications. 3000.735... Parte Communications § 3000.735-502 Public record of ex parte communications. As ex parte communications...

  11. 37 CFR 201.9 - Recordation of agreements between copyright owners and public broadcasting entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recordation of agreements between copyright owners and public broadcasting entities. 201.9 Section 201.9 Patents, Trademarks, and... public broadcasting entities will be filed in the Copyright Office, Licensing Division by recordation...

  12. Marketing and public programming in records and archives at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mpho ngoepe

    that marketing and public programming activities conducted at RAMD are insufficient and ineffective as they are only ... the Archives to undertake programmes that can directly benefit the common man. There are other reasons why ..... Location, including a map, transport and parking facilities;. 4. Outline of archival and ...

  13. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  14. 10 CFR 1703.103 - Requests for board records available through the public reading room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reading room. 1703.103 Section 1703.103 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1703.103 Requests for board records available through the public reading room. (a) A Public Reading Room will be maintained at the Board's headquarters and will be open between 8:30 a.m. and...

  15. High throughtput comparisons and profiling of metagenomes for industrially relevant enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Intikhab

    2016-01-26

    More and more genomes and metagenomes are being sequenced since the advent of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies (NGS). Many metagenomic samples are collected from a variety of environments, each exhibiting a different environmental profile, e.g. temperature, environmental chemistry, etc… These metagenomes can be profiled to unearth enzymes relevant to several industries based on specific enzyme properties such as ability to work on extreme conditions, such as extreme temperatures, salinity, anaerobically, etc.. In this work, we present the DMAP platform comprising of a high-throughput metagenomic annotation pipeline and a data-warehouse for comparisons and profiling across large number of metagenomes. We developed two reference databases for profiling of important genes, one containing enzymes related to different industries and the other containing genes with potential bioactivity roles. In this presentation we describe an example analysis of a large number of publicly available metagenomic sample from TARA oceans study (Science 2015) that covers significant part of world oceans.

  16. The YNP metagenome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment......, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3...

  17. 76 FR 64940 - Records Governing Off-the-Record Communications; Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... 18 CFR 385.2201(e)(1)(v). The following is a list of off-the-record communications recently received.... 13351-000 10-11-11 LaDonna Young. \\1\\ Re: May 26, 2011 ESA consultation meeting. Dated: October 13, 2011. Nathaniel J. Davis, Sr., Deputy Secretary. BILLING CODE 6717-01-P ...

  18. Multiple comparative metagenomics using multiset k-mer counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Benoit

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Large scale metagenomic projects aim to extract biodiversity knowledge between different environmental conditions. Current methods for comparing microbial communities face important limitations. Those based on taxonomical or functional assignation rely on a small subset of the sequences that can be associated to known organisms. On the other hand, de novo methods, that compare the whole sets of sequences, either do not scale up on ambitious metagenomic projects or do not provide precise and exhaustive results. Methods These limitations motivated the development of a new de novo metagenomic comparative method, called Simka. This method computes a large collection of standard ecological distances by replacing species counts by k-mer counts. Simka scales-up today’s metagenomic projects thanks to a new parallel k-mer counting strategy on multiple datasets. Results Experiments on public Human Microbiome Project datasets demonstrate that Simka captures the essential underlying biological structure. Simka was able to compute in a few hours both qualitative and quantitative ecological distances on hundreds of metagenomic samples (690 samples, 32 billions of reads. We also demonstrate that analyzing metagenomes at the k-mer level is highly correlated with extremely precise de novo comparison techniques which rely on all-versus-all sequences alignment strategy or which are based on taxonomic profiling.

  19. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-08-01

    As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe step-by-step the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of a bioinformatician. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning with pre-sequencing considerations such as community composition and sequence data type that will greatly influence downstream analyses. We proceed with recommendations for sampling and data generation including sample and metadata collection, community profiling, construction of shotgun libraries and sequencing strategies. We then discuss the application of generic sequence processing steps (read preprocessing, assembly, and gene prediction and annotation) to metagenomic datasets by contrast to genome projects. Different types of data analyses particular to metagenomes are then presented including binning, dominant population analysis and gene-centric analysis. Finally data management systems and issues are presented and discussed. We hope that this review will assist bioinformaticians and biologists in making better-informed decisions on their journey during a metagenomic project.

  20. A method for the automated, reliable retrieval of publication-citation records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Ruths

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Publication records and citation indices often are used to evaluate academic performance. For this reason, obtaining or computing them accurately is important. This can be difficult, largely due to a lack of complete knowledge of an individual's publication list and/or lack of time available to manually obtain or construct the publication-citation record. While online publication search engines have somewhat addressed these problems, using raw search results can yield inaccurate estimates of publication-citation records and citation indices. METHODOLOGY: In this paper, we present a new, automated method that produces estimates of an individual's publication-citation record from an individual's name and a set of domain-specific vocabulary that may occur in the individual's publication titles. Because this vocabulary can be harvested directly from a research web page or online (partial publication list, our method delivers an easy way to obtain estimates of a publication-citation record and the relevant citation indices. Our method works by applying a series of stringent name and content filters to the raw publication search results returned by an online publication search engine. In this paper, our method is run using Google Scholar, but the underlying filters can be easily applied to any existing publication search engine. When compared against a manually constructed data set of individuals and their publication-citation records, our method provides significant improvements over raw search results. The estimated publication-citation records returned by our method have an average sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 72% (in contrast to raw search result specificity of less than 10%. When citation indices are computed using these records, the estimated indices are within of the true value 10%, compared to raw search results which have overestimates of, on average, 75%. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm that our method provides

  1. 47 CFR 0.457 - Records not routinely available for public inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... publication would place American communication companies at a disadvantage in meeting the competition of... records available in connection with the Commission's licensing procedures. (2) Unless the materials to be...

  2. Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Dupont, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means “beyond the genome.” Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise ˜400 billion base pairs of DNA, only ˜3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  3. De-MetaST-BLAST: a tool for the validation of degenerate primer sets and data mining of publicly available metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Gulvik

    Full Text Available Development and use of primer sets to amplify nucleic acid sequences of interest is fundamental to studies spanning many life science disciplines. As such, the validation of primer sets is essential. Several computer programs have been created to aid in the initial selection of primer sequences that may or may not require multiple nucleotide combinations (i.e., degeneracies. Conversely, validation of primer specificity has remained largely unchanged for several decades, and there are currently few available programs that allows for an evaluation of primers containing degenerate nucleotide bases. To alleviate this gap, we developed the program De-MetaST that performs an in silico amplification using user defined nucleotide sequence dataset(s and primer sequences that may contain degenerate bases. The program returns an output file that contains the in silico amplicons. When De-MetaST is paired with NCBI's BLAST (De-MetaST-BLAST, the program also returns the top 10 nr NCBI database hits for each recovered in silico amplicon. While the original motivation for development of this search tool was degenerate primer validation using the wealth of nucleotide sequences available in environmental metagenome and metatranscriptome databases, this search tool has potential utility in many data mining applications.

  4. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Raut

    2017-06-01

    Over the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  5. 29 CFR 1209.08 - Transcripts, recordings or minutes of closed meetings; retention; public availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; retention; public availability. 1209.08 Section 1209.08 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued..., recordings or minutes of closed meetings; retention; public availability. (a) For every meeting or portion... Board meetings shall be directed to the Chief of Staff, National Mediation Board, Washington, DC 20572...

  6. 37 CFR 255.8 - Public performances of sound recordings and musical works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public performances of sound recordings and musical works. 255.8 Section 255.8 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE... UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE FOR MAKING AND DISTRIBUTING PHONORECORDS § 255.8 Public performances of sound...

  7. 22 CFR 214.51 - Administrative review of denial for public access to records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative review of denial for public access to records. 214.51 Section 214.51 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT Administrative Remedies § 214.51 Administrative review of denial for public access to...

  8. 45 CFR 2507.3 - What types of records are available for disclosure to the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... records: (i) All publications and other documents provided by the Corporation to the public in the normal... the Federal Register; (iv) Administrative staff manuals and instructions to the staff that affect a... files, or provide a requester with statistical or other data (unless such data has been compiled...

  9. Analyzing compound activity records and promiscuity degrees in light of publication statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    For the generation of contemporary databases of bioactive compounds, activity information is usually extracted from the scientific literature. However, when activity data are analyzed, source publications are typically no longer taken into consideration. Therefore, compound activity data selected from ChEMBL were traced back to thousands of original publications, activity records including compound, assay, and target information were systematically generated, and their distributions across the literature were determined. In addition, publications were categorized on the basis of activity records. Furthermore, compound promiscuity, defined as the ability of small molecules to specifically interact with multiple target proteins, was analyzed in light of publication statistics, thus adding another layer of information to promiscuity assessment. It was shown that the degree of compound promiscuity was not influenced by increasing numbers of source publications. Rather, most non-promiscuous as well as promiscuous compounds, regardless of their degree of promiscuity, originated from single publications, which emerged as a characteristic feature of the medicinal chemistry literature.

  10. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  11. Assembling large, complex environmental metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, A. C. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Jansson, J. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Malfatti, S. A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tringe, S. G. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Tiedje, J. M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Plant Soil and Microbial Sciences; Brown, C. T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Computer Science and Engineering

    2012-12-28

    The large volumes of sequencing data required to sample complex environments deeply pose new challenges to sequence analysis approaches. De novo metagenomic assembly effectively reduces the total amount of data to be analyzed but requires significant computational resources. We apply two pre-assembly filtering approaches, digital normalization and partitioning, to make large metagenome assemblies more computationaly tractable. Using a human gut mock community dataset, we demonstrate that these methods result in assemblies nearly identical to assemblies from unprocessed data. We then assemble two large soil metagenomes from matched Iowa corn and native prairie soils. The predicted functional content and phylogenetic origin of the assembled contigs indicate significant taxonomic differences despite similar function. The assembly strategies presented are generic and can be extended to any metagenome; full source code is freely available under a BSD license.

  12. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Anant; Yarbrough, Chase; Singh, Vivek; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Verma, Varun; Hawley, Jessica; Schwarz, Dan; Harsha Bangura, Alex; Shrestha, Biplav; Schwarz, Ryan; Adhikari, Mukesh; Maru, Duncan

    2017-06-23

    Globally, electronic medical records are central to the infrastructure of modern healthcare systems. Yet the vast majority of electronic medical records have been designed for resource-rich environments and are not feasible in settings of poverty. Here we describe the design and implementation of an electronic medical record at a public sector district hospital in rural Nepal, and its subsequent expansion to an additional public sector facility.DevelopmentThe electronic medical record was designed to solve for the following elements of public sector healthcare delivery: 1) integration of the systems across inpatient, surgical, outpatient, emergency, laboratory, radiology, and pharmacy sites of care; 2) effective data extraction for impact evaluation and government regulation; 3) optimization for longitudinal care provision and patient tracking; and 4) effectiveness for quality improvement initiatives. For these purposes, we adapted Bahmni, a product built with open-source components for patient tracking, clinical protocols, pharmacy, laboratory, imaging, financial management, and supply logistics. In close partnership with government officials, we deployed the system in February of 2015, added on additional functionality, and iteratively improved the system over the following year. This experience enabled us then to deploy the system at an additional district-level hospital in a different part of the country in under four weeks. We discuss the implementation challenges and the strategies we pursued to build an electronic medical record for the public sector in rural Nepal.DiscussionOver the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  13. Public administration archives: state of the art of record management and classification systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Reale

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is aimed at presenting the state of art related to the records management in the public sector and, more specifically, to the main tools required for managing current records according to the Direction general for Archives and its specific competencies which imply a role for defining and approving classification and preservation plans. The article analyses various projects developed for the public sectors in the last 25 years in connection with the innovation processes for the public administration and the crucial role recognised to the records management. The paper illustrates the work done by working groups for universities, municipalities, regions and provinces but also for health environment, chambers of trade, banks and educational institutions. With reference to the State institutions, a general picture is presented for ministries such as Ministry of Justice and Ministry for cultural heritage. In the last case, the classification system developed and adopted in 2004 in connection with the electronic registry system is discussed in detail. The paper presents also the project supported by the Agenzia dell’Italia digitale (AGID dedicated to the definition of a common classification plan for administrative functions in the public sector. Even if not complete the picture is able to provide elements to evaluate the tools and their critical aspects, to stress the need for cooperation, to update the present systems and study general methodologies. The contribution is also dedicated to the role of professionals with specific experience in the records management systems for the public sector.

  14. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Reddy, Cvsk; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations. Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER. The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide end-users the flexibility of

  15. COGNIZER: A Framework for Functional Annotation of Metagenomic Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tungadri Bose

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in an unprecedented increase in the number of metagenomes that are being sequenced world-wide. Given their volume, functional annotation of metagenomic sequence datasets requires specialized computational tools/techniques. In spite of having high accuracy, existing stand-alone functional annotation tools necessitate end-users to perform compute-intensive homology searches of metagenomic datasets against "multiple" databases prior to functional analysis. Although, web-based functional annotation servers address to some extent the problem of availability of compute resources, uploading and analyzing huge volumes of sequence data on a shared public web-service has its own set of limitations. In this study, we present COGNIZER, a comprehensive stand-alone annotation framework which enables end-users to functionally annotate sequences constituting metagenomic datasets. The COGNIZER framework provides multiple workflow options. A subset of these options employs a novel directed-search strategy which helps in reducing the overall compute requirements for end-users. The COGNIZER framework includes a cross-mapping database that enables end-users to simultaneously derive/infer KEGG, Pfam, GO, and SEED subsystem information from the COG annotations.Validation experiments performed with real-world metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, generated using diverse sequencing technologies, indicate that the novel directed-search strategy employed in COGNIZER helps in reducing the compute requirements without significant loss in annotation accuracy. A comparison of COGNIZER's results with pre-computed benchmark values indicate the reliability of the cross-mapping database employed in COGNIZER.The COGNIZER framework is capable of comprehensively annotating any metagenomic or metatranscriptomic dataset from varied sequencing platforms in functional terms. Multiple search options in COGNIZER provide end-users the

  16. 10 CFR 1303.104 - Board records exempt from public disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a confidential basis, and in the case of a record or information compiled by a criminal law... Section 1303.104 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.104... would not be available by law to a party other than an agency in litigation with the Board. (f...

  17. 17 CFR 147.8 - Public availability of transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Three Lafayette Centre, 1155 21st Street, NW., Washington, DC 20581... Commission shall maintain a complete verbatim copy of the transcript, a complete electronic recording or a complete copy of the minutes of each meeting or portion of a meeting closed to the public, which are made...

  18. Fizzy: feature subset selection for metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L

    2015-11-04

    Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α- & β-diversity. Feature subset selection--a sub-field of machine learning--can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  19. Assessment of Residential History Generation Using a Public-Record Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Wheeler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In studies of disease with potential environmental risk factors, residential location is often used as a surrogate for unknown environmental exposures or as a basis for assigning environmental exposures. These studies most typically use the residential location at the time of diagnosis due to ease of collection. However, previous residential locations may be more useful for risk analysis because of population mobility and disease latency. When residential histories have not been collected in a study, it may be possible to generate them through public-record databases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of a public-records database from LexisNexis to provide residential histories for subjects in a geographically diverse cohort study. We calculated 11 performance metrics comparing study-collected addresses and two address retrieval services from LexisNexis. We found 77% and 90% match rates for city and state and 72% and 87% detailed address match rates with the basic and enhanced services, respectively. The enhanced LexisNexis service covered 86% of the time at residential addresses recorded in the study. The mean match rate for detailed address matches varied spatially over states. The results suggest that public record databases can be useful for reconstructing residential histories for subjects in epidemiologic studies.

  20. Metagenomics: The Next Culture-Independent Game Changer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Forbes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A trend towards the abandonment of obtaining pure culture isolates in frontline laboratories is at a crossroads with the ability of public health agencies to perform their basic mandate of foodborne disease surveillance and response. The implementation of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs including nucleic acid and antigen-based assays for acute gastroenteritis is leaving public health agencies without laboratory evidence to link clinical cases to each other and to food or environmental substances. This limits the efficacy of public health epidemiology and surveillance as well as outbreak detection and investigation. Foodborne outbreaks have the potential to remain undetected or have insufficient evidence to support source attribution and may inadvertently increase the incidence of foodborne diseases. Next-generation sequencing of pure culture isolates in clinical microbiology laboratories has the potential to revolutionize the fields of food safety and public health. Metagenomics and other ‘omics’ disciplines could provide the solution to a cultureless future in clinical microbiology, food safety and public health. Data mining of information obtained from metagenomics assays can be particularly useful for the identification of clinical causative agents or foodborne contamination, detection of AMR and/or virulence factors, in addition to providing high-resolution subtyping data. Thus, metagenomics assays may provide a universal test for clinical diagnostics, foodborne pathogen detection, subtyping and investigation. This information has the potential to reform the field of enteric disease diagnostics and surveillance and also infectious diseases as a whole. The aim of this review will be to present the current state of CIDTs in diagnostic and public health laboratories as they relate to foodborne illness and food safety. Moreover, we will also discuss the diagnostic and subtyping utility and concomitant bias limitations of

  1. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ‘sequence capture’ reveals functional diversity in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. PMID:26490729

  2. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on 'sequence capture' reveals functional diversity in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-12-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  3. Filthy lucre: A metagenomic pilot study of microbes found on circulating currency in New York City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Maritz

    Full Text Available Paper currency by its very nature is frequently transferred from one person to another and represents an important medium for human contact with-and potential exchange of-microbes. In this pilot study, we swabbed circulating $1 bills obtained from a New York City bank in February (Winter and June (Summer 2013 and used shotgun metagenomic sequencing to profile the communities found on their surface. Using basic culture conditions, we also tested whether viable microbes could be recovered from bills.Shotgun metagenomics identified eukaryotes as the most abundant sequences on money, followed by bacteria, viruses and archaea. Eukaryotic assemblages were dominated by human, other metazoan and fungal taxa. The currency investigated harbored a diverse microbial population that was dominated by human skin and oral commensals, including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Micrococcus luteus. Other taxa detected not associated with humans included Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus, microbes typically associated with dairy production and fermentation. Culturing results indicated that viable microbes can be isolated from paper currency.We conducted the first metagenomic characterization of the surface of paper money in the United States, establishing a baseline for microbes found on $1 bills circulating in New York City. Our results suggest that money amalgamates DNA from sources inhabiting the human microbiome, food, and other environmental inputs, some of which can be recovered as viable organisms. These monetary communities may be maintained through contact with human skin, and DNA obtained from money may provide a record of human behavior and health. Understanding these microbial profiles is especially relevant to public health as money could potentially mediate interpersonal transfer of microbes.

  4. The MAR databases: development and implementation of databases specific for marine metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, Terje; Raknes, Inge A; Fu, Juan; Agafonov, Alexander; Balasundaram, Sudhagar V; Tartari, Giacomo; Robertsen, Espen; Willassen, Nils P

    2018-01-04

    We introduce the marine databases; MarRef, MarDB and MarCat (https://mmp.sfb.uit.no/databases/), which are publicly available resources that promote marine research and innovation. These data resources, which have been implemented in the Marine Metagenomics Portal (MMP) (https://mmp.sfb.uit.no/), are collections of richly annotated and manually curated contextual (metadata) and sequence databases representing three tiers of accuracy. While MarRef is a database for completely sequenced marine prokaryotic genomes, which represent a marine prokaryote reference genome database, MarDB includes all incomplete sequenced prokaryotic genomes regardless level of completeness. The last database, MarCat, represents a gene (protein) catalog of uncultivable (and cultivable) marine genes and proteins derived from marine metagenomics samples. The first versions of MarRef and MarDB contain 612 and 3726 records, respectively. Each record is built up of 106 metadata fields including attributes for sampling, sequencing, assembly and annotation in addition to the organism and taxonomic information. Currently, MarCat contains 1227 records with 55 metadata fields. Ontologies and controlled vocabularies are used in the contextual databases to enhance consistency. The user-friendly web interface lets the visitors browse, filter and search in the contextual databases and perform BLAST searches against the corresponding sequence databases. All contextual and sequence databases are freely accessible and downloadable from https://s1.sfb.uit.no/public/mar/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Metagenomic Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shota; Maeda, Norihiro; Miron, Ionut Mihai; Yoh, Myonsun; Izutsu, Kaori; Kataoka, Chidoh; Honda, Takeshi; Yasunaga, Teruo; Nakaya, Takaaki; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Horii, Toshihiro

    2008-01-01

    To test the ability of high-throughput DNA sequencing to detect bacterial pathogens, we used it on DNA from a patient’s feces during and after diarrheal illness. Sequences showing best matches for Campylobacter jejuni were detected only in the illness sample. Various bacteria may be detectable with this metagenomic approach. PMID:18976571

  6. A Delphi Technology Foresight Study: Mapping Social Construction of Scientific Evidence on Metagenomics Tests for Water Safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Birko

    Full Text Available Access to clean water is a grand challenge in the 21st century. Water safety testing for pathogens currently depends on surrogate measures such as fecal indicator bacteria (e.g., E. coli. Metagenomics concerns high-throughput, culture-independent, unbiased shotgun sequencing of DNA from environmental samples that might transform water safety by detecting waterborne pathogens directly instead of their surrogates. Yet emerging innovations such as metagenomics are often fiercely contested. Innovations are subject to shaping/construction not only by technology but also social systems/values in which they are embedded, such as experts' attitudes towards new scientific evidence. We conducted a classic three-round Delphi survey, comprised of 107 questions. A multidisciplinary expert panel (n = 24 representing the continuum of discovery scientists and policymakers evaluated the emergence of metagenomics tests. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first Delphi foresight study of experts' attitudes on (1 the top 10 priority evidentiary criteria for adoption of metagenomics tests for water safety, (2 the specific issues critical to governance of metagenomics innovation trajectory where there is consensus or dissensus among experts, (3 the anticipated time lapse from discovery to practice of metagenomics tests, and (4 the role and timing of public engagement in development of metagenomics tests. The ability of a test to distinguish between harmful and benign waterborne organisms, analytical/clinical sensitivity, and reproducibility were the top three evidentiary criteria for adoption of metagenomics. Experts agree that metagenomic testing will provide novel information but there is dissensus on whether metagenomics will replace the current water safety testing methods or impact the public health end points (e.g., reduction in boil water advisories. Interestingly, experts view the publics relevant in a "downstream capacity" for adoption of

  7. A Delphi Technology Foresight Study: Mapping Social Construction of Scientific Evidence on Metagenomics Tests for Water Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birko, Stanislav; Dove, Edward S; Özdemir, Vural

    2015-01-01

    Access to clean water is a grand challenge in the 21st century. Water safety testing for pathogens currently depends on surrogate measures such as fecal indicator bacteria (e.g., E. coli). Metagenomics concerns high-throughput, culture-independent, unbiased shotgun sequencing of DNA from environmental samples that might transform water safety by detecting waterborne pathogens directly instead of their surrogates. Yet emerging innovations such as metagenomics are often fiercely contested. Innovations are subject to shaping/construction not only by technology but also social systems/values in which they are embedded, such as experts' attitudes towards new scientific evidence. We conducted a classic three-round Delphi survey, comprised of 107 questions. A multidisciplinary expert panel (n = 24) representing the continuum of discovery scientists and policymakers evaluated the emergence of metagenomics tests. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first Delphi foresight study of experts' attitudes on (1) the top 10 priority evidentiary criteria for adoption of metagenomics tests for water safety, (2) the specific issues critical to governance of metagenomics innovation trajectory where there is consensus or dissensus among experts, (3) the anticipated time lapse from discovery to practice of metagenomics tests, and (4) the role and timing of public engagement in development of metagenomics tests. The ability of a test to distinguish between harmful and benign waterborne organisms, analytical/clinical sensitivity, and reproducibility were the top three evidentiary criteria for adoption of metagenomics. Experts agree that metagenomic testing will provide novel information but there is dissensus on whether metagenomics will replace the current water safety testing methods or impact the public health end points (e.g., reduction in boil water advisories). Interestingly, experts view the publics relevant in a "downstream capacity" for adoption of metagenomics rather

  8. Medical records for animals used in research, teaching, and testing: public statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Karl; Bailey, Michele; Foresman, Larry L; Harris, Robert L; Motzel, Sherri L; Rockar, Richard A; Ruble, Gaye; Suckow, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary care for animals used in research, teaching, and testing. However, prior to the release of the public statement on medical records by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM), the guidance that was available on the form and content of medical records used for the research setting was not consistent and, in some cases, was considered to be too rigid. To address this concern, ACLAM convened an ad hoc Medical Records Committee and charged the Committee with the task of developing a medical record guideline that was based on both professional judgment and performance standards. The Committee provided ACLAM with a guidance document titled Public Statements: Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing, which was approved by ACLAM in late 2004. The ACLAM public statement on medical records provides guidance on the definition and content of medical records, and clearly identifies the Attending Veterinarian as the individual who is charged with authority and responsibility for oversight of the institution's medical records program. The document offers latitude to institutions in the precise form and process used for medical records but identifies typical information to be included in such records. As a result, the ACLAM public statement on medical records provides practical yet flexible guidelines to assure that documentation of animal health is performed in research, teaching, and testing situations.

  9. Electronic health record case studies to advance environmental public health tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namulanda, Gonza; Qualters, Judith; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Roberts, Eric; Richardson, Max; Fraser, Alicia; McVeigh, Katharine H; Patterson, Scott

    2018-03-01

    Data from traditional public health surveillance systems can have some limitations, e.g., timeliness, geographic level, and amount of data accessible. Electronic health records (EHRs) could present an opportunity to supplement current sources of routinely collected surveillance data. The National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) sought to explore the use of EHRs for advancing environmental public health surveillance practices. The Tracking Program funded four state/local health departments to obtain and pilot the use of EHR data to address several issues including the challenges and technical requirements for accessing EHR data, and the core data elements required to integrate EHR data within their departments' Tracking Programs. The results of these pilot projects highlighted the potential of EHR data for public health surveillance of rare diseases that may lack comprehensive registries, and surveillance of prevalent health conditions or risk factors for health outcomes at a finer geographic level. EHRs therefore, may have potential to supplement traditional sources of public health surveillance data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. 78 FR 19442 - Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau Seeks To Refresh the Record Regarding Options for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... (Commission) Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau (PSHSB) seeks to refresh the record regarding the... CONTACT: Eric Ehrenreich, Policy and Licensing Division, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, at..., Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau. [FR Doc. 2013-06814 Filed 3-29-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6712...

  11. MetaBinG: using GPUs to accelerate metagenomic sequence classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jia

    Full Text Available Metagenomic sequence classification is a procedure to assign sequences to their source genomes. It is one of the important steps for metagenomic sequence data analysis. Although many methods exist, classification of high-throughput metagenomic sequence data in a limited time is still a challenge. We present here an ultra-fast metagenomic sequence classification system (MetaBinG using graphic processing units (GPUs. The accuracy of MetaBinG is comparable to the best existing systems and it can classify a million of 454 reads within five minutes, which is more than 2 orders of magnitude faster than existing systems. MetaBinG is publicly available at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/MetaBinG/MetaBinG.php.

  12. Privacy, security, and the public health researcher in the era of electronic health record research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Neal D; Sarwate, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Health data derived from electronic health records are increasingly utilized in large-scale population health analyses. Going hand in hand with this increase in data is an increasing number of data breaches. Ensuring privacy and security of these data is a shared responsibility between the public health researcher, collaborators, and their institutions. In this article, we review the requirements of data privacy and security and discuss epidemiologic implications of emerging technologies from the computer science community that can be used for health data. In order to ensure that our needs as researchers are captured in these technologies, we must engage in the dialogue surrounding the development of these tools.

  13. MetCap: a bioinformatics probe design pipeline for large-scale targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Meerupati, Tejashwari; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-02-28

    Massive sequencing of genes from different environments has evolved metagenomics as central to enhancing the understanding of the wide diversity of micro-organisms and their roles in driving ecological processes. Reduced cost and high throughput sequencing has made large-scale projects achievable to a wider group of researchers, though complete metagenome sequencing is still a daunting task in terms of sequencing as well as the downstream bioinformatics analyses. Alternative approaches such as targeted amplicon sequencing requires custom PCR primer generation, and is not scalable to thousands of genes or gene families. In this study, we are presenting a web-based tool called MetCap that circumvents the limitations of amplicon sequencing of multiple genes by designing probes that are suitable for large-scale targeted metagenomics sequencing studies. MetCap provides a novel approach to target thousands of genes and genomic regions that could be used in targeted metagenomics studies. Automatic analysis of user-defined sequences is performed, and probes specifically designed for metagenome studies are generated. To illustrate the advantage of a targeted metagenome approach, we have generated more than 400,000 probes that match more than 300,000 [corrected] publicly available sequences related to carbon degradation, and used these probes for target sequencing in a soil metagenome study. The results show high enrichment of target genes and a successful capturing of the majority of gene families. MetCap is freely available to users from: http://soilecology.biol.lu.se/metcap/ . MetCap is facilitating probe-based target enrichment as an easy and efficient alternative tool compared to complex primer-based enrichment for large-scale investigations of metagenomes. Our results have shown efficient large-scale target enrichment through MetCap-designed probes for a soil metagenome. The web service is suitable for any targeted metagenomics project that aims to study several genes

  14. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the period October 28, 1998, through December 31, 2002, royalty rates and fees for eligible digital... classical programs, the proportion that the playing time of copyrighted classical recordings bears to the total playing time of all classical recordings in the program, (2) For all other programs, the...

  15. Tentacle: distributed quantification of genes in metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Boulund, Fredrik; Sjögren, Anders; Kristiansson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background In metagenomics, microbial communities are sequenced at increasingly high resolution, generating datasets with billions of DNA fragments. Novel methods that can efficiently process the growing volumes of sequence data are necessary for the accurate analysis and interpretation of existing and upcoming metagenomes. Findings Here we present Tentacle, which is a novel framework that uses distributed computational resources for gene quantification in metagenomes. Tentacle is implemented...

  16. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Tobar-Tosse

    Full Text Available Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C content, Codon Usage (Cd, Trinucleotide Usage (Tn, and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  17. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-08-12

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals.

  18. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metagenomics and the protein universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics sequencing projects have dramatically increased our knowledge of the protein universe and provided over one-half of currently known protein sequences; they have also introduced a much broader phylogenetic diversity into the protein databases. The full analysis of metagenomic datasets is only beginning, but it has already led to the discovery of thousands of new protein families, likely representing novel functions specific to given environments. At the same time, a deeper analysis of such novel families, including experimental structure determination of some representatives, suggests that most of them represent distant homologs of already characterized protein families, and thus most of the protein diversity present in the new environments are due to functional divergence of the known protein families rather than the emergence of new ones. PMID:21497084

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of Dairy Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma K.; Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Despite their huge potential for characterizing the biodiversity of phages, metagenomic studies are currently not available for dairy bacteriophages, partly due to the lack of a standard procedure for phage extraction. We optimized an extraction method that allows to remove the bulk protein from ...... diversity. Possible co-induction of temperate P335 prophages and satellite phages in one of the whey mixtures was also observed....

  1. Integrative Workflows for Metagenomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymios eLadoukakis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of all sequencing technologies, described by the term Next Generation Sequencing (NGS, have revolutionized metagenomic analysis. They constitute a combination of high-throughput analytical protocols, coupled to delicate measuring techniques, in order to potentially discover, properly assemble and map allelic sequences to the correct genomes, achieving particularly high yields for only a fraction of the cost of traditional processes (i.e. Sanger. From a bioinformatic perspective, this boils down to many gigabytes of data being generated from each single sequencing experiment, rendering the management or even the storage, critical bottlenecks with respect to the overall analytical endeavor. The enormous complexity is even more aggravated by the versatility of the processing steps available, represented by the numerous bioinformatic tools that are essential, for each analytical task, in order to fully unveil the genetic content of a metagenomic dataset. These disparate tasks range from simple, nonetheless non-trivial, quality control of raw data to exceptionally complex protein annotation procedures, requesting a high level of expertise for their proper application or the neat implementation of the whole workflow. Furthermore, a bioinformatic analysis of such scale, requires grand computational resources, imposing as the sole realistic solution, the utilization of cloud computing infrastructures. In this review article we discuss different, integrative, bioinformatic solutions available, which address the aforementioned issues, by performing a critical assessment of the available automated pipelines for data management, quality control and annotation of metagenomic data, embracing various, major sequencing technologies and applications.

  2. A metagenomics portal for a democratized sequencing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Andreas; Glass, Elizabeth M; Bartels, Daniela; Bischof, Jared; Braithwaite, Daniel; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Harrison, Travis; Keegan, Kevin; Matthews, Hunter; Kottmann, Renzo; Paczian, Tobias; Tang, Wei; Trimble, William L; Yilmaz, Pelin; Wilkening, Jared; Desai, Narayan; Meyer, Folker

    2013-01-01

    The democratized world of sequencing is leading to numerous data analysis challenges; MG-RAST addresses many of these challenges for diverse datasets, including amplicon datasets, shotgun metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. The changes from version 2 to version 3 include the addition of a dedicated gene calling stage using FragGenescan, clustering of predicted proteins at 90% identity, and the use of BLAT for the computation of similarities. Together with changes in the underlying software infrastructure, this has enabled the dramatic scaling up of pipeline throughput while remaining on a limited hardware budget. The Web-based service allows upload, fully automated analysis, and visualization of results. As a result of the plummeting cost of sequencing and the readily available analytical power of MG-RAST, over 78,000 metagenomic datasets have been analyzed, with over 12,000 of them publicly available in MG-RAST. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 34 CFR 86.103 - What records and information must an IHE make available to the Secretary and the public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records and information must an IHE make available to the Secretary and the public concerning its drug prevention program? 86.103 Section 86.103 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.103 What records and...

  4. Current and future resources for functional metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Nguyen Lam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional metagenomics is a powerful experimental approach for studying gene function, starting from the extracted DNA of mixed microbial populations. A functional approach relies on the construction and screening of metagenomic libraries – physical libraries that contain DNA cloned from environmental metagenomes. The information obtained from functional metagenomics can help in future annotations of gene function and serve as a complement to sequence-based metagenomics. In this Perspective, we begin by summarizing the technical challenges of constructing metagenomic libraries and emphasize their value as resources. We then discuss libraries constructed using the popular cloning vector, pCC1FOS, and highlight the strengths and shortcomings of this system, alongside possible strategies to maximize existing pCC1FOS-based libraries by screening in diverse hosts. Finally, we discuss the known bias of libraries constructed from human gut and marine water samples, present results that suggest bias may also occur for soil libraries, and consider factors that bias metagenomic libraries in general. We anticipate that discussion of current resources and limitations will advance tools and technologies for functional metagenomics research.

  5. Metagenomic data analysis : computational methods and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is the study of the genomic content of microbial communities, acquired through DNA sequencing technology. The main advantage of metagenomics is that it can overcome the limitations of individual genome sequencing, that can work only on the few culturable microbes. Unfortunately, the

  6. Back to the Future of Soil Metagenomics.\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nesme J, J.; Achouak, W.; Agathos SN, S.N.; Bailey, M.; Baldrian, Petr; Brunel, D.; Frostegård, Å.; Heulin, T.; Jansson JK, J.K.; Jurkevitch, E.; Kruus, K.L.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Lagares, A.; Lapin-Scott, H.M.; Lemanceau, P.; Le Paslier, D.; Mandic-Mulec, I.; Murrell, J.C.; Myrold, D.D.; Nalin, R.; Nannipieri, P.; Neufeld, J.D.; O'Gara, F.; Parnell, J.J.; Pühler, A.; Pylro, V.; Ramos, J.L.; Roesch, L.F.; Schloter, M.; Schleper, C.; Sczyrba, A.; Sessitsch, A.; Sjöling, S.; Sørensen, J.; Sørensen, S.J.; Tebbe, C.C.; Topp, E.; Tsiamis, G.; van Elsas, J.D.; van Keulen, G.; Widmer, F.; Wagner, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L; Zhu, Y-G.; Vogel, T.M.; Simonet, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, FEB 10 (2016), s. 73 ISSN 1664-302X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : metagenomic * soil microbiology; terrestrial microbiology * metagenomic; soil microbiology; terrestrial microbiology Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  7. 37 CFR 201.26 - Recordation of documents pertaining to computer shareware and donation of public domain computer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pertaining to computer shareware and donation of public domain computer software. 201.26 Section 201.26... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.26 Recordation of documents pertaining to computer shareware and donation of public domain computer software. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures for submission of...

  8. Metagenomic applications in environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techtmann, Stephen M; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technology, the cost of sequencing has dramatically dropped and the scale of sequencing projects has increased accordingly. This has provided the opportunity for the routine use of sequencing techniques in the monitoring of environmental microbes. While metagenomic applications have been routinely applied to better understand the ecology and diversity of microbes, their use in environmental monitoring and bioremediation is increasingly common. In this review we seek to provide an overview of some of the metagenomic techniques used in environmental systems biology, addressing their application and limitation. We will also provide several recent examples of the application of metagenomics to bioremediation. We discuss examples where microbial communities have been used to predict the presence and extent of contamination, examples of how metagenomics can be used to characterize the process of natural attenuation by unculturable microbes, as well as examples detailing the use of metagenomics to understand the impact of biostimulation on microbial communities.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses. It w...... heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics.......From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses...

  10. MGC: a metagenomic gene caller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allali, Achraf; Rose, John R

    2013-01-01

    Computational gene finding algorithms have proven their robustness in identifying genes in complete genomes. However, metagenomic sequencing has presented new challenges due to the incomplete and fragmented nature of the data. During the last few years, attempts have been made to extract complete and incomplete open reading frames (ORFs) directly from short reads and identify the coding ORFs, bypassing other challenging tasks such as the assembly of the metagenome. In this paper we introduce a metagenomics gene caller (MGC) which is an improvement over the state-of-the-art prediction algorithm Orphelia. Orphelia uses a two-stage machine learning approach and computes a model that classifies extracted ORFs from fragmented sequences. We hypothesise and demonstrate evidence that sequences need separate models based on their local GC-content in order to avoid the noise introduced to a single model computed with sequences from the entire GC spectrum. We have also added two amino-acid features based on the benefit of amino-acid usage shown in our previous research. Our algorithm is able to predict genes and translation initiation sites (TIS) more accurately than Orphelia which uses a single model. Learning separate models for several pre-defined GC-content regions as opposed to a single model approach improves the performance of the neural network as demonstrated by the experimental results presented in this paper. The inclusion of amino-acid usage features also helps improve the overall accuracy of our algorithm. MGC's improvement sets the ground for further investigation into the use of GC-content to separate data for training models in machine learning based gene finders.

  11. Bioinformatic approaches reveal metagenomic characterization of soil microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofei Xu

    Full Text Available As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic soil, and mangrove sediment and integrated some state-of-the-art computational tools to explore the phylogenetic and functional characterizations of the microbial communities in soil. Microbial composition and metabolic potential in soils were comprehensively illustrated at the metagenomic level. A spectrum of metagenomic biomarkers containing 46 taxa and 33 metabolic modules were detected to be significantly differential that could be used as indicators to distinguish at least one of five soil communities. The co-occurrence associations between complex microbial compositions and functions were inferred by network-based approaches. Our results together with the established bioinformatic pipelines should provide a foundation for future research into the relation between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function.

  12. BeerDeCoded: the open beer metagenome project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jonathan; Henry, Luc; Rotman, Nicolas; Rando, Gianpaolo

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has radically changed research in the life sciences, in both academic and corporate laboratories. The potential impact is tremendous, yet a majority of citizens have little or no understanding of the technological and ethical aspects of this widespread adoption. We designed BeerDeCoded as a pretext to discuss the societal issues related to genomic and metagenomic data with fellow citizens, while advancing scientific knowledge of the most popular beverage of all. In the spirit of citizen science, sample collection and DNA extraction were carried out with the participation of non-scientists in the community laboratory of Hackuarium, a not-for-profit organisation that supports unconventional research and promotes the public understanding of science. The dataset presented herein contains the targeted metagenomic profile of 39 bottled beers from 5 countries, based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of fungal species. A preliminary analysis reveals the presence of a large diversity of wild yeast species in commercial brews. With this project, we demonstrate that coupling simple laboratory procedures that can be carried out in a non-professional environment with state-of-the-art sequencing technologies and targeted metagenomic analyses, can lead to the detection and identification of the microbial content in bottled beer. PMID:29123645

  13. Challenges of the Unknown: Clinical Application of Microbial Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast, high throughput and low cost whole genome sequencing holds great promise within public health microbiology, with applications ranging from outbreak detection and tracking transmission events to understanding the role played by microbial communities in health and disease. Within clinical metagenomics, identifying microorganisms from a complex and host enriched background remains a central computational challenge. As proof of principle, we sequenced two metagenomic samples, a known viral mixture of 25 human pathogens and an unknown complex biological model using benchtop technology. The datasets were then analysed using a bioinformatic pipeline developed around recent fast classification methods. A targeted approach was able to detect 20 of the viruses against a background of host contamination from multiple sources and bacterial contamination. An alternative untargeted identification method was highly correlated with these classifications, and over 1,600 species were identified when applied to the complex biological model, including several species captured at over 50% genome coverage. In summary, this study demonstrates the great potential of applying metagenomics within the clinical laboratory setting and that this can be achieved using infrastructure available to nondedicated sequencing centres.

  14. BeerDeCoded: the open beer metagenome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jonathan; Henry, Luc; Rotman, Nicolas; Rando, Gianpaolo

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has radically changed research in the life sciences, in both academic and corporate laboratories. The potential impact is tremendous, yet a majority of citizens have little or no understanding of the technological and ethical aspects of this widespread adoption. We designed BeerDeCoded as a pretext to discuss the societal issues related to genomic and metagenomic data with fellow citizens, while advancing scientific knowledge of the most popular beverage of all. In the spirit of citizen science, sample collection and DNA extraction were carried out with the participation of non-scientists in the community laboratory of Hackuarium, a not-for-profit organisation that supports unconventional research and promotes the public understanding of science. The dataset presented herein contains the targeted metagenomic profile of 39 bottled beers from 5 countries, based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of fungal species. A preliminary analysis reveals the presence of a large diversity of wild yeast species in commercial brews. With this project, we demonstrate that coupling simple laboratory procedures that can be carried out in a non-professional environment with state-of-the-art sequencing technologies and targeted metagenomic analyses, can lead to the detection and identification of the microbial content in bottled beer.

  15. Metagenomic Taxonomy-Guided Database-Searching Strategy for Improving Metaproteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jinqiu; Tanca, Alessandro; Jia, Ben; Yang, Runqing; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jing

    2018-02-26

    Metaproteomics provides a direct measure of the functional information by investigating all proteins expressed by a microbiota. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of microbial communities, it is very hard to construct a sequence database suitable for a metaproteomic study. Using a public database, researchers might not be able to identify proteins from poorly characterized microbial species, while a sequencing-based metagenomic database may not provide adequate coverage for all potentially expressed protein sequences. To address this challenge, we propose a metagenomic taxonomy-guided database-search strategy (MT), in which a merged database is employed, consisting of both taxonomy-guided reference protein sequences from public databases and proteins from metagenome assembly. By applying our MT strategy to a mock microbial mixture, about two times as many peptides were detected as with the metagenomic database only. According to the evaluation of the reliability of taxonomic attribution, the rate of misassignments was comparable to that obtained using an a priori matched database. We also evaluated the MT strategy with a human gut microbial sample, and we found 1.7 times as many peptides as using a standard metagenomic database. In conclusion, our MT strategy allows the construction of databases able to provide high sensitivity and precision in peptide identification in metaproteomic studies, enabling the detection of proteins from poorly characterized species within the microbiota.

  16. Recording and Management of CCT in a Public Hospital in the Region of Laconia in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Gkiouzeli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cranium-cerebral traumas in today’s era are a serious public health problem with bothsocial and economic dimensions. They are characterized as an ‘epidemic’, due to the increase in car accidents and they particularly affect the productive population.The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence and allocation of Cranium-cerebral traumas among the population in the Prefecture of Laconia, in order to determine the explanatory factors or risk factors, the record of how they are managed (diagnosis, therapy, and outcome and their correlation with demographics and other factors.Methodology: This study was conducted with the collection of data from hospital archives and Emergency Department logbooks from the General Hospital of Sparta. Specifically designed record forms were used which included patient demographics, means of arrival to the hospital, the clinical pictures, the gravity of the injury, possible accompanying injuries, diagnostic tests, treatment and outcome, as well as evidence related to the causes of the injury.Results: 2352 cases of children and adults with Cranium-cerebral traumas were included in this study who came to the Emergency Department from 1st of January 2005 to 31st of December 2010. The cause of Cranium-cerebral traumas in adults is affected by gender, nationality and place of residence, while in children it is affected by place of residence and the means of arrival to the Emergency Department. Respectively, the outcome of Cranium–cerebral traumas in adults is affected by place of residence and their means of arrival to the hospital while in children it is affected by nationality and place of residence.Conclusions: This study has revealed the magnitude of the problem and the epidemiological characteristics of Cranium-cerebral traumas in the Prefecture of Laconia, with the ultimate need for intervention at a level of prevention. Proposals regard the improvement in road networks, informative

  17. Bioprospecting metagenomes: glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monchy Sebastien

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

  18. The Australian general public's perceptions of having a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lynda; Gajanayake, Randike; Sahama, Tony

    2014-12-01

    The move internationally by Governments and other health providers to encourage patients to have their own electronic personal health record (e-PHRs) is growing exponentially. In Australia the initiative for a personally controlled electronic health record (known as PCEHR) is directed towards the public at large. The first objective of this study then, is to examine how individuals in the general population perceive the promoted idea of having a PCEHR. The second objective is to extend research on applying a theoretically derived consumer technology acceptance model to guide the research. An online survey was conducted to capture the perceptions and beliefs about having a PCEHR identified from technology acceptance models and extant literature. The survey was completed by 750 Queensland respondents, 97% of whom did not have a PCEHR at that time. The model was examined using exploratory factor analysis, regressions and mediation tests. Findings support eight of the 11 hypothesised relationships in the model. Perceived value and perceived risk were the two most important variables explaining attitude, with perceived usefulness and compatibility being weak but significant. The perception of risk was reduced through partial mediation from trust and privacy concerns. Additionally, web-self efficacy and ease of use partially mediate the relationship between attitude and intentions. The findings represent a snapshot of the early stages of implementing this Australian initiative and capture the perceptions of Queenslanders who at present do not have a PCEHR. Findings show that while individuals appreciate the value of having this record, they do not appear to regard it as particularly useful at present, nor is it particularly compatible with their current engagement with e-services. Moreover, they will need to have any concerns about the risks alleviated, particularly through an increased sense of trust and reduction of privacy concerns. It is noted that although the

  19. Human milk metagenome: a functional capacity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human milk contains a diverse population of bacteria that likely influences colonization of the infant gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies, however, have been limited to characterization of this microbial community by 16S rRNA analysis. In the present study, a metagenomic approach using Illumina sequencing of a pooled milk sample (ten donors) was employed to determine the genera of bacteria and the types of bacterial open reading frames in human milk that may influence bacterial establishment and stability in this primal food matrix. The human milk metagenome was also compared to that of breast-fed and formula-fed infants’ feces (n = 5, each) and mothers’ feces (n = 3) at the phylum level and at a functional level using open reading frame abundance. Additionally, immune-modulatory bacterial-DNA motifs were also searched for within human milk. Results The bacterial community in human milk contained over 360 prokaryotic genera, with sequences aligning predominantly to the phyla of Proteobacteria (65%) and Firmicutes (34%), and the genera of Pseudomonas (61.1%), Staphylococcus (33.4%) and Streptococcus (0.5%). From assembled human milk-derived contigs, 30,128 open reading frames were annotated and assigned to functional categories. When compared to the metagenome of infants’ and mothers’ feces, the human milk metagenome was less diverse at the phylum level, and contained more open reading frames associated with nitrogen metabolism, membrane transport and stress response (P milk metagenome also contained a similar occurrence of immune-modulatory DNA motifs to that of infants’ and mothers’ fecal metagenomes. Conclusions Our results further expand the complexity of the human milk metagenome and enforce the benefits of human milk ingestion on the microbial colonization of the infant gut and immunity. Discovery of immune-modulatory motifs in the metagenome of human milk indicates more exhaustive analyses of the functionality of the human

  20. Patterns in Greater Sage-grouse population dynamics correspond with public grazing records at broad scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Adrian; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Assal, Timothy J.; Veblen, Kari E.; Pyke, David A.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied effects on wildlife interacting within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming, USA, and we used Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. With annual counts of male Sage-grouse from 743 leks (breeding display sites) during 2004–2014, we modeled population trends in response to grazing level (represented by a relative grazing index) and timing across a gradient in vegetation productivity as measured by the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI). We found grazing can have both positive and negative effects on Sage-grouse populations depending on the timing and level of grazing. Sage-grouse populations responded positively to higher grazing levels after peak vegetation productivity, but populations declined when similar grazing levels occurred earlier, likely reflecting the sensitivity of cool-season grasses to grazing during peak growth periods. We also found support for the hypothesis that effects of grazing management vary with local vegetation productivity. These results illustrate the importance of broad-scale analyses by revealing patterns in Sage-grouse population trends that may not be inferred from studies at finer scales, and could inform sustainable grazing management in these ecosystems.

  1. Patterns in Greater Sage-grouse population dynamics correspond with public grazing records at broad scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Adrian P; Aldridge, Cameron L; Assal, Timothy J; Veblen, Kari E; Pyke, David A; Casazza, Michael L

    2017-06-01

    Human land use, such as livestock grazing, can have profound yet varied effects on wildlife interacting within common ecosystems, yet our understanding of land-use effects is often generalized from short-term, local studies that may not correspond with trends at broader scales. Here we used public land records to characterize livestock grazing across Wyoming, USA, and we used Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as a model organism to evaluate responses to livestock management. With annual counts of male Sage-grouse from 743 leks (breeding display sites) during 2004-2014, we modeled population trends in response to grazing level (represented by a relative grazing index) and timing across a gradient in vegetation productivity as measured by the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index (NDVI). We found grazing can have both positive and negative effects on Sage-grouse populations depending on the timing and level of grazing. Sage-grouse populations responded positively to higher grazing levels after peak vegetation productivity, but populations declined when similar grazing levels occurred earlier, likely reflecting the sensitivity of cool-season grasses to grazing during peak growth periods. We also found support for the hypothesis that effects of grazing management vary with local vegetation productivity. These results illustrate the importance of broad-scale analyses by revealing patterns in Sage-grouse population trends that may not be inferred from studies at finer scales, and could inform sustainable grazing management in these ecosystems. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. EBI metagenomics--a new resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah; Corbett, Matthew; Denise, Hubert; Fraser, Matthew; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hunter, Christopher; Jones, Philip; Leinonen, Rasko; McAnulla, Craig; Maguire, Eamonn; Maslen, John; Mitchell, Alex; Nuka, Gift; Oisel, Arnaud; Pesseat, Sebastien; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Scheremetjew, Maxim; Sterk, Peter; Vaughan, Daniel; Cochrane, Guy; Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively recently established but rapidly expanding field that uses high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting different ecosystems (including oceans, lakes, soil, tundra, plants and body sites). Metagenomics brings with it a number of challenges, including the management, analysis, storage and sharing of data. In response to these challenges, we have developed a new metagenomics resource (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metagenomics/) that allows users to easily submit raw nucleotide reads for functional and taxonomic analysis by a state-of-the-art pipeline, and have them automatically stored (together with descriptive, standards-compliant metadata) in the European Nucleotide Archive.

  3. Bacterial tag encoded FLX titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP based assessment of prokaryotic diversity in metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Dudhagara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diversity and archaeal diversity in metagenome of the Lonar soda lake sediment were assessed by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP. Metagenome comprised 5093 sequences with 2,531,282 bp and 53 ± 2% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the Bioproject database with accession no. PRJNA218849. Metagenome sequence represented the presence of 83.1% bacterial and 10.5% archaeal origin. A total of 14 different bacteria demonstrating 57 species were recorded with dominating species like Coxiella burnetii (17%, Fibrobacter intestinalis (12% and Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans (11%. Occurrence of two archaeal phyla representing 24 species, among them Methanosaeta harundinacea (35%, Methanoculleus chikugoensis (12% and Methanolinea tarda (11% were dominating species. Significant presence of 11% sequences as an unclassified indicated the possibilities for unknown novel prokaryotes from the metagenome.

  4. Managing records in South Africa's public sector – a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATUU, Shadrack

    managing digital records. The discussion on the management of digital records is more .... strategic factors (such as the business case, top management support and change management) .... Figure 1: The evolution of various terms related to the management of digital records. ERM systems evolved from early automated.

  5. 75 FR 17638 - National Historical Publications and Records Commission; Proposal To Amend Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... feel that our customers recognize that they need institutional support to successfully complete such... materials, and electronic files. Historical records repository means organizations whose mission is to... for a records grant? (a) The Commission provides grants to historical records repositories for...

  6. Use of Electronic Health Records and Administrative Data for Public Health Surveillance of Eye Health and Vision-Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda; Davidson, Arthur; Lum, Flora; Chiang, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B; Zhang, Xinzhi; Crews, John E.; Chou, Chiu-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To discuss the current trend toward greater use of electronic health records and how these records could enhance public health surveillance of eye health and vision-related conditions. Methods We describe three currently available sources of electronic health data (Kaiser Permanente, the Veterans Health Administration, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) and how these sources can contribute to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Results Each of the three sources of electronic health data can contribute meaningfully to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system, but none currently provide all the information required. The use of electronic health records for vision and eye health surveillance has both advantages and disadvantages. Conclusions Electronic health records may provide additional information needed to create a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Recommendations for incorporating electronic health records into such a system are presented. PMID:23158225

  7. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. Comparative metagenomics of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-26

    Metagenome produces a tremendous amount of data that comes from the organisms living in the environments. This big data enables us to examine not only microbial genes but also the community structure, interaction and adaptation mechanisms at the specific location and condition. The Red Sea has several unique characteristics such as high salinity, high temperature and low nutrition. These features must contribute to form the unique microbial community during the evolutionary process. Since 2014, we started monthly samplings of the metagenomes in the Red Sea under KAUST-CCF project. In collaboration with Kitasato University, we also collected the metagenome data from the ocean in Japan, which shows contrasting features to the Red Sea. Therefore, the comparative metagenomics of those data provides a comprehensive view of the Red Sea microbes, leading to identify key microbes, genes and networks related to those environmental differences.

  9. Explaining diversity in metagenomic datasets by phylogenetic-based feature weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Davide; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Donati, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Metagenomics is revolutionizing our understanding of microbial communities, showing that their structure and composition have profound effects on the ecosystem and in a variety of health and disease conditions. Despite the flourishing of new analysis methods, current approaches based on statistical comparisons between high-level taxonomic classes often fail to identify the microbial taxa that are differentially distributed between sets of samples, since in many cases the taxonomic schema do not allow an adequate description of the structure of the microbiota. This constitutes a severe limitation to the use of metagenomic data in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. To provide a more robust statistical framework, we introduce a class of feature-weighting algorithms that discriminate the taxa responsible for the classification of metagenomic samples. The method unambiguously groups the relevant taxa into clades without relying on pre-defined taxonomic categories, thus including in the analysis also those sequences for which a taxonomic classification is difficult. The phylogenetic clades are weighted and ranked according to their abundance measuring their contribution to the differentiation of the classes of samples, and a criterion is provided to define a reduced set of most relevant clades. Applying the method to public datasets, we show that the data-driven definition of relevant phylogenetic clades accomplished by our ranking strategy identifies features in the samples that are lost if phylogenetic relationships are not considered, improving our ability to mine metagenomic datasets. Comparison with supervised classification methods currently used in metagenomic data analysis highlights the advantages of using phylogenetic information.

  10. Plasmid metagenome reveals high levels of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available The overuse or misuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the public health in the world. Sewage treatment plants (STPs are considered as important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and activated sludge characterized with high microbial density and diversity facilitates ARG horizontal gene transfer (HGT via mobile genetic elements (MGEs. However, little is known regarding the pool of ARGs and MGEs in sludge microbiome. In this study, the transposon aided capture (TRACA system was employed to isolate novel plasmids from activated sludge of one STP in Hong Kong, China. We also used Illumina Hiseq 2000 high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics analysis to investigate the plasmid metagenome. Two novel plasmids were acquired from the sludge microbiome by using TRACA system and one novel plasmid was identified through metagenomics analysis. Our results revealed high levels of various ARGs as well as MGEs for HGT, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. The application of the TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the environmental metagenome, coupled with subsequent high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis, highlighted the prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in microbial community of STPs.

  11. Plasmid metagenome reveals high levels of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Ye, Lin

    2011-01-01

    The overuse or misuse of antibiotics has accelerated antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the public health in the world. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are considered as important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and activated sludge characterized with high microbial density and diversity facilitates ARG horizontal gene transfer (HGT) via mobile genetic elements (MGEs). However, little is known regarding the pool of ARGs and MGEs in sludge microbiome. In this study, the transposon aided capture (TRACA) system was employed to isolate novel plasmids from activated sludge of one STP in Hong Kong, China. We also used Illumina Hiseq 2000 high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics analysis to investigate the plasmid metagenome. Two novel plasmids were acquired from the sludge microbiome by using TRACA system and one novel plasmid was identified through metagenomics analysis. Our results revealed high levels of various ARGs as well as MGEs for HGT, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. The application of the TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the environmental metagenome, coupled with subsequent high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis, highlighted the prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in microbial community of STPs.

  12. Putative bacterial interactions from metagenomic knowledge with an integrative systems ecology approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bordron, P.; Latorre, M.; Cortés, M.; González, M.; Thiele, S.; Siegel, A.; Maass, A.; Eveillard, D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following the trend of studies that investigate microbial ecosystems using different metagenomic techniques, we propose a new integrative systems ecology approach that aims to decipher functional roles within a consortium through the integration of genomic and metabolic knowledge at genome scale. For the sake of application, using public genomes of five bacterial strains involved in copper bioleaching: Acidiphilium cryptum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidan...

  13. Monthly Record of Current Educational Publications. Bulletin, 1914, No. 21. Whole Number 594

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1914

    1914-01-01

    The present bulletin contains a survey of literature which has appeared since the publication in May, 1914, of the last preceding regular number in this series. A list of periodicals indexed, with places of publication is included. The bulletin is divided into the following sections: (1) Introductory notes; (2) Publications of associations; (3)…

  14. Willingness to share personal health record data for care improvement and public health: a survey of experienced personal health record users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitzman Elissa R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data stored in personally controlled health records (PCHRs may hold value for clinicians and public health entities, if patients and their families will share them. We sought to characterize consumer willingness and unwillingness (reticence to share PCHR data across health topics, and with different stakeholders, to advance understanding of this issue. Methods Cross-sectional 2009 Web survey of repeat PCHR users who were patients over 18 years old or parents of patients, to assess willingness to share their PCHR data with an-out-of-hospital provider to support care, and the state/local public health authority to support monitoring; the odds of reticence to share PCHR information about ten exemplary health topics were estimated using a repeated measures approach. Results Of 261 respondents (56% response rate, more reported they would share all information with the state/local public health authority (63.3% than with an out-of-hospital provider (54.1% (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1, 1.9; p = .005; few would not share any information with these parties (respectively, 7.9% and 5.2%. For public health sharing, reticence was higher for most topics compared to contagious illness (ORs 4.9 to 1.4, all p-values  Conclusions Pediatric patients and their families are often willing to share electronic health information to support health improvement, but remain cautious. Robust trust models for PCHR sharing are needed.

  15. Private Use, Private Property and Public Policy: Home Recording and Reproduction of Protected Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, David

    This discussion of the difficulties of protecting copyright for audio and video recordings focuses on the application of the 1976 Copyright Act and the Fair Use principle to educational off-air taping and private home recording. Court cases such as Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation versus Crooks and Universal Studios, et al. versus…

  16. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 2

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-10

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.  Created: 9/10/2009 by Coordinating Center for Health Information Service (CCHIS), Healthy Healthcare Settings Goal Team, Office of Strategy and Innovation.   Date Released: 6/3/2010.

  17. Electronic Health Records: PHR Opportunities for Public Health – Part 1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-10

    In this podcast, Dr. Ken Mandl discusses electronic health records and personally-controlled health records. Dr. Mandl leads the IndivoHealth personally-controlled health record project, the original reference model for the Microsoft, Google, and Dossia personal health records (PHRs or PCHRs). He has successfully used PHRs for immunization and influenza, leads efforts in real-time surveillance systems, and is currently adapting personal health records for longitudinal and genomic research. The lecture was given at CDC on June 19, 2009.  Created: 9/10/2009 by Coordinating Center for Health Information Service (CCHIS), Healthy Healthcare Settings Goal Team, Office of Strategy and Innovation.   Date Released: 6/3/2010.

  18. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondov, Brian D; Bergman, Nicholas H; Phillippy, Adam M

    2011-09-30

    A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  19. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  20. The metagenomic data life-cycle: standards and best practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ten Hoopen, Petra; Finn, Robert D.; Bongo, Lars Ailo; Corre, Erwan; Fosso, Bruno; Meyer, Folker; Mitchell, Alex; Pelletier, Eric; Pesole, Graziano; Santamaria, Monica; Willassen, Nils Peder; Cochrane, Guy

    2017-06-16

    Metagenomics data analyses from independent studies can only be compared if the analysis workflows are described in a harmonised way. In this overview, we have mapped the landscape of data standards available for the description of essential steps in metagenomics: (1) material sampling, (2) material sequencing (3) data analysis and (4) data archiving & publishing. Taking examples from marine research, we summarise essential variables used to describe material sampling processes and sequencing procedures in a metagenomics experiment. These aspects of metagenomics dataset generation have been to some extent addressed by the scientific community but greater awareness and adoption is still needed. We emphasise the lack of standards relating to reporting how metagenomics datasets are analysed and how the metagenomics data analysis outputs should be archived and published. We propose best practice as a foundation for a community standard to enable reproducibility and better sharing of metagenomics datasets, leading ultimately to greater metagenomics data reuse and repurposing.

  1. 16SPIP: a comprehensive analysis pipeline for rapid pathogen detection in clinical samples based on 16S metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jiaojiao; Han, Na; Qiang, Yujun; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Xiuwen; Zhang, Wen

    2017-12-28

    Pathogen detection in clinical samples based on 16S metagenomic sequencing technology in microbiology laboratories is an important strategy for clinical diagnosis, public health surveillance, and investigations of outbreaks. However, the implementation of the technology is limited by its accuracy and the time required for bioinformatics analysis. Therefore, a simple, standardized, and rapid analysis pipeline from the receipt of clinical samples to the generation of a test report is needed to increase the use of metagenomic analyses in clinical settings. We developed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis pipeline for the identification of pathogens in clinical samples based on 16S metagenomic sequencing data, named 16SPIP. This pipeline offers two analysis modes (fast and sensitive mode) for the rapid conversion of clinical 16S metagenomic data to test reports for pathogen detection. The pipeline includes tools for data conversion, quality control, merging of paired-end reads, alignment, and pathogen identification. We validated the feasibility and accuracy of the pipeline using a combination of culture and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic analyses. 16SPIP may be effective for the analysis of 16S metagenomic sequencing data for real-time, rapid, and unbiased pathogen detection in clinical samples.

  2. Shotgun metagenomic data streams: surfing without fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berendzen, Joel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Timely information about bio-threat prevalence, consequence, propagation, attribution, and mitigation is needed to support decision-making, both routinely and in a crisis. One DNA sequencer can stream 25 Gbp of information per day, but sampling strategies and analysis techniques are needed to turn raw sequencing power into actionable knowledge. Shotgun metagenomics can enable biosurveillance at the level of a single city, hospital, or airplane. Metagenomics characterizes viruses and bacteria from complex environments such as soil, air filters, or sewage. Unlike targeted-primer-based sequencing, shotgun methods are not blind to sequences that are truly novel, and they can measure absolute prevalence. Shotgun metagenomic sampling can be non-invasive, efficient, and inexpensive while being informative. We have developed analysis techniques for shotgun metagenomic sequencing that rely upon phylogenetic signature patterns. They work by indexing local sequence patterns in a manner similar to web search engines. Our methods are laptop-fast and favorable scaling properties ensure they will be sustainable as sequencing methods grow. We show examples of application to soil metagenomic samples.

  3. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  4. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-04-01

    The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and respondents with degree-level education

  5. Patient and public attitudes towards informed consent models and levels of awareness of Electronic Health Records in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Fiona; Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E.; Marston, Cicely; Bell, Derek; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Background The development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) forms an integral part of the information strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, with the aim of facilitating health information exchange for patient care and secondary use, including research and healthcare planning. Implementing EHR systems requires an understanding of patient expectations for consent mechanisms and consideration of public awareness towards information sharing as might be made possible through integrated EHRs across primary and secondary health providers. Objectives To explore levels of public awareness about EHRs and to examine attitudes towards different consent models with respect to sharing identifiable and de-identified records for healthcare provision, research and planning. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered to adult patients and members of the public in primary and secondary care clinics in West London, UK in 2011. In total, 5331 individuals participated in the survey, and 3157 were included in the final analysis. Results The majority (91%) of respondents expected to be explicitly asked for consent for their identifiable records to be accessed for health provision, research or planning. Half the respondents (49%) did not expect to be asked for consent before their de-identified records were accessed. Compared with White British respondents, those from all other ethnic groups were more likely to anticipate their permission would be obtained before their de-identified records were used. Of the study population, 59% reported already being aware of EHRs before the survey. Older respondents and individuals with complex patterns of interaction with healthcare services were more likely to report prior awareness of EHRs. Individuals self-identifying as belonging to ethnic groups other than White British, and those with lower educational qualifications were less likely to report being aware of EHRs than White British respondents and

  6. 78 FR 9654 - Public Access to NEH Records Under the Freedom of Information Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... distribution to the general public. The NEH will regard ``freelance'' journalists as working for a news-media... disclosure to a significant extent. The NEH will make no value judgments about whether the information at...

  7. AmphoraNet: the webserver implementation of the AMPHORA2 metagenomic workflow suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Bánky, Dániel; Grolmusz, Vince

    2014-01-10

    Metagenomics went through an astonishing development in the past few years. Today not only gene sequencing experts, but numerous laboratories of other specializations need to analyze DNA sequences gained from clinical or environmental samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the metagenomic data presents significant challenges for the biologist and the bioinformatician. The program suite AMPHORA and its workflow version are examples of publicly available software that yields reliable phylogenetic results for metagenomic data. Here we present AmphoraNet, an easy-to-use webserver that is capable of assigning a probability-weighted taxonomic group for each phylogenetic marker gene found in the input metagenomic sample; the webserver is based on the AMPHORA2 workflow. Since a large proportion of molecular biologists uses the BLAST program and its clones on public webservers instead of the locally installed versions, we believe that the occasional user may find it comfortable that, in this version, no time-consuming installation of every component of the AMPHORA2 suite or expertise in Linux environment is required. The webserver is freely available at http://amphoranet.pitgroup.org; no registration is required. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  9. Public and physician's expectations and ethical concerns about electronic health record: Benefits outweigh risks except for information security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entzeridou, Eleni; Markopoulou, Evgenia; Mollaki, Vasiliki

    2018-02-01

    Electronic Health Record systems (EHRs) offer numerous benefits in health care but also pose certain risks. As we progress toward the implementation of EHRs, a more in-depth understanding of attitudes that influence overall levels of EHR support is required. To record public and physicians' awareness, expectations for, and ethical concerns about the use of EHRs. A convenience sample was surveyed for both the public and physicians. The Public's Questionnaire was distributed to the public in a printed and an online version. The Physicians' Questionnaire was distributed to physicians in an online version. The questionnaires requested demographic characteristics followed by close-ended questions enquiring about awareness, perceived impact, perceived risks, and ethical issues raised by EHR use. In total, 46% of the public and 91% of physicians were aware of EHRs. Physicians' and public opinions were comparable concerning the positive impact of EHRs on better, more effective, and faster decisions on the patients' health, on better coordination between hospitals/clinics and on quality and reduced cost of health care. However, physicians were concerned that an EHR system would be a burden for their finances, for their time concerning training on the system, for their everyday workload and workflow. The majority of the public generally agreed that they would worry about the possibility that a non-authorized, third party might gain access to their personal health information (48.8%), and that they would worry about future discriminations due to possible disclosure of their health information (48.8%). Most physicians disagreed that EHRs will disrupt the doctor-patient relationship (58.1%) but they would worry about the safety of their patients' information (53.1%). Overall, both the public and physicians were in favor of the implementation of an EHR system, evaluating that possible benefits are more important than possible risks. The majority of the public believed that

  10. Principles of Public School Accounting. State Educational Records and Reports Series: Handbook II-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bert K.; And Others

    This handbook discusses the following primary aspects of school accounting: Definitions and principles; opening the general ledger; recording the approved budget; a sample month of transactions; the balance sheet, monthly, and annual reports; subsidiary journals; payroll procedures; cafeteria fund accounting; debt service accounting; construction…

  11. Gene Prediction in Metagenomic Fragments with Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Wu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies used in metagenomics yield numerous sequencing fragments which come from thousands of different species. Accurately identifying genes from metagenomics fragments is one of the most fundamental issues in metagenomics. In this article, by fusing multifeatures (i.e., monocodon usage, monoamino acid usage, ORF length coverage, and Z-curve features and using deep stacking networks learning model, we present a novel method (called Meta-MFDL to predict the metagenomic genes. The results with 10 CV and independent tests show that Meta-MFDL is a powerful tool for identifying genes from metagenomic fragments.

  12. A retrospective metagenomics approach to studying Blastocystis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lee O'Brien; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasitic genus, comprising several subtypes. Here, we screened data obtained by metagenomic analysis of faecal DNA for Blastocystis by searching for subtype-specific genes in coabundance gene groups, which are groups of genes that covary across......- and Prevotella-driven enterotypes. This is the first study to investigate the relationship between Blastocystis and communities of gut bacteria using a metagenomics approach. The study serves as an example of how it is possible to retrospectively investigate microbial eukaryotic communities in the gut using...

  13. Comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence signatures, as defined by the frequencies of k-tuples (or k-mers, k-grams, have been used extensively to compare genomic sequences of individual organisms, to identify cis-regulatory modules, and to study the evolution of regulatory sequences. Recently many next-generation sequencing (NGS read data sets of metagenomic samples from a variety of different environments have been generated. The assembly of these reads can be difficult and analysis methods based on mapping reads to genes or pathways are also restricted by the availability and completeness of existing databases. Sequence-signature-based methods, however, do not need the complete genomes or existing databases and thus, can potentially be very useful for the comparison of metagenomic samples using NGS read data. Still, the applications of sequence signature methods for the comparison of metagenomic samples have not been well studied. Results We studied several dissimilarity measures, including d2, d2* and d2S recently developed from our group, a measure (hereinafter noted as Hao used in CVTree developed from Hao’s group (Qi et al., 2004, measures based on relative di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide frequencies as in Willner et al. (2009, as well as standard lp measures between the frequency vectors, for the comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures. We compared their performance using a series of extensive simulations and three real next-generation sequencing (NGS metagenomic datasets: 39 fecal samples from 33 mammalian host species, 56 marine samples across the world, and 13 fecal samples from human individuals. Results showed that the dissimilarity measure d2S can achieve superior performance when comparing metagenomic samples by clustering them into different groups as well as recovering environmental gradients affecting microbial samples. New insights into the environmental factors affecting microbial compositions in metagenomic samples

  14. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    , nose and oral cavity has been analyzed. The central method has been a co-abundance clustering method, which separates genes from metagenomics data under the assumption that genes originating from the same DNA (e.g. a bacterial genome, a phage or a plasmid) will co-vary across samples. Thus, co...... to previous Blastocystis prevalence studies. Moreover, it was found that individuals with a Bacteroides-driven enterotype were less prone to harbor the Blastocystis parasite. Finally, the CAG clustering method was applied to metagenomics data from the human nose- and oral-cavity. It was concluded...

  15. Reconstructing Memory through the Archives: Public Pedagogy, Citizenship and Letizia Battaglia's Photographic Record of Mafia Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    This essay shuttles between the archive in its literal sense as a site of storage, and in its figurative senses as a migrating, foundational concept that is fused with affect and speaks of memory and forgetting, disavowal and betrayals. I maintain that a productive ground for theorising the archive as a site of radical public teaching can be found…

  16. 17 CFR Appendix A to Part 145 - Compilation of Commission Records Available to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... covered by a request for confidential treatment. (4) National Futures Association (NFA) rule amendments...) Rulemaking index. (12) Exchange membership notification. (13) Publicly available portions of applications to... part of the application not covered by a request for confidential treatment. (c) Office of Proceedings...

  17. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  18. Implementation of an innovative, integrated electronic medical record (EMR) and public health information exchange for HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbright, Wayne; Abrams, Amir; Bergson, Susan; Foxhood, Joseph; Kaiser, Michael; Smith, Luis; Xiao, Ke; Zapata, Amy; Magnus, Manya

    2011-01-01

    Louisiana is severely affected by HIV/AIDS, ranking fifth in AIDS rates in the USA. The Louisiana Public Health Information Exchange (LaPHIE) is a novel, secure bi-directional public health information exchange, linking statewide public health surveillance data with electronic medical record data. LaPHIE alerts medical providers when individuals with HIV/AIDS who have not received HIV care for >12 months are seen at any ambulatory or inpatient facility in an integrated delivery network. Between 2/1/2009 and 1/31/2011, 488 alerts identified 345 HIV positive patients. Of those identified, 82% had at least one CD4 or HIV viral load test over the study follow-up period. LaPHIE is an innovative use of health information exchange based on surveillance data and real time clinical messaging, facilitating rapid provider notification of those in need of treatment. LaPHIE successfully reduces critical missed opportunities to intervene with individuals not in care, leveraging information historically collected solely for public health purposes, not health care delivery, to improve public health. PMID:22037891

  19. Quality and integration of public health information systems: A systematic review focused on immunization and vital records systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R; Kirk, Hilary M; Issel, L Michele

    2012-01-01

    Public health professionals rely on quantitative data for the daily practice of public health as well as organizational decision making and planning. However, several factors work against effective data sharing among public health agencies in the US. This review characterizes the reported barriers and enablers of effective use of public health IS from an informatics perspective. A systematic review of the English language literature for 2005 to 2011 followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) format. The review focused on immunization information systems (IIS) and vital records information systems (VRIS). Systems were described according to the structural aspects of IS integration and data quality. Articles describing IIS documented issues pertaining to the distribution of the system, the autonomy of the data providers, the heterogeneous nature of information sharing as well as the quality of the data. Articles describing VRIS were focused much more heavily on data quality, particularly whether or not the data were free from errors. For state and local practitioners to effectively utilize data, public health IS will have to overcome the challenges posed by a large number of autonomous data providers utilizing a variety of technologies.

  20. Measuring Public Corruption in the United States: Evidence from Administrative Records of Federal Prosecutions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Milyo; Adriana Cordis

    2013-01-01

    A growing empirical literature examines the causes and consequences of public corruption in the United States; however, most of these studies measure corruption using data on federal convictions that is of dubious quality and provenance. We document these concerns and describe an alternative data source that provides more reliable and detailed information on corruption prosecutions and convictions by type of state official and even by lead charge. We employ these data to construct a taxonomy ...

  1. Variability in metagenomic samples from the Puget Sound: Relationship to temporal and anthropogenic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James C; Youngblood, Jessica E; Port, Jesse A; Cullen, Alison C; Smith, Marissa N; Workman, Tomomi; Faustman, Elaine M

    2018-01-01

    Whole-metagenome sequencing (WMS) has emerged as a powerful tool to assess potential public health risks in marine environments by measuring changes in microbial community structure and function in uncultured bacteria. In addition to monitoring public health risks such as antibiotic resistance determinants, it is essential to measure predictors of microbial variation in order to identify natural versus anthropogenic factors as well as to evaluate reproducibility of metagenomic measurements.This study expands our previous metagenomic characterization of Puget Sound by sampling new nearshore environments including the Duwamish River, an EPA superfund site, and the Hood Canal, an area characterized by highly variable oxygen levels. We also resampled a wastewater treatment plant, nearshore and open ocean sites introducing a longitudinal component measuring seasonal and locational variations and establishing metagenomics sampling reproducibility. Microbial composition from samples collected in the open sound were highly similar within the same season and location across different years, while nearshore samples revealed multi-fold seasonal variation in microbial composition and diversity. Comparisons with recently sequenced predominant marine bacterial genomes helped provide much greater species level taxonomic detail compared to our previous study. Antibiotic resistance determinants and pollution and detoxification indicators largely grouped by location showing minor seasonal differences. Metal resistance, oxidative stress and detoxification systems showed no increase in samples proximal to an EPA superfund site indicating a lack of ecosystem adaptation to anthropogenic impacts. Taxonomic analysis of common sewage influent families showed a surprising similarity between wastewater treatment plant and open sound samples suggesting a low-level but pervasive sewage influent signature in Puget Sound surface waters. Our study shows reproducibility of metagenomic data

  2. Machine Learning Approaches for Detecting Diabetic Retinopathy from Clinical and Public Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, Omolola; Kermah, Dulcie

    2015-01-01

    Annual eye examinations are recommended for diabetic patients in order to detect diabetic retinopathy and other eye conditions that arise from diabetes. Medically underserved urban communities in the US have annual screening rates that are much lower than the national average and could benefit from informatics approaches to identify unscreened patients most at risk of developing retinopathy. Using clinical data from urban safety net clinics as well as public health data from the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined different machine learning approaches for predicting retinopathy from clinical or public health data. All datasets utilized exhibited a class imbalance. Classifiers learned on the clinical data were modestly predictive of retinopathy with the best model having an AUC of 0.72, sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 55.9%. Classifiers learned on public health data were not predictive of retinopathy. Successful approaches to detecting latent retinopathy using machine learning could help safety net and other clinics identify unscreened patients who are most at risk of developing retinopathy and the use of ensemble classifiers on clinical data shows promise for this purpose.

  3. Ten years of maintaining and expanding a microbial genome and metagenome analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Victor M; Chen, I-Min A; Chu, Ken; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-11-01

    Launched in March 2005, the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system is a comprehensive data management system that supports multidimensional comparative analysis of genomic data. At the core of the IMG system is a data warehouse that contains genome and metagenome datasets sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute or provided by scientific users, as well as public genome datasets available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information Genbank sequence data archive. Genomes and metagenome datasets are processed using IMG's microbial genome and metagenome sequence data processing pipelines and are integrated into the data warehouse using IMG's data integration toolkits. Microbial genome and metagenome application specific data marts and user interfaces provide access to different subsets of IMG's data and analysis toolkits. This review article revisits IMG's original aims, highlights key milestones reached by the system during the past 10 years, and discusses the main challenges faced by a rapidly expanding system, in particular the complexity of maintaining such a system in an academic setting with limited budgets and computing and data management infrastructure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metagenomic survey for viruses in Western Arctic caribou, Alaska, through iterative assembly of taxonomic units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita C Schürch

    Full Text Available Pathogen surveillance in animals does not provide a sufficient level of vigilance because it is generally confined to surveillance of pathogens with known economic impact in domestic animals and practically nonexistent in wildlife species. As most (re-emerging viral infections originate from animal sources, it is important to obtain insight into viral pathogens present in the wildlife reservoir from a public health perspective. When monitoring living, free-ranging wildlife for viruses, sample collection can be challenging and availability of nucleic acids isolated from samples is often limited. The development of viral metagenomics platforms allows a more comprehensive inventory of viruses present in wildlife. We report a metagenomic viral survey of the Western Arctic herd of barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti in Alaska, USA. The presence of mammalian viruses in eye and nose swabs of 39 free-ranging caribou was investigated by random amplification combined with a metagenomic analysis approach that applied exhaustive iterative assembly of sequencing results to define taxonomic units of each metagenome. Through homology search methods we identified the presence of several mammalian viruses, including different papillomaviruses, a novel parvovirus, polyomavirus, and a virus that potentially represents a member of a novel genus in the family Coronaviridae.

  5. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laborato......We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing...... laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human...... counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies....

  6. Snowball: Strain aware gene assembly of Metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Gregor; A. Schönhuth (Alexander); A.C. McHardy (Alice)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractGene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the studied

  7. Snowball: strain aware gene assembly of metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Gregor; A. Schönhuth (Alexander); A.C. McHardy (Alice)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMotivation: Gene assembly is an important step in functional analysis of shotgun metagenomic data. Nonetheless, strain aware assembly remains a challenging task, as current assembly tools often fail to distinguish among strain variants or require closely related reference genomes of the

  8. Bracken: estimating species abundance in metagenomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic experiments attempt to characterize microbial communities using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Identification of the microorganisms in a sample provides information about the genetic profile, population structure, and role of microorganisms within an environment. Until recently, most metagenomics studies focused on high-level characterization at the level of phyla, or alternatively sequenced the 16S ribosomal RNA gene that is present in bacterial species. As the cost of sequencing has fallen, though, metagenomics experiments have increasingly used unbiased shotgun sequencing to capture all the organisms in a sample. This approach requires a method for estimating abundance directly from the raw read data. Here we describe a fast, accurate new method that computes the abundance at the species level using the reads collected in a metagenomics experiment. Bracken (Bayesian Reestimation of Abundance after Classification with KrakEN uses the taxonomic assignments made by Kraken, a very fast read-level classifier, along with information about the genomes themselves to estimate abundance at the species level, the genus level, or above. We demonstrate that Bracken can produce accurate species- and genus-level abundance estimates even when a sample contains multiple near-identical species.

  9. Similarity and pleasantness assessments of water-fountain sounds recorded in urban public spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Maria Rådsten; Lundén, Peter; Nilsson, Mats E

    2015-11-01

    Water fountains are potential tools for soundscape improvement, but little is known about their perceptual properties. To explore this, sounds were recorded from 32 fountains installed in urban parks. The sounds were recorded with a sound-field microphone and were reproduced using an ambisonic loudspeaker setup. Fifty-seven listeners assessed the sounds with regard to similarity and pleasantness. Multidimensional scaling of similarity data revealed distinct groups of soft variable and loud steady-state sounds. Acoustically, the soft variable sounds were characterized by low overall levels and high temporal variability, whereas the opposite pattern characterized the loud steady-state sounds. The perceived pleasantness of the sounds was negatively related to their overall level and positively related to their temporal variability, whereas spectral centroid was weakly correlated to pleasantness. However, the results of an additional experiment, using the same sounds set equal in overall level, found a negative relationship between pleasantness and spectral centroid, suggesting that spectral factors may influence pleasantness scores in experiments where overall level does not dominate pleasantness assessments. The equal-level experiment also showed that several loud steady-state sounds remained unpleasant, suggesting an inherently unpleasant sound character. From a soundscape design perspective, it may be advisable to avoid fountains generating such sounds.

  10. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-09-01

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

  11. Explaining diversity in metagenomic datasets by phylogenetic-based feature weighting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Albanese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics is revolutionizing our understanding of microbial communities, showing that their structure and composition have profound effects on the ecosystem and in a variety of health and disease conditions. Despite the flourishing of new analysis methods, current approaches based on statistical comparisons between high-level taxonomic classes often fail to identify the microbial taxa that are differentially distributed between sets of samples, since in many cases the taxonomic schema do not allow an adequate description of the structure of the microbiota. This constitutes a severe limitation to the use of metagenomic data in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. To provide a more robust statistical framework, we introduce a class of feature-weighting algorithms that discriminate the taxa responsible for the classification of metagenomic samples. The method unambiguously groups the relevant taxa into clades without relying on pre-defined taxonomic categories, thus including in the analysis also those sequences for which a taxonomic classification is difficult. The phylogenetic clades are weighted and ranked according to their abundance measuring their contribution to the differentiation of the classes of samples, and a criterion is provided to define a reduced set of most relevant clades. Applying the method to public datasets, we show that the data-driven definition of relevant phylogenetic clades accomplished by our ranking strategy identifies features in the samples that are lost if phylogenetic relationships are not considered, improving our ability to mine metagenomic datasets. Comparison with supervised classification methods currently used in metagenomic data analysis highlights the advantages of using phylogenetic information.

  12. The binning of metagenomic contigs for microbial physiology of mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Marc; Kraft, Beate; Bisdorf, Regina; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2012-01-01

    So far, microbial physiology has dedicated itself mainly to pure cultures. In nature, cross feeding and competition are important aspects of microbial physiology and these can only be addressed by studying complete communities such as enrichment cultures. Metagenomic sequencing is a powerful tool to characterize such mixed cultures. In the analysis of metagenomic data, well established algorithms exist for the assembly of short reads into contigs and for the annotation of predicted genes. However, the binning of the assembled contigs or unassembled reads is still a major bottleneck and required to understand how the overall metabolism is partitioned over different community members. Binning consists of the clustering of contigs or reads that apparently originate from the same source population. In the present study eight metagenomic samples from the same habitat, a laboratory enrichment culture, were sequenced. Each sample contained 13-23 Mb of assembled contigs and up to eight abundant populations. Binning was attempted with existing methods but they were found to produce poor results, were slow, dependent on non-standard platforms or produced errors. A new binning procedure was developed based on multivariate statistics of tetranucleotide frequencies combined with the use of interpolated Markov models. Its performance was evaluated by comparison of the results between samples with BLAST and in comparison to existing algorithms for four publicly available metagenomes and one previously published artificial metagenome. The accuracy of the new approach was comparable or higher than existing methods. Further, it was up to a 100 times faster. It was implemented in Java Swing as a complete open source graphical binning application available for download and further development (http://sourceforge.net/projects/metawatt).

  13. The binning of metagenomic contigs for microbial physiology of mixed cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eStrous

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available So far, microbial physiology has dedicated itself mainly to pure cultures. In nature, cross feeding and competition are important aspects of microbial physiology and these can only be addressed by studying complete communities such as enrichment cultures. Metagenomic sequencing is a powerful tool to characterize such mixed cultures. In the analysis of metagenomic data, well established algorithms exist for the assembly of short reads into contigs and for the annotation of predicted genes. However, the binning of the assembled contigs or unassembled reads is still a major bottleneck and required to understand how the overall metabolism is partitioned over different community members. Binning consists of the clustering of contigs or reads that apparently originate from the same source population.In the present study eight metagenomic samples originating from the same habitat, a laboratory enrichment culture, were sequenced. Each sample contained 13-23 Mb of assembled contigs and up to eight abundant populations. Binning was attempted with existing methods but they were found to produce poor results, were slow, dependent on non-standard platforms or produced errors. A new binning procedure was developed based on multivariate statistics of tetranucleotide frequencies combined with the use of interpolated Markov models. Its performance was evaluated by comparison of the results between samples with BLAST and in comparison to exisiting algorithms for four publicly available metagenomes and one previously published artificial metagenome. The accuracy of the new approach was comparable or higher than existing methods. Further, it was up to a hunderd times faster. It was implemented in Java Swing as a complete open source graphical binning application available for download and further development (http://sourceforge.net/projects/metawatt.

  14. An extended genovo metagenomic assembler by incorporating paired-end information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiahayati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomes present assembly challenges, when assembling multiple genomes from mixed reads of multiple species. An assembler for single genomes can’t adapt well when applied in this case. A metagenomic assembler, Genovo, is a de novo assembler for metagenomes under a generative probabilistic model. Genovo assembles all reads without discarding any reads in a preprocessing step, and is therefore able to extract more information from metagenomic data and, in principle, generate better assembly results. Paired end sequencing is currently widely-used yet Genovo was designed for 454 single end reads. In this research, we attempted to extend Genovo by incorporating paired-end information, named Xgenovo, so that it generates higher quality assemblies with paired end reads.First, we extended Genovo by adding a bonus parameter in the Chinese Restaurant Process used to get prior accounts for the unknown number of genomes in the sample. This bonus parameter intends for a pair of reads to be in the same contig and as an effort to solve chimera contig case. Second, we modified the sampling process of the location of a read in a contig. We used relative distance for the number of trials in the symmetric geometric distribution instead of using distance between the offset and the center of contig used in Genovo. Using this relative distance, a read sampled in the appropriate location has higher probability. Therefore a read will be mapped in the correct location.Results of extensive experiments on simulated metagenomic datasets from simple to complex with species coverage setting following uniform and lognormal distribution showed that Xgenovo can be superior to the original Genovo and the recently proposed metagenome assembler for 454 reads, MAP. Xgenovo successfully generated longer N50 than Genovo and MAP while maintaining the assembly quality even for very complex metagenomic datasets consisting of 115 species. Xgenovo also demonstrated the potential to

  15. Metagenomic approach for discovering new pathogens in infection disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Giombini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses represent the most abundant biological components on earth.They can be found in every environment, from deep layers of oceans to animal bodies.Although several viruses have been isolated and sequenced, in each environment there are millions of different types of viruses that have not been identified yet.The advent of nextgeneration sequencing technologies with their high throughput capabilities make possible to study in a single experiment all the community of microorganisms present in a particular sample “microbioma”.They made more feasible the application of the metagenomic approach, by which it is also possible to discover and identify new pathogens, that may pose a threat to public health.This paper summarizes the most recent applications of nextgeneration sequencing to discover new viral pathogens during the occurrence of infection disease outbreaks.

  16. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.4: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Ioanna; Liolios, Konstantinos; Jansson, Jakob; Chen, I-Min A.; Smirnova, Tatyana; Nosrat, Bahador; Markowitz, Victor M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2012-01-01

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD, http://www.genomesonline.org/) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2011, GOLD, now on version 4.0, contains information for 11 472 sequencing projects, of which 2907 have been completed and their sequence data has been deposited in a public repository. Out of these complete projects, 1918 are finished and 989 are permanent drafts. Moreover, GOLD contains information for 340 metagenome studies associated with 1927 metagenome samples. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about any (x) Sequence specification and beyond. PMID:22135293

  17. An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-03-01

    The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

  18. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate the quanti......SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate...

  19. Protein structure determination using metagenome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Park, Hahnbeom; Varghese, Neha; Huang, Po-Ssu; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Baker, David

    2017-01-20

    Despite decades of work by structural biologists, there are still ~5200 protein families with unknown structure outside the range of comparative modeling. We show that Rosetta structure prediction guided by residue-residue contacts inferred from evolutionary information can accurately model proteins that belong to large families and that metagenome sequence data more than triple the number of protein families with sufficient sequences for accurate modeling. We then integrate metagenome data, contact-based structure matching, and Rosetta structure calculations to generate models for 614 protein families with currently unknown structures; 206 are membrane proteins and 137 have folds not represented in the Protein Data Bank. This approach provides the representative models for large protein families originally envisioned as the goal of the Protein Structure Initiative at a fraction of the cost. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Metagenomic Detection Methods in Biopreparedness Outbreak Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Oskar Erik; Hansen, Trine; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic microbiology, rapid molecular methods are critically important for detecting pathogens. With rapid and accurate detection, preventive measures can be put in place early, thereby preventing loss of life and further spread of a disease. From a preparedness perspective...... of a clinical sample, creating a metagenome, in a single week of laboratory work. As new technologies emerge, their dissemination and capacity building must be facilitated, and criteria for use, as well as guidelines on how to report results, must be established. This article focuses on the use of metagenomics......, from sample collection to data analysis and to some extent NGS, for the detection of pathogens, the integration of the technique in outbreak response systems, and the risk-based evaluation of sample processing in routine diagnostics labs. The article covers recent advances in the field, current debate...

  1. Extent of ICT Application in the Management of Administrative and Student Personnel Records in the Public Universities in Enugu State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidobi, Roseline Unoma

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify the extent of ICT application in management of administrative and student personnel record in the public universities in Enugu state. The study was a survey research the quantitative data were collected through a 20-item questionnaire title "Extent of ICT Application in Record management"…

  2. The use of regional platforms for managing electronic health records for the production of regional public health indicators in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Marie-Hélène

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In France, recent developments in healthcare system organization have aimed at strengthening decision-making and action in public health at the regional level. Firstly, the 2004 Public Health Act, by setting 100 national and regional public health targets, introduced an evaluative approach to public health programs at the national and regional levels. Meanwhile, the implementation of regional platforms for managing electronic health records (EHRs has also been under assessment to coordinate the deployment of this important instrument of care within each geographic area. In this context, the development and implementation of a regional approach to epidemiological data extracted from EHRs are an opportunity that must be seized as soon as possible. Our article addresses certain design and organizational aspects so that the technical requirements for such use are integrated into regional platforms in France. The article will base itself on organization of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform. Discussion Different tools being deployed in France allow us to consider the potential of these regional platforms for epidemiology and public health (implementation of a national health identification number and a national information system interoperability framework. The deployment of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform began in the 2000s in France. By August 2011, 2.6 million patients were identified in this platform. A new development step is emerging because regional decision-makers need to measure healthcare efficiency. To pool heterogeneous information contained in various independent databases, the format, norm and content of the metadata have been defined. Two types of databases will be created according to the nature of the data processed, one for extracting structured data, and the second for extracting non-structured and de-identified free-text documents. Summary Regional platforms for managing EHRs could constitute

  3. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities yields insight into impacts of nanoparticle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metch, Jacob W.; Burrows, Nathan D.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Pruden, Amy; Vikesland, Peter J.

    2018-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing and metagenomic analysis provide powerful tools for the environmentally friendly design of nanoparticles. Herein we demonstrate this approach using a model community of environmental microbes (that is, wastewater-activated sludge) dosed with gold nanoparticles of varying surface coatings and morphologies. Metagenomic analysis was highly sensitive in detecting the microbial community response to gold nanospheres and nanorods with either cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or polyacrylic acid surface coatings. We observed that the gold-nanoparticle morphology imposes a stronger force in shaping the microbial community structure than does the surface coating. Trends were consistent in terms of the compositions of both taxonomic and functional genes, which include antibiotic resistance genes, metal resistance genes and gene-transfer elements associated with cell stress that are relevant to public health. Given that nanoparticle morphology remained constant, the potential influence of gold dissolution was minimal. Surface coating governed the nanoparticle partitioning between the bioparticulate and aqueous phases.

  4. Record of responses to public comments on proposed general guidelines for recommendation of sites for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425, referred to in this document as the Act) assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) the authority for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Among other provisions, the Act specifies a process and schedule for the siting of two geologic repositories for this purpose. The Act requires that the DOE issue general guidelines for the recommendation of sites for repositories. The guidelines are to be developed in consultation with three Federal agencies (the Council on Environmental Quality, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Geological Survey) and with interested Governors and issued with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To meet this directive, the DOE convened a task force of program experts to develop proposed guidelines, issued the proposed guidelines on February 7, 1983, and invited comments from the specified Federal agencies, interested Governors, and the general public. Public hearings on the proposed guidelines were held in March at the following locations: Chicago, New Orleans, Washington, DC, Salt Lake City, and Seattle. After considering the resulting comments and preparing responses to them, the task force prepared a draft of this comment-response document and a set of alternative guidelines; these documents were issued on May 27, 1983. This document summarizes the record of comments that directly led to the alternative guidelines of May 27, 1983. It contains synopses of comments, presents the responses of the task force to the comments, and briefly describes how the proposed guidelines of February 7, 1983, were revised to produce the alternative guidelines of May 27, 1983. 13 references

  5. Cross-cutting activities: Soil quality and soil metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Motavalli, Peter P.; Garrett, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reports on the work of the SANREM CRSP cross-cutting activities "Assessing and Managing Soil Quality for Sustainable Agricultural Systems" and "Soil Metagenomics to Construct Indicators of Soil Degradation." The introduction gives an overview of the extensiveness of soil degradation globally and defines soil quality. The objectives of the soil quality cross cutting activity are: CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  6. Online Semi-Supervised Learning: Algorithm and Application in Metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key rolein metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm and

  7. Online semi-supervised learning: algorithm and application in metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; Keijser, B.J.; Crielaard, W.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Li, G.Z.; Kim, S.; Hughes, M.; McLachlan, G.; Sun, H.; Hu, X.; Ressom, H.; Liu, B.; Liebman, M.

    2013-01-01

    As the amount of metagenomic data grows rapidly, online statistical learning algorithms are poised to play key role in metagenome analysis tasks. Frequently, data are only partially labeled, namely dataset contains partial information about the problem of interest. This work presents an algorithm

  8. The Metagenomics and Metadesign of the Subways and Urban Biomes (MetaSUB) International Consortium inaugural meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    The Metagenomics and Metadesign of the Subways and Urban Biomes (MetaSUB) International Consortium is a novel, interdisciplinary initiative comprised of experts across many fields, including genomics, data analysis, engineering, public health, and architecture. The ultimate goal of the MetaSUB Consortium is to improve city utilization and planning through the detection, measurement, and design of metagenomics within urban environments. Although continual measures occur for temperature, air pressure, weather, and human activity, including longitudinal, cross-kingdom ecosystem dynamics can alter and improve the design of cities. The MetaSUB Consortium is aiding these efforts by developing and testing metagenomic methods and standards, including optimized methods for sample collection, DNA/RNA isolation, taxa characterization, and data visualization. The data produced by the consortium can aid city planners, public health officials, and architectural designers. In addition, the study will continue to lead to the discovery of new species, global maps of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) markers, and novel biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Finally, we note that engineered metagenomic ecosystems can help enable more responsive, safer, and quantified cities.

  9. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metagenomes of diverse habitats. The present review also highlights the paradigm shift of metagenomics from basic study of community composition to insight into the microbial community dynamics for harnessing the full potential of uncultured microbes with more emphasis on the implication of breakthrough developments, namely, Next Generation Sequencing, advanced bioinformatics tools, and systems biology.

  10. Analysis of composition-based metagenomic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Susan; Barreto, André da Motta Salles; Cantão, Maurício Egidio; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    An essential step of a metagenomic study is the taxonomic classification, that is, the identification of the taxonomic lineage of the organisms in a given sample. The taxonomic classification process involves a series of decisions. Currently, in the context of metagenomics, such decisions are usually based on empirical studies that consider one specific type of classifier. In this study we propose a general framework for analyzing the impact that several decisions can have on the classification problem. Instead of focusing on any specific classifier, we define a generic score function that provides a measure of the difficulty of the classification task. Using this framework, we analyze the impact of the following parameters on the taxonomic classification problem: (i) the length of n-mers used to encode the metagenomic sequences, (ii) the similarity measure used to compare sequences, and (iii) the type of taxonomic classification, which can be conventional or hierarchical, depending on whether the classification process occurs in a single shot or in several steps according to the taxonomic tree. We defined a score function that measures the degree of separability of the taxonomic classes under a given configuration induced by the parameters above. We conducted an extensive computational experiment and found out that reasonable values for the parameters of interest could be (i) intermediate values of n, the length of the n-mers; (ii) any similarity measure, because all of them resulted in similar scores; and (iii) the hierarchical strategy, which performed better in all of the cases. As expected, short n-mers generate lower configuration scores because they give rise to frequency vectors that represent distinct sequences in a similar way. On the other hand, large values for n result in sparse frequency vectors that represent differently metagenomic fragments that are in fact similar, also leading to low configuration scores. Regarding the similarity measure, in

  11. Meta4: a web application for sharing and annotating metagenomic gene predictions using web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Emily J; Escalettes, Franck; Fotheringham, Ian; Wallace, Robert J; Watson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome shotgun metagenomics experiments produce DNA sequence data from entire ecosystems, and provide a huge amount of novel information. Gene discovery projects require up-to-date information about sequence homology and domain structure for millions of predicted proteins to be presented in a simple, easy-to-use system. There is a lack of simple, open, flexible tools that allow the rapid sharing of metagenomics datasets with collaborators in a format they can easily interrogate. We present Meta4, a flexible and extensible web application that can be used to share and annotate metagenomic gene predictions. Proteins and predicted domains are stored in a simple relational database, with a dynamic front-end which displays the results in an internet browser. Web services are used to provide up-to-date information about the proteins from homology searches against public databases. Information about Meta4 can be found on the project website, code is available on Github, a cloud image is available, and an example implementation can be seen at.

  12. Comparing and Evaluating Metagenome Assembly Tools from a Microbiologist's Perspective - Not Only Size Matters!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Vollmers

    Full Text Available With the constant improvement in cost-efficiency and quality of Next Generation Sequencing technologies, shotgun-sequencing approaches -such as metagenomics- have nowadays become the methods of choice for studying and classifying microorganisms from various habitats. The production of data has dramatically increased over the past years and processing and analysis steps are becoming more and more of a bottleneck. Limiting factors are partly the availability of computational resources, but mainly the bioinformatics expertise in establishing and applying appropriate processing and analysis pipelines. Fortunately, a large diversity of specialized software tools is nowadays available. Nevertheless, choosing the most appropriate methods for answering specific biological questions can be rather challenging, especially for non-bioinformaticians. In order to provide a comprehensive overview and guide for the microbiological scientific community, we assessed the most common and freely available metagenome assembly tools with respect to their output statistics, their sensitivity for low abundant community members and variability in resulting community profiles as well as their ease-of-use. In contrast to the highly anticipated "Critical Assessment of Metagenomic Interpretation" (CAMI challenge, which uses general mock community-based assembler comparison we here tested assemblers on real Illumina metagenome sequencing data from natural communities of varying complexity sampled from forest soil and algal biofilms. Our observations clearly demonstrate that different assembly tools can prove optimal, depending on the sample type, available computational resources and, most importantly, the specific research goal. In addition, we present detailed descriptions of the underlying principles and pitfalls of publically available assembly tools from a microbiologist's perspective, and provide guidance regarding the user-friendliness, sensitivity and reliability of

  13. Metagenomic Approach to Identifying Foodborne Pathogens on Chinese Cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeho; Hong, Sanghyun; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2018-02-28

    Foodborne illness represents a major threat to public health and is frequently attributed to pathogenic microorganisms on fresh produce. Recurrent outbreaks often come from vegetables that are grown close to or within the ground. Therefore, the first step to understanding the public health risk of microorganisms on fresh vegetables is to identify and describe microbial communities. We investigated the phyllospheres on Chinese cabbage ( Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis , N = 54). 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing targeting the V5-V6 region of 16S rRNA genes was conducted by employing the Illumina MiSeq system. Sequence quality was assessed, and phylogenetic assessments were performed using the RDP classifier implemented in QIIME with a bootstrap cutoff of 80%. Principal coordinate analysis was performed using a weighted Fast UniFrac matrix. The average number of sequence reads generated per sample was 34,584. At the phylum level, bacterial communities were composed primarily of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The most abundant genera on Chinese cabbages were Chryseobacterium, Aurantimonadaceae_g, Sphingomonas , and Pseudomonas . Diverse potential pathogens, such as Pantoea, Erwinia, Klebsiella, Yersinia, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Salmonella , and Clostridium were also detected from the samples. Although further epidemiological studies will be required to determine whether the detected potential pathogens are associated with foodborne illness, our results imply that a metagenomic approach can be used to detect pathogenic bacteria on fresh vegetables.

  14. Metagenomic islands of hyperhalophiles: the case of Salinibacter ruber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohwer Forest

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saturated brines are extreme environments of low diversity. Salinibacter ruber is the only bacterium that inhabits this environment in significant numbers. In order to establish the extent of genetic diversity in natural populations of this microbe, the genomic sequence of reference strain DSM 13855 was compared to metagenomic fragments recovered from climax saltern crystallizers and obtained with 454 sequencing technology. This kind of analysis reveals the presence of metagenomic islands, i.e. highly variable regions among the different lineages in the population. Results Three regions of the sequenced isolate were scarcely represented in the metagenome thus appearing to vary among co-occurring S. ruber cells. These metagenomic islands showed evidence of extensive genomic corruption with atypically low GC content, low coding density, high numbers of pseudogenes and short hypothetical proteins. A detailed analysis of island gene content showed that the genes in metagenomic island 1 code for cell surface polysaccharides. The strain-specific genes of metagenomic island 2 were found to be involved in biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharide components. Finally, metagenomic island 3 was rich in DNA related enzymes. Conclusion The genomic organisation of S. ruber variable genomic regions showed a number of convergences with genomic islands of marine microbes studied, being largely involved in variable cell surface traits. This variation at the level of cell envelopes in an environment devoid of grazing pressure probably reflects a global strategy of bacteria to escape phage predation.

  15. New Bacterial Phytase through Metagenomic Prospection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathálya Farias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phytases from uncultured microorganisms, which hydrolyze phytate to less phosphorylated myo-inositols and inorganic phosphate, have great potential as additives in agricultural industry. The development of metagenomics has stemmed from the ineluctable evidence that as-yet-uncultured microorganisms represent the vast majority of organisms in most environments on earth. In this study, a gene encoding a phytase was cloned from red rice crop residues and castor bean cake using a metagenomics strategy. The amino acid identity between this gene and its closest published counterparts is lower than 60%. The phytase was named PhyRC001 and was biochemically characterized. This recombinant protein showed activity on sodium phytate, indicating that PhyRC001 is a hydrolase enzyme. The enzymatic activity was optimal at a pH of 7.0 and at a temperature of 35 °C. β-propeller phytases possess great potential as feed additives because they are the only type of phytase with high activity at neutral pH. Therefore, to explore and exploit the underlying mechanism for β-propeller phytase functions could be of great benefit to biotechnology.

  16. Metagenomic characterization of ambulances across the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Niamh B; Reed, Harry J; Afshinnekoo, Ebrahim; Harvin, Donell; Caplan, Nora; Rosen, Gail; Frye, Brook; Woloszynek, Stephen; Ounit, Rachid; Levy, Shawn; Butler, Erin; Mason, Christopher E

    2017-09-22

    Microbial communities in our built environments have great influence on human health and disease. A variety of built environments have been characterized using a metagenomics-based approach, including some healthcare settings. However, there has been no study to date that has used this approach in pre-hospital settings, such as ambulances, an important first point-of-contact between patients and hospitals. We sequenced 398 samples from 137 ambulances across the USA using shotgun sequencing. We analyzed these data to explore the microbial ecology of ambulances including characterizing microbial community composition, nosocomial pathogens, patterns of diversity, presence of functional pathways and antimicrobial resistance, and potential spatial and environmental factors that may contribute to community composition. We found that the top 10 most abundant species are either common built environment microbes, microbes associated with the human microbiome (e.g., skin), or are species associated with nosocomial infections. We also found widespread evidence of antimicrobial resistance markers (hits ~ 90% samples). We identified six factors that may influence the microbial ecology of ambulances including ambulance surfaces, geographical-related factors (including region, longitude, and latitude), and weather-related factors (including temperature and precipitation). While the vast majority of microbial species classified were beneficial, we also found widespread evidence of species associated with nosocomial infections and antimicrobial resistance markers. This study indicates that metagenomics may be useful to characterize the microbial ecology of pre-hospital ambulance settings and that more rigorous testing and cleaning of ambulances may be warranted.

  17. Metagenomic investigation of gastrointestinal microbiome in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minseok Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract, including the rumen and the other intestinal segments of cattle, harbors a diverse, complex, and dynamic microbiome that drives feed digestion and fermentation in cattle, determining feed efficiency and output of pollutants. This microbiome also plays an important role in affecting host health. Research has been conducted for more than a century to understand the microbiome and its relationship to feed efficiency and host health. The traditional cultivation-based research elucidated some of the major metabolism, but studies using molecular biology techniques conducted from late 1980’s to the late early 2000’s greatly expanded our view of the diversity of the rumen and intestinal microbiome of cattle. Recently, metagenomics has been the primary technology to characterize the GI microbiome and its relationship with host nutrition and health. This review addresses the main methods/techniques in current use, the knowledge gained, and some of the challenges that remain. Most of the primers used in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification and diversity analysis using metagenomics of ruminal bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protozoa were also compiled.

  18. Use of public pension scheme and industrial statistics data for supplement of company records in Denmark and influence on cohort mortality pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, E; Juel, K

    1987-01-01

    Completeness of company records is a crucial point in interpretation of follow-up studies of industrial cohorts. The Employers Quarterly Reports on Earnings (EQRE) are valuable for control of company records in the United States. The public Supplementary Pension Scheme (ATP) and the industrial...... statistics questionnaires are of equal value in Denmark. The authors report on a cohort study from a chemical plant, where cohort members were identified from company records, which were checked against ATP and industrial statistics data. The mortality analysis shows employees known only from the ATP data...

  19. VSEARCH: a versatile open source tool for metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognes, Torbjørn; Flouri, Tomáš; Nichols, Ben; Quince, Christopher; Mahé, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    VSEARCH is an open source and free of charge multithreaded 64-bit tool for processing and preparing metagenomics, genomics and population genomics nucleotide sequence data. It is designed as an alternative to the widely used USEARCH tool (Edgar, 2010) for which the source code is not publicly available, algorithm details are only rudimentarily described, and only a memory-confined 32-bit version is freely available for academic use. When searching nucleotide sequences, VSEARCH uses a fast heuristic based on words shared by the query and target sequences in order to quickly identify similar sequences, a similar strategy is probably used in USEARCH. VSEARCH then performs optimal global sequence alignment of the query against potential target sequences, using full dynamic programming instead of the seed-and-extend heuristic used by USEARCH. Pairwise alignments are computed in parallel using vectorisation and multiple threads. VSEARCH includes most commands for analysing nucleotide sequences available in USEARCH version 7 and several of those available in USEARCH version 8, including searching (exact or based on global alignment), clustering by similarity (using length pre-sorting, abundance pre-sorting or a user-defined order), chimera detection (reference-based or de novo ), dereplication (full length or prefix), pairwise alignment, reverse complementation, sorting, and subsampling. VSEARCH also includes commands for FASTQ file processing, i.e., format detection, filtering, read quality statistics, and merging of paired reads. Furthermore, VSEARCH extends functionality with several new commands and improvements, including shuffling, rereplication, masking of low-complexity sequences with the well-known DUST algorithm, a choice among different similarity definitions, and FASTQ file format conversion. VSEARCH is here shown to be more accurate than USEARCH when performing searching, clustering, chimera detection and subsampling, while on a par with USEARCH for paired

  20. VSEARCH: a versatile open source tool for metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjørn Rognes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background VSEARCH is an open source and free of charge multithreaded 64-bit tool for processing and preparing metagenomics, genomics and population genomics nucleotide sequence data. It is designed as an alternative to the widely used USEARCH tool (Edgar, 2010 for which the source code is not publicly available, algorithm details are only rudimentarily described, and only a memory-confined 32-bit version is freely available for academic use. Methods When searching nucleotide sequences, VSEARCH uses a fast heuristic based on words shared by the query and target sequences in order to quickly identify similar sequences, a similar strategy is probably used in USEARCH. VSEARCH then performs optimal global sequence alignment of the query against potential target sequences, using full dynamic programming instead of the seed-and-extend heuristic used by USEARCH. Pairwise alignments are computed in parallel using vectorisation and multiple threads. Results VSEARCH includes most commands for analysing nucleotide sequences available in USEARCH version 7 and several of those available in USEARCH version 8, including searching (exact or based on global alignment, clustering by similarity (using length pre-sorting, abundance pre-sorting or a user-defined order, chimera detection (reference-based or de novo, dereplication (full length or prefix, pairwise alignment, reverse complementation, sorting, and subsampling. VSEARCH also includes commands for FASTQ file processing, i.e., format detection, filtering, read quality statistics, and merging of paired reads. Furthermore, VSEARCH extends functionality with several new commands and improvements, including shuffling, rereplication, masking of low-complexity sequences with the well-known DUST algorithm, a choice among different similarity definitions, and FASTQ file format conversion. VSEARCH is here shown to be more accurate than USEARCH when performing searching, clustering, chimera detection and subsampling

  1. Use of electronic health records and administrative data for public health surveillance of eye health and vision-related conditions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda F; Davidson, Arthur; Lum, Flora; Chiang, Michael F; Saaddine, Jinan B; Zhang, Xinzhi; Crews, John E; Chou, Chiu-Fang

    2012-12-01

    To discuss the current trend toward greater use of electronic health records and how these records could enhance public health surveillance of eye health and vision-related conditions. Perspective, comparing systems. We describe 3 currently available sources of electronic health data (Kaiser Permanente, the Veterans Health Administration, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) and how these sources can contribute to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Each of the 3 sources of electronic health data can contribute meaningfully to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system, but none currently provide all the information required. The use of electronic health records for vision and eye health surveillance has both advantages and disadvantages. Electronic health records may provide additional information needed to create a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Recommendations for incorporating electronic health records into such a system are presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioprospecting Potential of the Soil Metagenome: Novel Enzymes and Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Hwan Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The microbial diversity in soil ecosystems is higher than in any other microbial ecosystem. The majority of soil microorganisms has not been characterized, because the dominant members have not been readily culturable on standard cultivation media; therefore, the soil ecosystem is a great reservoir for the discovery of novel microbial enzymes and bioactivities. The soil metagenome, the collective microbial genome, could be cloned and sequenced directly from soils to search for novel microbial resources. This review summarizes the microbial diversity in soils and the efforts to search for microbial resources from the soil metagenome, with more emphasis on the potential of bioprospecting metagenomics and recent discoveries.

  3. Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation-a benchmark of metagenomics software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sczyrba, Alexander; Hofmann, Peter; Belmann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Methods for assembly, taxonomic profiling and binning are key to interpreting metagenome data, but a lack of consensus about benchmarking complicates performance assessment. The Critical Assessment of Metagenome Interpretation (CAMI) challenge has engaged the global developer community to benchmark...... their programs on highly complex and realistic data sets, generated from ∼700 newly sequenced microorganisms and ∼600 novel viruses and plasmids and representing common experimental setups. Assembly and genome binning programs performed well for species represented by individual genomes but were substantially...... affected by the presence of related strains. Taxonomic profiling and binning programs were proficient at high taxonomic ranks, with a notable performance decrease below family level. Parameter settings markedly affected performance, underscoring their importance for program reproducibility. The CAMI...

  4. Comparative Metagenomics of Freshwater Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemme, Chris; Deng, Ye; Tu, Qichao; Fields, Matthew; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Tringe, Susannah; Watson, David; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry; Tiedje, James; Rubin, Eddy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Previous analyses of a microbial metagenome from uranium and nitric-acid contaminated groundwater (FW106) showed significant environmental effects resulting from the rapid introduction of multiple contaminants. Effects include a massive loss of species and strain biodiversity, accumulation of toxin resistant genes in the metagenome and lateral transfer of toxin resistance genes between community members. To better understand these results in an ecological context, a second metagenome from a pristine groundwater system located along the same geological strike was sequenced and analyzed (FW301). It is hypothesized that FW301 approximates the ancestral FW106 community based on phylogenetic profiles and common geological parameters; however, even if is not the case, the datasets still permit comparisons between healthy and stressed groundwater ecosystems. Complex carbohydrate metabolism has been almost entirely lost in the stressed ecosystem. In contrast, the pristine system encodes a wide diversity of complex carbohydrate metabolism systems, suggesting that carbon turnover is very rapid and less leaky in the healthy groundwater system. FW301 encodes many (∼160+) carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes while FW106 encodes none. This result suggests that the community is frequently exposed to oxygen from aerated rainwater percolating into the subsurface, with a resulting high rate of carbon metabolism and CO production. When oxygen levels fall, the CO then serves as a major carbon source for the community. FW301 appears to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reductive carboxylase (reverse TCA) cycle and possibly acetogenesis, activities; these activities are lacking in the heterotrophic FW106 system which relies exclusively on respiration of nitrate and/or oxygen for energy production. FW301 encodes a complete set of B12 biosynthesis pathway at high abundance suggesting the use of sodium gradients for energy production in the healthy groundwater community. Overall

  5. Comparative Metagenomics of Freshwater Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemme, Chris; Deng, Ye; Tu, Qichao; Fields, Matthew; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Tringe, Susannah; Watson, David; He, Zhili; Hazen, Terry; Tiedje, James; Rubin, Eddy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Previous analyses of a microbial metagenome from uranium and nitric-acid contaminated groundwater (FW106) showed significant environmental effects resulting from the rapid introduction of multiple contaminants. Effects include a massive loss of species and strain biodiversity, accumulation of toxin resistant genes in the metagenome and lateral transfer of toxin resistance genes between community members. To better understand these results in an ecological context, a second metagenome from a pristine groundwater system located along the same geological strike was sequenced and analyzed (FW301). It is hypothesized that FW301 approximates the ancestral FW106 community based on phylogenetic profiles and common geological parameters; however, even if is not the case, the datasets still permit comparisons between healthy and stressed groundwater ecosystems. Complex carbohydrate metabolism has been almost entirely lost in the stressed ecosystem. In contrast, the pristine system encodes a wide diversity of complex carbohydrate metabolism systems, suggesting that carbon turnover is very rapid and less leaky in the healthy groundwater system. FW301 encodes many (~;;160+) carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes while FW106 encodes none. This result suggests that the community is frequently exposed to oxygen from aerated rainwater percolating into the subsurface, with a resulting high rate of carbon metabolism and CO production. When oxygen levels fall, the CO then serves as a major carbon source for the community. FW301 appears to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reductive carboxylase (reverse TCA) cycle and possibly acetogenesis, activities; these activities are lacking in the heterotrophic FW106 system which relies exclusively on respiration of nitrate and/or oxygen for energy production. FW301 encodes a complete set of B12 biosynthesis pathway at high abundance suggesting the use of sodium gradients for energy production in the healthy groundwater community. Overall

  6. Analysis and comparison of very large metagenomes with fast clustering and functional annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The remarkable advance of metagenomics presents significant new challenges in data analysis. Metagenomic datasets (metagenomes are large collections of sequencing reads from anonymous species within particular environments. Computational analyses for very large metagenomes are extremely time-consuming, and there are often many novel sequences in these metagenomes that are not fully utilized. The number of available metagenomes is rapidly increasing, so fast and efficient metagenome comparison methods are in great demand. Results The new metagenomic data analysis method Rapid Analysis of Multiple Metagenomes with a Clustering and Annotation Pipeline (RAMMCAP was developed using an ultra-fast sequence clustering algorithm, fast protein family annotation tools, and a novel statistical metagenome comparison method that employs a unique graphic interface. RAMMCAP processes extremely large datasets with only moderate computational effort. It identifies raw read clusters and protein clusters that may include novel gene families, and compares metagenomes using clusters or functional annotations calculated by RAMMCAP. In this study, RAMMCAP was applied to the two largest available metagenomic collections, the "Global Ocean Sampling" and the "Metagenomic Profiling of Nine Biomes". Conclusion RAMMCAP is a very fast method that can cluster and annotate one million metagenomic reads in only hundreds of CPU hours. It is available from http://tools.camera.calit2.net/camera/rammcap/.

  7. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  8. Quantitative metagenomic analyses based on average genome size normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Jeremy Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Over the past quarter-century, microbiologists have used DNA sequence information to aid in the characterization of microbial communities. During the last decade, this has expanded from single genes to microbial community genomics, or metagenomics, in which the gene content of an environment can...... provide not just a census of the community members but direct information on metabolic capabilities and potential interactions among community members. Here we introduce a method for the quantitative characterization and comparison of microbial communities based on the normalization of metagenomic data...... by estimating average genome sizes. This normalization can relieve comparative biases introduced by differences in community structure, number of sequencing reads, and sequencing read lengths between different metagenomes. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by comparing metagenomes from two different...

  9. Assessment of metagenomic assembly using simulated next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mende, Daniel R; Waller, Alison S; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    the accuracy and contig lengths of resulting assemblies. We then compared the quality-trimmed Illumina assemblies to those from Sanger and pyrosequencing. For the simple community (10 genomes) all sequencing technologies assembled a similar amount and accurately represented the expected functional composition......Due to the complexity of the protocols and a limited knowledge of the nature of microbial communities, simulating metagenomic sequences plays an important role in testing the performance of existing tools and data analysis methods with metagenomic data. We developed metagenomic read simulators...... with platform-specific (Sanger, pyrosequencing, Illumina) base-error models, and simulated metagenomes of differing community complexities. We first evaluated the effect of rigorous quality control on Illumina data. Although quality filtering removed a large proportion of the data, it greatly improved...

  10. FY11 Report on Metagenome Analysis using Pathogen Marker Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Shea N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Allen, Jonathan E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLoughlin, Kevin S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Slezak, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-02

    A method, sequence library, and software suite was invented to rapidly assess whether any member of a pre-specified list of threat organisms or their near neighbors is present in a metagenome. The system was designed to handle mega- to giga-bases of FASTA-formatted raw sequence reads from short or long read next generation sequencing platforms. The approach is to pre-calculate a viral and a bacterial "Pathogen Marker Library" (PML) containing sub-sequences specific to pathogens or their near neighbors. A list of expected matches comparing every bacterial or viral genome against the PML sequences is also pre-calculated. To analyze a metagenome, reads are compared to the PML, and observed PML-metagenome matches are compared to the expected PML-genome matches, and the ratio of observed relative to expected matches is reported. In other words, a 3-way comparison among the PML, metagenome, and existing genome sequences is used to quickly assess which (if any) species included in the PML is likely to be present in the metagenome, based on available sequence data. Our tests showed that the species with the most PML matches correctly indicated the organism sequenced for empirical metagenomes consisting of a cultured, relatively pure isolate. These runs completed in 1 minute to 3 hours on 12 CPU (1 thread/CPU), depending on the metagenome and PML. Using more threads on the same number of CPU resulted in speed improvements roughly proportional to the number of threads. Simulations indicated that detection sensitivity depends on both sequencing coverage levels for a species and the size of the PML: species were correctly detected even at ~0.003x coverage by the large PMLs, and at ~0.03x coverage by the smaller PMLs. Matches to true positive species were 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than to false positives. Simulations with short reads (36 nt and ~260 nt) showed that species were usually detected for metagenome coverage above 0.005x and coverage in the PML above 0.05x, and

  11. [Metagenomics and biodiversity of sphagnum bogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusin, L Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity of sphagnum bogs is one of the richest and less studied, while these ecosystems are among the top ones in ecological, conservation, and economic value. Recent studies focused on the prokaryotic consortia associated with sphagnum mosses, and revealed the factors that maintain sustainability and productivity of bog ecosystems. High-throughput sequencing technologies provided insight into functional diversity of moss microbial communities (microbiomes), and helped to identify the biochemical pathways and gene families that facilitate the spectrum of adaptive strategies and largely foster the very successful colonization of the Northern hemisphere by sphagnum mosses. Rich and valuable information obtained on microbiomes of peat bogs sets off the paucity of evidence on their eukaryotic diversity. Prospects and expectations of reliable assessment of taxonomic profiles, relative abundance of taxa, and hidden biodiversity of microscopic eukaryotes in sphagnum bog ecosystems are briefly outlined in the context of today's metagenomics.

  12. Metagenomic Sequencing of an In Vitro-Simulated Microbial Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Jenna L.; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2009-12-01

    Background: Microbial life dominates the earth, but many species are difficult or even impossible to study under laboratory conditions. Sequencing DNA directly from the environment, a technique commonly referred to as metagenomics, is an important tool for cataloging microbial life. This culture-independent approach involves collecting samples that include microbes in them, extracting DNA from the samples, and sequencing the DNA. A sample may contain many different microorganisms, macroorganisms, and even free-floating environmental DNA. A fundamental challenge in metagenomics has been estimating the abundance of organisms in a sample based on the frequency with which the organism's DNA was observed in reads generated via DNA sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings: We created mixtures of ten microbial species for which genome sequences are known. Each mixture contained an equal number of cells of each species. We then extracted DNA from the mixtures, sequenced the DNA, and measured the frequency with which genomic regions from each organism was observed in the sequenced DNA. We found that the observed frequency of reads mapping to each organism did not reflect the equal numbers of cells that were known to be included in each mixture. The relative organism abundances varied significantly depending on the DNA extraction and sequencing protocol utilized. Conclusions/Significance: We describe a new data resource for measuring the accuracy of metagenomic binning methods, created by in vitro-simulation of a metagenomic community. Our in vitro simulation can be used to complement previous in silico benchmark studies. In constructing a synthetic community and sequencing its metagenome, we encountered several sources of observation bias that likely affect most metagenomic experiments to date and present challenges for comparative metagenomic studies. DNA preparation methods have a particularly profound effect in our study, implying that samples prepared with

  13. MGkit: Metagenomic Framework For The Study Of Microbial Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Rubino, Francesco; Creevey, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While metagenomics has been used extensively to study microbial communities from a taxonomic and functional perspective, little has been done to address how the species in a microbiome are adapted to and maintain specific roles in dynamic environments like the rumen. Rationale To address this issue we have developed a framework for the robust analysis of metagenomic data that includes fully automated analysis from next-generation sequencing (NGS) reads to assembly, gene ...

  14. Going Deeper: Metagenome of a Hadopelagic Microbial Community

    OpenAIRE

    Eloe, Emiley A.; Fadrosh, Douglas W.; Novotny, Mark; Zeigler Allen, Lisa; Kim, Maria; Lombardo, Mary-Jane; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn; Yooseph, Shibu; Allen, Eric E.; Lasken, Roger; Williamson, Shannon J.; Bartlett, Douglas H.

    2011-01-01

    The paucity of sequence data from pelagic deep-ocean microbial assemblages has severely restricted molecular exploration of the largest biome on Earth. In this study, an analysis is presented of a large-scale 454-pyrosequencing metagenomic dataset from a hadopelagic environment from 6,000 m depth within the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT). A total of 145 Mbp of assembled sequence data was generated and compared to two pelagic deep ocean metagenomes and two representative surface seawater datasets fr...

  15. Expanding the marine virosphere using metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Megumi Mizuno

    Full Text Available Viruses infecting prokaryotic cells (phages are the most abundant entities of the biosphere and contain a largely uncharted wealth of genomic diversity. They play a critical role in the biology of their hosts and in ecosystem functioning at large. The classical approaches studying phages require isolation from a pure culture of the host. Direct sequencing approaches have been hampered by the small amounts of phage DNA present in most natural habitats and the difficulty in applying meta-omic approaches, such as annotation of small reads and assembly. Serendipitously, it has been discovered that cellular metagenomes of highly productive ocean waters (the deep chlorophyll maximum contain significant amounts of viral DNA derived from cells undergoing the lytic cycle. We have taken advantage of this phenomenon to retrieve metagenomic fosmids containing viral DNA from a Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum sample. This method allowed description of complete genomes of 208 new marine phages. The diversity of these genomes was remarkable, contributing 21 genomic groups of tailed bacteriophages of which 10 are completely new. Sequence based methods have allowed host assignment to many of them. These predicted hosts represent a wide variety of important marine prokaryotic microbes like members of SAR11 and SAR116 clades, Cyanobacteria and also the newly described low GC Actinobacteria. A metavirome constructed from the same habitat showed that many of the new phage genomes were abundantly represented. Furthermore, other available metaviromes also indicated that some of the new phages are globally distributed in low to medium latitude ocean waters. The availability of many genomes from the same sample allows a direct approach to viral population genomics confirming the remarkable mosaicism of phage genomes.

  16. Metagenomics of the Methane Ice Worm, Hesiocaeca methanicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, K. D.; Edsall, L.; Xin, W.; Head, S. R.; Gelbart, T.; Wood, A. M.; Gaasterland, T.

    2012-12-01

    The methane ice worm (Hesiocaeca methanicola) is a polychaete found on methane hydrate deposits for which there appears to be no publically available genomic or metagenomic data. Methane ice worms were collected in 2009 by the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible (543m depth; N 27:44.7526 W 91:13.3168). Next-generation sequencing (HiSeq2000) was applied to samples of tissue and gut contents. A subset of the assembled data (40M reads, randomly selected) was run through MG-RAST. Preliminary results for the gut content (1,269,153 sequences, average length 202 bp) indicated that 0.1% of the sequences contained ribosomal RNA genes with the majority (67%) classified as Bacteria, a relatively small per cent (1.4%) as Archae, and 31% as Eukaryota. Campylobacterales was the predominant order (14%), with unclassified (7.5%) and Desulfobacterales (4%) being the next dominant. Preliminary results for the worm tissue (2,716,461 sequences, average length 241 bp) indicated that the majority of sequences were Eukaryota (73%), with 256 sequences classified as phylum Annelida and 58% of those belonging to class Polychaeta. For the bacterial sequences obtained from the tissue samples, the predominant order was Actinomycetales (2.7%). For both the tissue and gut content samples, the majority of proteins were classified as clustering-based subsystems. This preliminary analysis will be compared to an assembly consisting of 40M of the highest quality reads.; methane ice worms on methane hydrate

  17. Evaluation of ddRADseq for reduced representation metagenome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Profiling of microbial communities via metagenomic shotgun sequencing has enabled researches to gain unprecedented insight into microbial community structure and the functional roles of community members. This study describes a method and basic analysis for a metagenomic adaptation of the double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq protocol for reduced representation metagenome profiling. Methods This technique takes advantage of the sequence specificity of restriction endonucleases to construct an Illumina-compatible sequencing library containing DNA fragments that are between a pair of restriction sites located within close proximity. This results in a reduced sequencing library with coverage breadth that can be tuned by size selection. We assessed the performance of the metagenomic ddRADseq approach by applying the full method to human stool samples and generating sequence data. Results The ddRADseq data yields a similar estimate of community taxonomic profile as obtained from shotgun metagenome sequencing of the same human stool samples. No obvious bias with respect to genomic G + C content and the estimated relative species abundance was detected. Discussion Although ddRADseq does introduce some bias in taxonomic representation, the bias is likely to be small relative to DNA extraction bias. ddRADseq appears feasible and could have value as a tool for metagenome-wide association studies.

  18. Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens: Towards Diagnostic Metagenomics of Fecal Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Christine Andersen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic metagenomics is a rapidly evolving laboratory tool for culture-independent tracing of foodborne pathogens. The method has the potential to become a generic platform for detection of most pathogens and many sample types. Today, however, it is still at an early and experimental stage. Studies show that metagenomic methods, from sample storage and DNA extraction to library preparation and shotgun sequencing, have a great influence on data output. To construct protocols that extract the complete metagenome but with minimal bias is an ongoing challenge. Many different software strategies for data analysis are being developed, and several studies applying diagnostic metagenomics to human clinical samples have been published, detecting, and sometimes, typing bacterial infections. It is possible to obtain a draft genome of the pathogen and to develop methods that can theoretically be applied in real-time. Finally, diagnostic metagenomics can theoretically be better geared than conventional methods to detect co-infections. The present review focuses on the current state of test development, as well as practical implementation of diagnostic metagenomics to trace foodborne bacterial infections in fecal samples from animals and humans.

  19. Evaluation of ddRADseq for reduced representation metagenome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael Y; Worden, Paul; Monahan, Leigh G; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Burke, Catherine M; Djordjevic, Steven P; Charles, Ian G; Darling, Aaron E

    2017-01-01

    Profiling of microbial communities via metagenomic shotgun sequencing has enabled researches to gain unprecedented insight into microbial community structure and the functional roles of community members. This study describes a method and basic analysis for a metagenomic adaptation of the double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) protocol for reduced representation metagenome profiling. This technique takes advantage of the sequence specificity of restriction endonucleases to construct an Illumina-compatible sequencing library containing DNA fragments that are between a pair of restriction sites located within close proximity. This results in a reduced sequencing library with coverage breadth that can be tuned by size selection. We assessed the performance of the metagenomic ddRADseq approach by applying the full method to human stool samples and generating sequence data. The ddRADseq data yields a similar estimate of community taxonomic profile as obtained from shotgun metagenome sequencing of the same human stool samples. No obvious bias with respect to genomic G + C content and the estimated relative species abundance was detected. Although ddRADseq does introduce some bias in taxonomic representation, the bias is likely to be small relative to DNA extraction bias. ddRADseq appears feasible and could have value as a tool for metagenome-wide association studies.

  20. Public Sector Readiness for Digital Preservation in New Zealand: The Rate of Adoption of an Innovation in Records Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent legislation in New Zealand has placed statutory obligations on its government organizations to introduce sound records management practices and to ensure long-term access to their digital records. To obtain a base level of knowledge on current digital preservation practices and on awareness of digital preservation issues, an online survey…

  1. 76 FR 5973 - Privacy Act of 1974; Notice; Publication of the Systems of Records Managed by the Commodity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ..., 19th Floor, New York, New York 10005, Telephone: (646) 746-9700. In the system of records notice, the... (exempted) CFTC-33 Electronic Access Card CFTC-34 Telephone System (BlackBerry or Calling Card) CFTC-35... security number, and home telephone. OPM/GOVT-2 is the OPM Employee Performance File System Records System...

  2. The Institute of Public Administration's Document Center: From Paper to Electronic Records--A Full Image Government Documents Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Rashed S.

    Since its establishment in 1960, the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia has had responsibility for documenting Saudi administrative literature, the official publications of Saudi Arabia, and the literature of regional and international organizations through establishment of the Document Center in 1961. This paper…

  3. Going deeper: metagenome of a hadopelagic microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiley A Eloe

    Full Text Available The paucity of sequence data from pelagic deep-ocean microbial assemblages has severely restricted molecular exploration of the largest biome on Earth. In this study, an analysis is presented of a large-scale 454-pyrosequencing metagenomic dataset from a hadopelagic environment from 6,000 m depth within the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT. A total of 145 Mbp of assembled sequence data was generated and compared to two pelagic deep ocean metagenomes and two representative surface seawater datasets from the Sargasso Sea. In a number of instances, all three deep metagenomes displayed similar trends, but were most magnified in the PRT, including enrichment in functions for two-component signal transduction mechanisms and transcriptional regulation. Overrepresented transporters in the PRT metagenome included outer membrane porins, diverse cation transporters, and di- and tri-carboxylate transporters that matched well with the prevailing catabolic processes such as butanoate, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism. A surprisingly high abundance of sulfatases for the degradation of sulfated polysaccharides were also present in the PRT. The most dramatic adaptational feature of the PRT microbes appears to be heavy metal resistance, as reflected in the large numbers of transporters present for their removal. As a complement to the metagenome approach, single-cell genomic techniques were utilized to generate partial whole-genome sequence data from four uncultivated cells from members of the dominant phyla within the PRT, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Planctomycetes. The single-cell sequence data provided genomic context for many of the highly abundant functional attributes identified from the PRT metagenome, as well as recruiting heavily the PRT metagenomic sequence data compared to 172 available reference marine genomes. Through these multifaceted sequence approaches, new insights have been provided into the unique functional

  4. Environmental Metagenomics: The Data Assembly and Data Analysis Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Maitra, S. S.; Shukla, Rohit Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gene finding is one of the emerging fields in the environmental research. In the past decades the research was focused mainly on the discovery of microorganisms which were capable of degrading a particular compound. A lot of methods are available in literature about the cultivation and screening of these novel microorganisms. All of these methods are efficient for screening of microbes which can be cultivated in the laboratory. Microorganisms which live in extreme conditions like hot springs, frozen glaciers, acid mine drainage, etc. cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, this is because of incomplete knowledge about their growth requirements like temperature, nutrients and their mutual dependence on each other. The microbes that can be cultivated correspond only to less than 1 % of the total microbes which are present in the earth. Rest of the 99 % of uncultivated majority remains inaccessible. Metagenomics transcends the culture requirements of microbes. In metagenomics DNA is directly extracted from the environmental samples such as soil, seawater, acid mine drainage etc., followed by construction and screening of metagenomic library. With the ongoing research, a huge amount of metagenomic data is accumulating. Understanding this data is an essential step to extract novel genes of industrial importance. Various bioinformatics tools have been designed to analyze and annotate the data produced from the metagenome. The Bio-informatic requirements of metagenomics data analysis are different in theory and practice. This paper reviews the tools that are available for metagenomic data analysis and the capability such tools—what they can do and their web availability.

  5. Metagenomic analysis of kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Park, Moon Su; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2011-04-01

    Kimchi, a traditional food in the Korean culture, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this study, metagenomic approaches were used to monitor changes in bacterial populations, metabolic potential, and overall genetic features of the microbial community during the 29-day fermentation process. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from kimchi samples obtained periodically and was sequenced using a 454 GS FLX Titanium system, which yielded a total of 701,556 reads, with an average read length of 438 bp. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA genes from the metagenome indicated that the kimchi microbiome was dominated by members of three genera: Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella. Assignment of metagenomic sequences to SEED categories of the Metagenome Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) server revealed a genetic profile characteristic of heterotrophic lactic acid fermentation of carbohydrates, which was supported by the detection of mannitol, lactate, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation products. When the metagenomic reads were mapped onto the database of completed genomes, the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 23K genomes were highly represented. These same two genera were confirmed to be important in kimchi fermentation when the majority of kimchi metagenomic sequences showed very high identity to Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus genes. Besides microbial genome sequences, a surprisingly large number of phage DNA sequences were identified from the cellular fractions, possibly indicating that a high proportion of cells were infected by bacteriophages during fermentation. Overall, these results provide insights into the kimchi microbial community and also shed light on fermentation processes carried out broadly by complex microbial communities.

  6. Differences in sequencing technologies improve the retrieval of anammox bacterial genome from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.; Tringe, S.G.; Folino, G.; Van Hijum, S.A.F.T.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Marchiori, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sequencing technologies have different biases, in single-genome sequencing and metagenomic sequencing; these can significantly affect ORFs recovery and the population distribution of a metagenome. In this paper we investigate how well different technologies represent information related

  7. Differences in sequencing technologies improve the retrieval of anammox bacterial genome from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, F.; Tringe, S.G.; Folino, G.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Camp, H.J. Op den; Jetten, M.S.; Marchiori, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sequencing technologies have different biases, in single-genome sequencing and metagenomic sequencing; these can significantly affect ORFs recovery and the population distribution of a metagenome. In this paper we investigate how well different technologies represent information related

  8. Public and Private Spheres of Neighborhood Disorder: Assessing Pathways to Violence Using Large-scale Digital Records

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Daniel T.; Sampson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: “Broken windows” theory is an influential model of neighborhood change, but there is disagreement over whether public disorder leads to more serious crime. This article distinguishes between public and private disorder, arguing that large-scale administrative data provide new opportunities to examine broken windows theory and alternative models of neighborhood change. Method: We apply an ecometric methodology to two databases from Boston: 1,000,000+ 911 dispatches and indicator...

  9. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, I-Min A.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-01-01

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification. GOLD is available at: http://www.genomesonline.org and has a mirror site at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Crete, Greece, at: http://gold.imbb.forth.gr/ PMID:19914934

  10. Taxonomer: an interactive metagenomics analysis portal for universal pathogen detection and host mRNA expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Steven; Simmon, Keith; Miller, Chase; Qiao, Yi; Kennedy, Brett; Di Sera, Tonya; Graf, Erin H; Tardif, Keith D; Kapusta, Aurélie; Rynearson, Shawn; Stockmann, Chris; Queen, Krista; Tong, Suxiang; Voelkerding, Karl V; Blaschke, Anne; Byington, Carrie L; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew; Ampofo, Krow; Eilbeck, Karen; Marth, Gabor; Yandell, Mark; Schlaberg, Robert

    2016-05-26

    High-throughput sequencing enables unbiased profiling of microbial communities, universal pathogen detection, and host response to infectious diseases. However, computation times and algorithmic inaccuracies have hindered adoption. We present Taxonomer, an ultrafast, web-tool for comprehensive metagenomics data analysis and interactive results visualization. Taxonomer is unique in providing integrated nucleotide and protein-based classification and simultaneous host messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript profiling. Using real-world case-studies, we show that Taxonomer detects previously unrecognized infections and reveals antiviral host mRNA expression profiles. To facilitate data-sharing across geographic distances in outbreak settings, Taxonomer is publicly available through a web-based user interface. Taxonomer enables rapid, accurate, and interactive analyses of metagenomics data on personal computers and mobile devices.

  11. Analysis of bacterial metagenomes from the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico for pathogens detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy; Pardo-López, Liliana

    2017-07-31

    Little is known about the diversity of bacteria in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The aim of the study illustrated in this perspective was to search for the presence of bacterial pathogens in this ecosystem, using metagenomic data recently generated by the Mexican research group known as the Gulf of Mexico Research Consortium. Several genera of bacteria annotated as pathogens were detected in water and sediment marine samples. As expected, native and ubiquitous pathogenic bacteria genera such as Burkolderia, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Vibrio were highly represented. Surprisingly, non-native genera of public health concern were also detected, including Borrelia, Ehrlichia, Leptospira, Mycobacterium, Mycoplasma, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Treponema. While there are no previous metagenomics studies of this environment, the potential influences of natural, anthropogenic and ecological factors on the diversity of putative pathogenic bacteria found in it are reviewed. The taxonomic annotation herein reported provides a starting point for an improved understanding of bacterial biodiversity in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. It also represents a useful tool in public health as it may help identify infectious diseases associated with exposure to marine water and ingestion of fish or shellfish, and thus may be useful in predicting and preventing waterborne disease outbreaks. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Massively Parallel Sequence Similarity Search for Metagenomic Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kakuta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sequence similarity searches have been widely used in the analyses of metagenomic sequencing data. Finding homologous sequences in a reference database enables the estimation of taxonomic and functional characteristics of each query sequence. Because current metagenomic sequencing data consist of a large number of nucleotide sequences, the time required for sequence similarity searches account for a large proportion of the total time. This time-consuming step makes it difficult to perform large-scale analyses. To analyze large-scale metagenomic data, such as those found in the human oral microbiome, we developed GHOST-MP (Genome-wide HOmology Search Tool on Massively Parallel system, a parallel sequence similarity search tool for massively parallel computing systems. This tool uses a fast search algorithm based on suffix arrays of query and database sequences and a hierarchical parallel search to accelerate the large-scale sequence similarity search of metagenomic sequencing data. The parallel computing efficiency and the search speed of this tool were evaluated. GHOST-MP was shown to be scalable over 10,000 CPU (Central Processing Unit cores, and achieved over 80-fold acceleration compared with mpiBLAST using the same computational resources. We applied this tool to human oral metagenomic data, and the results indicate that the oral cavity, the oral vestibule, and plaque have different characteristics based on the functional gene category.

  13. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S; Smith, Renee J; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of permafrost microbial community response to thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; DeAngelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-07-01

    We employed deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes and related this data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows for the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses revealed that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there were rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5°C, permafrost metagenomes converged to be more similar to each other than while they were frozen. We found that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shifted rapidly during thaw. We also constructed the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponded to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost was released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost.

  15. Reconstruction of bacterial and viral genomes from multiple metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet K Sharma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several metagenomic projects have been accomplished or are in progress. However, in most cases, it is not feasible to generate complete genomic assemblies of species from the metagenomic sequencing of a complex environment. Only a few studies have reported the reconstruction of bacterial genomes from complex metagenomes. In this work, Binning-Assembly approach has been proposed and demonstrated for the reconstruction of bacterial and viral genomes from 72 human gut metagenomic datasets. A total 1,156 bacterial genomes belonging to 219 bacterial families and, 279 viral genomes belonging to 84 viral families could be identified. More than 80% complete draft genome sequences could be reconstructed for a total of 126 bacterial and 11 viral genomes. Selected draft assembled genomes could be validated with 99.8% accuracy using their ORFs. The study provides useful information on the assembly expected for a species given its number of reads and abundance. This approach along with spiking was also demonstrated to be useful in improving the draft assembly of a bacterial genome. The Binning-Assembly approach can be successfully used to reconstruct bacterial and viral genomes from multiple metagenomic datasets obtained from similar environments.

  16. Reconstruction of Bacterial and Viral Genomes from Multiple Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kumar, Sanjiv; Prasoodanan, Vishnu P K; Harish, K; Sharma, Ashok K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2016-01-01

    Several metagenomic projects have been accomplished or are in progress. However, in most cases, it is not feasible to generate complete genomic assemblies of species from the metagenomic sequencing of a complex environment. Only a few studies have reported the reconstruction of bacterial genomes from complex metagenomes. In this work, Binning-Assembly approach has been proposed and demonstrated for the reconstruction of bacterial and viral genomes from 72 human gut metagenomic datasets. A total 1156 bacterial genomes belonging to 219 bacterial families and, 279 viral genomes belonging to 84 viral families could be identified. More than 80% complete draft genome sequences could be reconstructed for a total of 126 bacterial and 11 viral genomes. Selected draft assembled genomes could be validated with 99.8% accuracy using their ORFs. The study provides useful information on the assembly expected for a species given its number of reads and abundance. This approach along with spiking was also demonstrated to be useful in improving the draft assembly of a bacterial genome. The Binning-Assembly approach can be successfully used to reconstruct bacterial and viral genomes from multiple metagenomic datasets obtained from similar environments.

  17. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-21

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of the next-generation sequencing technology, progress has been made in the study of the human intestinal microbiome. Metagenomics can be used to study intestinal microbiome diversity and dysbiosis, as well as its relationship to health and disease. Moreover, functional metagenomics can identify novel functional genes, microbial pathways, antibiotic resistance genes, functional dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome, and determine interactions and co-evolution between microbiota and host, though there are still some limitations. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics represent enormous complements to the understanding of the human gut microbiome. This review aims to demonstrate that metagenomics can be a powerful tool in studying the human gut microbiome with encouraging prospects. The limitations of metagenomics to be overcome are also discussed. Metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics in relation to the study of the human gut microbiome are also briefly discussed.

  18. Meta-IDBA: a de Novo assembler for metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu; Leung, Henry C M; Yiu, S M; Chin, Francis Y L

    2011-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques allow us to generate reads from a microbial environment in order to analyze the microbial community. However, assembling of a set of mixed reads from different species to form contigs is a bottleneck of metagenomic research. Although there are many assemblers for assembling reads from a single genome, there are no assemblers for assembling reads in metagenomic data without reference genome sequences. Moreover, the performances of these assemblers on metagenomic data are far from satisfactory, because of the existence of common regions in the genomes of subspecies and species, which make the assembly problem much more complicated. We introduce the Meta-IDBA algorithm for assembling reads in metagenomic data, which contain multiple genomes from different species. There are two core steps in Meta-IDBA. It first tries to partition the de Bruijn graph into isolated components of different species based on an important observation. Then, for each component, it captures the slight variants of the genomes of subspecies from the same species by multiple alignments and represents the genome of one species, using a consensus sequence. Comparison of the performances of Meta-IDBA and existing assemblers, such as Velvet and Abyss for different metagenomic datasets shows that Meta-IDBA can reconstruct longer contigs with similar accuracy. Meta-IDBA toolkit is available at our website http://www.cs.hku.hk/~alse/metaidba. chin@cs.hku.hk.

  19. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia S Khodakova

    Full Text Available Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER; similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF; non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS; and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations.

  20. Inference of microbial recombination rates from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L F Johnson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic sequencing projects from environments dominated by a small number of species produce genome-wide population samples. We present a two-site composite likelihood estimator of the scaled recombination rate, rho = 2N(ec, that operates on metagenomic assemblies in which each sequenced fragment derives from a different individual. This new estimator properly accounts for sequencing error, as quantified by per-base quality scores, and missing data, as inferred from the placement of reads in a metagenomic assembly. We apply our estimator to data from a sludge metagenome project to demonstrate how this method will elucidate the rates of exchange of genetic material in natural microbial populations. Surprisingly, for a fixed amount of sequencing, this estimator has lower variance than similar methods that operate on more traditional population genetic samples of comparable size. In addition, we can infer variation in recombination rate across the genome because metagenomic projects sample genetic diversity genome-wide, not just at particular loci. The method itself makes no assumption specific to microbial populations, opening the door for application to any mixed population sample where the number of individuals sampled is much greater than the number of fragments sequenced.

  1. The great screen anomaly-a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been

  2. The oral metagenome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Alcaraz, Luis David; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Romero, Héctor; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Mira, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity of humans is inhabited by hundreds of bacterial species and some of them have a key role in the development of oral diseases, mainly dental caries and periodontitis. We describe for the first time the metagenome of the human oral cavity under health and diseased conditions, with a focus on supragingival dental plaque and cavities. Direct pyrosequencing of eight samples with different oral-health status produced 1 Gbp of sequence without the biases imposed by PCR or cloning. These data show that cavities are not dominated by Streptococcus mutans (the species originally identified as the ethiological agent of dental caries) but are in fact a complex community formed by tens of bacterial species, in agreement with the view that caries is a polymicrobial disease. The analysis of the reads indicated that the oral cavity is functionally a different environment from the gut, with many functional categories enriched in one of the two environments and depleted in the other. Individuals who had never suffered from dental caries showed an over-representation of several functional categories, like genes for antimicrobial peptides and quorum sensing. In addition, they did not have mutans streptococci but displayed high recruitment of other species. Several isolates belonging to these dominant bacteria in healthy individuals were cultured and shown to inhibit the growth of cariogenic bacteria, suggesting the use of these commensal bacterial strains as probiotics to promote oral health and prevent dental caries.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  4. Metagenomic scaffolds enable combinatorial lignin transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Cameron R; Singh, Rahul; VanInsberghe, David; Ievdokymenko, Kateryna; Budwill, Karen; Mohn, William W; Eltis, Lindsay D; Hallam, Steven J

    2014-07-15

    Engineering the microbial transformation of lignocellulosic biomass is essential to developing modern biorefining processes that alleviate reliance on petroleum-derived energy and chemicals. Many current bioprocess streams depend on the genetic tractability of Escherichia coli with a primary emphasis on engineering cellulose/hemicellulose catabolism, small molecule production, and resistance to product inhibition. Conversely, bioprocess streams for lignin transformation remain embryonic, with relatively few environmental strains or enzymes implicated. Here we develop a biosensor responsive to monoaromatic lignin transformation products compatible with functional screening in E. coli. We use this biosensor to retrieve metagenomic scaffolds sourced from coal bed bacterial communities conferring an array of lignin transformation phenotypes that synergize in combination. Transposon mutagenesis and comparative sequence analysis of active clones identified genes encoding six functional classes mediating lignin transformation phenotypes that appear to be rearrayed in nature via horizontal gene transfer. Lignin transformation activity was then demonstrated for one of the predicted gene products encoding a multicopper oxidase to validate the screen. These results illuminate cellular and community-wide networks acting on aromatic polymers and expand the toolkit for engineering recombinant lignin transformation based on ecological design principles.

  5. OTU analysis using metagenomic shotgun sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Hao

    Full Text Available Because of technological limitations, the primer and amplification biases in targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have veiled the true microbial diversity underlying environmental samples. However, the protocol of metagenomic shotgun sequencing provides 16S rRNA gene fragment data with natural immunity against the biases raised during priming and thus the potential of uncovering the true structure of microbial community by giving more accurate predictions of operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Nonetheless, the lack of statistically rigorous comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragments and other data types makes it difficult to interpret previously reported results using 16S rRNA gene fragments. Therefore, in the present work, we established a standard analysis pipeline that would help confirm if the differences in the data are true or are just due to potential technical bias. This pipeline is built by using simulated data to find optimal mapping and OTU prediction methods. The comparison between simulated datasets revealed a relationship between 16S rRNA gene fragments and full-length 16S rRNA sequences that a 16S rRNA gene fragment having a length >150 bp provides the same accuracy as a full-length 16S rRNA sequence using our proposed pipeline, which could serve as a good starting point for experimental design and making the comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragment-based and targeted 16S rRNA sequencing-based surveys possible.

  6. Metagenomics Reveals Pervasive Bacterial Populations and Reduced Community Diversity across the Alaska Tundra Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric R; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Luo, Chengwei; Yuan, Mengting M; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Schuur, Edward A G; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2016-01-01

    How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 g) are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth) by sequencing, and the recovery of 27 high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness) population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart) tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity). Collectively, our results revealed that

  7. Recovery of a Medieval Brucella melitensis Genome Using Shotgun Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Gemma L.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Giuffra, Valentina; Bandiera, Pasquale; Milanese, Marco; Bramanti, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shotgun metagenomics provides a powerful assumption-free approach to the recovery of pathogen genomes from contemporary and historical material. We sequenced the metagenome of a calcified nodule from the skeleton of a 14th-century middle-aged male excavated from the medieval Sardinian settlement of Geridu. We obtained 6.5-fold coverage of a Brucella melitensis genome. Sequence reads from this genome showed signatures typical of ancient or aged DNA. Despite the relatively low coverage, we were able to use information from single-nucleotide polymorphisms to place the medieval pathogen genome within a clade of B. melitensis strains that included the well-studied Ether strain and two other recent Italian isolates. We confirmed this placement using information from deletions and IS711 insertions. We conclude that metagenomics stands ready to document past and present infections, shedding light on the emergence, evolution, and spread of microbial pathogens. PMID:25028426

  8. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  9. The potential of viral metagenomics in blood transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Gomez, J; Boizeau, L; Laperche, S

    2017-09-01

    Thanks to the significant advent of high throughput sequencing in the last ten years, it is now possible via metagenomics to define the spectrum of the microbial sequences present in human blood samples. Therefore, metagenomics sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new, emerging and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. However, despite considerable advantages compared to the traditional methods of pathogen identification, this non-targeted approach presents several drawbacks including a lack of sensitivity and sequence contaminant issues. With further improvements, especially to increase sensitivity, metagenomics sequencing should become in a near future an additional diagnostic tool in infectious disease field and especially in blood transfusion safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomic selections represent a powerful technique that is widely applied for identification of novel genes from complex metagenomic sources. However, whereas hundreds to thousands of clones can be easily generated and sequenced over a few days of experiments, analyzing the data...... is time consuming and constitutes a major bottleneck for experimental researchers in the field. Here we present the deFUME web server, an easy-to-use web-based interface for processing, annotation and visualization of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non......-bioinformaticians. The web-server integrates multiple analysis steps into one single workflow: read assembly, open reading frame prediction, and annotation with BLAST, InterPro and GO classifiers. Analysis results are visualized in an online dynamic web-interface. The deFUME webserver provides a fast track from raw sequence...

  11. Metagenomic Investigation of the Microbial Community Structure and Diversity for Sentinel Coral Reefs and Urbanized Coastal Waters in Southeast Florida, and Molecular Microbial Source Tracking to Characterize Potential LBSP Microbial Contaminant Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigalliano, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs and recreational beaches provide critical ecosystem services. However, coastal waters of the Southeast Florida region receive anthropogenic discharges from highly urbanized watersheds via runoff, canals, coastal inlets, and treated wastewater outfalls. There is concern regarding the biological contaminants that enter the coastal zone from land-based sources, especially for viable pathogens and genetic elements that could confer virulence or resistance. Targeted molecular microbial source tracking (MST) by quantitative PCR allows the measurement of specific microbial contaminants such as host-specific fecal indicators. These fecal source markers can help track specific fecal contamination of public health concern in the coastal zone and may also help track exposure of coral reefs to such contamination. A range of pathogens associated with sewage/septic contamination have shown detrimental impact to coral communities, including changes to the biodiversity of coral microbiomes. High-throughput Next-Generation-Sequencing (NGS) and community genomic analysis can provide a comprehensive, culture-independent approach to investigate microbial community diversity in complex environmental samples. The combination of host-specific microbial source tracking by qPCR and metagenomic NGS can provide substantial enhancement to traditional methods of water quality assessment to better protect both environmental biodiversity and human health. Reported here is a multifaceted water quality assessment study of three coastal inlets, two treated wastewater outfalls, and four sentinel coral reef communities in the Southeast Florida coastal zone offshore of Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. This study utilized a combination of bi-monthly sampling for nutrients, fecal indicator bacteria, and human-source molecular source tracking to measure specific contaminants of ecosystem and public health concern. In addition, 16S metagenomic analysis using Illumina Next-Generation Sequencing

  12. Multi-Layer and Recursive Neural Networks for Metagenomic Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Gregory; Polikar, Robi; Rosen, Gail

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in machine learning, specifically in deep learning with neural networks, has made a profound impact on fields such as natural language processing, image classification, and language modeling; however, feasibility and potential benefits of the approaches to metagenomic data analysis has been largely under-explored. Deep learning exploits many layers of learning nonlinear feature representations, typically in an unsupervised fashion, and recent results have shown outstanding generalization performance on previously unseen data. Furthermore, some deep learning methods can also represent the structure in a data set. Consequently, deep learning and neural networks may prove to be an appropriate approach for metagenomic data. To determine whether such approaches are indeed appropriate for metagenomics, we experiment with two deep learning methods: i) a deep belief network, and ii) a recursive neural network, the latter of which provides a tree representing the structure of the data. We compare these approaches to the standard multi-layer perceptron, which has been well-established in the machine learning community as a powerful prediction algorithm, though its presence is largely missing in metagenomics literature. We find that traditional neural networks can be quite powerful classifiers on metagenomic data compared to baseline methods, such as random forests. On the other hand, while the deep learning approaches did not result in improvements to the classification accuracy, they do provide the ability to learn hierarchical representations of a data set that standard classification methods do not allow. Our goal in this effort is not to determine the best algorithm in terms accuracy-as that depends on the specific application-but rather to highlight the benefits and drawbacks of each of the approach we discuss and provide insight on how they can be improved for predictive metagenomic analysis.

  13. RNA viral metagenome of whiteflies leads to the discovery and characterization of a whitefly-transmitted carlavirus in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Rosario

    Full Text Available Whiteflies from the Bemisia tabaci species complex have the ability to transmit a large number of plant viruses and are some of the most detrimental pests in agriculture. Although whiteflies are known to transmit both DNA and RNA viruses, most of the diversity has been recorded for the former, specifically for the Begomovirus genus. This study investigated the total diversity of DNA and RNA viruses found in whiteflies collected from a single site in Florida to evaluate if there are additional, previously undetected viral types within the B. tabaci vector. Metagenomic analysis of viral DNA extracted from the whiteflies only resulted in the detection of begomoviruses. In contrast, whiteflies contained sequences similar to RNA viruses from divergent groups, with a diversity that extends beyond currently described viruses. The metagenomic analysis of whiteflies also led to the first report of a whitefly-transmitted RNA virus similar to Cowpea mild mottle virus (CpMMV Florida (genus Carlavirus in North America. Further investigation resulted in the detection of CpMMV Florida in native and cultivated plants growing near the original field site of whitefly collection and determination of its experimental host range. Analysis of complete CpMMV Florida genomes recovered from whiteflies and plants suggests that the current classification criteria for carlaviruses need to be reevaluated. Overall, metagenomic analysis supports that DNA plant viruses carried by B. tabaci are dominated by begomoviruses, whereas significantly less is known about RNA viruses present in this damaging insect vector.

  14. Metagenomic Approaches to Assess Bacteriophages in Various Environmental Niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Stephen; Mahony, Jennifer; Nauta, Arjen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-05-24

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous and numerous parasites of bacteria and play a critical evolutionary role in virtually every ecosystem, yet our understanding of the extent of the diversity and role of phages remains inadequate for many ecological niches, particularly in cases in which the host is unculturable. During the past 15 years, the emergence of the field of viral metagenomics has drastically enhanced our ability to analyse the so-called viral 'dark matter' of the biosphere. Here, we review the evolution of viral metagenomic methodologies, as well as providing an overview of some of the most significant applications and findings in this field of research.

  15. The soil microbiome — from metagenomics to metaphenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Janet K.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.

    2018-06-01

    Soil microorganisms carry out important processes, including support of plant growth and cycling of carbon and other nutrients. However, the majority of soil microbes have not yet been isolated and their functions are largely unknown. Although metagenomic sequencing reveals microbial identities and functional gene information, it includes DNA from microbes with vastly varying physiological states. Therefore, metagenomics is only predictive of community functional potential. We posit that the next frontier lies in understanding the metaphenome, the product of the combined genetic potential of the microbiome and available resources. Here we describe examples of opportunities towards gaining understanding of the soil metaphenome.

  16. Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens: Towards Diagnostic Metagenomics of Fecal Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Diagnostic metagenomics is a rapidly evolving laboratory tool for culture-independent tracing of foodborne pathogens. The method has the potential to become a generic platform for detection of most pathogens and many sample types. Today, however, it is still at an early and experimental stage...... for data analysis are being developed, and several studies applying diagnostic metagenomics to human clinical samples have been published, detecting, and sometimes, typing bacterial infections. It is possible to obtain a draft genome of the pathogen and to develop methods that can theoretically be applied...... in fecal samples from animals and humans....

  17. Evaluating characteristics of PROSPERO records as predictors of eventual publication of non-Cochrane systematic reviews: a meta-epidemiological study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Juan; Gómez-García, Francisco; Gay-Mimbrera, Jesús; Aguilar-Luque, Macarena; Fernández-Rueda, José Luis; Fernández-Chaichio, Jesús; Alcalde-Mellado, Patricia; Carmona-Fernandez, Pedro J; Sanz-Cabanillas, Juan Luis; Viguera-Guerra, Isabel; Franco-García, Francisco; Cárdenas-Aranzana, Manuel; Romero, José Luis Hernández; Gonzalez-Padilla, Marcelino; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz; Garcia-Nieto, Antonio Velez

    2018-03-09

    , characteristics of PROSPERO records that may be associated with the publication of a completed systematic review. The evidence may help to improve review workflow performance in terms of research topic selection, decision-making regarding team selection, planning relationships with funding sources, implementing literature search strategies, and efficient data extraction and analysis. We expect to make our results, datasets, and R and Python code scripts publicly available during the third quarter of 2018.

  18. Intended Use of a Building in Terms of Updating the Cadastral Database and Harmonizing the Data with other Public Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the original wording of the Regulation on the register of land and buildings of 2001, in the real estate cadastre there was one attribute associated with the use of a building structure - its intended use, which was applicable until the amendment to the Regulation was introduced in 2013. Then, additional attributes were added, i.e. the type of the building according to the Classification of Fixed Assets (KST, the class of the building according to the Polish Classification of Types of Constructions (PKOB and, at the same time, the main functional use and other functions of the building remained in the Regulation as well. The record data on buildings are captured for the real estate cadastre from other data sets, for example those maintained by architectural and construction authorities. At the same time, the data contained in the cadastre, after they have been entered or changed in the database, are transferred to other registers, such as tax records, or land and mortgage court registers. This study is the result of the analysis of the laws applicable to the specific units and registers. A list of discrepancies in the attributes occurring in the different registers was prepared. The practical part of the study paid particular attention to the legal bases and procedures for entering the function of a building in the real estate cadastre, which is extremely significant, as it is the attribute determining the property tax basis.

  19. Intended Use of a Building in Terms of Updating the Cadastral Database and Harmonizing the Data with other Public Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buśko, Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    According to the original wording of the Regulation on the register of land and buildings of 2001, in the real estate cadastre there was one attribute associated with the use of a building structure - its intended use, which was applicable until the amendment to the Regulation was introduced in 2013. Then, additional attributes were added, i.e. the type of the building according to the Classification of Fixed Assets (KST), the class of the building according to the Polish Classification of Types of Constructions (PKOB) and, at the same time, the main functional use and other functions of the building remained in the Regulation as well. The record data on buildings are captured for the real estate cadastre from other data sets, for example those maintained by architectural and construction authorities. At the same time, the data contained in the cadastre, after they have been entered or changed in the database, are transferred to other registers, such as tax records, or land and mortgage court registers. This study is the result of the analysis of the laws applicable to the specific units and registers. A list of discrepancies in the attributes occurring in the different registers was prepared. The practical part of the study paid particular attention to the legal bases and procedures for entering the function of a building in the real estate cadastre, which is extremely significant, as it is the attribute determining the property tax basis.

  20. Meta4: a web-application for sharing and annotating metagenomic gene predictions using web-services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Richardson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome-shotgun (WGS metagenomics experiments produce DNA sequence data from entire ecosystems, and provide a huge amount of novel information. Gene discovery projects require up-to-date information about sequence homology and domain structure for millions of predicted proteins to be presented in a simple, easy-to-use system. There is a lack of simple, open, flexible tools that allow the rapid sharing of metagenomics datasets with collaborators in a format they can easily interrogate. We present Meta4, a flexible and extensible web-application that can be used to share and annotate metagenomic gene predictions. Proteins and predicted domains are stored in a simple relational database, with a dynamic front-end which displays the results in an internet browser. Web-services are used to provide up-to-date information about the proteins from homology searches against public databases. Information about Meta4 can be found on the project website (http://www.ark-genomics.org/bioinformatics/meta4, code is available on Github (https://github.com/mw55309/meta4, a cloud image is available, and an example implementation can be seen at http://www.ark-genomics.org/tools/meta4

  1. Minimum information about a single amplified genome (MISAG) and a metagenome-assembled genome (MIMAG) of bacteria and archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Robert M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Harmon-Smith, Miranda; Doud, Devin; Reddy, T. B. K.; Schulz, Frederik; Jarett, Jessica; Rivers, Adam R.; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Copeland, Alex; Clum, Alicia; Becraft, Eric D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Birren, Bruce; Podar, Mircea; Bork, Peer; Weinstock, George M.; Garrity, George M.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Glöckner, Frank O.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nelson, William C.; Hallam, Steven J.; Jungbluth, Sean P.; Ettema, Thijs J. G.; Tighe, Scott; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Baker, Brett J.; Rattei, Thomas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hedlund, Brian; McMahon, Katherine D.; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob; Finn, Rob; Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Tyson, Gene W.; Rinke, Christian; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Schriml, Lynn; Garrity, George M.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sutton, Granger; Yilmaz, Pelin; Meyer, Folker; Glöckner, Frank O.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob; Finn, Rob; Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lapidus, Alla; Meyer, Folker; Yilmaz, Pelin; Parks, Donovan H.; Eren, A. M.; Schriml, Lynn; Banfield, Jillian F.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-08-08

    The number of genomes from uncultivated microbes will soon surpass the number of isolate genomes in public databases (Hugenholtz, Skarshewski, & Parks, 2016). Technological advancements in high-throughput sequencing and assembly, including single-cell genomics and the computational extraction of genomes from metagenomes (GFMs), are largely responsible. Here we propose community standards for reporting the Minimum Information about a Single-Cell Genome (MIxS-SCG) and Minimum Information about Genomes extracted From Metagenomes (MIxS-GFM) specific for Bacteria and Archaea. The standards have been developed in the context of the International Genomics Standards Consortium (GSC) community (Field et al., 2014) and can be viewed as a supplement to other GSC checklists including the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS), Minimum information about a Metagenomic Sequence(s) (MIMS) (Field et al., 2008) and Minimum Information about a Marker Gene Sequence (MIMARKS) (P. Yilmaz et al., 2011). Community-wide acceptance of MIxS-SCG and MIxS-GFM for Bacteria and Archaea will enable broad comparative analyses of genomes from the majority of taxa that remain uncultivated, improving our understanding of microbial function, ecology, and evolution.

  2. TagCleaner: Identification and removal of tag sequences from genomic and metagenomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing metagenomes that were pre-amplified with primer-based methods requires the removal of the additional tag sequences from the datasets. The sequenced reads can contain deletions or insertions due to sequencing limitations, and the primer sequence may contain ambiguous bases. Furthermore, the tag sequence may be unavailable or incorrectly reported. Because of the potential for downstream inaccuracies introduced by unwanted sequence contaminations, it is important to use reliable tools for pre-processing sequence data. Results TagCleaner is a web application developed to automatically identify and remove known or unknown tag sequences allowing insertions and deletions in the dataset. TagCleaner is designed to filter the trimmed reads for duplicates, short reads, and reads with high rates of ambiguous sequences. An additional screening for and splitting of fragment-to-fragment concatenations that gave rise to artificial concatenated sequences can increase the quality of the dataset. Users may modify the different filter parameters according to their own preferences. Conclusions TagCleaner is a publicly available web application that is able to automatically detect and efficiently remove tag sequences from metagenomic datasets. It is easily configurable and provides a user-friendly interface. The interactive web interface facilitates export functionality for subsequent data processing, and is available at http://edwards.sdsu.edu/tagcleaner.

  3. Viral metagenomics on animals as a tool for the detection of zoonoses prior to human infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmam, Sarah; Davoust, Bernard; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-06-10

    Many human viral infections have a zoonotic, i.e., wild or domestic animal, origin. Several zoonotic viruses are transmitted to humans directly via contact with an animal or indirectly via exposure to the urine or feces of infected animals or the bite of a bloodsucking arthropod. If a virus is able to adapt and replicate in its new human host, human-to-human transmissions may occur, possibly resulting in an epidemic, such as the A/H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009. Thus, predicting emerging zoonotic infections is an important challenge for public health officials in the coming decades. The recent development of viral metagenomics, i.e., the characterization of the complete viral diversity isolated from an organism or an environment using high-throughput sequencing technologies, is promising for the surveillance of such diseases and can be accomplished by analyzing the viromes of selected animals and arthropods that are closely in contact with humans. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of viral diversity within such animals (in particular blood-feeding arthropods, wildlife and domestic animals) using metagenomics and present its possible future application for the surveillance of zoonotic and arboviral diseases.

  4. Viral Metagenomics on Animals as a Tool for the Detection of Zoonoses Prior to Human Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmam, Sarah; Davoust, Bernard; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    Many human viral infections have a zoonotic, i.e., wild or domestic animal, origin. Several zoonotic viruses are transmitted to humans directly via contact with an animal or indirectly via exposure to the urine or feces of infected animals or the bite of a bloodsucking arthropod. If a virus is able to adapt and replicate in its new human host, human-to-human transmissions may occur, possibly resulting in an epidemic, such as the A/H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009. Thus, predicting emerging zoonotic infections is an important challenge for public health officials in the coming decades. The recent development of viral metagenomics, i.e., the characterization of the complete viral diversity isolated from an organism or an environment using high-throughput sequencing technologies, is promising for the surveillance of such diseases and can be accomplished by analyzing the viromes of selected animals and arthropods that are closely in contact with humans. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of viral diversity within such animals (in particular blood-feeding arthropods, wildlife and domestic animals) using metagenomics and present its possible future application for the surveillance of zoonotic and arboviral diseases. PMID:24918293

  5. Viral Metagenomics on Animals as a Tool for the Detection of Zoonoses Prior to Human Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Temmam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many human viral infections have a zoonotic, i.e., wild or domestic animal, origin. Several zoonotic viruses are transmitted to humans directly via contact with an animal or indirectly via exposure to the urine or feces of infected animals or the bite of a bloodsucking arthropod. If a virus is able to adapt and replicate in its new human host, human-to-human transmissions may occur, possibly resulting in an epidemic, such as the A/H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009. Thus, predicting emerging zoonotic infections is an important challenge for public health officials in the coming decades. The recent development of viral metagenomics, i.e., the characterization of the complete viral diversity isolated from an organism or an environment using high-throughput sequencing technologies, is promising for the surveillance of such diseases and can be accomplished by analyzing the viromes of selected animals and arthropods that are closely in contact with humans. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of viral diversity within such animals (in particular blood-feeding arthropods, wildlife and domestic animals using metagenomics and present its possible future application for the surveillance of zoonotic and arboviral diseases.

  6. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a BLAST search of all these sequences against a database containing sequences of a host genome (e.g. human genome) will take enormous amount of time and computing resources. In this article, we present a novel alignment-free algorithm, called Eu-Detect, that can detect eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic data ...

  7. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Marguerite Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including, metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique used for decades to study environmental microorganisms but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community independent of identity to known genes by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host. Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex community and its human host.

  8. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    species but also from accidental contamination from the genome of eukaryotic host cells. The latter scenario generally occurs in the case of host-associated metagenomes, e.g. microbes living in human gut. In such cases, one needs to identify and remove contaminating host DNA sequences, since the latter sequences will ...

  9. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alma’abadi, Amani D.

    2015-11-10

    More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  10. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani D. Alma’abadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to a great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  11. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e. contigs) of phage origin in metage-nomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic...

  12. Metagenomic species profiling using universal phylogenetic marker genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunagawa, S.; Mende, D.R.; Zeller, G.; Izquierdo-Carrasco, F.; Berger, S.A.; Kultima, J.R.; Coelho, L.P.; Arumugam, M.; Tap, J.; Nielsen, H.B.; Rasmussen, S.; Brunak, S.; Pedersen, O.; Guarner, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Wang, J.; Li, J.; Doré, J.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Stamatakis, A.; Bork, P.

    2013-01-01

    To quantify known and unknown microorganisms at species-level resolution using shotgun sequencing data, we developed a method that establishes metagenomic operational taxonomic units (mOTUs) based on single-copy phylogenetic marker genes. Applied to 252 human fecal samples, the method revealed that

  13. Network construction and structure detection with metagenomic count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Lin, Shili; Piantadosi, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome plays a critical role in human health. Massive amounts of metagenomic data have been generated with advances in next-generation sequencing technologies that characterize microbial communities via direct isolation and sequencing. How to extract, analyze, and transform these vast amounts of data into useful knowledge is a great challenge to bioinformaticians. Microbial biodiversity research has focused primarily on taxa composition and abundance and less on the co-occurrences among different taxa. However, taxa co-occurrences and their relationships to environmental and clinical conditions are important because network structure may help to understand how microbial taxa function together. We propose a systematic robust approach for bacteria network construction and structure detection using metagenomic count data. Pairwise similarity/distance measures between taxa are proposed by adapting distance measures for samples in ecology. We also extend the sparse inverse covariance approach to a sparse inverse of a similarity matrix from count data for network construction. Our approach is efficient for large metagenomic count data with thousands of bacterial taxa. We evaluate our method with real and simulated data. Our method identifies true and biologically significant network structures efficiently. Network analysis is crucial for detecting subnetwork structures with metagenomic count data. We developed a software tool in MATLAB for network construction and biologically significant module detection. Software MetaNet can be downloaded from http://biostatistics.csmc.edu/MetaNet/.

  14. Metagenomic Analysis of the Ferret Fecal Viral Flora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); V.S. Raj (Stalin); M. Oduber (Minoushka); C.M.E. Schapendonk (Claudia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); L.B.V. Provacia (Lisette); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFerrets are widely used as a small animal model for a number of viral infections, including influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus. To further analyze the microbiological status of ferrets, their fecal viral flora was studied using a metagenomics approach. Novel viruses from the families

  15. MetaGenomic Assembly by Merging (MeGAMerge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-08-03

    "MetaGenomic Assembly by Merging" (MeGAMerge)Is a novel method of merging of multiple genomic assembly or long read data sources for assembly by use of internal trimming/filtering of data, followed by use of two 3rd party tools to merge data by overlap based assembly.

  16. Metagenomic species profiling using universal phylogenetic marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Mende, Daniel R; Zeller, Georg

    2013-01-01

    To quantify known and unknown microorganisms at species-level resolution using shotgun sequencing data, we developed a method that establishes metagenomic operational taxonomic units (mOTUs) based on single-copy phylogenetic marker genes. Applied to 252 human fecal samples, the method revealed...

  17. metaSNV: A tool for metagenomic strain level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Igor Costea

    Full Text Available We present metaSNV, a tool for single nucleotide variant (SNV analysis in metagenomic samples, capable of comparing populations of thousands of bacterial and archaeal species. The tool uses as input nucleotide sequence alignments to reference genomes in standard SAM/BAM format, performs SNV calling for individual samples and across the whole data set, and generates various statistics for individual species including allele frequencies and nucleotide diversity per sample as well as distances and fixation indices across samples. Using published data from 676 metagenomic samples of different sites in the oral cavity, we show that the results of metaSNV are comparable to those of MIDAS, an alternative implementation for metagenomic SNV analysis, while data processing is faster and has a smaller storage footprint. Moreover, we implement a set of distance measures that allow the comparison of genomic variation across metagenomic samples and delineate sample-specific variants to enable the tracking of specific strain populations over time. The implementation of metaSNV is available at: http://metasnv.embl.de/.

  18. Metagenomic Analysis of Koumiss in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-12-01

    : Lactobacillus diolivorans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei, L. curvatus  yeast genus Torula (62.4% and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (37.6%.Conclusion. Thus, the first metagenomic research of koumiss, which was conducted in Kazakhstan, showed significant variations in microbial composition.

  19. Patient and public views about the security and privacy of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in the UK: results from a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Chrysanthi; Reed, Julie E; Marston, Cicely; Lewis, Ruth; Majeed, Azeem; Bell, Derek

    2015-10-14

    Although policy discourses frame integrated Electronic Health Records (EHRs) as essential for contemporary healthcare systems, increased information sharing often raises concerns among patients and the public. This paper examines patient and public views about the security and privacy of EHRs used for health provision, research and policy in the UK. Sequential mixed methods study with a cross-sectional survey (in 2011) followed by focus group discussions (in 2012-2013). Survey participants (N = 5331) were recruited from primary and secondary care settings in West London (UK). Complete data for 2761 (51.8 %) participants were included in the final analysis for this paper. The survey results were discussed in 13 focus groups with people living with a range of different health conditions, and in 4 mixed focus groups with patients, health professionals and researchers (total N = 120). Qualitative data were analysed thematically. In the survey, 79 % of participants reported that they would worry about the security of their record if this was part of a national EHR system and 71 % thought the National Health Service (NHS) was unable to guarantee EHR safety at the time this work was carried out. Almost half (47 %) responded that EHRs would be less secure compared with the way their health record was held at the time of the survey. Of those who reported being worried about EHR security, many would nevertheless support their development (55 %), while 12 % would not support national EHRs and a sizeable proportion (33 %) were undecided. There were also variations by age, ethnicity and education. In focus group discussions participants weighed up perceived benefits against potential security and privacy threats from wider sharing of information, as well as discussing other perceived risks: commercial exploitation, lack of accountability, data inaccuracies, prejudice and inequalities in health provision. Patient and public worries about the security risks associated

  20. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigliucci, Federica; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15–50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms’ profiles as indicators of their origin. - Highlights: • Sludge- and green- based biosolids analysed by metagenomics. • Biosolids may introduce microbial hazards in the food chain. • Metagenomics enables tracking biosolids’ sources.

  1. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk.

  2. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner, Marsha W; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-12-31

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource of information for genome and metagenome projects world-wide. GOLD provides access to complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata through pre-computed lists and a search page. The database currently incorporates information for more than 2900 sequencing projects, of which 639 have been completed and the data deposited in the public databases. GOLD is constantly expanding to provide metadata information related to the project and the organism and is compliant with the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS) specifications.

  3. [Mini review] metagenomic studies of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Hayedeh

    2015-10-23

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied amongst marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmolyte C1 oxidation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1–3 °C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the

  4. Assessing the process of designing and implementing electronic health records in a statewide public health system: the case of Colima, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Palacio-Mejía, Lina Sofia; Lara-Esqueda, Agustín; Silvestre, Eva; Agudelo-Botero, Marcela; Diana, Mark L; Hotchkiss, David R; Plaza, Beatriz; Sanchez Parbul, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The findings of a case study assessing the design and implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the public health system of Colima, Mexico, its perceived benefits and limitations, and recommendations for improving the implementation process are presented. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were used to examine the experience of the actors and stakeholders participating in the design and implementation of EHRs. Results indicate that the main driving force behind the use of EHRs was to improve reporting to the two of the main government health and social development programs. Significant challenges to the success of the EHR include resistance by physicians to use the ICD-10 to code diagnoses, insufficient attention to recurrent resources needed to maintain the system, and pressure from federal programs to establish parallel information systems. Operating funds and more importantly political commitment are required to ensure sustainability of the EHRs in Colimaima.

  5. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  6. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, David T; Schoenfeld, Thomas

    2008-09-17

    Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC), where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of the Octopus and Bear Paw metagenomic contigs

  7. MetAnnotate: function-specific taxonomic profiling and comparison of metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Pavel; Lobb, Briallen; Kurtz, Daniel A; Neufeld, Josh D; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-11-05

    Metagenomes provide access to the taxonomic composition and functional capabilities of microbial communities. Although metagenomic analysis methods exist for estimating overall community composition or metabolic potential, identifying specific taxa that encode specific functions or pathways of interest can be more challenging. Here we present MetAnnotate, which addresses the common question: "which organisms perform my function of interest within my metagenome(s) of interest?" MetAnnotate uses profile hidden Markov models to analyze shotgun metagenomes for genes and pathways of interest, classifies retrieved sequences either through a phylogenetic placement or best hit approach, and enables comparison of these profiles between metagenomes. Based on a simulated metagenome dataset, the tool achieves high taxonomic classification accuracy for a broad range of genes, including both markers of community abundance and specific biological pathways. Lastly, we demonstrate MetAnnotate by analyzing for cobalamin (vitamin B12) synthesis genes across hundreds of aquatic metagenomes in a fraction of the time required by the commonly used Basic Local Alignment Search Tool top hit approach. MetAnnotate is multi-threaded and installable as a local web application or command-line tool on Linux systems. Metannotate is a useful framework for general and/or function-specific taxonomic profiling and comparison of metagenomes.

  8. The new science of metagenomics: revealing the secrets of our microbial planet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Metagenomics; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... The emerging field of metagenomics offers a new way of exploring the microbial world that will transform modern microbiology and lead to practical applications in medicine, agriculture, alternative...

  9. Metagenomic discovery of polybrominated diphenyl ether biosynthesis by marine sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Sheila; Taton, Arnaud; Schorn, Michelle A.; Busch, Julia; Lin, Zhenjian; Schmidt, Eric W.; Jensen, Paul R.; Paul, Valerie J.; Biggs, Jason S.; Golden, James W.; Allen, Eric E.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2017-01-01

    Naturally produced polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) pervade the marine environment and structurally resemble toxic man-made brominated flame retardants. PBDEs bioaccumulate in marine animals and are likely transferred to the human food chain. However, the biogenic basis for PBDE production in one of their most prolific sources, marine sponges of the order Dysideidae, remains unidentified. Here, we report the discovery of PBDE biosynthetic gene clusters within sponge microbiome-associated cyanobacterial endosymbionts by employing an unbiased metagenome mining approach. By expression of PBDE biosynthetic genes in heterologous cyanobacterial hosts, we correlate the structural diversity of naturally produced PBDEs to modifications within PBDE biosynthetic gene clusters in multiple sponge holobionts. Our results establish the genetic and molecular foundation for the production of PBDEs in one of the most abundant natural sources of these molecules, further setting the stage for a metagenomic-based inventory of other PBDE sources in the marine environment. PMID:28319100

  10. Towards standards for human fecal sample processing in metagenomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costea, Paul I; Zeller, Georg; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Pelletier, Eric; Alberti, Adriana; Levenez, Florence; Tramontano, Melanie; Driessen, Marja; Hercog, Rajna; Jung, Ferris-Elias; Kultima, Jens Roat; Hayward, Matthew R; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Bertrand, Laurie; Blaut, Michael; Brown, Jillian R M; Carton, Thomas; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Daigneault, Michelle; Derrien, Muriel; Druesne, Anne; de Vos, Willem M; Finlay, B Brett; Flint, Harry J; Guarner, Francisco; Hattori, Masahira; Heilig, Hans; Luna, Ruth Ann; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Junick, Jana; Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Langella, Philippe; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Mai, Volker; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Martin, Jennifer C; Mery, Clémentine; Morita, Hidetoshi; O'Toole, Paul W; Orvain, Céline; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Penders, John; Persson, Søren; Pons, Nicolas; Popova, Milena; Salonen, Anne; Saulnier, Delphine; Scott, Karen P; Singh, Bhagirath; Slezak, Kathleen; Veiga, Patrick; Versalovic, James; Zhao, Liping; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Dore, Joel; Bork, Peer

    2017-11-01

    Technical variation in metagenomic analysis must be minimized to confidently assess the contributions of microbiota to human health. Here we tested 21 representative DNA extraction protocols on the same fecal samples and quantified differences in observed microbial community composition. We compared them with differences due to library preparation and sample storage, which we contrasted with observed biological variation within the same specimen or within an individual over time. We found that DNA extraction had the largest effect on the outcome of metagenomic analysis. To rank DNA extraction protocols, we considered resulting DNA quantity and quality, and we ascertained biases in estimates of community diversity and the ratio between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We recommend a standardized DNA extraction method for human fecal samples, for which transferability across labs was established and which was further benchmarked using a mock community of known composition. Its adoption will improve comparability of human gut microbiome studies and facilitate meta-analyses.

  11. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  12. A metagenomic framework for the study of airborne microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial content of the air has important scientific, health, and economic implications. While studies have primarily characterized the taxonomic content of air samples by sequencing the 16S or 18S ribosomal RNA gene, direct analysis of the genomic content of airborne microorganisms has not been possible due to the extremely low density of biological material in airborne environments. We developed sampling and amplification methods to enable adequate DNA recovery to allow metagenomic profiling of air samples collected from indoor and outdoor environments. Air samples were collected from a large urban building, a medical center, a house, and a pier. Analyses of metagenomic data generated from these samples reveal airborne communities with a high degree of diversity and different genera abundance profiles. The identities of many of the taxonomic groups and protein families also allows for the identification of the likely sources of the sampled airborne bacteria.

  13. Metagenome of a versatile chemolithoautotroph from expanding oceanic dead zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David A; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles G; Song, Young C; Wright, Jody J; Tringe, Susannah G; Tortell, Philippe D; Hallam, Steven J

    2009-10-23

    Oxygen minimum zones, also known as oceanic "dead zones," are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding because of global warming. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, they support a cryptic microbiota whose metabolic activities affect nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here, we report metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated oxygen minimum zone microbe (SUP05) related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur oxidation, and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water-column redox states. Our analysis provides a genomic foundation for understanding the ecological and biogeochemical role of pelagic SUP05 in oxygen-deficient oceanic waters and its potential sensitivity to environmental changes.

  14. Extremozymes from metagenome: Potential applications in food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahejibin; Sathya, T A

    2017-06-12

    The long-established use of enzymes for food processing and product formulation has resulted in an increased enzyme market compounding to 7.0% annual growth rate. Advancements in molecular biology and recognition that enzymes with specific properties have application for industrial production of infant, baby and functional foods boosted research toward sourcing the genes of microorganisms for enzymes with distinctive properties. In this regard, functional metagenomics for extremozymes has gained attention on the premise that such enzymes can catalyze specific reactions. Hence, metagenomics that can isolate functional genes of unculturable extremophilic microorganisms has expanded attention as a promising tool. Developments in this field of research in relation to food sector are reviewed.

  15. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell-cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed.

  16. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    reads in ten real metagenomes compared to programs based on genomic k-mers. Kaiju can process up to millions of reads per minute, and its memory footprint is below 5 GB of RAM, allowing the analysis on a standard PC. The program is available under the GPL3 license at: github.com/bioinformatics-centre/kaiju...... and genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy...... heuristic. We show in a genome exclusion study that Kaiju can classify more reads with higher sensitivity and similar precision compared to fast k-mer based classifiers, especially in genera that are underrepresented in reference databases. We also demonstrate that Kaiju classifies more than twice as many...

  17. The Imperious Need of Change Of Law 6.015/1973: A Record Public Regarding Transsexuality and the Right to Social Name Without the Power of Judicial Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Mattos do Amaral

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comes this study on changing the legal name of origin by social behalf of transgender individuals, without the need for judiciary intervention. To this end, it is imperative to change the art. 58 of Law 6.015/1973 - Laws of Public Records. Justified this amendment by the legislative admissibility already portrayed by the State in the use of the social name by transsexuals, to identify themselves various situations, including in public bodies and activities. Depicts the brief study the problem of discrimination suffered by these people in their daily lives, embedded in a society where intolerance and discrimination permeate the social fabric, fueling abuses and promoting the kick man on his journey. Relevant is the subject of analysis, as regards the conquest of rights by transgender individuals and the consequent non-discrimination in society of sexual freedoms, combined with the change in their marital name for the social name as well as the identification of sex without that to it have that bail laws that dignify man and the Judiciary. Still, due to the subject, it shows the need for without the need for transsexual name change to undergo a sex reassignment process on the grounds that such a procedure is not necessary to register peace and comfort in their transgender status.

  18. A prepared speech in front of a pre-recorded audience: subjective, physiological, and neuroendocrine responses to the Leiden Public Speaking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, P Michiel; Bokhorst, Caroline L; Miers, Anne C; Sumter, Sindy R; Kallen, Victor L; van Pelt, Johannes; Blöte, Anke W

    2009-10-01

    This study describes a new public speaking protocol for youth. The main question asked whether a speech prepared at home and given in front of a pre-recorded audience creates a condition of social-evaluative threat. Findings showed that, on average, this task elicits a moderate stress response in a community sample of 83 12- to 15-year-old adolescents. During the speech, participants reported feeling more nervous and having higher heart rate and sweatiness of the hands than at baseline or recovery. Likewise, physiological (heart rate and skin conductance) and neuroendocrine (cortisol) activity were higher during the speech than at baseline or recovery. Additionally, an anticipation effect was observed: baseline levels were higher than recovery levels for most variables. Taking the anticipation and speech response together, a substantial cortisol response was observed for 55% of participants. The findings indicate that the Leiden Public Speaking Task might be particularly suited to investigate individual differences in sensitivity to social-evaluative situations.

  19. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of ...

  20. Metagenome-derived haloalkane dehalogenases with novel catalytic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotík, Michael; Vaňáček, P.; Kuňka, A.; Prokop, Z.; Dambrovský, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 16 (2017), s. 6385-6397 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0137; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015047; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Haloalkane dehalogenase * Metagenomic DNA * Heterologous production Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.420, year: 2016

  1. Quantitative metagenomics reveals unique gut microbiome biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; He, Zhixing; Zhong, Wendi; Fan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Linshuang; Li, Haichang; Wu, Chunyan; Hu, Changfeng; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Jia; Cai, Shunfeng; Wang, Dawei; Huang, Yun; Breban, Maxime; Qin, Nan

    2017-01-01

    Background The assessment and characterization of the gut microbiome has become a focus of research in the area of human autoimmune diseases. Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease and evidence showed that ankylosing spondylitis may be a microbiome-driven disease. Results To investigate the relationship between the gut microbiome and ankylosing spondylitis, a quantitative metagenomics study based on deep shotgun sequencing was performed, using gut microbial DNA from 211 ...

  2. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules.

  3. Forest harvesting reduces the soil metagenomic potential for biomass decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Erick; Kranabetter, J M; Hope, Graeme; Maas, Kendra R; Hallam, Steven; Mohn, William W

    2015-11-01

    Soil is the key resource that must be managed to ensure sustainable forest productivity. Soil microbial communities mediate numerous essential ecosystem functions, and recent studies show that forest harvesting alters soil community composition. From a long-term soil productivity study site in a temperate coniferous forest in British Columbia, 21 forest soil shotgun metagenomes were generated, totaling 187 Gb. A method to analyze unassembled metagenome reads from the complex community was optimized and validated. The subsequent metagenome analysis revealed that, 12 years after forest harvesting, there were 16% and 8% reductions in relative abundances of biomass decomposition genes in the organic and mineral soil layers, respectively. Organic and mineral soil layers differed markedly in genetic potential for biomass degradation, with the organic layer having greater potential and being more strongly affected by harvesting. Gene families were disproportionately affected, and we identified 41 gene families consistently affected by harvesting, including families involved in lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin degradation. The results strongly suggest that harvesting profoundly altered below-ground cycling of carbon and other nutrients at this site, with potentially important consequences for forest regeneration. Thus, it is important to determine whether these changes foreshadow long-term changes in forest productivity or resilience and whether these changes are broadly characteristic of harvested forests.

  4. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Aaron E; Jospin, Guillaume; Lowe, Eric; Matsen, Frederick A; Bik, Holly M; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection. In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata. These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454).

  5. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Darling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection.In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata.These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454.

  6. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai; Wang, Manyuan; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  7. Reconstruction of ribosomal RNA genes from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics has a great potential for describing the 16S rRNA gene diversity of microbial communities. However current approaches using this 16S rRNA gene information to describe community diversity suffer from low taxonomic resolution or chimera problems. Here we describe a new strategy that involves stringent assembly and data filtering to reconstruct full-length 16S rRNA genes from metagenomicpyrosequencing data. Simulations showed that reconstructed 16S rRNA genes provided a true picture of the community diversity, had minimal rates of chimera formation and gave taxonomic resolution down to genus level. The strategy was furthermore compared to PCR-based methods to determine the microbial diversity in two marine sponges. This showed that about 30% of the abundant phylotypes reconstructed from metagenomic data failed to be amplified by PCR. Our approach is readily applicable to existing metagenomic datasets and is expected to lead to the discovery of new microbial phylotypes.

  8. MOCAT: a metagenomics assembly and gene prediction toolkit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Roat Kultima

    Full Text Available MOCAT is a highly configurable, modular pipeline for fast, standardized processing of single or paired-end sequencing data generated by the Illumina platform. The pipeline uses state-of-the-art programs to quality control, map, and assemble reads from metagenomic samples sequenced at a depth of several billion base pairs, and predict protein-coding genes on assembled metagenomes. Mapping against reference databases allows for read extraction or removal, as well as abundance calculations. Relevant statistics for each processing step can be summarized into multi-sheet Excel documents and queryable SQL databases. MOCAT runs on UNIX machines and integrates seamlessly with the SGE and PBS queuing systems, commonly used to process large datasets. The open source code and modular architecture allow users to modify or exchange the programs that are utilized in the various processing steps. Individual processing steps and parameters were benchmarked and tested on artificial, real, and simulated metagenomes resulting in an improvement of selected quality metrics. MOCAT can be freely downloaded at http://www.bork.embl.de/mocat/.

  9. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, (China); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro, E-mail: abei@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  10. Revealing large metagenomic regions through long DNA fragment hybridization capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Peyret, Pierre

    2017-03-14

    High-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized genomic analysis, including the de novo assembly of whole genomes from single organisms or metagenomic samples. However, due to the limited capacity of short-read sequence data to assemble complex or low coverage regions, genomes are typically fragmented, leading to draft genomes with numerous underexplored large genomic regions. Revealing these missing sequences is a major goal to resolve concerns in numerous biological studies. To overcome these limitations, we developed an innovative target enrichment method for the reconstruction of large unknown genomic regions. Based on a hybridization capture strategy, this approach enables the enrichment of large genomic regions allowing the reconstruction of tens of kilobase pairs flanking a short, targeted DNA sequence. Applied to a metagenomic soil sample targeting the linA gene, the biomarker of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation, our method permitted the enrichment of the gene and its flanking regions leading to the reconstruction of several contigs and complete plasmids exceeding tens of kilobase pairs surrounding linA. Thus, through gene association and genome reconstruction, we identified microbial species involved in HCH degradation which constitute targets to improve biostimulation treatments. This new hybridization capture strategy makes surveying and deconvoluting complex genomic regions possible through large genomic regions enrichment and allows the efficient exploration of metagenomic diversity. Indeed, this approach enables to assign identity and function to microorganisms in natural environments, one of the ultimate goals of microbial ecology.

  11. Metagenomics reveals pervasive bacterial populations and reduced community diversity across the Alaska tundra ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Robert Johnston

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available How soil microbial communities contrast with respect to taxonomic and functional composition within and between ecosystems remains an unresolved question that is central to predicting how global anthropogenic change will affect soil functioning and services. In particular, it remains unclear how small-scale observations of soil communities based on the typical volume sampled (1-2 grams are generalizable to ecosystem-scale responses and processes. This is especially relevant for remote, northern latitude soils, which are challenging to sample and are also thought to be more vulnerable to climate change compared to temperate soils. Here, we employed well-replicated shotgun metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to characterize community composition and metabolic potential in Alaskan tundra soils, combining our own datasets with those publically available from distant tundra and temperate grassland and agriculture habitats. We found that the abundance of many taxa and metabolic functions differed substantially between tundra soil metagenomes relative to those from temperate soils, and that a high degree of OTU-sharing exists between tundra locations. Tundra soils were an order of magnitude less complex than their temperate counterparts, allowing for near-complete coverage of microbial community richness (~92% breadth by sequencing, and the recovery of twenty-seven high-quality, almost complete (>80% completeness population bins. These population bins, collectively, made up to ~10% of the metagenomic datasets, and represented diverse taxonomic groups and metabolic lifestyles tuned toward sulfur cycling, hydrogen metabolism, methanotrophy, and organic matter oxidation. Several population bins, including members of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were also present in geographically distant (~100-530 km apart tundra habitats (full genome representation and up to 99.6% genome-derived average nucleotide identity. Collectively

  12. Deconvoluting simulated metagenomes: the performance of hard- and soft- clustering algorithms applied to metagenomic chromosome conformation capture (3C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Z. DeMaere

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Chromosome conformation capture, coupled with high throughput DNA sequencing in protocols like Hi-C and 3C-seq, has been proposed as a viable means of generating data to resolve the genomes of microorganisms living in naturally occuring environments. Metagenomic Hi-C and 3C-seq datasets have begun to emerge, but the feasibility of resolving genomes when closely related organisms (strain-level diversity are present in the sample has not yet been systematically characterised. Methods We developed a computational simulation pipeline for metagenomic 3C and Hi-C sequencing to evaluate the accuracy of genomic reconstructions at, above, and below an operationally defined species boundary. We simulated datasets and measured accuracy over a wide range of parameters. Five clustering algorithms were evaluated (2 hard, 3 soft using an adaptation of the extended B-cubed validation measure. Results When all genomes in a sample are below 95% sequence identity, all of the tested clustering algorithms performed well. When sequence data contains genomes above 95% identity (our operational definition of strain-level diversity, a naive soft-clustering extension of the Louvain method achieves the highest performance. Discussion Previously, only hard-clustering algorithms have been applied to metagenomic 3C and Hi-C data, yet none of these perform well when strain-level diversity exists in a metagenomic sample. Our simple extension of the Louvain method performed the best in these scenarios, however, accuracy remained well below the levels observed for samples without strain-level diversity. Strain resolution is also highly dependent on the amount of available 3C sequence data, suggesting that depth of sequencing must be carefully considered during experimental design. Finally, there appears to be great scope to improve the accuracy of strain resolution through further algorithm development.

  13. NeSSM: a Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metagenomics can reveal the vast majority of microbes that have been missed by traditional cultivation-based methods. Due to its extremely wide range of application areas, fast metagenome sequencing simulation systems with high fidelity are in great demand to facilitate the development and comparison of metagenomics analysis tools. RESULTS: We present here a customizable metagenome simulation system: NeSSM (Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics. Combining complete genomes currently available, a community composition table, and sequencing parameters, it can simulate metagenome sequencing better than existing systems. Sequencing error models based on the explicit distribution of errors at each base and sequencing coverage bias are incorporated in the simulation. In order to improve the fidelity of simulation, tools are provided by NeSSM to estimate the sequencing error models, sequencing coverage bias and the community composition directly from existing metagenome sequencing data. Currently, NeSSM supports single-end and pair-end sequencing for both 454 and Illumina platforms. In addition, a GPU (graphics processing units version of NeSSM is also developed to accelerate the simulation. By comparing the simulated sequencing data from NeSSM with experimental metagenome sequencing data, we have demonstrated that NeSSM performs better in many aspects than existing popular metagenome simulators, such as MetaSim, GemSIM and Grinder. The GPU version of NeSSM is more than one-order of magnitude faster than MetaSim. CONCLUSIONS: NeSSM is a fast simulation system for high-throughput metagenome sequencing. It can be helpful to develop tools and evaluate strategies for metagenomics analysis and it's freely available for academic users at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/NeSSM.php.

  14. Viral indicators for fecal contamination - a one-year viral metagenomic study of treatment efficiency in danish waste water treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmér, Maria; Stranddorf, Kasper; Seidel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Viral pathogens in irrigation water are a major threat to public health due to their possibility to cause disease in humans. When using reclaimed water for irrigation it is therefore important to make sure that the water is free from pathogens which can contaminate the crops. In this study we...... are therefore using metagenomics sequencing with the aim to map the viriome in different water sources. In addition we investigate the possibility to use Human Adenovirus (HAdV) or JC Polyomavirus (JCPyV) as indicator for human fecal contamination. Water has been sampled monthly throughout the treatment process...... from two urban waste water treatment plants in Copenhagen. All samples are investigated for their viral content and the presence of pathogens by metagenomic sequencing and analyzed specifically for HAdV, JCPyV, norovirus GI and GII (NoV GI and GII) using quantitative (q)PCR. Preliminary qPCR results...

  15. Metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2016-07-15

    Oceanic microbial diversity covaries with physicochemical parameters. Temperature, for example, explains approximately half of global variation in surface taxonomic abundance. It is unknown, however, whether covariation patterns hold over narrower parameter gradients and spatial scales, and extending to mesopelagic depths. We collected and sequenced 45 epipelagic and mesopelagic microbial metagenomes on a meridional transect through the eastern Red Sea. We asked which environmental parameters explain the most variation in relative abundances of taxonomic groups, gene ortholog groups, and pathways—at a spatial scale of <2000 km, along narrow but well-defined latitudinal and depth-dependent gradients. We also asked how microbes are adapted to gradients and extremes in irradiance, temperature, salinity, and nutrients, examining the responses of individual gene ortholog groups to these parameters. Functional and taxonomic metrics were equally well explained (75–79%) by environmental parameters. However, only functional and not taxonomic covariation patterns were conserved when comparing with an intruding water mass with different physicochemical properties. Temperature explained the most variation in each metric, followed by nitrate, chlorophyll, phosphate, and salinity. That nitrate explained more variation than phosphate suggested nitrogen limitation, consistent with low surface N:P ratios. Covariation of gene ortholog groups with environmental parameters revealed patterns of functional adaptation to the challenging Red Sea environment: high irradiance, temperature, salinity, and low nutrients. Nutrient-acquisition gene ortholog groups were anti-correlated with concentrations of their respective nutrient species, recapturing trends previously observed across much larger distances and environmental gradients. This dataset of metagenomic covariation along densely sampled environmental gradients includes online data exploration supplements, serving as a community

  16. Construction of a dairy microbial genome catalog opens new perspectives for the metagenomic analysis of dairy fermented products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mathieu; Hébert, Agnès; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Rasmussen, Simon; Monnet, Christophe; Pons, Nicolas; Delbès, Céline; Loux, Valentin; Batto, Jean-Michel; Leonard, Pierre; Kennedy, Sean; Ehrlich, Stanislas Dusko; Pop, Mihai; Montel, Marie-Christine; Irlinger, Françoise; Renault, Pierre

    2014-12-13

    Microbial communities of traditional cheeses are complex and insufficiently characterized. The origin, safety and functional role in cheese making of these microbial communities are still not well understood. Metagenomic analysis of these communities by high throughput shotgun sequencing is a promising approach to characterize their genomic and functional profiles. Such analyses, however, critically depend on the availability of appropriate reference genome databases against which the sequencing reads can be aligned. We built a reference genome catalog suitable for short read metagenomic analysis using a low-cost sequencing strategy. We selected 142 bacteria isolated from dairy products belonging to 137 different species and 67 genera, and succeeded to reconstruct the draft genome of 117 of them at a standard or high quality level, including isolates from the genera Kluyvera, Luteococcus and Marinilactibacillus, still missing from public database. To demonstrate the potential of this catalog, we analysed the microbial composition of the surface of two smear cheeses and one blue-veined cheese, and showed that a significant part of the microbiota of these traditional cheeses was composed of microorganisms newly sequenced in our study. Our study provides data, which combined with publicly available genome references, represents the most expansive catalog to date of cheese-associated bacteria. Using this extended dairy catalog, we revealed the presence in traditional cheese of dominant microorganisms not deliberately inoculated, mainly Gram-negative genera such as Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis or Psychrobacter immobilis, that may contribute to the characteristics of cheese produced through traditional methods.

  17. BioCreative Workshops for DOE Genome Sciences: Text Mining for Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cathy H. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology; Hirschman, Lynette [The MITRE Corporation, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-10-29

    The objective of this project was to host BioCreative workshops to define and develop text mining tasks to meet the needs of the Genome Sciences community, focusing on metadata information extraction in metagenomics. Following the successful introduction of metagenomics at the BioCreative IV workshop, members of the metagenomics community and BioCreative communities continued discussion to identify candidate topics for a BioCreative metagenomics track for BioCreative V. Of particular interest was the capture of environmental and isolation source information from text. The outcome was to form a “community of interest” around work on the interactive EXTRACT system, which supported interactive tagging of environmental and species data. This experiment is included in the BioCreative V virtual issue of Database. In addition, there was broad participation by members of the metagenomics community in the panels held at BioCreative V, leading to valuable exchanges between the text mining developers and members of the metagenomics research community. These exchanges are reflected in a number of the overview and perspective pieces also being captured in the BioCreative V virtual issue. Overall, this conversation has exposed the metagenomics researchers to the possibilities of text mining, and educated the text mining developers to the specific needs of the metagenomics community.

  18. A metagenomic snapshot of taxonomic and functional diversity in an alpine glacier cryoconite ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Pachebat, Justin A; Swain, Martin; Hegarty, Matt; Rassner, Sara M E; Hodson, Andrew J; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D L; Sattler, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Cryoconite is a microbe–mineral aggregate which darkens the ice surface of glaciers. Microbial process and marker gene PCR-dependent measurements reveal active and diverse cryoconite microbial communities on polar glaciers. Here, we provide the first report of a cryoconite metagenome and culture-independent study of alpine cryoconite microbial diversity. We assembled 1.2 Gbp of metagenomic DNA sequenced using an Illumina HiScanSQ from cryoconite holes across the ablation zone of Rotmoosferner in the Austrian Alps. The metagenome revealed a bacterially-dominated community, with Proteobacteria (62% of bacterial-assigned contigs) and Bacteroidetes (14%) considerably more abundant than Cyanobacteria (2.5%). Streptophyte DNA dominated the eukaryotic metagenome. Functional genes linked to N, Fe, S and P cycling illustrated an acquisitive trend and a nitrogen cycle based upon efficient ammonia recycling. A comparison of 32 metagenome datasets revealed a similarity in functional profiles between the cryoconite and metagenomes characterized from other cold microbe–mineral aggregates. Overall, the metagenomic snapshot reveals the cryoconite ecosystem of this alpine glacier as dependent on scavenging carbon and nutrients from allochthonous sources, in particular mosses transported by wind from ice-marginal habitats, consistent with net heterotrophy indicated by productivity measurements. A transition from singular snapshots of cryoconite metagenomes to comparative analyses is advocated. (letter)

  19. Contamination of the Arctic reflected in microbial metagenomes from the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Cameron, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    interact with contamination in the Arctic is limited. Through shotgun metagenomic data and binned genomes from metagenomes we show that microbial communities, sampled from multiple surface ice locations on the Greenland ice sheet, have the potential for resistance to and degradation of contaminants....... These results indicate that, from a microbiological perspective, the Greenland ice sheet cannot be seen as a pristine environment....

  20. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  1. A metagenomic analysis of pandemic influenza A (2009 H1N1 infection in patients from North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L Greninger

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although metagenomics has been previously employed for pathogen discovery, its cost and complexity have prevented its use as a practical front-line diagnostic for unknown infectious diseases. Here we demonstrate the utility of two metagenomics-based strategies, a pan-viral microarray (Virochip and deep sequencing, for the identification and characterization of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus. Using nasopharyngeal swabs collected during the earliest stages of the pandemic in Mexico, Canada, and the United States (n = 17, the Virochip was able to detect a novel virus most closely related to swine influenza viruses without a priori information. Deep sequencing yielded reads corresponding to 2009 H1N1 influenza in each sample (percentage of aligned sequences corresponding to 2009 H1N1 ranging from 0.0011% to 10.9%, with up to 97% coverage of the influenza genome in one sample. Detection of 2009 H1N1 by deep sequencing was possible even at titers near the limits of detection for specific RT-PCR, and the percentage of sequence reads was linearly correlated with virus titer. Deep sequencing also provided insights into the upper respiratory microbiota and host gene expression in response to 2009 H1N1 infection. An unbiased analysis combining sequence data from all 17 outbreak samples revealed that 90% of the 2009 H1N1 genome could be assembled de novo without the use of any reference sequence, including assembly of several near full-length genomic segments. These results indicate that a streamlined metagenomics detection strategy can potentially replace the multiple conventional diagnostic tests required to investigate an outbreak of a novel pathogen, and provide a blueprint for comprehensive diagnosis of unexplained acute illnesses or outbreaks in clinical and public health settings.

  2. MetaGenSense: A web-application for analysis and exploration of high throughput sequencing metagenomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Caro, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The detection and characterization of emerging infectious agents has been a continuing public health concern. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) or Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have proven to be promising approaches for efficient and unbiased detection of pathogens in complex biological samples, providing access to comprehensive analyses. As NGS approaches typically yield millions of putatively representative reads per sample, efficient data management and visualization resources have become mandatory. Most usually, those resources are implemented through a dedicated Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS), solely to provide perspective regarding the available information. We developed an easily deployable web-interface, facilitating management and bioinformatics analysis of metagenomics data-samples. It was engineered to run associated and dedicated Galaxy workflows for the detection and eventually classification of pathogens. The web application allows easy interaction with existing Galaxy metagenomic workflows, facilitates the organization, exploration and aggregation of the most relevant sample-specific sequences among millions of genomic sequences, allowing them to determine their relative abundance, and associate them to the most closely related organism or pathogen. The user-friendly Django-Based interface, associates the users’ input data and its metadata through a bio-IT provided set of resources (a Galaxy instance, and both sufficient storage and grid computing power). Galaxy is used to handle and analyze the user’s input data from loading, indexing, mapping, assembly and DB-searches. Interaction between our application and Galaxy is ensured by the BioBlend library, which gives API-based access to Galaxy’s main features. Metadata about samples, runs, as well as the workflow results are stored in the LIMS. For metagenomic classification and exploration purposes, we show, as a proof of concept, that integration of intuitive

  3. Vikodak--A Modular Framework for Inferring Functional Potential of Microbial Communities from 16S Metagenomic Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Nagpal

    Full Text Available The overall metabolic/functional potential of any given environmental niche is a function of the sum total of genes/proteins/enzymes that are encoded and expressed by various interacting microbes residing in that niche. Consequently, prior (collated information pertaining to genes, enzymes encoded by the resident microbes can aid in indirectly (reconstructing/ inferring the metabolic/ functional potential of a given microbial community (given its taxonomic abundance profile. In this study, we present Vikodak--a multi-modular package that is based on the above assumption and automates inferring and/ or comparing the functional characteristics of an environment using taxonomic abundance generated from one or more environmental sample datasets. With the underlying assumptions of co-metabolism and independent contributions of different microbes in a community, a concerted effort has been made to accommodate microbial co-existence patterns in various modules incorporated in Vikodak.Validation experiments on over 1400 metagenomic samples have confirmed the utility of Vikodak in (a deciphering enzyme abundance profiles of any KEGG metabolic pathway, (b functional resolution of distinct metagenomic environments, (c inferring patterns of functional interaction between resident microbes, and (d automating statistical comparison of functional features of studied microbiomes. Novel features incorporated in Vikodak also facilitate automatic removal of false positives and spurious functional predictions.With novel provisions for comprehensive functional analysis, inclusion of microbial co-existence pattern based algorithms, automated inter-environment comparisons; in-depth analysis of individual metabolic pathways and greater flexibilities at the user end, Vikodak is expected to be an important value addition to the family of existing tools for 16S based function prediction.A web implementation of Vikodak can be publicly accessed at: http://metagenomics

  4. MetaGenSense: A web-application for analysis and exploration of high throughput sequencing metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Damien; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Caro, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The detection and characterization of emerging infectious agents has been a continuing public health concern. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) or Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have proven to be promising approaches for efficient and unbiased detection of pathogens in complex biological samples, providing access to comprehensive analyses. As NGS approaches typically yield millions of putatively representative reads per sample, efficient data management and visualization resources have become mandatory. Most usually, those resources are implemented through a dedicated Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS), solely to provide perspective regarding the available information. We developed an easily deployable web-interface, facilitating management and bioinformatics analysis of metagenomics data-samples. It was engineered to run associated and dedicated Galaxy workflows for the detection and eventually classification of pathogens. The web application allows easy interaction with existing Galaxy metagenomic workflows, facilitates the organization, exploration and aggregation of the most relevant sample-specific sequences among millions of genomic sequences, allowing them to determine their relative abundance, and associate them to the most closely related organism or pathogen. The user-friendly Django-Based interface, associates the users' input data and its metadata through a bio-IT provided set of resources (a Galaxy instance, and both sufficient storage and grid computing power). Galaxy is used to handle and analyze the user's input data from loading, indexing, mapping, assembly and DB-searches. Interaction between our application and Galaxy is ensured by the BioBlend library, which gives API-based access to Galaxy's main features. Metadata about samples, runs, as well as the workflow results are stored in the LIMS. For metagenomic classification and exploration purposes, we show, as a proof of concept, that integration of intuitive

  5. Preventive management plans recorded by Dental Therapists and Oral Health Therapists using clinical vignettes for adolescents accessing Public Oral Health Services, NSW Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoe, Angela V; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Taylor, Jane; Blinkhorn, Fiona A

    2015-04-25

    To investigate factors that influence Dental Therapists and Oral Health Therapists (Therapists) plan preventive oral health care for adolescents attending New South Wales (NSW) Public Oral Health Services. A cross-sectional postal survey using two clinical vignettes were used to record the preventive care treatment plans offered by Therapists working across sixteen NSW Local Health Districts (LHDs). Data were tabulated and Chi square statistics were used in the analysis. One hundred and seventeen Therapists returned questionnaires giving a 64.6% response rate. The participants highlighted the importance of offering oral hygiene instruction (97.0%); dietary advice (95.0%) and topical fluoride applications (74.0%). Recommended home use products included fluoride toothpaste 5000ppmF (59.0%) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous phosphates plus fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste (57.7%). Over 50% used fissure sealants. More respondents (88%) would utilise Motivational Interviewing strategies for a patient with dental caries concerns, however, only 63% would use this technique for a patient in pain (pdental disease, suggesting a need for Clinical Directors to consider providing more advice to Therapists on the scientific basis of preventing dental caries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of novel open reading frames from metagenomic libraries generated from extremophilic organisms: application of metagenomics and high throughput screening for novel enzyme isolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available South African mines. Genomic DNA was isolated from these biofilms, and various metagenomic libraries generated. These libraries were in turn screened for industrially important enzymes, in particular proteases and lipases. Resultant hits had plasmid DNA...

  7. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    Albertsen Keywords: Metagenomics; Accumulibacter; Micro-diversity; Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Introduction Metagenomics, or environmental genomics, provides comprehensive information about the entire microbial community of a certain ecosystem, e.g. a wastewater treatment plant. So far......, metagenomic analyses have been hampered by high costs and high level of expertise needed to conduct the investigations, but it is changing now with development of new technologies allowing analyses of billions of DNA sequences (deep-sequencing) and user-friendly pipelines for analyses of the huge data sets...... in Albertsen et al., (2011). Results and Discussion We sequenced two metagenomes from Aalborg East and West EBPR wastewater treatment plants at a depth of 12 and 8 Gb using Illumina short read sequencing. The EBPR plants form a distinct group when compared to metagenomes from a wide range of environments, both...

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase originating from the Metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroids and pyrethrins are widely used insecticides. Extensive applications not only result in pest resistance to these insecticides, but also may lead to environmental issues and human exposure. Numerous studies have shown that very high exposure to pyrethroids might cause potential problems to man and aquatic organisms. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and efficient disposal process to eliminate or minimize contamination of surface water, groundwater and agricultural products by pyrethroid insecticides. Bioremediation is considered to be a reliable and cost-effective technique for pesticides abatement and a major factor determining the fate of pyrethroid pesticides in the environment, and suitable esterase is expected to be useful for potential application for detoxification of pyrethroid residues. Soil is a complex environment considered as one of the main reservoirs of microbial diversity on the planet. However, most of the microorganisms in nature are inaccessible as they are uncultivable in the laboratory. Metagenomic approaches provide a powerful tool for accessing novel valuable genetic resources (novel enzymes and developing various biotechnological applications. Results The pyrethroid pesticides residues on foods and the environmental contamination are a public safety concern. Pretreatment with pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase has the potential to alleviate the conditions. To this end, a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase gene was successfully cloned using metagenomic DNA combined with activity-based functional screening from soil, sequence analysis of the DNA responsible for the pye3 gene revealed an open reading frame of 819 bp encoding for a protein of 272 amino acid residues. Extensive multiple sequence alignments of the deduced amino acid of Pye3 with the most homologous carboxylesterases revealed moderate identity (45–49%. The recombinant Pye3 was heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3

  9. MG-Digger: an automated pipeline to search for giant virus-related sequences in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eVerneau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a ‘dark matter’. We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase pairs were collected, processed and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and five virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate hundreds of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are

  10. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  11. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliucci, Federica; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15-50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms' profiles as indicators of their origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assembly of viral metagenomes from yellowstone hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Thomas; Patterson, Melodee; Richardson, Paul M; Wommack, K Eric; Young, Mark; Mead, David

    2008-07-01

    Thermophilic viruses were reported decades ago; however, knowledge of their diversity, biology, and ecological impact is limited. Previous research on thermophilic viruses focused on cultivated strains. This study examined metagenomic profiles of viruses directly isolated from two mildly alkaline hot springs, Bear Paw (74 degrees C) and Octopus (93 degrees C). Using a new method for constructing libraries from picograms of DNA, nearly 30 Mb of viral DNA sequence was determined. In contrast to previous studies, sequences were assembled at 50% and 95% identity, creating composite contigs up to 35 kb and facilitating analysis of the inherent heterogeneity in the populations. Lowering the assembly identity reduced the estimated number of viral types from 1,440 and 1,310 to 548 and 283, respectively. Surprisingly, the diversity of viral species in these springs approaches that in moderate-temperature environments. While most known thermophilic viruses have a chronic, nonlytic infection lifestyle, analysis of coding sequences suggests lytic viruses are more common in geothermal environments than previously thought. The 50% assembly included one contig with high similarity and perfect synteny to nine genes from Pyrobaculum spherical virus (PSV). In fact, nearly all the genes of the 28-kb genome of PSV have apparent homologs in the metagenomes. Similarities to thermoacidophilic viruses isolated on other continents were limited to specific open reading frames but were equally strong. Nearly 25% of the reads showed significant similarity between the hot springs, suggesting a common subterranean source. To our knowledge, this is the first application of metagenomics to viruses of geothermal origin.

  13. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saw, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Senin, Pavel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woyke, Tanja [DOE JOINT GENOME INAT.; Copeland, Alex [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Gonzalez, Jose [UNIV OF LAGUNA, SPAIN; Chatterji, Sourav [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Cheng, Jan - Fang [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Eisen, Jonathan A [DOE JOINT GENOME INST.; Sieracki, Michael E [UNIV OF CA-DAVIS; Stepanauskas, Ramunas [BIGELOW LAB

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex

  14. Assembling the marine metagenome, one cell at a time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    Full Text Available The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  15. Comparative (metagenomic analysis and ecological profiling of human gut-specific bacteriophage φB124-14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A Ogilvie

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage associated with the human gut microbiome are likely to have an important impact on community structure and function, and provide a wealth of biotechnological opportunities. Despite this, knowledge of the ecology and composition of bacteriophage in the gut bacterial community remains poor, with few well characterized gut-associated phage genomes currently available. Here we describe the identification and in-depth (metagenomic, proteomic, and ecological analysis of a human gut-specific bacteriophage (designated φB124-14. In doing so we illuminate a fraction of the biological dark matter extant in this ecosystem and its surrounding eco-genomic landscape, identifying a novel and uncharted bacteriophage gene-space in this community. φB124-14 infects only a subset of closely related gut-associated Bacteroides fragilis strains, and the circular genome encodes functions previously found to be rare in viral genomes and human gut viral metagenome sequences, including those which potentially confer advantages upon phage and/or host bacteria. Comparative genomic analyses revealed φB124-14 is most closely related to φB40-8, the only other publically available Bacteroides sp. phage genome, whilst comparative metagenomic analysis of both phage failed to identify any homologous sequences in 136 non-human gut metagenomic datasets searched, supporting the human gut-specific nature of this phage. Moreover, a potential geographic variation in the carriage of these and related phage was revealed by analysis of their distribution and prevalence within 151 human gut microbiomes and viromes from Europe, America and Japan. Finally, ecological profiling of φB124-14 and φB40-8, using both gene-centric alignment-driven phylogenetic analyses, as well as alignment-free gene-independent approaches was undertaken. This not only verified the human gut-specific nature of both phage, but also indicated that these phage populate a distinct and unexplored

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of the Medicinal Leech Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A Maltz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by ten-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host’s digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of theses microbial interactions within this niche. The medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, has been shown to be a useful tool in overcoming these challenges, due to the simplicity of the microbiome and the availability of genetic tools for one of the two dominant gut symbionts, Aeromonas veronii. In this study, we utilize 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to further explore the microbial composition of the leech digestive tract, confirming the dominance of two taxa, the Rikenella-like bacterium and A. veronii. The deep sequencing approach revealed the presence of additional members of the microbial community that suggests the presence of a moderately complex microbial community with a richness of 36 taxa. The presence of a Proteus strain as a newly identified resident in the leech crop was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The metagenome of this community was also pyrosequenced and the contigs were binned into the following taxonomic groups: Rikenella-like (3.1 MB, Aeromonas (4.5 MB, Proteus (2.9 MB, Clostridium (1.8 MB, Eryspelothrix (0.96 MB, Desulfovibrio (0.14 MB and Fusobacterium (0.27 MB. Functional analyses on the leech gut symbionts were explored using the metagenomic data and MG-RAST. A comparison of the COG and KEGG categories of the leech gut metagenome to that of other animal digestive-tract microbiomes revealed that the leech digestive-tract had a similar metabolic potential to the human digestive-tract, supporting the usefulness of this system as a model for studying

  17. Comparative metagenomics of eight geographically remote terrestrial hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Islin, Sóley Ruth; Rike, Anne Gunn

    2015-01-01

    Hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria. In this paper, we present the metagenomic analysis of eight globally distributed terrestrial hot springs from China, Iceland, Italy, Russia, and the USA with a temperature range between 61 and 92 (∘)C and pH between 1.8 and 7...... Thermoprotei were detected, whereas no single bacterial species was found in all samples, suggesting a better adaptation of certain archaeal species to different thermophilic environments. Two hot springs show high abundance of Acidithiobacillus, supporting the idea of a true thermophilic Acidithiobacillus...

  18. Metagenomics and development of the gut microbiota in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallès, Y.; Gosalbes, M. J.; de Vries, Lisbeth Elvira

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18 (Suppl. 4): 21–26 The establishment of a balanced intestinal microbiota is essential for numerous aspects of human health, yet the microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of infants is both complex and highly variable among individuals. In addition......, the gastrointestinal tract microbiota is often exposed to antibiotics, and may be an important reservoir of resistant strains and of transferable resistance genes from early infancy. We are investigating by means of diverse metagenomic approaches several areas of microbiota development in infants, including...

  19. Metagenomic analysis of fungal taxa inhabiting Mecca region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A.A. Moussa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of the Mecca region, Saudi Arabia. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon aligned between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. A total of 460 fungal species belonging to 133 genera, 58 families, 33 orders, 13 classes and 4 phyla were identified in four contrasting locations. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA under accession numbers: SRR3150823, SRR3144873, SRR3150825 and SRR3150846.

  20. Binning sequences using very sparse labels within a metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halgamuge Saman K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In metagenomic studies, a process called binning is necessary to assign contigs that belong to multiple species to their respective phylogenetic groups. Most of the current methods of binning, such as BLAST, k-mer and PhyloPythia, involve assigning sequence fragments by comparing sequence similarity or sequence composition with already-sequenced genomes that are still far from comprehensive. We propose a semi-supervised seeding method for binning that does not depend on knowledge of completed genomes. Instead, it extracts the flanking sequences of highly conserved 16S rRNA from the metagenome and uses them as seeds (labels to assign other reads based on their compositional similarity. Results The proposed seeding method is implemented on an unsupervised Growing Self-Organising Map (GSOM, and called Seeded GSOM (S-GSOM. We compared it with four well-known semi-supervised learning methods in a preliminary test, separating random-length prokaryotic sequence fragments sampled from the NCBI genome database. We identified the flanking sequences of the highly conserved 16S rRNA as suitable seeds that could be used to group the sequence fragments according to their species. S-GSOM showed superior performance compared to the semi-supervised methods tested. Additionally, S-GSOM may also be used to visually identify some species that do not have seeds. The proposed method was then applied to simulated metagenomic datasets using two different confidence threshold settings and compared with PhyloPythia, k-mer and BLAST. At the reference taxonomic level Order, S-GSOM outperformed all k-mer and BLAST results and showed comparable results with PhyloPythia for each of the corresponding confidence settings, where S-GSOM performed better than PhyloPythia in the ≥ 10 reads datasets and comparable in the ≥ 8 kb benchmark tests. Conclusion In the task of binning using semi-supervised learning methods, results indicate S-GSOM to be the best of

  1. Computational workflow for the fine-grained analysis of metagenomic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Arjona-Medina, Jose A; Torreno, Oscar; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Trelles, Oswaldo

    2016-10-25

    The field of metagenomics, defined as the direct genetic analysis of uncultured samples of genomes contained within an environmental sample, is gaining increasing popularity. The aim of studies of metagenomics is to determine the species present in an environmental community and identify changes in the abundance of species under different conditions. Current metagenomic analysis software faces bottlenecks due to the high computational load required to analyze complex samples. A computational open-source workflow has been developed for the detailed analysis of metagenomes. This workflow provides new tools and datafile specifications that facilitate the identification of differences in abundance of reads assigned to taxa (mapping), enables the detection of reads of low-abundance bacteria (producing evidence of their presence), provides new concepts for filtering spurious matches, etc. Innovative visualization ideas for improved display of metagenomic diversity are also proposed to better understand how reads are mapped to taxa. Illustrative examples are provided based on the study of two collections of metagenomes from faecal microbial communities of adult female monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for leanness or obesity and their mothers. The proposed workflow provides an open environment that offers the opportunity to perform the mapping process using different reference databases. Additionally, this workflow shows the specifications of the mapping process and datafile formats to facilitate the development of new plugins for further post-processing. This open and extensible platform has been designed with the aim of enabling in-depth analysis of metagenomic samples and better understanding of the underlying biological processes.

  2. MALINA: a web service for visual analytics of human gut microbiota whole-genome metagenomic reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyakht, Alexander V; Popenko, Anna S; Belenikin, Maxim S; Altukhov, Ilya A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Selezneva, Oksana V; Larin, Andrei K; Karpova, Irina Y; Alexeev, Dmitry G

    2012-12-07

    MALINA is a web service for bioinformatic analysis of whole-genome metagenomic data obtained from human gut microbiota sequencing. As input data, it accepts metagenomic reads of various sequencing technologies, including long reads (such as Sanger and 454 sequencing) and next-generation (including SOLiD and Illumina). It is the first metagenomic web service that is capable of processing SOLiD color-space reads, to authors' knowledge. The web service allows phylogenetic and functional profiling of metagenomic samples using coverage depth resulting from the alignment of the reads to the catalogue of reference sequences which are built into the pipeline and contain prevalent microbial genomes and genes of human gut microbiota. The obtained metagenomic composition vectors are processed by the statistical analysis and visualization module containing methods for clustering, dimension reduction and group comparison. Additionally, the MALINA database includes vectors of bacterial and functional composition for human gut microbiota samples from a large number of existing studies allowing their comparative analysis together with user samples, namely datasets from Russian Metagenome project, MetaHIT and Human Microbiome Project (downloaded from http://hmpdacc.org). MALINA is made freely available on the web at http://malina.metagenome.ru. The website is implemented in JavaScript (using Ext JS), Microsoft .NET Framework, MS SQL, Python, with all major browsers supported.

  3. Metagenomics workflow analysis of endophytic bacteria from oil palm fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjung, Z. A.; Aditama, R.; Sudania, W. M.; Utomo, C.; Liwang, T.

    2017-05-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has become a powerful sequencing tool for microbial study especially to lead the establishment of the field area of metagenomics. This study described a workflow to analyze metagenomics data of a Sequence Read Archive (SRA) file under accession ERP004286 deposited by University of Sao Paulo. It was a direct sequencing data generated by 454 pyrosequencing platform originated from oil palm fruits endophytic bacteria which were cultured using oil-palm enriched medium. This workflow used SortMeRNA to split ribosomal reads sequence, Newbler (GS Assembler and GS Mapper) to assemble and map reads into genome reference, BLAST package to identify and annotate contigs sequence, and QualiMap for statistical analysis. Eight bacterial species were identified in this study. Enterobacter cloacae was the most abundant species followed by Citrobacter koseri, Seratia marcescens, Latococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter amalonaticus, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Pseudomonas sp. respectively. All of these species have been reported as endophyte bacteria in various plant species and each has potential as plant growth promoting bacteria or another application in agricultural industries.

  4. The impact of metagenomic interplay on the mosquito redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Cody J; Xu, Jiannong

    2017-04-01

    Mosquitoes are exposed to oxidative challenges throughout their life cycle. The primary challenge comes from a blood meal. The blood digestion turns the midgut into an oxidative environment, which imposes pressure not only on mosquito fecundity and other physiological traits but also on the microbiota in the midgut. During evolution, mosquitoes have developed numerous oxidative defense mechanisms to maintain redox homeostasis in the midgut. In addition to antioxidants, SOD, catalase, and glutathione system, sufficient supply of the reducing agent, NADPH, is vital for a successful defense against oxidative stress. Increasing evidence indicates that in response to oxidative stress, cells reconfigure metabolic pathways to increase the generation of NADPH through NADP-reducing networks including the pentose phosphate pathway and others. The microbial homeostasis is critical for the functional contributions to various host phenotypes. The symbiotic microbiota is regulated largely by the Duox-ROS pathway in Drosophila. In mosquitoes, Duox-ROS pathway, heme-mediated signaling, antimicrobial peptide production and C-type lectins work in concert to maintain the dynamic microbial community in the midgut. Microbial mechanisms against oxidative stress in this context are not well understood. Emerging evidence that microbial metabolites trigger host oxidative response warrants further study on the metagenomic interplay in an oxidative environment like mosquito gut ecosystem. Besides the classical Drosophila model, hematophagous insects like mosquitoes provide an alternative model system to study redox homeostasis in a symbiotic metagenomic context. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative metagenome of a stream impacted by the urbanization phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julliane Dutra Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract Rivers and streams are important reservoirs of freshwater for human consumption. These ecosystems are threatened by increasing urbanization, because raw sewage discharged into them alters their nutrient content and may affect the composition of their microbial community. In the present study, we investigate the taxonomic and functional profile of the microbial community in an urban lotic environment. Samples of running water were collected at two points in the São Pedro stream: an upstream preserved and non-urbanized area, and a polluted urbanized area with discharged sewage. The metagenomic DNA was sequenced by pyrosequencing. Differences were observed in the community composition at the two sites. The non-urbanized area was overrepresented by genera of ubiquitous microbes that act in the maintenance of environments. In contrast, the urbanized metagenome was rich in genera pathogenic to humans. The functional profile indicated that the microbes act on the metabolism of methane, nitrogen and sulfur, especially in the urbanized area. It was also found that virulence/defense (antibiotic resistance and metal resistance and stress response-related genes were disseminated in the urbanized environment. The structure of the microbial community was altered by uncontrolled anthropic interference, highlighting the selective pressure imposed by high loads of urban sewage discharged into freshwater environments.

  6. Nasopharyngeal metagenomic deep sequencing data, Lancaster, UK, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Kate V; Bishop, Lisa A; Rhodes, Glenn; Salez, Nicolas; McEwan, Neil R; Hegarty, Matthew J; Robey, Julie; Harding, Nicola; Wetherell, Simon; Lauder, Robert M; Pickup, Roger W; Wilkinson, Mark; Gatherer, Derek

    2017-10-24

    Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from volunteers attending a general medical practice and a general hospital in Lancaster, UK, and at Lancaster University, in the winter of 2014-2015. 51 swabs were selected based on high RNA yield and allocated to deep sequencing pools as follows: patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; asthmatics; adults with no respiratory symptoms; adults with feverish respiratory symptoms; adults with respiratory symptoms and presence of antibodies against influenza C; paediatric patients with respiratory symptoms (2 pools); adults with influenza C infection (2 pools), giving a total of 9 pools. Illumina sequencing was performed, with data yields per pool in the range of 345.6 megabases to 14 gigabases after removal of reads aligning to the human genome. The data were deposited in the Sequence Read Archive at NCBI, and constitute a resource for study of the viral, bacterial and fungal metagenome of the human nasopharynx in healthy and diseased states and comparison with other metagenomic studies on the human respiratory tract.

  7. Quantitative metagenomics reveals unique gut microbiome biomarkers in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chengping; Zheng, Zhijun; Shao, Tiejuan; Liu, Lin; Xie, Zhijun; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; He, Zhixing; Zhong, Wendi; Fan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Linshuang; Li, Haichang; Wu, Chunyan; Hu, Changfeng; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Jia; Cai, Shunfeng; Wang, Dawei; Huang, Yun; Breban, Maxime; Qin, Nan; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2017-07-27

    The assessment and characterization of the gut microbiome has become a focus of research in the area of human autoimmune diseases. Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease and evidence showed that ankylosing spondylitis may be a microbiome-driven disease. To investigate the relationship between the gut microbiome and ankylosing spondylitis, a quantitative metagenomics study based on deep shotgun sequencing was performed, using gut microbial DNA from 211 Chinese individuals. A total of 23,709 genes and 12 metagenomic species were shown to be differentially abundant between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls. Patients were characterized by a form of gut microbial dysbiosis that is more prominent than previously reported cases with inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, the ankylosing spondylitis patients demonstrated increases in the abundance of Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella copri, and Prevotella sp. C561 and decreases in Bacteroides spp. It is noteworthy that the Bifidobacterium genus, which is commonly used in probiotics, accumulated in the ankylosing spondylitis patients. Diagnostic algorithms were established using a subset of these gut microbial biomarkers. Alterations of the gut microbiome are associated with development of ankylosing spondylitis. Our data suggest biomarkers identified in this study might participate in the pathogenesis or development process of ankylosing spondylitis, providing new leads for the development of new diagnostic tools and potential treatments.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of human diarrhea: viral detection and discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R Finkbeiner

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, approximately 1.8 million children die from diarrhea annually, and millions more suffer multiple episodes of nonfatal diarrhea. On average, in up to 40% of cases, no etiologic agent can be identified. The advent of metagenomic sequencing has enabled systematic and unbiased characterization of microbial populations; thus, metagenomic approaches have the potential to define the spectrum of viruses, including novel viruses, present in stool during episodes of acute diarrhea. The detection of novel or unexpected viruses would then enable investigations to assess whether these agents play a causal role in human diarrhea. In this study, we characterized the eukaryotic viral communities present in diarrhea specimens from 12 children by employing a strategy of "micro-mass sequencing" that entails minimal starting sample quantity (<100 mg stool, minimal sample purification, and limited sequencing (384 reads per sample. Using this methodology we detected known enteric viruses as well as multiple sequences from putatively novel viruses with only limited sequence similarity to viruses in GenBank.

  9. New insight into the gut microbiome through metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boyang Ji, Jens Nielsen Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden Abstract: The human gut is colonized by different types of microorganisms, which are known to play important roles in the human host by maintaining physiological homeostasis. The human host provides a nutrient-rich environment, and the microbiota provides some necessary functions that humans cannot perform. A comprehensive analysis of the human gut microbiome is thus important for revealing the mechanisms of these host–microbe interactions. The development of high-throughput sequencing technology and related computational frameworks enables exploration of the metabolic interactions and their roles in human health and diseases. Herein, we describe the metagenomic methods used in human gut microbiome studies and review the roles of gut microbiota as well as the integrative analyses of metagenomic data with other omics data. Finally, we discuss the application of constraint-based modeling to elucidate the microbe–microbe interaction and host–microbe interaction in the human gut microbiota. Keywords: dysbiosis, host–microbe interaction, metabolic modeling 

  10. Towards diagnostic metagenomics of Campylobacter in fecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Christine; Kiil, Kristoffer; Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    2017-01-01

    of the challenges in diagnostic metagenomics are, that it requires a great next-generation sequencing depth and unautomated data analysis. DNA from human fecal samples spiked with 7.75 × 101-7.75 × 107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml Campylobacter jejuni and chicken fecal samples spiked with 1 × 102-1 × 106 CFU....../g Campylobacter jejuni was sequenced and data analysis was done by the metagenomic tools Kraken and CLARK. More hits were obtained at higher spiking levels, however with no significant linear correlations (human samples p = 0.12, chicken samples p = 0.10). Therefore, no definite detection limit could...... be determined, but the lowest spiking levels found positive were 7.75 × 104 CFU/ml in human feces and 103 CFU/g in chicken feces. Eight human clinical fecal samples with estimated Campylobacter infection loads from 9.2 × 104-1.0 × 109 CFU/ml were analyzed using the same methods. It was possible to detect...

  11. Comparative metagenome of a stream impacted by the urbanization phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Julliane Dutra; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Nicolás, Marisa Fabiana; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro de; Coelho, Cíntia Marques

    Rivers and streams are important reservoirs of freshwater for human consumption. These ecosystems are threatened by increasing urbanization, because raw sewage discharged into them alters their nutrient content and may affect the composition of their microbial community. In the present study, we investigate the taxonomic and functional profile of the microbial community in an urban lotic environment. Samples of running water were collected at two points in the São Pedro stream: an upstream preserved and non-urbanized area, and a polluted urbanized area with discharged sewage. The metagenomic DNA was sequenced by pyrosequencing. Differences were observed in the community composition at the two sites. The non-urbanized area was overrepresented by genera of ubiquitous microbes that act in the maintenance of environments. In contrast, the urbanized metagenome was rich in genera pathogenic to humans. The functional profile indicated that the microbes act on the metabolism of methane, nitrogen and sulfur, especially in the urbanized area. It was also found that virulence/defense (antibiotic resistance and metal resistance) and stress response-related genes were disseminated in the urbanized environment. The structure of the microbial community was altered by uncontrolled anthropic interference, highlighting the selective pressure imposed by high loads of urban sewage discharged into freshwater environments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Metagenomic characterization of viral communities in Goseong Bay, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Cho, Won Kyong; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, seawater samples were collected from Goseong Bay, Korea in March 2014 and viral populations were examined by metagenomics assembly. Enrichment of marine viral particles using FeCl3 followed by next-generation sequencing produced numerous sequences. De novo assembly and BLAST search showed that most of the obtained contigs were unknown sequences and only 0.74% of sequences were associated with known viruses. As a result, 138 viruses, including bacteriophages (87%), viruses infecting algae and others (13%) were identified. The identified 138 viruses were divided into 11 orders, 14 families, 34 genera, and 133 species. The dominant viruses were Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P and Roseobacter phage SIO1. The viruses infecting algae, including the Ostreococcus species, accounted for 9.4% of total identified viruses. In addition, we identified pathogenic herpes viruses infecting fishes and giant viruses infecting parasitic acanthamoeba species. This is a comprehensive study to reveal the viral populations in the Goseong Bay using metagenomics. The information associated with the marine viral community in Goseong Bay, Korea will be useful for comparative analysis in other marine viral communities.

  13. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments: a large scale machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Katharina J; Tech, Maike; Lingner, Thomas; Daniel, Rolf; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Meinicke, Peter

    2008-04-28

    Metagenomics is an approach to the characterization of microbial genomes via the direct isolation of genomic sequences from the environment without prior cultivation. The amount of metagenomic sequence data is growing fast while computational methods for metagenome analysis are still in their infancy. In contrast to genomic sequences of single species, which can usually be assembled and analyzed by many available methods, a large proportion of metagenome data remains as unassembled anonymous sequencing reads. One of the aims of all metagenomic sequencing projects is the identification of novel genes. Short length, for example, Sanger sequencing yields on average 700 bp fragments, and unknown phylogenetic origin of most fragments require approaches to gene prediction that are different from the currently available methods for genomes of single species. In particular, the large size of metagenomic samples requires fast and accurate methods with small numbers of false positive predictions. We introduce a novel gene prediction algorithm for metagenomic fragments based on a two-stage machine learning approach. In the first stage, we use linear discriminants for monocodon usage, dicodon usage and translation initiation sites to extract features from DNA sequences. In the second stage, an artificial neural network combines these features with open reading frame length and fragment GC-content to compute the probability that this open reading frame encodes a protein. This probability is used for the classification and scoring of gene candidates. With large scale training, our method provides fast single fragment predictions with good sensitivity and specificity on artificially fragmented genomic DNA. Additionally, this method is able to predict translation initiation sites accurately and distinguishes complete from incomplete genes with high reliability. Large scale machine learning methods are well-suited for gene prediction in metagenomic DNA fragments. In particular, the

  14. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments: A large scale machine learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenstern Burkhard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics is an approach to the characterization of microbial genomes via the direct isolation of genomic sequences from the environment without prior cultivation. The amount of metagenomic sequence data is growing fast while computational methods for metagenome analysis are still in their infancy. In contrast to genomic sequences of single species, which can usually be assembled and analyzed by many available methods, a large proportion of metagenome data remains as unassembled anonymous sequencing reads. One of the aims of all metagenomic sequencing projects is the identification of novel genes. Short length, for example, Sanger sequencing yields on average 700 bp fragments, and unknown phylogenetic origin of most fragments require approaches to gene prediction that are different from the currently available methods for genomes of single species. In particular, the large size of metagenomic samples requires fast and accurate methods with small numbers of false positive predictions. Results We introduce a novel gene prediction algorithm for metagenomic fragments based on a two-stage machine learning approach. In the first stage, we use linear discriminants for monocodon usage, dicodon usage and translation initiation sites to extract features from DNA sequences. In the second stage, an artificial neural network combines these features with open reading frame length and fragment GC-content to compute the probability that this open reading frame encodes a protein. This probability is used for the classification and scoring of gene candidates. With large scale training, our method provides fast single fragment predictions with good sensitivity and specificity on artificially fragmented genomic DNA. Additionally, this method is able to predict translation initiation sites accurately and distinguishes complete from incomplete genes with high reliability. Conclusion Large scale machine learning methods are well-suited for gene

  15. Records Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Charles M.

    1977-01-01

    This discussion of evaluating a records management course includes comments on management orientation, creation of records, maintenance of records, selection and use of equipment, storage and destruction of records, micrographics, and a course outline. (TA)

  16. Environmental Review Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD’s Environmental Review Records page houses environmental reviews made publicly available through the HUD Environmental Review Online System (HEROS). This...

  17. EXTRACT: interactive extraction of environment metadata and term suggestion for metagenomic sample annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra; Pereira, Emiliano; Schnetzer, Julia; Arvanitidis, Christos; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have therefore developed an interactive annotation tool, EXTRACT, which helps curators identify and extract standard-compliant terms for annotation of metagenomic records and other samples. Behind its web-based user interface, the system combines published methods for named entity recognition of environment, organism, tissue and disease terms. The evaluators in the BioCreative V Interactive Annotation Task found the system to be intuitive, useful, well documented and sufficiently accurate to be helpful in spotting relevant text passages and extracting organism and environment terms. Comparison of fully manual and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed. Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Metagenomic profiling of historic Colorado Front Range flood impact on distribution of riverine antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Emily; Wallace, Joshua S.; Argoty, Gustavo Arango; Wilkinson, Caitlin; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Heath, Lenwood S.; Zhang, Liqing; Arabi, Mazdak; Aga, Diana S.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-12-01

    Record-breaking floods in September 2013 caused massive damage to homes and infrastructure across the Colorado Front Range and heavily impacted the Cache La Poudre River watershed. Given the unique nature of this watershed as a test-bed for tracking environmental pathways of antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) dissemination, we sought to determine the impact of extreme flooding on ARG reservoirs in river water and sediment. We utilized high-throughput DNA sequencing to obtain metagenomic profiles of ARGs before and after flooding, and investigated 23 antibiotics and 14 metals as putative selective agents during post-flood recovery. With 277 ARG subtypes identified across samples, total bulk water ARGs decreased following the flood but recovered to near pre-flood abundances by ten months post-flood at both a pristine site and at a site historically heavily influenced by wastewater treatment plants and animal feeding operations. Network analysis of de novo assembled sequencing reads into 52,556 scaffolds identified ARGs likely located on mobile genetic elements, with up to 11 ARGs per plasmid-associated scaffold. Bulk water bacterial phylogeny correlated with ARG profiles while sediment phylogeny varied along the river’s anthropogenic gradient. This rare flood afforded the opportunity to gain deeper insight into factors influencing the spread of ARGs in watersheds.

  19. Unsupervised Binning of Metagenomic Assembled Contigs Using Improved Fuzzy C-Means Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Hou, Tao; Kang, Bing; Liu, Fu

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomic contigs binning is a necessary step of metagenome analysis. After assembly, the number of contigs belonging to different genomes is usually unequal. So a metagenomic contigs dataset is a kind of imbalanced dataset and traditional fuzzy c-means method (FCM) fails to handle it very well. In this paper, we will introduce an improved version of fuzzy c-means method (IFCM) into metagenomic contigs binning. First, tetranucleotide frequencies are calculated for every contig. Second, the number of bins is roughly estimated by the distribution of genome lengths of a complete set of non-draft sequenced microbial genomes from NCBI. Then, IFCM is used to cluster DNA contigs with the estimated result. Finally, a clustering validity function is utilized to determine the binning result. We tested this method on a synthetic and two real datasets and experimental results have showed the effectiveness of this method compared with other tools.

  20. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    of microorganisms to function properly. Insight into community and species level stability and dynamics is valuable for knowledge driven optimization of the EBPR process. The metagenomes of the EBPR communities were distinct compared to metagenomes of communities from a wide range of other environments, which could...... be attributed to selection pressures of the EBPR process. The metabolic potential of one of the key microorganisms in the EPBR process, Accumulibacter, was investigated in more detail in the two plants revealing a potential importance of phage predation on the dynamics of Accumulibacter populations. The results...... demonstrate that metagenomics can be used as a powerful tool for system wide characterization of the EBPR community as well as for a deeper understanding of the function of specific community members. Furthermore, we discuss and illustrate some of the general pitfalls in metagenomics and stress the need...

  1. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese, a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411.

  2. A sampling and metagenomic sequencing-based methodology for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Patrick; Dalhoff Andersen, Vibe; de Knegt, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable methods for monitoring antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and other reservoirs are essential to understand the trends, transmission and importance of agricultural resistance. Quantification of AMR is mostly done using culture-based techniques, but metagenomic read...... on known antimicrobial consumption in 10 Danish integrated slaughter pig herds. In addition, we evaluated whether fresh or manure floor samples constitute suitable proxies for intestinal sampling, using cfu counting, qPCR and metagenomic shotgun sequencing. Results Metagenomic read-mapping outperformed...... cultivation-based techniques in terms of predicting expected tetracycline resistance based on antimicrobial consumption. Our metagenomic approach had sufficient resolution to detect antimicrobial-induced changes to individual resistance gene abundances. Pen floor manure samples were found to represent rectal...

  3. Quantifying environmental adaptation of metabolic pathways in metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gianoulis, Tara A; Raes, Jeroen; Patel, Prianka V

    2009-01-01

    Recently, approaches have been developed to sample the genetic content of heterogeneous environments (metagenomics). However, by what means these sequences link distinct environmental conditions with specific biological processes is not well understood. Thus, a major challenge is how the usage...... of particular pathways and subnetworks reflects the adaptation of microbial communities across environments and habitats-i.e., how network dynamics relates to environmental features. Previous research has treated environments as discrete, somewhat simplified classes (e.g., terrestrial vs. marine), and searched...... for obvious metabolic differences among them (i.e., treating the analysis as a typical classification problem). However, environmental differences result from combinations of many factors, which often vary only slightly. Therefore, we introduce an approach that employs correlation and regression to relate...

  4. Metagenomics of microbial life in extreme temperature environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Anna; Wentzel, Alexander; Valla, Svein

    2013-06-01

    Microbial life in extreme environments is attracting broad scientific interest. Knowledge about it helps in defining the boundaries for life to exist, and organisms living under extreme conditions are also interesting sources for enzymes with unusual and desirable properties. The tremendous progress in DNA sequencing technologies now makes it relatively easy to gain a representative overview of the composition of such communities, and many community studies have in the last decade applied metagenomics to characterize habitats extreme in, for example, temperature, salt and acidity. The future challenges in the field are likely to become more and more related to the conversion of the expected massive amounts of sequence information into an understanding of the corresponding biological community functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-09-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boeffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-05-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.

  7. DNA extraction for streamlined metagenomics of diverse environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotz, Clarisse; Amir, Amnon; Humphrey, Greg; Gaffney, James; Gogul, Grant; Knight, Rob

    2017-06-01

    A major bottleneck for metagenomic sequencing is rapid and efficient DNA extraction. Here, we compare the extraction efficiencies of three magnetic bead-based platforms (KingFisher, epMotion, and Tecan) to a standardized column-based extraction platform across a variety of sample types, including feces, oral, skin, soil, and water. Replicate sample plates were extracted and prepared for 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing in parallel to assess extraction bias and DNA quality. The data demonstrate that any effect of extraction method on sequencing results was small compared with the variability across samples; however, the KingFisher platform produced the largest number of high-quality reads in the shortest amount of time. Based on these results, we have identified an extraction pipeline that dramatically reduces sample processing time without sacrificing bacterial taxonomic or abundance information.

  8. [Construction of large fragment metagenome library of natural mangrove soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zheng, Tian-Ling

    2007-11-01

    Applying our optimized direct extraction method, the percentage of large fragment DNA in the total extracted mangrove soil DNA was significant increased. The large fragment metagenome library derived from natural mangrove soil over four seasons was successfully constructed by the optimized DNA extraction and electro elution purification method. All of the clones had recombinant Cosmids and each differed in their fragment profiles when Cosmid DNA was extracted from 12 randomly picked colonies and digested with BamHI. The average insert size for this library was larger than 35 kbp. This culturing-independent library at least encompassed 335 Mbp valuable genetic information of mangrove soil microbes. It allowed mining of valuable intertidal microbial resource to become a reality. It is a recommended method for those researchers who have still not circumvented the large insert environmental libraries or for those beginning research in this field, so as to avoid them attempting repetitive, fussy work.

  9. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence......, from faecal samples of 124 European individuals. The gene set, ,150 times larger than the human gene complement, contains an overwhelming majority of the prevalent (more frequent) microbial genes of the cohort and probably includes a large proportion of the prevalent human intestinal microbial genes....... The genes are largely shared among individuals of the cohort. Over 99% of the genes are bacterial, indicating that the entire cohort harbours between 1,000 and 1,150 prevalent bacterial species and each individual at least 160 such species, which are also largely shared. We define and describe the minimal...

  10. Metagenomic Approaches to Natural Products from Free-Living and Symbiotic Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Sean F.; Simmons, Luke; Kim, Jeff H.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial cultivation has been a mainstay of natural products discovery for the past 80 years. However, the majority of bacteria are recalcitrant to culture, providing an untapped source for new natural products. Metagenomic analysis provides an alternative method to directly access the uncultivated genome for natural products research and for the discovery of novel, bioactive substances. Applications of metagenomics to diverse habitats, such as soils and the interior of animals, are described.

  11. The Characterization of Novel Tissue Microbiota Using an Optimized 16S Metagenomic Sequencing Pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Lluch, J?r?me; Servant, Florence; Pa?ss?, Sandrine; Valle, Carine; Vali?re, Sophie; Kuchly, Claire; Vilchez, Ga?lle; Donnadieu, C?cile; Courtney, Michael; Burcelin, R?my; Amar, Jacques; Bouchez, Olivier; Lelouvier, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Substantial progress in high-throughput metagenomic sequencing methodologies has enabled the characterisation of bacteria from various origins (for example gut and skin). However, the recently-discovered bacterial microbiota present within animal internal tissues has remained unexplored due to technical difficulties associated with these challenging samples. Results We have optimized a specific 16S rDNA-targeted metagenomics sequencing (16S metabarcoding) pipeline based on the Illu...

  12. Metagenomics for the discovery of novel biosurfactants of environmental interest from marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen A; Borchert, Erik; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2015-06-01

    Research focused on the search for new biosurfactants aims to replace chemical surfactants, which while being cost-effective are ecologically undesirable. Metagenomics can lead to discovery of novel biosurfactants, tackling issues of low production yields. Recent successes include the heterologous production of biosurfactants. The dearth of biosurfactants discovered to date through metagenomics is puzzling given that good screening systems and heterologous host systems are available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial strain-level population structure and genetic diversity from metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Duy Tin; Tett, Adrian; Pasolli, Edoardo; Huttenhower, Curtis; Segata, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Among the human health conditions linked to microbial communities, phenotypes are often associated with only a subset of strains within causal microbial groups. Although it has been critical for decades in microbial physiology to characterize individual strains, this has been challenging when using culture-independent high-throughput metagenomics. We introduce StrainPhlAn, a novel metagenomic strain identification approach, and apply it to characterize the genetic structure of thousands of st...

  14. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the...

  15. Detecting nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ) genes in soil metagenomes: method development and implications for the nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, L H; Rodriguez-R, L M; Higgins, S; Chee-Sanford, J C; Sanford, R A; Ritalahti, K M; Löffler, F E; Konstantinidis, K T

    2014-06-03

    Microbial activities in soils, such as (incomplete) denitrification, represent major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. The key enzyme for mitigating N2O emissions is NosZ, which catalyzes N2O reduction to N2. We recently described "atypical" functional NosZ proteins encoded by both denitrifiers and nondenitrifiers, which were missed in previous environmental surveys (R. A. Sanford et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:19709-19714, 2012, doi:10.1073/pnas.1211238109). Here, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of both nosZ types in whole-genome shotgun metagenomes from sandy and silty loam agricultural soils that typify the U.S. Midwest corn belt. First, different search algorithms and parameters for detecting nosZ metagenomic reads were evaluated based on in silico-generated (mock) metagenomes. Using the derived cutoffs, 71 distinct alleles (95% amino acid identity level) encoding typical or atypical NosZ proteins were detected in both soil types. Remarkably, more than 70% of the total nosZ reads in both soils were classified as atypical, emphasizing that prior surveys underestimated nosZ abundance. Approximately 15% of the total nosZ reads were taxonomically related to Anaeromyxobacter, which was the most abundant genus encoding atypical NosZ-type proteins in both soil types. Further analyses revealed that atypical nosZ genes outnumbered typical nosZ genes in most publicly available soil metagenomes, underscoring their potential role in mediating N2O consumption in soils. Therefore, this study provides a bioinformatics strategy to reliably detect target genes in complex short-read metagenomes and suggests that the analysis of both typical and atypical nosZ sequences is required to understand and predict N2O flux in soils. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas with ozone layer destruction potential. Microbial activities control both the production and the consumption of N2O, i.e., its conversion to innocuous dinitrogen gas (N

  16. A Metagenomic Survey of Serpentinites and Nearby Soils in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K. Y.; Hsu, Y. W.; Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Shih, Y. J.; Chen, J. S.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The serpentinite of Taiwan is originated from the subduction zone of the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. Many small bodies of serpentinite are scattered around the lands of the East Rift Valley, which are also one of the major agricultural areas in Taiwan. Since microbial communities play a role both on weathering process and soil recovery, uncovering the microbial compositions in serpentinites and surrounding soils may help people to understand the roles of microorganisms on serpentinites during the nature weathering process. In this study, microorganisms growing on the surface of serpentinites, in the surrounding soil, and agriculture soils that are miles of horizontal distance away from serpentinite were collected. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was carried out to examine the metagenomics of uncultured microbial community in these samples. The metagenomics were further clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to analyze relative abundance, heatmap of OTUs, and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA). Our data revealed the different types of geographic material had their own distinct structures of microbial community. In serpentinites, the heatmaps based on the phylogenetic pattern showed that the OTUs distributions were similar in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and WPS-1/WPS-2. On the other hand, the heatmaps of phylogenetic pattern of agriculture soils showed that the OTUs distributions in phyla of Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, WPS-1/WPS-2, and Proteobacteria were similar. In soil nearby the serpentinite, some clusters of OTUs in phyla of Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and WPS-1/WPS-2 have disappeared. Our data provided evidence regarding kinetic evolutions of microbial communities in different geographic materials.

  17. A metagenomic study of primate insect diet diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Sarah B; Bergey, Christina M; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Descriptions of primate diets are generally based on either direct observation of foraging behavior, morphological classification of food remains from feces, or analysis of the stomach contents of deceased individuals. Some diet items (e.g. insect prey), however, are difficult to identify visually, and observation conditions often do not permit adequate quantitative sampling of feeding behavior. Moreover, the taxonomically informative morphology of some food species (e.g. swallowed seeds, insect exoskeletons) may be destroyed by the digestive process. Because of these limitations, we used a metagenomic approach to conduct a preliminary, "proof of concept" study of interspecific variation in the insect component of the diets of six sympatric New World monkeys known, based on observational field studies, to differ markedly in their feeding ecology. We used generalized arthropod polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers and cloning to sequence mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the arthropod cytochrome b (CYT B) gene from fecal samples of wild woolly, titi, saki, capuchin, squirrel, and spider monkeys collected from a single sampling site in western Amazonia where these genera occur sympatrically. We then assigned preliminary taxonomic identifications to the sequences by basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) comparison to arthropod CYT B sequences present in GenBank. This study is the first to use molecular techniques to identify insect prey in primate diets. The results suggest that a metagenomic approach may prove valuable in augmenting and corroborating observational data and increasing the resolution of primate diet studies, although the lack of comparative reference sequences for many South American insects limits the approach at present. As such reference data become available for more animal and plant taxa, this approach also holds promise for studying additional components of primate diets. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Metagenomic exploration of viruses throughout the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Williamson

    Full Text Available The characterization of global marine microbial taxonomic and functional diversity is a primary goal of the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition. As part of this study, 19 water samples were collected aboard the Sorcerer II sailing vessel from the southern Indian Ocean in an effort to more thoroughly understand the lifestyle strategies of the microbial inhabitants of this ultra-oligotrophic region. No investigations of whole virioplankton assemblages have been conducted on waters collected from the Indian Ocean or across multiple size fractions thus far. Therefore, the goals of this study were to examine the effect of size fractionation on viral consortia structure and function and understand the diversity and functional potential of the Indian Ocean virome. Five samples were selected for comprehensive metagenomic exploration; and sequencing was performed on the microbes captured on 3.0-, 0.8- and 0.1 µm membrane filters as well as the viral fraction (<0.1 µm. Phylogenetic approaches were also used to identify predicted proteins of viral origin in the larger fractions of data from all Indian Ocean samples, which were included in subsequent metagenomic analyses. Taxonomic profiling of viral sequences suggested that size fractionation of marine microbial communities enriches for specific groups of viruses within the different size classes and functional characterization further substantiated this observation. Functional analyses also revealed a relative enrichment for metabolic proteins of viral origin that potentially reflect the physiological condition of host cells in the Indian Ocean including those involved in nitrogen metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. A novel classification method, MGTAXA, was used to assess virus-host relationships in the Indian Ocean by predicting the taxonomy of putative host genera, with Prochlorococcus, Acanthochlois and members of the SAR86 cluster comprising the most abundant predictions. This is the first study

  19. Accessing carboxylesterase diversity from termite hindgut symbionts through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashamuse, Konanani; Mabizela-Mokoena, Nobalanda; Sanyika, Tendai Walter; Mabvakure, Batsirai; Brady, Dean

    2012-01-01

    A shotgun metagenomic library was constructed from termite hindgut symbionts and subsequently screened for esterase activities. A total of 68 recombinant clones conferring esterolytic phenotypes were identified, of which the 14 most active were subcloned and sequenced. The nucleotide lengths of the esterase-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) ranged from 783 to 2,592 bp and encoded proteins with predicted molecular masses of between 28.8 and 97.5 kDa. The highest identity scores in the GenBank database, from a global amino acid alignment ranged from 39 to 83%. The identified ORFs revealed the presence of the G-X-S-X-D, G-D-S-X, and S-X-X-K sequence motifs that have been reported to harbour a catalytic serine residue in other previously reported esterase primary structures. Five of the ORFs (EstT5, EstT7, EstT9, EstT10, and EstT12) could not be classified into any of the original eight esterase families. One of the ORFs (EstT9) showed a unique primary structure consisting of an amidohydrolase-esterase fusion. Six of the 14 esterase-encoding genes were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified enzymes exhibited temperature optima of between 40-50°C. Substrate-profiling studies revealed that the characterised enzymes were 'true' carboxylesterases based on their preferences for short to medium chain length p-nitrophenyl ester substrates. This study has demonstrated a successful application of a metagenomic approach in accessing novel esterase-encoding genes from the gut of termites that could otherwise have been missed by classical culture enrichment approaches. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Putative bacterial interactions from metagenomic knowledge with an integrative systems ecology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordron, Philippe; Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, Maria-Paz; González, Mauricio; Thiele, Sven; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro; Eveillard, Damien

    2016-02-01

    Following the trend of studies that investigate microbial ecosystems using different metagenomic techniques, we propose a new integrative systems ecology approach that aims to decipher functional roles within a consortium through the integration of genomic and metabolic knowledge at genome scale. For the sake of application, using public genomes of five bacterial strains involved in copper bioleaching: Acidiphilium cryptum, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, we first reconstructed a global metabolic network. Next, using a parsimony assumption, we deciphered sets of genes, called Sets from Genome Segments (SGS), that (1) are close on their respective genomes, (2) take an active part in metabolic pathways and (3) whose associated metabolic reactions are also closely connected within metabolic networks. Overall, this SGS paradigm depicts genomic functional units that emphasize respective roles of bacterial strains to catalyze metabolic pathways and environmental processes. Our analysis suggested that only few functional metabolic genes are horizontally transferred within the consortium and that no single bacterial strain can accomplish by itself the whole copper bioleaching. The use of SGS pinpoints a functional compartmentalization among the investigated species and exhibits putative bacterial interactions necessary for promoting these pathways. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Metagenomic insights into chlorination effects on microbial antibiotic resistance in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Jia, Shuyu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong; Cheng, Shupei; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the chlorination effects on microbial antibiotic resistance in a drinking water treatment plant. Biochemical identification, 16S rRNA gene cloning and metagenomic analysis consistently indicated that Proteobacteria were the main antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) dominating in the drinking water and chlorine disinfection greatly affected microbial community structure. After chlorination, higher proportion of the surviving bacteria was resistant to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim and cephalothin. Quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that sulI had the highest abundance among the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) detected in the drinking water, followed by tetA and tetG. Chlorination caused enrichment of ampC, aphA2, bla(TEM-1), tetA, tetG, ermA and ermB, but sulI was considerably removed (p water chlorination could concentrate various ARGs, as well as of plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons involved in horizontal transfer of the ARGs. Water pipeline transportation tended to reduce the abundance of most ARGs, but various ARB and ARGs were still present in the tap water, which deserves more public health concerns. The results highlighted prevalence of ARB and ARGs in chlorinated drinking water and this study might be technologically useful for detecting the ARGs in water environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Future Perspectives of Personalized Weight Loss Interventions Based on Nutrigenetic, Epigenetic, and Metagenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Leticia; Cuervo, Marta; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-03-09

    As obesity has become a major global public health challenge, a large number of studies have analyzed different strategies aimed at inducing a negative energy balance and, consequently, body weight loss. However, most existing weight loss programs are generally unsuccessful, so several interventions have been carried out to identify physiologic and behavioral factors concerning this variability in order to implement more personalized treatment. Nowadays, an individualized approach is being proposed through so-called personalized nutrition, whereby not only the phenotype but also the genotype is used for customized nutrition treatment. Regarding body weight regulation, ∼70 polymorphisms have been identified in or near genes related to energy expenditure, appetite, adipogenesis, insulin resistance, and lipid metabolism. Although personalized nutrition refers mainly to genetic makeup, recent advances in the investigation of the epigenome and the microbiome open the door to implement more personalized recommendations for body weight management. In this context, recent studies have demonstrated the existence of several epigenetic markers that may modify gene expression and could be involved in the outcome of weight loss interventions. Moreover, different studies have shown that dietary interventions could affect the composition of gut microbiota and have an impact on body weight. The integration of nutrigenetic, epigenetic, and metagenomic data may lead to the design of more personalized dietary treatments to prevent chronic diseases and to optimize the individual's response to dietary interventions. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP. Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  4. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; Miao, Yu; Shi, Peng; Liu, Bo; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet) were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  5. Records Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — All Federal Agencies are required to prescribe an appropriate records maintenance program so that complete records are filed or otherwise preserved, records can be...

  6. Diversity Indices as Measures of Functional Annotation Methods in Metagenomics Studies

    KAUST Repository

    Jankovic, Boris R.

    2016-01-26

    Applications of high-throughput techniques in metagenomics studies produce massive amounts of data. Fragments of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic molecules are all found in metagenomics samples. Laborious and meticulous effort in sequencing and functional annotation are then required to, amongst other objectives, reconstruct a taxonomic map of the environment that metagenomics samples were taken from. In addition to computational challenges faced by metagenomics studies, the analysis is further complicated by the presence of contaminants in the samples, potentially resulting in skewed taxonomic analysis. The functional annotation in metagenomics can utilize all available omics data and therefore different methods that are associated with a particular type of data. For example, protein-coding DNA, non-coding RNA or ribosomal RNA data can be used in such an analysis. These methods would have their advantages and disadvantages and the question of comparison among them naturally arises. There are several criteria that can be used when performing such a comparison. Loosely speaking, methods can be evaluated in terms of computational complexity or in terms of the expected biological accuracy. We propose that the concept of diversity that is used in the ecosystems and species diversity studies can be successfully used in evaluating certain aspects of the methods employed in metagenomics studies. We show that when applying the concept of Hill’s diversity, the analysis of variations in the diversity order provides valuable clues into the robustness of methods used in the taxonomical analysis.

  7. A novel bioinformatics strategy for searching industrially useful genome resources from metagenomic sequence libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Yuki; Wada, Chieko; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Abe, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although remarkable progress in metagenomic sequencing of various environmental samples has been made, large numbers of fragment sequences have been registered in the international DNA databanks, primarily without information on gene function and phylotype, and thus with limited usefulness. Industrial useful biological activity is often carried out by a set of genes, such as those constituting an operon. In this connection, metagenomic approaches have a weakness because sets of the genes are usually split up, since the sequences obtained by metagenome analyses are fragmented into 1-kb or much shorter segments. Therefore, even when a set of genes responsible for an industrially useful function is found in one metagenome library, it is usually difficult to know whether a single genome harbors the entire gene set or whether different genomes have individual genes. By modifying Self-Organizing Map (SOM), we previously developed BLSOM for oligonucleotide composition, which allowed classification (self-organization) of sequence fragments according to genomes. Because BLSOM could reassociate genomic fragments according to genomes, BLSOM may ameliorate the abovementioned weakness of metagenome analyses. Here, we have developed a strategy for clustering of metagenomic sequences according to phylotypes and genomes, by testing a gene set contributing to environment preservation.

  8. A statistical toolbox for metagenomics: assessing functional diversity in microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handelsman Jo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 99% of bacteria in the environment that are recalcitrant to culturing have spurred the development of metagenomics, a culture-independent approach to sample and characterize microbial genomes. Massive datasets of metagenomic sequences have been accumulated, but analysis of these sequences has focused primarily on the descriptive comparison of the relative abundance of proteins that belong to specific functional categories. More robust statistical methods are needed to make inferences from metagenomic data. In this study, we developed and applied a suite of tools to describe and compare the richness, membership, and structure of microbial communities using peptide fragment sequences extracted from metagenomic sequence data. Results Application of these tools to acid mine drainage, soil, and whale fall metagenomic sequence collections revealed groups of peptide fragments with a relatively high abundance and no known function. When combined with analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments from the same communities these tools enabled us to demonstrate that although there was no overlap in the types of 16S rRNA gene sequence observed, there was a core collection of operational protein families that was shared among the three environments. Conclusion The results of comparisons between the three habitats were surprising considering the relatively low overlap of membership and the distinctively different characteristics of the three habitats. These tools will facilitate the use of metagenomics to pursue statistically sound genome-based ecological analyses.

  9. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  10. Bioprospecting for β-lactam resistance genes using a metagenomics-guided strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Yang, Ying; Che, You; Xia, Yu; Li, Liguan; Xiong, Wenguang; Zhang, Tong

    2017-08-01

    Emergence of new antibiotic resistance bacteria poses a serious threat to human health, which is largely attributed to the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this work, a metagenomics-guided strategy consisting of metagenomic analysis and function validation was proposed for rapidly identifying novel ARGs from hot spots of ARG dissemination, such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and animal feces. We used an antibiotic resistance gene database to annotate 76 putative β-lactam resistance genes from the metagenomes of sludge and chicken feces. Among these 76 candidate genes, 25 target genes that shared 40~70% amino acid identity to known β-lactamases were cloned by PCR from the metagenomes. Their resistances to four β-lactam antibiotics were further demonstrated. Furthermore, the validated ARGs were used as the reference sequences to identify novel ARGs in eight environmental samples, suggesting the necessity of re-examining the profiles of ARGs in environmental samples using the validated novel ARG sequences. This metagenomics-guided pipeline does not rely on the activity of ARGs during the initial screening process and may specifically select novel ARG sequences for function validation, which make it suitable for the high-throughput screening of novel ARGs from environmental metagenomes.

  11. Use of public pension scheme and industrial statistics data for supplement of company records in Denmark and influence on cohort mortality pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, E; Juel, K

    1987-01-01

    statistics questionnaires are of equal value in Denmark. The authors report on a cohort study from a chemical plant, where cohort members were identified from company records, which were checked against ATP and industrial statistics data. The mortality analysis shows employees known only from the ATP data...

  12. Metagenomic analysis of viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Nada; Al-Nakib, Widad; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Habibi, Nazima

    2018-03-01

    A metagenomic approach based on target independent next-generation sequencing has become a known method for the detection of both known and novel viruses in clinical samples. This study aimed to use the metagenomic sequencing approach to characterize the viral diversity in respiratory samples from patients with respiratory tract infections. We have investigated 86 respiratory samples received from various hospitals in Kuwait between 2015 and 2016 for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections. A metagenomic approach using the next-generation sequencer to characterize viruses was used. According to the metagenomic analysis, an average of 145, 019 reads were identified, and 2% of these reads were of viral origin. Also, metagenomic analysis of the viral sequences revealed many known respiratory viruses, which were detected in 30.2% of the clinical samples. Also, sequences of non-respiratory viruses were detected in 14% of the clinical samples, while sequences of non-human viruses were detected in 55.8% of the clinical samples. The average genome coverage of the viruses was 12% with the highest genome coverage of 99.2% for respiratory syncytial virus, and the lowest was 1% for torque teno midi virus 2. Our results showed 47.7% agreement between multiplex Real-Time PCR and metagenomics sequencing in the detection of respiratory viruses in the clinical samples. Though there are some difficulties in using this method to clinical samples such as specimen quality, these observations are indicative of the promising utility of the metagenomic sequencing approach for the identification of respiratory viruses in patients with respiratory tract infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Strain-Level Metagenomic Analysis of the Fermented Dairy Beverage Nunu Highlights Potential Food Safety Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Aaron M; Crispie, Fiona; Daari, Kareem; O'Sullivan, Orla; Martin, Jennifer C; Arthur, Cornelius T; Claesson, Marcus J; Scott, Karen P; Cotter, Paul D

    2017-08-15

    The rapid detection of pathogenic strains in food products is essential for the prevention of disease outbreaks. It has already been demonstrated that whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing can be used to detect pathogens in food but, until recently, strain-level detection of pathogens has relied on whole-metagenome assembly, which is a computationally demanding process. Here we demonstrated that three short-read-alignment-based methods, i.e., MetaMLST, PanPhlAn, and StrainPhlAn, could accurately and rapidly identify pathogenic strains in spinach metagenomes that had been intentionally spiked with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in a previous study. Subsequently, we employed the methods, in combination with other metagenomics approaches, to assess the safety of nunu, a traditional Ghanaian fermented milk product that is produced by the spontaneous fermentation of raw cow milk. We showed that nunu samples were frequently contaminated with bacteria associated with the bovine gut and, worryingly, we detected putatively pathogenic E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in a subset of nunu samples. Ultimately, our work establishes that short-read-alignment-based bioinformatics approaches are suitable food safety tools, and we describe a real-life example of their utilization. IMPORTANCE Foodborne pathogens are responsible for millions of illnesses each year. Here we demonstrate that short-read-alignment-based bioinformatics tools can accurately and rapidly detect pathogenic strains in food products by using shotgun metagenomics data. The methods used here are considerably faster than both traditional culturing methods and alternative bioinformatics approaches that rely on metagenome assembly; therefore, they can potentially be used for more high-throughput food safety testing. Overall, our results suggest that whole-metagenome sequencing can be used as a practical food safety tool to prevent diseases or to link outbreaks to specific food products. Copyright

  14. Comparative fecal metagenomics unveils unique functional capacity of the swine gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health as well as to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Nonetheless, limited information on the functional diversity of the swine gut microbiome is available. Results Analysis of 637, 722 pyrosequencing reads (130 megabases generated from Yorkshire pig fecal DNA extracts was performed to help better understand the microbial diversity and largely unknown functional capacity of the swine gut microbiome. Swine fecal metagenomic sequences were annotated using both MG-RAST and JGI IMG/M-ER pipelines. Taxonomic analysis of metagenomic reads indicated that swine fecal microbiomes were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla. At a finer phylogenetic resolution, Prevotella spp. dominated the swine fecal metagenome, while some genes associated with Treponema and Anareovibrio species were found to be exclusively within the pig fecal metagenomic sequences analyzed. Functional analysis revealed that carbohydrate metabolism was the most abundant SEED subsystem, representing 13% of the swine metagenome. Genes associated with stress, virulence, cell wall and cell capsule were also abundant. Virulence factors associated with antibiotic resistance genes with highest sequence homology to genes in Bacteroidetes, Clostridia, and Methanosarcina were numerous within the gene families unique to the swine fecal metagenomes. Other abundant proteins unique to the distal swine gut shared high sequence homology to putative carbohydrate membrane transporters. Conclusions The results from this metagenomic survey demonstrated the presence of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and carbohydrate metabolism suggesting that the swine gut microbiome may be shaped by husbandry practices.

  15. The Cyanobacteria-Dominated Sponge Dactylospongia elegans in the South China Sea: Prokaryotic Community and Metagenomic Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhao-Ming; Zhou, Guo-Wei; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The South China Sea is a special reservoir of sponges of which prokaryotic communities are less studied. Here, a new record of the sponge Dactylospongia elegans is reported near the coast of Jinqing Island in the South China Sea, and its prokaryotic community is comprehensively investigated. Sponge specimens displayed lower microbial diversity compared with surrounding seawater. At the phylum level, prokaryotic communities were consistently dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Thaumarchaeota, and Poribacteria. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU) analysis alternatively showed that the most abundant symbiont was the sponge-specific cyanobacterial species “Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum,” followed by OTUs belonging to the unidentified Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria. Phylogenetic tree based on 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions indicated that the dominated cyanobacterial OTU represented a new clade of “Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum.” More reliable metagenomic data further revealed that poribacterial symbionts were highly abundant and only secondary to the cyanobacterial symbiont. One draft genome for each of the Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria and three poribacterial genomes were extracted from the metagenomes. Among them, genomes affiliated with the Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria were reported for the first time in sponge symbionts. Eukaryotic-like domains were found in all the binned genomes, indicating their potential symbiotic roles with the sponge host. The high quality of the six recovered genomes of sponge symbionts from the sponge D. elegans makes it possible to understand their symbiotic roles and interactions with the sponge host as well as among one another. PMID:28790992

  16. Glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase retrieved from the metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku eUchiyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available β-glucosidases (BGLs hydrolyze cellooligosaccharides to glucose and play a crucial role in the enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Despite their significance for the production of glucose, most identified BGLs are commonly inhibited by low (~mM concentrations of glucose. Therefore, BGLs that are insensitive to glucose inhibition have great biotechnological merit. We applied a metagenomic approach to screen for such rare glucose-tolerant BGLs. A metagenomic library was created in Escherichia coli (approximately 10,000 colonies and grown on LB agar plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-glucoside, yielding 828 positive (blue colonies. These were then arrayed in 96-well plates, grown in LB, and secondarily screened for activity in the presence of 10% (w/v glucose. Seven glucose-tolerant clones were identified, each of which contained a single bgl gene. The genes were classified into two groups, differing by two nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes were identical (452 aa and found to belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 1. The recombinant protein (Ks5A7 was overproduced in E. coli as a C-terminal 6 × His-tagged protein and purified to apparent homogeneity. The molecular mass of the purified Ks5A7 was determined to be 54 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and 160 kDa by gel filtration analysis. The enzyme was optimally active at 45°C and pH 5.0–6.5 and retained full or 1.5–2-fold enhanced activity in the presence of 0.1–0.5 M glucose. It had a low KM (78 µM with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 0.36 mM with cellobiose and high Vmax (91 µmol min-1 mg-1 with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 155 µmol min-1 mg-1 with cellobiose among known glucose-tolerant BGLs and was free from substrate (0.1 M cellobiose inhibition. The efficient use of Ks5A7 in conjunction with Trichoderma reesei cellulases in enzymatic saccharification of alkaline-treated rice straw was demonstrated by increased production of glucose.

  17. Metagenomic Insights of Microbial Feedbacks to Elevated CO2 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Tu, Q.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the responses of biological communities to elevated CO2 (eCO2) is a central issue in ecology and global change biology, but its impacts on the diversity, composition, structure, function, interactions and dynamics of soil microbial communities remain elusive. In this study, we first examined microbial responses to eCO2 among six FACE sites/ecosystems using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip), and then focused on details of metagenome sequencing analysis in one particular site. GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array for examining the relationships between microbial community structure and ecosystem functioning and is a very powerful technology for biogeochemical, ecological and environmental studies. The current version of GeoChip (GeoChip 5.0) contains approximately 162,000 probes from 378,000 genes involved in C, N, S and P cycling, organic contaminant degradation, metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, stress responses, metal homeostasis, virulence, pigment production, bacterial phage-mediated lysis, soil beneficial microorganisms, and specific probes for viruses, protists, and fungi. Our experimental results revealed that both ecosystem and CO2 significantly (p changes in the soil microbial community structure were closely correlated with geographic distance, soil NO3-N, NH4-N and C/N ratio. Further metagenome sequencing analysis of soil microbial communities in one particular site showed eCO2 altered the overall structure of soil microbial communities with ambient CO2 samples retaining a higher functional gene diversity than eCO2 samples. Also the taxonomic diversity of functional genes decreased at eCO2. Random matrix theory (RMT)-based network analysis showed that the identified networks under ambient and elevated CO2 were substantially different in terms of overall network topology, network composition, node overlap, module preservation, module-based higher order organization (meta-modules), topological roles of

  18. Multisubstrate isotope labeling and metagenomic analysis of active soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Y; Cheng, J; Engel, K; Kolczynski, D; Mortimer, S; Lavigne, J; Montalibet, J; Romantsov, T; Hall, M; McConkey, B J; Rose, D R; Tomashek, J J; Scott, B R; Charles, T C; Neufeld, J D

    2014-07-15

    Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon ((12)C) or stable-isotope-labeled ((13)C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the (13)C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importance: The ability to identify genes based on function, instead of sequence homology, allows the discovery of genes that would not be identified through sequence alone. This

  19. A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments

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    Haverkamp Thomas HA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane oxidizing prokaryotes in marine sediments are believed to function as a methane filter reducing the oceanic contribution to the global methane emission. In the anoxic parts of the sediments, oxidation of methane is accomplished by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME living in syntrophy with sulphate reducing bacteria. This anaerobic oxidation of methane is assumed to be a coupling of reversed methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. Where oxygen is available aerobic methanotrophs take part in methane oxidation. In this study, we used metagenomics to characterize the taxonomic and metabolic potential for methane oxidation at the Tonya seep in the Coal Oil Point area, California. Two metagenomes from different sediment depth horizons (0-4 cm and 10-15 cm below sea floor were sequenced by 454 technology. The metagenomes were analysed to characterize the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic taxa at the two sediment depths. To gain insight into the metabolic potential the metagenomes were searched for marker genes associated with methane oxidation. Results Blast searches followed by taxonomic binning in MEGAN revealed aerobic methanotrophs of the genus Methylococcus to be overrepresented in the 0-4 cm metagenome compared to the 10-15 cm metagenome. In the 10-15 cm metagenome, ANME of the ANME-1 clade, were identified as the most abundant methanotrophic taxon with 8.6% of the reads. Searches for particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA, marker genes for aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of methane respectively, identified pmoA in the 0-4 cm metagenome as Methylococcaceae related. The mcrA reads from the 10-15 cm horizon were all classified as originating from the ANME-1 clade. Conclusions Most of the taxa detected were present in both metagenomes and differences in community structure and corresponding metabolic potential between the two samples were mainly

  20. Automated and Accurate Estimation of Gene Family Abundance from Shotgun Metagenomes.

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    Stephen Nayfach

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shotgun metagenomic DNA sequencing is a widely applicable tool for characterizing the functions that are encoded by microbial communities. Several bioinformatic tools can be used to functionally annotate metagenomes, allowing researchers to draw inferences about the functional potential of the community and to identify putative functional biomarkers. However, little is known about how decisions made during annotation affect the reliability of the results. Here, we use statistical simulations to rigorously assess how to optimize annotation accuracy and speed, given parameters of the input data like read length and library size. We identify best practices in metagenome annotation and use them to guide the development of the Shotgun Metagenome Annotation Pipeline (ShotMAP. ShotMAP is an analytically flexible, end-to-end annotation pipeline that can be implemented either on a local computer or a cloud compute cluster. We use ShotMAP to assess how different annotation databases impact the interpretation of how marine metagenome and metatranscriptome functional capacity changes across seasons. We also apply ShotMAP to data obtained from a clinical microbiome investigation of inflammatory bowel disease. This analysis finds that gut microbiota collected from Crohn's disease patients are functionally distinct from gut microbiota collected from either ulcerative colitis patients or healthy controls, with differential abundance of metabolic pathways related to host-microbiome interactions that may serve as putative biomarkers of disease.

  1. Soil-specific limitations for access and analysis of soil microbial communities by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Nathalie; Prestat, Emmanuel; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    Metagenomics approaches represent an important way to acquire information on the microbial communities present in complex environments like soil. However, to what extent do these approaches provide us with a true picture of soil microbial diversity? Soil is a challenging environment to work with. Its physicochemical properties affect microbial distributions inside the soil matrix, metagenome extraction and its subsequent analyses. To better understand the bias inherent to soil metagenome 'processing', we focus on soil physicochemical properties and their effects on the perceived bacterial distribution. In the light of this information, each step of soil metagenome processing is then discussed, with an emphasis on strategies for optimal soil sampling. Then, the interaction of cells and DNA with the soil matrix and the consequences for microbial DNA extraction are examined. Soil DNA extraction methods are compared and the veracity of the microbial profiles obtained is discussed. Finally, soil metagenomic sequence analysis and exploitation methods are reviewed. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection and characterization of forest soil metagenome genes encoding lipolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kyung Sik; Lim, He Kyoung; Chung, Eu Jin; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Choi, Gyung Ja; Cho, Kwang Yun; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2007-10-01

    A metagenome is a unique resource to search for novel microbial enzymes from the unculturable microorganisms in soil. A forest soil metagenomic library using a fosmid and soil microbial DNA from Gwangneung forest, Korea, was constructed in Escherichia coli and screened to select lipolytic genes. A total of seven unique lipolytic clones were selected by screening of the 31,000-member forest soil metagenome library based on tributyrin hydrolysis. The ORFs for lipolytic activity were subcloned in a high copy number plasmid by screening the secondary shortgun libraries from the seven clones. Since the lipolytic enzymes were well secreted in E. coli into the culture broth, the lipolytic activity of the subclones was confirmed by the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate using culture broth. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis of the identified ORFs for lipolytic activity revealed that 4 genes encode hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in lipase family IV. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 4 proteins were clustered with HSL in the database and other metagenomic HSLs. The other 2 genes and 1 gene encode non-heme peroxidase-like enzymes of lipase family V and a GDSL family esterase/lipase in family II, respectively. The gene for the GDSL enzyme is the first description of the enzyme from metagenomic screening.

  3. Metagenomics of the Svalbard reindeer rumen microbiome reveals abundance of polysaccharide utilization loci.

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    Phillip B Pope

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass remains a largely untapped source of renewable energy predominantly due to its recalcitrance and an incomplete understanding of how this is overcome in nature. We present here a compositional and comparative analysis of metagenomic data pertaining to a natural biomass-converting ecosystem adapted to austere arctic nutritional conditions, namely the rumen microbiome of Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus. Community analysis showed that deeply-branched cellulolytic lineages affiliated to the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes are dominant, whilst sequence binning methods facilitated the assemblage of metagenomic sequence for a dominant and novel Bacteroidales clade (SRM-1. Analysis of unassembled metagenomic sequence as well as metabolic reconstruction of SRM-1 revealed the presence of multiple polysaccharide utilization loci-like systems (PULs as well as members of more than 20 glycoside hydrolase and other carbohydrate-active enzyme families targeting various polysaccharides including cellulose, xylan and pectin. Functional screening of cloned metagenome fragments revealed high cellulolytic activity and an abundance of PULs that are rich in endoglucanases (GH5 but devoid of other common enzymes thought to be involved in cellulose degradation. Combining these results with known and partly re-evaluated metagenomic data strongly indicates that much like the human distal gut, the digestive system of herbivores harbours high numbers of deeply branched and as-yet uncultured members of the Bacteroidetes that depend on PUL-like systems for plant biomass degradation.

  4. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Presence of Treponema denticola in a Tissue Biopsy of the Iceman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman’s genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman’s bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics- enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  5. WGSQuikr: fast whole-genome shotgun metagenomic classification.

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    David Koslicki

    Full Text Available With the decrease in cost and increase in output of whole-genome shotgun technologies, many metagenomic studies are utilizing this approach in lieu of the more traditional 16S rRNA amplicon technique. Due to the large number of relatively short reads output from whole-genome shotgun technologies, there is a need for fast and accurate short-read OTU classifiers. While there are relatively fast and accurate algorithms available, such as MetaPhlAn, MetaPhyler, PhyloPythiaS, and PhymmBL, these algorithms still classify samples in a read-by-read fashion and so execution times can range from hours to days on large datasets. We introduce WGSQuikr, a reconstruction method which can compute a vector of taxonomic assignments and their proportions in the sample with remarkable speed and accuracy. We demonstrate on simulated data that WGSQuikr is typically more accurate and up to an order of magnitude faster than the aforementioned classification algorithms. We also verify the utility of WGSQuikr on real biological data in the form of a mock community. WGSQuikr is a Whole-Genome Shotgun QUadratic, Iterative, K-mer based Reconstruction method which extends the previously introduced 16S rRNA-based algorithm Quikr. A MATLAB implementation of WGSQuikr is available at: http://sourceforge.net/projects/wgsquikr.

  6. Metagenomic analysis of a Southern Maritime Antarctic soil

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    David Anthony Pearce

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Antarctic soils is derived from direct culture on selective media, biodiversity studies based on clone library construction and analysis, quantitative PCR amplification of specific gene sequences and the application of generic microarrays for microbial community analysis. Here, we investigated the biodiversity and functional potential of a soil community at Mars Oasis on Alexander Island in the southern Maritime Antarctic, by applying 454 pyrosequencing technology to a metagenomic library constructed from soil genomic DNA. The results suggest that the commonly cited range of phylotypes used in clone library construction and analysis of 78-730 OTUs (de-replicated to 30-140 provides low coverage of the major groups present (~5%. The vast majority of functional genes (>77% were for structure, carbohydrate metabolism and DNA/RNA processing and modification. This study suggests that prokaryotic diversity in Antarctic terrestrial environments appears to be limited at the generic level, with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria being common. Cyanobacteria were surprisingly under-represented at 2.6% of sequences, although ~1% of the genes identified were involved in CO2 fixation. At the sequence level there appeared to be much greater heterogeneity, and this might be due to high divergence within the relatively restricted lineages which have successfully colonized Antarctic terrestrial environments.

  7. A Metagenomic Survey of Limestone Hill in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y. W.; Li, K. Y.; Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Chen, W. J.; Shih, Y. J.; Chen, J. S.; Fan, C. W.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The limestone of Narro-Sky in Tainliao, Taiwan is of Pleistocene reef limestones interbedded in clastic layers that covered the Takangshan anticlines. Understanding how microbial relative abundance was changed in response to changes of environmental factors may contribute to better comprehension of roles that microorganisms play in altering the landscape structures. In this study, microorganisms growing on the wall of limestone, in the water dripping from the limestone wall and of soil underneath the wall were collected from different locations where the environmental factors such as daytime illumination, humidity, or pH are different. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was carried out to examine the compositions and richness of microbial community. The metagenomics were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to analyze relative abundance, diversities and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA). Our results showed the soil sample has the highest alpha diversity while water sample has the lowest. Four major phyla, which are Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria, account for 80 % of total microbial biomass in all groups. Cyanobacteria were found most abundantly in limestone wall instead of water or soil of weathering limestone. The PCoA dimensional patterns of each phylum showed a trace of microbial community dynamic changes, which might be affected by environmental factors. This study provides the insights to understand how environmental factors worked together with microbial community to shape landscape structures.

  8. Microbes of deep marine sediments as viewed by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ten years after the first deep marine sediment metagenome was produced, questions still exist about the nucleic acid sequences we have retrieved. Current data sets, including the Peru Margin, Costa Rica Margin and Iberian Margin show that consistently, data forms larger assemblies at depth due to the reduced complexity of the microbial community. But are these organisms active or preserved? At SMTZs, a change in the assembly statistics is noted, as well as an increase in cell counts, suggesting that cells are truly active. As depth increases, genome sizes are consistently large, suggesting that much like soil microbes, sedimentary microbes may maintain a larger reportorie of genomic potential. Functional changes are seen with depth, but at many sites are not correlated to specific geochemistries. Individual genomes show changes with depth, which raises interesting questions on how the subsurface is settled and maintained. The subsurface does have a distinct genomic signature, including unusual microbial groups, which we are now able to analyze for total genomic content.

  9. Nonlinear electrophoresis for purification of soil DNA for metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Katja; Pinnell, Lee; Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C; Neufeld, Josh D

    2012-01-01

    Purification of microbial DNA from soil is challenging due to the co-extraction of humic acids and associated phenolic compounds that inhibit subsequent cloning, amplification or sequencing. Removal of these contaminants is critical for the success of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput sequencing of extracted DNA. Using three different composite soil samples, we compared a novel DNA purification technique using nonlinear electrophoresis on the synchronous coefficient of drag alteration (SCODA) instrument with alternate purification methods such as direct current (DC) agarose gel electrophoresis followed by gel filtration or anion exchange chromatography, Wizard DNA Clean-Up System, and the PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit. Both nonlinear and DC electrophoresis were effective at retrieving high-molecular weight DNA with high purity, suitable for construction of large-insert libraries. The PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit and the nonlinear electrophoresis had high recovery of high purity DNA suitable for sequencing purposes. All methods demonstrated high consistency in the bacterial community profiles generated from the DNA extracts. Nonlinear electrophoresis using the SCODA instrument was the ideal methodology for the preparation of soil DNA samples suitable for both high-throughput sequencing and large-insert cloning applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative Metagenomics of Eight Geographically Remote Terrestrial Hot Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Peter; Gudbergsdóttir, Sóley Ruth; Rike, Anne Gunn; Lin, Lianbing; Zhang, Qi; Contursi, Patrizia; Moracci, Marco; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Bolduc, Benjamin; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ravin, Nikolai; Mardanov, Andrey; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta; Young, Mark; Krogh, Anders; Peng, Xu

    2015-08-01

    Hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria. In this paper, we present the metagenomic analysis of eight globally distributed terrestrial hot springs from China, Iceland, Italy, Russia, and the USA with a temperature range between 61 and 92 (∘)C and pH between 1.8 and 7. A comparison of the biodiversity and community composition generally showed a decrease in biodiversity with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. Another important factor shaping microbial diversity of the studied sites was the abundance of organic substrates. Several species of the Crenarchaeal order Thermoprotei were detected, whereas no single bacterial species was found in all samples, suggesting a better adaptation of certain archaeal species to different thermophilic environments. Two hot springs show high abundance of Acidithiobacillus, supporting the idea of a true thermophilic Acidithiobacillus species that can thrive in hyperthermophilic environments. Depending on the sample, up to 58 % of sequencing reads could not be assigned to a known phylum, reinforcing the fact that a large number of microorganisms in nature, including those thriving in hot environments remain to be isolated and characterized.

  11. The Microbiome of Brazilian Mangrove Sediments as Revealed by Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreote, Fernando Dini; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Chaves, Diego; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Luvizotto, Danice Mazzer; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Lopez, Maryeimy Varon; Baena, Sandra; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2012-01-01

    Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H2S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments. PMID:22737213

  12. The microbiome of Brazilian mangrove sediments as revealed by metagenomics.

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    Fernando Dini Andreote

    Full Text Available Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04 in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H(2S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments.

  13. Microbial community profiling of human saliva using shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

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    Nur A Hasan

    Full Text Available Human saliva is clinically informative of both oral and general health. Since next generation shotgun sequencing (NGS is now widely used to identify and quantify bacteria, we investigated the bacterial flora of saliva microbiomes of two healthy volunteers and five datasets from the Human Microbiome Project, along with a control dataset containing short NGS reads from bacterial species representative of the bacterial flora of human saliva. GENIUS, a system designed to identify and quantify bacterial species using unassembled short NGS reads was used to identify the bacterial species comprising the microbiomes of the saliva samples and datasets. Results, achieved within minutes and at greater than 90% accuracy, showed more than 175 bacterial species comprised the bacterial flora of human saliva, including bacteria known to be commensal human flora but also Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Gamma proteobacteria. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTn analysis in parallel, reported ca. five times more species than those actually comprising the in silico sample. Both GENIUS and BLAST analyses of saliva samples identified major genera comprising the bacterial flora of saliva, but GENIUS provided a more precise description of species composition, identifying to strain in most cases and delivered results at least 10,000 times faster. Therefore, GENIUS offers a facile and accurate system for identification and quantification of bacterial species and/or strains in metagenomic samples.

  14. Biogeographic partitioning of Southern Ocean microorganisms revealed by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; Demaere, Matthew Z; Brown, Mark V; Hoffman, Jeffrey M; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Riddle, Martin J; Rintoul, Stephen R; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    We performed a metagenomic survey (6.6 Gbp of 454 sequence data) of Southern Ocean (SO) microorganisms during the austral summer of 2007-2008, examining the genomic signatures of communities across a latitudinal transect from Hobart (44°S) to the Mertz Glacier, Antarctica (67°S). Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of the SAR11 and SAR116 clades and the cyanobacterial genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were strongly overrepresented north of the Polar Front (PF). Conversely, OTUs of the Gammaproteobacterial Sulfur Oxidizer-EOSA-1 (GSO-EOSA-1) complex, the phyla Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia and order Rhodobacterales were characteristic of waters south of the PF. Functions enriched south of the PF included a range of transporters, sulfur reduction and histidine degradation to glutamate, while branched-chain amino acid transport, nucleic acid biosynthesis and methionine salvage were overrepresented north of the PF. The taxonomic and functional characteristics suggested a shift of primary production from cyanobacteria in the north to eukaryotic phytoplankton in the south, and reflected the different trophic statuses of the two regions. The study provides a new level of understanding about SO microbial communities, describing the contrasting taxonomic and functional characteristics of microbial assemblages either side of the PF. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. MetaPhinder—Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

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    Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder. PMID:27684958

  16. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets.

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    Vanessa Isabell Jurtz

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder.

  17. MetaPhinder-Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder.

  18. Structural and Functional Insights from the Metagenome of an Acidic Hot Spring Microbial Planktonic Community in the Colombian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez Avella, Diego; Dini Andreote, Fernando; Chaves, Diego; Montaña, José Salvador; Osorio-Forero, Cesar; Junca, Howard; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A taxonomic and annotated functional description of microbial life was deduced from 53 Mb of metagenomic sequence retrieved from a planktonic fraction of the Neotropical high Andean (3,973 meters above sea level) acidic hot spring El Coquito (EC). A classification of unassembled metagenomic reads

  19. VizBin : An application for reference-independent visualization and human-augmented binning of metagenomic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laczny, C.C.; Sternal, T.; Plugaru, V.; Gawron, P.; Atashpendar, A.; Margossian, H.H.; Coronado, S.; Van der Maaten, L.J.M.; Vlassis, N.; Wilmes, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metagenomics is limited in its ability to link distinct microbial populations to genetic potential due to a current lack of representative isolate genome sequences. Reference-independent approaches, which exploit for example inherent genomic signatures for the clustering of metagenomic

  20. 45 CFR 2543.46 - Procurement records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procurement records. 2543.46 Section 2543.46 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.46 Procurement records. Procurement records and...

  1. 49 CFR 801.59 - Geological records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geological records. 801.59 Section 801.59... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Exemption From Public Disclosure § 801.59 Geological records. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(9), records concerning geological wells are exempt from public disclosure. ...

  2. MetaGenSense: A web-application for analysis and exploration of high throughput sequencing metagenomic data [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Correia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The detection and characterization of emerging infectious agents has been a continuing public health concern. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS or Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS technologies have proven to be promising approaches for efficient and unbiased detection of pathogens in complex biological samples, providing access to comprehensive analyses. As NGS approaches typically yield millions of putatively representative reads per sample, efficient data management and visualization resources have become mandatory. Most usually, those resources are implemented through a dedicated Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS, solely to provide perspective regarding the available information. We developed an easily deployable web-interface, facilitating management and bioinformatics analysis of metagenomics data-samples. It was engineered to run associated and dedicated Galaxy workflows for the detection and eventually classification of pathogens. The web application allows easy interaction with existing Galaxy metagenomic workflows, facilitates the organization, exploration and aggregation of the most relevant sample-specific sequences among millions of genomic sequences, allowing them to determine their relative abundance, and associate them to the most closely related organism or pathogen. The user-friendly Django-Based interface, associates the users’ input data and its metadata through a bio-IT provided set of resources (a Galaxy instance, and both sufficient storage and grid computing power. Galaxy is used to handle and analyze the user’s input data from loading, indexing, mapping, assembly and DB-searches. Interaction between our application and Galaxy is ensured by the BioBlend library, which gives API-based access to Galaxy’s main features. Metadata about samples, runs, as well as the workflow results are stored in the LIMS. For metagenomic classification and exploration purposes, we show, as a proof of concept, that integration

  3. MetaGenSense: A web-application for analysis and exploration of high throughput sequencing metagenomic data [version 3; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Correia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The detection and characterization of emerging infectious agents has been a continuing public health concern. High Throughput Sequencing (HTS or Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS technologies have proven to be promising approaches for efficient and unbiased detection of pathogens in complex biological samples, providing access to comprehensive analyses. As NGS approaches typically yield millions of putatively representative reads per sample, efficient data management and visualization resources have become mandatory. Most usually, those resources are implemented through a dedicated Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS, solely to provide perspective regarding the available information. We developed an easily deployable web-interface, facilitating management and bioinformatics analysis of metagenomics data-samples. It was engineered to run associated and dedicated Galaxy workflows for the detection and eventually classification of pathogens. The web application allows easy interaction with existing Galaxy metagenomic workflows, facilitates the organization, exploration and aggregation of the most relevant sample-specific sequences among millions of genomic sequences, allowing them to determine their relative abundance, and associate them to the most closely related organism or pathogen. The user-friendly Django-Based interface, associates the users’ input data and its metadata through a bio-IT provided set of resources (a Galaxy instance, and both sufficient storage and grid computing power. Galaxy is used to handle and analyze the user’s input data from loading, indexing, mapping, assembly and DB-searches. Interaction between our application and Galaxy is ensured by the BioBlend library, which gives API-based access to Galaxy’s main features. Metadata about samples, runs, as well as the workflow results are stored in the LIMS. For metagenomic classification and exploration purposes, we show, as a proof of concept, that integration

  4. Metagenomics profiling for assessing microbial diversity in both active and closed landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainun, Mohamad Yusof; Simarani, Khanom

    2018-03-01

    The municipal landfill is an example of human-made environment that harbours some complex diversity of microorganism communities. To evaluate this complexity, the structures of bacterial communities in active (operational) and closed (non-operational) landfills in Malaysia were analysed with culture independent metagenomics approaches. Several points of soil samples were collected from 0 to 20cm depth and were subjected to physicochemical test, such as temperature, pH, and moisture content. In addition, the heavy metal contamination was determined by using ICPMS. The bacterial enumeration was examined on nutrient agar (NA) plates aerobically at 30°C. The soil DNA was extracted, purified and amplified prior to sequence the 16S rRNA gene for statistical and bioinformatics analyses. As a result, the average of bacteria for the closed landfill was higher compared to that for the active landfill at 9.16×10 7 and 1.50×10 7 , respectively. The higher bacterial OTUs sequenced was also recorded in closed landfills compared to active landfill i.e. 6625 and 4552 OTUs respectively. The data from both landfills showed that the predominant phyla belonged to Proteobacteria (55.7%). On average, Bacteroidetes was the second highest phylum followed by Firmicutes for the active landfill. While the phyla for communities in closed landfill were dominated by phyla from Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria. There was also Euryarchaeota (Archaea) which became a minor phylum that was detected in active landfill, but almost completely absent in closed landfill. As such, the composition of bacterial communities suggests some variances between the bacterial communities found in active and closed landfills. Thus, this study offers new clues pertaining to bacterial diversity pattern between the varied types of landfills studied. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Enhanced Publications Linking Publications and Research Data in Digital Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    Vernooy-Gerritsen, Marjan

    2009-01-01

    The traditional publication will be overhauled by the 'Enhanced Publication'. This is a publication that is enhanced with research data, extra materials, post publication data, and database records. It has an object-based structure with explicit l

  6. Revealing the bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways by analyzing (meta)genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Howe, Adina Chuang; Tiedje, James M

    2014-04-22

    maintaining health, but an understanding of effects of specific microbial functions on the host is in its infancy, partly because in-depth functional microbial analyses are rare and publicly available databases are often incomplete/misannotated. In this study, we focused on production of butyrate, the main energy source for colonocytes, which plays a critical role in health and disease. We have provided a complete database of genes from major known butyrate-producing pathways, using in-depth genomic analysis of publicly available genomes, filling an important gap to accurately assess the butyrate-producing potential of complex microbial communities from "-omics"-derived data. Furthermore, a reference data set containing the abundance and diversity of butyrate synthesis pathways from the healthy gut microbiota was established through a metagenomics-based assessment. This study will help in understanding the role of butyrate producers in health and disease and may assist the development of treatments for functional dysbiosis.

  7. Metagenomic and proteomic analyses to elucidate the mechanism of anaerobic benzene degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Laban, Nidal [Helmholtz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the mechanism of anaerobic benzene degradation using metagenomic and proteomic analyses. The objective of the study is to find out the microbes and biochemistry involved in benzene degradation. Hypotheses are proposed for the initial activation mechanism of benzene under anaerobic conditions. Two methods for degradation, molecular characterization and identification of benzene-degrading enzymes, are described. The physiological and molecular characteristics of iron-reducing enrichment culture are given and the process is detailed. Metagenome analysis of iron-reducing culture is presented using a pie chart. From the metagenome analysis of benzene-degrading culture, putative mobile element genes were identified in the aromatic-degrading configurations. Metaproteomic analysis of iron-reducing cultures and the anaerobic benzene degradation pathway are also elucidated. From the study, it can be concluded that gram-positive bacteria are involved in benzene degradation under iron-reducing conditions and that the catalysis mechanism of putative anaerobic benzene carboxylase needs further investigation.

  8. SFA-SPA: a suffix array based short peptide assembler for metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youngik; Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2015-06-01

    The determination of protein sequences from a metagenomic dataset enables the study of metabolism and functional roles of the organisms that are present in the sampled microbial community. We had previously introduced algorithm and software for the accurate reconstruction of protein sequences from short peptides identified on nucleotide reads in a metagenomic dataset. Here, we present significant computational improvements to the short peptide assembly algorithm that make it practical to reconstruct proteins from large metagenomic datasets containing several hundred million reads, while maintaining accuracy. The improved computational efficiency is achieved using a suffix array data structure that allows for fast querying during the assembly process, and a significant redesign of assembly steps that enables multi-threaded execution. The program is available under the GPLv3 license from sourceforge.net/projects/spa-assembler. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  10. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    , such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly...... of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify...... affiliations between MGS and hundreds of viruses or genetic entities. Our method provides the means for comprehensive profiling of the diversity within complex metagenomic samples....

  11. Marine Metagenomics: New Tools for the Study and Exploitation of Marine Microbial Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D. W. Dobson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is extremely diverse, with huge variations in pressure and temperature. Nevertheless, life, especially microbial life, thrives throughout the marine biosphere and microbes have adapted to all the divergent environments present. Large scale DNA sequence based approaches have recently been used to investigate the marine environment and these studies have revealed that the oceans harbor unprecedented microbial diversity. Novel gene families with representatives only within such metagenomic datasets represent a large proportion of the ocean metagenome. The presence of so many new gene families from these uncultured and highly diverse microbial populations represents a challenge for the understanding of and exploitation of the biology and biochemistry of the ocean environment. The application of new metagenomic and single cell genomics tools offers new ways to explore the complete metabolic diversity of the marine biome.

  12. Marine metagenomics: strategies for the discovery of novel enzymes with biotechnological applications from marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson Alan DW

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metagenomic based strategies have previously been successfully employed as powerful tools to isolate and identify enzymes with novel biocatalytic activities from the unculturable component of microbial communities from various terrestrial environmental niches. Both sequence based and function based screening approaches have been employed to identify genes encoding novel biocatalytic activities and metabolic pathways from metagenomic libraries. While much of the focus to date has centred on terrestrial based microbial ecosystems, it is clear that the marine environment has enormous microbial biodiversity that remains largely unstudied. Marine microbes are both extremely abundant and diverse; the environments they occupy likewise consist of very diverse niches. As culture-dependent methods have thus far resulted in the isolation of only a tiny percentage of the marine microbiota the application of metagenomic strategies holds great potential to study and exploit the enormous microbial biodiversity which is present within these marine environments.

  13. Metagenomics as a tool to obtain full genomes of process-critical bacteria in engineered systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W.

    parameters with functions of specific bacteria within the ecosystems in order to decipher principles that might be used to control and predict ecosystem performance. The main bottleneck in obtaining genomes from the environment is that the vast majority of bacteria are not readily cultured. Metagenomics...... sequenced two metagenomes from the same environmental sample, but using two independent DNA extraction methods, which resulted in different population abundances. This allowed sequence-composition independent binning of numerous high quality draft genomes from both high and low abundant members...... of the bacteria, including time-series. Using more than two metagenomes increases the binning resolution and hence the number of genomes that can be extracted. We are currently at a tipping point in microbial ecology – in the future it will be fast, cheap and easy to obtain genomes directly from the environment...

  14. Functional metagenomics identifies novel genes ABCTPP, TMSRP1 and TLSRP1 among human gut enterotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Manoj Kumar; Ahmed, Vasim; Gupta, Shashank

    2018-01-01

    gut microbiome to identify candidate genes responsible for the salt stress tolerance. A plasmid borne metagenomic library of Bacteroidetes enriched human fecal metagenomic DNA led to identification of unique salt osmotolerance clones SR6 and SR7. Subsequent gene analysis combined with functional...... groups in a North Indian population. This study unravels an alternative method for imparting ionic stress tolerance, which may be prevalent in the human gut microbiome....... is an important aspect of gut microbes for their survival and colonization. Identification of these survival mechanisms is a pivotal step towards understanding genomic suitability of a symbiont for successful human gut colonization. Here we highlight our recent work applying functional metagenomics to study human...

  15. MetaBAT: Metagenome Binning based on Abundance and Tetranucleotide frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dongwan; Froula, Jeff; Egan, Rob; Wang, Zhong

    2014-03-21

    Grouping large fragments assembled from shotgun metagenomic sequences to deconvolute complex microbial communities, or metagenome binning, enables the study of individual organisms and their interactions. Here we developed automated metagenome binning software, called MetaBAT, which integrates empirical probabilistic distances of genome abundance and tetranucleotide frequency. On synthetic datasets MetaBAT on average achieves 98percent precision and 90percent recall at the strain level with 281 near complete unique genomes. Applying MetaBAT to a human gut microbiome data set we recovered 176 genome bins with 92percent precision and 80percent recall. Further analyses suggest MetaBAT is able to recover genome fragments missed in reference genomes up to 19percent, while 53 genome bins are novel. In summary, we believe MetaBAT is a powerful tool to facilitate comprehensive understanding of complex microbial communities.

  16. Novel polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers produced in Pseudomonas putida by metagenomic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterially produced biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with versatile properties can be achieved using different PHA synthases (PhaCs). This work aims to expand the diversity of known PhaCs via functional metagenomics and demonstrates the use of these novel enzymes in PHA production. Complementation of a PHA synthesis-deficient Pseudomonas putida strain with a soil metagenomic cosmid library retrieved 27 clones expressing either class I, class II, or unclassified PHA synthases, and many did not have close sequence matches to known PhaCs. The composition of PHA produced by these clones was dependent on both the supplied growth substrates and the nature of the PHA synthase, with various combinations of short-chain-length (SCL) and medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate diverse genes for PHA synthesis by functional metagenomics and their use for the production of a variety of PHA polymer and copolymer mixtures.

  17. High-resolution metagenomics targets major functional types in complex microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex C.; McHardy, Alice C.; Szeto, Ernest; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Suciu, Dominic; Levine, Samuel R.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bruce, David C.; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2009-08-01

    Most microbes in the biosphere remain uncultured and unknown. Whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics) allows glimpses into genetic and metabolic potentials of natural microbial communities. However, in communities of high complexity metagenomics fail to link specific microbes to specific ecological functions. To overcome this limitation, we selectively targeted populations involved in oxidizing single-carbon (C{sub 1}) compounds in Lake Washington (Seattle, USA) by labeling their DNA via stable isotope probing (SIP), followed by WGS sequencing. Metagenome analysis demonstrated specific sequence enrichments in response to different C{sub 1} substrates, highlighting ecological roles of individual phylotypes. We further demonstrated the utility of our approach by extracting a nearly complete genome of a novel methylotroph Methylotenera mobilis, reconstructing its metabolism and conducting genome-wide analyses. This approach allowing high-resolution genomic analysis of ecologically relevant species has the potential to be applied to a wide variety of ecosystems.

  18. Inferring Intra-Community Microbial Interaction Patterns from Metagenomic Datasets Using Associative Rule Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of inter-microbial metabolic interactions defines the stability of microbial communities residing in any ecological niche. Deciphering these interaction patterns is crucial for understanding the mode/mechanism(s) through which an individual microbial community transitions from one state to another (e.g. from a healthy to a diseased state). Statistical correlation techniques have been traditionally employed for mining microbial interaction patterns from taxonomic abundance data corresponding to a given microbial community. In spite of their efficiency, these correlation techniques can capture only 'pair-wise interactions'. Moreover, their emphasis on statistical significance can potentially result in missing out on several interactions that are relevant from a biological standpoint. This study explores the applicability of one of the earliest association rule mining algorithm i.e. the 'Apriori algorithm' for deriving 'microbial association rules' from the taxonomic profile of given microbial community. The classical Apriori approach derives association rules by analysing patterns of co-occurrence/co-exclusion between various '(subsets of) features/items' across various samples. Using real-world microbiome data, the efficiency/utility of this rule mining approach in deciphering multiple (biologically meaningful) association patterns between 'subsets/subgroups' of microbes (constituting microbiome samples) is demonstrated. As an example, association rules derived from publicly available gut microbiome datasets indicate an association between a group of microbes (Faecalibacterium, Dorea, and Blautia) that are known to have mutualistic metabolic associations among themselves. Application of the rule mining approach on gut microbiomes (sourced from the Human Microbiome Project) further indicated similar microbial association patterns in gut microbiomes irrespective of the gender of the subjects. A Linux implementation of the Association Rule Mining (ARM

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of Therapeutic PYO Phage Cocktails from 1997 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy has regained interest in recent years due to the alarming spread of antibiotic resistance. Whilst phage cocktails are commonly sold in pharmacies in countries such as Georgia and Russia, this is not the case in western countries due to western regulatory agencies requiring a thorough characterization of the drug. Here, DNA sequencing of constituent biological entities constitutes a first step. The pyophage (PYO cocktail is one of the main commercial products of the Georgian Eliava Institute of Bacteriophage, Microbiology and Virology and is used to cure skin infections. Since its first production in the 1930s, the composition of the cocktail has been periodically modified to add phages effective against emerging pathogenic strains. In this paper, we compared the composition of three PYO cocktails from 1997 (PYO97, 2000 (PYO2000 and 2014 (PYO2014. Based on next generation sequencing, de novo assembly and binning of contigs into draft genomes based on tetranucleotide distance, thirty and twenty-nine phage draft genomes were predicted in PYO97 and PYO2014, respectively. Of these, thirteen and fifteen shared high similarity to known phages. Eleven draft genomes were found to be common in the two cocktails. One of these showed no similarity to publicly available phage genomes. Representatives of phages targeting E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. coli, Proteus, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found in both cocktails. Finally, we estimated larger overlap of the PYO2000 cocktail to PYO97 compared to PYO2014. Using next generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis, we were able to characterize and compare the content of PYO cocktails separated by 17 years in time. Even though the cocktail composition is upgraded every six months, we found it to remain relatively stable over the years.

  20. Inferring Intra-Community Microbial Interaction Patterns from Metagenomic Datasets Using Associative Rule Mining Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disha Tandon

    Full Text Available The nature of inter-microbial metabolic interactions defines the stability of microbial communities residing in any ecological niche. Deciphering these interaction patterns is crucial for understanding the mode/mechanism(s through which an individual microbial community transitions from one state to another (e.g. from a healthy to a diseased state. Statistical correlation techniques have been traditionally employed for mining microbial interaction patterns from taxonomic abundance data corresponding to a given microbial community. In spite of their efficiency, these correlation techniques can capture only 'pair-wise interactions'. Moreover, their emphasis on statistical significance can potentially result in missing out on several interactions that are relevant from a biological standpoint. This study explores the applicability of one of the earliest association rule mining algorithm i.e. the 'Apriori algorithm' for deriving 'microbial association rules' from the taxonomic profile of given microbial community. The classical Apriori approach derives association rules by analysing patterns of co-occurrence/co-exclusion between various '(subsets of features/items' across various samples. Using real-world microbiome data, the efficiency/utility of this rule mining approach in deciphering multiple (biologically meaningful association patterns between 'subsets/subgroups' of microbes (constituting microbiome samples is demonstrated. As an example, association rules derived from publicly available gut microbiome datasets indicate an association between a group of microbes (Faecalibacterium, Dorea, and Blautia that are known to have mutualistic metabolic associations among themselves. Application of the rule mining approach on gut microbiomes (sourced from the Human Microbiome Project further indicated similar microbial association patterns in gut microbiomes irrespective of the gender of the subjects. A Linux implementation of the Association Rule

  1. Use of Substrate-Induced Gene Expression in Metagenomic Analysis of an Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthew J; Paterson, E Suzanne; Lambert, Iain B

    2016-02-01

    Metagenomics allows the study of genes related to xenobiotic degradation in a culture-independent manner, but many of these studies are limited by the lack of genomic context for metagenomic sequences. This study combined a phenotypic screen known as substrate-induced gene expression (SIGEX) with whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing. SIGEX is a high-throughput promoter-trap method that relies on transcriptional activation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in response to an inducing compound and subsequent fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate individual inducible clones from a metagenomic DNA library. We describe a SIGEX procedure with improved library construction from fragmented metagenomic DNA and improved flow cytometry sorting procedures. We used SIGEX to interrogate an aromatic hydrocarbon (AH)-contaminated soil metagenome. The recovered clones contained sequences with various degrees of similarity to genes (or partial genes) involved in aromatic metabolism, for example, nahG (salicylate oxygenase) family genes and their respective upstream nahR regulators. To obtain a broader context for the recovered fragments, clones were mapped to contigs derived from de novo assembly of shotgun-sequenced metagenomic DNA which, in most cases, contained complete operons involved in aromatic metabolism, providing greater insight into the origin of the metagenomic fragments. A comparable set of contigs was generated using a significantly less computationally intensive procedure in which assembly of shotgun-sequenced metagenomic DNA was directed by the SIGEX-recovered sequences. This methodology may have broad applicability in identifying biologically relevant subsets of metagenomes (including both novel and known sequences) that can be targeted computationally by in silico assembly and prediction tools. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Utilization of defined microbial communities enables effective evaluation of meta-genomic assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, William W; Klitgord, Niels; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Venter, J Craig; Garner, Chad; Nelson, Karen E; Li, Weizhong

    2017-04-13

    Metagenomics is the study of the microbial genomes isolated from communities found on our bodies or in our environment. By correctly determining the relation between human health and the human associated microbial communities, novel mechanisms of health and disease can be found, thus enabling the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics. Due to the diversity of the microbial communities, strategies developed for aligning human genomes cannot be utilized, and genomes of the microbial species in the community must be assembled de novo. However, in order to obtain the best metagenomic assemblies, it is important to choose the proper assembler. Due to the rapidly evolving nature of metagenomics, new assemblers are constantly created, and the field has not yet agreed on a standardized process. Furthermore, the truth sets used to compare these methods are either too simple (computationally derived diverse communities) or complex (microbial communities of unknown composition), yielding results that are hard to interpret. In this analysis, we interrogate the strengths and weaknesses of five popular assemblers through the use of defined biological samples of known genomic composition and abundance. We assessed the performance of each assembler on their ability to reassemble genomes, call taxonomic abundances, and recreate open reading frames (ORFs). We tested five metagenomic assemblers: Omega, metaSPAdes, IDBA-UD, metaVelvet and MEGAHIT on known and synthetic metagenomic data sets. MetaSPAdes excelled in diverse sets, IDBA-UD performed well all around, metaVelvet had high accuracy in high abundance organisms, and MEGAHIT was able to accurately differentiate similar organisms within a community. At the ORF level, metaSPAdes and MEGAHIT had the least number of missing ORFs within diverse and similar communities respectively. Depending on the metagenomics question asked, the correct assembler for the task at hand will differ. It is important to choose the appropriate

  3. Metagenomic and metabolic profiling of nonlithifying and lithifying stromatolitic mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L M Khodadad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stromatolites are laminated carbonate build-ups formed by the metabolic activity of microbial mats and represent one of the oldest known ecosystems on Earth. In this study, we examined a living stromatolite located within the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas and profiled the metagenome and metabolic potential underlying these complex microbial communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The metagenomes of the two dominant stromatolitic mat types, a nonlithifying (Type 1 and lithifying (Type 3 microbial mat, were partially sequenced and compared. This deep-sequencing approach was complemented by profiling the substrate utilization patterns of the mats using metabolic microarrays. Taxonomic assessment of the protein-encoding genes confirmed previous SSU rRNA analyses that bacteria dominate the metagenome of both mat types. Eukaryotes comprised less than 13% of the metagenomes and were rich in sequences associated with nematodes and heterotrophic protists. Comparative genomic analyses of the functional genes revealed extensive similarities in most of the subsystems between the nonlithifying and lithifying mat types. The one exception was an increase in the relative abundance of certain genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the lithifying Type 3 mats. Specifically, genes associated with the degradation of carbohydrates commonly found in exopolymeric substances, such as hexoses, deoxy- and acidic sugars were found. The genetic differences in carbohydrate metabolisms between the two mat types were confirmed using metabolic microarrays. Lithifying mats had a significant increase in diversity and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur substrates. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The two stromatolitic mat types retained similar microbial communities, functional diversity and many genetic components within their metagenomes. However, there were major differences detected in the activity and genetic pathways of organic carbon

  4. Metabolic reconstruction for metagenomic data and its application to the human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Abubucker

    Full Text Available Microbial communities carry out the majority of the biochemical activity on the planet, and they play integral roles in processes including metabolism and immune homeostasis in the human microbiome. Shotgun sequencing of such communities' metagenomes provides information complementary to organismal abundances from taxonomic markers, but the resulting data typically comprise short reads from hundreds of different organisms and are at best challenging to assemble comparably to single-organism genomes. Here, we describe an alternative approach to infer the functional and metabolic potential of a microbial community metagenome. We determined the gene families and pathways present or absent within a community, as well as their relative abundances, directly from short sequence reads. We validated this methodology using a collection of synthetic metagenomes, recovering the presence and abundance both of large pathways and of small functional modules with high accuracy. We subsequently applied this method, HUMAnN, to the microbial communities of 649 metagenomes drawn from seven primary body sites on 102 individuals as part of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP. This provided a means to compare functional diversity and organismal ecology in the human microbiome, and we determined a core of 24 ubiquitously present modules. Core pathways were often implemented by different enzyme families within different body sites, and 168 functional modules and 196 metabolic pathways varied in metagenomic abundance specifically to one or more niches within the microbiome. These included glycosaminoglycan degradation in the gut, as well as phosphate and amino acid transport linked to host phenotype (vaginal pH in the posterior fornix. An implementation of our methodology is available at http://huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/humann. This provides a means to accurately and efficiently characterize microbial metabolic pathways and functional modules directly from high

  5. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangming Xu; Thomas Passey; Feng Wei; Robert Saville; Richard J. Harrison

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites ha...

  6. Tuning the performance of a natural treatment process using metagenomics for improved trace organic chemical attenuation

    KAUST Repository

    Drewes, Jorg

    2014-02-01

    By utilizing high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics, this study revealed how the microbial community characteristics including composition, diversity, as well as functional genes in managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems can be tuned to enhance removal of trace organic chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). Increasing the humic content of the primary substrate resulted in higher microbial diversity. Lower concentrations and a higher humic content of the primary substrate promoted the attenuation of biodegradable CECs in laboratory and field MAR systems. Metagenomic results indicated that the metabolic capabilities of xenobiotic biodegradation were significantly promoted for the microbiome under carbon-starving conditions. © IWA Publishing 2014.

  7. Constructing and Screening a Metagenomic Library of a Cold and Alkaline Extreme Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Vester, Jan K; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns as a source of bacteria and enzymes adapted to these conditions. They have also highlighted the limitations of cultivation-based methods in this extreme environment and metagenomic approaches may provide access to novel extremophilic enzymes from the uncultured majority of bacteria. Here, we describe the construction and screening of a metagenomic library of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the ikaite columns.

  8. Constructing and screening a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline extreme environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns...... as a source of bacteria and enzymes adapted to these conditions. They have also highlighted the limitations of cultivation-based methods in this extreme environment and metagenomic approaches may provide access to novel extremophilic enzymes from the uncultured majority of bacteria. Here, we describe...... the construction and screening of a metagenomic library of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the ikaite columns....

  9. Technical Report: Benchmarking for Quasispecies Abundance Inference with Confidence Intervals from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLoughlin, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-22

    The software application “MetaQuant” was developed by our group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It is designed to profile microbial populations in a sample using data from whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic DNA sequencing. Several other metagenomic profiling applications have been described in the literature. We ran a series of benchmark tests to compare the performance of MetaQuant against that of a few existing profiling tools, using real and simulated sequence datasets. This report describes our benchmarking procedure and results.

  10. Understanding Aquatic Rhizosphere Processes Through Metabolomics and Metagenomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jian; Mynampati, Kalyan; Drautz, Daniela; Arumugam, Krithika; Williams, Rohan; Schuster, Stephan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    The aquatic rhizosphere is a region around the roots of aquatic plants. Many studies focusing on terrestrial rhizosphere have led to a good understanding of the interactions between the roots, its exudates and its associated rhizobacteria. The rhizosphere of free-floating roots, however, is a different habitat that poses several additional challenges, including rapid diffusion rates of signals and nutrient molecules, which are further influenced by the hydrodynamic forces. These can lead to rapid diffusion and complicates the studying of diffusible factors from both plant and/or rhizobacterial origins. These plant systems are being increasingly used for self purification of water bodies to provide sustainable solution. A better understanding of these processes will help in improving their performance for ecological engineering of freshwater systems. The same principles can also be used to improve the yield of hydroponic cultures. Novel toolsets and approaches are needed to investigate the processes occurring in the aquatic rhizosphere. We are interested in understanding the interaction between root exudates and the complex microbial communities that are associated with the roots, using a systems biology approach involving metabolomics and metagenomics. With this aim, we have developed a RhizoFlowCell (RFC) system that provides a controlled study of aquatic plants, observed the root biofilms, collect root exudates and subject the rhizosphere system to changes in various chemical or physical perturbations. As proof of concept, we have used RFC to test the response of root exudation patterns of Pandanus amaryllifolius after exposure to the pollutant naphthalene. Complexity of root exudates in the aquatic rhizosphere was captured using this device and analysed using LC-qTOF-MS. The highly complex metabolomic profile allowed us to study the dynamics of the response of roots to varying levels of naphthalene. The metabolic profile changed within 5mins after spiking with

  11. Phylogenetic community ecology of soil biodiversity using mitochondrial metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Ruzicka, Filip; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput DNA methods hold great promise for the study of taxonomically intractable mesofauna of the soil. Here, we assess species diversity and community structure in a phylogenetic framework, by sequencing total DNA from bulk specimen samples and assembly of mitochondrial genomes. The combination of mitochondrial metagenomics and DNA barcode sequencing of 1494 specimens in 69 soil samples from three geographic regions in southern Iberia revealed >300 species of soil Coleoptera (beetles) from a broad spectrum of phylogenetic lineages. A set of 214 mitochondrial sequences longer than 3000 bp was generated and used to estimate a well-supported phylogenetic tree of the order Coleoptera. Shorter sequences, including cox1 barcodes, were placed on this mitogenomic tree. Raw Illumina reads were mapped against all available sequences to test for species present in local samples. This approach simultaneously established the species richness, phylogenetic composition and community turnover at species and phylogenetic levels. We find a strong signature of vertical structuring in soil fauna that shows high local community differentiation between deep soil and superficial horizons at phylogenetic levels. Within the two vertical layers, turnover among regions was primarily at the tip (species) level and was stronger in the deep soil than leaf litter communities, pointing to layer-mediated drivers determining species diversification, spatial structure and evolutionary assembly of soil communities. This integrated phylogenetic framework opens the application of phylogenetic community ecology to the mesofauna of the soil, among the most diverse and least well-understood ecosystems, and will propel both theoretical and applied soil science. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. SLIMM: species level identification of microorganisms from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temesgen Hailemariam Dadi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and quantification of microorganisms is a significant step in studying the alpha and beta diversities within and between microbial communities respectively. Both identification and quantification of a given microbial community can be carried out using whole genome shotgun sequences with less bias than when using 16S-rDNA sequences. However, shared regions of DNA among reference genomes and taxonomic units pose a significant challenge in assigning reads correctly to their true origins. The existing microbial community profiling tools commonly deal with this problem by either preparing signature-based unique references or assigning an ambiguous read to its least common ancestor in a taxonomic tree. The former method is limited to making use of the reads which can be mapped to the curated regions, while the latter suffer from the lack of uniquely mapped reads at lower (more specific taxonomic ranks. Moreover, even if the tools exhibited good performance in calling the organisms present in a sample, there is still room for improvement in determining the correct relative abundance of the organisms. We present a new method Species Level Identification of Microorganisms from Metagenomes (SLIMM which addresses the above issues by using coverage information of reference genomes to remove unlikely genomes from the analysis and subsequently gain more uniquely mapped reads to assign at lower ranks of a taxonomic tree. SLIMM is based on a few, seemingly easy steps which when combined create a tool that outperforms state-of-the-art tools in run-time and memory usage while being on par or better in computing quantitative and qualitative information at species-level.

  13. Dynamic processes of the microbiota - from metagenomics to biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingreen, Ned

    The extent, origin, and impact of microbial diversity is a central question in biology. We expect that physical processes contribute to this diversity, but we are only beginning to explore the nature of these interactions. I will briefly discuss two approaches to this question, one based on metagenomics the other on observation of bacterial biofilms. First, I will address the challenge of identifying the constituents of microbial systems by presenting a new approach to analyzing community sequencing data that identifies microbial subpopulations while avoiding problematic clustering-based methods. Using data from a time-series study of human tongue microbiota, we were able to resolve within the standard definition of a ``species'' up to 20 ecologically distinct subpopulations with tag sequences differing by as little as one nucleotide (99.2% similarity). This fine resolution allowed us decouple sequence similarity from dynamical similarity, and to resolve dynamics on multiple time scales, including the slow appearance and disappearance of strains over months. Second, I will present recent results on the growth and competition of bacteria within biofilms. We imaged the growth ofliving biofilms of Vibrio choleraefrom single founder cells to ten thousand cells at single cell spatial resolution and with temporal resolution of one cell cycle. We discovered a transition from a branched 2D colony to a dense 3D cluster, in which cells at the biofilm center exhibit collective vertical alignment and local nematic packing. Our results suggest that biofilm cells exploit mechanics to simultaneously achieve strong surface adhesion, access to 3D space, resistance to invasion, and dominance over surface territory.

  14. Metagenomics as a preliminary screen for antimicrobial bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Al Amoudi, Soha

    2016-09-16

    Since the composition of soil directs the diversity of the contained microbiome and its potential to produce bioactive compounds, many studies has been focused on sediment types with unique features characteristic of extreme environments. However, not much is known about the potential of microbiomes that inhabit the highly saline and hot Red Sea lagoons. This case study explores mangrove mud and the microbial mat of sediments collected from the Rabigh harbor lagoon and Al Kharrar lagoon for antimicrobial bioprospecting. Rabigh harbor lagoon appears the better location, and the best sediment type for this purpose is mangrove mud. On the other hand, Al Kharrar lagoon displayed increased anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation and an abundance of bacterial DNA associated with antibiotic resistance. Moreover, our findings show an identical shift in phyla associated with historic hydrocarbon contamination exposure reported in previous studies (that is, enrichment of Gamma-and Delta-proteobacteria), but we also report that bacterial DNA sequences associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes are derived from Gamma-, Delta-and Alpha-proteobacteria. This suggests that selection pressure associated with hydrocarbon contamination tend to enrich the bacterial classes DNA associated with antibiotic synthesis enzymes. Although Actinobacteria tends to be the common target for research when it comes to antimicrobial bioprospecting, our study suggests that Firmicutes (Bacilli and Clostridia), Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Proteobacteria should be antimicrobial bioprospecting targets as well. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study that analyzed the microbiomes in Red Sea lagoons for antimicrobial bioprospecting. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Deployment and Preparation of Metagenomic Analysis on the EELA Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, G.; Blanquer, I.; Hernandez, V.; Pignatelli, M.; Tamames, J.

    2007-01-01

    In many cases, the sequencing of the DNA of many microorganisms is hindered by the impossibility of growing significant samples of isolated specimens. Many bacteria cannot survive alone, and require the interaction with other organisms. In such cases, the information of the DNA available belongs to different kinds of organisms. Metagenomic studies aim at processing samples of multiple specimens to extract the genes and proteins that belong to the different species. This can be achieved through a process of extraction of fragment, comparison and analysis of the function. By the comparison to existing chains, whose function is well known, fragments can be classified. This process is computationally expensive and requires several iterations of alignment and phylogeny classification steps. Source samples reach several millions of sequences, which could reach up to thousands of nucleotides each. These sequences are compared to a selected part of the N on-redundant d atabase which only implies the information from eukaryotic species. From this first analysis, a refining process is performed and alignment analysis is restarted from the results. This process implies several CPU years. An environment has been developed to fragment, automate and check the above operations. This environment has been tuned-up from an experimental study which has tested the most efficient and reliable resources, the optimal job size, and the data transference and database reindexation overhead. The environment should re-submit faulty jobs, detect endless tasks and ensure that the results are correctly retrieved and work flow synchronised. The paper will give an outline on the structure of the system, and the preparation steps performed to deal with this experiment. (Author)

  16. Metagenomic analysis of a tropical composting operation at the são paulo zoo park reveals diversity of biomass degradation functions and organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Farage Martins

    Full Text Available Composting operations are a rich source for prospection of biomass degradation enzymes. We have analyzed the microbiomes of two composting samples collected in a facility inside the São Paulo Zoo Park, in Brazil. All organic waste produced in the park is processed in this facility, at a rate of four tons/day. Total DNA was extracted and sequenced with Roche/454 technology, generating about 3 million reads per sample. To our knowledge this work is the first report of a composting whole-microbial community using high-throughput sequencing and analysis. The phylogenetic profiles of the two microbiomes analyzed are quite different, with a clear dominance of members of the Lactobacillus genus in one of them. We found a general agreement of the distribution of functional categories in the Zoo compost metagenomes compared with seven selected public metagenomes of biomass deconstruction environments, indicating the potential for different bacterial communities to provide alternative mechanisms for the same functional purposes. Our results indicate that biomass degradation in this composting process, including deconstruction of recalcitrant lignocellulose, is fully performed by bacterial enzymes, most likely by members of the Clostridiales and Actinomycetales orders.

  17. Identifying patterns of non-communicable diseases in developed eastern coastal China: a longitudinal study of electronic health records from 12 public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dehua; Shi, Jianwei; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wang, Zhaoxin; Lu, Yuan; Zhang, Bin; Pan, Ying; Wang, Bo; Sun, Pengfei

    2017-10-05

    Few studies have examined the spectrum and trends of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in inpatients in eastern coastal China, which is transforming from an industrial economy to a service-oriented economy and is the most economically developed region in the country. This study aimed to dynamically elucidate the spectrum and characteristics of severe NCDs in eastern coastal China by analysing patients' longitudinal electronic health records (EHRs). To monitor the spectrum of NCDs dynamically, we extracted the EHR data from 12 general tertiary hospitals in eastern coastal China from 2003 to 2014. The rankings of and trends in the proportions of different NCDs presented by inpatients in different gender and age groups were calculated and analysed. We obtained a total sample of 1 907 484 inpatients with NCDs from 2003 to 2014, 50.05% of whom were men and 81.53% were aged 50 years or older. There was an increase in the number of total NCD inpatients in eastern coastal China from 2003 to 2014. However, the proportion of chronic respiratory diseases and cancer inpatients decreased over the 12-year period. Compared with men, women displayed a significant increase in the proportion of mental and behavioural disorders (pwomen. The older group accounted for a larger and growing proportion of the NCD inpatients, and the most common conditions in this group were cerebral infarctions, coronary heart disease and hypertension. In addition, the proportion of 21-year-old to 50-year-old inpatients with diabetes, blood diseases or endocrine diseases skyrocketed from 2003 to 2014 (pwomen and younger people. The NCD spectrum observed in eastern coastal China is a good source of evidence for developing prevention guides for regions experiencing transition. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. 77 FR 65245 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Visa Records, State-39

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8070] Privacy Act; System of Records: Visa Records, State-39... records, Visa Records, State-39, pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (5 U.S... of records, Visa Records, State-39, to ensure Privacy Act of 1974 compliance: Purpose. The Department...

  19. Lagos Notes and Records

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lagos Notes and Records is an annual, interdisciplinary journal of the humanities. It is devoted to the publication of well-researched articles in all the subjects in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Law. In addition to original articles, the journal publishes review articles, brief accounts of work in progress, notes and comments on ...

  20. Metagenome reveals potential microbial degradation of hydrocarbon coupled with sulfate reduction in an oil-immersed chimney from Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eHe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys contain a high diversity of microorganisms, yet the metabolic activity and the ecological functions of the microbial communities remain largely unexplored. In this study, a metagenomic approach was applied to characterize the metabolic potential in a Guaymas hydrothermal vent chimney and to conduct comparative genomic analysis among a variety of environments with sequenced metagenomes. Complete clustering of functional gene categories with a comparative metagenomic approach showed that this Guaymas chimney metagenome was clustered most closely with a chimney metagenome from Juan de Fuca. All chimney samples were enriched with genes involved in recombination and repair, chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, highlighting their roles in coping with the fluctuating extreme deep-sea environments. A high proportion of transposases was observed in all the metagenomes from deep-sea chimneys, supporting the previous hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer may be common in the deep-sea vent chimney biosphere. In the Guaymas chimney metagenome, thermophilic sulfate reducing microorganisms including bacteria and archaea were found predominant, and genes coding for the degradation of refractory organic compounds such as cellulose, lipid, pullullan, as well as a few hydrocarbons including toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene were identified. Therefore, this oil-immersed chimney supported a thermophilic microbial community capable of oxidizing a range of hydrocarbons that served as electron donors for sulphate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community structure and diversity of lignocellulolytic bacteria in Vietnamese native goat rumen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Huyen Thi; Dao, Khoa Trong; Nguyen, Viet Khanh Hoang; Le Ngoc, Giang; Nguyen, Phuong Thi Mai; Le, Lam Tung; Phung, Nguyet Thu; M. van Straalen, Nico; Roelofs, Dick; Truong, Hai Nam

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In a previous study, analysis of Illumina sequenced metagenomic DNA data of bacteria in Vietnamese goats' rumen showed a high diversity of putative lignocellulolytic genes. In this study, taxonomy speculation of microbial community and lignocellulolytic bacteria population in the rumen

  2. Metagenomic approach to characterize soil microbial diversity of Phumdi at Loktak Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Sampada; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; More, Ravi Prabhakar; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-11-01

    Loktak, one of the largest freshwater lakes of India, is known for floating islands (Phumdi), being made up of a heterogeneous biomass of vegetation and soil. This ecological site represents an exclusive environmental habitat wherein the rhizospheric microbial community of Phumdi plays a key role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. A culture-independent whole genome shotgun sequencing based metagenomic approach was employed to unravel the composition of the microbial community and its corresponding functional potential at this environmental habitat. Proteobacteria (51%) was found to be the most dominant bacterial phylum followed by Acidobacteria (10%), Actinobacteria (9%) and Bacteroidetes (7%). Furthermore, Loktak metagenome data were compared with available metagenomes from four other aquatic habitats, varying from pristine to highly polluted eutrophic habitats. The comparative metagenomics approach aided by statistical analysis revealed that Candidatus Solibacter, Bradyrhizobium, Candidatus Koribacter, Pedosphaera, Methylobacterium, Anaeromyxobacter, Sorangium, Opitutus and Acidobacterium genera are selectively dominant at this habitat. Correspondingly, 12 different functional categories were found to be exclusively prevalent at Phumdi compared to other freshwater habitats. These differential features have been attributed to the unique habitat at Phumdi and correlated to the phenomenon of bioremediation at Loktak Lake.

  3. Novel florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance gene discovered in Alaskan soil by using functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin S; Anderson, Janet M; Schwarz, Stefan; Williamson, Lynn; Handelsman, Jo; Singer, Randall S

    2010-08-01

    Functional metagenomics was used to search for florfenicol resistance genes in libraries of cloned DNA isolated from Alaskan soil. A gene that mediated reduced susceptibility to florfenicol was identified and designated pexA. The predicted PexA protein showed a structure similar to that of efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF CHICKEN-SPECIFIC FECAL MICROBIAL SEQUENCES USING A METAGENOMIC APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we applied a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to select for genomic regions that differ between different fecal metagenomes. Competitive DNA hybridizations were performed between chicken fecal DNA and pig fecal DNA (C-P) and between chicken fecal DNA and an ...

  5. Possibilities and obstacles in recovery of genomes from elusive microbes in complex metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, Søren Michael; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    Representative genomes provide an entry point for understanding a given ecosystem. The genomes themselves give insights in the metabolic potential and possible role of the bacteria in the ecosystem, as well as being essential when applying other omics based techniques. Metagenomics and single cel...

  6. Comprehensive Diagnosis of Bacterial Infection Associated with Acute Cholecystitis Using Metagenomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kujiraoka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute cholecystitis (AC, which is strongly associated with retrograde bacterial infection, is an inflammatory disease that can be fatal if inappropriately treated. Currently, bacterial culture testing, which is basically recommended to detect the etiological agent, is a time-consuming (4–6 days, non-comprehensive approach. To rapidly detect a potential pathogen and predict its antimicrobial susceptibility, we undertook a metagenomic approach to characterize the bacterial infection associated with AC. Six patients (P1–P6 who underwent cholecystectomy for AC were enrolled in this study. Metagenome analysis demonstrated possible single or multiple bacterial infections in four patients (P1, P2, P3, and P4 with 24-h experimental procedures; in addition, the CTX-M extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL gene was identified in two bile samples (P1 and P4. Further whole genome sequencing of Escherichia coli isolates suggested that CTX-M-27-producing ST131 and CTX-M-14-producing novel-ST were identified in P1 and P4, respectively. Metagenome analysis of feces and saliva also suggested some imbalance in the microbiota for more comprehensive assessment of patients with AC. In conclusion, metagenome analysis was useful for rapid bacterial diagnostics, including assessing potential antimicrobial susceptibility, in patients with AC.

  7. Productivity and salinity structuring of the microplankton revealed by comparative freshwater metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, Alexander; Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Martínez-García, Manuel; McMahon, Katherine D; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Andersson, Siv G E; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the diversity and structuring of freshwater microbial communities beyond the patterns revealed by tracing their distribution in the landscape with common taxonomic markers such as the ribosomal RNA. To address this gap in knowledge, metagenomes from temperate lakes were compared to selected marine metagenomes. Taxonomic analyses of rRNA genes in these freshwater metagenomes confirm the previously reported dominance of a limited subset of uncultured lineages of freshwater bacteria, whereas Archaea were rare. Diversification into marine and freshwater microbial lineages was also reflected in phylogenies of functional genes, and there were also significant differences in functional beta-diversity. The pathways and functions that accounted for these differences are involved in osmoregulation, active transport, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, predicted genes orthologous to active transporters and recalcitrant organic matter degradation were more common in microbial genomes from oligotrophic versus eutrophic lakes. This comparative metagenomic analysis allowed us to formulate a general hypothesis that oceanic- compared with freshwater-dwelling microorganisms, invest more in metabolism of amino acids and that strategies of carbohydrate metabolism differ significantly between marine and freshwater microbial communities. © 2013 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of a pooled strategy for high-throughput sequencing of cosmid clones from metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kathy N; Hall, Michael W; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones.

  9. Metagenome sequencing of the microbial community of two Brazilian anthropogenic Amazon dark earth sites, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Leandro Nascimento; de Souza, Rosineide Cardoso; de Souza Cannavan, Fabiana; Patricio, André; Pylro, Victor Satler; Hanada, Rogério Eiji; Mui, Tsai Siu

    2016-12-01

    The Anthropogenic Amazon Dark Earth soil is considered one of the world's most fertile soils. These soils differs from conventional Amazon soils because its higher organic content concentration. Here we describe the metagenome sequencing of microbial communities of two sites of Anthropogenic Amazon Dark Earth soils from Amazon Rainforest, Brazil. The raw sequence data are stored under Short Read Accession number: PRJNA344917.

  10. Estimating DNA coverage and abundance in metagenomes using a gamma approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Sean D; Dalevi, Daniel; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing generates large numbers of short DNA reads from either an isolated organism or, in the case of metagenomics projects, from the aggregate genome of a microbial community. These reads are then assembled based on overlapping sequences into larger, contiguous sequences (contigs). The feasibility of assembly and the coverage achieved (reads per nucleotide or distinct sequence of nucleotides) depend on several factors: the number of reads sequenced, the read length and the relative abundances of their source genomes in the microbial community. A low coverage suggests that most of the genomic DNA in the sample has not been sequenced, but it is often difficult to estimate either the extent of the uncaptured diversity or the amount of additional sequencing that would be most efficacious. In this work, we regard a metagenome as a population of DNA fragments (bins), each of which may be covered by one or more reads. We employ a gamma distribution to model this bin population due to its flexibility and ease of use. When a gamma approximation can be found that adequately fits the data, we may estimate the number of bins that were not sequenced and that could potentially be revealed by additional sequencing. We evaluated the performance of this model using simulated metagenomes and demonstrate its applicability on three recent metagenomic datasets.

  11. Using a metagenomic approach to improve our understanding of Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Ross-Davis; Matt Settles; John W. Hanna; John D. Shaw; Andrew T. Hudak; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics has illuminated our understanding of how microbial communities influence health and disease. Researchers are beginning to characterize what constitutes healthy microbiota in terms of structure, function, and diversity in a variety of environments. Although investigation lags behind the more well-studied human microbiome, a growing body of research is using...

  12. Improved cultivation and metagenomics as new tools for bioprospecting in cold environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    be limited as few hosts are available for expression of genes with extremophilic properties. This review summarizes the methods developed for improved cultivation as well as the metagenomic approaches for bioprospecting with focus on the challenges faced by bioprospecting in cold environments....

  13. Metagenomic evaluation of bacterial and archaeal diversity in the geothermal hot springs of manikaran, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Green, Stefan J; Joshi, Amit; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-02-19

    Bacterial and archaeal diversity in geothermal spring water were investigated using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing. This revealed the dominance of Firmicutes, Aquificae, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group in this thermophilic environment. A number of sequences remained taxonomically unresolved, indicating the presence of potentially novel microbes in this unique habitat. Copyright © 2015 Bhatia et al.

  14. Prospecting Biotechnologically-Relevant Monooxygenases from Cold Sediment Metagenomes: An In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Matías A; Lozada, Mariana; Rial, Daniela V; Mac Cormack, Walter P; Jansson, Janet K; Sjöling, Sara; Carroll, JoLynn; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2017-04-09

    The goal of this work was to identify sequences encoding monooxygenase biocatalysts with novel features by in silico mining an assembled metagenomic dataset of polar and subpolar marine sediments. The targeted enzyme sequences were Baeyer-Villiger and bacterial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP153). These enzymes have wide-ranging applications, from the synthesis of steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins and pheromones to the synthesis of monomers for polymerization and anticancer precursors, due to their extraordinary enantio-, regio-, and chemo- selectivity that are valuable features for organic synthesis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to select the most divergent sequences affiliated to these enzyme families among the 264 putative monooxygenases recovered from the ~14 million protein-coding sequences in the assembled metagenome dataset. Three-dimensional structure modeling and docking analysis suggested features useful in biotechnological applications in five metagenomic sequences, such as wide substrate range, novel substrate specificity or regioselectivity. Further analysis revealed structural features associated with psychrophilic enzymes, such as broader substrate accessibility, larger catalytic pockets or low domain interactions, suggesting that they could be applied in biooxidations at room or low temperatures, saving costs inherent to energy consumption. This work allowed the identification of putative enzyme candidates with promising features from metagenomes, providing a suitable starting point for further developments.

  15. Soil Bacterial Community Shifts after Chitin Enrichment: An Integrative Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Franqueville, Laure; Cécillon, Sébastien; M. Vogel, Timothy; Simonet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is the second most produced biopolymer on Earth after cellulose. Chitin degrading enzymes are promising but untapped sources for developing novel industrial biocatalysts. Hidden amongst uncultivated micro-organisms, new bacterial enzymes can be discovered and exploited by metagenomic approaches through extensive cloning and screening. Enrichment is also a well-known strategy, as it allows selection of organisms adapted to feed on a specific compound. In this study, we investigated how the soil bacterial community responded to chitin enrichment in a microcosm experiment. An integrative metagenomic approach coupling phylochips and high throughput shotgun pyrosequencing was established in order to assess the taxonomical and functional changes in the soil bacterial community. Results indicate that chitin enrichment leads to an increase of Actinobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria suggesting specific selection of chitin degrading bacteria belonging to these classes. Part of enriched bacterial genera were not yet reported to be involved in chitin degradation, like the members from the Micrococcineae sub-order (Actinobacteria). An increase of the observed bacterial diversity was noticed, with detection of specific genera only in chitin treated conditions. The relative proportion of metagenomic sequences related to chitin degradation was significantly increased, even if it represents only a tiny fraction of the sequence diversity found in a soil metagenome. PMID:24278158

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.; Almstrand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome.

  17. A procedure for the metagenomics exploration of disease-suppressive soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Speksnijder, A.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2008-01-01

    The microbiota of, in particular, disease-suppressive soils contains a wealth of antibiotic biosynthetic loci that are inaccessible by traditional cultivation-based techniques. Hence, we developed a methodology based on soil microbial DNA, which allowed the metagenomics-based unlocking of the

  18. Metagenomic Profiling of Soil Microbes to Mine Salt Stress Tolerance Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Vasim; Verma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Shashank

    2018-01-01

    /halotolerant phylotypes affiliated to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Acidobacteria. A functional metagenomics approach led to the identification of osmotolerant clones SSR1, SSR4, SSR6, SSR2 harbouring BCAA_ABCtp, GSDH, STK_Pknb and duf3445 genes. Furthermore, transposon...

  19. Human pegivirus detected in a patient with severe encephalitis using a metagenomic pan-virus array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridholm, Helena; Østergaard Sørensen, Line; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.

    2016-01-01

    We have used a metagenomic microarray to detect genomic RNA from human pegivirus in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from a patient suffering from severe encephalitis. No other pathogen was detected. HPgV in cerebrospinal fluid during encephalitis has never been reported before and its prevalence...

  20. Metataxonomic and Metagenomic Approaches Versus Culture-Based Techniques For Clinical Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Hilton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diagnoses that are both timely and accurate are critically important for patients with life-threatening or drug resistant infections. Technological improvements in High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS have led to its use in pathogen detection and its application in clinical diagnoses of infectious diseases. The present study compares two HTS methods, 16S rRNA marker gene sequencing (metataxonomics and whole metagenomic shotgun sequencing (metagenomics, in their respective abilities to match the same diagnosis as traditional culture methods (culture inference for patients with ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP. The metagenomic analysis was able to produce the same diagnosis as culture methods at the species-level for five of the six samples, while the metataxonomic analysis was only able to produce results with the same species-level identification as culture for two of the six samples. These results indicate that metagenomic analyses have the accuracy needed for a clinical diagnostic tool, but full integration in diagnostic protocols is contingent on technological improvements to decrease turnaround time and lower costs.

  1. WebCARMA: a web application for the functional and taxonomic classification of unassembled metagenomic reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jünemann Sebastian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics is a new field of research on natural microbial communities. High-throughput sequencing techniques like 454 or Solexa-Illumina promise new possibilities as they are able to produce huge amounts of data in much shorter time and with less efforts and costs than the traditional Sanger technique. But the data produced comes in even shorter reads (35-100 basepairs with Illumina, 100-500 basepairs with 454-sequencing. CARMA is a new software pipeline for the characterisation of species composition and the genetic potential of microbial samples using short, unassembled reads. Results In this paper, we introduce WebCARMA, a refined version of CARMA available as a web application for the taxonomic and functional classification of unassembled (ultra-short reads from metagenomic communities. In addition, we have analysed the applicability of ultra-short reads in metagenomics. Conclusions We show that unassembled reads as short as 35 bp can be used for the taxonomic classification of a metagenome. The web application is freely available at http://webcarma.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  2. Identification of nitrogen-fixing genes and gene clusters from metagenomic library of acid mine drainage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Dai

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community.

  3. Metagenomic Analysis of Viruses in Feces from Unsolved Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicole E.; Wang, Jing; Hewitt, Joanne; Croucher, Dawn; Williamson, Deborah A.; Paine, Shevaun; Yen, Seiha; Greening, Gail E.

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of an outbreak of gastroenteritis in humans cannot always be determined, and ∼25% of outbreaks remain unsolved in New Zealand. It is hypothesized that novel viruses may account for a proportion of unsolved cases, and new unbiased high-throughput sequencing methods hold promise for their detection. Analysis of the fecal metagenome can reveal the presence of viruses, bacteria, and parasites which may have evaded routine diagnostic testing. Thirty-one fecal samples from 26 gastroenteritis outbreaks of unknown etiology occurring in New Zealand between 2011 and 2012 were selected for de novo metagenomic analysis. A total data set of 193 million sequence reads of 150 bp in length was produced on an Illumina MiSeq. The metagenomic data set was searched for virus and parasite sequences, with no evidence of novel pathogens found. Eight viruses and one parasite were detected, each already known to be associated with gastroenteritis, including adenovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and Dientamoeba fragilis. In addition, we also describe the first detection of human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) in Australasia. Metagenomics may thus provide a useful audit tool when applied retrospectively to determine where routine diagnostic processes may have failed to detect a pathogen. PMID:25339401

  4. Toward molecular trait-based ecology through integration of biogeochemical, geographical and metagenomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raes, Jeroen; Letunic, Ivica; Yamada, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    provincialism). Molecular functional richness and diversity show a distinct latitudinal gradient peaking at 20° N and correlate with primary production. The latter can also be predicted from the molecular functional composition of an environmental sample. Together, our results show that the functional community...... composition derived from metagenomes is an important quantitative readout for molecular trait-based biogeography and ecology....

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Desulfobacteraceae Member from a Sulfate-Reducing Bioreactor Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Almstrand, Robert; Pinto, Ameet J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Sharp, Jonathan O.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulfur cycle and of considerable commercial interest. The draft genome sequence of a sulfate-reducing bacterium of the family Desulfobacteraceae, assembled from a sulfate-reducing bioreactor metagenome, indicates that heavy-metal? and acid-resistance traits of this organism may be of importance for its application in acid mine drainage mitigation.

  6. The Source and Evolutionary History of a Microbial Contaminant Identified Through Soil Metagenomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olm, Matthew R; Butterfield, Cristina N; Copeland, Alex; Boles, T Christian; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2017-02-21

    In this study, strain-resolved metagenomics was used to solve a mystery. A 6.4-Mbp complete closed genome was recovered from a soil metagenome and found to be astonishingly similar to that of Delftia acidovorans SPH-1, which was isolated in Germany a decade ago. It was suspected that this organism was not native to the soil sample because it lacked the diversity that is characteristic of other soil organisms; this suspicion was confirmed when PCR testing failed to detect the bacterium in the original soil samples. D. acidovorans was also identified in 16 previously published metagenomes from multiple environments, but detailed-scale single nucleotide polymorphism analysis grouped these into five distinct clades. All of the strains indicated as contaminants fell into one clade. Fragment length anomalies were identified in paired reads mapping to the contaminant clade genotypes only. This finding was used to establish that the DNA was present in specific size selection reagents used during sequencing. Ultimately, the source of the contaminant was identified as bacterial biofilms growing in tubing. On the basis of direct measurement of the rate of fixation of mutations across the period of time in which contamination was occurring, we estimated the time of separation of the contaminant strain from the genomically sequenced ancestral population within a factor of 2. This research serves as a case study of high-resolution microbial forensics and strain tracking accomplished through metagenomics-based comparative genomics. The specific case reported here is unusual in that the study was conducted in the background of a soil metagenome and the conclusions were confirmed by independent methods. IMPORTANCE It is often important to determine the source of a microbial strain. Examples include tracking a bacterium linked to a disease epidemic, contaminating the food supply, or used in bioterrorism. Strain identification and tracking are generally approached by using

  7. Phenological Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phenology is the scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The few records...

  8. Metagenomic analysis of the microbiomes in ruminants and other herbivores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.; Adams, S.E.; Nelson, K.E.; Attwood, G.T.

    2005-01-01

    Many conceptual breakthroughs in the life sciences would not have been possible without first developing techniques and instrumentation to investigate biological processes and molecules. In 1995, The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) completely sequenced, assembled and published the fist genome of a free-living organism, that of Haemophilus influenzae Rd. This milestone in scientific achievement has allowed microbiologists to progress from a reductionist approach of studying one gene at a time to the examination of microbial biology from an organismal perspective, using a combination of existing and newly developed (bio)chemical and computational (in silico) approaches. These fields of investigation are often defined with an 'omics' suffix. Hence, genomics refers to the holistic examination of the genetic blueprint that a microbe has acquired, at that point in evolutionary time, to support its lifestyle. Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics refer to a similar level of analysis at the RNA, protein and metabolite levels, respectively. Furthermore, the latest advances in sequencing technologies and cloning vectors better enable a detailed examination of the structure and function of microbial communities, including those organisms that cannot readily be cultured, and we refer to the integrative use of the following methods as the basis of an emerging scientific discipline referred to as metagenomics: 1. Bacterial artificial chromosome and fosmid cloning technologies: Community genomic DNA is cloned in large fragments (>50-150 kilobases [kb]) to create libraries of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), or smaller fragments (∼40 kb) are cloned into fosmid vectors. These libraries can then be screened by DNA- and activity-based screens for genes encoding any number of particular functions including hydrolytic and other enzymes central to schemes of carbon sequestration. 2. High throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatics: Both BAC and fosmid libraries

  9. Biotechnological applications of functional metagenomics in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Laura M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are found throughout nature, thriving in a vast range of environmental conditions. The majority of them are unculturable or difficult to culture by traditional methods. Metagenomics enables the study of all microorganisms, regardless of whether they can be cultured or not, through the analysis of genomic data obtained directly from an environmental sample, providing knowledge of the species present, and allowing the extraction of information regarding the functionality of microbial communities in their natural habitat. Function-based screenings, following the cloning and expression of metagenomic DNA in a heterologous host, can be applied to the discovery of novel proteins of industrial interest encoded by the genes of previously inaccessible microorganisms. Functional metagenomics has considerable potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries, where it can, for instance, aid (i) the identification of enzymes with desirable technological properties, capable of catalyzing novel reactions or replacing existing chemically synthesized catalysts which may be difficult or expensive to produce, and able to work under a wide range of environmental conditions encountered in food and pharmaceutical processing cycles including extreme conditions of temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc; (ii) the discovery of novel bioactives including antimicrobials active against microorganisms of concern both in food and medical settings; (iii) the investigation of industrial and societal issues such as antibiotic resistance development. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art functional metagenomic methods available and discusses the potential of functional metagenomic approaches to mine as yet unexplored environments to discover novel genes with biotechnological application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of a permafrost microbial community reveals a rapid response to thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; Deangelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost contains an estimated 1672????????Pg carbon (C), an amount roughly equivalent to the total currently contained within land plants and the atmosphere. This reservoir of C is vulnerable to decomposition as rising global temperatures cause the permafrost to thaw. During thaw, trapped organic matter may become more accessible for microbial degradation and result in greenhouse gas emissions. Despite recent advances in the use of molecular tools to study permafrost microbial communities, their response to thaw remains unclear. Here we use deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes, and relate these data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses reveal that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there are rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5 ??C, permafrost metagenomes converge to be more similar to each other than while they are frozen. We find that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shift rapidly during thaw. We also construct the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponds to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost is released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Biotechnological applications of functional metagenomics in the food and pharmaceutical industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Coughlan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are found throughout nature, thriving in a vast range of environmental conditions. The majority of them are unculturable or difficult to culture by traditional methods. Metagenomics enables the study of all microorganisms, regardless of whether they can be cultured or not, through the analysis of genomic data obtained directly from an environmental sample, providing knowledge of the species present and allowing the extraction of information regarding the functionality of microbial communities in their natural habitat. Function-based screenings, following the cloning and expression of metagenomic DNA in a heterologous host, can be applied to the discovery of novel proteins of industrial interest encoded by the genes of previously inaccessible microorganisms. Functional metagenomics has considerable potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries, where it can, for instance, aid (i the identification of enzymes with desirable technological properties, capable of catalysing novel reactions or replacing existing chemically synthesized catalysts which may be difficult or expensive to produce, and able to work under a wide range of environmental conditions encountered in food and pharmaceutical processing cycles including extreme conditions of temperature, pH, osmolarity, etc; (ii the discovery of novel bioactives including antimicrobials active against microorganisms of concern both in food and medical settings; (iii the investigation of industrial and societal issues such as antibiotic resistance development. This review article summarizes the state-of-the-art functional metagenomic methods available and discusses the potential of functional metagenomic approaches to mine as yet unexplored environments to discover novel genes with biotechnological application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  12. Whole-Genome Enrichment Provides Deep Insights into Vibrio cholerae Metagenome from an African River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzulli, L; Grande, C; Tassistro, G; Brettar, I; Höfle, M G; Pereira, R P A; Mushi, D; Pallavicini, A; Vassallo, P; Pruzzo, C

    2017-04-01

    The detection and typing of Vibrio cholerae in natural aquatic environments encounter major methodological challenges related to the fact that the bacterium is often present in environmental matrices at very low abundance in nonculturable state. This study applied, for the first time to our knowledge, a whole-genome enrichment (WGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach for direct genotyping and metagenomic analysis of low abundant V. cholerae DNA (<50 genome unit/L) from natural water collected in the Morogoro river (Tanzania). The protocol is based on the use of biotinylated RNA baits for target enrichment of V. cholerae metagenomic DNA via hybridization. An enriched V. cholerae metagenome library was generated and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Up to 1.8 × 10 7  bp (4.5× mean read depth) were found to map against V. cholerae reference genome sequences representing an increase of about 2500 times in target DNA coverage compared to theoretical calculations of performance for shotgun metagenomics. Analysis of metagenomic data revealed the presence of several V. cholerae virulence and virulence associated genes in river water including major virulence regions (e.g. CTX prophage and Vibrio pathogenicity island-1) and genetic markers of epidemic strains (e.g. O1-antigen biosynthesis gene cluster) that were not detectable by standard culture and molecular techniques. Overall, besides providing a powerful tool for direct genotyping of V. cholerae in complex environmental matrices, this study provides a 'proof of concept' on the methodological gap that might currently preclude a more comprehensive understanding of toxigenic V. cholerae emergence from natural aquatic environments.

  13. Metagenomic analyses of bacteria on human hairs: a qualitative assessment for applications in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridico, Silvana R; Murray, Dáithí C; Addison, Jayne; Kirkbride, Kenneth P; Bunce, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian hairs are one of the most ubiquitous types of trace evidence collected in the course of forensic investigations. However, hairs that are naturally shed or that lack roots are problematic substrates for DNA profiling; these hair types often contain insufficient nuclear DNA to yield short tandem repeat (STR) profiles. Whilst there have been a number of initial investigations evaluating the value of metagenomics analyses for forensic applications (e.g. examination of computer keyboards), there have been no metagenomic evaluations of human hairs-a substrate commonly encountered during forensic practice. This present study attempts to address this forensic capability gap, by conducting a qualitative assessment into the applicability of metagenomic analyses of human scalp and pubic hair. Forty-two DNA extracts obtained from human scalp and pubic hairs generated a total of 79,766 reads, yielding 39,814 reads post control and abundance filtering. The results revealed the presence of unique combinations of microbial taxa that can enable discrimination between individuals and signature taxa indigenous to female pubic hairs. Microbial data from a single co-habiting couple added an extra dimension to the study by suggesting that metagenomic analyses might be of evidentiary value in sexual assault cases when other associative evidence is not present. Of all the data generated in this study, the next-generation sequencing (NGS) data generated from pubic hair held the most potential for forensic applications. Metagenomic analyses of human hairs may provide independent data to augment other forensic results and possibly provide association between victims of sexual assault and offender when other associative evidence is absent. Based on results garnered in the present study, we believe that with further development, bacterial profiling of hair will become a valuable addition to the forensic toolkit.

  14. Potential and pitfalls of eukaryotic metagenome skimming: a test case for lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greshake, Bastian; Zehr, Simonida; Dal Grande, Francesco; Meiser, Anjuli; Schmitt, Imke; Ebersberger, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of multispecies communities using only a single library layout is commonly used to assess taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial assemblages. Here, we investigate to what extent such metagenome skimming approaches are applicable for in-depth genomic characterizations of eukaryotic communities, for example lichens. We address how to best assemble a particular eukaryotic metagenome skimming data, what pitfalls can occur, and what genome quality can be expected from these data. To facilitate a project-specific benchmarking, we introduce the concept of twin sets, simulated data resembling the outcome of a particular metagenome sequencing study. We show that the quality of genome reconstructions depends essentially on assembler choice. Individual tools, including the metagenome assemblers Omega and MetaVelvet, are surprisingly sensitive to low and uneven coverages. In combination with the routine of assembly parameter choice to optimize the assembly N50 size, these tools can preclude an entire genome from the assembly. In contrast, MIRA, an all-purpose overlap assembler, and SPAdes, a multisized de Bruijn graph assembler, facilitate a comprehensive view on the individual genomes across a wide range of coverage ratios. Testing assemblers on a real-world metagenome skimming data from the lichen Lasallia pustulata demonstrates the applicability of twin sets for guiding method selection. Furthermore, it reveals that the assembly outcome for the photobiont Trebouxia sp. falls behind the a priori expectation given the simulations. Although the underlying reasons remain still unclear, this highlights that further studies on this organism require special attention during sequence data generation and downstream analysis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A case study for large-scale human microbiome analysis using JCVI's metagenomics reports (METAREP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Goll

    Full Text Available As metagenomic studies continue to increase in their number, sequence volume and complexity, the scalability of biological analysis frameworks has become a rate-limiting factor to meaningful data interpretation. To address this issue, we have developed JCVI Metagenomics Reports (METAREP as an open source tool to query, browse, and compare extremely large volumes of metagenomic annotations. Here we present improvements to this software including the implementation of a dynamic weighting of taxonomic and functional annotation, support for distributed searches, advanced clustering routines, and integration of additional annotation input formats. The utility of these improvements to data interpretation are demonstrated through the application of multiple comparative analysis strategies to shotgun metagenomic data produced by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap for Biomedical Research Human Microbiome Project (HMP (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov. Specifically, the scalability of the dynamic weighting feature is evaluated and established by its application to the analysis of over 400 million weighted gene annotations derived from 14 billion short reads as predicted by the HMP Unified Metabolic Analysis Network (HUMAnN pipeline. Further, the capacity of METAREP to facilitate the identification and simultaneous comparison of taxonomic and functional annotations including biological pathway and individual enzyme abundances from hundreds of community samples is demonstrated by providing scenarios that describe how these data can be mined to answer biological questions related to the human microbiome. These strategies provide users with a reference of how to conduct similar large-scale metagenomic analyses using METAREP with their own sequence data, while in this study they reveal insights into the nature and extent of variation in taxonomic and functional profiles across body habitats and individuals. Over one thousand HMP WGS datasets and the latest

  16. Exploration of soil metagenome diversity for prospection of enzymes involved in lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, T.M.; Squina, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paixao, D.A.A.; Franco Cairo, J.P.L.; Buchli, F.; Ruller, R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Prade, R. [Oklahoma State University, Sillwater, OK (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Metagenomics allows access to genetic information encoded in DNA of microorganisms recalcitrant to cultivation. They represent a reservoir of novel biocatalyst with potential application in environmental friendly techniques aiming to overcome the dependence on fossil fuels and also to diminish air and water pollution. The focus of our work is the generation of a tool kit of lignocellulolytic enzymes from soil metagenome, which could be used for second generation ethanol production. Environmental samples were collected at a sugarcane field after harvesting, where it is expected that the microbial population involved on lignocellulose degradation was enriched due to the presence of straws covering the soil. Sugarcane Bagasse-Degrading-Soil (SBDS) metagenome was massively-parallel-454-Roche-sequenced. We identified a full repertoire of genes with significant match to glycosyl hydrolases catalytic domain and carbohydrate-binding modules. Soil metagenomics libraries cloned into pUC19 were screened through functional assays. CMC-agar screening resulted in positive clones, revealing new cellulases coding genes. Through a CMC-zymogram it was possible to observe that one of these genes, nominated as E-1, corresponds to an enzyme that is secreted to the extracellular medium, suggesting that the cloned gene carried the original signal peptide. Enzymatic assays and analysis through capillary electrophoresis showed that E-1 was able to cleave internal glycosidic bonds of cellulose. New rounds of functional screenings through chromogenic substrates are being conducted aiming the generation of a library of lignocellulolytic enzymes derived from soil metagenome, which may become key component for development of second generation biofuels. (author)

  17. The Source and Evolutionary History of a Microbial Contaminant Identified Through Soil Metagenomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Olm

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, strain-resolved metagenomics was used to solve a mystery. A 6.4-Mbp complete closed genome was recovered from a soil metagenome and found to be astonishingly similar to that of Delftia acidovorans SPH-1, which was isolated in Germany a decade ago. It was suspected that this organism was not native to the soil sample because it lacked the diversity that is characteristic of other soil organisms; this suspicion was confirmed when PCR testing failed to detect the bacterium in the original soil samples. D. acidovorans was also identified in 16 previously published metagenomes from multiple environments, but detailed-scale single nucleotide polymorphism analysis grouped these into five distinct clades. All of the strains indicated as contaminants fell into one clade. Fragment length anomalies were identified in paired reads mapping to the contaminant clade genotypes only. This finding was used to establish that the DNA was present in specific size selection reagents used during sequencing. Ultimately, the source of the contaminant was identified as bacterial biofilms growing in tubing. On the basis of direct measurement of the rate of fixation of mutations across the period of time in which contamination was occurring, we estimated the time of separation of the contaminant strain from the genomically sequenced ancestral population within a factor of 2. This research serves as a case study of high-resolution microbial forensics and strain tracking accomplished through metagenomics-based comparative genomics. The specific case reported here is unusual in that the study was conducted in the background of a soil metagenome and the conclusions were confirmed by independent methods.

  18. Ecogenomic perspectives on domains of unknown function: correlation-based exploration of marine metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Luigi Buttigieg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proportion of conserved DNA sequences with no clear function is steadily growing in bioinformatics databases. Studies of sequence and structural homology have indicated that many uncharacterized protein domain sequences are variants of functionally described domains. If these variants promote an organism's ecological fitness, they are likely to be conserved in the genome of its progeny and the population at large. The genetic composition of microbial communities in their native ecosystems is accessible through metagenomics. We hypothesize the co-variation of protein domain sequences across metagenomes from similar ecosystems will provide insights into their potential roles and aid further investigation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated the correlation of Pfam protein domain sequences across the Global Ocean Sampling metagenome collection, employing conservative detection and correlation thresholds to limit results to well-supported hits and associations. We then examined intercorrelations between domains of unknown function (DUFs and domains involved in known metabolic pathways using network visualization and cluster-detection tools. We used a cautious "guilty-by-association" approach, referencing knowledge-level resources to identify and discuss associations that offer insight into DUF function. We observed numerous DUFs associated to photobiologically active domains and prevalent in the Cyanobacteria. Other clusters included DUFs associated with DNA maintenance and repair, inorganic nutrient metabolism, and sodium-translocating transport domains. We also observed a number of clusters reflecting known metabolic associations and cases that predicted functional reclassification of DUFs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Critically examining domain covariation across metagenomic datasets can grant new perspectives on the roles and associations of DUFs in an ecological setting. Targeted attempts at DUF characterization in the

  19. 45 CFR 74.46 - Procurement records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procurement records. 74.46 Section 74.46 Public..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 74.46 Procurement records. Procurement records and files for purchases in excess of the simplified acquisition threshold shall include...

  20. 43 CFR 12.946 - Procurement records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procurement records. 12.946 Section 12.946 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND... Requirements § 12.946 Procurement records. Procurement records and files for purchases in excess of the small...